Science.gov

Sample records for failure investigation 1983-2009

  1. Genesis Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John

    2004-01-01

    The-Genesis mission to collect solar-wind samples and return them to Earth for detailed analysis proceeded successfully for 3.5 years. During reentry on September 8, 2004, a failure in the entry, descent and landing sequence resulted in a crash landing of the Genesis sample return capsule. This document describes the findings of the avionics sub-team that supported the accident investigation of the JPL Failure Review Board.

  2. The association of meteorological factors and mortality in rural Bangladesh, 1983-2009.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Wietze; Alam, Nurul; Begum, Dilruba; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2012-11-23

    While the association of weather and mortality has been well documented for moderate climate zones, little is known about sub-tropical zones, particularly Bangladesh. This study aims to assess the short-term relationship of temperature and rainfall on daily mortality after controlling for seasonality and time-trends. The study used data from Matlab, Bangladesh, where a rigorous health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) has been operational since 1966. Matlab HDSS data on mortality and population for the period 1983-2009 were used. Weather data for the same period were obtained from a nearby government weather station. Time series Poisson regression with cubic spline functions was applied allowing for lagged effects of weather and extreme weather events on mortality, and controlling for time trends and seasonal patterns. Analysis was carried out using R statistical software. Both temperature and rainfall showed strong seasonal patterns, explaining a significant part of mortality in all age groups. After adjusting for seasonality and trend, mortality and temperature show a U-shaped pattern; below a temperature of around 29°C, a decrease in temperature resulted in an increase in mortality, whereas above 29°C, increased temperature resulted in increased mortality. The strongest negative mortality temperature association was observed in the elderly (5.4% increase with every 1°C decrease in temperature at temperatures below 23°C), and the opposite trend was observed in the age groups 1-4 and 5-19 years old. At aggregate level, the rainfall-mortality association is statistically weak. However in the age group 5-19, a 0.6% increase in mortality per 1 mm additional rainfall was found, at rainfall levels over 100 mm per day. Multivariate analysis showed high mortality risks for women aged 20-59 years of age during cyclone episodes. Weather and extreme weather were associated with mortality with differential impacts in age and sex sub-groups. Further studies

  3. Tape recorder failure investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, M. D.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Carnahan, C. C.; Snyder, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Two end-item tape recorders lost 4:1 mode data recording mode capability at less than half of their 1 6,000-cycle, 4-year operating life. Subsequent life tests on two spare recorders also experienced 4:1 mode data loss at 8,000 and 11,700 cycles. Tear down inspection after completion of the life tests showed that the tape had worn through the alfesil record and reproduce heads. An investigation was initiated to understand the cause of excessive tape head wear and the reasons why the 4:1 mode data rate, low-speed mode is more damaging than the 1:1 mode data rate, high-speed recording mode. The objective was to establish how operating conditions (tape speed, humidity, temperature, stop/start cycles) affects head life with the goal of extending head life on the remaining in-service tape recorders. Another interest was to explain why an earlier vendor life test showed capability beyond 16,000 cycles.

  4. The association of weather and mortality in Bangladesh from 1983-2009.

    PubMed

    Alam, Nurul; Lindeboom, Wietze; Begum, Dilruba; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2012-11-23

    The association of weather and mortality have not been widely studied in subtropical monsoon regions, particularly in Bangladesh. This study aims to assess the association of weather and mortality (measured with temperature and rainfall), adjusting for time trend and seasonal patterns in Abhoynagar, Bangladesh. A sample vital registration system (SVRS) was set up in 1982 to facilitate operational research in family planning and maternal and child health. SVRS provided data on death counts and population from 1983-2009. The Bangladesh Meteorological Department provided data on daily temperature and rainfall for the same period. Time series Poisson regression with cubic spline functions was used, allowing for over-dispersion, including lagged weather parameters, and adjusting for time trends and seasonal patterns. Analysis was carried out using R statistical software. Both weekly mean temperature and rainfall showed strong seasonal patterns. After adjusting for seasonal pattern and time trend, weekly mean temperatures (lag 0) below the 25th percentile and between the 25th and 75th percentiles were associated with increased mortality risk, particularly in females and adults aged 20-59 years by 2.3-2.4% for every 1°C decrease. Temperature above the 75th percentile did not increase the risk. Every 1 mm increase in rainfall up to 14 mm of weekly average rainfall over lag 0-4 weeks was associated with decreased mortality risks. Rainfall above 14 mm was associated with increased mortality risk. The relationships between temperature, rainfall and mortality reveal the importance of understanding the current factors contributing to adaptation and acclimatization, and how these can be enhanced to reduce negative impacts from weather.

  5. Small Explorer WIRE Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the Small Explorer WIRE Failure Investigation Report in viewgraph form. Some of the diagrams include: 1) Overview of the Pyro Box and key interfaces; 2) Schematic Diagram of the A1020 FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) inputs; 3) Three critical FPGA reset signals shown in detail; 4) State machines for firing the cover pyrotechnic devices; 5) Oscillator Overview; and 6) General Crystal Oscillator Startup Characteristics.

  6. ACIS Door Failure Investigation and Mitigation Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podgorski, William A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (formerly AXAF) was launched on July 23, 1999 and is currently in orbit performing scientific studies. Chandra is the third of NASA's Great Observatories to be launched, following the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. One of four primary science instruments on Chandra, and one of only two focal plane instruments, is the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, or ACIS. The ACIS focal plane and Optical Blocking Filter (OBF) must be launched under vacuum, so a tightly sealed, functioning door and venting subsystem were implemented. The door was opened two and one-half weeks after launch (after most out-gassing of composite materials) and allowed X-rays to be imaged by the ACIS CCD's in the focal plane. A failure of this door to open on-orbit would have eliminated all ACIS capabilities, severely degrading mission science. During the final pre-flight thermal-vacuum test of the fully integrated Chandra Observatory at TRW, the ACIS door failed to open when commanded to do so. This paper describes the efforts, under considerable time pressure, by NASA, its contractors and outside review teams to investigate the failure and to develop modified hardware and procedures which would correct the problem. Of interest is the fact that the root cause of the test failure was never clearly identified despite massive effort. We ultimately focussed on hardware and procedures designed to mitigate the effects of potential, but unproven, failure modes. We describe a frequent real-world engineering situation in which one must proceed on the best basis possible in the absence of the complete set of facts.

  7. ACIS Door Failure Investigation and Mitigation Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podgorski, William A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (formerly AXAF) was launched on July 23, 1999 and is currently in orbit performing scientific studies. Chandra is the third of NASA's Great Observatories to be launched, following the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. One of four primary science instruments on Chandra, and one of only two focal plane instruments, is the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, or ACIS. The ACIS focal plane and Optical Blocking Filter (OBF) must be launched under vacuum, so a tightly sealed, functioning door and venting subsystem were implemented. The door was opened two and one-half weeks after launch (after most out-gassing of composite materials) and allowed X-rays to be imaged by the ACIS CCD's in the focal plane. A failure of this door to open on-orbit would have eliminated all ACIS capabilities, severely degrading mission science. During the final pre-flight thermal-vacuum test of the fully integrated Chandra Observatory at TRW, the ACIS door failed to open when commanded to do so. This paper describes the efforts, under considerable time pressure, by NASA, its contractors and outside review teams to investigate the failure and to develop modified hardware and procedures which would correct the problem. Of interest is the fact that the root cause of the test failure was never clearly identified despite massive effort. We ultimately focussed on hardware and procedures designed to mitigate the effects of potential, but unproven, failure modes. We describe a frequent real-world engineering situation in which one must proceed on the best basis possible in the absence of the complete set of facts.

  8. Analytical investigation of solid rocket nozzle failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, K. E.; Hester, J.

    1985-01-01

    On April 5, 1983, an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft experienced loss of control during the burn of the second of two solid rocket motors. The anomaly investigation showed the cause to be a malfunction of the solid rocket motor. This paper presents a description of the IUS system, a failure analysis summary, an account of the thermal testing and computer modeling done at Marshall Space Flight Center, a comparison of analysis results with thermal data obtained from motor static tests, and describes some of the design enhancement incorporated to prevent recurrence of the anomaly.

  9. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…

  10. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…

  11. Human Brucellosis Trends: Re-emergence and Prospects for Control Using a One Health Approach in Azerbaijan (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Kracalik, I T; Abdullayev, R; Asadov, K; Ismayilova, R; Baghirova, M; Ustun, N; Shikhiyev, M; Talibzade, A; Blackburn, J K

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common and widely spread zoonotic diseases in the world. Control of the disease in humans is dependent upon limiting the infection in animals through surveillance and vaccination. Given the dramatic economic and political changes that have taken place in the former Soviet Union, which have limited control, evaluating the status of human brucellosis in former Soviet states is crucial. We assessed annual spatial and temporal trends in the epidemiology of human brucellosis in Azerbaijan, 1983-2009, in conjunction with data from a livestock surveillance and control programme (2002-2009). To analyse trends, we used a combination of segmented regression and spatial analysis. From 1983 to 2009, a total of 11 233 cases of human brucellosis were reported. Up to the mid-1990s, the incidence of human brucellosis showed a pattern of re-emergence, increasing by 25% annually, on average. Following Soviet governance, the incidence rates peaked, increasing by 1.8% annually, on average, and subsequently decreasing by 5% annually, on average, during the period 2002-2009. Despite recent national declines in human incidence, we identified geographic changes in the case distribution characterized by a geographic expansion and an increasing incidence among districts clustered in the south-east, compared to a decrease of elsewhere in the country. Males were consistently, disproportionately afflicted (71%) and incidence was highest in the 15 to 19 age group (18.1 cases/100 000). During the period 2002-2009, >10 million small ruminants were vaccinated with Rev1. Our findings highlight the improving prospects for human brucellosis control following livestock vaccination; however, the disease appears to be re-emerging in south-eastern Azerbaijan. Sustained one health measures are needed to address changing patterns of brucellosis in Azerbaijan and elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. © 2015 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell

  12. Materials investigation of STS-3 parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Main parachute, No. 2 of SRB A-12 on STS-3, sustained damage during deployment or initial inflation that resulted in its collapse and failure to sustain load. During an investigation of the materials from this parachute, optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were conducted. This examination identified stains and abrasions on vent lines that appear to have been a result of friction contact with its flotation bag lanyard. Mechanical testing of the vent band indicated a reduction in strength of 37 percent obviously due to structural overload, heat, and ocean water exposure. It is concluded from this and other available data that entanglement of parachutes No. 1 and No. 2 during deployment caused adequate structural damage to main parachute No. 2 to render it unable to carry load.

  13. An Investigation of Digital Instrumentation and Control System Failure Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Muhlheim, Michael David; Poore III, Willis P

    2010-01-01

    A study sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission study was conducted to investigate digital instrumentation and control (DI&C) systems and module-level failure modes using a number of databases both in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries. The objectives of the study were to obtain relevant operational experience data to identify generic DI&C system failure modes and failure mechanisms, and to obtain generic insights, with the intent of using results to establish a unified framework for categorizing failure modes and mechanisms. Of the seven databases studied, the Equipment Performance Information Exchange database was found to contain the most useful data relevant to the study. Even so, the general lack of quality relative to the objectives of the study did not allow the development of a unified framework for failure modes and mechanisms of nuclear I&C systems. However, an attempt was made to characterize all the failure modes observed (i.e., without regard to the type of I&C equipment under consideration) into common categories. It was found that all the failure modes identified could be characterized as (a) detectable/preventable before failures, (b) age-related failures, (c) random failures, (d) random/sudden failures, or (e) intermittent failures. The percentage of failure modes characterized as (a) was significant, implying that a significant reduction in system failures could be achieved through improved online monitoring, exhaustive testing prior to installation, adequate configuration control or verification and validation, etc.

  14. Investigation of possible wellbore cement failures during hydraulic fracturing operations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Researchers used the peer-reviewed TOUGH+ geomechanics computational software and simulation system to investigate the possibility of fractures and shear failure along vertical wells during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  15. Changes in dental caries and oral hygiene among 7-8 year-old schoolchildren in different regions of Lithuania 1983-2009.

    PubMed

    Matulaitiene, Zivilė Kristina; Zemaitiene, Migle; Zemgulyte, Sandra; Milciuviene, Simona

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the changes of the dental caries prevalence and severity of 7 to 8 year old schoolchildren in six Lithuanian regions over the past 26 years (1983-2009) and to propose recommendations based on the results of the study. The study is based on the analysis of data, containing 576 cases of children examined in 1983 and comparison with data containing 531 cases added in 2009. The studies were conducted in the same six regions of Lithuania among the children from 7 to 8 years of age. For the study of children the WHO oral assessment methodology was used (WHO Basic methods 1997). Severity of dental caries was described by df-t and DMF-T index. The average of individual df-t and DMF-T indices was calculated for all subjects and sorted by gender. Oral hygiene status was evaluated by applying the simplified Green-Vermilion index-OHI-S (1964) The prevalence of primary dental caries among the children 7 to 8 years of age was 92.4% in 1983 and 88.7% (p=0.43) in 2009. The prevalence of permanent dental caries decreased from 49.6% in 1983 to 29.7% (p<0.001) in 2009. Mean df-t score decreased from 4.9±3.4 in 1983 to 4.1±2.7 in 2009 and DMF-T index decreased from 1.1±1.7 in 1983 to 0.5±1.0 in 2009 (p<0.001). The OHI-S index was not significantly different during 1983-2009. In the period of last 26 years a tendency towards the decrease in the prevalence and severity of dental caries was observed. That could be related to the frequent using of the toothpastes with fluoride, as well as implementation of the caries prevention program with sealants among the children of that age. The poor oral hygiene and comparatively high caries prevalence in schoolchildren show that it is still necessary to improve preventive measures in Lithuania.

  16. ISS Fiber Optic Failure Investigation Root Cause Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette

    2000-01-01

    In August of 1999, Boeing Corporation (Boeing) engineers began investigating failures of optical fiber being used on International Space Station flight hardware. Catastrophic failures of the fiber were linked to a defect in the glass fiber. Following several meetings of Boeing and NASA engineers and managers, Boeing created and led an investigation team, which examined the reliability of the cable installed in the U.S. Lab. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Components Technologies and Radiation Effects Branch (GSFC) led a team investigating the root cause of the failures. Information was gathered from: regular telecons and other communications with the investigation team, investigative trips to the cable distributor's plant, the cable manufacturing plant and the fiber manufacturing plant (including a review of build records), destructive and non-destructive testing, and expertise supplied by scientists from Dupont, and Lucent-Bell Laboratories. Several theories were established early on which were not able to completely address the destructive physical analysis and experiential evidence. Lucent suggested hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the glass and successfully duplicated the "rocket engine" defect. Strength testing coupled with examination of the low strength break sites linked features in the polyimide coating with latent defect sites. The information provided below explains what was learned about the susceptibility of the pre-cabled fiber to failure when cabled as it was for Space Station and the nature of the latent defects.

  17. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL...

  2. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  3. Investigating cytokinesis failure as a strategy in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Callum; Paolo D’Avino, Pier

    2016-01-01

    Effective therapeutics exploit common characteristics shared amongst cancers. As many cancers present chromosomal instability (CIN), one possible approach to treat these cancers could be to increase their CIN above a threshold that would affect their viability. Here, we investigated whether causing polyploidy by cytokinesis failure could represent a useful approach. We show that cytokinesis failure caused by depletion of Citron kinase (CIT-K) dramatically decreased cell proliferation in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer cells. CIT-K depletion activated the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway in normal, but not in cancer cells, indicating that cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to bypass this control. CIT-K depleted cancer cells died via apoptosis in a caspase 7 dependent manner and, consistent with this, p53-deficient HCT116 colon carcinoma cells failed to induce apoptosis after cytokinesis failure. However, other p53-mutated cancer cells were able to initiate apoptosis, indicating that cytokinesis failure can trigger apoptosis through a p53-independent mechanism. Finally, we found that actively dividing and, in some cases, polyploid cancer cells were more susceptible to CIT-K depletion. In sum, our findings indicate that inducing cytokinesis failure could be a promising anti-cancer therapeutic approach for a wide range of cancers, especially those characterized by fast cell proliferation and polyploidy. PMID:27895316

  4. Investigation of failure mode transition in ceramics under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, G.; Chen, W.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    A newly developed experimental technique is used to investigate the failure behavior of ceramics in multi-axial compression. The axial loading is provided by a split Kolsky (Hopkinson) compression bar and the radial confinement is provided by shrink fit sleeves on the cylindrical specimens. Confinement pressures on the order of 1 GPa have been achieved. As the confinement is increased on the specimen, the failure mode changes from axial splitting under no confinement to conical faulting under moderate confinement. Experimental data have been obtained for several engineering ceramics in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The peak or failure strength increases with increasing confinement. The increase in strength over its unconfined strength for a given level of confinement remains independent of the strain rate. The data from multiaxial loading experiments suggest that the engineering ceramics follow the Drucker-Prager model for pressure sensitive dilatant materials. This model is used to predict the localization modes in axi-symmetric geometries. The predictions are compared with experimental results for the limit load and the geometry of the fault. The implications of the proposed constitutive and failure model for the performance of engineering ceramics under multi-axial loading are discussed.

  5. Investigation of capacitor failures in an automated external defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Tan, K-S; Hinberg, I

    2002-09-01

    Over the past 2 years, the Canadian Medical Devices Bureau has received a number of reports of capacitor failures on the high voltage board of an automated external defibrillator. Twenty-five cases of broken capacitor leads were found during routine preventive maintenance by the biomedical engineering staff of the institutions reporting the incidents. The Bureau has carried out a laboratory investigation to determine the effect of missing capacitors on the energy delivered by the defibrillator and to assess whether these capacitor failures represent a significant risk to patients. Our findings indicate that the automated external defibrillator will not perform acceptably with two broken capacitors. They further suggest that, during preventive maintenance, operators should use a defibrillator analyser to measure the delivered energy output rather than using the internal energy measurement circuit within the automated external defibrillator.

  6. Trends in prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension, and the risk of mortality among middle-aged Lithuanian urban population in 1983-2009.

    PubMed

    Reklaitiene, Regina; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Virviciute, Dalia; Baceviciene, Migle; Luksiene, Dalia

    2012-08-31

    Arterial hypertension (AH) is a main risk factor for the risk from cardiovascular (CVD) and stroke mortality. Only few data was published on prevalence, awareness and management of AH in Lithuania. Development of objective approaches to the treatment and control of AH reduces the risk of mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate time trends, the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of AH and risk of mortality among Lithuanian urban population aged 45-64 years during the period of 1983-2009. Time trends of AH and risk of mortality were examined in three MONICA health surveys in 1983, 1986, 1992, and in one health survey according to MONICA protocol in 2002 included randomly recruited of 2,218 men and 2,491 women. AH was defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP of ≥90 mmHg or current use of antihypertensive medication. The main outcome measures were all-cause mortality, mortality from CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. The mean duration of follow-up was 11.8 ± 9.2 years. All survey periods were age standardized to the year 2006 of Kaunas population. The estimates of hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval were based on the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression. In men during 1983-2002 period hypertension prevalence was 52.1-58.7% and did not significantly change whereas in women decreased from 61.0 to 51.0%. There was a significant increase in hypertension awareness among hypertensive men and women (45.0 to 64.4% and 47.7 to 72.3%, respectively) and in treated hypertensives (55.4 to 68.3% in men and 65.6 to 86.2% in women). Adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression analyses revealed a strong dose-response association between blood-pressure level and all-cause, CVD, CHD and stroke-mortality risk in both men and women groups. In Lithuanian urban population the prevalence of hypertension remains high. Despite positive changes in hypertension awareness and treatment, hypertension control

  7. Experimental Investigations Of Failure Mechanisms Associated With Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Tamarkin, T.

    2010-12-01

    Slow slip events such as very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are detected in the Nankai accretionary prism [Ito and Obara, 2006]. It is proposed that high pore fluid pressure weakens the out-of-sequence-thrusts and mega-splay faults by reducing effective normal stress on the fault plane and consequently generates slip instability producing low stress drop VLFEs. However, the frictional behaviors and failure mechanisms associated with reduction of effective normal stress are not well understood. In this study, we conducted frictional experiments on porous sedimentary rocks with a saw-cut. Sediments with different clay content from NantroSEIZE drilling project ODP Legs 315, 316, and 322 are used as fault gouge. A new triaxial loading configuration was designed to investigate the effect of high pore pressure on frictional instability and failure modes. During the deformation experiments, samples were subjected to constant axial stress and decreasing radial stresses. Distinguishing from the conventional loading configuration in which mean stress increases during deformation, with the alternative loading path, mean stress decreases during deformation. Under fully drained conditions where pore pressure remains constant, the effective stress decreases in these experiments, analoguous to increasing pore pressure. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) frictional strength is comparable to that observed under conventional loading; 2) the rate of fracture energy release is considerably slower, which bears similar characteristics with observed slow slip events. Microstructural analyses on the deformed samples provide experimental constraints on deformation mechanisms associated with slow slip events.

  8. Variation in Cognitive Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation of Everyday Attention and Memory Failures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday cognitive failures assessed by diaries. A large sample of participants completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory. Furthermore, a subset of these participants also recorded everyday cognitive failures (attention, retrospective memory, and prospective memory failures)…

  9. Variation in Cognitive Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation of Everyday Attention and Memory Failures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday cognitive failures assessed by diaries. A large sample of participants completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory. Furthermore, a subset of these participants also recorded everyday cognitive failures (attention, retrospective memory, and prospective memory failures)…

  10. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  11. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  12. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  13. Genesis failure investigation report : JPL Failure Review Board, Avionics Sub-Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John; Manning, Rob; Barry, Ed; Donaldson, Jim; Rivellini, Tom; Battel, Steven; Savino, Joe; Lee, Wayne; Dalton, Jerry; Underwood, Mark; hide

    2004-01-01

    On January 7, 2001, the Genesis spacecraft lifted off from Cape Canaveral. Its mission was to collect solar wind samples and return those samples to Earth for detailed analysis by scientists. The mission proceeded successfully for three-and-a-half years. On September 8, 2004, the spacecraft approached Earth, pointed the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) at its entry target, and then fired pyros that jettisoned the SRC. The SRC carried the valuable samples collected over the prior 29 months. The SRC also contained the requisite hardware (mechanisms, parachutes, and electronics) to manage the process of entry, descent, and landing (EDL). After entering Earthas atmosphere, the SRC was expected to open a drogue parachute. This should have been followed by a pyro event to release the drogue chute, and then by a pyro event to deploy the main parachute at an approximate elevation of 6.7 kilometers. As the SRC descended to the Utah landing site, helicopters were in position to capture the SRC before the capsule touched down. On September 8, 2004, observers of the SRCas triumphant return became concerned as the NASA announcer fell silent, and then became even more alarmed as they watched the spacecraft tumble as it streaked across the sky. Long-distance cameras clearly showed that the drogue parachute had not deployed properly. On September 9, 2004, General Eugene Tattini, Deputy Director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory formed a Failure Review Board (FRB). This board was charged with investigating the cause of the Genesis mishap in close concert with the NASA Mishap Investigation Board (MIB). The JPL-FRB was populated with experts from within and external to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The JPL-FRB participated with the NASA-MIB through all phases of the investigation, working jointly and concurrently as one team to discover the facts of the mishap.

  14. Genesis failure investigation report : JPL Failure Review Board, Avionics Sub-Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John; Manning, Rob; Barry, Ed; Donaldson, Jim; Rivellini, Tom; Battel, Steven; Savino, Joe; Lee, Wayne; Dalton, Jerry; Underwood, Mark; Surampudi, Rao; Accord, Arden; Perkins, Dave; Barrow, Kirk; Wilson, Bob

    2004-01-01

    On January 7, 2001, the Genesis spacecraft lifted off from Cape Canaveral. Its mission was to collect solar wind samples and return those samples to Earth for detailed analysis by scientists. The mission proceeded successfully for three-and-a-half years. On September 8, 2004, the spacecraft approached Earth, pointed the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) at its entry target, and then fired pyros that jettisoned the SRC. The SRC carried the valuable samples collected over the prior 29 months. The SRC also contained the requisite hardware (mechanisms, parachutes, and electronics) to manage the process of entry, descent, and landing (EDL). After entering Earthas atmosphere, the SRC was expected to open a drogue parachute. This should have been followed by a pyro event to release the drogue chute, and then by a pyro event to deploy the main parachute at an approximate elevation of 6.7 kilometers. As the SRC descended to the Utah landing site, helicopters were in position to capture the SRC before the capsule touched down. On September 8, 2004, observers of the SRCas triumphant return became concerned as the NASA announcer fell silent, and then became even more alarmed as they watched the spacecraft tumble as it streaked across the sky. Long-distance cameras clearly showed that the drogue parachute had not deployed properly. On September 9, 2004, General Eugene Tattini, Deputy Director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory formed a Failure Review Board (FRB). This board was charged with investigating the cause of the Genesis mishap in close concert with the NASA Mishap Investigation Board (MIB). The JPL-FRB was populated with experts from within and external to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The JPL-FRB participated with the NASA-MIB through all phases of the investigation, working jointly and concurrently as one team to discover the facts of the mishap.

  15. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  16. Investigation of successive failure modes in graphite/epoxy laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, R.; Chapon, E.

    1993-05-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is conducted for the successive failure modes of graphite-epoxy laminated beams, on the basis of the Tsai-Wu and maximum stress failure theories, giving attention to behavior beyond the first failure. It is assumed that, once a ply fails in a laminate, it can carry no further load and its elastic properties are set to zero. The failure analysis is then repeated with the modified laminae on updated matrices, until the next failure point is reached. Theoretical results are compared with experimental ones, and it is found that theory-based failures occur at substantially lower loads than those of actual fracture.

  17. Investigation of Tantalum Wet Slug Capacitor Failures in the Apollo Telescope Mount Charger Battery Regulator Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. F.; Wiedeman, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation describes the capacitor failures and to identify the cause of the failure mechanism. Early failures were thought to have happened because of age and/or abuse since the failed capacitors were dated 1967. It is shown that all 1967 capacitors were replaced with 1972 capacitors.

  18. Investigation of TC-1 flight failure using power spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    During the Titan Centaur 1 test flight a failure involving at least one of the Centaur propellant boost pumps occurred. Also, neither of the boost pump speed instruments indicated pump rotation. Accelerometer data from the Titan Centaur 1 flight failure were analyzed using power spectral density methods to determine boost pump speed during attempted starts of the Centaur. The technique was demonstrated on a reference flight. The hydrogen boost pump speed transient was determined for the TC-1 flight. Other trends are seen in the data. However, these are not believed to be the oxygen boost pump. Discussion of data enhancement techniques is also presented.

  19. Findings from the X-33 Hydrogen Tank Failure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermeyer, Melinda; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The X-33 Hydrogen tank failed during test in November of 1999 at MSFC. The tank completed the structural loading phase of the test successfully and was drained of hydrogen prior to the failure. The failure initiated in the acreage of Lobe 1 and was instantaneous, peeling the outer skin and core away from the inner skin. It was determined there were several factors that provided the opportunity for the tank to fail in this way. The factor giving life to these opportunistic circumstances was hydrogen infiltration into the core of the tank. The mechanism for this phenomenon will be discussed in this presentation.

  20. An investigation into the causes of failure of PTFE grafts.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R S; McFarland, R J; Cox, M I

    1987-10-01

    In an attempt to improve the results of PTFE bypass grafting in the lower limb, a consecutive series of 159 grafts has been analysed in detail to determine the causes of failure. The majority were performed for limb salvage (76%) and the remainder for severe claudication. Forty-five grafts (28%) were to tibial or peroneal vessels. All patients were studied by preoperative arteriographic and Doppler studies, operative arteriography and postoperative Doppler and vasoscan studies. In selected cases postoperative arteriography was carried out with the knee straight and flexed. Thirty-seven failures occurred during a follow-up period of between 6 months and 6 years. The findings indicated four main causes of failure, extension of disease (30%), anastomotic hyperplasia (19%), graft kinking (13%) and technical faults (5%). Each of these is considered in detail and illustrative examples described. Overall patency rates for all popliteal bypasses (AK 43%; BK 57%) were 90 +/- 3% at one year, 78 +/- 5% at 3 years and 69 +/- 8% at 5 years. Comparable figures for tibial grafts were 86 +/- 6% at one year, and 60 +/- 14% at three years. As a consequence of the study, operative techniques have now been modified and preliminary results indicate that these patency rates can be significantly improved.

  1. Morpheus 1.5A Lander Failure Investigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Steve; Olansen, John

    2013-01-01

    On August 9th, 2012, the Morpheus 1.5 Vertical Testbed (VTB) crashed during Free Flight 2 (FF2) at KSC SLF, resulting in the loss of 1.5 VTB hardware. JSC/KSC Morpheus team immediately executed the pre-rehearsed Emergency Action Plan to protect personnel and property, so damage was limited to 1.5 VTB hardware. JSC/KSC Morpheus team secured data and mapped & recovered debris. Project had pre-declared loss of VTB to be a test failure, not a mishap.

  2. Manual for investigation and correction of boiler tube failures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamping, G.A.; Arrowood, R.M. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The manual is for use by electric utility power plant personnel during the investigation into the cause of a boiler tube failure and during the evaluation of corrective actions to prevent future boiler tube failures. It is intended to aid plant personnel in their understanding of the basic failure mechanisms that can produce a boiler tube failure. Information is provided on ways to identify the specific failure mechanisms, to determine the root cause of the failure, and to evaluate the corrective action that can be taken. The Manual contains information on the current methods to control the root causes of tube failures with the understanding that current and future research is necessary on many of these mechanisms to fully understand the factors which can prevent their recurrence. The Manual does not eliminate the need for a thorough metallurgical analysis during the failure investigation but is intended to enhance the investigative process by providing descriptive information for use during communications with technical specialists. The Manual encourages the comprehensive acquisition of failure data and pertinent records to document the failure for immediate and future reference. 80 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Investigation of failure to separate an Inconel 718 frangible nut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, William C., III; Hohmann, Carl

    1994-01-01

    The 2.5-inch frangible nut is used in two places to attach the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the External Tank. It must be capable of sustaining structural loads and must also separate into two pieces upon command. Structural load capability is verified by proof loading each flight nut, while ability to separate is verified on a sample of a production lot. Production lots of frangible nuts beginning in 1987 experienced an inability to reliably separate using one of two redundant explosive boosters. The problems were identified in lot acceptance tests, and the cause of failure has been attributed to differences in the response of the Inconel 718. Subsequent tests performed on the frangible nuts resulted in design modifications to the nuts along with redesign of the explosive booster to reliably separate the frangible nut. The problem history along with the design modifications to both the explosive booster and frangible nut are discussed in this paper. Implications of this failure experience impact any pyrotechnic separation system involving fracture of materials with respect to design margin control and lot acceptance testing.

  4. A near-miss management system architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures.

    PubMed

    Bella, M A Bihina; Eloff, J H P

    2016-02-01

    Digital forensics has been proposed as a methodology for doing root-cause analysis of major software failures for quite a while. Despite this, similar software failures still occur repeatedly. A reason for this is the difficulty of obtaining detailed evidence of software failures. Acquiring such evidence can be challenging, as the relevant data may be lost or corrupt following a software system's crash. This paper proposes the use of near-miss analysis to improve on the collection of evidence for software failures. Near-miss analysis is an incident investigation technique that detects and subsequently analyses indicators of failures. The results of a near-miss analysis investigation are then used to detect an upcoming failure before the failure unfolds. The detection of these indicators - known as near misses - therefore provides an opportunity to proactively collect relevant data that can be used as digital evidence, pertaining to software failures. A Near Miss Management System (NMS) architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures is proposed. The viability of the proposed architecture is demonstrated through a prototype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of Interface States and Failure Mechanisms in Mnos Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsing-Liang

    The objective of this dissertation is to conduct a quantitative study of the interface state characteristics at Si-SiO(,2) interface and the failure mechanisms in the silicon MNOS nonvolatile memory devices under different write/erase (W/E) cycling conditions. The main thrust of this research is to quantitatively characterize the interface states in MNOS devices and to correlate the results of the measurements to the failure mechanisms in the exercised MNOS devices for W/E cycles up to 1 x 10('11) cycles. The Constant-Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (CC-DLTS) technique is employed for the first time to characterize the interface states in the MNOS device. The existing theory for the CC-DLTS technique is modified to analyze the interface state density and electron capture cross sections of the trap states at Si-SiO(,2) interface. An exact equivalent circuit model for the p('+)-gridded MNOS capacitors is developed to predict the high frequency C -V behavior in the exercised MNOS devices. The results show little change in the interface state density was observed for W/E cycles less than 1 x 10('7) and increased rapidly for W/E cycles greater than 1 x 10('7). For W/E cycles greater than 5 x 10('9), a gradual increase in interface state density with W/E cyclings was observed. The negative shift of threshold voltage in the exercised MNOS devices can be attributed to the creation of interface states for W/E cycles less than 10('9) and primarily due to the generation of interface states for W/E cycles exceeding 1 x 10('9). The increase in interface state densities and the degradation of the thin oxide layer after prolonged W/E cycling increase the back tunneling current which results in the increase of retention decay rate. Furthermore, mobility degradation in the inversion layer was observed in the MNOS transistors for W/E cycling exceeds 10('9). This is attributed to the generation of surface state densities. Improvement in retention and endurance of the

  6. Investigation of failure mechanisms in integrated vacuum circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengreen, A.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication techniques of integrated vacuum circuits are described in detail. Data obtained from a specially designed test circuit are presented. The data show that the emission observed in reverse biased devices is due to cross-talk between the devices and can be eliminated by electrostatic shielding. The lifetime of the cathodes has been improved by proper activation techniques. None of the cathodes on life test has shown any sign of failure after more than 3500 hours. Life tests of triodes show a decline of anode current by a factor of two to three after a few days. The current recovers when the large positive anode voltage (100 V) has been removed for a few hours. It is suggested that this is due to trapped charges in the sapphire substrate. Evidence of the presence of such charges is given, and a model of the charge distribution is presented consistent with the measurements. Solution of the problem associated with the decay of triode current may require proper treatment of the sapphire surface and/or changes in the deposition technique of the thin metal films.

  7. Failure Investigation of Radiant Platen Superheater Tube of Thermal Power Plant Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Mandal, A.; Roy, H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a radiant platen superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement and chemical analysis, are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these, metallographic analysis and fractography are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to localized creep at high temperature. The corrective actions has also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  8. Investigation into Cause of High Temperature Failure of Boiler Superheater Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    The failure of the boiler tubes occur due to various reasons like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion. This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a final superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, oxide scale thickness measurement, microstructural examination are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these investigations, sulfur print, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD) are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure of final super heater tube. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to the combination of localized high tube metal temperature and loss of metal from the outer surface due to high temperature corrosion. The corrective actions have also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  9. A simulator investigation of engine failure compensation for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijse, A. W.; Franklin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulator investigation of various engine failure compensation concepts for powered-lift STOL aircraft was carried out at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of engine failure compensation on recovery from an engine failure during the landing approach and on the precision of the STOL landing. The various concepts include: (1) cockpit warning lights to cue the pilot of an engine failure, (2) programmed thrust and roll trim compensation, (3) thrust command and (4) flight-path stabilization. The aircraft simulated was a 150 passenger four-engine, externally blown flap civil STOL transport having a 90 psf wing loading and a .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results of the simulation indicate that the combination of thrust command and flight-path stabilization offered the best engine-out landing performance in turbulence and did so over the entire range of altitudes for which engine failures occurred.

  10. Numerical investigations of rib fracture failure models in different dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Jikuang; Miller, Karol; Li, Guibing; Joldes, Grand R; Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rib fracture is one of the most common thoracic injuries in vehicle traffic accidents that can result in fatalities associated with seriously injured internal organs. A failure model is critical when modelling rib fracture to predict such injuries. Different rib failure models have been proposed in prediction of thorax injuries. However, the biofidelity of the fracture failure models when varying the loading conditions and the effects of a rib fracture failure model on prediction of thoracic injuries have been studied only to a limited extent. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three rib failure models on prediction of thoracic injuries using a previously validated finite element model of the human thorax. The performance and biofidelity of each rib failure model were first evaluated by modelling rib responses to different loading conditions in two experimental configurations: (1) the three-point bending on the specimen taken from rib and (2) the anterior-posterior dynamic loading to an entire bony part of the rib. Furthermore, the simulation of the rib failure behaviour in the frontal impact to an entire thorax was conducted at varying velocities and the effects of the failure models were analysed with respect to the severity of rib cage damages. Simulation results demonstrated that the responses of the thorax model are similar to the general trends of the rib fracture responses reported in the experimental literature. However, they also indicated that the accuracy of the rib fracture prediction using a given failure model varies for different loading conditions.

  11. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandan; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report [1] including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  12. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  13. An investigation of theories of failure for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report is comprised of the abstract of a masters thesis research grant. The abstract of the thesis, 'An Investigation of Acoustic Emission Techniques for the Discrimination of Damage Mechanisms in Ceramic Matrix Composites', is as follows: In order to further advance the understanding of the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composites (CMS's), acoustic emission (AE) techniques were implemented to monitor and identify damage mechanisms in CMC's under tensile loading. In addition to real-time AE monitoring techniques, a data acquisition system was developed and implemented in order to capture AE waveforms resulting from stress-induced damage. Waveforms were inspected for multiple events, separated in distinct events, and then analyzed to determine waveform characteristics in the time and frequency domains. Waveform characteristics included peak amplitude, event duration, MARSE, energy, and dominant and centroidal frequency. In addition to conventional methods for determining a damage discrimination criteria, a study of the distribution and correlation of the waveform characteristics criteria and a study of the distribution and correlation of the waveform characteristics were performed to aid in the determination of a damage discrimination criteria. The damage discrimination criteria was tested for 'uniqueness', i.e., the effectiveness of the criteria to identify and monitor damage independent of the stress-strain relationship. Insitu radiography was used to substantiate the damage accumulation. A simulation test was also performed over the loading history to study the changes in the waveform characteristics of the system response from a constant excitation. This thesis demonstrates the use of waveform analysis to study the AE activity resulting from stress-induced damage in CMC's in conjunction with other nondestructive evaluation techniques to investigate the mechanical behavior of CMC's.

  14. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M.; Bahr, David F.

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  15. An Investigation of the Ability to Recover from Transients Following Failures for Single-Pilot Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Schroeder, Jeffery A.

    1988-01-01

    A moving-base simulation was conducted to investigate a pilot's ability to recover from transients following single-axis hard-over failures of the flight-control system. The investigation was performed in conjunction with a host simulation that examined the influence of control modes on a single pilot's ability to perform various mission elements under high-workload conditions. The NASA Ames large-amplitude-motion Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was utilized, and the experimental variables were the failure axis, the severity of the failure, and the airspeed at which the failure occurred. Other factors, such as pilot workload and terrain and obstacle proximity at the time of failure, were kept as constant as possible within the framework of the host simulation task scenarios. No explicit failure warnings were presented to the pilot. Data from the experiment are shown, and pilot ratings are compared with the proposed handling-qualities requirements for military rotorcraft. Results indicate that the current proposed failure transient requirements may need revision.

  16. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transient fiberglass-epoxy birefringent material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study is reported in which a nondestructive technique involving the use of a transparent fiberglass-epoxy composite birefringent material has been used to investigate compression failure mechanisms in graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that the birefringency and transparency of the fiberglass-epoxy material permits regions of high stress to be located and the mechanisms of local failure propagation to be identified within the laminate. The material may also be useful for studying stress fields and for identifying failure initiation and propagation mechanisms in a wide variety of composite-structure problems.

  17. Investigation of HP Turbine Blade Failure in a Military Turbofan Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Thomas, Johny; Srinivasan, K.; Nandi, Vaishakhi; Bhatt, R. Raghavendra

    2017-04-01

    Failure of a high pressure (HP) turbine blade in a military turbofan engine is investigated to determine the root cause of failure. Forensic and metallurgical investigations are carried out on the affected blades. The loss of coating and the presence of heavily oxidized intergranular fracture features including substrate material aging and airfoil curling in the trailing edge of a representative blade indicate that the coating is not providing adequate oxidation protection and the blade material substrate is not suitable for the application at hand. Coating spallation followed by substrate oxidation and aging leading to intergranular cracking and localized trailing edge curling is the root cause of the blade failure. The remaining portion of the blade fracture surface showed ductile overload features in the final failure. The damage observed in downstream components is due to secondary effects.

  18. Lessons Learned from Recent Failure and Incident Investigations of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, L. S.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reeder, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has supported several large-scale failure and incident investigations and numerous requests for engineering consultations. Although various extenuating circumstances contributed to each of these incidents, in all cases, the failure resulted from accumulation and/or propagation of damage that reduced the load carrying capability of the structure to a level below that which was needed to sustain structural loads. A brief overview of various failure and incident investigations supported by LaRC, including some of the computational and experimental methodologies that have been applied, is presented. An important outcome of many of these failure and incident investigations is the development of an improved understanding of not only the state-of-the-art in experimental and analytical methods but also the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing processes that may contribute to such failures. In order to provide insight into such large-scale investigations, a series of lessons learned were captured. Awareness of these lessons learned is highly beneficial to engineers involved in similar investigations. Therefore, it is prudent that the lessons learned are disseminated such that they can be built upon in other investigations and in ensuing research and development activities.

  19. Identifying trends and developing solutions for incurred sample reanalysis failure investigations in a bioanalytical CRO.

    PubMed

    Meng, Min; Reuschel, Scott; Bennett, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    In 2007, the US FDA recommended that pharmaceutical companies and CROs conduct incurred sample reanalysis (ISR) following the analysis of study samples using validated methods. Between January 2008 and December 2009, over 250 separate analytes were tested for ISR in our laboratory (a bioanalytical CRO). Among these, nine analytes initially failed for ISR. While thorough investigations were conducted to identify the root cause of ISR failure for each study, these investigations were often painfully tedious and very costly, both financially and in terms of project timelines. In this paper, three representative studies are presented to showcase the detailed investigation processes, methodologies and final conclusions of the ISR investigations. Additionally, all nine ISR failures are analyzed to identify trends or common elements of the studies or methods that might help identify potential problems before they occur. Furthermore, suggestions and recommendations to minimize future ISR failures are provided.

  20. A topological investigation of phase transitions of cascading failures in power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koç, Yakup; Warnier, Martijn; Van Mieghem, Piet; Kooij, Robert E.; Brazier, Frances M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Cascading failures are one of the main reasons for blackouts in electric power transmission grids. The economic cost of such failures is in the order of tens of billion dollars annually. The loading level of power system is a key aspect to determine the amount of the damage caused by cascading failures. Existing studies show that the blackout size exhibits phase transitions as the loading level increases. This paper investigates the impact of the topology of a power grid on phase transitions in its robustness. Three spectral graph metrics are considered: spectral radius, effective graph resistance and algebraic connectivity. Experimental results from a model of cascading failures in power grids on the IEEE power systems demonstrate the applicability of these metrics to design/optimise a power grid topology for an enhanced phase transition behaviour of the system.

  1. Investigation of a Modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) Pipe Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, Ronald L; Shingledecker, John P

    2006-04-01

    A modified 9Cr-1Mo feedwater (condensate) line at an Eastman Chemical Company plant failed in January 2005. The line was in continuous service since start-up December 2001 until failure. The Plant Superintendent estimated there were three thermal cycles since start-up, although there may have been as many as 25 thermal cycles during commissioning. Normal operating temperature was 325 F (163 C) and pressure was 1762 psig. The line was steam traced with the tracing activated only when ambient outdoor temperature dropped to 40 F (5 C). A modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (P91) pipe failure in a feedwater line in a chemical plant was investigated. The failure occurred in the vicinity of an elbow produced with socket welds of the pipe to the elbow. Based on metallography and hardness measurements, it was concluded that failure occurred because of an improper post-weld heat treatment of the socket weldment.

  2. Failure detection and isolation investigation for strapdown skew redundant tetrad laser gyro inertial sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Lahm, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    The degree to which flight-critical failures in a strapdown laser gyro tetrad sensor assembly can be isolated in short-haul aircraft after a failure occurrence has been detected by the skewed sensor failure-detection voting logic is investigated along with the degree to which a failure in the tetrad computer can be detected and isolated at the computer level, assuming a dual-redundant computer configuration. The tetrad system was mechanized with two two-axis inertial navigation channels (INCs), each containing two gyro/accelerometer axes, computer, control circuitry, and input/output circuitry. Gyro/accelerometer data is crossfed between the two INCs to enable each computer to independently perform the navigation task. Computer calculations are synchronized between the computers so that calculated quantities are identical and may be compared. Fail-safe performance (identification of the first failure) is accomplished with a probability approaching 100 percent of the time, while fail-operational performance (identification and isolation of the first failure) is achieved 93 to 96 percent of the time.

  3. An investigation of gear mesh failure prediction techniques. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed in which several gear failure prediction methods were investigated and applied to experimental data from a gear fatigue test apparatus. The primary objective was to provide a baseline understanding of the prediction methods and to evaluate their diagnostic capabilities. The methods investigated use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain to detect gear failure. Data from eleven gear fatigue tests were recorded at periodic time intervals as the gears were run from initiation to failure. Four major failure modes, consisting of heavy wear, tooth breakage, single pits, and distributed pitting were observed among the failed gears. Results show that the prediction methods were able to detect only those gear failures which involved heavy wear or distributed pitting. None of the methods could predict fatigue cracks, which resulted in tooth breakage, or single pits. It is suspected that the fatigue cracks were not detected because of limitations in data acquisition rather than in methodology. Additionally, the frequency response between the gear shaft and the transducer was found to significantly affect the vibration signal. The specific frequencies affected were filtered out of the signal average prior to application of the methods.

  4. Investigating the "Failure of Further Learning" Effect in Preservice Science Teacher Education. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Peter F. W.; Postlethwaite, Keith C.; Skinner, Nigel C.; Simpson, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    In an investigation of the learning of science content knowledge in a postgraduate preservice education course, it was found that the 'failure of further learning' effect can be overcome, at least in part, in well-designed courses. Nevertheless the persistence of certain misconceptions among some students did indicate the partial salience of the…

  5. University Students' Metacognitive Failures in Mathematical Proving Investigated Based on the Framework of Assimilation and Accommodation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huda, Nizlel; Subanji; Nusantar, Toto; Susiswo; Sutawidjaja, Akbar; Rahardjo, Swasono

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine students' metacognitive failure in Mathematics Education Program of FKIP in Jambi University investigated based on assimilation and accommodation Mathematical framework. There were 35 students, five students did not answer the question, three students completed the questions correctly and 27 students tried to solve…

  6. Investigation of static and cyclic bearing failure mechanisms for GR/EP laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. W.; Tuttle, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Static, cyclic load (fatigue), and residual strength testing of graphite-epoxy (GR/EP) and aluminum pin bearing joints was completed to study bearing failure mechanisms. Parameters investigated included static strength, failure mode, fatigue life, hole growth, joint stiffness, and residual strength. Comparative evaluation of these results show that the MIL-HDBK-5 convention for the definition of bearing strength can be used for GR/EP materials while maintaining the same, or improved, level of structural integrity shown for metal joints.

  7. Full-Field Strain Methods for Investigating Failure Mechanisms in Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advancements in braiding technology have led to commercially viable manufacturing approaches for making large structures with complex shape out of triaxial braided composite materials. In some cases, the static load capability of structures made using these materials has been higher than expected based on material strength properties measured using standard coupon tests. A more detailed investigation of deformation and failure processes in large-unit-cell-size triaxial braid composites is needed to evaluate the applicability of standard test methods for these materials and to develop alternative testing approaches. This report presents some new techniques that have been developed to investigate local deformation and failure using digital image correlation techniques. The methods were used to measure both local and global strains during standard straight-sided coupon tensile tests on composite materials made with 12- and 24-k yarns and a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Local deformation and failure within fiber bundles was observed and correlations were made between these local failures and global composite deformation and strength.

  8. Failure Investigation of a Cage Suspension Gear Chain used in Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Dutta, Shamik; Shukla, Awdhesh Kumar; Roy, Himadri

    2016-10-01

    This investigation is primarily aimed to examine the probable causes of in-service failure of cage suspension gear chain used in coal mines. Preliminary visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, magnetic particle inspection and estimation of mechanical properties are necessary supplement to this investigation. Optical microscopic analysis along with scanning electron microscopy examinations are carried out to understand the metallurgical reasons for failure. The visual examination and magnetic particle investigations reveal presence of fissure cracks at weld joint for both un-failed and failed end link chain. The average hardness value has been found to increase gradually with the distance from the weld interface. The macro and microstructural examinations of the samples prepared from both failed and un-failed specimens depict presence of continuous as well as aligned linear inclusions randomly distributed along with decarburized layer at weld interface/fusion zone. Fractographic examination shows flat fracture covering major portion of cross-section, which is surrounded by a narrow annular metallic fracture surface having a texture different from that of the remaining surface. Fracture mechanics principles have been used to study the fatigue crack growth rate in both weld region and base region of the un-failed gear chain material. Detailed stress analyses are also carried out to evaluate the stress generated along the chain periphery. Finally, it is concluded that presence of serious weld defect due to use of improper welding parameters/procedure caused failure of the end links of the investigated chain link.

  9. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-21

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests, a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM, which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  10. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-01

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests [1], a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM [2], which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  11. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Commodities are transferred between the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) crew module (CM) and service module (SM) via an external umbilical that is driven apart with spring-loaded struts after the structural connection is severed. The spring struts must operate correctly for the modules to separate safely. There was no vibration testing of strut development units scoped in the MPCV Program Plan; therefore, any design problems discovered as a result of vibration testing would not have been found until the component qualification. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations including identified lessons learned and best practices to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  12. In vitro/in silico investigation of failure criteria to predict flexural strength of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Mehdawi, Idris Mohamed; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Inoue, Sayuri; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-09-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate a failure criterion to predict flexural strengths of composite resins (CR) by three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Models of flexural strength for test specimens of CR and rods comprising a three-point loading were designed. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of CR were conducted using a modified McGee-McCullough model. Using the experimental CR, flexural strengths were measured by three-point bending tests with crosshead speed 1.0 mm/min and compared with the values determined by in silico analysis. The flexural strengths of experimental CR calculated using the maximum principal strain significantly correlated with those obtained in silico amongst the four types of failure criteria applied. The in silico analytical model established in this study was found to be effective to predict the flexural strengths of CR incorporating various silica filler contents by maximum principal strain.

  13. Results of investigations of failures of geothermal direct-use well pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1994-12-01

    Failures of 13 geothermal direct-use well pumps were investigated and information obtained about an additional 5 pumps that have been in service up to 23 years, but have not failed. Pumps with extra long lateral and variable-speed drives had the highest correlation with reduced time in service. There appears to be at least circumstantial evidence that recirculation may be a cause of reduced pump life. If recirculation is a cause of pump failures, pump specifiers will need to be more aware of minimum flow conditions as well as maximum flow conditions when specifying pumps. Over-sizing pumps and the tendency to specify pumps with high flow and low Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) could lead to increased problems with recirculation.

  14. Project Morpheus: Morpheus 1.5A Lander Failure Investigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devolites, Jennifer L.; Olansen, Jon B.; Munday, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    On August 9, 2012 the Morpheus 1.5A vehicle crashed shortly after lift off from the Kennedy Space Center. The loss was limited to the vehicle itself which was pre-declared to be a test failure and not a mishap. The Morpheus project is demonstrating advanced technologies for in space and planetary surface vehicles including: autonomous flight control, landing site hazard identification and safe site selection, relative surface and hazard navigation, precision landing, modular reusable flight software, and high performance, non-toxic, cryogenic liquid Oxygen and liquid Methane integrated main engine and attitude control propulsion system. A comprehensive failure investigation isolated the fault to the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data path to the flight computer. Several improvements have been identified and implemented for the 1.5B and 1.5C vehicles.

  15. A clinical investigation of the effects of omission of pumice prophylaxis on band and bond failure.

    PubMed

    Barry, G R

    1995-08-01

    One hundred and twelve first molar bands and 614 directly bonded brackets on incisor, canine, and premolar teeth were included in a clinical trail to investigate the importance of omission of pumice prophylaxis at the time of banding and bonding, on their possible subsequent failure. Half of the sample were selected for the non-pumiced test groups using a random number allocation method, the remaining pumiced teeth acting as control groups. Two etch times were used for the direct bonding part of the study, 15 and 60 seconds, with non-pumiced test and pumiced control groups included within both etch-time groups. Results showed no statistical difference in the failure rate of attachments in either test or control groups during the course of treatment. The different etch times had no significant effects in the direct bonding part of the study.

  16. Yield and Failure Behavior Investigated for Cross-Linked Phenolic Resins Using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Joshua D.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to fundamentally evaluate the yield and failure behavior of cross-linked phenolic resins at temperatures below the glass transition. Yield stress was investigated at various temperatures, strain rates, and degrees of cross-linking. The onset of non-linear behavior in the cross-linked phenolic structures was caused by localized irreversible molecular rearrangements through the rotation of methylene linkers followed by the formation or annihilation of neighboring hydrogen bonds. The yield stress results, with respect to temperature and strain rate, could be fit by existing models used to describe yield behavior of amorphous glasses. The degree of cross-linking only indirectly influences the maximum yield stress through its influence on glass transition temperature (Tg), however there is a strong relationship between the degree of cross-linking and the failure mechanism. Low cross-linked samples were able to separate through void formation, whereas the highly cross-linked structures exhibited bond scission.

  17. Investigation of failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by EB-PVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, M. R.; Abbas, Musharaf

    2013-06-01

    Failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique owing to formation of micro cracks was investigated. The TBCs were deposited on the Ni-based super alloy IN-100 and the micro cracks were observed within the top ceramic coat of thermally cycled TBCs at 1050°C. It was observed that these cracks propagate in the ceramic coat in the direction normal to interface while no cracks were observed in the bond coat. SEM/EDS studies revealed that some non-uniform oxides were formed on the interface between ceramic top and metallic bond coat just below the cracks. Study proposed that the cracks were initiated due to stress owing to big difference in Pilling-Bed worth ratio of non-uniform oxides as well as thermal stress, which caused the formation of cracks in top ceramic coat leading to failure of TBCs

  18. Investigation of a Shock Absorber for Safeguard of Fuel Assemblies Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Karalevicius, Renatas; Dundulis, Gintautas; Rimkevicius, Sigitas; Uspuras, Eugenijus

    2006-07-01

    The Ignalina NPP has two reactors. The Unit 1 was shut down, therefore the special equipment was designed for transportation of the fuel from Unit 1 to Unit 2. The fuel-loaded basket can drop during transportation. The special shock absorber was designed in order to avoid failure of fuel assemblies during transportation. In case of drop of fuel loaded basket, the failure of fuel assemblies can occur. This shock absorber was studied by scaled experiments at Lithuanian Energy Institute. Static and dynamic investigations of shock absorber are presented in this paper, including dependency of axial force versus axial compression. The finite element codes BRIGADE/Plus and ABAQUS/Explicit were used for analysis. Static simulation was used to optimize the dimensions of shock absorber. Dynamic analysis shows that shock absorber is capable to withstand the dynamic load for successful force suppression function in case of an accident. (authors)

  19. Full-field Strain Methods for Investigating Failure Mechanisms in Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials made with triaxial braid architecture and large tow size carbon fibers are beginning to be used in many applications, including composite aircraft and engine structures. Recent advancements in braiding technology have led to commercially viable manufacturing approaches for making large structures with complex shape. Although the large unit cell size of these materials is an advantage for manufacturing efficiency, the fiber architecture presents some challenges for materials characterization, design, and analysis. In some cases, the static load capability of structures made using these materials has been higher than expected based on material strength properties measured using standard coupon tests. A potential problem with using standard tests methods for these materials is that the unit cell size can be an unacceptably large fraction of the specimen dimensions. More detailed investigation of deformation and failure processes in large unit cell size triaxial braid composites is needed to evaluate the applicability of standard test methods for these materials and to develop alternative testing approaches. In recent years, commercial equipment has become available that enables digital image correlation to be used on a more routine basis for investigation of full field 3D deformation in materials and structures. In this paper, some new techniques that have been developed to investigate local deformation and failure using digital image correlation techniques are presented. The methods were used to measure both local and global strains during standard straight-sided coupon tensile tests on composite materials made with 12 and 24 k yarns and a 0/+60/-60 triaxial braid architecture. Local deformation and failure within fiber bundles was observed, and this local failure had a significant effect on global stiffness and strength. The matrix material had a large effect on local damage initiation for the two matrix materials used in this investigation

  20. Geochemical Investigation of Slope Failure on the Northern Cascadia Margin Frontal Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J. W.; Riedel, M.; Waite, W.; Rose, K.; Lapham, L.; Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, R.; Spence, G. D.; Hyndman, R.; Haacke, R.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous submarine landslides occur along the seaward side of the northern Cascadia margin's frontal ridge. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) are also prevalent beneath the ridge at a sediment depth (~255 mbsf) coincident with the failure of at least one potentially recent slump. By one scenario, the most recent megathrust earthquake on the northern Cascadia margin, which occurred in 1700 A.D., raised the pore pressure and destabilized gas-charged sediment at the BSR depth. If true, the exposed seafloor within the slide's sole would contain gas-charged, sulfate-free sediment immediately following the slope failure. Over time, sulfate would diffuse into the exposed sediment and re-establish an equilibrium sulfate gradient. In this study, three 1-5 km wide collapse structures and the surrounding areas were cored during the Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) supported cruise PGC0807 to determine if the failures were related to over- pressurized gas and constrain the age of the slumps. Sulfate and methane gradients were measured from cores typically collected along a transect from the headwall scarp, and down to the toe of the slide. Rapidly decreasing sulfate concentrations with depth (a proxy for enhanced methane flux toward the seafloor) above the headwall of Lopez slump confirms a high background flux on the crest of the ridge. However, within the cores we recovered from the headwall, slide sole and slide deposits at all sites investigated, sulfate was abundant, methane was largely absent and, correspondingly, sulfate gradients were relatively low. On the basis of these results, methane was either lost from the system during or since the slope failure, or was never present in the high concentrations expected at an exhumed BSR. Numerical models that simulate sulfate diffusion following the slump-induced pore water profile perturbations will be utilized to constrain the age of the slope failures. Complementary sedimentological and geotechnical studies from the

  1. An investigation of planar failure mechanisms of rock slope using distinct element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özge Dinç, Şaziye; Sinan Işık, Nihat; Karaca, Zeki

    2015-04-01

    Our research project presents planar failure mechanisms of rock masses having different rock materials and discontinuity properties in slopes that are designed in different dip angles and heights. For this purpose, the distinct element methods are used for rock masses deformed under the static and dynamic loads based on their structural components such as joint, crack, bedding and foliation planes. In this work, the numerical modeling technique on PFC2D (particle flow code produced by Itasca) has been used that has advantages over other modeling methods since it effectively creates synthetic rock masses with the smooth-joint model approach. From the methodological perspective, the intact rock samples are initially created by particles with confined micro-parameters, afterwards they are subjected to uniaxial compressive and Brazilian tests. Following to this, joint properties of rock masses are determined by smooth-joint modeling. These rock masses are assigned to the slopes with different dip angles and heights and then slope stability analysis are performed. The controlling role of each property of a discontinuity (e.g. roughness, spacing etc.) and the intact properties (σc, σt etc.) on the movements and failure mechanisms are investigated correspondingly. Our preliminary results suggest how persistence of a discontinuity plays a primary role in the occurence of the planar failure mechanisms and the stability process.

  2. Investigation of pump and pump switch failures in rainwater harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Magnus; Gan, Kein; Delbridge, Nathan; Sharma, Ashok K.; Tjandraatmadja, Grace

    2016-07-01

    Rainwater harvesting is an important technology in cities that can contribute to a number of functions, such as sustainable water management in the face of demand growth and drought as well as the detention of rainwater to increase flood protection and reduce damage to waterways. The objective of this article is to investigate the integrity of residential rainwater harvesting systems, drawing on the results of the field inspection of 417 rainwater systems across Melbourne that was combined with a survey of householders' situation, maintenance behaviour and attitudes. Specifically, the study moves beyond the assumption that rainwater systems are always operational and functional and draws on the collected data to explore the various reasons and rates of failure associated with pumps and pump switches, leaving for later further exploration of the failure in other components such as the collection area, gutters, tank, and overflows. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no data like this in academic literature or in the water sector. Straightforward Bayesian Network models were constructed in order to analyse the factors contributing to various types of failures, including system age, type of use, the reason for installation, installer, and maintenance behaviour. Results show that a number of issues commonly exist, such as failure of pumps (5% of systems), automatic pump switches that mediate between the tank and reticulated water (9% of systems), and systems with inadequate setups (i.e. no pump) limiting their use. In conclusion, there appears to be a lack of enforcement or quality controls in both installation practices by sometimes unskilled contractors and lack of ongoing maintenance checks. Mechanisms for quality control and asset management are required, but difficult to promote or enforce. Further work is needed into how privately owned assets that have public benefits could be better managed.

  3. How Child Protective Services Investigators Decide to Substantiate Mothers for Failure-to-Protect in Sexual Abuse Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coohey, Carol

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how Child Protective Services (CPS) investigators decide to substantiate mothers for failure-to-protect from sexual abuse. A case-comparison study was used to compare 31 mothers who were and 62 mothers who were not substantiated for failure-to-protect by CPS. The multivariate analysis showed that mothers…

  4. Delamination Failure Investigation for Out-Of-Plane Loading in Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R M; DeTeresa, S J

    2003-03-26

    In contrast to failure approaches at the lamina level or the micromechanics level the present work concerns failure characterization at the laminate level. Specifically, attention is given to the ultimate failure characterization for quasi-isotropic laminates. This is in further contrast to the commonly used approaches for initial damage or progressive damage. It is shown that the analytical failure forms decompose into two modes, one for out of plane, delamination type failure and one for in plane, fiber controlled type failure. The work here is mainly given over to the delamination mode of failure. Experimental results are presented for laminates in this mode of failure. These results are then integrated with the analytical forms to give a simple criterion for delamination failure.

  5. Investigation of failures in operation of heat networks of large heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskaya, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of deviations in heat network parameters on operation of heating system and hot-water supply systems in buildings is examined. The consequences of a decrease in the water temperature in a heat network under extreme weather conditions in a range below the design ambient air temperature, the efficiency of disconnection of a hot water supply system (HWSS) heater in this period, and deviations in the normal heat supply in the transition period at relatively high outdoor temperatures are considered. The specific and scope of failures depend on the design-heating load to design hot water supply load ratio for the heat network. A mathematical model was developed, and numerical investigation was performed of modern schemes of heat points which are designed primarily for covering the hot water supply load and recovering the heating system heat output in case of low or no hot water consumption in HWSS. The performed calculations demonstrate that the heating system has no time to restore its heat output, thereby considerably reducing air temperature in the heated premises. The lower the ambient air temperature and the lower the ratio of the design loads for hot water supply and heating, the greater is this decrease. At the same time, in case of a sudden decrease in the outdoor temperature and an accident in the heat supply system, the heating system must be the priority consumer, since a heating failure not only decreases the thermal comfort of consumers but can cause emergency situations in local utility systems, such as a cold water supply system. Correction of failures in a heat supply system requires calculation of operating conditions of heat networks.

  6. Graphene coating for anti-corrosion and the investigation of failure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. X.; Duan, C. Y.; Liu, H. Y.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods has been considered as a promising corrosion prevention layer because of its exceptional structure and impermeability. However, the anti-corrosion performance and the failure mechanism are still controversial. In this study, graphene layers with different quality levels, crystallite sizes, and layer numbers were prepared on the surface of Cu by a CVD process. The effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the failure of graphene layers to provide adequate protection were investigated in detail by combining graphene transfer techniques, computation, and anti-corrosion measurements. Our results reveal that corrosion rates decrease marginally upon the increase of graphene layer number, and this rather weak dependence on thickness likely arises from the aligned nature of the GBs in CVD-grown few-layer graphene. This problem can potentially be overcome by layer-by-layer graphene transfer technique, in which corrosion is found to be arrested locally when transferred graphene is present on top of the as-grown graphene. However, this advantage is not reflected in corrosion studies performed on large-scale samples, where cracks or imperfect interfaces could offset the advantages of GB misalignment. With improvements in technology, the layer-by-layer assembly technique could be used to develop an effective anti-corrosion barrier.

  7. Triggers for the Collapse of Ice Shelves in Antarctica: Investigating Compressive Arch Failure with Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic ice shelves restrain, or buttress, grounded ice from flowing freely into the ocean by redistributing the force of the ice flow to pinning points (ice rises) at the ice front and shear margins at adjacent bay walls. This buttressing process typically defines a 'compressive arch' in the strain rate-field of the ice shelf, where the smallest principal component transitions from compressive inland of the arch to extensive seaward of the arch. If the compressive arch is breached due to iceberg calving at the ice front or thinning at the shear margins, the ice shelf will retreat irreversibly to a new stable configuration or collapse entirely. This retreat can compromise ice shelf buttressing, resulting in sea-level rise and ocean freshening as grounded ice flows unrestricted into the ocean. Here, we investigate the dynamics of compressive arch failure using Larsen C ice shelf as a test case for a larger study that will include several other ice shelves and projections for sea-level rise. We use satellite observations to develop a steady state model of Larsen C in Elmer/ICE, a finite element ice sheet/ice flow software package. We run calving and thinning simulations to determine the conditions needed to trigger ice shelf retreat via compressive arch failure and discuss the likelihood of these scenarios occurring in relation to extrapolations of current melt profiles and calving trends.

  8. Investigation of an outbreak of measles: failure to vaccinate or vaccine failure in a community of predominantly fishermen in Kerala.

    PubMed

    Nujum, Zinia T; Varghese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Measles outbreaks continue to occur in developing countries. This study attempted to explore the context of an outbreak of measles in a community of predominantly fishermen in Kerala to find out whether the outbreak was the result of a failure to vaccinate or failure of the vaccine itself. A cross sectional study was conducted in Mukkola village of Thiruvananthapuram district, Kerala, India. A total of 215 children of ages between 9 and 35 months were studied. Documented evidence of measles vaccination was available only in 71.6% (65.57-77.62) of the children. The risk factors for not being immunized against measles were being third or higher in birth order and having: a father whose occupation is fishing, low family income, lower parental education, Muslim religion and poor knowledge regarding measles and its vaccine. Of the 215 children studied, 43 had a history of measles. Thirty percent of these 43 children were younger than the age of vaccination. Unvaccinated children, children third or higher in birth order and children of families with more than 5 members had a significantly higher risk of contracting measles. Vaccine effectiveness was 76.6% (95% CI: 75.96-77.99). The prevalence of missed vaccination opportunities was found to be 15.8% (34/215). Even with the relatively low vaccine effectiveness, this outbreak could have been prevented by higher vaccination coverage. Lowering the age at administration of the first dose of measles vaccine needs to be considered. Effective utilization of opportunities for vaccination could enhance coverage and prevent outbreaks in the future.

  9. Investigation of Bonded Jacket Cable Insulation Failure Mechanisms: HELB Environment Results

    SciTech Connect

    L. Duncan

    2002-11-01

    When overaged from thermal or radiation environments, composite insulation composed of a layer of ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) covered with a bonded layer of chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE[Hypalon]) can crack if subjected to steam environments associated with loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The work described in this report evaluated the effects of a lesser accident, a high-energy line break (HELB), on the aged insulating materials. The object of the test was to determine if the same cracking concerns exist for the less severe HELB environment. The work is based on the use of aged specimens that were prepared under the test program described in EPRI report Investigation of Bonded Jacket Cable Insulation Failure Mechanisms (1001002).

  10. The Failure of Inquiry: Preparing Science Teachers with an Authentic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, David

    2009-12-01

    This mixed methodology action research study examined the impact of a curricular innovation designed to provide an authentic science inquiry learning experience for 15 secondary science teacher candidates enrolled in a master’s level initial certification program. The class investigated the question “How can peak autumn color in New England be determined?” The project goals were to help teacher candidates acquire the skills, knowledge, and dispositions necessary to foster learning through inquiry in their respective content areas as defined by teacher preparation professional standards. Though the teacher candidates were successful at identifying a likely answer to the question, the project failed to achieve its learning goals. Reasons for the project’s failure and implications for the science education community are discussed.

  11. An investigation of the causes of failure of flexible thermal protection materials in an aerodynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    Tests of small panels of advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI) were conducted using a small wind tunnel that was designed to simulate Space Shuttle Orbiter entry mean-flow and pulsating aerodynamic loads. The wind tunnel, with a 3 inch wide by 1.75 inch high by 7.5 inch long test section, proved to be capable of continuous flow at dynamic pressures q near 580 psf with fluctuating pressures over 2 psi RMS at an excitation frequency f sub E of 200 Hz. For this investigation, however, the wind tunnel was used to test entry-temperature preconditioned and heat-cleaned AFRSI at q = 280 psf, Prms was nearly equal to 1.2 psi and f sub E = 200 Hz. The objective of these tests was to determine the mechanism of failure of AFRSI at Orbiter entry conditions. Details of the test apparatus and test results are presented.

  12. Review of current and investigational pharmacologic agents for acute heart failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shin, David D; Brandimarte, Filippo; De Luca, Leonardo; Sabbah, Hani N; Fonarow, Gregg C; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Komajda, Michel; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2007-01-22

    Acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) are a major public health problem and present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Commonly used agents in the treatment of AHFS include diuretics, vasodilators (eg, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, nesiritide), and inotropes (eg, dobutamine, dopamine, milrinone). Patients admitted to hospital with AHFS and low cardiac output state (AHFS/LO) represent a subgroup with very high inhospital and postdischarge mortality rates. Most of these patients require intravenous inotropic therapy. However, the use of current intravenous inotropes has been associated with risk for hypotension, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and possibly increased postdischarge mortality, particularly in those with coronary artery disease. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new agents to safely improve cardiac performance (contractility and/or active relaxation) in this patient population. This article reviews a selection of current and investigational agents for the treatment of AHFS, with a main focus on the high-risk patient population with AHFS/LO.

  13. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  14. Investigating pain in heart failure patients: the pain assessment, incidence, and nature in heart failure (PAIN-HF) study.

    PubMed

    Goodlin, Sarah J; Wingate, Sue; Albert, Nancy M; Pressler, Susan J; Houser, Janet; Kwon, Jennifer; Chiong, Jun; Storey, C Porter; Quill, Timothy; Teerlink, John R

    2012-10-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure (HF) have high rates of pain and other symptoms that diminish quality of life. We know little about the characteristics and correlates of pain in patients with advanced HF. We identified pain prevalence, location, character, severity, frequency, and correlates in 347 outpatients with advanced HF enrolled from hospices and clinics. We evaluated the correlation of pain with HF-related quality of life, mortality, symptoms and health problems, and current treatments for pain. Pain at any site was reported by 293 patients (84.4%), and 138 (39.5%) reported pain at more than one site. The most common site of pain was the legs below the knees (32.3% of subjects). Pain interfered with activity for 70% of patients. Pain was "severe" or "very severe" for 28.6% of subjects with chest pain, and for 38.9% of those with other sites of pain. The only medication reported to provide pain relief was opioids, prescribed for 34.1% of subjects (P = .001). The strongest predictors of pain were degenerative joint disease (DJD) (odds ratio [OR] 14.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9-56.0; P < .001), other arthritis (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.20-6.62; P = .017), shortness of breath (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.47-7.28; P = .004), and angina pectoris (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.30-8.81; P = .013). Pain occurred at multiple sites in patients with advanced HF. Pain correlated with DJD or other arthritis, shortness of breath, and angina. Only opioid analgesics provided relief of pain. Future research should evaluate the etiology of and interventions to manage pain in patients with HF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  16. 65p Failure Investigation: Separation Analyses for Progress Spacecraft and Soyuz 3rd Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke

    2017-01-01

    MSFC ER41 was tasked with assessing the potential failure scenarios capabilities in order to determine whether particular failure causes could have resulted in the observed telemetry information and what the worst case results of these particular failures could be. A mass accurate CAD model was developed by the analyst using existing data regarding the Progress spacecraft and publically available information regarding the 3rdstage of the Soyuz rocket. This model was used as a basis for the following analyses.

  17. TAIL SECTION TEST STAND, SUSTAINER HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, DECAY CHARACTERISTICS AND FAILURE INVESTIGATION. BOOK III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ENGINEERING DRAWINGS, STAGING , CONTROL SYSTEMS, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PRESSURE, ATTENUATION....LEAKAGE(FLUID), * SUSTAINER ENGINES, HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SURFACE TO SURFACE MISSILES, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), FAILURE(MECHANICS), CAPTIVE TESTS

  18. Comparison Between Corrosion Behavior of Copper and Stainless Steel 90° Elbow and Failure Investigation of 90° Copper Elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Mohamed Ahmed; Zewail, Taghreed Mohamed; Amine, Nieven Abbas; El-Tawail, Yehia Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Frequently found in elbow, erosion failures may lead to the leakage of pipes and even damage the whole system. Erosion is a form of material degradation that involves electrochemical corrosion and mechanical wear processes encountered on the surface of metal pipes. Research on the erosion-corrosion mechanism indicates that the erosion mainly results from the interactions between the elbow surface and the fluid traveling along the surface. Corrosion behavior of 90° copper and stainless steel elbow was studied. Scanning electron microscopy was processed on the 90° copper elbow to show the surface morphology of the failed copper elbow. Failure investigation was carried out on 90° copper elbow to determine failure location and failure causes.

  19. Aortic banding in rat as a model to investigate malnutrition associated with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Moinard, Christophe; Rasmusen, Carole; Tabbi-Anneni, Imène; Cynober, Luc; Grynberg, Alain

    2005-05-01

    Heart failure is a severe pathology, which has displayed a dramatic increase in the occurrence of patients with chronic heart disease in developed countries, as a result of increases in the population's average age and in survival time. This pathology is associated with severe malnutrition, which worsens the prognosis. Although the cachexia associated with chronic heart failure is a well-known complication, there is no reference animal model of malnutrition related to heart failure. This study was designed to evaluate the nutritional status of rats in a model of loss of cardiac function obtained by ascending aortic banding. Cardiac overload led to the development of cardiac hypertrophy, which decompensates to heart failure, with increased brain natriuretic peptide levels. The rats displayed hepatic dysfunction and an associated renal hypotrophy and renal failure, evidenced by the alteration in renal function markers such as citrullinemia, creatininemia, and uremia. Malnutrition has been evidenced by the alteration of protein and amino acid metabolism. A muscular atrophy with decreased protein content and increased amino acid concentrations in both plasma and muscle was observed. These rats with heart failure displayed a multiorgan failure and malnutrition, which reflected the clinical situation of human chronic heart failure.

  20. Malfunction and failure analysis investigations of C26000 (Cu-30% Zn) brass cartridge cases

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, C.; Clark, S. . Metallic Materials Branch of the Armaments Technology Div.)

    1994-01-01

    The C26000 alloy, containing 70% Cu and 30% Zn, is predominantly used for cartridge case production and has an outstanding record of service. A multiple-step manufacturing process is employed to produce different microstructure in different sections of the cartridge case. The constant demands to increase performance have resulted in frequent revisions to the manufacturing process, and more stringent controls have been implemented in an attempt to produce a better product. Not surprisingly, however, failures and malfunctions are encountered in the tryout'' experiments. Studies indicate that failures in the head section can usually be traced to factors associated with gun design and propellant materials. Failures in the wall section are primarily stress-induced. Descriptions are given of the distinctive modes of failure in various sections of the cartridge case. The causes of failure and the remedies to prevent their recurrence are discussed.

  1. Root Cause Investigation of Lead-Free Solder Joint Interfacial Failures After Multiple Reflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hatch, Olen; Liu, Pilin; Goyal, Deepak

    2017-03-01

    Solder joint interconnects in three-dimensional (3D) packages with package stacking configurations typically must undergo multiple reflow cycles during the assembly process. In this work, interfacial open joint failures between the bulk solder and the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer were found in Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solder joints connecting a small package to a large package after multiple reflow reliability tests. Systematic progressive 3D x-ray computed tomography experiments were performed on both incoming and assembled parts to reveal the initiation and evolution of the open failures in the same solder joints before and after the reliability tests. Characterization studies, including focused ion beam cross-sections, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, were conducted to determine the correlation between IMC phase transformation and failure initiation in the solder joints. A comprehensive failure mechanism, along with solution paths for the solder joint interfacial failures after multiple reflow cycles, is discussed in detail.

  2. Root Cause Investigation of Lead-Free Solder Joint Interfacial Failures After Multiple Reflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hatch, Olen; Liu, Pilin; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-12-01

    Solder joint interconnects in three-dimensional (3D) packages with package stacking configurations typically must undergo multiple reflow cycles during the assembly process. In this work, interfacial open joint failures between the bulk solder and the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer were found in Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solder joints connecting a small package to a large package after multiple reflow reliability tests. Systematic progressive 3D x-ray computed tomography experiments were performed on both incoming and assembled parts to reveal the initiation and evolution of the open failures in the same solder joints before and after the reliability tests. Characterization studies, including focused ion beam cross-sections, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, were conducted to determine the correlation between IMC phase transformation and failure initiation in the solder joints. A comprehensive failure mechanism, along with solution paths for the solder joint interfacial failures after multiple reflow cycles, is discussed in detail.

  3. An Investigation of Emotion Recognition and Theory of Mind in People with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Habota, Tina; McLennan, Skye N; Cameron, Jan; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Rendell, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are common in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), but no study has investigated whether these deficits extend to social cognition. The present study provided the first empirical assessment of emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM) in patients with CHF. In addition, it assessed whether each of these social cognitive constructs was associated with more general cognitive impairment. A group comparison design was used, with 31 CHF patients compared to 38 demographically matched controls. The Ekman Faces test was used to assess emotion recognition, and the Mind in the Eyes test to measure ToM. Measures assessing global cognition, executive functions, and verbal memory were also administered. There were no differences between groups on emotion recognition or ToM. The CHF group's performance was poorer on some executive measures, but memory was relatively preserved. In the CHF group, both emotion recognition performance and ToM ability correlated moderately with global cognition (r = .38, p = .034; r = .49, p = .005, respectively), but not with executive function or verbal memory. CHF patients with lower cognitive ability were more likely to have difficulty recognizing emotions and inferring the mental states of others. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. An Investigation of Emotion Recognition and Theory of Mind in People with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Habota, Tina; McLennan, Skye N.; Cameron, Jan; Ski, Chantal F.; Thompson, David R.; Rendell, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive deficits are common in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), but no study has investigated whether these deficits extend to social cognition. The present study provided the first empirical assessment of emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM) in patients with CHF. In addition, it assessed whether each of these social cognitive constructs was associated with more general cognitive impairment. Methods A group comparison design was used, with 31 CHF patients compared to 38 demographically matched controls. The Ekman Faces test was used to assess emotion recognition, and the Mind in the Eyes test to measure ToM. Measures assessing global cognition, executive functions, and verbal memory were also administered. Results There were no differences between groups on emotion recognition or ToM. The CHF group’s performance was poorer on some executive measures, but memory was relatively preserved. In the CHF group, both emotion recognition performance and ToM ability correlated moderately with global cognition (r = .38, p = .034; r = .49, p = .005, respectively), but not with executive function or verbal memory. Conclusion CHF patients with lower cognitive ability were more likely to have difficulty recognizing emotions and inferring the mental states of others. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26529409

  5. Numerical investigations of failure in EB-PVD thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael L.

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are used in high temperature applications in turbine engines. TBCs are applied on superalloy substrates and are multilayered coatings comprised of a metallic bond coat, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) and a ceramic top coat. They provide thermal protection for the superalloy substrate and are considered to hold the greatest potential for increased operating temperatures. Failure of the TBC system most commonly occurs as a result of large scale buckling and spallation. The buckling is a consequence of many small-scale delaminations that arise in the top coat above local imperfections in the TGO, and durability of the TBC system is governed by a sequence of crack nucleation, propagation and coalescence. The numerical investigations that are employed in this dissertation are used to determine the stress development near the imperfections and are based on microstructural observations and measured material properties of TBC test buttons supplied by GE Aircraft Engines. The test buttons were subject to thermal cycling at GE and cycled to different percentages of TBC life. Numerical simulations of two different types of TBC tests are used to show that the top coat out-of-plane stress increases with a decrease of the substrate radius of curvature and a decrease in the heating rate. An inherent scaling parameter in the TBC system is identified and used to demonstrate that the stress developed in the top coat is governed by the evolution of an imperfection in the TGO. The effect of a martensitic phase transformation in the bond coat, related to a change in bond coat chemistry, is shown to significantly increase the top coat out-of-plane tensile stress. Finally, a subsurface crack is simulated in the top coat and used to determine the influence of the bond coat on failure of the TBC system. While the bond coat inelastic properties are the most important factors in determining the extent of the crack opening displacement, the bond coat

  6. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Failure Mechanisms in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-29

    The Drucker - Prager criterion and the low tensile strength criterion are used to simulate the failure mechanism. Key words: Triaxial test, random...0.4. The Drucker - Prager criterion and the low tensile strength criterion are used to simulate the failure mechanism. 2 Experimental Technique...element analysis code, which was developed for static analysis of nonlinear structural systems. The Drucker - Prager criterion and the low tensile

  8. An observational study investigating failure of primary endocrine therapy for operable breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert; Rowell, Rachel; Crichton, Siobhan; Cain, Henry

    2017-09-06

    Elderly patients are more likely to have oestrogen receptor positive cancers that can be treated without surgery with primary endocrine therapy (PET). Few studies have sought to identify predictors of failure of PET and so the aim of this study was to evaluate treatment failures in elderly breast cancer patients treated with PET and to determine predictors of failure. A retrospective observational study was performed on consecutive patients with ER-positive early stage breast cancer treated with PET between 2005 and 2015 in the three breast units in the North East of England. The primary outcome measure was treatment failure and secondary outcome measure was disease progression. 488 patients were included with mean follow-up 31 months (SD 23). Overall, 206 patients were still alive with their disease controlled at the end of follow-up, 219 had died with their disease controlled and 63 (12%) experienced treatment failure. Younger age [SHR 0.96 (95% CI 0.94-0.99) p 0.013], larger tumours [SHR 1.03 (1.01-1.06) p 0.015], grade 3 cancers [SHR 3.58 (1.93-6.63) p < 0.001] and axillary lymph node metastases [SHR 1.93 (1.06-3.52) p 0.030] were all independent predictors of treatment failure. Disease progression was reported in 86 (17.6%) of patients. This is the largest retrospective series evaluating PET treatment failure. Clear predictors of failure have been identified, which can be used to facilitate treatment decision making. These results support previous analyses, further validating our results.

  9. Time-lapsed investigation of three-dimensional failure and damage accumulation in trabecular bone using synchrotron light.

    PubMed

    Thurner, P J; Wyss, P; Voide, R; Stauber, M; Stampanoni, M; Sennhauser, U; Müller, R

    2006-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SRmicroCT) is a very useful technique when it comes to three-dimensional (3D) imaging of complex internal and external geometries. Being a fully non-destructive technique, SRmicroCT can be combined with other experiments in situ for functional imaging. We are especially interested in the combination of SRmicroCT with mechanical testing in order to gain new insights in the failure mechanism of trabecular bone. This interest is motivated by the immense costs in health care due to patients suffering from osteoporosis, a systemic skeletal disease resulting in decreased bone stability and increased fracture risk. To better investigate the different failure mechanisms on the microlevel, we have developed a novel in situ mechanical compression device, capable of exerting both static and dynamic displacements on experimental samples. The device was calibrated for mechanical testing using solid aluminum and bovine trabecular bone samples. To study different failure mechanisms in trabecular bone, we compared a fatigued and a non-fatigued bovine bone sample with respect to failure initiation and propagation. The fatigued sample failed in a burst-like fashion in contrast to the non-fatigued sample, which exhibited a distinct localized failure band. Moreover, microscopic cracks - microcracks and microfractures - were uncovered in a 3D fashion illustrating the failure process in great detail. The majority of these cracks were connected to a bone surface. The data also showed that the classification of microcracks and -fractures from 2D section can sometimes be ambiguous, which is also true for the distinction of diffuse and distinct microdamage. Detailed investigation of the failure mechanism in these samples illustrated that trabecular bone often fails in delamination, providing a mechanism for energy dissipation while conserving trabecular bone architecture. In the future, this will allow an even better understanding of bone

  10. Comments on "How Child Protective Services Investigators Decide to Substantiate Mothers for Failure-to-Protect in Sexual Abuse Cases"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadoin, Amy L.; Carnes, Connie N.

    2006-01-01

    This commentary discusses the decisions of child protective service (CPS) investigators to substantiate mothers for failure-to-protect (FTP) in child sexual abuse cases. Four areas are identified in which the scientific literature remains inadequate to fully inform child maltreatment researchers, CPS practitioners and child welfare policymakers on…

  11. Investigation of precipitate refinement in Mg alloys by an analytical composite failure model

    SciTech Connect

    Tabei, Ali; Li, Dongsheng; Lavender, Curt A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    An analytical model is developed to simulate precipitate refinement in second phase strengthened magnesium alloys. The model is developed based on determination of the stress fields inside elliptical precipitates embedded in a rate dependent inelastic matrix. The stress fields are utilized to determine the failure mode that governs the refinement behavior. Using an AZ31 Mg alloy as an example, the effects the applied load, aspect ratio and orientation of the particle is studied on the macroscopic failure of a single α-Mg17Al12 precipitate. Additionally, a temperature dependent version of the corresponding constitutive law is used to incorporate the effects of temperature. In plane strain compression, an extensional failure mode always fragments the precipitates. The critical strain rate at which the precipitates start to fail strongly depends on the orientation of the precipitate with respect to loading direction. The results show that the higher the aspect ratio is, the easier the precipitate fractures. Precipitate shape is another factor influencing the failure response. In contrast to elliptical precipitates with high aspect ratio, spherical precipitates are strongly resistant to sectioning. In pure shear loading, in addition to the extensional mode of precipitate failure, a shearing mode may get activated depending on orientation and aspect ratio of the precipitate. The effect of temperature in relation to strain rate was also verified for plane strain compression and pure shear loading cases.

  12. Investigation of extrusion failures of PTFE-based gaskets in chemical plant service

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.R.; Keywood, S.S.

    1996-12-01

    PTFE-based gaskets in chemical plant service typically fail in an extrusion mode, sometimes referred to as blowout. Test work previously published by Monsanto indicated that correctly installed PTFE-based gaskets have pressure performance far exceeding system pressure ratings. These results have since been confirmed by extensive testing at the Montreal based Ecole Polytechnique Tightness Testing and Research Laboratory (TTRL), funded by a consortium of gasket users and manufacturers. With the knowledge that properly installed gaskets can withstand system pressures in excess of 1,000 psig [6,894 kPa], failures at two chemical plants were re-examined. This analysis indicates that extrusion type failures can be caused by excessive internal pressures, associated with sections of pipe having an external source of heat coincident with a blocked flow condition. This results in high system pressures which explain the extrusion type failures observed. The paper discusses details of individual failures and examines methods to prevent them. Other causes for extrusion failures are reviewed, with a recommendation that stronger gasket materials not be utilized to correct problems until it is verified that excessive pressure build-up is not the problem. Also summarized are the requirements for proper installation to achieve the potential blowout resistance found in these gaskets.

  13. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    distribution is unlimited. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation The views...Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation Report Title In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the...utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor- grade martensitic steel

  14. Elephant butte powerplant investigation of permanent magnet generator corrosion and bearing failures. Project notes 8450-97-07. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.; Atwater, P.

    1997-04-01

    This investigation and report were initiated in response to a request to determine causes for excessive corrosion and premature bearing failures on the Woodward Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) on the three main generating units at Elephant Butte. All three main generating units were rewound using epoxy-type insulating materials between 1989 and 1991. Plant personnel reported that corrosion and failure rates seemed to accelerate after the new stator windings were installed. This report documents field testing conducted the week of March 10, 1997, to determine if stray electrical currents/voltages were causing the problems. Electrical field test results indicate that accelerated PMG bearing failure and corrosion were not caused by stray voltages or current. Tests were conducted on the main shaft in the turbine pit and on the PMG shaft and housing located atop the exciter shaft.

  15. Experimental and computed results investigating time-dependent failure in a borosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocron, Sidney; Barnette, Darrel; Holmquist, Timothy; Anderson, Charles E.; Bigger, Rory; Moore, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Symmetric plate-impact tests of borosilicate glass were performed from low (116 m/s) to higher (351 m/s) velocities. The tests were recorded with an ultra-high-speed camera to see the shock and failure propagation. The velocity of the back of the target was also recorded with a PDV (Photon Doppler Velocimeter). The images show failure nucleation sites that trail the shock wave. Interestingly, even though the failure wave is clearly seen, the PDV never detected the expected recompression wave. The reason might be that at these low impact velocities the recompression wave is too small to be seen and is lost in the noise. This work also presents a new way to interpret the signals from the PDV. By letting part of the signal travel through the target and reflect on the impact side, it is possible to see the PDV decrease in intensity with time, probably due to the damage growth behind the shock wave.

  16. Investigations of the Failure in Boilers Economizer Tubes Used in Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moakhar, Roozbeh Siavash; Mehdipour, Mehrad; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Mohebali, Milad; Koohbor, Behrad

    2013-09-01

    In this study, failure of a high pressure economizer tube of a boiler used in gas-Mazut combined cycle power plants was studied. Failure analysis of the tube was accomplished by taking into account visual inspection, thickness measurement, and hardness testing as well as microstructural observations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy images indicate that there is no phase transformation during service, and ferrite-pearlite remained. The results of XRD also revealed Iron sulfate (FeSO4) and Iron hydroxide sulfate (FeOH(SO4)) phases formed on the steel surface. A considerable amount of Sulfur was also detected on the outer surface of the tube by EDS analysis. Dew-point corrosion was found to be the principal reason for the failure of the examined tube while it has been left out-of-service.

  17. Clinical investigation: Regional nodal failure patterns in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Woodward, Wendy A.; Katz, Angela; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Perkins, George H.; Jhingran, Anuja; Theriault, Richard; Singletary, Eva; Sahin, Aysegul; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe regional nodal failure patterns in patients who had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection to define subgroups of patients who might benefit from supplemental regional nodal radiation to the axilla or supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 1031 patients treated with mastectomy (including a level I-II axillary dissection) and doxorubicin-based systemic therapy without radiation on five clinical trials at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Patient records, including pathology reports, were retrospectively reviewed. All regional recurrences (with or without distant metastasis) were recorded. Median follow-up was 116 months (range, 6-262 months). Results: Twenty-one patients recurred within the low-mid axilla (10-year actuarial rate 3%). Of these, 16 were isolated regional failures (no chest wall failure). The risk of failure in the low-mid axilla was not significantly higher for patients with increasing numbers of involved nodes, increasing percentage of involved nodes, larger nodal size or gross extranodal extension. Only 3 of 100 patients with <10 nodes examined recurred in the low-mid axilla. Seventy-seven patients had a recurrence in the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex (10-year actuarial rate 8%). Forty-nine were isolated regional recurrences. Significant predictors of failures in this region included {>=}4 involved axillary lymph nodes, >20% involved axillary nodes, and the presence of gross extranodal extension (10-year actuarial rates 15%, 14%, and 19%, respectively, p < 0.0005). The extent of axillary dissection and the size of the largest involved node were not predictive of failure within the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Conclusions: These results suggest that failure in the level I-II axilla is an uncommon occurrence after modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Therefore, supplemental radiotherapy to the dissected axilla is not warranted for

  18. Investigation of a fatigue failure in a stainless steel femoral plate.

    PubMed

    Marcomini, J B; Baptista, C A R P; Pascon, J P; Teixeira, R L; Reis, F P

    2014-10-01

    Surgical implants are exposed to severe working conditions and therefore a wide range of failure mechanisms may occur, including fatigue, corrosion, wear, fretting and combinations of them. The mechanical failures of metallic implants may also be influenced by several other factors, including the design, material, manufacturing, installation, postoperative complications and misuse. An 83-year-old patient suffered an oblique femoral shaft fracture due to a fall at home. A stainless steel locking compression plate (LCP) employed in the fracture reduction failed after four months and was sent back to the producer. A second LCP of the same type was implanted and also failed after six months. A failure analysis of the second femoral LCP is performed in this paper. The results demonstrate that poor material quality was decisive to the failure. The chemical analysis revealed a high P content in the steel, which is not in accordance to the standards. A combination of factors lead to LCP fracture and these include: brittle crack initiation due to phosphorus, segregation at grain boundaries, crack propagation due to cyclic loading and final fast fracture favored by the loss of ductility due to cold work.

  19. Are Success and Failure Experiences Equally Motivational? An Investigation of Regulatory Focus and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Tse-Mei; Lam, Shui-fong

    2011-01-01

    The present study extended regulatory focus theory (Idson & Higgins, 2000) to an educational setting and attempted to identify individuals with high motivation after both success and failure feedback. College students in Hong Kong (N = 180) participated in an experiment with a 2 promotion focus (high vs. low) x 2 prevention focus (high vs.…

  20. Failure Investigation for QP Steel Sheets under uniaxial and Equal-Biaxial Tension Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Danqing; Li, Shuhui; He, Ji; Cui, Ronggao

    2016-08-01

    The Quenching and Partitioning (QP) steel sheet is new generation material to induce phase transformation for plasticity in forming vehicle parts. The phase transformation is strongly stress state dependent behavior in experiments, which should affect the failure timing and limit strain in forming processes. In this paper, Nakajima test with QP980 and DP1000 steel sheets under equal-biaxial loading condition is performed for failure behavior. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is adopted to obtain the volume fraction of retained austenite (fA). Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to record the surface strain field and its evolution during equal-biaxial tension deformation. The same level Dual Phase (DP) steel is also employed for the purpose of comparison. The results show that phase transformation in QP steel gives small impact on failure strain under equal biaxial tension condition which is contradicted with our understanding. It suggests that failure behavior under uniaxial tension of QP980 is strongly phase transformation dependent. But it shows almost independent under equal biaxial tension condition.

  1. Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigations of the Failure Mechanism of a Rock Disc with a Central or Eccentric Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.; Tang, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    The diametrical compression of a circular disc (Brazilian test) or cylinder with a small eccentric hole is a simple but important test to determine the tensile strength of rocks. This paper studies the failure mechanism of circular disc with an eccentric hole by a 3D numerical model (RFPA3D). A feature of the code RFPA3D is that it can numerically simulate the evolution of cracks in three-dimensional space, as well as the heterogeneity of the rock mass. First, numerically simulated Brazilian tests are compared with experimental results. Special attention is given to the effect of the thickness to radius ratio on the failure modes and the peak stress of specimens. The effects of the compressive strength to tensile strength ratio ( C/T), the loading arc angle (2 α), and the homogeneity index ( m) are also studied in the numerical simulations. Secondly, the failure process of a rock disc with a central hole is studied. The effects of the ratio of the internal hole radius ( r) to the radius of the rock disc ( R) on the failure mode and the peak stress are investigated. Thirdly, the influence of the vertical and horizontal eccentricity of an internal hole on the initiation and propagation of cracks inside a specimen are simulated. The effect of the radius of the eccentric hole and the homogeneity index ( m) are also investigated.

  2. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  3. The failure analysis of composite material flight helmets as an aid in aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Caine, Y G; Bain-Ungerson, O; Schochat, I; Marom, G

    1991-06-01

    Understanding why a flying helmet fails to maintain its integrity during an accident can contribute to an understanding of the mechanism of injury and even of the accident itself. We performed a post-accident evaluation of failure modes in glass and aramid fibre-reinforced composite helmets. Optical and microscopic (SEM) techniques were employed to identify specific fracture mechanisms. They were correlated with the failure mode. Stress and energy levels were estimated from the damage extent. Damage could be resolved into distinct impact, flexure and compression components. Delamination was identified as a specific mode, dependent upon the matrix material and bonding between the layers. From the energy dissipated in specific fracture mechanisms we calculated the minimum total energy imparted to the helmet-head combination and the major injury vector (MIV) direction and magnitude. The level of protection provided by the helmet can also be estimated.

  4. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF). This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I–III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index. A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were −52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = −0.318, P < 0.05) and distal (r = −0.391, P < 0.01) parts of the upper extremities and lower extremities (r = −0.288, P < 0.05), FVC (r = −0.471, P < 0.01), predicted FVC% (r = −0.299, P < 0.05), and FEV1 (r = −0.397, P < 0.01). MEP was positively associated with average Brunnstrom stage of the distal area of the upper extremities (r = 0.351, P < 0.05), FVC (r = 0.526, P < 0

  5. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF).This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I-III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index.A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were -52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = -0.318, P < 0.05) and distal (r = -0.391, P < 0.01) parts of the upper extremities and lower extremities (r = -0.288, P < 0.05), FVC (r = -0.471, P < 0.01), predicted FVC% (r = -0.299, P < 0.05), and FEV1 (r = -0.397, P < 0.01). MEP was positively associated with average Brunnstrom stage of the distal area of the upper extremities (r = 0.351, P < 0.05), FVC (r = 0.526, P < 0.01), FEV1 (r = 0

  6. Psychosocial Factors, Exercise Adherence, and Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients: Insights From Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training (HF-ACTION).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lauren B; Mentz, Robert J; Sun, Jie-Lena; Schulte, Phillip J; Fleg, Jerome L; Cooper, Lawton S; Piña, Ileana L; Leifer, Eric S; Kraus, William E; Whellan, David J; Keteyian, Steven J; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2015-11-01

    Psychosocial factors may influence adherence with exercise training for heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to describe the association between social support and barriers to participation with exercise adherence and clinical outcomes. Of patients enrolled in Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training (HF-ACTION), 2279 (97.8%) completed surveys to assess social support and barriers to exercise, resulting in the perceived social support score (PSSS) and barriers to exercise score (BTES). Higher PSSS indicated higher levels of social support, whereas higher BTES indicated more barriers to exercise. Exercise time at 3 and 12 months correlated with PSSS (r= 0.09 and r= 0.13, respectively) and BTES (r=-0.11 and r=-0.12, respectively), with higher exercise time associated with higher PSSS and lower BTES (All P<0.005). For cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization, there was a significant interaction between the randomization group and BTES (P=0.035), which corresponded to a borderline association between increasing BTES and cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization in the exercise group (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.99, 1.59), but no association in the usual care group (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.66, 1.06). Poor social support and high barriers to exercise were associated with lower exercise time. PSSS did not impact the effect of exercise training on outcomes. However, for cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization, exercise training had a greater impact on patients with lower BTES. Given that exercise training improves outcomes in HF patients, assessment of perceived barriers may facilitate individualized approaches to implement exercise training therapy in clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00047437. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Nutritional status and its effects on muscle wasting in patients with chronic heart failure: insights from Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Masakazu; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Ebner, Nicole; Emami, Amir; Konishi, Masaaki; Ishida, Junichi; Valentova, Miroslava; Sandek, Anja; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Inadequate nutritional status has been linked to poor outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). Skeletal muscle wasting affects about 20% of ambulatory patients with HF. The impact of nutritional intake and appetite on skeletal muscle wasting has not been investigated so far. We sought to investigate the impact of nutritional status on muscle wasting and mortality in ambulatory patients with HF. We studied 130 ambulatory patients with HF who were recruited as a part of the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF) program. Muscle wasting was defined according to criteria of sarcopenia, i.e., appendicular skeletal muscle mass two standard deviations below the mean of a healthy reference group aged 18-40 years. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini-Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Functional capacity was assessed as peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) by cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 6‑minute walk testing, and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). At baseline, 19 patients (15%) presented with muscle wasting. Patients with muscle wasting had significantly lower values of peak VO2, 6‑minute walk distance, SPPB, and MNA-SF score than patients without (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, MNA-SF remained an independent predictor of muscle wasting after adjustment for age and New York Heart Association class (odds ratio [OR] 0.66; confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.88; p < 0.01). A total of 16 (12%) patients died during a mean follow-up of 21 months. In Cox regression analysis, MNA-SF (OR 0.80, CI 0.64-0.99, p = 0.04), left ventricular ejection fraction (OR 0.93, CI 0.86-0.99, p = 0.05), and peak VO2 (OR 0.78, CI 0.65-0.94, p = 0.008) were predictors of death. MNA-SF is an independent predictor of muscle wasting and mortality in ambulatory patients with HF. Nutritional screening should be included as a fundamental part of the overall assessment of these patients.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation on the Bearing and Failure Mechanism of Multiple Pillars Under Overburden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Chen, Lu; Zhao, Yuan; Zhao, Tongbin; Cai, Xin; Du, Xueming

    2017-04-01

    To reveal the mechanical response of a multi-pillar supporting system under external loads, compressive tests were carried out on single-pillar and double-pillar specimens. The digital speckle correlation method and acoustic emission technique were applied to record and analyse information of the deformation and failure processes. Numerical simulations with the software programme PFC2D were also conducted. In the compressive process of the double-pillar system, if both individual pillars have the same mechanical properties, each pillar deforms similarly and reaches the critical stable state almost simultaneously by sharing equal loads. If the two individual pillars have different mechanical properties, the pillar with higher elastic modulus or lower strength would be damaged and lose its bearing capacity firstly. The load would then be transferred to the other pillar under a load redistribution process. When the pillar with higher strength is strong enough, the load carried by the pillar system would increase again. However, the maximum bearing load of the double-pillar system is smaller than the sum of peak load of individual pillars. The study also indicates that the strength, elastic modulus, and load state of pillars all influence the supporting capacity of the pillar system. In underground space engineering, the appropriate choice of pillar dimensions and layout may play a great role in preventing the occurrence of cascading pillar failure.

  9. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  10. What causes an icy fault to slip? Investigating strike-slip failure conditions on Ganymede at Dardanus and Tiamat Sulcus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Burkhard, L. M.; Collins, G. C.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede exhibits two geologically distinct terrains known as dark and light (grooved) terrain. The mechanism for a transition from dark to light terrain remains unclear; however, inferences of strike-slip faulting and distributed shear zones suggest that strike-slip tectonism may be important to the structural development of Ganymede's surface and in this transition. Here we investigate the role of tidal stresses on Ganymede in the formation and evolution of strike-slip structures in both dark and grooved terrains. Using numerical code SatStress, we calculate both diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) tidal stresses at Ganymede's surface. Specifically, we investigate the role of fault friction and orbital eccentricity in the development of ~45 km of right-lateral offset at Dardanus Sulcus and a possible case of <10 km of right-lateral offset at Tiamat Sulcus. We compute Coulomb failure conditions for these target fractures and consider tidal stress scenarios for both present eccentricity (0.0013) and possible past high (~0.05) eccentricity of Ganymede. We find that while diurnal stresses are not large enough to support strike-slip failure at present or past eccentricities, models that include both diurnal and NSR stress readily generate shear and normal stress magnitudes that could give rise to shear failure. Results for a past high eccentricity assuming a low coefficient of friction (μf = 0.2) suggest shear failure is possible down to depths of 1-2 km along both Dardanus and Tiamat. For a high coefficient of friction (μf = 0.6), failure is limited to about 1 km depth at Dardanus and Tiamat, although confined to small episodic slip windows for the latter. Moreover, our models predict a right-lateral sense of slip, in agreement with inferred offset observed at both regions. Based on these results, we infer that past shear failure on Ganymede is possible when NSR is a driving stress mechanism. We complement this study with a detailed morphological mapping of

  11. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the reliability of terrestrial solar cells was performed to identify failure/degradation modes affecting solar cells and to relate these to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Particular concerns addressed were the reliability attributes of individual single crystalline, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin film silicon cells. Results of subjecting different types of crystalline cells to the Clemson accelerated test schedule are given. Preliminary step stress results on one type of thin film amorphous silicon (a:Si) cell indicated that extraneous degradation modes were introduced above 140 C. Also described is development of measurement procedures which are applicable to the reliability testing of a:Si solar cells as well as an approach to achieving the necessary repeatability of fabricating a simulated a:Si reference cell from crystalline silicon photodiodes.

  12. Investigating the role of X chromosome breakpoints in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the genetic factor in the aetiology of premature ovarian failure (POF) is emphasized by the high percentage of familial cases and X chromosome abnormalities account for 10% of chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we report the detailed analysis of 4 chromosomal abnormalities involving the X chromosome and associated with POF that were detected during a screening of 269 affected women. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics were valuable tools for locating the breakpoint regions and thus the following karyotypes were defined: 46,X,der(X)t(X;19)(p21.1;q13.42)mat, 46,X,t(X;2)(q21.33;q14.3)dn, 46,X,der(X)t(X;Y)(q26.2;q11.223)mat and 46,X,t(X;13)(q13.3;q31)dn. A bioinformatic analysis of the breakpoint regions identified putative candidate genes for ovarian failure near the breakpoint regions on the X chromosome or on autosomes that were involved in the translocation event. HS6ST1, HS6ST2 and MATER genes were identified and their functions and a literature review revealed an interesting connection to the POF phenotype. Moreover, the 19q13.32 locus is associated with the age of onset of the natural menopause. These results support the position effect of the breakpoint on flanking genes, and cytogenetic techniques, in combination with bioinformatic analysis, may help to improve what is known about this puzzling disorder and its diagnostic potential. PMID:22794123

  13. Investigation of the failure behaviour of vertebral trabecular architectures under uni-axial compression and wedge action loading conditions.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P; Harrison, N; McHugh, P E

    2010-07-01

    Vertebral wedge fractures are associated with combined compression and flexure loading and are the most common fracture type for human vertebrae. In this study, rapid prototype (RP) biomodels of human vertebral trabecular bone were mechanically tested under uni-axial compression loading and also under wedge action loading (combination of compression and flexure loading) to investigate the mode of failure and the ultimate loads that could be sustained under these different loading conditions. Two types of trabecular bone models were manufactured and tested: baseline models which were directly derived from microCT scans of human thoracic vertebrae, and osteoporotic models which were generated from the baseline models using a custom-developed bone loss algorithm. The ultimate load for each model under compression and wedge action loading was determined and a video was recorded of each test so that failure mechanisms could be evaluated. The results of the RP model mechanical tests showed that the ultimate loads that could be supported by vertebral trabecular architectures under wedge action loading were less than those that could be supported under uni-axial compression loading by up to 26%. Also, the percentage reduction in strength from the baseline value due to osteoporotic bone loss was slightly less for the wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading. Analysis of the videos for each test revealed that failure occurred in localised regions of the trabecular structure due to bending and buckling of thin vertical struts. These results suggest that vertebral trabecular bone is more susceptible to failure from wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading, although this effect is not exacerbated by osteoporotic bone loss.

  14. Centrifuge model tests of rainfall-induced slope failures for the investigation of the initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matziaris, Vasileios; Marshall, Alec; Yu, Hai-Sui

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are very common natural disasters which cause damage to properties and infrastructure and may result in the loss of human lives. These phenomena often take place in unsaturated soil slopes and are triggered by the saturation of the soil profile, due to rain infiltration, which leads to a loss of shear strength. The aim of this study is to determine rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides under different initial conditions. Model tests of rainfall-induced landslides are conducted in the Nottingham Centre for Geomechanics 50g-T geotechnical centrifuge. Initially unsaturated plane-strain slope models made with fine silica sand are prepared at varying densities at 1g and accommodated within a climatic chamber which provides controlled environmental conditions. During the centrifuge flight at 60g, rainfall events of varying intensity and duration are applied to the slope models causing the initiation of slope failure. The impact of soil state properties and rainfall characteristics on the landslide initiation process are discussed. The variation of pore water pressures within the slope before, during and after simulated rainfall events is recorded using miniature pore pressure transducers buried in the soil model. Slope deformation is determined by using a high-speed camera and digital image analysis techniques.

  15. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1986-09-01

    This is the final report of a reliability research program to study the response of amorphous silicon colar cells to accelerated temperature testing. The goal of the research was to utilize accelerated testing to identify failure/degradation modes and to relate them to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Four types of single junction commercial modules were subjected to 140 C testing, both in the dark and under illuminated conditions. The before and after electrical characteristics of individual cells were measured and compared and correlated with physical evidence. A fifth module type could not be tested because of poor adherence of the films to the glass superstrate. A short term effect of stressing was noted which dramatically improved cells with low Voc on one type of construction. All cells eventually showed long term irreversible degradation, but the time to 50% Pm reduction varied by as much as two orders of magnitude depending on construction. No basic difference could be detected between degradation under illuminated or non-illuminated conditions, when cells were either open or short circuited. Comparison with one type of tendem cell and with published results of Japanese cell testing indicated the marked superiority of the tandem cell to all other types. Cells were examined physically by optical, IR, and scanning electron microscopy and by Auger spectroscopy, spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The long term degradation was felt to be due to localized penetration of aluminum through the amorphous film.

  16. Retrogressive Failures in Sand Deposits of the Mississippi River. Report 1. Field Investigations, Laboratory Studies and Analysis of the Hypothesized Failure Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    mechanism and placement of the next threaded rod. Cone tip resistance and sleeve friction were plotted on a strip chart recorder during pushing. The cone...pressure in the riser was isolated from the regulator by closure of a valve between the two. The strip chart recorder plotting the transducer readings...failure than against strip or two-dimensional failure (Prof. Donald Taylor took exception to this statement in a later meeting of consultants). The

  17. Investigation into the failure of tank track pads: technical report for FY-79 and FY-80

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Zaslawsky, M.; Kulkarni, S.V.; Cornell, R.H.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1980-10-29

    A two-year study into the failure of tank track pads is described. Emphasis here is primarily on pads associated with the T-142 track. Temperature was recognized as an important parameter, and a thermal model has been developed which employs a finite element thermal analysis code at LLNL. The model involves a plane section of T-142 track and utilizes convective boundary conditions. The model does an excellent job of predicting temperature data obtained in the field on the T-142 track. The maximum predicted temperature at the center of the pad after 6000 s (1.67 hr) or continuous operation is 132/sup 0/C (270/sup 0/F). The structural response of the pad to the loading provided by the tank has also been analyzed using a mechanical model which includes a section of T-142 track, a roadwheel, and supporting terrain. The output of the model has been presented in the form of stress contour plots showing the normal stress and effective stress generated in the pad. Field data relevant to the problem have been collected at the Yuma Proving Grounds. Surface and internal pad temperatures have been measured on an M-103 tank as a function of running time and pad manufacturer. Experimental work has also been done to assess crack growth, fatigue strength, and residual tear strength after fatigue. In addition, material properties required for the structural and thermal models were evaluated. The changes in physical properties and chemical characteristics brought about by running pads on a tank at the Yuma Proving Grounds were also examined. The thermal diffusivity was observed to decrease by about 20% due to field testing, while the tear strength decreased between 20% and 30% depending on the terrain.

  18. Economic burden of heart failure: investigating outpatient and inpatient costs in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogah, Okechukwu S; Stewart, Simon; Onwujekwe, Obinna E; Falase, Ayodele O; Adebayo, Saheed O; Olunuga, Taiwo; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a deadly, disabling and often costly syndrome world-wide. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data describing its economic impact in sub Saharan Africa; a region in which the number of relatively younger cases will inevitably rise. Heath economic data were extracted from a prospective HF registry in a tertiary hospital situated in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria. Outpatient and inpatient costs were computed from a representative cohort of 239 HF cases including personnel, diagnostic and treatment resources used for their management over a 12-month period. Indirect costs were also calculated. The annual cost per person was then calculated. Mean age of the cohort was 58.0 ± 15.1 years and 53.1% were men. The total computed cost of care of HF in Abeokuta was 76, 288,845 Nigerian Naira (US$508, 595) translating to 319,200 Naira (US$2,128 US Dollars) per patient per year. The total cost of in-patient care (46% of total health care expenditure) was estimated as 34,996,477 Naira (about 301,230 US dollars). This comprised of 17,899,977 Naira- 50.9% ($US114,600) and 17,806,500 naira -49.1%($US118,710) for direct and in-direct costs respectively. Out-patient cost was estimated as 41,292,368 Naira ($US 275,282). The relatively high cost of outpatient care was largely due to cost of transportation for monthly follow up visits. Payments were mostly made through out-of-pocket spending. The economic burden of HF in Nigeria is particularly high considering, the relatively young age of affected cases, a minimum wage of 18,000 Naira ($US120) per month and considerable component of out-of-pocket spending for those affected. Health reforms designed to mitigate the individual to societal burden imposed by the syndrome are required.

  19. Economic Burden of Heart Failure: Investigating Outpatient and Inpatient Costs in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Stewart, Simon; Onwujekwe, Obinna E.; Falase, Ayodele O.; Adebayo, Saheed O.; Olunuga, Taiwo; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a deadly, disabling and often costly syndrome world-wide. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data describing its economic impact in sub Saharan Africa; a region in which the number of relatively younger cases will inevitably rise. Methods: Heath economic data were extracted from a prospective HF registry in a tertiary hospital situated in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria. Outpatient and inpatient costs were computed from a representative cohort of 239 HF cases including personnel, diagnostic and treatment resources used for their management over a 12-month period. Indirect costs were also calculated. The annual cost per person was then calculated. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 58.0±15.1 years and 53.1% were men. The total computed cost of care of HF in Abeokuta was 76, 288,845 Nigerian Naira (US$508, 595) translating to 319,200 Naira (US$2,128 US Dollars) per patient per year. The total cost of in-patient care (46% of total health care expenditure) was estimated as 34,996,477 Naira (about 301,230 US dollars). This comprised of 17,899,977 Naira- 50.9% ($US114,600) and 17,806,500 naira −49.1%($US118,710) for direct and in-direct costs respectively. Out-patient cost was estimated as 41,292,368 Naira ($US 275,282). The relatively high cost of outpatient care was largely due to cost of transportation for monthly follow up visits. Payments were mostly made through out-of-pocket spending. Conclusion: The economic burden of HF in Nigeria is particularly high considering, the relatively young age of affected cases, a minimum wage of 18,000 Naira ($US120) per month and considerable component of out-of-pocket spending for those affected. Health reforms designed to mitigate the individual to societal burden imposed by the syndrome are required. PMID:25415310

  20. Quality Assurance in Software Development: An Exploratory Investigation in Software Project Failures and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichu, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Software quality is perhaps one of the most sought-after attributes in product development, however; this goal is unattained. Problem factors in software development and how these have affected the maintainability of the delivered software systems requires a thorough investigation. It was, therefore, very important to understand software…

  1. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 1: Summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, E. E.; Bloomquist, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the KSC program for investigating the reliability aspects of the ground support activities is presented. An analysis of unsatisfactory condition reports (RC), and the generation of reliability assessment of components based on the URC are discussed along with the design considerations for attaining reliable real time hardware/software configurations.

  2. Quality Assurance in Software Development: An Exploratory Investigation in Software Project Failures and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichu, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Software quality is perhaps one of the most sought-after attributes in product development, however; this goal is unattained. Problem factors in software development and how these have affected the maintainability of the delivered software systems requires a thorough investigation. It was, therefore, very important to understand software…

  3. A suggested schedule for the rapid investigation of acute haemostatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, G. I. C.

    1961-01-01

    A small group of tests is proposed for the rapid investigation of acute bleeding states. These techniques are within the compass of many clinical laboratories, and the whole scheme may be run through in one to one-and-a-half hours. PMID:13717713

  4. Failure Investigation of an Intra-Manifold Explosion in a Horizontally-Mounted 870 lbf Reaction Control Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durning, Joseph G., III; Westover, Shayne C.; Cone, Darren M.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, an 870 lbf Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System Primary Thruster experienced an unintended shutdown during a test being performed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Subsequent removal and inspection of the thruster revealed permanent deformation and misalignment of the thruster valve mounting plate. Destructive evaluation determined that after three nominal firing sequences, the thruster had experienced an energetic event within the fuel (monomethylhydrazine) manifold at the start of the fourth firing sequence. The current understanding of the phenomenon of intra-manifold explosions in hypergolic bipropellant thrusters is documented in literature where it is colloquially referred to as a ZOT. The typical ZOT scenario involves operation of a thruster in a gravitational field with environmental pressures above the triple point pressure of the propellants. Post-firing, when the thruster valves are commanded closed, there remains a residual quantity of propellant in both the fuel and oxidizer (nitrogen tetroxide) injector manifolds known as the "dribble volume". In an ambient ground test configuration, these propellant volumes will drain from the injector manifolds but are impeded by the local atmospheric pressure. The evacuation of propellants from the thruster injector manifolds relies on the fluids vapor pressure to expel the liquid. The higher vapor pressure oxidizer will evacuate from the manifold before the lower vapor pressure fuel. The localized cooling resulting from the oxidizer boiling during manifold draining can result in fuel vapor migration and condensation in the oxidizer passage. The liquid fuel will then react with the oxidizer that enters the manifold during the next firing and may produce a localized high pressure reaction or explosion within the confines of the oxidizer injector manifold. The typical ZOT scenario was considered during this failure investigation, but was ultimately ruled out as a cause of the explosion

  5. Failure Investigation & Design Optimization of a Photo-Multiplier Tube Assembly Under Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahya, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of GLAST ACD Photo-Multiplier Tube (PMT) assembly under thermal loading demonstrates that the glass tube experiences high stresses due to Coefficient of Thermal Expansion mismatch, as well as increased stress due to high stiffness and incompressibility of potting compound. Further investigation shows adverse loading effects due to the magnetic shield, a thin piece of steel wrapped around the PMT. This steel, Mu Metal, contained an overlap region that directly attributed to crack propagation in the outside surface of the tube. Sensitivities to different configurations were studied to reduce the stress and provide a more uniform loading throughout the PMT to ensure mission success. Studies indicate substituting a softer and more compressible potting compound and moving the Mu metal from the glass tube to the outside wall of the aluminum housing yields lower stress.

  6. Investigation into the influence of build parameters on failure of 3D printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Giacomo

    Additive manufacturing, including fused deposition modeling (FDM), is transforming the built world and engineering education. Deep understanding of parts created through FDM technology has lagged behind its adoption in home, work, and academic environments. Properties of parts created from bulk materials through traditional manufacturing are understood well enough to accurately predict their behavior through analytical models. Unfortunately, Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters create anisotropy on a scale that fundamentally affects the part properties. Understanding AM process parameters (implemented by program algorithms called slicers) is necessary to predict part behavior. Investigating algorithms controlling print parameters (slicers) revealed stark differences between the generation of part layers. In this work, tensile testing experiments, including a full factorial design, determined that three key factors, width, thickness, infill density, and their interactions, significantly affect the tensile properties of 3D printed test samples.

  7. Failure of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition for a lined duct: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Renou, Ygaäl; Aurégan, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with experimental investigation of the lined wall boundary condition in flow duct applications such as aircraft engine systems or automobile mufflers. A first experiment, based on a microphone array located in the liner test section, is carried out in order to extract the axial wavenumbers with the help of an "high-accurate" singular value decomposition Prony-like algorithm. The experimental axial wavenumbers are then used to provide the lined wall impedance for both downstream and upstream acoustic propagation by means of a straightforward impedance education method involving the classical Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The results show that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition fails to predict with accuracy the acoustic behavior in a lined duct with flow. An effective lined wall impedance, valid whatever the direction of acoustic propagation, can be suitably found from experimental axial wavenumbers and a modified version of the Ingard-Myers condition with the form inspired from a previous theoretical study [Aurégan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 59-64 (2001)]. In a second experiment, the scattering matrix of the liner test section is measured and is then compared to the predicted scattering matrix using the multimodal approach and the lined wall impedances previously deduced. A large discrepancy is observed between the measured and the predicted scattering coefficients that confirms the poor accuracy provided from the Ingard-Myers boundary condition widely used in lined duct applications.

  8. Investigation of pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis from implant clustering failure patients: a whole-exome sequencing pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value <0.05) out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID). The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05) from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at

  9. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Peri-Implantitis from Implant Clustering Failure Patients: A Whole-Exome Sequencing Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value <0.05) out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID). The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05) from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at

  10. Simulation and Mechanistic Investigation of the Arrhythmogenic Role of the Late Sodium Current in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Gomez, Juan F.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Ferrero, Jose M.; Belardinelli, Luiz; Saiz, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts sets the stage for malignant arrhythmias, in which the role of the late Na+ current (INaL) is relevant and is currently under investigation. In this study we examined the role of INaL in the electrophysiological phenotype of ventricular myocytes, and its proarrhythmic effects in the failing heart. A model for cellular heart failure was proposed using a modified version of Grandi et al. model for human ventricular action potential that incorporates the formulation of INaL. A sensitivity analysis of the model was performed and simulations of the pathological electrical activity of the cell were conducted. The proposed model for the human INaL and the electrophysiological remodeling of myocytes from failing hearts accurately reproduce experimental observations. The sensitivity analysis of the modulation of electrophysiological parameters of myocytes from failing hearts due to ion channels remodeling, revealed a role for INaL in the prolongation of action potential duration (APD), triangulation of the shape of the AP, and changes in Ca2+ transient. A mechanistic investigation of intracellular Na+ accumulation and APD shortening with increasing frequency of stimulation of failing myocytes revealed a role for the Na+/K+ pump, the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and INaL. The results of the simulations also showed that in failing myocytes, the enhancement of INaL increased the reverse rate-dependent APD prolongation and the probability of initiating early afterdepolarizations. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts and especially the enhancement of the INaL prolong APD and alter Ca2+ transient facilitating the development of early afterdepolarizations. An enhanced INaL appears to be an important contributor to the electrophysiological phenotype and to the dysregulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis of failing myocytes. PMID:22427860

  11. What causes an icy fault to slip? Investigating the depth and frictional conditions for tidally driven Coulomb failure along major strike-slip faults of Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Marissa E.; Smith-Konter, Bridget R.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2014-11-01

    The surfaces of Europa and Ganymede display strike-slip fractures, presumably arising from a combination of global and local stress sources. To better understand the role of tidal stress sources and implications for strike-slip faulting on these icy bodies, we investigate the relationship between shear and normal stresses at several major fault zones: Agenor Linea, Rhadamanthys Linea, Agave/Asterius Lineae, and Astypalaea Linea (on Europa), and Dardanus Sulcus (on Ganymede). Assuming tidal diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) stresses as plausible mechanisms for strike-slip tectonism, here we investigate the mechanics of Coulomb shear failure. We consider a range of friction coefficients (µf = 0.2 - 0.6) and fault depths (0 - 6 km) to evaluate how failure predictions vary between the satellites and as a function of depth, ice friction, geographic location, and fault geometry. Assuming present-day orbital eccentricities, our results indicate that the conditions for failure at depth are not met for any of the fault systems if subject to diurnal stresses only. Alternatively, models that include both diurnal and NSR stresses readily generate stress magnitudes that could permit shear failure. On Europa, shear failure is easily activated and failure extends to depths ranging from 3 - 6 km when a low coefficient of friction (µf = 0.2) is assumed. On Ganymede, failure is limited to even shallower depths (< 2 km). A high coefficient of friction (µf = 0.6) limits failure depths to < 3 km on Europa faults and discourages strike-slip faulting completely on Ganymede. Based on these results, we infer that the conditions for shear failure are potentially met along at least these five studied systems, and possibly others in the outer solar system, if NSR is adopted as a driving stress mechanism and the coefficient of friction is low.

  12. Investigation and treatment for iron deficiency in heart failure: the unmet need in Lower and Middle Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Makubi, Abel; Roberts, David J

    2017-06-01

    Frank iron deficiency has been associated with a wide range of cardiac and pulmonary abnormalities including non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Iron deficiency anaemia and isolated iron deficiency are well-defined adverse prognostic factors in non-ischaemic cardiac failure. Furthermore, iron-deficient patients in chronic heart failure with a serum ferritin of <100 μg/l or <300 μg/l with reduced transferrin saturation of <20%, who were given intravenous iron showed improved clinical outcomes. Iron deficiency with or without anaemia affects over a quarter of the world's population, but the impact of iron deficiency in heart failure and the effective management of iron deficiency in heart failure in Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) is not well described. Heart failure in African cohorts occurs at a younger age than in North America and Europe and is more likely to be due to hypertension. Recent studies suggest that iron deficiency anaemia, which is very common in heart failure patients in Africa, and iron deficiency are independently associated with a poor prognosis in heart failure. Preliminary data suggest that iron deficiency in patients with heart failure can be treated with oral iron, with significant beneficial effects on haematological and physiological variables. Cost may prohibit the use of intravenous iron on a large scale in LMICs and optimal regimes to treat iron deficiency in heart failure patients with oral iron therapy remain to be defined. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  14. Vibrational and thermal characterisation of a new chiral drug under investigation for the therapy of congestive heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Torreggiani, Armida; Fini, Giancarlo

    2002-12-01

    Racemic (5,6-bis 2-methyl propanoic acid-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphtalen-2-yl)-methylammonium chloride, CHF-1035, under clinical investigation for the treatment of congestive heart failure, was here characterised by Raman and IR spectroscopies coupled with thermal analysis (thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry). These techniques proved suitable for investigating the presence of different polymorphic forms, their relative stability and interconversion tendency in relation to industrial manufacturing processes undergone by the drug (i.e. grinding, compression, heating). Crystallisation experiments were carried out and two different CHF-1035 polymorphic forms were identified. Both grinding and heating revealed to cause a polymorphic transformation of the drug crystal form. It was hypothesised that a change in molecular packing occurs in the drug by effect of both treatments. The possible sources of polymorphism were identified in the -OCOCH(CH 3) groups and in the saturated ring. The non-ground sample showed two endothermic transitions; since they are reversible and not due to desolvation processes the system is probably enantiotropic.

  15. Sarcopenia and Endothelial Function in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: Results From the Studies Investigating Comorbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marcelo R; Saitoh, Masakazu; Ebner, Nicole; Valentova, Miroslava; Konishi, Masaaki; Ishida, Junichi; Emami, Amir; Springer, Jochen; Sandek, Anja; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting, also known as sarcopenia, has recently been identified as a serious comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to assess the impact of sarcopenia on endothelial dysfunction in patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Cross-sectional study. Ambulatory patients with HF were recruited at Charité Medical School, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany. We assessed peripheral blood flow (arm and leg) in 228 patients with HF and 32 controls who participated in the Studies Investigating Comorbidities Aggravating HF (SICA-HF). The appendicular skeletal muscle mass of the arms and the legs combined was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Sarcopenia was defined as the appendicular muscle mass two standard deviations below the mean of a healthy reference group of adults aged 18 to 40 years, as suggested for the diagnosis of muscle wasting in healthy aging. All patients underwent a 6-minute walk test and spiroergometry testing. Forearm and leg blood flow were measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Peak blood flow was assessed after a period of ischemia in the limbs to test endothelial function. Sarcopenia was identified in 37 patients (19.5%). Patients with sarcopenia presented with lower baseline forearm blood flow (2.30 ± 1.21 vs. 3.06 ± 1.49 vs. 4.00 ± 1.66 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .02) than those without sarcopenia or controls. The group of patients with sarcopenia showed similar baseline leg blood flow (2.06 ± 1.62 vs. 2.39 ± 1.39 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .11) to those without but lower values when compared to controls (2.06 ± 1.62 vs. 2.99 ± 1.28 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P = .03). In addition, patients with and without sarcopenia presented with lower peak flow in the forearm when compared to controls (18.37 ± 7.07 vs. 22.19 ± 8.64 vs. 33.63 ± 8.57 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1); P < .001). A similar result was

  16. In-Situ AFM Investigation of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation and Failure Mechanisms in Lithium -Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Kumar, Ravi; Tokranov, Anton; Huang, Teddy; Li, Chunzeng; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian

    The formation and evolution of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is critical for lifetime and performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), particularly for LIBs with high energy density materials such as silicon. Si has almost ten time theoretical specific capacity vs graphite, but its volume changes during cycling (up to 400%) put enormous strains on the SEI layer, resulting in continuous capacity loss. In this study we report in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation on the formation and failure mechanisms of SEI layer using patterned Si island structures. Due to the shear lag effect, patterned Si islands go through lateral expansion and Contraction, putting the SEI layer in tension and compression during lithiation and delithiation, respectively. Experimentally, we performed the studies in a glovebox with <1 ppm O2 and H2O, using PeakForce Tapping to image the extremely fragile SEI layer. We show for the first time the in operando cracking of SEI layer. To understand the mechanics of the SEI layer, the critical strain for cracking was derived from a progression of the AFM images. Our studies provide new insight into SEI formation, evolution and its mechanical response, and offer guidance to tailor passivation layers for optimal performance.

  17. Memokath Stent Failure in Recurrent Bulbar Urethral Strictures: Results From an Investigative Pilot Stage 2A Study.

    PubMed

    Barbagli, Guido; Rimondi, Claudio; Balò, Sofia; Butnaru, Denis; Sansalone, Salvatore; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Memokath stent in managing recurrent bulbar urethral strictures. This is an investigative pilot stage 2A study in patients with a recurrent bulbar urethral stricture who underwent a Memokath stent implant from January 2014 to January 2016 in a single high-volume center for urethral reconstruction. The Memokath stent (Pnn Medical A/S, Kvistgaard, Denmark) was manufactured from nitinol, a biocompatible alloy of nickel and titanium, which was endoscopically placed. It had a 24-Fr outside diameter and was preloaded on a disposable delivery device. When correctly positioned, the stent was anchored by a warm water (55°C) instillation, which expanded the proximal end of the stent from 24 to 42 Fr .The stent was provided in lengths of 3-7 cm in 1-cm increments. Sixteen patients were included in the study. The median follow-up was 16 months. In 7 patients (43.7%), the stent was removed within 1 year. The main adverse events were pain, encrustations, stones, and recurrent strictures. Four patients (25%) were considered a success and 12 (75%) were failures. Study limitations include the small sample. The Memokath stent was deemed to be not clinically helpful and had significant side effects, and therefore should not be considered a treatment option for men with bulbar urethral strictures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Baoguang; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yingjie; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s) and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s)) to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results.

  19. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Baoguang; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yingjie; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s) and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s)) to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results. PMID:28772383

  20. High-frequency data observations from space shuttle main engine low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T. F.; Farr, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Observations made by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers during their participation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) low pressure fuel turbopump discharge duct flex joint tripod failure investigation are summarized. New signal processing techniques used by the Component Assessment Branch and the Induced Environments Branch during the failure investigation are described in detail. Moreover, nonlinear correlations between frequently encountered anomalous frequencies found in SSME dynamic data are discussed. A recommendation is made to continue low pressure fuel (LPF) duct testing through laboratory flow simulations and MSFC-managed technology test bed SSME testing.

  1. Investigating internal architecture effect in plastic deformation and failure for TPMS-based scaffolds using simulation methods and experimental procedure.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Raeisi, S

    2014-10-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) has been a promising technique for producing tissue engineering scaffolds which mimic the behavior of host tissue as properly as possible. Biodegradability, agreeable feasibility of cell growth, and migration parallel to mechanical properties, such as strength and energy absorption, have to be considered in design procedure. In order to study the effect of internal architecture on the plastic deformation and failure pattern, the architecture of triply periodic minimal surfaces which have been observed in nature were used. P and D surfaces at 30% and 60% of volume fractions were modeled with 3∗3∗ 3 unit cells and imported to Objet EDEN 260 3-D printer. Models were printed by VeroBlue FullCure 840 photopolymer resin. Mechanical compression test was performed to investigate the compressive behavior of scaffolds. Deformation procedure and stress-strain curves were simulated by FEA and exhibited good agreement with the experimental observation. Current approaches for predicting dominant deformation mode under compression containing Maxwell's criteria and scaling laws were also investigated to achieve an understanding of the relationships between deformation pattern and mechanical properties of porous structures. It was observed that effect of stress concentration in TPMS-based scaffolds resultant by heterogeneous mass distribution, particularly at lower volume fractions, led to a different behavior from that of typical cellular materials. As a result, although more parameters are considered for determining dominant deformation in scaling laws, two mentioned approaches could not exclusively be used to compare the mechanical response of cellular materials at the same volume fraction.

  2. Dental implant treatment following trauma: An investigation into the failure to complete Accident Compensation Corporation funded care.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R; Murray, C; Leichter, J

    2016-03-01

    Among other restorative strategies, the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides benefits for dental implant treatment to replace teeth lost as a result of trauma. While ACC has funded over 15,000 dental implants since 2002, the outcomes of this treatment and patient perceptions of this treatment have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of the dental implant treatment outcomes and reasons for failure to complete restorative treatment in patients who had undergone trauma-related implant surgery funded by ACC between February 2006 and September 2009, but had not completed the prosthetic component of the treatment. A randomly selected sample of 399 patients, who had undergone dental implant surgery but not completed the crown restoration, was identified from the ACC database. These individuals were contacted by mail for expressions of interest and 181 clients were interviewed by telephone. Responses to open-ended questions were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and analysed using a general inductive technique. A common emergent theme was the high level of satisfaction expressed by participants with the implant process, however just under half of those responding felt they had been pushed into having implants and were given the impression that this was the only treatment ACC paid for. The cost of the prosthetic phase of the treatment and surgical complications were identified as the primary reasons why participants failed to complete the restorative phase of treatment, after completing the surgical phase. The results highlighted the need to better inform patients of their treatment options and to allow time for them to process this information before progressing with care. A patient decision tool may help to give greater ownership of the treatment options. Newly implemented protocols to assist dentists to better assess treatment needs may also assist in achieving improvements in perceived treatment outcomes for

  3. Acoustic Emission Investigation of Rolling/Sliding Contact Fatigue Failure of NiCr-Cr3C2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guolu, Li; Zhonglin, Xu; Tianshun, Dong; Haidou, Wang; Jinhai, Liu; Jiajie, Kang

    2016-10-01

    NiCr-Cr3C2 coating was fabricated using supersonic plasma spraying technology. Subsequently, rolling/sliding contact fatigue (R/SCF) testing was carried out, using acoustic emission (AE) technology to monitor the failure process. The results showed that R/SCF consists of three failure modes, namely abrasion, spalling, and delamination. Abrasion is the main failure mode, but delamination is the most severe. The AE monitoring results indicated that the R/SCF failure process is composed of normal contact, crack initiation, crack propagation, and material removal stages. The frequency of each stage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform, revealing a peak frequency for each stage mainly distributed from 200 to 250 kHz.

  4. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results are also included.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure – 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health

  6. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  7. Using Spatial Analysis to Investigate Geographic Variations in Heart Failure Hospitalizations among Medicare Beneficiaries in the Tennessee Catchment Area

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Modele O.; Holt, James B.; Croft, Janet B.; Nwaise, Isaac A.; Okafor, Henry E.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Giles, Wayne H.; Mensah, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although differences in heart failure hospitalization rates by race and sex are well documented, little is known about geographic variations in hospitalization rates for heart failure among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods Using exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, we examined hospitalization rates for heart failure as the first-listed discharge diagnosis among Medicare beneficiaries in a 10-state Tennessee catchment area, based on the resident states reported by Tennessee hospitals from 2000 to 2004. Results The age-adjusted heart failure hospitalization rate (per 1,000) among Medicare beneficiaries was 23.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3–23.4) for the Tennessee catchment area, 21.4 (95% CI, 21.4 -21.5) for the non-catchment US area and 21.9 (95% CI, 21.9–22.0) for the overall US. The age-adjusted HF hospitalization rates were also significantly higher in the catchment area than the non catchment US area and the overall US, among men, women, and whites, whereas rates among the blacks were higher outside the catchment area. Beneficiaries in the catchment area also had higher age-specific HF hospitalization rates. Among states in the catchment area, the highest mean county-level rates were in Mississippi (30.6±7.6) and Kentucky (29.2±11.5), and the lowest were in North Carolina (21.7±5.7), closely and Virginia (21.8±6.6). Conclusions Knowledge of geographic differences in rates of hospitalization for heart failure can be useful in identifying needs of health care providers, allocating resources, developing comprehensive heart failure outreach programs, and formulating policies designed to reduce these differences. PMID:21804374

  8. Detection of muscle wasting in patients with chronic heart failure using C-terminal agrin fragment: results from the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Lisa; Ebner, Nicole; Valentova, Miroslava; Bekfani, Tarek; Elsner, Sebastian; Dahinden, Pius; Hettwer, Stefan; Scherbakov, Nadja; Schefold, Jörg C; Sandek, Anja; Springer, Jochen; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting affects 20% of patients with chronic heart failure and has serious implications for their activities of daily living. Assessment of muscle wasting is technically challenging. C-terminal agrin-fragment (CAF), a breakdown product of the synaptically located protein agrin, has shown early promise as biomarker of muscle wasting. We sought to investigate the diagnostic properties of CAF in muscle wasting among patients with heart failure. We assessed serum CAF levels in 196 patients who participated in the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF). Muscle wasting was identified using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 38 patients (19.4%). Patients with muscle wasting demonstrated higher CAF values than those without (125.1 ± 59.5 pmol/L vs. 103.8 ± 42.9 pmol/L, P = 0.01). Using receiver operating characteristics (ROC), we calculated the optimal CAF value to identify patients with muscle wasting as >87.5 pmol/L, which had a sensitivity of 78.9% and a specificity of 43.7%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.63 (95% confidence interval 0.56-0.70). Using simple regression, we found that serum CAF was associated with handgrip (R = - 0.17, P = 0.03) and quadriceps strength (R = - 0.31, P < 0.0001), peak oxygen consumption (R = - 0.5, P < 0.0001), 6-min walk distance (R = - 0.32, P < 0.0001), and gait speed (R = - 0.2, P = 0.001), as well as with parameters of kidney and liver function, iron metabolism and storage. CAF shows good sensitivity for the detection of skeletal muscle wasting in patients with heart failure. Its assessment may be useful to identify patients who should undergo additional testing, such as detailed body composition analysis. As no other biomarker is currently available, further investigation is warranted. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Prospective memory failures as an unexplored threat to patient safety: results from a pilot study using patient simulators to investigate the missed execution of intentions.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, P; Reddersen, S; Wehner, T; Rall, M

    This study investigated failures of prospective memory (PM) as a relevant but neglected error type in medicine. A patient simulator was used to investigate PM failures. The influence of subjective importance (high, low) and type of intention (educational, internal, external) on the (missed) execution of intention was investigated in a 2 x 2 design. The effects on missed executions by importance (high < low) and type of intention (educational < external < internal) were hypothesized. Of 73 valid intentions in 40 prepared simulator scenarios 19 (26%) were missed overall. A total of 64% of unimportant and 80% of important intentions were executed 79% of educational 67% of external and 72% of internal intentions were executed. Neither difference was statistically significant using chi(2) tests. Interaction was significant for missed executions (p = 0.025; n = 19; df = 2; chi(2) = 7.41) and for executions (p = 0.002; n = 54; df = 2; chi(2) = 12.50). Despite low statistical support and some methodological limitations, it was possible to show that PM failures are relevant to patient safety and that patient simulators are a suitable but so far unused tool for their investigation.

  10. Investigation of iron deficiency in patients with congestive heart failure: A medical practice that requires greater attention.

    PubMed

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, Alm; Albines Fiestas, Zoila; Serrano Soto, Mara; Kislikova, María; Seras Mozas, Miguel; Unzueta, Mayte García; Arias Rodríguez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency in congestive heart failure (CHF), with or without concomitant anaemia, is associated with health-related quality of life, NYHA functional class, and exercise capacity. Prospective, randomised studies have demonstrated that correcting iron deficiency improves the quality of life and functional status of patients with CHF, including those who do not have anaemia. The aim of this study was to analyse how frequently these iron parameters are tested and thus determine the extent to which this quality improvement tool has been implemented in patients admitted with CHF. Retrospective observational study of patients from a university hospital diagnosed with CHF on admission between 01/01/2012 and 11/06/2013. Iron parameters were tested in 39% (324) of the 824 patients analysed. There was no significant difference in age between the patients whose iron was tested and those whose iron was not tested, but the difference in terms of gender was significant (P=.007). Glomerular filtration rate and haemoglobin, were significantly lower in the group of patients whose iron was tested (P<.001). The proportion of patients with anaemia, renal failure or both was significantly higher in the group of patients who had iron tests (P<.001). Of the 324 patients whose iron parameters were tested, 164 (51%) had iron deficiency. There were no differences between patients with and without iron deficiency in terms of age or gender. The iron parameters in both groups, ferritin and transferrin saturation index were significantly lower among the patients with iron deficiency (P<.001). The glomerular filtration rate values were significantly lower in patients with no iron deficiency (P<.001). Significant differences were also observed between those with and without iron deficiency in the proportion of patients with renal failure (79 vs. 66%, respectively, P=.013), but not in terms of haemoglobin concentration. Congestive heart failure is very frequently associated with anaemia, iron

  11. Failure analysis of sandwich-type ceramic-on-ceramic hip joints: A spectroscopic investigation into the role of the polyethylene shell component.

    PubMed

    Okita, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Puppulin, Leonardo; Sudo, Akihiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to systematic failure in modular acetabular components with a sandwich insertion (alumina/polyethylene/titanium) have been reconsidered in light of the newly collected Raman spectroscopic results. Raman assessments were conducted on the polyethylene shells, which belonged to a series of six failed sandwich implants with in vivo lifetimes ranging between 2 and 9yr. With only one exception, all implants commonly showed dislodgment of the polyethylene shell during radiographic analyses prior to revision surgery. The polyethylene shell slipped out of the backing titanium shell, while always remaining integer to the ceramic liner. Four implants fractured at the ceramic liners, but their fractures occurred according to distinctly different patterns, which could be rationalized and classified. The insertion of the polyethylene layer, originally conceived to reduce the rigidity of the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing and to prevent impingement between the ceramic liner rim and the femoral neck, played a role in implant failure with its initial (asymmetric) thickness reduction due to creep deformation (eventually followed by cup rotation and backside wear). The results of the present spectroscopic investigation suggest that a simplistic failure classification of the sandwich-type implant as a "ceramic fracture failure" could be misleading and might represent a confounding factor in judging about the reliability of modern ceramic implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  13. Investigations into the tensile failure of doubly-convex cylindrical tablets under diametral loading using finite element methodology.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Drake, Kevin R; Newton, J Michael

    2013-09-15

    In the literature various solutions exist for the calculation of the diametral compression tensile strength of doubly-convex tablets and each approach is based on experimental data obtained from single materials (gypsum, microcrystalline cellulose) only. The solutions are represented by complex equations and further differ for elastic and elasto-plastic behaviour of the compacts. The aim of this work was to develop a general equation that is applicable independently of deformation behaviour and which is based on simple tablet dimensions such as diameter and total tablet thickness only. With the help of 3D-FEM analysis the tensile failure stress of doubly-convex tables with central cylinder to total tablet thickness ratios W/D between 0.06 and 0.50 and face-curvature ratios D/R between 0.25 and 1.85 were evaluated. Both elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour were considered. The results of 80 individual simulations were combined and showed that the tensile failure stress σt of doubly-convex tablets can be calculated from σt=(2P/πDW)(W/T)=2P/πDT with P being the failure load, D the diameter, W the central cylinder thickness, and T the total thickness of the tablet. This equation converts into the standard Brazilian equation (σt=2P/πDW) when W equals T, i.e. is equally valid for flat cylindrical tablets. In practice, the use of this new equation removes the need for complex measurements of tablet dimensions, because it only requires values for diameter and total tablet thickness. It also allows setting of standards for the mechanical strength of doubly-convex tablets. The new equation holds both for elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour of the tablets under load. It is valid for all combinations of W/D-ratios between 0.06 and 0.50 with D/R-ratios between 0.00 and 1.85 except for W/D=0.50 in combination with D/R-ratios of 1.85 and 1.43 and for W/D-ratios of 0.40 and 0.30 in combination with D/R=1.85. FEM-analysis indicated a tendency to

  14. Telemedical Interventional Monitoring in Heart Failure (TIM-HF), a randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the impact of telemedicine on mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure: study design.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Friedrich; Winkler, Sebastian; Schieber, Michael; Sechtem, Udo; Stangl, Karl; Böhm, Michael; Boll, Herbert; Kim, Simone S; Koehler, Kerstin; Lücke, Stephanie; Honold, Marcus; Heinze, Peter; Schweizer, Thomas; Braecklein, Martin; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Gelbrich, Goetz; Anker, Stefan D

    2010-12-01

    Remote patient management (telemonitoring) may help to detect early signs of cardiac decompensation, allowing optimization of and adherence to treatments in chronic heart failure (CHF). Two meta-analyses have suggested that telemedicine in CHF can reduce mortality by 30-35%. The aim of the TIM-HF study was to investigate the impact of telemedical management on mortality in ambulatory CHF patients. Methods CHF patients [New York Heart Association (NYHA) II/III, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)≤35%] with a history of cardiac decompensation with hospitalization in the past or therapy with intravenous diuretics in the prior 24 months (no decompensation required if LVEF≤25%) were randomized 1:1 to an intervention group of daily remote device monitoring (electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body weight) coupled with medical telephone support or to usual care led by the patients' local physician. In the intervention group, 24/7 physician-led medical support was provided by two central telemedical centres. A clinical event committee blinded to treatment allocation assessed cause of death and reason for hospitalization. The primary endpoint was total mortality. The first secondary endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular mortality or hospitalization due to heart failure. Other secondary endpoints included cardiovascular mortality, all-cause and cause-specific hospitalizations (all time to first event) as well as days lost due to heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular death (in % of follow-up time), and changes in quality of life and NYHA class. Overall, 710 CHF patients were recruited. The mean follow-up was 21.5±7.2 months, with a minimum of 12 months. Perspective The study will provide important prospective outcome data on the impact of telemedical management in patients with CHF.

  15. Probing Heterogeneity and Bonding at Silica Surfaces through Single-Molecule Investigation of Base-Mediated Linkage Failure.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Katherine M; Hinton, Daniel A; Ng, James D; Padilla, Nicolas A; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2016-09-13

    The nature of silica surfaces is relevant to many chemical systems, including heterogeneous catalysis and chromatographies utilizing functionalized-silica stationary phases. Surface linkages must be robust to achieve wide and reliable applicability. However, silyl ether-silica support linkages are known to be susceptible to detachment when exposed to basic conditions. We use single-molecule spectroscopy to examine the rate of surface linkage failure upon exposure to base at a variety of deposition conditions. Kinetic analysis elucidates the role of thermal annealing and addition of blocking layers in increasing stability. Critically, it was found that successful surface modification strategies alter the rate at which base molecules approach the silica surface as opposed to reducing surface linkage reactivity. Our results also demonstrate that the innate structural diversity of the silica surface is likely the cause of observed heterogeneity in surface-linkage disruption kinetics.

  16. Recognition Failure: Another Case of Retrieval Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Jan; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of recognition failure and a presentation of seven experiments investigating performance. Recognition failure is reduced when a more stringent recognition criterion is used, essentially eliminated when the proper access test is used and significantly reduced when variability in recognition performance is…

  17. Investigation of heat transfer in zirconium potassium perchlorate at low temperature: A study of the failure mechanism of the NASA standard initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the reasons for the failure of pyrotechnic initiators at very low temperatures (10 to 100 K). A two-dimensional model of the NASA standard initiator was constructed to model heat transfer from the electrically heated stainless steel bridgewire to the zirconium potassium perchlorate explosive charge and the alumina charge cup. Temperature dependent properties were used in the model to simulate initiator performance over a wide range of initial temperatures (10 to 500 K). A search of the thermophysical property data base showed that pure alumina has a very high thermal conductivity at low temperatures. It had been assumed to act as a thermal insulator in all previous analyses. Rapid heat transfer from the bridgewire to the alumina at low initial temperatures was shown to cause failure of the initiators if the wire did not also make good contact with the zirconium potassium perchlorate charge. The mode is able to reproduce the results of the tests that had been conducted to investigate the cause for failure. It also provides an explanation for previously puzzling results and suggests simple design changes that will increase reliability at very low initial temperatures.

  18. Exploratory Investigation of Failure Mechanisms in Transition Regions between Solid Laminates and X-cor(registered tm) Truss Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Paris, Isabelle L.

    2004-01-01

    Small sub-component specimens consisting of solid laminates at the ends that transition to X-cor(R) truss sandwich in the center, were tested in a combination of three point bending, uni-axial tension, and combined tension and bending. The failure process in the transition region was documented for each loading using digital video and high-resolution cameras. For the 3-point bending tests, most of the deformation occurred in the solid laminate regions on either end of the specimen. Some pin debonding from the skin of the X-cor(R) truss sandwich was observed in the transition region and was accompanied by audible "pings" throughout the loading. Tension loaded specimens failed in the sandwich skin in the middle of the gage length, accompanied by separation of the sandwich core from the back skin and by delamination between the top skin and bottom skin at the transition region. The pinging associated with pin debonding occurred as the load was increased. However, the frequency of the pinging exceeded any visual observations of pin debonding in the video of the transition region. For specimens tested in combined tension and bending, the greatest amount of pinging occurred during initial application of the axial load. High-resolution images in the transition region indicated that the pinging corresponded to pins debonding and buckling due to the through-thickness Poisson contraction of the specimen. This buckling continued to a much smaller extent as the transverse load was applied.

  19. The path from childhood behavioural disorders to felony offending: Investigating the role of adolescent drinking, peer marginalisation and school failure.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Jukka; Mason, W Alex; Bolen, Jonathan D; Chmelka, Mary B; Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Nordström, Tanja; Taanila, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Although a pathway from childhood behavioural disorders to criminal offending is well established, the aetiological processes remain poorly understood. Also, it is not clear if attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is predictive of crime in the absence of comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD). We examined two research questions: (1) Does ADHD have a unique effect on the risk of criminal offending, independently of DBD? (2) Is the effect of childhood behavioural disorders on criminal offending direct or mediated by adolescent processes related to school experience, substance misuse and peers? Structural equation modelling, with latent variables, was applied to longitudinally collected data on 4644 men from the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort Study. Both ADHD and DBD separately predicted felony conviction risk. Most of these effects were mediated by adolescent alcohol use and low academic performance. The effect of DBD was stronger and included a direct pathway to criminal offending. Findings were more consistent with the life course mediation hypothesis of pathways into crime than the behavioural continuity path, in that the effects of each disorder category were mediated by heavy drinking and educational failure. Preventing these adolescent risk outcomes may be an effective approach to closing pathways to criminal behaviour amongst behaviourally disordered children. However, as there was some evidence of a direct pathway from DBD, effective treatments targeting this disorder are also expected to reduce criminal offending. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  1. The Path from Childhood Behavioural Disorders to Felony Offending: Investigating the Role of Adolescent Drinking, Peer Marginalization, and School Failure

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Jukka; Mason, W. Alex; Bolen, Jonathan D.; Chmelka, Mary B.; Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Nordström, Tanja; Taanila, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a pathway from childhood behavioural disorders to criminal offending is well-established, the aetiological processes remain poorly understood. Also, it is not clear if attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is predictive of crime in the absence of comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD). Hypothesis We examined two research questions: (1) Does ADHD have a unique effect on the risk of criminal offending, independently of DBD? (2) Is the effect of childhood behavioural disorders on criminal offending direct or mediated by adolescent processes related to school experience, substance misuse, and peers? Method Structural equation modelling, with latent variables, was applied to longitudinally collected data on 4,644 males from the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort Study. Results Both ADHD and DBD separately predicted felony conviction risk. Most of these effects were mediated by adolescent alcohol use and low academic performance. The effect of DBD was stronger and included a direct pathway to criminal offending. Conclusion Findings were more consistent with the life course mediation hypothesis of pathways into crime, in that the effects of each disorder category were mediated by heavy drinking and educational failure. Preventing these adolescent risk outcomes may be an effective approach to closing pathways to criminal behaviour among behaviourally disordered children. However, as there was some evidence of a direct pathway from DBD, effective treatments targeting this disorder are also expected to reduce criminal offending. PMID:25250918

  2. A poroplastic model of mature fault cores with biphasic pore fluids to investigate the role of gas on the onset of fault failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, V.; Fitzenz, D. D.; Piau, J.

    2011-12-01

    A poroplastic model of mature fault cores with biphasic pore fluids to investigate the role of gas on the onset of fault failure The effects of a rapid access of a fault to a source of overpressured fluids on effective stress and failure criterion have been recognized for a long time (Quattrocchi 1999), resulting in a decrease of the effective stress. We concentrate here on the case of the appearance/disappearance of gas in the pore fluid, and its effects on the loading path (Maury et al., 2011). Indeed, gas can appear continuously in a fault zone through dilatant deformation of the zones adjacent to the core fault (Kuo, 2006 ), due to fluid depressurization and degassing. Other source of gas e.g., mantle degasing (Miller et al, 2004), devolitization of coal or other organic matter during frictional sliding (O'Hara et al, 2006), may be remote, and diffuse through a fracture network, or local. Gas in a fault core reduces the Skempton's coefficient to almost 0, the total stress increase during tectonic loading induces a larger increase in effective stress than when pore fluid is fully liquid saturated, thus changing dramatically the loading path for that fault. Not only is failure delayed, but the shear stress at failure increases significantly. Before gas disappearance, the fault might not be critically stressed. However, a subsequent disappearance of gas may lead to failure for small increments of normal and shear stress: apparently strong faults can fail in response to small stress changes. Dilatant failure envelopes are often assumed for localized faults, whereas end-cap envelopes are usually used in association with compaction bands. Here we investigate a poroplastic model for mature fault cores acknowledging that these can be dilatant/contractant according to the state of stress at the plasticity criterion contact. We therefore use a Cam-Clay model as a first approximation. This model enables us to monitor the stability behavior and compute the jumps in stress

  3. [Correction of cronic liver failure by transplantation of liver cells suspension and cell-engineering designs (experimental investigation)].

    PubMed

    Got'e, S V; Shagidulin, M Iu; Onishchenko, N A; Krasheninnikov, M E; Il'inskiĭ, I M; Mozheĭko, N P; Liundup, A V; Volkova, E A; Petrakov, K I; Avramov, P V; Perova, N V; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2013-01-01

    On an experimental model of chronic fibrotic liver damage (male rats Wistar (n-60), damage of CCl4, the duration of the experiment 90 days) it was studied the effectiveness of cell therapy for the correction of chronic liver failure. These rats were divided into 3 experimental groups: in the Ist-group (control, n=10) isotonic saline (650 mkl.) was injected; in the IInd-group (n=20) suspension of liver cells was applicated in a dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) cells; in the IIIrd-group (n=30) suspension of liver cells and bone marrow cells (mesenchymal stromal cells) in ratio 5:1 were used as cell associates on microparticles intjectable heterogeneous biopolymer hydrogel "SpheroGEL" (cell-engineering design) in common dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) It was ascertained that in the 2nd and in the 3rd groups the accelerated normalization of disturbed liver functional indices (ALT, AST, ALP) took place - to 30 days, but in the control group only to 90 days. The reliable differences in rats ofnormalization offunctional indices were absent between the IInd and the IIIrd groups. But in 90 days by using special histological dyeing it was found out that defibrotic processes in liver tissue were more expressed in the IIIrd group in comparison with the IIIrd group. Received results were consequence of prolonged vital activity of cells (liver cells and mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells) into cell-engineering designs, which were transplanted in the IIIrd group. The obtained effect can be explained by that the developed cell-engineering designs provide adequate conditions for prolonged vital activity of the transplanted cells.

  4. Failure Mechanism analysis of rainfall-induced landslide at Pingguang Stream in Taiwan: Mapping, Investigation, and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Kai; Lee, Ching-Fang; Lo, Chia-Ming; Chiu, Chun-Jung

    2015-04-01

    On September 15, 2012, torrential storm carried by the peripheral circulation of Typhoon Sanba and the northeast monsoon induced a translational landslide near Pingguang Road in Xindian District of New Taipei City, Taiwan. The total volume of the landslide was approximately 162,000 m^3. The sliding mass destroyed two houses across the stream and formed a landslide dam at the toe of the slope, constricting the stream. In this study, remote sensing images and LiDAR scanning were interpreted, and conducted onsite surveys to obtain material parameters, and performed simulations using the discrete element method to reconstruction the post event, in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the landslide process. Survey results revealed complex geological conditions with wide spreading tension cracks at source area. This facilitated the infiltration of surface runoff into weak surfaces and raised groundwater levels. Once the shear strength falls below a critical value, failure surface will occur along the stratum boundary. The results of numerical simulation reveal that at 80 sec after the Pingguang Stream landslide began, a maximum deposition depth of 20 m had been reached. The sliding mass cut off the stream and pushed the stream flow roughly 35 m to the southeast. Because the slope materials surrounding the study area and the landslide-inducing mechanisms are similar, the top of the slopes to the northwest of the study area require monitoring immediately. In addition to filling in the tension cracks, drainage facilities should be constructed to prevent further landslides. Keywords: translational landslide, onsite survey, discrete element method, mechanism, landslide process

  5. RESP-24: a computer program for the investigation of 24-h breathing abnormalities in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; Robbi, E; Varanini, M; Emdin, M; Raciti, M; La Rovere, M T

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a computer program (RESP-24) specifically devised to assess the prevalence and characteristics of breathing disorders in ambulant chronic heart failure patients during the overall 24 h period. The system works on a single channel respiratory signal (RS) recorded through a Holter-like portable device. In the pre-processing stage RESP-24 removes noise, baseline drift and motion artefacts from the RS using a non-linear filter, enhances respiratory frequency components through high-pass filtering and derives an instantaneous tidal volume (ITV) signal. The core processing is devoted to the identification and classification of the breathing pattern into periodic breathing (PB), normal breathing or non-classifiable breathing using a 60 s segmentation, and to the identification and estimation of apnea and hypopnea events. Sustained episodes of PB are detected by cross analysis of both the spectral content and time behavior of the ITV signal. User-friendly interactive facilities allow all the results of the automatic analysis procedure to be edited. The final report provides a set of standard and non-standard parameters quantifying breathing abnormalities during the 24 h period, the night-time and the day-time, including the apnea/hypopnea index, the apnea index, the total time spent in apnea or in hypopnea and the prevalence of non-apneic and apneic PB. The accuracy of these measurements was appraised on a data set of 14 recordings, by comparing them with those provided by a trained analyst. The mean and standard deviation of the error of the automatic procedure were below respectively 6 and 8% of the reference value for all parameters considered and the mean total classification accuracy was 92%. In most cases, the individual error was <12%. We conclude that measurements provided automatically by the RESP-24 software are suitable for screening purposes and clinical trials, although a preventive check of signal quality should be recommended.

  6. Exercise training and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks in patients with heart failure: results from HF-ACTION (Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing).

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Hellkamp, Anne S; Whellan, David J; Ellis, Stephen J; Keteyian, Steven J; Kraus, William E; Hernandez, Adrian F; Daubert, James P; Piña, leana L; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise training is associated with an increased risk of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with heart failure (HF). Few data are available regarding the safety of exercise training in patients with ICDs and HF. HF-ACTION (Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing) randomized 2,331 outpatients with HF and an ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% to exercise training or usual care. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to examine the relationship between exercise training and ICD shocks. We identified 1,053 patients (45%) with an ICD at baseline who were randomized to exercise training (n = 546) or usual care (n = 507). Median age was 61 years old, and median EF was 24%. Over a median of 2.2 years of follow-up, 20% (n = 108) of the exercise patients had a shock versus 22% (n = 113) of the control patients. A history of sustained ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.93 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47 to 2.54]), previous atrial fibrillation/flutter (HR: 1.63 [95% CI: 1.22 to 2.18]), exercise-induced dysrhythmia (HR: 1.67 [95% CI: 1.23 to 2.26]), lower diastolic blood pressure (HR for 5-mm Hg decrease <60: 1.35 [95% CI: 1.12 to 1.61]), and nonwhite race (HR: 1.50 [95% CI: 1.13 to 2.00]) were associated with an increased risk of ICD shocks. Exercise training was not associated with the occurrence of ICD shocks (HR: 0.90 [95% CI: 0.69 to 1.18], p = 0.45). The presence of an ICD was not associated with the primary efficacy composite endpoint of death or hospitalization (HR: 0.99 [95% CI: 0.86 to 1.14], p = 0.90). We found no evidence of increased ICD shocks in patients with HF and reduced left ventricular function who underwent exercise training. Exercise therapy should not be prohibited in ICD recipients with HF. (Exercise Training Program to Improve Clinical Outcomes in Individuals With Congestive Heart Failure; NCT00047437)

  7. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    Dynamic deformation, flow, and failure are integral parts of all dynamic processes in materials. Invariably, dynamic failure also involves the relative sliding of one component of the material over the other. Advances in elucidation of these failure mechanisms under high loading rates has been of great interest to scientists working in this area. The need to develop new dynamic mechanical property tests for materials under well characterized and controllable loading conditions has always been a challenge to experimentalists. The current study focuses on the development of two experimental methods to study some aspects of dynamic material response. The first part focuses on the development of a single stage gas gun facility for investigating high-speed metal to metal interfacial friction with applications to high speed machining. During the course of this investigation a gas gun was designed and built capable of accelerating projectiles upto velocities of 1 km/s. Using this gas gun pressure-shear plate impact friction experiments were conducted to simulate conditions similar to high speed machining at the tool-workpiece interface. The impacting plates were fabricated from materials representing the tribo-pair of interest. Accurate measurements of the interfacial tractions, i.e. the normal pressure and the frictional stress at the tribo-pair interface, and the interfacial slip velocity could be made by employing laser interferometry. Normal pressures of the order of 1-2 MPa were generated and slipping velocities of the order of 50 m/s were obtained. In order to illustrate the structure of the constitutive law governing friction, the study included experimental investigation of frictional response to step changes in normal pressure and interfacial shear stress. The results of these experiments indicate that sliding resistance for Ti6Al4V/CH steel interface is much lower than measured under quasi-static sliding conditions. Also the temperature at the interface strongly

  8. Investigating the Impact of Different Suspicion of Infection Criteria on the Accuracy of Quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, and Early Warning Scores.

    PubMed

    Churpek, Matthew M; Snyder, Ashley; Sokol, Sarah; Pettit, Natasha N; Edelson, Dana P

    2017-07-21

    Studies in sepsis are limited by heterogeneity regarding what constitutes suspicion of infection. We sought to compare potential suspicion criteria using antibiotic and culture order combinations in terms of patient characteristics and outcomes. We further sought to determine the impact of differing criteria on the accuracy of sepsis screening tools and early warning scores. Observational cohort study. Academic center from November 2008 to January 2016. Hospitalized patients outside the ICU. None. Six criteria were investigated: 1) any culture, 2) blood culture, 3) any culture plus IV antibiotics, 4) blood culture plus IV antibiotics, 5) any culture plus IV antibiotics for at least 4 of 7 days, and 6) blood culture plus IV antibiotics for at least 4 of 7 days. Accuracy of the quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, the National and Modified Early Warning Score, and the electronic Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage score were calculated for predicting ICU transfer or death within 48 hours of meeting suspicion criteria. A total of 53,849 patients met at least one infection criteria. Mortality increased from 3% for group 1 to 9% for group 6 and percentage meeting Angus sepsis criteria increased from 20% to 40%. Across all criteria, score discrimination was lowest for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (median area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.60) and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score (median area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.62), intermediate for quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (median area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.65) and Modified Early Warning Score (median area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.67), and highest for National Early Warning Score (median area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.71) and electronic Cardiac Arrest

  9. Investigation of the mechanical properties and failure modes of hybrid natural fiber composites for potential bone fracture fixation plates.

    PubMed

    Manteghi, Saeed; Mahboob, Zia; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanical feasibility of a hybrid Glass/Flax/Epoxy composite material for bone fracture fixation such as fracture plates. These hybrid composite plates have a sandwich structure in which the outer layers are made of Glass/Epoxy and the core from Flax/Epoxy. This configuration resulted in a unique structure compared to prior composites proposed for similar clinical applications. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of this hybrid composite, uniaxial tension, compression, three-point bending and Rockwell Hardness tests were conducted. In addition, water absorption tests were performed to investigate the rate of water absorption for the specimens. This study confirms that the proposed hybrid composite plates are significantly more flexible axially compared to conventional metallic plates. Furthermore, they have considerably higher ultimate strength in tension, compression and flexion. Such high strength will ensure good stability of bone-implant construct at the fracture site, immobilize adjacent bone fragments and carry clinical-type forces experienced during daily normal activities. Moreover, this sandwich structure with stronger and stiffer face sheets and more flexible core can result in a higher stiffness and strength in bending compared to tension and compression. These qualities make the proposed hybrid composite an ideal candidate for the design of an optimized fracture fixation system with much closer mechanical properties to human cortical bone.

  10. Gait failure.

    PubMed

    Sudarsky, L

    1987-11-01

    Gait failure is a common presentation in the Emergency Department, and one that may herald an acute neurologic episode. This article reviews the mechanisms of gait failure, some of their causes, and the appropriate examination techniques for determining possible diagnoses.

  11. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  12. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    Despite major improvements in the treatment of virtually all cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) is an exception, in that its prevalence is rising, and only small prolongations in survival are occurring. An increasing fraction, especially older women with diabetes, obesity, and atrial fibrillation exhibit HF with preserved systolic function. Several pathogenetic mechanisms appear to be operative in HF. These include increased hemodynamic overload, ischemia-related dysfunction, ventricular remodeling, excessive neurohumoral stimulation, abnormal myocyte calcium cycling, excessive or inadequate proliferation of the extracellular matrix, accelerated apoptosis, and genetic mutations. Biomarkers released as a consequence of myocardial stretch, imbalance between formation and breakdown of extracellular matrix, inflammation, and renal failure are useful in the identification of the pathogenetic mechanism and, when used in combination, may become helpful in estimating prognosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Promising new therapies that are now undergoing intensive investigation include an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, a naturally-occurring vasodilator peptide, a myofilament sensitizer and several drugs that enhance Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cell therapy, using autologous bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells, appears to be promising, as does gene therapy. Chronic left ventricular assistance with continuous flow pumps is being applied more frequently and successfully as destination therapy, as a bridge to transplantation, and even as a bridge to recovery and explantation. While many of these therapies will improve the care of patients with HF, significant reductions in prevalence will require vigorous, multifaceted, preventive approaches.

  13. Effects of exercise training on outcomes in women with heart failure: analysis of HF-ACTION (Heart Failure-A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing) by sex.

    PubMed

    Piña, Ileana L; Bittner, Vera; Clare, Robert M; Swank, Ann; Kao, Andrew; Safford, Robert; Nigam, Anil; Barnard, Denise; Walsh, Mary N; Ellis, Stephen J; Keteyian, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    The authors hypothesized that the women enrolled in the HF-ACTION (Heart Failure-A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing) trial and randomly assigned to exercise training (ET) would improve functional capacity as measured by peak oxygen uptake (VO2) compared with those in the usual care group. Furthermore, they hypothesized that the improvement in peak VO2 would correlate with prognosis. They explored whether exercise had a differential effect on outcomes in women versus men. There is less evidence for the benefit of ET in women with heart failure (HF) compared with men because of the small numbers of women studied. HF-ACTION was a randomized trial of ET versus usual care in 2,331 patients with class II-IV HF and a left ventricular ejection fraction of ≤35%. Sex differences in the effects of randomized treatment on clinical outcomes were assessed through the use of a series of Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for covariates known to affect prognosis in HF-ACTION. Women had lower baseline peak VO2 and 6-min walk distance than did men (median, 13.4 vs. 14.9 ml/min/kg and 353 vs. 378 m, respectively). An increase in peak VO2 at 3 months was present in women and men in the ET group (mean ± SD; median, 0.88 ± 2.2, 0.80 and 0.77 ± 2.7, 0.60, respectively, women vs. men; p = 0.42). Women randomly assigned to ET had a significant reduction in the primary endpoint, (hazard ratio: 0.74) compared with men (hazard ratio: 0.99) randomly assigned to ET, with a significant treatment-by-sex interaction (p = 0.027). Although there is no significant difference between men and women in the effect of ET on peak VO2 change at 3 months, ET in women with HF is associated with a larger reduction in rate of the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital stay than in men. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  15. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  16. Numerical Investigation of Seismically Induced Rock Mass Fatigue as a Mechanism Contributing to the Progressive Failure of Deep-Seated Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, Valentin; Preisig, Giona; Eberhardt, Erik

    2016-06-01

    The importance of earthquakes in triggering catastrophic failure of deep-seated landslides has long been recognized and is well documented in the literature. However, seismic waves do not only act as a trigger mechanism. They also contribute to the progressive failure of large rock slopes as a fatigue process that is highly efficient in deforming and damaging rock slopes. Given the typically long recurrence time and unpredictability of earthquakes, field-based investigations of co-seismic rock slope deformations are difficult. We present here a conceptual numerical study that demonstrates how repeated earthquake activity over time can destabilize a relatively strong rock slope by creating and propagating new fractures until the rock mass is sufficiently weakened to initiate catastrophic failure. Our results further show that the damage and displacement induced by a certain earthquake strongly depends on pre-existing damage. In fact, the damage history of the slope influences the earthquake-induced displacement as much as earthquake ground motion characteristics such as the peak ground acceleration. Because seismically induced fatigue is: (1) characterized by low repeat frequency, (2) represents a large amplitude damage event, and (3) weakens the entire rock mass, it differs from other fatigue processes. Hydro-mechanical cycles, for instance, occur at higher repeat frequencies (i.e., annual cycles), lower amplitude, and only affect limited parts of the rock mass. Thus, we also compare seismically induced fatigue to seasonal hydro-mechanical fatigue. While earthquakes can progressively weaken even a strong, competent rock mass, hydro-mechanical fatigue requires a higher degree of pre-existing damage to be effective. We conclude that displacement rates induced by hydro-mechanical cycling are indicative of the degree of pre-existing damage in the rock mass. Another indicator of pre-existing damage is the seismic amplification pattern of a slope; frequency

  17. Efficacy and safety of digoxin in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction according to diabetes status: An analysis of the Digitalis Investigation Group (DIG) trial.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; MacIsaac, Rachael L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Petrie, Mark C; Lees, Kennedy R; McMurray, John J V

    2016-04-15

    Digoxin is recommended in symptomatic heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) in sinus rhythm and refractory to other evidence-based therapy. Although HF-REF patients with diabetes have worse functional status than those without, the effects of digoxin have not been specifically evaluated according to diabetes status. We examined the efficacy and safety of digoxin in HF-REF patients with and without diabetes in the Digitalis Investigation Group trial. Mortality from all-cause, cardiovascular (CV) causes and heart failure (HF), along with HF hospitalisation and suspected digoxin toxicity were analyzed according to diabetes status and randomised treatment assignment. Of the 6800 patients, those with diabetes (n=1933) were older, more often women, had worse clinical status and more co-morbidity than those without diabetes. All-cause and CV mortality were higher in patients with diabetes than in those without and digoxin did not reduce mortality in either sub-group. The rate of HF hospitalization (per 100 person-years) in patients with diabetes was higher than in those without and was reduced by digoxin in both patient groups: diabetes - placebo 20.5 and digoxin 16.0 (HR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.68-0.91); no diabetes - placebo 12.7 and digoxin 8.7 (HR 0.69, 0.62-0.77); interaction p=0.14. Suspected digoxin toxicity in patients randomised to digoxin was more common among patients with diabetes than without (6.5% versus 5.8%), as was hospitalisation for digoxin toxicity (1.4% versus 0.8%). Added to an ACE inhibitor, digoxin reduced HF hospitalisation in HF-REF patients with and without diabetes without a substantial risk of toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the cross-ship comparison monitoring method of failure detection in the HIMAT RPRV. [digital control techniques using airborne microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HIMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) uses cross-ship comparison monitoring of the actuator RAM positions to detect a failure in the aileron, canard, and elevator control surface servosystems. Some possible sources of nuisance trips for this failure detection technique are analyzed. A FORTRAN model of the simplex servosystems and the failure detection technique were utilized to provide a convenient means of changing parameters and introducing system noise. The sensitivity of the technique to differences between servosystems and operating conditions was determined. The cross-ship comparison monitoring method presently appears to be marginal in its capability to detect an actual failure and to withstand nuisance trips.

  19. A Study to Compare the Failure Rates of Current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment with the New Pathfinder Equipment and Investigate the Effect that the Proposed GSE Infrastructure Upgrade Might Have to Reduce GSE Infrastructure Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to compare the current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment (GSE) infrastructure with the proposed GSE infrastructure upgrade modification. The methodology will include analyzing the first prototype installation equipment at Launch PAD B called the "Pathfinder". This study will begin by comparing the failure rate of the current components associated with the "Hardware interface module (HIM)" at the Kennedy Space Center to the failure rate of the neW Pathfinder components. Quantitative data will be gathered specifically on HIM components and the PAD B Hypergolic Fuel facility and Hypergolic Oxidizer facility areas which has the upgraded pathfinder equipment installed. The proposed upgrades include utilizing industrial controlled modules, software, and a fiber optic network. The results of this study provide evidence that there is a significant difference in the failure rates of the two studied infrastructure equipment components. There is also evidence that the support staff for each infrastructure system is not equal. A recommendation to continue with future upgrades is based on a significant reduction of failures in the new' installed ground system components.

  20. Preliminary results: Root cause investigation of orbital anomalies and failures in NASA standard 50 ampere-hour nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Two lots of NASA standard 50 A.H. Ni-Cd battery cells, manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries and built into batteries by McDonnell Douglas, have experienced significant performance problems. The two lots were used on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. Both of these satellites are Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites containing batteries on a parallel bus charged to NASA standard V/T curves using a NASA standard power regulator. The following preliminary conclusions were reached: (1) several plate and cell parameters have migrated within their spec limits over the years (in some cases, from one extreme to the other); (2) several parametric relationships, not generally monitored and therefore not under specification control, have also migrated over the years; (3) many of these changes appear to have taken place as a natural consequence of changes in GE/GAB materials and processes; (4) several of these factors may be 'conspiring' to aggravate known cell failure mechanisms (factors such as heavier plate, less teflon and/or less-uniform teflon, and less electrolyte) but all are still in spec (where specs exist); (5) the weight of the evidence collected to characterize the anomalies and to characterize the negative electrode itself, strongly suggests that alterations to the structure, composition, uniformity, and efficiency of the negative electrode are at the heart of the battery performance problems currently being experienced; and (6) further investigation at all levels (plate, cell, battery, and system) continues to be warranted.

  1. Lunar Base Life Support Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of the lunar outpost habitat life support was undertaken to investigate the impact of life support failures and to investigate responses. Some preparatory static analysis for the Lunar Outpost life support model, an earlier version of the model, and an investigation into the impact of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) were reported previously. (Jones, 2008-01-2184, 2008-01-2017) The earlier model was modified to include possible resupply delays, power failures, recycling system failures, and atmosphere and other material storage failures. Most failures impact the lunar outpost water balance and can be mitigated by reducing water usage. Food solids, nitrogen can be obtained only by resupply from Earth. The most time urgent failure is a lass of carbon dioxide removal capability. Life support failures might be survivable if effective operational solutions are provided in the system design.

  2. Primary investigation the impacts of the external memory (DDR3) failures on the performance of Xilinx Zynq-7010 SoC based system (MicroZed) using laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhuan; Du, Xuecheng; Du, Xiaozhi; Zhang, Yao; Mubashiru, Lawal Olarewaju; Luo, Dongyang; yuan, Yuan; Deng, Tianxiang; Li, Zhuoqi; Zang, Hang; Li, Yonghong; He, Chaohui; Ma, Yingqi; Shangguan, Shipeng

    2017-09-01

    The impacts of the external dynamic memory (DDR3) failures on the performance of 28 nm Xilinx Zynq-7010 SoC based system (MicroZed) were investigated with two sets of 1064 nm laser platforms. The failure sensitive area distributionsons on the back surface of the test DDR3 were primarily localized with a CW laser irradiation platform. During the CW laser scanning on the back surface of the DDR3 of the test board system, various failure modes except SEU and SEL (MBU, SEFI, data storage address error, rebooting, etc) were found in the testing embedded modules (ALU, PL, Register, Cache and DMA, etc) of SoC. Moreover, the experimental results demonstrated that there were 16 failure sensitive blocks symmetrically distributed on the back surface of the DDR3 with every sensitive block area measured was about 1 mm × 0.5 mm. The influence factors on the failure modes of the embedded modules were primarily analyzed and the SEE characteristics of DDR3 induced by the picoseconds pulsed laser were tested. The failure modes of DDR3 found were SEU, SEFI, SEL, test board rebooting by itself, unknown data, etc. Furthermore, the time interval distributions of failure occurrence in DDR3 changes with the pulsed laser irradiation energy and the CPU operating frequency were measured and compared. Meanwhile, the failure characteristics of DDR3 induced by pulsed laser irradiation were primarily explored. The measured results and the testing techniques designed in this paper provide some reference information for evaluating the reliability of the test system or other similar electronic system in harsh environment.

  3. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 2: Recommended format for reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results presented in this handbook are also included.

  4. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood tests may show a low level of testosterone and high levels of prolactin, FSH , and LH . ... testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to diagnose in older ...

  5. Impact of Plasma Kynurenine Level on Functional Capacity and Outcome in Heart Failure - Results From Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF).

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Ebner, Nicole; Springer, Jochen; Schefold, Joerg C; Doehner, Wolfram; Dschietzig, Thomas Bernd; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-12-22

    Kynurenine is a circulating metabolite from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Accelerated degradation of kynurenine in skeletal muscle has been reported to provide an anti-inflammatory effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between blood kynurenine and muscle mass/function in patients with heart failure (HF), in whom diseased muscle mass/function plays a pathophysiological role.Methods and Results:Plasma kynurenine was assessed in 249 patients with HF (67±11 years, 21% women) and in 45 controls from the SICA-HF study. Kynurenine was higher in 173 HF patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF) and in 76 patients with preserved EF than controls (3.5±1.5, 3.4±1.3, and 2.4±1.1 μmol/L, P<0.001). In HF patients, kynurenine had an inverse association with handgrip strength (r=-0.26, P<0.01), peak oxygen consumption (r=-0.29, P<0.01), 6-min walk distance (r=-0.23, P<0.01), and had a positive association with kidney and liver function parameters. No correlation was observed between kynurenine and lean mass. On multivariable linear regression analysis, a significant association was noted between kynurenine and peak oxygen consumption even after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, and hemoglobin (β=-0.23, P<0.001). Patients with higher kynurenine were at higher risk of death (adjusted HR, 1.46 per 1 μmol/L, P<0.01). In stable HF patients, plasma kynurenine was inversely correlated with muscle strength and functional capacity as well as with liver and kidney function.

  6. Identification, separation and characterization of process-related impurities of bifendate derivative (DB-6), an investigational agent combating acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weiwei; Yang, Yinghong; Wang, Guangcheng; Luo, Youfu; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    DB-6, with an IUPAC name of (Z)-5-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-5'-methyl-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-dicarboxylate, is an investigational agent for acute liver failure. The focus of this study is the identification and characterization of major unknown impurities in DB-6 bulk drug samples. Four major impurities of DB-6 were detected by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and designated as IMP-I, IMP-II, IMP-III and IMP-IV. Accurate masses of these impurities were determined by using a Q-TOF mass spectrometer. Based on chromatographic, spectrometric data and plausible chemical transformation mechanism, the structures of IMP-I, IMP-II, IMP-III and IMP-IV were identified, respectively, as bifendate, (E)-5-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-5'-methyl-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-dicarboxylate, (Z)-5-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) thiazolidine-2,4-dione and bis(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((Z)-(2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-icarboxylate. The impurities were isolated by preparative-HPLC or preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography and their structures were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  8. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  9. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  10. A recent investigation of gas hydrate as a factor in northern Cascadia accretionary margin frontal ridge slope failures and cold seep biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R.; Riedel, M.; Pohlman, J.; Rose, K.; Lapham, L.; Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, R.; Spence, G.; Hyndman, R.

    2008-12-01

    In August 2008, a research expedition was conducted on the n. Cascadia margin by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) as part of the Earth Science Sector, Natural Gas Hydrate Program, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This collaboration included researchers from several universities as well as Canadian and U.S. government agencies. The primary objective was to determine the impact of gas hydrate on slope stability along the frontal ridges of the N. Cascadia accretionary wedge. Multibeam bathymetry data indicate numerous slope collapse features along the frontal ridges. To constrain the cause and timing of the collapse features, sedimentological, physical property and geochemical studies were conducted at several slump areas. Four cores were collected from within the headwall, apron and sole of the slumped material of 'Lopez Slide', a failure area detected prior to IODP Expedition 311. Directly south of Lopez Slide at a slump feature named 'Slipstream Slide', a 5-core transect extended from the headwall scarp to the toe of the slide deposits. Slipstream Slide is a series of en echelon box-like slump blocks bounded by transverse faults that cross-cut that frontal ridge. One additional core from a slump-feature further south (Chunk Slide) was also recovered. Onboard analyses suggest that the slump occurrences are not related to the last mega-thrust earthquake that occurred at the N. Cascadia subduction zone in January 1700. However, the slumps could have been triggered by earlier such earthquakes. Further analyses and age determinations are underway to confirm the linkages between slumps and the mega-thrust earthquake cycle and other possible trigger mechanisms such as eustatic sea level changes. The secondary objective of the expedition was a multidisciplinary program that included microbiological, geochemical, geophysical and sedimentological studies designed to advance our understanding of the environmental factors that control methane fluxes and oxidation at cold

  11. Investigation of the link between fluid shift and airway collapsibility as a mechanism for obstructive sleep apnea in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Tom; Ward, Neil R; Atalla, Angela; Cowie, Martin R; Simonds, Anita K; Morrell, Mary J

    2017-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in congestive heart failure (CHF) may be associated with rostral fluid shift. We investigated the effect of overnight rostral fluid shift on pharyngeal collapsibility (Pcrit), pharyngeal caliber (APmean), and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in CHF patients. Twenty-three optimally treated systolic CHF patients were studied. Neck circumference was measured immediately prior to sleep in the evening and immediately after waking in the morning as a marker of rostral fluid shift. Pcrit was measured during sleep, early and late in the night. APmean was measured using acoustic reflection at the same times as neck circumference measurements. 15/23 CHF patients experienced an overnight increase in neck circumference; overall neck circumference significantly increased overnight (mean±SD, evening: 41.7 ± 3.2 cm; morning: 42.3 ± 3.1 cm; P = 0.03). Pcrit increased significantly overnight (early-night: -3.8 ± 3.3 cmH2O; late-night: -2.6 ± 3.0 cmH2O; P = 0.03) and APmean decreased (evening: 4.2 ± 1.3 cm(2); morning: 3.7 ± 1.3 cm(2); P = 0.006). The total AHI correlated with neck circumference (r = 0.4; P = 0.04) and Pcrit (r = 0.5; P = 0.01). APmean correlated with neck circumference (r = -0.47; P = 0.02). There was no significant change in AHI between the first and second half of the night (first-half: 12.9 ± 12.4/h; second-half: 13.7 ± 13.3/h; P = 0.6). Overnight rostral fluid shift was associated with increased pharyngeal collapsibility and decreased pharyngeal caliber during sleep in CHF patients. Rostral fluid shift may be an important mechanism of OSA in this patient group.

  12. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and exercise capacity in chronic heart failure: data from the Heart Failure and a Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training (HF-ACTION) study.

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Whellan, David; Kraus, William E; Clare, Robert; Zannad, Faiez; Donahue, Mark; Adams, Kirkwood; McKelvie, Robert; Piña, Ileana L; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2009-10-01

    To examine the relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and exercise capacity in a large contemporary cohort of patients with chronic heart failure. Natriuretic peptides such as NT-proBNP are important biomarkers in heart failure. The relationship between NT-proBNP and exercise capacity has not been well studied. We analyzed the relationship between baseline NT-proBNP and peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2)) or distance in the 6-minute walk test in 1383 subjects enrolled in the HF-ACTION study. Linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between NT-proBNP and peak Vo(2) or distance in the 6-minute walk test in the context of other clinical variables. Receiver operator curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of NT-proBNP to accurately predict a peak VO(2) <12 mL/kg per minute. NT-proBNP was the most powerful predictor of peak VO(2) (partial R(2) = 0.13, P < .0001) of 35 candidate variables. Although NT-proBNP was also a predictor of distance in the 6-minute walk test, this relationship was weaker than that for peak VO(2) (partial R(2) = 0.02, P < .0001). For both peak VO(2) and distance in the 6-minute walk test, much of the variability in exercise capacity remained unexplained by the variables tested. Receiver operator curve analysis suggested NT-proBNP had moderate ability to identify patients with peak VO(2) <12 mL/kg per minute (c-index, 0.69). In this analysis of baseline data from HF-ACTION, NT-proBNP was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) and a significant predictor of distance in the 6-minute walk test. Despite these associations, NT-proBNP demonstrated only modest performance in identifying patients with a low peak VO(2) who might be considered for cardiac transplantation. These data suggest that, although hemodynamic factors are important determinants of exercise capacity, much of the variability in exercise performance in heart failure remains unexplained by traditional clinical and demographic

  13. A stability analysis of semi-cohesive streambanks with CONCEPTS: Coupling field and laboratory investigations to quantify the onset of fluvial erosion and mass failure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The overarching goal of this study is to perform a comprehensive bank stability analysis that is phenomenologically sound by considering both mass failure and fluvial erosion. The nature of this study is twofold. First, field and experimental analysis is conducted to generate data for channel cross-...

  14. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  15. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  16. Geochemical evidence of multistage retrogressive failure during the 160,000ka Icod landslide from turbidite facies analysis: multidisciplinary investigative approaches using destructive and non-destructive methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, James; Wynn, Russell; Masson, Doug; Croudace, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The study of modern deep-sea systems through targeted piston coring has enabled detailed investigations into the process mechanics of turbidity currents. In complex systems such as the Moroccan Turbidite System the derivation of provenance is of vital importance, since flows from different sources in this system have been found to behave differently. Early provenance studies in the Madeira Abyssal Plain found that bulk sand-fraction geochemical analysis through ICP-AES could enable successful attribution of provenance to specific turbidites alongside electron microprobe analysis (de Lange, Jarvis & Kuijpers, 1987; Pearce & Jarvis, 1992). These sources including the Moroccan siliclastic shelf, Tenerife, Las Palma, El Hierro and Madeira. ICP-AES, MC-ICP-MS and XRF have been utilised here, however these present destructive methodologies, using 0.1-5g of material >63µm. Deep-sea piston cores are also expensive to collect, and often there is not enough material to remove for analysis without compromising the core. Furthermore, routine sampling, preparation and analysis using the destructive methods stated above are undertaken at considerable cost and analytical time. The successful use of non-destructive instruments to yield quantitative geochemical has become paramount at the NOC. This presentation serves to show the successful application of the TM-1000 tabletop SEM EDS analyser, ITRAX micro-XRF analyser and the GEOTEK XYZ logger, in coincidence with traditional destructive methods. These instruments can only supply semi-quantitative data, unless correct calibration can be achieved, and will be shown here. The 160,000ka Icod landslide from Tenerife generated a 150km3 debris avalanche with a runout of 105km and a >180km3 turbidity, which will form the case study for application of these instruments. The vertically stacked subunit facies of the Icod turbidite has been attributed to generation from a multistage retrogressive failure (Wynn & Masson, 2003). Here there

  17. An Investigation of Ways to Reduce the Failure Rate of Student Pilots during Flying Training in the Royal Australian Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    criticism (other than constructive), sarcasm or comparison with others after failure. Attributions to stable factors (ability or task difficulty...I k In-flight Remediation Any ideas about what might help? r Caring for frame of mind/ pi-A. I h,24~ eI ’.A-, fPW.’. anxiety / demoralization...source(s) Of your satisfaction or dissatisfaction’ 71l,. Any ideas about what might help? ______ . ei .- 13. So that w may better aoppreciate your

  18. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  19. Failure Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn; Nikora, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Three questions to which software developers want accurate, precise answers are "How can the software system fail?", "mat bad things will happen if the software fails?t', and "How many failures will the software experience?". Numerous techniques have been devised to answer these questions; three of the best known are: 1) Software Fault Tree Analysis (SFTA) 2) Software Failure Modes, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (SFMECA 3) Software Fault/Failure Modeling. SFTA and SFMECA have been successfully used to analyze the flight software for a number of robotic planetary exploration missions, including Galileo, Cassini, and Deep Space 1. Given the increasing interest in reusing software components from mission to mission, one of us has developed techniques for reusing the corresponding portions of the SFTA and SFMECA, reducing the effort required to conduct these analyses. SFTA has also been shown to be effective in analyzing the security aspects of software systems; intrusion mechanisms and effects can easily be modeled using these techniques. The Bi- Directional Safety Analysis (BDSA) method combines a forward search (similar to SFMECA) from potential failure modes to their effects, with a backward search (similar to SFTA) from feasible hazards to the contributing causes of each hazard. BDSA offers an efficient way to identify latent failures. Recent work has extended BDSA to product-line applications such as flight-instrumentation displays and developed tool support for the reuse of the failure-analysis artifacts within a product line. BDSA has also been streamlined to support those projects having tight cost and/or schedule constraints for their failure analysis efforts. We discuss lessons learned from practice, describe available tools, and identi@ some future directions for the topic. A substantial amount of research has been devoted to estimating the number of failures that a software system will experience during test and operations, as well as the number of

  20. Why young elite athletes fear failure: consequences of failure.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Sam S; Lavallee, David; Spray, Christopher M

    2007-09-01

    Fear of failure can have negative effects on children in achievement settings, affecting many aspects of their lives. Perceiving the consequences of failure to be aversive provides the basis for fear of failure, and the anticipation of a threatening outcome elicits fear. Problems attributed to fear of failure in achievement settings are prevalent. Sport is a popular and significant achievement domain for children and adolescents and there is a lack of research on fear of failure in sport among this age group. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate fear of failure in the sport domain among young elite athletes, and to explore their perceptions of the consequences of failure. Interviews were conducted individually with nine athletes aged 14 - 17 years (5 males, 4 females). Analysis identified and organized perceived consequences of failure into themes and categories. Results revealed that the most commonly perceived aversive consequences of failure were diminished perception of self, no sense of achievement, and the emotional cost of failure. These findings are consistent with those reported in adult population, suggesting the potential for generalizing existing results to young elite athletes.

  1. The impact of iron deficiency and anaemia on exercise capacity and outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure. Results from the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Nicole; Jankowska, Ewa A; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lainscak, Mitja; Elsner, Sebastian; Sliziuk, Veronika; Steinbeck, Lisa; Kube, Jennifer; Bekfani, Tarek; Scherbakov, Nadja; Valentova, Miroslava; Sandek, Anja; Doehner, Wolfram; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-02-15

    Anaemia and iron deficiency (ID) are important co-morbidities in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and both may lead to reduced exercise capacity. We enrolled 331 out-patients with stable chronic HF (mean age: 64 ± 11 years, 17% female, left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] 35 ± 13%, body mass index [BMI] 28.5 ± 5.2 kg/m(2), New York Heart Association [NYHA] class 2.2 ± 0.7, chronic kidney disease 35%, glomerular filtration rate 61.7 ± 20.1 mL/min). Anaemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria (haemoglobin [Hb] < 13 g/dL in men, < 12 g/dL in women). ID was defined as serum ferritin < 100 μg/L or ferritin < 300 μg/L with transferrin saturation (TSAT) < 20%. Exercise capacity was assessed as peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) by spiroergometry and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A total of 91 (27%) patients died from any cause during a mean follow-up of 18 months. At baseline, 98 (30%) patients presented with anaemia and 149 (45%) patients presented with ID. We observed a significant reduction in exercise capacity in parallel to decreasing Hb levels (r = 0.24, p < 0.001). In patients with anaemia and ID (n = 63, 19%), exercise capacity was significantly lower than in patients with ID or anaemia only. Cox regression analysis showed that after adjusting for NYHA, age, hsCRP and creatinine anaemia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with HF (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.33-0.97, p = 0.04). The impact of anaemia on reduced exercise capacity and on mortality is stronger than that of ID. Anaemia remained an independent predictor of death after adjusting for clinically relevant variables. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vamistor resistor investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of the failure investigation conducted on resistors produced by the Vamistor Divison, Wagner Electric Corporation. This failure investigation included; failure analyses, chemical and metallurgical analyses, failure mechanism studies, seal leak analyses, and nondestructive stress tests. The data, information, conclusions, and recommendation can be helpful in assessing current usage of these resistors.

  3. Investigation of long-term survival outcomes and failure patterns of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Lei, Hao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ling; Qu, Song; Liang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has replaced the conventional radiotherapy (2D-RT) and improved clinical efficacy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC) patients. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients with NPC treated with IMRT to assess the long-term survival outcomes and failure patterns. Of the 527 patients, One hundred and twenty-one patients experienced treatment failure, 86 patients developed distant metastases, and 12 patients developed a second primary tumor. The local and regional recurrence rates were 31.4% and 14.0%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastatic relapse-free survival (DMFS) rates were 80.9%, 75.6%, 91.7%, 96.2%, and 83.0%, respectively. The 5-year LRFS rates of Stage T1-4 patients were 100.0%, 93.1%, 92.0%, and 85.8%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS rates of Stage N0-3 patients were 95.0%, 86.1%, 79.5%, and 67.2%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed age and T-stage were independent predictors of OS, T-stage was an independent predictor of LRFS, and age and N-stage were independent predictors of PFS and DMFS. In summary, the improved treatment results with IMRT are primarily due to the achievement of a higher local tumor control rate and OS in NPC patients. However, distant metastasis was the most commonly observed failure pattern after treatment. These results provide deep insights about the value of IMRT in the treatment and prognosis of NPC patients. PMID:27894100

  4. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  5. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  6. Failure of fiber posts after cementation with different adhesives with or without silanization investigated by pullout tests and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Mu, Yunjing; Setzer, Frank C; Lu, Hong; Qu, Tiejun; Yu, Qing

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to test retentive forces of different adhesive systems after cementation of glass-fiber posts with or without prior silanization of the post by using a pullout test and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation to detect the mode of failure. Fifty-six roots were randomly divided into 6 experimental and 2 control groups: ParaCore (PAR), Paracore + silane (PAR-SIL), RelyX Unicem (RXU), RelyX Unicem + silane (RXU-SIL), RelyX ARC (RXA), RelyX ARC + silane (RXA-SIL), negative control (NEG-CON), and positive control (POS-CON). ParaCore posts were placed in the experimental groups (each n = 8) by using an adhesive resin with or without prior silanization. NEG-CON received uncemented posts (n = 4); POS-CON received an active screw post with an adhesive (n = 4). All samples were subjected to a pullout test in a universal mechanical testing machine for pullout tests and SEM to assess the fiber posts and the roots after the tests. Mean failure load values for each ground were PAR 247.4 ± 59.3 N, PAR-SIL 240.5 ± 68.8 N, RXU 102.3 ± 22.8 N, RXU-SIL 106.4 ± 19.8 N, RXA 119.8 ± 27.3 N, RXA-SIL 125.8 ± 28.3 N, NEG-CON 0 ± 0 N, and POS-CON 412.9 ± 27.4 N. There was a statistically significant difference between the 3 experimental adhesive systems (P < .001) and between each experimental group and NEG-CON and POS-CON (P < .05). PAR was significantly different from RXU and RXA (P < .05). No statistically significant differences existed between RXU and RXA and between the use of silanization or not. Representative samples for SEM showed cohesive failure as the principal fracture mode for PAR and mainly adhesive failure for RXU and RXA. The results indicated that silanization of fiber posts does not make a difference to prevent dislocation of a post. Full-etching systems demonstrated significantly higher retentive forces than self-etching systems. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An investigation of CYP2D6 genotype and response to metoprolol CR/XL during dose titration in patients with heart failure: a MERIT-HF substudy.

    PubMed

    Batty, J A; Hall, A S; White, H L; Wikstrand, J; de Boer, R A; van Veldhuisen, D J; van der Harst, P; Waagstein, F; Hjalmarson, Å; Kjekshus, J; Balmforth, A J

    2014-03-01

    To explore the pharmacogenetic effects of the cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 genotype in patients with systolic heart failure treated using controlled/extended-release (CR/XL) metoprolol, this study assessed the CYP2D6 locus for the nonfunctional *4 allele (1846G>A; rs3892097) in the Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure (MERIT-HF; n = 605). Participants were characterized as extensive, intermediate, or poor metabolizers (EMs, IMs, or PMs, respectively), based on the presence of the CYP2D6*4 allele (EM: *1*1, 60.4%; IM: *1*4, 35.8%; and PM: *4*4, 3.8%). Plasma metoprolol concentrations were 2.1-/4.6-fold greater in the IM/PM groups as compared with the EM group (P < 0.0001). Metoprolol induced significantly lower heart rates and diastolic blood pressures during early titration, indicating a CYP2D6*4 allele dose-response effect (P < 0.05). These effects were not observed at maximal dose, suggesting a saturable effect. Genotype did not adversely affect surrogate treatment efficacy. CYP2D6 genotype modulates metoprolol pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics during early titration; however, the MERIT-HF-defined titration schedule remains recommended for all patients, regardless of genotype.

  8. Antibiotic managment in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Winter, R E

    1976-06-01

    This is a brief compilation of the work of many investigators. It includes facts about toxicity and recommendations about antibiotic management in patients with renal failure. As new data are accrued, changes in these recommendations will be necessary.

  9. Global left atrial failure in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Triposkiadis, Filippos; Pieske, Burkert; Butler, Javed; Parissis, John; Giamouzis, Gregory; Skoularigis, John; Brutsaert, Dirk; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2016-11-01

    The left atrium plays an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular and neurohumoral homeostasis in heart failure. However, with progressive left ventricular dysfunction, left atrial (LA) dilation and mechanical failure develop, which frequently culminate in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, LA mechanical failure is accompanied by LA endocrine failure [deficient atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) processing-synthesis/development of ANP resistance) and LA regulatory failure (dominance of sympathetic nervous system excitatory mechanisms, excessive vasopressin release) contributing to neurohumoral overactivity, vasoconstriction, and volume overload (global LA failure). The purpose of the present review is to describe the characteristics and emphasize the clinical significance of global LA failure in patients with heart failure. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  10. Comparison of different threshold values r for approximate entropy: application to investigate the heart rate variability between heart failure and healthy control groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Changchun; Shao, Peng; Li, Liping; Sun, Xin; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Feng

    2011-02-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn) is widely accepted as a complexity measure of the heart rate variability (HRV) signal, but selecting the criteria for the threshold value r is controversial. This paper aims to verify whether Chon's method of forecasting the r(max) is an appropriate one for the HRV signal. The standard limb lead ECG signals of 120 subjects were recorded for 10 min in a supine position. The subjects were divided into two groups: the heart failure (22 females and 38 males, median age 62.4 ± 12.6) and healthy control group (33 females and 27 males, median age 51.5 ± 16.9). Three types of ApEn were calculated: the ApEn(0.2) using the recommended constant r = 0.2, the ApEn(chon) using Chon's method and the ApEn(max) using the true r(max). A Wilcoxon rank sum test showed that the ApEn(0.2) (p = 0.267) and the ApEn(max) (p = 0.813) had no statistical differences between the two groups, while the ApEn(chon) (p = 0.040) had. We generated a synthetic database to study the effect of two influential factors (the signal length N and the ratio of short- and long-term variability sd(1)/sd(2)) on the empirical formula in Chon's method (Chon et al 2009 IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Mag. 28 18-23). The results showed that the empirical formula proposed by Chon et al is a good method for analyzing the random signal, but not an appropriate tool for analyzing nonlinear signals, such as the logistic or HRV signals.

  11. Investigation of the Quasi-Brittle Failure of Alashan Granite Viewed from Laboratory Experiments and Grain-Based Discrete Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Duoxing; Braun, Anika; Han, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    Granite is a typical crystalline material, often used as a building material, but also a candidate host rock for the repository of high-level radioactive waste. The petrographic texture—including mineral constituents, grain shape, size, and distribution—controls the fracture initiation, propagation, and coalescence within granitic rocks. In this paper, experimental laboratory tests and numerical simulations of a grain-based approach in two-dimensional Particle Flow Code (PFC2D) were conducted on the mechanical strength and failure behavior of Alashan granite, in which the grain-like structure of granitic rock was considered. The microparameters for simulating Alashan granite were calibrated based on real laboratory strength values and strain-stress curves. The unconfined uniaxial compressive test and Brazilian indirect tensile test were performed using a grain-based approach to examine and discuss the influence of mineral grain size and distribution on the strength and patterns of microcracks in granitic rocks. The results show it is possible to reproduce the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and uniaxial tensile strength (UTS) of Alashan granite using the grain-based approach in PFC2D, and the average mineral size has a positive relationship with the UCS and UTS. During the modeling, most of the generated microcracks were tensile cracks. Moreover, the ratio of the different types of generated microcracks is related to the average grain size. When the average grain size in numerical models is increased, the ratio of the number of intragrain tensile cracks to the number of intergrain tensile cracks increases, and the UCS of rock samples also increases with this ratio. However, the variation in grain size distribution does not have a significant influence on the likelihood of generated microcracks. PMID:28773201

  12. Investigation of the Quasi-Brittle Failure of Alashan Granite Viewed from Laboratory Experiments and Grain-Based Discrete Element Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Duoxing; Braun, Anika; Han, Zhenhua

    2017-07-21

    Granite is a typical crystalline material, often used as a building material, but also a candidate host rock for the repository of high-level radioactive waste. The petrographic texture-including mineral constituents, grain shape, size, and distribution-controls the fracture initiation, propagation, and coalescence within granitic rocks. In this paper, experimental laboratory tests and numerical simulations of a grain-based approach in two-dimensional Particle Flow Code (PFC2D) were conducted on the mechanical strength and failure behavior of Alashan granite, in which the grain-like structure of granitic rock was considered. The microparameters for simulating Alashan granite were calibrated based on real laboratory strength values and strain-stress curves. The unconfined uniaxial compressive test and Brazilian indirect tensile test were performed using a grain-based approach to examine and discuss the influence of mineral grain size and distribution on the strength and patterns of microcracks in granitic rocks. The results show it is possible to reproduce the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and uniaxial tensile strength (UTS) of Alashan granite using the grain-based approach in PFC2D, and the average mineral size has a positive relationship with the UCS and UTS. During the modeling, most of the generated microcracks were tensile cracks. Moreover, the ratio of the different types of generated microcracks is related to the average grain size. When the average grain size in numerical models is increased, the ratio of the number of intragrain tensile cracks to the number of intergrain tensile cracks increases, and the UCS of rock samples also increases with this ratio. However, the variation in grain size distribution does not have a significant influence on the likelihood of generated microcracks.

  13. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  14. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  15. Manufacturing quality from electronic failure analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, B.

    The Electronic Failure Analysis Group of the AFWAL/Materials Laboratory Systems Support Division has investigated numerous electronic device failures that resulted from manufacturing process defects. The electronic failure analysis program that verifies the device failure, locates the failure site, establishes the cause of failure and recommends corrective actions is discussed in relation to improving the quality of electronic devices; performing electronic failure analysis is a high-payoff activity. Corrective actions usually involve very small costs to the manufacturer and provide the user with a large return on investment. Brief case histories are presented in regard to packaging, die attachment, solder flux removal, package moisture content, IC metallization processes, potted modules, and handling procedures affecting device cleanliness. Situations are identified where better quality control could eliminate many device defects that lead to premature part failure.

  16. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  17. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  18. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  19. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  20. Investigation of failure mechanisms in silicon based half cells during the first cycle by micro X-ray tomography and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fu; Markötter, Henning; Dong, Kang; Manke, Ingo; Hilger, Andre; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Banhart, John

    2016-07-01

    Two proof-of-concept batteries were designed and prepared for X-ray microtomography and radiography characterizations to investigate the degradation mechanisms of silicon (Si) based half cells during the first cycle. It is highlighted here for the first time that, apart from the significant volume expansion-induced pulverization, the electrochemical "deactivation" mechanism contributes significantly to the capacity loss during the first charge process. In addition, the unexpected electrochemically inactive Si particles are also believed to substantially decrease the energy density due to the inefficient utilization of loaded active material. These unexpected findings, which cannot be deduced from macroscopic electrochemical characterizations, expand the inherent explanations for performance deterioration of Si-anode material based lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and emphasize the vital value of microscopic techniques in revealing the correlation between macroscopic electrode structure and the overall electrochemical performance.

  1. [Obesity and heart failure].

    PubMed

    Weismann, D; Wiedmann, S; Bala, M; Frantz, S; Fassnacht, M

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for the development of heart failure. In normotensive obese patients, a reduced peripheral resistance is typically observed and is accompanied by an increased fluid volume and an increase in cardiac work, resulting in hypertrophy and diastolic heart failure, which can be visualized with echocardiography. However, in the presence of arterial hypertension cardiac geometry is not different to hypertensive heart disease without obesity. Furthermore, the typical changes found with obesity, such as reduced peripheral resistance and increased blood volume, are no longer present. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very common in obesity and warrants screening but levels of the heart failure marker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP) might be misleading as the values are lower in obesity than in normal weight controls. Body weight reduction is advisable but difficult to achieve and much more difficult to maintain. Furthermore, diet and exercise has not been proven to enhance life expectancy in obesity. However, with bariatric surgery, long-term weight reduction can be achieved and mortality can be reduced. With effective weight loss and improved clinical outcome after bariatric surgery, treatment of obesity has shifted much more into focus. Regardless of technical challenges in the work-up of obese patients, clinical symptoms suggestive of cardiac disorders warrant prompt investigation with standard techniques following recommendations as established for normal weight patients.

  2. Statistical relation between single- and multiple-component failures

    SciTech Connect

    Teichmann, T.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the results of some investigations of the statistical (and to some degree the qualitative) relation between single and multiple component failure events at US operating nuclear plants. The objectives of the investigations were to establish whether: multiple component failures could be attributed to random coincidences of single independent failures; there was any clear cut qualitative connection between the two type of failures; and there were any quantitative statistical parameters that related the two types of failure.

  3. An investigation of the stable orientations of orthorhombic particles in a thin film and their effect on its critical failure pressure.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-09-01

    The effects of shape and contact angle on the behaviour of orthorhombic particles at an interface and in thin films were investigated using Surface Evolver. It is shown that the energetically stable orientations of the particle change with its aspect ratio. Long, wide, flat particles with low contact angles are more stable in flat orientations, i.e. with two faces parallel to the flat film surface. More cubic particles with higher contact angles are more stable in twisted orientations, where the opposite sides of the film can be drawn together at the sharp edges of the particle. The combination of contact angle and orientation has been found to have a large effect on the capillary pressure required to rupture the film. A film containing a particle in a flat orientation will rupture at a capillary pressure up to three times greater than one containing an identical particle in a twisted orientation. Wider, flatter particles with low contact angles stabilise thin liquid films to a greater extent than cubic particles with high contact angles.

  4. Stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional failures predict earlier relapse to smoking in young adults: A pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Schepis, Ty S; Tapscott, Brian E; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence links greater impulsivity and stress exposure to poorer smoking cessation outcomes. Results from adolescents also indicate that stress-related change in risk taking can impede cessation attempts. We investigated the effects of stress-related change in impulsivity, risk taking, attention and nicotine withdrawal, and craving in young adult smokers on time to smoking relapse in a relapse analogue paradigm. Twenty-six young adult smokers (50% women; mean age: 20.9 ± 1.8) were exposed to a stress imagery session followed by a contingency management-based relapse analogue paradigm. Participants smoked at least 5 cigarettes daily, with a mean baseline carbon monoxide (CO) level of 13.7 (± 5.1) ppm. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t tests examined stress induction validity and Cox regressions of proportional hazards examined the effects of stress-related changes in nicotine withdrawal, nicotine craving, attention, impulsivity, and risk taking on time to relapse. While stress-related change in impulsivity, nicotine craving and withdrawal did not predict time to relapse (all ps > .10), greater stress-related increases in reaction time (RT) variability (p = .02) were predictive of shorter time to relapse, with trend-level findings for inattention and risk taking. Furthermore, changes in stress-related risk taking affected outcome in women more than in men, with a significant relationship between stress-related change in risk taking only in women (p = .026). Smoking cessation attempts in young adults may be adversely impacted by stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional disruption. Clinicians working with young adults attempting cessation may need to target these stress-related impairments by fostering more adaptive coping and resilience.

  5. A longitudinal study investigating the role of decisional conflicts and regret and short-term psychological adjustment after IVF treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Chan, Celia Hoi Yan; Lau, Hi Po Bobo; Tam, Michelle Yi Jun; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu

    2016-12-01

    What is the relationship between decisional conflict, decisional regret and psychological well-being in women following unsuccessful IVF cycles? The mediating effect of decisional regret on the relationship between decisional conflict and fertility-related quality of life (FRQOL) has been found to be moderated by the availability (versus absence) of frozen embryos after an unsuccessful IVF cycle. Infertility treatment is marked by its open-ended nature. Stresses in treatment decision-making could be aggravated by a culture which honours families through procreation. While studies have investigated treatment-related decision-making among infertile women, little is known about the mental health consequences of decisional conflict and decisional regret following an unsuccessful IVF cycle. A study was conducted over a 3-month period with infertile women who had recently experienced a failed IVF cycle (T0). Decisional conflict when they decided on terminating or continuing treatment (T1) and decisional regret 3 months later (T2) were measured. Participants reported their levels of depression, anxiety and FRQOL at three time points. A total of 151 participants completed all time points (attrition rate: 39%). The average age of participants was 37.2 years, and they had had 1.1 cycles (range: 0-8) on average at the time of study intake. The duration of the study was 2 years. Participants were infertile women who were not pregnant following an IVF cycle recruited from a university-affiliated assisted reproduction centre. Following the notification of a negative pregnancy result, patients were invited to complete measures of FRQOL, depression and anxiety across three time points and decisional conflict and decisional regret at T1 and T2 respectively. Decisional regret partially mediated the effect of decisional conflict on overall and treatment-specific FRQOL (P < 0.05). The mediation by decisional regret was present only among participants who had no remaining frozen

  6. Wind Turbine Failures - Tackling current Problems in Failure Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reder, M. D.; Gonzalez, E.; Melero, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    The wind industry has been growing significantly over the past decades, resulting in a remarkable increase in installed wind power capacity. Turbine technologies are rapidly evolving in terms of complexity and size, and there is an urgent need for cost effective operation and maintenance (O&M) strategies. Especially unplanned downtime represents one of the main cost drivers of a modern wind farm. Here, reliability and failure prediction models can enable operators to apply preventive O&M strategies rather than corrective actions. In order to develop these models, the failure rates and downtimes of wind turbine (WT) components have to be understood profoundly. This paper is focused on tackling three of the main issues related to WT failure analyses. These are, the non-uniform data treatment, the scarcity of available failure analyses, and the lack of investigation on alternative data sources. For this, a modernised form of an existing WT taxonomy is introduced. Additionally, an extensive analysis of historical failure and downtime data of more than 4300 turbines is presented. Finally, the possibilities to encounter the lack of available failure data by complementing historical databases with Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) alarms are evaluated.

  7. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  8. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  9. Investigation of TESCOM Driveshaft Assembly Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    end and through a laser window port. The horoscope revealed that rotor 1 had rubbed the abradable material on the case, concentrating on the bottom of... horoscope . The oils were turned on and the compressor was boroscoped through the exit flow path inside the rotor hub to determine if the carbon seals were

  10. Dynamic Constitutive/Failure Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    compressive failure--microfracture versus microplasticity . Actual traces observed in plate impact tests on ceramic targets are hardly ever as simple as the...observa- tions for microfracture and microplasticity . Unfortunately, each team of investigators has used slightly different experimental techniques and

  11. Failure in glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Review of state of the art concerning glass failure mechanisms and fatigue theories discusses brittle fracture in glass, fatigue mechanisms, fatigue behavior, environmental effects on failure rate, and aging.

  12. [Understanding heart failure].

    PubMed

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  13. Failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jerry; Stricker, George

    2011-11-01

    This article addresses the issue of failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Drawing on the clinical and research literatures, and utilizing our clinical experiences, we first describe and define criteria for success and failure in treatment. We then review five factors that can lead to failure: client factors, therapist factors, technical factors, relationship factors, and environmental factors. We illustrate our presentation with a case example, and conclude by discussing ways in which the likelihood of failures in psychodynamic treatment can be lowered.

  14. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  15. Heart failure - palliative care

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic heart failure very often gets worse over time. Many people who have heart failure die of ... failure to take in enough calories and nutrients. Wasting of muscles and weight loss are part of the natural disease process. It can help to eat several small ...

  16. Success, Failure, and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary B.; Fisher, Judith L.

    In order to discover the effects of success and failure on subsequent aggressiveness, 26 male and 55 female college students were randomly assigned to success, failure, and neutral conditions. Those in the success condition were led to feel they were superior to other college students on a task, those in the failure condition were led to feel they…

  17. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask ... Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  18. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment.

  19. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  20. Failure models for textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the `Binary Model,` was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  1. Failure analyses of composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. W.; Gillespie, J. W.; York, J. L.; Pipes, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The complex failure behavior exhibited by bolted joints of graphite epoxy (Hercules AS/3501) was investigated for the net tension, bearing and shearout failure modes using combined analytical and experimental techniques. Plane stress, linear elastic, finite element methods were employed to determine the two dimensional state of stress resulting from a loaded hole in a finite width, semiinfinite strip. The stresses predicted by the finite element method were verified by experiment to lend credence to the analysis. The influence of joint geometric parameters on the state of stress and resultant strength of the joint was also studied. The resulting functional relationships found to exist between bolted joint strength and the geometric parameters, were applied in the formulation of semiempirical strength models for the basic failure modes. A point stress failure criterion was successfully applied as the failure criterion for the net tension and shearout failure modes.

  2. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  3. Vein graft failure

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Christopher D.; Gasper, Warren J.; Rahman, Amreen S.; Conte, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Following the creation of an autogenous lower extremity bypass graft, the vein must undergo a series of dynamic structural changes to stabilize the arterial hemodynamic forces. These changes, commonly referred to as remodeling, include an inflammatory response, the development of a neointima, matrix turnover, and cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The sum total of these processes results in dramatic alterations in the physical and biomechanical attributes of the arterialized vein. The most clinically obvious and easily measured of these is lumen remodeling of the graft. However, though somewhat less precise, wall thickness, matrix composition, and endothelial changes can be measured in vivo within the healing vein graft. Recent translational work has demonstrated the clinical relevance of remodeling as it relates to vein graft patency and the systemic factors influencing it. By correlating histologic and molecular changes in the vein, insights into potential therapeutic strategies to prevent bypass failure and areas for future investigation are explored. PMID:24095042

  4. The failure of earthquake failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  5. Failure of Non-Circular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a progressive failure analysis is used to investigate leakage in internally pressurized non-circular composite cylinders. This type of approach accounts for the localized loss of stiffness when material failure occurs at some location in a structure by degrading the local material elastic properties by a certain factor. The manner in which this degradation of material properties takes place depends on the failure modes, which are determined by the application of a failure criterion. The finite-element code STAGS, which has the capability to perform progressive failure analysis using different degradation schemes and failure criteria, is utilized to analyze laboratory scale, graphite-epoxy, elliptical cylinders with quasi-isotropic, circumferentially-stiff, and axially-stiff material orthotropies. The results are divided into two parts. The first part shows that leakage, which is assumed to develop if there is material failure in every layer at some axial and circumferential location within the cylinder, does not occur without failure of fibers. Moreover before fibers begin to fail, only matrix tensile failures, or matrix cracking, takes place, and at least one layer in all three cylinders studied remain uncracked, preventing the formation of a leakage path. That determination is corroborated by the use of different degradation schemes and various failure criteria. Among the degradation schemes investigated are the degradation of different engineering properties, the use of various degradation factors, the recursive or non-recursive degradation of the engineering properties, and the degradation of material properties using different computational approaches. The failure criteria used in the analysis include the noninteractive maximum stress criterion and the interactive Hashin and Tsai-Wu criteria. The second part of the results shows that leakage occurs due to a combination of matrix tensile and compressive, fiber tensile and compressive, and inplane

  6. Congestive heart failure in children with pneumonia and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Nimdet, Kachaporn; Techakehakij, Win

    2017-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common cardiac complications of pneumonia in adulthood leading to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Little is known, however, of CHF and pneumonia in children. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the characteristics and factors associated with CHF in under-5 children with pneumonia and respiratory failure. A retrospective cohort was conducted in hospitalized patients aged 2-59 months with community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory failure from June 2011 to June 2014 at Suratthani Hospital, Thailand. The characteristics, therapeutic strategy, and clinical outcomes of CHF were reviewed. Baseline characteristics and basic laboratory investigations on admission were compared between the CHF and non-CHF groups. Of 135 patients, 14 (10%) had CHF. Compared with patients without CHF, the CHF group had prolonged intubation and hospital stay and high rates of associated complications such as ventilator-associated pneumonia, sepsis, shock, and 30 day mortality. CHF was significantly associated with certain characteristics, including male sex and bacterial pneumonia. Pneumonia with respiratory failure is associated with CHF even in healthy children without cardiac risks. The awareness and early recognition of CHF, particularly in male, and bacterial pneumonia, is important in order to provide immediate treatment to reduce complications. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Kidney Failure What is kidney failure and how is it treated? Kidney failure ... Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis . Peritoneal dialysis Kidney Transplant A kidney transplant places a healthy kidney ...

  8. Loess failure in northeast Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroder, John F.; Schettler, Megan Jensen; Weihs, Brandon J.

    Mass movements in northeastern Afghanistan include large-scale rockslides and complex slope failures, as well as failures in loess. The loess region in northeastern Afghanistan occurs in the Badakhshan and Takhar provinces and was likely created by dust blown to the east from the Karakum Desert and the alluvial plains of northern Afghanistan. This loessic dust was deposited against the Hindu Kush mountain range which rises up along the eastern half of Afghanistan as a result of transpressional tectonism. It overlies less permeable crystalline and sedimentary bedrocks such as Triassic granite, Proterozoic gneiss, and Miocene and Pliocene clastics in the area with the largest concentration of slope failures. Thirty-four loess slides and flows were mapped and analyzed using remote satellite imagery over digital elevation models on Google Earth™. This source enabled location, classification, and measurement of failures. Findings revealed that most failed slopes faced north, west, and northwest. This trend can be explained possibly as different moisture contents resulting from the primarily westerly wind direction, which may cause more precipitation to be deposited on west-facing slopes, and sun position during the hottest part of the day. Additionally, the easterly rising Hindu Kush range may cause more slope area to face west in the study region. Other contributing factors could be the very high seismicity of the area, which may cause rapid dry fluidized loess flows, and landscape modification by humans. Several loess slope failures appear to be generated by water concentration through irrigation ditches and possible rutted tire tracks, which can create tunneling between the loess and its less permeable bedrock. Causes and effects of loess failure in Afghanistan need to be investigated in more depth. Further study may lead to the adoption of more sustainable and safe farming practices and more informed housing locations, which may prevent loss of property, crop, and

  9. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  10. Duralumin - Defects and Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    It is proposed in this paper to identify some of the defects and failures in duralumin most frequently encountered by the aircraft industry with a view to indicate their importance. The defects and failures in duralumin may be classified into the following groups: 1) defects produced during manufacture; 2) defects produced during fabrication; 3) corrosion and erosion; and 4) fatigue failures. Only the first two will be covered in this report.

  11. Early complications. Respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, J B; Alpard, S K; Bidani, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Respiratory failure after pneumonectomy occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of cases and significantly increases patient mortality. Strategies for ventilator support are based on the nature of the underlying complication and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure. This article describes the cause and pathophysiology of respiratory failure and pulmonary embolus postpneumonectomy. Diagnosis, management, and innovative therapies are also reviewed.

  12. The declining frequency of inducible myocardial ischemia during stress echocardiography over 27 consecutive years (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Landi, Patrizia; Michelassi, Claudio; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested a decline in positivity of stress cardiac imaging, suggesting the need for developing better strategies for test selection to achieve acceptable cost-effectiveness balance. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the rate of positivity of stress echocardiography (SE) over 27 consecutive years. We assessed the rate of SE positivity in 2007 patients without previous myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization who performed SE in a tertiary care referral center from 1983 to 2009. SE was performed with dipyridamole (1427), dobutamine (136) or exercise (444). There was a progressive decline over time in the rate of SE positivity from 42% (1983-1991) to 22% (2001-2009), with a relative increase of patients with low pre-test probability of disease (from 5% to 27%). The percentage of patients studied with SE under anti-ischemic therapy increased markedly (from 8% in the first to 61% in the last nine years). Over 27 consecutive years, we observed a steady decline in SE positivity rate (with >5-fold increase of low probability patients), with almost 8-fold increase in anti-ischemic therapy at testing. We probably need refined criteria of referral for testing and/or better ways to titrate the negative response beyond wall motion abnormalities during SE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Failure to thrive.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Scott D; Dubowitz, Howard

    2003-09-01

    Failure to thrive is a condition commonly seen by primary care physicians. Prompt diagnosis and intervention are important for preventing malnutrition and developmental sequelae. Medical and social factors often contribute to failure to thrive. Either extreme of parental attention (neglect or hypervigilance) can lead to failure to thrive. About 25 percent of normal infants will shift to a lower growth percentile in the first two years of life and then follow that percentile; this should not be diagnosed as failure to thrive. Infants with Down syndrome, intrauterine growth retardation, or premature birth follow different growth patterns than normal infants. Many infants with failure to thrive are not identified unless careful attention is paid to plotting growth parameters at routine checkups. A thorough history is the best guide to establishing the etiology of the failure to thrive and directing further evaluation and management. All children with failure to thrive need additional calories for catch-up growth (typically 150 percent of the caloric requirement for their expected, not actual, weight). Few need laboratory evaluation. Hospitalization is rarely required and is indicated only for severe failure to thrive and for those whose safety is a concern. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended when failure to thrive persists despite intervention or when it is severe.

  14. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  15. A failure recovery planning prototype for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Kelly, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is investigating the use of advanced automation to enhance crew productivity for Space Station Freedom in numerous areas, including failure management. A prototype is described that uses various advanced automation techniques to generate courses of action whose intents are to recover from a diagnosed failure, and to do so within the constraints levied by the failure and by Freedom's configuration and operating conditions.

  16. Myocardial perfusion, function, and dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure: baseline results from the single-photon emission computed tomography imaging ancillary study of the Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing (HF-ACTION) Trial.

    PubMed

    Atchley, Allen E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Whellan, David J; Iskandrian, Ami E; Ellis, Stephen J; Pagnanelli, Robert A; Kao, Andrew; Abdul-Nour, Khaled; O'Connor, Christopher M; Ewald, Greg; Kraus, William E; Borges-Neto, Salvador

    2009-10-01

    There are currently limited data on the relationships between resting perfusion abnormalities, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, and exercise capacity as defined by peak VO(2) and 6-minute walk test in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced LVEF. Furthermore, the association between resting perfusion abnormalities and left ventricular dyssynchrony is currently unknown. This article addresses the Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing (HF-ACTION) gated SPECT imaging (gSPECT) substudy baseline results. HF-ACTION was a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of aerobic exercise training versus usual care in 2,331 stable patients with LVEF of < or = 35% and NYHA class II to IV HF symptoms treated with optimal medical therapy. Subjects enrolled in the HF-ACTION substudy underwent resting Tc-99m tetrofosmin gSPECT at baseline (n = 240). Images were evaluated for extent and severity of perfusion abnormalities using a 17-segment and a 5-degree gradation severity score (summed rest score [SRS]). Left ventricular function and dyssynchrony were assessed using validated available commercial software. The average age of patients enrolled was 59, 69% were male, 63% were white, and 33% were African American. Of the 240 participants, 129 (54%) were ischemic and 111 (46%) were nonischemic in etiology. The median LVEF by gSPECT for the entire cohort was 26%. Among the nuclear variables, there was a modest correlation between LVEF and SRS (r = -0.31, P < .0001) and there were stronger correlations between phase SD and SRS (r = 0.66, P < .0001) as well as phase SD and LVEF (r = -0.50, P < .0001). Patients with NYHA class III symptoms had more severe and significant degrees of dyssynchrony (median phase SD 54 degrees ) than those with NYHA class II symptoms (median phase SD 39 degrees, P = .001). Patients with an ischemic etiology had a higher SRS (P < .0001) and significantly

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  18. Ampoule Failure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, Dale A. (Inventor); Johnson, Martin L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ampoule failure system for use in material processing furnaces comprising a containment cartridge and an ampoule failure sensor. The containment cartridge contains an ampoule of toxic material therein and is positioned within a furnace for processing. An ampoule failure probe is positioned in the containment cartridge adjacent the ampoule for detecting a potential harmful release of toxic material therefrom during processing. The failure probe is spaced a predetermined distance from the ampoule and is chemically chosen so as to undergo a timely chemical reaction with the toxic material upon the harmful release thereof. The ampoule failure system further comprises a data acquisition system which is positioned externally of the furnace and is electrically connected to the ampoule failure probe so as to form a communicating electrical circuit. The data acquisition system includes an automatic shutdown device for shutting down the furnace upon the harmful release of toxic material. It also includes a resistance measuring device for measuring the resistance of the failure probe during processing. The chemical reaction causes a step increase in resistance of the failure probe whereupon the automatic shutdown device will responsively shut down the furnace.

  19. Physicists and failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheem, Ruby; zilch, Mortimer

    2015-08-01

    In reply to a post on the physicsworld.com blog about the central role of failure in physics (“Success, failure and women in physics”, 10 June, http://ow.ly/O8kvR; see also “Failing better,” Editorial, July p15).

  20. Living with Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... smoking. Emotional Issues and Support Living with respiratory failure may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel with your health care team. Talking to a professional counselor also can ... to living with respiratory failure. You can see how other people who have ...

  1. Stem cell niche failure concerns bone marrow failure--a diagnostic and therapeutic consideration.

    PubMed

    Law, Sujata; Chaudhuri, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the bone marrow often referred to as "Bone marrow failure" have complicated pathophysiological picture with respect to hematopoietic systemic function. The reason for such bone marrow disorder is not well understood till date, although some sporadic etiological sources have been described earlier. With the advent of current investigations, hematopoietic stem cell involvement together with the failure of signaling interaction within the bone marrow niche has been found to reveal interesting correlations with the disease onset. The present review furnishes justification for bone marrow failure as a concern of stem cell niche failure and hints at providing important clues for disease diagnosis and therapeutic maneuver.

  2. Heart failure symptom relationships: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Herr, Janet K; Salyer, Jeanne; Lyon, Debra E; Goodloe, Lauren; Schubert, Christine; Clement, Dolores G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a prevalent chronic health condition in the United States. Individuals who have heart failure experience as many as 2 to 9 symptoms. The examination of relationships among heart failure symptoms may benefit patients and clinicians who are charged with managing heart failure symptoms. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize what is known about relationships among heart failure symptoms, a precursor to the identification of heart failure symptom clusters, as well as to examine studies specifically addressing symptom clusters described in this population. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed in the conduct of this systematic review. PubMed, PsychINFO, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Cochrane Database were searched using the search term heart failure in combination with a pair of symptoms. Of a total of 1316 studies identified from database searches, 34 were included in this systematic review. More than 1 investigator found a moderate level of correlation between depression and fatigue, depression and anxiety, depression and sleep, depression and pain, anxiety and fatigue, and dyspnea and fatigue. The findings of this systematic review provide support for the presence of heart failure symptom clusters. Depression was related to several of the symptoms, providing an indication to clinicians that individuals with heart failure who experience depression may have other concurrent symptoms. Some symptom relationships such as the relationships between fatigue and anxiety or sleep or pain were dependent on the symptom characteristics studied. Symptom prevalence in the sample and restricted sampling may influence the robustness of the symptom relationships. These findings suggest that studies defining the phenotype of individual heart failure symptoms may be a beneficial step in the study of heart failure symptom clusters.

  3. Generalized energy failure criterion.

    PubMed

    Qu, R T; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, P; Liu, Z Q; Zhang, Z F

    2016-03-21

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the "generalized energy criterion", as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components.

  4. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  5. Failure mechanisms in MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    MEMS components by their very nature have different and unique failure mechanisms than their macroscopic counterparts. This paper discusses failure mechanisms observed in various MEMS components and technologies. MEMS devices fabricated using bulk and surface micromachining process technologies are emphasized. MEMS devices offer uniqueness in their application, fabrication, and functionality. Their uniqueness creates various failure mechanisms not typically found in their bulk or IC counterparts. In ICs, electrical precautions are taken to mitigate failure. In MEMS, both electrical and mechanical precautions must be enacted to reduce the risk of failure and increased reliability. Unlike ICs, many MEMS components are designed to interact with their environment, making the fabrication, testing, and packaging processes critical for the success of the device.

  6. Generalized energy failure criterion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the “generalized energy criterion”, as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components. PMID:26996781

  7. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  8. Liver Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bacak, Stephen J; Thornburg, Loralei L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but life-threatening medical emergency in pregnancy whose true incidence remains unknown. Many cases of acute liver failure are caused by pregnancy-related conditions such as acute fatty liver of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. However, acute deterioration in liver function can also be caused by drug overdose, viral infections, and an exacerbation of underlying chronic liver disease. This article provides an overview of the normal liver changes that occur during pregnancy, and summarizes the most common conditions and general management strategies of liver failure during pregnancy.

  9. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  10. Heart failure in children - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth defect of the heart - heart ...

  11. Triac failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A failure detector is provided for detecting unidirectional failures in triacs, particularly as used in power factor controllers for induction motors. In a first embodiment, the triac voltage waveform is sensed and upon detection of an unbalanced signal, corresponding to failure of the triac in either the positive or negative direction, the triac is turned full on in both directions. In a second embodiment, a pair of pulsed signals are derived, the pulse durations of which are proportional to the phase difference between the load current and voltage for each half cycle, and the triac is turned full on responsive to a difference in pulse duration between the half cycle signals. An unidirectional open circuit detector is adapted to use a signal from either of the first and second embodiment to turn the triac off in response to an open circuit failure in either direction.

  12. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  13. Acute Liver Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause acute liver failure include the poisonous wild mushroom Amanita phalloides, which is sometimes mistaken for one ... also can spread infection. Don't eat wild mushrooms. It can be difficult to tell the difference ...

  14. Failure to communicate.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-02-01

    When a medication error is coupled with a communication problem, a patient may experience significant injury. Cases involving communication breakdown, i.e, failure to communicate or listen, are discussed.

  15. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  16. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to quit Ventricular assist ... ask your doctor How to read food labels Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge Low-salt diet Mediterranean diet Taking warfarin ( ...

  17. Evaluation of ultrafiltration failure.

    PubMed

    Korbet, S M

    1998-07-01

    The evaluation of ultrafiltration failure is embarked upon when a patient has persistent problems with symptoms and signs of fluid overload. Fluid overload is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and the risk of its occurrence increases with time on dialysis. Although often attributed to changes in peritoneal membrane function (membrane failure), there are a number of potential, and frequently more common factors that can contribute to the failure of adequate fluid removal in patients on PD. Many of the causes of ultrafiltration failure may be apparent after an initial informal evaluation. However, if after this the etiology remains unexplained, a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of this problem can be utilized with the use of the peritoneal equilibration test. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, a logical therapeutic plan can be formulated.

  18. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you in the future. Follow Your Treatment Plan Treatment can relieve your symptoms and make daily ... or nurse about getting flu and pneumonia vaccines. Plan Ahead If you have heart failure, it's important ...

  19. Maximizing wood Failure

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1965-01-01

    The durability of plywood bonds in exterior exposure is commonly measured indirectly by failing wetted specimens in shear; a high percentage of wood failure is accepted in the industry as evidence that the gluebond will be durable.

  20. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  1. Acute Liver Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs and anticonvulsants, can cause acute liver failure. Herbal supplements. Herbal drugs and supplements, including kava, ephedra, skullcap ... over-the-counter medications do you take? What herbal supplements do you take? Do you use illegal drugs? ...

  2. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  3. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common causes of heart failure are: Coronary artery disease (CAD), a narrowing of the small blood vessels that ... at the same time. A defibrillator sends an electrical pulse to stop life-threatening abnormal heart rhythms. ...

  4. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors, making good decisions requires teamwork. Through shared decision making, doctors and patients consider both the options and ... care you want to receive. What is shared decision making? When heart failure progresses to an advanced stage, ...

  5. Pathophysiology of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, M; Perrone-Filardi, P

    1999-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Common etiology is mostly represented by ischemic and hypertensive heart disease. Clinically, heart failure can be defined as an impaired cardiac performance, unable to meet the energy requirements of the periphery. Pathophysiologically, the clinical onset of heart failure symptoms already represents an advanced stage of disease when compensatory mechanisms triggered by the underlying decrease in contractility are no longer capable of maintaining adequate cardiac performance during exercise and, subsequently, under resting conditions. Independent of its underlying etiology, cardiac failure is always characterized by an impairment in the intrinsic contractility of myocytes. As a consequence of reduced contractility, a number of central and peripheral compensatory mechanisms take place that are capable of effectively counteracting reduced intravascular intrinsic performance for a long period of time. Among them, recruitment of preload reserve, enhanced neurohormonal stimulation and cardiac hypertrophy are the most important. All of them, however, also carry unfavorable effects that contribute to further deterioration of cardiac function. In fact, increased end-diastolic volume determines increased wall stress that further reduces systolic performance; sympathetic and angiotensin stimulation increases peripheral resistance and contributes to increase volume expansion; hypertrophic myocytes demonstrate impaired intrinsic contractility and relaxation, and hypertrophy causes a clinically relevant deterioration of ventricular relaxation and compliance that substantially participates in increased end-diastolic pressure, and, therefore, to limited exercise performance. Diastolic dysfunction usually accompanies systolic dysfunction, although in some cases it may represent the prevalent mechanism of congestive heart failure in patients in whom systolic performance is preserved. Biological causes

  6. Heart failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, John D

    2012-12-01

    With increasing maternal age and the presence of comorbid conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular assessment and monitoring is the responsibility of all clinicians caring for pregnant patients. Furthermore, there are specific conditions, such as mitral stenosis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, and preeclampsia, that can be associated with heart failure and secondary maternal (and fetal) mortality and morbidity. The important causes of heart failure in pregnancy are discussed.

  7. Equipment Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Tennessee Eastman uses NASTRAN to minimize lost production by pinpointing the causes of equipment failures and preventing recurrences. An example of the program's utility involves a large centrifugal fan which developed cracks during start-ups and shutdowns. This information prompted redesign of the fan. Tennessee Eastman has made extensive use of NASTRAN, both as failure analysis tool and as an aid in redesigning production hardware.

  8. Decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Braga, Fabiana Goulart Marcondes; Bacal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure is a disease with high incidence and prevalence in the population. The costs with hospitalization for decompensated heart failure reach approximately 60% of the total cost with heart failure treatment, and mortality during hospitalization varies according to the studied population, and could achieve values of 10%. In patients with decompensated heart failure, history and physical examination are of great value for the diagnosis of the syndrome, and also can help the physician to identify the beginning of symptoms, and give information about etiology, causes and prognosis of the disease. The initial objective of decompensated heart failure treatment is the hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement preservation and/or improvement of renal function, prevention of myocardial damage, modulation of the neurohormonal and/or inflammatory activation and control of comorbidities that can cause or contribute to progression of the syndrome. According to the clinical-hemodynamic profile, it is possible to establish a rational for the treatment of decompensated heart failure, individualizing the proceedings to be held, leading to reduction in the period of hospitalization and consequently reducing overall mortality. PMID:24136770

  9. Premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Kalantaridou, S N; Davis, S R; Nelson, L M

    1998-12-01

    In 1% of women, premature ovarian failure develops by 40 years of age, a condition causing amenorrhea, infertility, sex steroid deficiency, and elevated gonadotropins. Early loss of ovarian function has significant psychosocial sequelae and major health implications. These young women have a nearly two-fold age-specific increase in mortality rate. Among women with spontaneous premature ovarian failure who have a normal karyotype, half have ovarian follicles remaining in the ovary that function intermittently. Indeed, pregnancies have occurred after the diagnosis of premature ovarian failure. Thus, premature ovarian failure should not be considered as a premature menopause. Young women with this disorder have a 5% to 10% chance for spontaneous pregnancy. Attempts at ovulation induction using various regimens fail to induce ovulation rates greater than those seen in untreated patients; however, oocyte donation for women desiring fertility is an option. Young women with premature ovarian failure need a thorough assessment, sex steroid replacement, and long-term surveillance to monitor therapy. Estrogen-progestin replacement therapy should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made. Androgen replacement should also be considered for women with low libido, persistent fatigue, and poor well-being despite taking adequate estrogen replacement. Women with premature ovarian failure should be followed up for the presence of associated autoimmune endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and diabetes mellitus.

  10. Life Support with Failures and Variable Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The life support system for long duration missions will recycle oxygen and water to reduce the material resupply mass from Earth. The impact of life support failures was investigated by dynamic simulation of a lunar outpost habitat life support model. The model was modified to simulate resupply delays, power failures, recycling system failures, and storage failures. Many failures impact the lunar outpost water supply directly or indirectly, depending on the water balance and water storage. Failure effects on the water supply are reduced if Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) water use is low and the water supply is ample. Additional oxygen can be supplied by scavenging unused propellant or by production from regolith, but the amounts obtained can vary significantly. The requirements for oxygen and water can also vary significantly, especially for EVA. Providing storage buffers can improve efficiency and reliability, and minimize the chance of supply failing to meet demand. Life support failures and supply variations can be survivable if effective solutions are provided by the system design

  11. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe current results from an on-going study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental and analytical results are presented. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data for the TIBB (Technology Integration Box Beam). An analytical investigation was conducted to compliment the experimental investigation and to gain additional insight into the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB. A local analysis of the failure region is being completed. These analytical results are validated through comparisons with the experimental results from the TIBB tests. The experimental and analytical results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that may have resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Typical analytical results are presented for a stiffener runout specimen that is being defined to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms. The results of this study are anticipated to provide better understanding of potential failure mechanisms in composite aircraft structures, to lead to future design improvements, and to identify needed analytical tools for design and analysis.

  12. SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, George; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karagiannis, Georgios; Butler, Javed; Tsougos, Ioannis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Giannakoulas, George; Dimakopoulos, Nikolaos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2017-02-02

    Heart failure is a common clinical syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of heart failure, at least in the industrialized countries. Proper diagnosis of the syndrome and management of patients with heart failure require anatomical and functional information obtained through various imaging modalities. Nuclear cardiology techniques play a main role in the evaluation of heart failure. Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium-201 or technetium-99 m labelled tracers offer valuable data regarding ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, viability, and intraventricular synchronism. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) permits accurate evaluation of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and viability, providing high-quality images and the ability of quantitative analysis. As these imaging techniques assess different parameters of cardiac structure and function, variations of sensitivity and specificity have been reported among them. In addition, the role of SPECT and PET guided therapy remains controversial. In this comprehensive review, we address these controversies and report the advances in patient's investigation with SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure. Furthermore, we present the innovations in technology that are expected to strengthen the role of nuclear cardiology modalities in the investigation of heart failure.

  13. Analysis of failure in manufacturing machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Abidin Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents information about how to interpret the machine failure in suitable ways. The concept in this paper focuses on the methodology and creates active thinking with positive attitude to solve the machine failure. It is also described few topic on elaborate the technique towards investigate and develop a better understanding of using this concept in manufacturing industry. Failure analysis (FA) in manufacturing has its own value for each characteristic and to communicate, it needs specific data. Two methods were discussed to perform FA i.e. Why-why analysis and PM analysis (is a philosophy which aims to clarify the mechanism behind the chronically defective phenomena by analyzing the phenomena in terms of physical principle). For Why-why analysis, it is mainly effective in preventing the recurrence of failures that occur at the initial period. Whereas PM analysis is mainly effective for resolving on a fundamental problem that occur in the accidental period.

  14. SAW Sensor for Fastener Failure Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Fisher, B.; Roller, M. J.; Malocha, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    The proof of concept for using surface acoustic wave (SAW) strain sensors in the detection of aircraft fastener failures is demonstrated. SAW sensors were investigated because they have the potential for the development of passive wireless systems. The SAW devices employed four orthogonal frequency coding (OFC) spread spectrum reflectors in two banks on a high temperature piezoelectric substrate. Three SAW devices were attached to a cantilever panel with removable side stiffeners. Damage in the form of fastener failure was simulated by removal of bolts from the side stiffeners. During testing, three different force conditions were used to simulate static aircraft structural response under loads. The design of the sensor, the panel arrangement and the panel testing results are reported. The results show that the sensors successfully detected single fastener failure at distances up to 54.6 cm from the failure site under loaded conditions.

  15. Mechanical failure of cavities in poroelastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, G.; Ortoleva, P.

    1998-12-31

    The stress-induced failure of cavities in poroelastic media is investigated using an analytical solution of the elastic matrix inclusion problem of Eshelby and a rock failure criterion. The elastic properties of the porous matrix surrounding the cavity are modeled using a self-consistent version of the theory of Berryman while the cavity collapse criterion is based on a failure condition calibrated as a function of matrix mineralogy, grain size and porosity. The influence of the latter textural variables as well as pore fluid pressure and cavity shape and orientation relative to the far-field stress are evaluated. The region of failure on the cavity surface is identified. These results are applied to the prediction of vug stability in a sedimentary basin in the context of vuggy reservoir exploration and production.

  16. Apollo 15 main-parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arabian, D. D.; Mechelay, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    In the investigation of the failure of one of the three main parachutes of the Apollo 15 spacecraft, which collapsed at approximately 1825 meters after operating properly from deployment at 3050 meters, three conditions considered to be possible causes of the failure were produced. The suspect conditions were the proximity of the forward heat shield that passed the spacecraft at approximately 1825 meters, the dumping of the reaction control system hypergolic propellants at approximately 1825 meters, and the failing of a riser link found on a recovered parachute. (The failed parachute was not recovered). The remaining two parachutes functioned as planned and averted a catastrophic failure. The conclusions concerning the cause of the failure are discussed.

  17. Neonatal acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah A; Whitington, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure (NALF) is a rare disease about which there is little published data; however, NALF is an extremely important condition as it is distinct from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. First, unlike acute liver failure in older patients, NALF can be diagnosed in an infant with cirrhosis. This is due to the fetal-neonatal continuum of liver disease, or the principle that neonatal liver failure may be the result of a liver disease that began in utero. Further differences exist in the mechanism of disease, diagnostic principles, and the common etiologies of NALF when compared with pediatric and adult acute liver failure. This review will address many of the distinguishing features of NALF and focus on the most common etiologies of NALF, including gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD), the most common cause of NALF. Additionally, this review will provide insight into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare condition. Liver Transplantation 22 677-685 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  19. Theoretical investigations into the influence of the position of a breaking line on the tensile failure of flat, round, bevel-edged tablets using finite element methodology (FEM) and its practical relevance for industrial tablet strength testing.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Newton, J Michael; Fromme, Paul

    2014-12-30

    Flat, round tablets may have a breaking ("score") line. Pharmacopoeial tablet breaking load tests are diametral in their design, and industrially used breaking load testers often have automatic tablet feeding systems, which position the tablets between the loading platens of the machine with the breaking lines in random orientation to the applied load. The aim of this work was to ascertain the influence of the position of the breaking line in a diametral compression test using finite element methodology (FEM) and to compare the theoretical results with practical findings using commercially produced bevel-edged, scored tablets. Breaking line test positions at an angle of 0°, 22.5°, 45°, 67.5° and 90° relative to the loading plane were studied. FEM results obtained for fully elastic and elasto-plastic tablets were fairly similar, but they highlighted large differences in stress distributions depending on the position of the breaking line. The stress values at failure were predicted to be similar for tablets tested at an angle of 45° or above, whereas at lower test angles the predicted breaking loads were up to three times larger. The stress distributions suggested that not all breaking line angles would result in clean tensile failure. Practical results, however, did not confirm the differences in the predicted breaking loads, but they confirmed differences in the way tablets broke. The results suggest that it is not advisable to convert breaking loads obtained on scored tablets into tablet tensile strength values, and comparisons between different tablets or batches should carefully consider the orientation of the breaking line with respect to the loading plane, as the failure mechanisms appear to vary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Causal Attributions for Failure and the Effect of Gender among Moroccan EFL University Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohri, Abdelaziz

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study that sought to investigate Moroccan university learners' perceptions of failure. 333 subjects studying English at university ranked their perceptions of failure in a Causal Attribution Scale of University Failure (CASUF). The results show that Moroccan learners attribute their failure to teachers' attitude, effort,…

  1. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  2. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  3. Failure to Diagnose Failure to Grow.

    PubMed

    Rose; Strasburger; Penland

    1996-10-01

    A 14-year-old female presented with a 3-week history of sore throat, hoarseness, croupy nonproductive cough, fever, diarrhea, and 5.5-kg weight loss. She was a poor student and "picky eater," and both her current weight and height (18.5 kg and 128 cm) were far below the fifth percentile. Her apparent failure to thrive was a source of concern, and although her diarrhea appeared to be acute, she began to have guaiac-positive stools, and admitted to chronic episodes of diarrhea and recurrent abdominal pains. A colonoscopy revealed chronic aphthous ulcers consistent with Crohn's disease of the large bowel. She was discharged on nutritional supplements, high-dose prednisone therapy, and mesalimine delayed-release tablets.

  4. Lactulose and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Frey, F J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of lactulose as a new therapeutic agent for treatment of hepatic encephalopathy was a major breakthrough in this field. It was hypothesized that lactulose might prevent postoperative renal impairment after biliary surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The presumable mechanism purported was the diminished endotoxinemia by lactulose. Unfortunately, such a reno-protective effect has not been shown conclusively until now in clinical studies. In chronic renal failure lactulose is known to promote fecal excretion of water, sodium, potassium, amonium, urea, creatinine and protons. Thus, lactulose could be useful for the treatment of chronic renal failure. However, compliance to the therapy represents a major problem.

  5. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  6. Diuretics for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  7. Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Winters, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure are usually critically ill and require immediate treatment. However, most are not volume overloaded. Emergency department (ED) management is based on rapid initiation of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and aggressive titration of nitrates. Afterload reduction with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor can be considered. A diuretic should not be administered before optimal preload and afterload reduction has been achieved. Short-term inotropic therapy can be considered in select patients with cardiogenic shock and acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who fail to respond to standard therapy.

  8. Failure detection and identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massoumnia, Mohammad-Ali; Verghese, George C.; Willsky, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Using the geometric concept of an unobservability subspace, a solution is given to the problem of detecting and identifying control system component failures in linear, time-invariant systems. Conditions are developed for the existence of a causal, linear, time-invariant processor that can detect and uniquely identify a component failure, first for the case where components can fail simultaneously, and then for the case where they fail only one at a time. Explicit design algorithms are provided when these conditions are satisfied. In addition to time-domain solvability conditions, frequency-domain interpretations of the results are given, and connections are drawn with results already available in the literature.

  9. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  10. Large Rock Slope Failures Induced by Recent Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ö.

    2016-06-01

    Recent earthquakes caused many large-scale rock slope failures. The scale and impact of rock slope failures are very large, and the form of failure differs depending upon the geological structures of slopes. First, the author briefly describes some model experiments to investigate the effects of shaking or faulting due to earthquakes on rock slopes. Then, fundamental characteristics of the rock slope failures induced by the earthquakes are described and evaluated according to some empirical and theoretical models. Furthermore, the observations for slope failures in relation to earthquake magnitude and epicenter or hypocenter distance were compared with several empirical relations available in the literature. Some of major rock slope failures induced by earthquakes are selected, and the post-failure motions are simulated and compared with observations. In addition, the effects of tsunamis on rock slopes in view of observations in the reconnaissances of the recent mega-earthquakes are explained and are discussed.

  11. Detecting dam failures

    SciTech Connect

    Knarr, C.M.; Barker, T.J.; McKenery, S.F. )

    1994-06-01

    This article describes efforts by Southern California Edison to meet Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requirements for unattended dam monitoring against failure. The topics include a description of the two dam systems, monitoring system design and operation including warning sirens for remote camping areas, and installation of the systems.

  12. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  13. Failure in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In this article, it is argued that Kurt Hahn felt that it was important for children to experience 'failure' at times and to learn how to cope with it. If this is no longer desirable in the classroom, it ought to be possible to encourage children to be adventurous and "take risks" in a wide range of Outward Bound activities.

  14. Learning from Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1991-01-01

    Describes mistakes made in trying to change the Nutrition and Digestion section of a medical biochemistry course. Author tried to make the section student taught and reports nine mistakes including the following: ignoring active opposition of colleagues, failure to assess the receptivity of the class to a new form of teaching, and overestimating…

  15. Learning from Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1991-01-01

    Describes mistakes made in trying to change the Nutrition and Digestion section of a medical biochemistry course. Author tried to make the section student taught and reports nine mistakes including the following: ignoring active opposition of colleagues, failure to assess the receptivity of the class to a new form of teaching, and overestimating…

  16. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ureter (s) or a tube connected to an external drainage bag. Both options are used to unblock the ureters in order to allow proper urine flow from the kidneys if this has been identified as the cause for the renal failure. Surgical treatment such as a urinary stent or ...

  17. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  18. Designing for Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu; Bielaczyc, Katerine

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe the design principles undergirding "productive failure" (PF; M. Kapur, 2008). We then report findings from an ongoing program of research on PF in mathematical problem solving in 3 Singapore public schools with significantly different mathematical ability profiles, ranging from average to lower ability. In…

  19. PREVENTION OF FAILURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    THE IMPORTANCE OF THE PREVENTION OF FAILURE IN SCHOOL IS THE MAIN THEME OF THIS PAMPHLET. THE DIFFERENT FORCES WHICH INFLUENCE THE SELF-IMAGES OF CHILDREN, THEIR SCHOOL PERFORMANCE, ACCEPTANCE OR REJECTION BY OTHER CHILDREN, AND, MOST IMPORTANT, ACCEPTANCE OR REJECTION BY THE TEACHER HERSELF, ARE DISCUSSED IN A GROUP OF PAPERS UNDER ELEVEN…

  20. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-27

    starting point of the investigation. Such techniques included flow charts describing the logical arrangement of investigative operations along with...to determine the causes of failure in continuous fiber reinforced composite materials. Such techniques included flow charts describing the logical...sub-FALN’s were developed to describe the logical flow of analysis in greater detail for each major discipline (see section 6.0). To aid investigators

  1. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  2. Mathematics of Failures in Complex Systems: Characterization and Mitigation of Service Failures in Complex Dynamic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-30

    equivalently , the 3nite-state machine Fig. 2 can be started from any arbitrary state corresponding to no speci3c initial condition.) While the time...University Research Initiative (MURI) Project Characterization and Mitigation of Failures in Complex Dynamical Systems Principal Investigator: Professor...Failure (CSF) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) project has been to formulate and disseminate a knowledge base of science and

  3. Carbon Fiber Strand Tensile Failure Dynamic Event Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; Reeder, James

    2016-01-01

    There are few if any clear, visual, and detailed images of carbon fiber strand failures under tension useful for determining mechanisms, sequences of events, different types of failure modes, etc. available to researchers. This makes discussion of physics of failure difficult. It was also desired to find out whether the test article-to-test rig interface (grip) played a part in some failures. These failures have nothing to do with stress rupture failure, thus representing a source of waste for the larger 13-00912 investigation into that specific failure type. Being able to identify or mitigate any competing failure modes would improve the value of the 13-00912 test data. The beginnings of the solution to these problems lay in obtaining images of strand failures useful for understanding physics of failure and the events leading up to failure. Necessary steps include identifying imaging techniques that result in useful data, using those techniques to home in on where in a strand and when in the sequence of events one should obtain imaging data.

  4. Dynamic failure in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-04-01

    Failure of brittle solids within the extremes of the shock loading environment is not well understood. Recent shock-wave data on compression shear failure and tensile spall failure for selected high-strength ceramics are presented and used to examine the mechanisms of dynamic failure. Energy-based theories are used to bound the measured strength properties. A new concept of failure waves in brittle solids is explored in light of the kinetic processes of high-rate fracture. Classical failure criteria are compared with the present base of dynamic strength data on ceramics.

  5. Social Support, Perceived Stress, and Markers of Heart Failure Severity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    heart failure (Levy, Larson, Vasan, Kannel, & Ho, 1996). Similarly, patients with diabetes are more likely to develop heart failure than nondiabetic...risk for acute myocardial infarction, emerging as a more potent risk factor than recognized predictors such as diabetes , obesity, poor nutrition...e.g., hypertension, diabetes ) that are common for persons with heart failure. Findings from this investigation, therefore, ought to be interpreted in

  6. Failure analysis of stainless steel femur fixation plate.

    PubMed

    Hussain, P B; Mohammad, M

    2004-05-01

    Failure analysis was performed to investigate the failure of the femur fixation plate which was previously fixed on the femur of a girl. Radiography, metallography, fractography and mechanical testing were conducted in this study. The results show that the failure was due to the formation of notches on the femur plate. These notches act as stress raisers from where the cracks start to propagate. Finally fracture occurred on the femur plate and subsequently, the plate failed.

  7. Buckling failures in insect exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Parle, Eoin; Herbaj, Simona; Sheils, Fiona; Larmon, Hannah; Taylor, David

    2015-12-17

    Thin walled tubes are often used for load-bearing structures, in nature and in engineering, because they offer good resistance to bending and torsion at relatively low weight. However, when loaded in bending they are prone to failure by buckling. It is difficult to predict the loading conditions which cause buckling, especially for tubes whose cross sections are not simple shapes. Insights into buckling prevention might be gained by studying this phenomenon in the exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods. We investigated the leg segments (tibiae) of five different insects: the locust (Schistocerca gergaria), American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), death's head cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis), stick insect (Parapachymorpha zomproi) and bumblebee (Bombus terrestris audax). These were tested to failure in cantilever bending and modelled using finite element analysis (FEA). The tibiae of the locust and the cockroaches were found to be approximately circular in shape. Their buckling loads were well predicted by linear elastic FEA, and also by one of the analytical solutions available in the literature for elastic buckling. The legs of the stick insect are also circular in cross section but have several prominent longitudinal ridges. We hypothesised that these ridges might protect the legs against buckling but we found that this was not the case: the loads necessary for elastic buckling were not reached in practice because yield occurred in the material, causing plastic buckling. The legs of bees have a non-circular cross section due to a pollen-carrying feature (the corbicula). We found that this did not significantly affect their resistance to buckling. Our results imply that buckling is the dominant failure mode in the tibia of insects; it likely to be a significant consideration for other arthropods and any organisms with stiff exoskeletons. The interactions displayed here between material properties and cross sectional geometry may provide insights for the

  8. Factors Influencing Academic Failure of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Yousaf Ali; Ahamad, Zahoor; Kousar, Sadia

    2013-01-01

    There was a close link between education and development. Education played a vital role in human capital formation. Academic failure from university was a problem that had became a serious concern for higher education institutions. This study presented the result of a recent investigation at the University of Gujrat that attempted to identify the…

  9. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF), also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS) in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system. PMID:28250725

  10. Anemia and heart failure.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Eileen; Murphy, Clare; McMurray, John J V

    2004-12-01

    Over the past few years, anemia has emerged as a powerful independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). It affects up to 50% of patients with CHF, depending on the definition of anemia used and on the population studied. Even small reductions in hemoglobin are associated with worse outcome. However, the causes of anemia in CHF remain unclear, although impairment of renal function and inflammatory cytokines are proposed mechanisms. Both may act through impairment of the synthesis or action of erythropoietin. Preliminary studies have demonstrated improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and reductions in hospitalizations when patients with severe CHF were treated with erythropoietin. The benefits and the potential risks of such therapies will be further addressed in upcoming larger randomized trials. The recent interest in anemia reflects a new perspective in heart failure therapy, focusing on non-cardiovascular comorbidities.

  11. Heart rate is a marker of amiodarone mortality reduction in severe heart failure. The GESICA-GEMA Investigators. Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina-Grupo de Estudios Multicéntricos en Argentina.

    PubMed

    Nul, D R; Doval, H C; Grancelli, H O; Varini, S D; Soifer, S; Perrone, S V; Prieto, N; Scapin, O

    1997-05-01

    The impact of amiodarone on mortality in patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) (New York Heart Association functional classes II [advanced], III and IV; left ventricular ejection fraction < 35%) In the Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA) trial was analyzed in relation to initial mean baseline heart rate (BHR) and its change after 6 months of follow-up. Trials of amiodarone therapy in CHF have produced discordant results, suggesting that the effect is not uniform in all patient subgroups with regard to survival. The present analysis was carried out in 516 patients randomized to receive amiodarone, 300 mg/day (n = 260), or nonantiarrhythmic therapy (n = 256, control group) and followed up for 2 years. Survival was evaluated for patients with a BHR > or = 90 beats/min (control: n = 132; amiodarone: n = 122) and < 90 beats/min (control: n = 124; amiodarone: n = 138). Survival was also analyzed according to heart rate reduction at 6 months for 367 patients. For patients with a BHR > or = 90 beats/min, amiodarone therapy reduced mortality to 38.4% compared with 62.4% in control patients (relative risk [RR] 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35 to 0.95, p < 0.002). Both sudden death (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.90, p < 0.02) and progressive heart failure death (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.03, p < 0.06) were reduced, and functional capacity was improved. In patients with a BHR < 90 beats/min, amiodarone did not alter survival. Among 367 patients who completed 6 months of follow-up, amiodarone reduced 2-year mortality only in those with a BHR > or = 90 beats/min, which was reduced at 6 months. Elevated rest heart rates in severe CHF identify a subgroup of patients who benefit from treatment with amiodarone. Amiodarone-induced heart rate slowing may be an important benefit for patients.

  12. Triggers of State Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    forms, and is limited to the most acute cases of state failure in which the apparatus of the state collapses. A state trying, and failing, to provide...and the writ of government does not practically extend beyond the city limits of the capital. A failing state may be on the trend towards collapse...provide reasonable accuracy in post-dictive analysis, but are of limited use for short-term predictions as changes do not happen quickly, not are they

  13. Observing a failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Leonard

    1994-06-01

    Mars Observer was being sent to 'rewrite the book on Mars.' That was the claim of one NASA scientist as the interplanetary robot sat atop a Titan 3 booster that roared skyward from a Cape Canaveral launch pad. On August 21, 1993, only three days before entering Mars orbit, America's first mission to Mars in 17 years fell silent. This article reviews possible causes of this failure.

  14. Pharmacogenetics of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mestroni, Luisa; Begay, Rene; Graw, Sharon L; Taylor, Matthew RG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Novel medical approaches and personalized medicine seek to use genetic information to “individualize” and improve diagnosis, prevention, and therapy. The personalized management of cardiovascular disease involves a large spectrum of potential applications, from diagnostics of monogenic disorders, to prevention and management strategies based on modifier genes, to pharmacogenetics in which individual genetic information is used to optimize pharmacological treatments. Recent Findings Evidence suggests that common polymorphic variants of modifier genes could influence drug response in cardiovascular disease in a variety of areas including heart failure, arrhythmias, dyslipidemia and hypertension. In heart failure, common genetic variants of beta-adrenergic receptors, alpha-adrenergic receptors, and endothelin receptors (among others) have been associated with variable response to heart failure therapies. The challenge remains to develop strategies to leverage this information in ways that personalize and optimize cardiovascular therapy based on a patient's genetic profile. Summary While advances in technologies will continue to transition personalized medicine from the research to the clinical setting, health care providers will need to reshape clinical diagnostic paradigms. Ultimately, pharmacogenetics will give providers options for improving patient management on the basis of pharmacogenetic data. PMID:24717669

  15. Pharmacogenetics of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mestroni, Luisa; Begay, Rene L; Graw, Sharon L; Taylor, Matthew R G

    2014-05-01

    Novel medical approaches and personalized medicine seek to use genetic information to 'individualize' and improve diagnosis, prevention, and therapy. The personalized management of cardiovascular disease involves a large spectrum of potential applications, from diagnostics of monogenic disorders, to prevention and management strategies based on modifier genes, to pharmacogenetics, in which individual genetic information is used to optimize the pharmacological treatments. Evidence suggests that the common polymorphic variants of modifier genes could influence drug response in cardiovascular disease in a variety of areas, including heart failure, arrhythmias, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. In heart failure, common genetic variants of β-adrenergic receptors, α-adrenergic receptors, and endothelin receptors (among others) have been associated with variable response to heart failure therapies. The challenge remains to develop strategies to leverage this information in ways that personalize and optimize cardiovascular therapy based on a patient's genetic profile. Although advances in technologies will continue to transition personalized medicine from the research to the clinical setting, healthcare providers will need to reshape the clinical diagnostic paradigms. Ultimately, pharmacogenetics will give providers the options for improving patient management on the basis of pharmacogenetic data.

  16. Reducing Failures in Reference Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Ian

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the results of 11 selected studies of the accuracy of reference services and identifies six modes of failure of reference services. Methods of detecting and reducing failure in each of these modes are then discussed. (17 references) (MES)

  17. Drug Treatment of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Achong, M. R.; Kumana, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of cardiac failure should first be aimed at reversing or ameliorating the underlying pathological processes. This review highlights the common problems and pitfalls in the use of digoxin, diuretics and vasodilators in patients with cardiac failure. PMID:21289849

  18. [Exercise training in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, F; Grabs, V; Halle, M

    2014-06-01

    Exercise training in patients with chronic stable heart failure (HF) is a recommended and broadly accepted treatment strategy that is an integral part of an evidence-based management involving pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. There is ample scientific evidence that exercise training in HF with reduced (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) improves exercise capacity, HF symptoms and quality of life. This is due to an improvement of central hemodynamics, endothelial function, neurohumoral activation, skeletal muscle structure and function as well as a decrease in inflammatory markers. The largest randomized, controlled HF-ACTION study (Heart Failure-A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of exercise TraiNing) demonstrated that exercise training results in a modest improvement of all-cause mortality and hospitalizations in HFrEF, depending on adequate compliance. Outcome data in HFpEF are lacking. Besides compliance, efficacy of exercise training is dependent on the intensity and type of exercise. Resistance and high intensity endurance training in addition to a standard aerobic exercise seem to be superior in improving the clinical status of HF patients. In the future, individualized exercise programs will help to improve long-term adherence to exercise training.

  19. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Ware; T. Y. Chang

    1999-10-25

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components.

  20. Synergistic Failure of BWR Internals

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, Arthur Gates; Chang, T-Y

    1999-10-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components.

  1. On the failure and post-failure of fiber composites in compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy John

    The failure and post-failure behavior of an AS4/PEEK composite in axial compression was studied through experiments and analysis. Compressive stresses cause shearing of the matrix in regions of fiber misaligned. Increasing stresses yield the matrix, resulting in fiber collapse and failure of the composite. The strength is strongly imperfection sensitive. After failure, deformation localizes into an inclined region of rotated fibers called a kink band. Compressive failure was investigated using 2-D and 3-D finite element models and three simpler models. When properly calibrated, their strength predictions are quite similar, especially for larger fiber misalignments. However, the FE models allow examination of post-failure events leading to kink band formation. The rate dependence of compressive strength was examined experimentally and with a modified version of a simple model. The addition of a far-field shear stress significantly reduces the compressive strength. Failure predictions from modified versions of the 2-D model and the simple models agree well with experimental data. Post-failure events are very similar to those observed for pure compression loading, except that failure can occur in a controlled manner for certain loading paths. It has been discovered that the kink bands formed during compressive failure can propagate axially in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level termed the propagation stress. This propagation stress, a new characteristic stress of the material, is approximately 40% of the compressive strength for AS4/PEEK. Steadystate propagation can give "ductility" to a material normally considered quite brittle. The propagation has been observed directly, revealing the mechanism of propagation as well as new details about fiber rotation in the band. A 3-D numerical model was developed which simulates the steady-state propagation. The propagation stress and deformation are predicted reasonably well. As a basis for modeling of failure and

  2. Saturn component failure rate and failure rate modifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Failure mode frequency ratios, environmental adjustment factors, and failure rates for mechanical and electromechanical component families are presented. The failure rates and failure rate modifiers resulted from a series of studies whose purpose was to provide design, tests, reliability, and systems engineers with accurate, up-to-date failure rate information. The results of the studies were achieved through an extensive engineering analysis of the Saturn Program test data and Unsatisfactory Condition Reports (UCR's) and the application of mathematical techniques developed for the studies.

  3. Constructive Failure in Mathematics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlett, Joel E.

    2011-01-01

    Great strides in the real world are usually accompanied by failure. Mathematics teachers should accept some failure as their students take risks during mathematical explorations. This is not to imply that students should fail an entire course, but they should have opportunities to take risks that may lead to failure, especially in the area of…

  4. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Sep 28,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Warning Signs of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 By themselves, any one ... faster. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  6. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  7. Encoding Specificity: Retrieval in the Recognition Failure Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartling, Carl A.; Thompson, Charles P.

    1977-01-01

    The paradigm producing recognition failure of recallable words was investigated in a series of three experiments. Results indicate that retrieval asymmetry: (a) exists in the recognition failure paradigm directly following list study, (b) increases significantly following a free-association task aimed at generation of the target words from the…

  8. Failure analysis in semiconductor devices - Rationale, methodology and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, B. P.; Footner, P. K.

    It is pointed out that failure analysis represents a vital part of a complex reliability evaluation in the semiconductor industry. The present study is concerned with the results of investigations involving failed devices, ranging from high power thyristors to microwave devices, discrete transistors and both active and passive elements of ICs. Particular attention is given to the rationale and procedure for failure analysis, some procedural problems and the consequent necessity for techniques complementary to microscopy, an illustration of the approaches used to overcome the problems, and the problems involved in identifying particular failure mechanisms and failure causes.

  9. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  10. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2013-12-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. © 2013 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  11. Failure is an option: Reactions to failure in elementary engineering design projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew M.

    Recent reform documents in science education have called for teachers to use epistemic practices of science and engineering researchers to teach disciplinary content (NRC, 2007; NRC, 2012; NGSS Lead States, 2013). Although this creates challenges for classroom teachers unfamiliar with engineering, it has created a need for high quality research about how students and teachers engage in engineering activities to improve curriculum development and teaching pedagogy. While framers of the Next Generation Science Standards (NRC, 2012; NGSS Lead States 2013) focused on the similarities of the practices of science researchers and engineering designers, some have proposed that engineering has a unique set of epistemic practices, including improving from failure (Cunningham & Carlsen, 2014; Cunningham & Kelly, in review). While no one will deny failures occur in science, failure in engineering is thought of in fundamentally different ways. In the study presented here, video data from eight classes of elementary students engaged in one of two civil engineering units were analyzed using methods borrowed from psychology, anthropology, and sociolinguistics to investigate: 1) the nature of failure in elementary engineering design; 2) the ways in which teachers react to failure; and 3) how the collective actions of students and teachers support or constrain improvement in engineering design. I propose new ways of considering the types and causes of failure, and note three teacher reactions to failure: the manager, the cheerleader, and the strategic partner. Because the goal of iteration in engineering is improvement, I also studied improvement. Students only systematically improve when they have the opportunity, productive strategies, and fair comparisons between prototypes. I then investigate the use of student engineering journals to assess learning from the process of improvement after failure. After discussion, I consider implications from this work as well as future research

  12. A modeling framework for system restoration from cascading failures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems.

  13. A Modeling Framework for System Restoration from Cascading Failures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems. PMID:25474408

  14. Incretin-related drug therapy in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vest, Amanda R

    2015-02-01

    The new pharmacological classes of GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors are now widely used in diabetes and have been postulated as beneficial in heart failure. These proposed benefits arise from the inter-related pathophysiologies of diabetes and heart failure (diabetes increases the risk of heart failure, and heart failure can induce insulin resistance) and also in light of the dysfunctional myocardial energetics seen in heart failure. The normal heart utilizes predominantly fatty acids for energy production, but there is some evidence to suggest that increased myocardial glucose uptake may be beneficial for the failing heart. Thus, GLP-1 agonists, which stimulate glucose-dependent insulin release and enhance myocardial glucose uptake, have become a focus of investigation in both animal models and humans with heart failure. Limited pilot data for GLP-1 agonists shows potential improvements in systolic function, hemodynamics, and quality of life, forming the basis for current phase II trials.

  15. SCADA alarms processing for wind turbine component failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Reder, M.; Melero, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine failure and downtime can often compromise the profitability of a wind farm due to their high impact on the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Early detection of failures can facilitate the changeover from corrective maintenance towards a predictive approach. This paper presents a cost-effective methodology to combine various alarm analysis techniques, using data from the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, in order to detect component failures. The approach categorises the alarms according to a reviewed taxonomy, turning overwhelming data into valuable information to assess component status. Then, different alarms analysis techniques are applied for two purposes: the evaluation of the SCADA alarm system capability to detect failures, and the investigation of the relation between components faults being followed by failure occurrences in others. Various case studies are presented and discussed. The study highlights the relationship between faulty behaviour in different components and between failures and adverse environmental conditions.

  16. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors.

  17. Analysis of cascading failure in gene networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longxiao; Wang, Shudong; Li, Kaikai; Meng, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    It is an important subject to research the functional mechanism of cancer-related genes make in formation and development of cancers. The modern methodology of data analysis plays a very important role for deducing the relationship between cancers and cancer-related genes and analyzing functional mechanism of genome. In this research, we construct mutual information networks using gene expression profiles of glioblast and renal in normal condition and cancer conditions. We investigate the relationship between structure and robustness in gene networks of the two tissues using a cascading failure model based on betweenness centrality. Define some important parameters such as the percentage of failure nodes of the network, the average size-ratio of cascading failure, and the cumulative probability of size-ratio of cascading failure to measure the robustness of the networks. By comparing control group and experiment groups, we find that the networks of experiment groups are more robust than that of control group. The gene that can cause large scale failure is called structural key gene. Some of them have been confirmed to be closely related to the formation and development of glioma and renal cancer respectively. Most of them are predicted to play important roles during the formation of glioma and renal cancer, maybe the oncogenes, suppressor genes, and other cancer candidate genes in the glioma and renal cancer cells. However, these studies provide little information about the detailed roles of identified cancer genes.

  18. The pathology of bone marrow failure.

    PubMed

    Leguit, Roos J; van den Tweel, Jan G

    2010-11-01

    An important indication for bone marrow investigation is the presence of bone marrow failure, which manifests itself as (pan)cytopenia. The causes of cytopenia are varied and differ considerably between childhood and adulthood. In the paediatric age group inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are important causes of bone marrow failure, but they play only a minor role in later life. This review gives a comprehensive overview of bone marrow failure disorders in children and adults. We classified the causes of bone marrow failure according to the main presenting haematological abnormality, i.e. anaemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia. The following red cell disorders are discussed: red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anaemia, congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, iron deficiency anaemia, anaemia of chronic disease and megaloblastic anaemia. The neutropenias occur in the context of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), severe congenital neutropenia, cyclic neutropenia, immune-related neutropenia and non-immune neutropenia. In addition, the following causes of thrombocytopenia are discussed: congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopenia with absent radii, immune-related thrombocytopenia and non-immune thrombocytopenia. Finally, we pay attention to the following pancytopenic disorders: Fanconi anaemia, dyskeratosis congenita, aplastic anaemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  19. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  20. Teacher Perceptions of High School Student Failure in the Classroom: Identifying Preventive Practices of Failure Using Critical Incident Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalahar, Kory G.

    2011-01-01

    Student failure is a prominent issue in many comprehensive secondary schools nationwide. Researchers studying error, reliability, and performance in organizations have developed and employed a method known as critical incident technique (CIT) for investigating failure. Adopting an action research model, this study involved gathering and analyzing…

  1. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  2. Intelligent failure-tolerant control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure-tolerant control is presented, beginning with robust control, progressing through parallel and analytical redundancy, and ending with rule-based systems and artificial neural networks. By design or implementation, failure-tolerant control systems are 'intelligent' systems. All failure-tolerant systems require some degrees of robustness to protect against catastrophic failure; failure tolerance often can be improved by adaptivity in decision-making and control, as well as by redundancy in measurement and actuation. Reliability, maintainability, and survivability can be enhanced by failure tolerance, although each objective poses different goals for control system design. Artificial intelligence concepts are helpful for integrating and codifying failure-tolerant control systems, not as alternatives but as adjuncts to conventional design methods.

  3. Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Newland, Catherine D

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is a complex and rapidly progressive syndrome that results from a variety of age-dependent etiologies. It is defined by the acute onset of liver disease with no evidence of chronic liver disease. There must be biochemical or clinical evidence of severe liver dysfunction as defined by an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥2. If hepatic encephalopathy is present, INR should be ≥1.5. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of ALF in pediatric patients, there is a paucity of diagnostic and management algorithms and each patient must have an individualized approach. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e433-e438.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause.

  5. Pharmacoepigenetics in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Leach, Irene; van der Harst, Pim

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics studies inheritable changes of genes and gene expression that do not concern DNA nucleotide variation. Such modifications include DNA methylation, several forms of histone modification, and microRNAs. From recent studies, we know not only that genetic changes account for heritable phenotypic variation, but that epigenetic changes also play an important role in the variation of predisposition to disease and to drug response. In this review, we discuss recent evidence of epigenetic changes that play an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure and may dictate response to therapy. PMID:20424992

  6. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-06-29

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Scaling of structural failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chen, Er-Ping

    1997-01-01

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  8. Heart Failure Readmission Reduction.

    PubMed

    Drozda, Joseph P; Smith, Donna A; Freiman, Paul C; Pursley, Janet; VanSlette, Jeffrey A; Smith, Timothy R

    Little is known regarding effectiveness of readmission reduction programs over time. The Heart Failure Management Program (HFMP) of St. John's Physician Group Practice (PGP) Demonstration provided an opportunity to assess outcomes over an extended period. Data from an electronic health record, an inpatient database, a disease registry, and the Social Security Death Master File were analyzed for patients admitted with heart failure (HF) for 5 years before (Period 1) and 5 years after (Period 2) inception of PGP. HF admissions decreased (Period 1, 58.3/month; Period 2, 52.4/month, P = .007). Thirty-day all-cause readmission rate dropped from Period 1 (annual average 18.8% [668/3545]) to year 1 of Period 2 (16.9% [136/804], P = .04) and remained stable thereafter (annual average 16.8% [589/3503]). Thirty-day mortality rate was flat throughout. HFMP was associated with decreased readmissions, primarily related to outpatient case management, while mortality remained stable.

  9. Preparing for Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.T.

    2006-07-01

    Risk management is one of the most complex project management processes, requiring rigorous management and discipline. Unfortunately, for many organizations, the risk management process has become contaminated by poor management practices, an absence of meaningful risk assessments, meaningless risk event descriptions, incomplete and vague risk impact analyses, poor follow through on risk mitigation activities and a general lack of attention to accuracy, completeness and quality. At this point, the risk register, instead of being a key tool used by the organization to systematically identify and eliminate risk, while exploiting opportunities, has become a list of pre-prepared excuses based on the repeat of failures encountered on past projects. However, organizations are not condemned to repeat past failures. By returning to the basics of risk management, and through the application of some basic management guidelines, the risk register-instead of being an 'Excuse Register' - can become the cornerstone of a comprehensive risk management program to promote a systematic, pro-active approach within an organization that will result in accomplishing mitigation activities, reducing risk and gaining advantage through opportunities. (authors)

  10. Understanding Cytokinesis Failure

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Guillaume; King, Randall W.

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final step in cell division. The process begins during chromosome segregation, when the ingressing cleavage furrow begins to partition the cytoplasm between the nascent daughter cells. The process is not completed until much later, however, when the final cytoplasmic bridge connecting the two daughter cells is severed. Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process, requiring an intricate interplay between cytoskeletal, chromosomal, and cell cycle regulatory pathways. A surprisingly broad range of additional cellular processes are also important for cytokinesis, including protein and membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, protein synthesis and signaling pathways. As a highly regulated, complex process, it is not surprising that cytokinesis can sometimes fail. Cytokinesis failure leads to both centrosome amplification and production of tetraploid cells, which may set the stage for the development of tumor cells. However, tetraploid cells are abundant components of some normal tissues including liver and heart, indicating that cytokinesis is physiologically regulated. In this chapter, we summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms of cytokinesis, emphasizing steps in the pathway that may be regulated or prone to failure. Our discussion emphasizes findings in vertebrate cells although we have attempted to highlight important contributions from other model systems. PMID:20687468

  11. Fracture, failure, and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dienes, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A general approach is required for describing matter of behavior when the failure is likely to involve growth and coalescence of a large number of fractures. Failures of this kind appear frequently in rapid dynamic processes, particularly in the formation of spall fragments. An approach to formulating constitutive relations that accounts for the opening, shear and growth of an ensemble of cracks is discussed. The approach accounts for plastic flow accompanying fragmentation. The resulting constitutive relations were incorporated into a Lagrangian computer program. A theoretical approach to coalescence is described. The simplest formulation uses a linear Liouville equation, with crack growth limited by the mean free path of cracks, assumed constant. This approach allows for an anisotropic distribution of cracks. An alternative approach in which the decrease of the mean free path with increasing crack size is accounted for, but the crack distribution is assumed isotropic is described. A reduction of the governing Liouville equation to an ordinary differential equation of third order is possible, and the result can be used to determine how mean free path decreases with increasing crack size.

  12. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:28154583

  13. High-Temperature Graphitization Failure of Primary Superheater Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Mandal, N.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Failure of boiler tubes is the main cause of unit outages of the plant, which further affects the reliability, availability and safety of the unit. So failure analysis of boiler tubes is absolutely essential to predict the root cause of the failure and the steps are taken for future remedial action to prevent the failure in near future. This paper investigates the probable cause/causes of failure of the primary superheater tube in a thermal power plant boiler. Visual inspection, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, metallographic examination and hardness measurement are conducted as the part of the investigative studies. Apart from these tests, mechanical testing and fractographic analysis are also conducted as supplements. Finally, it is concluded that the superheater tube is failed due to graphitization for prolonged exposure of the tube at higher temperature.

  14. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  15. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  16. Proceedings of the international symposium for testing and failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The papers presented in this book include: The protection from erosion of the leading edge of titanium blades; Investigation of the corrosion failure of thin-walled 17-7 PH tubes; and Reverse bending fatigue case study.

  17. Forecasting the failure of heterogeneous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallée, Y.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Eruption prediction is a long-sought-after goal of volcanology. Yet applying existing techniques retrospectively (hindcasting), we fail to predict events more often than we success. As much of the seismicity associated with intermediate to silicic volcanic eruptions comes from the brittle response of the ascending magma itself, we clearly require a good understanding of the parameters that control the ability to forecast magma failure itself. Here, we present suites of controlled experiments at magmatic temperatures using a range of synthetic magmas to investigate the control of microstructures on the efficacy of forecast models for material failure. We find that the failure of magmas with very little microstructural heterogeneity - such as melts - is very challenging to predict; whereas, the failure of very heterogeneous magmas is always well-predicted. To shed further light on this issue, we provide a scaling law based on the relationship between the microstructural heterogeneity in a magma and the error in the prediction of its failure time. We propose this method be used to elucidate the variable success rate of predicting volcanic predictions. We discuss this scaling in the context of the birth, life and death of structural heterogeneity during magma ascent with specific emphasis on obsidian-forming eruptions such as Chaitèn, 2008. During such eruptions, the repetitive creation and destruction of fractures filled with granular magma, which are thought to be the in situ remnants of seismogenic fracturing itself, are expressions of the life-cycle of heterogeneity in an otherwise coherent, melt-rich magma. We conclude that the next generation of failure forecast tools available to monitoring teams should incorporate some acknowledgment of the magma microstructure and not be solely based on the geophysical signals prior to eruption.

  18. Failure events in transition of care for surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S; Martin, Larry C; Martin, Magdeline; Mitchell, Marc E

    2014-04-01

    Unexpected clinical deterioration (failure events) in surgical patients on standard nursing units (WARDs) could have a significant impact on eventual survival. We sought to investigate failure events requiring intensive care (surgical ICU [SICU]) transfer of surgical patients on WARDs in a single-center academic setting. Surgical patients admitted to WARDs over a 12-month period, who developed failure events, were retrospectively reviewed. Time to deterioration since WARD arrival, clinical factors, notification chain, and outcomes were identified. A physician review panel determined the preventability of failure events. Ninety-eight patients experienced 111 failure events requiring SICU transfer. Most patients (85%) were emergency admissions. Of 111 events, 90% had been previously discharged from an SICU or a postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Recognition of failure was by nursing (54%) and on routine physician rounds (34%). Rapid response or code blue alone was less common (12%). A second physician notification was needed in 29%, with delays due to failure to identify severity of illness. Most commonly, respiratory events prompted notification (77 of 111, 69%). Overall mortality was 26 of 98 (27%). Median time to failure was 2 days and was associated with early transfer from the SICU or PACU. Rapid response or code blue activation was associated with higher mortality than physician notification. Patients most at risk for WARD failures were those with acute surgical emergencies or recently discharged from the SICU or PACU. Respiratory complications were the most common cause of WARD failure events. Many early failures may have been due to premature transfer from the SICU or PACU. Failure events on WARDs can have lethal consequences. Awareness, monitoring, and communication are important components of preventative measures. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatigue failure load indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, D. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An indicator for recording the load at which a fatigue specimen breaks during the last cycle of a fatigue test is described. A load cell is attached to the specimen which is alternately subjected to tension and compression loads. The output of the load cell which is proportional to the load on the specimen is applied to the input of a peak detector. Each time the specimen is subjected to a compression load, means are provided for applying a positive voltage to the rest of the peak detector to reset it. During the last cycle of the tension load the peak detector measures the maximum load on the specimen. Means are provided for disconnecting the load cell from the peak detector when there is a failure in the specimen.

  20. Component failure data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  1. Iridium: failures & successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  2. Mud pump failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.C. II

    1981-10-01

    Extrusion, the primary cause of piston failure, is the degradation of a seal caused by the seal material moving into the interface between the two parts being sealed. It is shown that operational dynamics of the mud piston lead to an aggravated extrusion condition. As both the liner wall and the piston OD lose material, the clearance gap between liner and piston increases. This gap provides the piston seal a space to move into when pressurized. This movement, called extrusion, is undesirable because the piston rubber is then subjected to abnormal stresses which it cannot tolerate. As the piston moves forward, this extruded material is gradually nibbled away. Extrusion and nibble action continue on each stroke of the pump as additional rubber moves away from the high-pressure side of the piston toward the low-pressure side. A discussion is presented of extrusion rates and seal leakage.

  3. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  4. Insulation failure in laparoscopic instruments.

    PubMed

    Montero, Paul N; Robinson, Thomas N; Weaver, John S; Stiegmann, Greg V

    2010-02-01

    Electrosurgery is used in virtually every laparoscopic operation. In the early days of laparoscopic surgery, capacitive coupling, associated with hybrid trocars, was thought to be the major cause of laparoscopic electrosurgery injuries. Modern laparoscopy has reduced capacitive coupling, and now insulation failure is thought to be the main cause of electrosurgical complications. The aim of this study was (1) to determine the incidence of insulation failures, (2) to compare the incidence of insulation failure in reusable and disposable instruments, and (3) to determine the location of insulation failures. At four major urban hospitals, reusable laparoscopic instruments were checked for insulation failure using a high-voltage porosity detector. Disposable L-hooks were collected following laparoscopic cholecystectomy and similarly evaluated for insulation failure. Instruments were determined to have insulation failure if 2.5 kV crossed the instrument's insulation to create a closed loop circuit. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact or chi(2) analysis (*denotes significance set at p < 0.05). Two hundred twenty-six laparoscopic instruments were tested (165 reusable). Insulation failure occurred more often in reusable (19%; 31/165) than in disposable instruments (3%; 2/61; *p < 0.01). When reusable sets were evaluated, 71% (12/17) were found to have at least one instrument with insulation failure. Insulation failure incidence in reusable instruments was similar between hospitals that routinely checked for insulation failure (19%; 25/130) and hospitals that do not routinely check for insulation failures (33%; 7/21; p = 0.16). Insulation failure was most common in the distal third of the instruments (54%; 25/46) compared to the middle or proximal third of the instruments (*p < 0.05). One in five reusable laparoscopic instruments has insulation failure; a finding that is not altered by whether the hospital routinely checks for insulation defects

  5. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  6. Strategies of learning from failure.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Amy C

    2011-04-01

    Many executives believe that all failure is bad (although it usually provides Lessons) and that Learning from it is pretty straightforward. The author, a professor at Harvard Business School, thinks both beliefs are misguided. In organizational life, she says, some failures are inevitable and some are even good. And successful learning from failure is not simple: It requires context-specific strategies. But first leaders must understand how the blame game gets in the way and work to create an organizational culture in which employees feel safe admitting or reporting on failure. Failures fall into three categories: preventable ones in predictable operations, which usually involve deviations from spec; unavoidable ones in complex systems, which may arise from unique combinations of needs, people, and problems; and intelligent ones at the frontier, where "good" failures occur quickly and on a small scale, providing the most valuable information. Strong leadership can build a learning culture-one in which failures large and small are consistently reported and deeply analyzed, and opportunities to experiment are proactively sought. Executives commonly and understandably worry that taking a sympathetic stance toward failure will create an "anything goes" work environment. They should instead recognize that failure is inevitable in today's complex work organizations.

  7. Public Choice, Market Failure, and Government Failure in Principles Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Rosemarie; Gwartney, James

    2015-01-01

    Public choice uses the tools of economics to analyze how the political process allocates resources and impacts economic activity. In this study, the authors examine twenty-three principles texts regarding coverage of public choice, market failure, and government failure. Approximately half the texts provide coverage of public choice and recognize…

  8. Public Choice, Market Failure, and Government Failure in Principles Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Rosemarie; Gwartney, James

    2015-01-01

    Public choice uses the tools of economics to analyze how the political process allocates resources and impacts economic activity. In this study, the authors examine twenty-three principles texts regarding coverage of public choice, market failure, and government failure. Approximately half the texts provide coverage of public choice and recognize…

  9. Comparing Learning from Productive Failure and Vicarious Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu

    2014-01-01

    A total of 136 eighth-grade math students from 2 Singapore schools learned from either productive failure (PF) or vicarious failure (VF). PF students "generated" solutions to a complex problem targeting the concept of variance that they had not learned yet before receiving instruction on the targeted concept. VF students…

  10. Computational Failure Modeling of Lower Extremities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    bone fracture, ligament tear, and muscle rupture. While these injuries may seem well-defined through medical imaging, the process of injury and the... process of high strain rate direct axial loading that leads to bone fracture and fragmentation is investigated. 15. SUBJECT TERMS failure, lower...While these injuries may seem well-defined through medical imaging, the process of injury and the effects of vehicle system design to protection are

  11. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  12. Chronic heart failure: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure has significant prevalence in older people: the mean average age of patients with the condition is 77. It has serious prognostic and quality of life implications for patients, as well as health service costs. Diagnosis requires confirmatory investigations and consideration of causative processes. First-line treatment involves education, lifestyle modification, symptom-controlling and disease-modifying medication. Further treatment may include additional medications, cardiac devices and surgery. End of life planning is part of the care pathway.

  13. Apollo 15 mission main parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The failure of one of the three main parachutes of the Apollo 15 spacecraft was investigated by studying malfunctions in the forward heat shield, broken riser, and firing the fuel expelled from the command module reaction control system. It is concluded that the most probable cause was the burning of raw fuel being expelled during the latter portion of depletion firing. Recommended corrective actions are included.

  14. A failure diagnosis and impact assessment prototype for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Carolyn G.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is investigating the use of advanced automation to enhance crew productivity for Space Station Freedom in numerous areas, one being failure management. A prototype is described that diagnoses failure sources and assesses the future impacts of those failures on other Freedom entities.

  15. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Turner, David A; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of cardiopulmonary bypass that is a mainstay of therapy in neonatal and pediatric patients with life threatening respiratory and/or cardiac failure. Historically, the use of ECMO in adults has been limited, but recent reports and technological advances have increased utilization and interest in this technology in adult patients with severe respiratory failure. As ECMO is considered in this critically ill population, patient selection, indications, contraindications, comorbidities, and pre-ECMO support are all important considerations. Once the decision is made to cannulate a patient for ECMO, meticulous multi-organ-system management is required, with a priority being placed on lung rest and minimization of ventilator-induced lung injury. Close monitoring is also necessary for complications, some of which are related to ECMO and others secondary to the patient's underlying degree of illness. Despite the risks, reports demonstrate survival > 70% in some circumstances for patients requiring ECMO for refractory respiratory failure. As the utilization of ECMO in adult patients with respiratory failure continues to expand, ongoing discussion and investigation are needed to determine whether ECMO should remain a "rescue" therapy or if earlier ECMO may be beneficial as a lung-protective strategy.

  16. Cascading failure analysis and restoration strategy in an interdependent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sheng; Lv, Chuan; Zhao, Tingdi; Wang, Baoqing; Wang, Jianghui; Zhu, Juxing

    2016-05-01

    In modern society, many infrastructures are interdependent owing to functional and logical relations among components in different systems. These networked infrastructures can be modeled as interdependent networks. In the real world, different networks carry different traffic loads whose values are dynamic and stem from the load redistribution in the same network and disturbance from the interdependent network. Interdependency makes interdependent networks so fragile that even a slight initial disturbance may lead to a cascading failure of the entire systems. In this paper, interdependencies among networks are modeled and a failure cascade process is studied considering their effects on failure propagation. Meanwhile, an in-process restoration strategy after the initial failure is investigated. The restoration effects depend strongly on the trigger timing, restoration probability and priority of the restoration actions along with the additional disturbances. Our findings highlight the necessity to decrease the large-scale cascading failure by structuring and managing an interdependent network reasonably.

  17. The role of rigidity in controlling material failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Michelle M.; Gin-ge Chen, Bryan; Beuman, Thomas H.; Ulrich, Stephan; Nagel, Sidney R.; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate how material rigidity acts as a key control parameter for the failure of solids under stress. In both experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that material failure can be continuously tuned by varying the underlying rigidity of the material while holding the amount of disorder constant. As the rigidity transition is approached, failure due to the application of uniaxial stress evolves from brittle cracking to system-spanning diffuse breaking. This evolution in failure behavior can be parameterized by the width of the crack. As a system becomes more and more floppy, this crack width increases until it saturates at the system size. Thus, the spatial extent of the failure zone can be used as a direct probe for material rigidity.

  18. The role of rigidity in controlling material failure

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Michelle M.; Chen, Bryan Gin-ge; Beuman, Thomas H.; Ulrich, Stephan; Nagel, Sidney R.; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how material rigidity acts as a key control parameter for the failure of solids under stress. In both experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that material failure can be continuously tuned by varying the underlying rigidity of the material while holding the amount of disorder constant. As the rigidity transition is approached, failure due to the application of uniaxial stress evolves from brittle cracking to system-spanning diffuse breaking. This evolution in failure behavior can be parameterized by the width of the crack. As a system becomes more and more floppy, this crack width increases until it saturates at the system size. Thus, the spatial extent of the failure zone can be used as a direct probe for material rigidity. PMID:27621463

  19. "Cognitive Style" and School Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kathryn M.

    Focusing on school failure among lower-class and minority children, the paper reexamines the relationship between "cognitive style" and school performance, and questions whether lower-class school failure really concerns cognitive performance at all. "Cognitive style" is defined as information processing habits which represent the learners'…

  20. Data Driven Device Failure Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-15

    solution is to use statistical machine learning to predict failure. However, since failure is still a relatively rare event, obtaining labelled training...52 15 Pre-Update, Memory Leak Support Vector Machine (SVM...37 9 Pre-Update, Memory Leak, Support Vector Machine (SVM) Confusion Matrix

  1. Compression failure of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation attempts to characterize the compressive behavior of Hercules AS-1/3501-6 graphite-epoxy composite. The effect of varying specimen geometry on test results is examined. The transition region is determined between buckling and compressive failure. Failure modes are defined and analytical models to describe these modes are presented.

  2. Failure to Manage Constant Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Ann

    2010-01-01

    This study examines patterns of system failure (communication, typographic, material, economic, maintenance) and the resulting workarounds in signs that are intended to communicate frequently changing information in the built environment. The observed failures and workarounds in the communication of ephemeral data and the accompanying narratives…

  3. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... March 31, 2017 The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) asks the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) members to comment on the proposed Organ Procurement and Transplant... Highlights Video from the Managing the Economic Challenges in the Treatment of Heart Failure (Non- ...

  5. Failure criteria for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects concerned with developing a theory of fracture of materials are discussed. The effects of the geometry of the structure and the loads acting on the structure as they influence the failure process are analyzed. The effects of the viscoelastic deformation characteristics of the bulk elastomer on failure behavior are examined. Additional material parameters which control the fracture process are identified.

  6. Failure detection system risk reduction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Robert B. (Inventor); Huang, Zhaofeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process includes determining a probability of a failure mode of a system being analyzed reaching a failure limit as a function of time to failure limit, determining a probability of a mitigation of the failure mode as a function of a time to failure limit, and quantifying a risk reduction based on the probability of the failure mode reaching the failure limit and the probability of the mitigation.

  7. Photovoltaic failure and degradation modes: PV failure and degradation modes

    DOE PAGES

    Jordan, Dirk C.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; ...

    2017-01-30

    The extensive photovoltaic field reliability literature was analyzed and reviewed. Future work is prioritized based upon information assembled from recent installations, and inconsistencies in degradation mode identification are discussed to help guide future publication on this subject. Reported failure rates of photovoltaic modules fall mostly in the range of other consumer products; however, the long expected useful life of modules may not allow for direct comparison. In general, degradation percentages are reported to decrease appreciably in newer installations that are deployed after the year 2000. However, these trends may be convoluted with varying manufacturing and installation quality world-wide. Modules inmore » hot and humid climates show considerably higher degradation modes than those in desert and moderate climates, which warrants further investigation. Delamination and diode/j-box issues are also more frequent in hot and humid climates than in other climates. The highest concerns of systems installed in the last 10 years appear to be hot spots followed by internal circuitry discoloration. Encapsulant discoloration was the most common degradation mode, particularly in older systems. In newer systems, encapsulant discoloration appears in hotter climates, but to a lesser degree. Thin-film degradation modes are dominated by glass breakage and absorber corrosion, although the breadth of information for thin-film modules is much smaller than for x-Si.« less

  8. Different characteristics of heart failure due to pump failure and bradyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Iwataki, Mai; Kim, Yun-Jeong; Sun, Byung-Joo; Jang, Jeong-Yoon; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Fukuda, Shota; Otani, Kyoko; Yoshitani, Hidetoshi; Ohe, Hisaharu; Kohno, Ritsuko; Oginosawa, Yasushi; Abe, Haruhiko; Levine, Robert A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) can be caused by left ventricular (LV) pump failure as well as by bradyarrhythmias. Hemodynamic differences between HF by LV pump failure and that by bradyarrhythmia have not been fully investigated. We hypothesized that HF by LV pump failure could be associated with both reduced cardiac output (CO) and increased LV filling pressure due to associated LV diastolic dysfunction, whereas HF by bradyarrhythmia could be associated with reduced CO but only modestly increased LV filling pressure due to the absence of LV diastolic dysfunction. In 39 patients with HF by LV pump failure (LV ejection fraction <35%), 24 with HF by bradyarrhythmia, and 22 normal controls, LV volume, ejection fraction, stroke volume, left atrial volume, and early diastolic mitral valve flow to tissue annular velocity ratio (E/E') were measured by echocardiography. Compared to patients with HF by LV pump failure, those with HF by bradyarrhythmia had significantly lower heart rates, less LV dilatation, preserved LV ejection fraction, preserved stroke volume, similarly reduced cardiac index (1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.6 ± 0.4 L/min/m(2), n.s.), preserved LV diastolic function (E') (4.4 ± 2.1 vs. 7.1 ± 2.9 cm/s, p < 0.001), less dilated end-systolic LA volume, and preserved E/E' (24 ± 10 vs. 13 ± 7, p < 0.001). HF by LV pump failure is characterized by both significantly reduced CO and increased LV filling pressure, whereas HF by bradyarrhythmia is characterized by a similar reduction in CO but only modestly increased LV filling pressure.

  9. Failure to recall.

    PubMed

    Laming, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical analysis shows that if the pattern of rehearsal in free-recall experiments (of necessity, the pattern observed when participants rehearse aloud) be continued without any further interruption by stimuli (as happens during recall), it terminates with the retrieval of the same 1 word over and over again. Such a terminal state is commonly reached before some of the words in the list have been retrieved even once; those words are not recalled. The 1 minute frequently allowed for recall in free-recall experiments is ample time for retrieval to seize up in this way. The author proposes a model that represents the essential features of the pattern of rehearsal; validates that model by reference to the overt rehearsal data from B. B. Murdock, Jr., and J. Metcalfe (1978) and the recall data from B. B. Murdock, Jr., and R. Okada (1970); demonstrates the long-term properties of continued sequences of retrievals and, also, a fundamental relation linking recall to the total time of presentation; and, finally, compares failure to recall in free-recall experiments with forgetting in general.

  10. Acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Laura; Bernal, William

    2015-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare critical illness with high mortality whose successful management requires early recognition and effective initial management. Though it may result from a wide variety of causes, in the UK and much of the developed world most cases result from paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity, and administration of antidotal N-acetyl cysteine at first recognition is key. Involvement of local critical care services should occur at an early stage for stabilisation, monitoring and supportive care with parallel discussion with specialist liver centres to identify those patients who may benefit from transfer. Prognostic criteria are applied to identify patients for emergency liver transplantation, and candidates for surgery are prioritised on waitlisting schemes. Outcomes now approach that of elective surgery. However, the majority of cases, and particularly those with paracetamol-induced disease, recover with supportive medical care alone. Overall outcomes for patients with ALF have improved dramatically over the last three decades, but mortality remains unacceptable and further advances in care are required.

  11. Pharmacotherapy of autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Shibao, Cyndya; Okamoto, Luis; Biaggioni, Italo

    2012-01-01

    The clinical picture of autonomic failure is characterized by severe and disabling orthostatic hypotension. These disorders can develop as a result of damage of central neural pathways or peripheral autonomic nerves, caused either by a primary autonomic neurodegenerative disorder or secondary to systemic illness. Treatment should be focused on decreasing presyncopal symptoms instead of achieving blood pressure goals. Non-pharmacologic strategies such as physical counter-maneuvers, dietary changes (i.e. high salt diet, rapid water drinking or compression garments) are the first line therapy. Affected patients should be screened for co-morbid conditions such as post-prandial hypotension and supine hypertension that can worsen orthostatic hypotension if not treated. If symptoms are not controlled with these conservative measures the next step is to start pharmacological agents; these interventions should be aimed at increasing intravascular volume either by promoting water and salt retention (fludrocortisone) or by increasing red blood cell mass when anemia is present (recombinant erythropoietin). When pressor agents are needed, direct pressor agents (midodrine) or agents that potentiate sympathetic activity (atomoxetine, yohimbine, pyridostigmine) can be used. It is preferable to use short-acting pressor agents that can be taken on as needed basis in preparation for upright activities. PMID:21664375

  12. Rethinking Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catecholamines, which induce excessive aerobic metabolism leading to excessive cardiac oxygen consumption. Resulting impaired mitochondrial function causes acidosis, which results in reduction in blood flow by impairment of contractility. To the extent that the excessive aerobic metabolism resulting from adrenergic stimulation comes to a halt the energy deficit has to be compensated for by anaerobic metabolism. Glucose and glycogen become the essential nutrients. Beta-adrenergic blockade is used successfully to decrease hyperadrenergic drive. Neurohumoral antagonists block adrenergic over-stimulation but do not provide the heart with fuel for compensatory anaerobic metabolism. The endogenous hormone ouabain reduces catecholamine levels in healthy volunteers, promotes the secretion of insulin, induces release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes and potentiates the stimulation of glucose metabolism by insulin and acetylcholine. Ouabain stimulates glycogen synthesis and increases lactate utilisation by the myocardium. Decades of clinical experience with ouabain confirm the cardioprotective effects of this endogenous hormone. The so far neglected sympatholytic and vagotonic effects of ouabain on myocardial metabolism clearly make a clinical re-evaluation of this endogenous hormone necessary. Clinical studies with ouabain that correspond to current standards are warranted. PMID:28352413

  13. Adaptive control of nonlinear systems with actuator failures and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xidong

    2005-11-01

    Actuator failures have damaging effect on the performance of control systems, leading to undesired system behavior or even instability. Actuator failures are unknown in terms of failure time instants, failure patterns, and failure parameters. For system safety and reliability, the compensation of actuator failures is of both theoretical and practical significance. This dissertation is to further the study of adaptive designs for actuator failure compensation to nonlinear systems. In this dissertation a theoretical framework for adaptive control of nonlinear systems with actuator failures and system uncertainties is established. The contributions are the development of new adaptive nonlinear control schemes to handle unknown actuator failures for convergent tracking performance, the specification of conditions as a guideline for applications and system designs, and the extension of the adaptive nonlinear control theory. In the dissertation, adaptive actuator failure compensation is studied for several classes of nonlinear systems. In particular, adaptive state feedback schemes are developed for feedback linearizable systems and parametric strict-feedback systems. Adaptive output feedback schemes are deigned for output-feedback systems and a class of systems with unknown state-dependent nonlinearities. Furthermore, adaptive designs are addressed for MIMO systems with actuator failures, based on two grouping techniques: fixed grouping and virtual grouping. Theoretical issues such as controller structures, actuation schemes, zero dynamics, observation, grouping conditions, closed-loop stability, and tracking performance are extensively investigated. For each scheme, design conditions are clarified, and detailed stability and performance analysis is presented. A variety of applications including a wing-rock model, twin otter aircraft, hypersonic aircraft, and cooperative multiple manipulators are addressed with simulation results showing the effectiveness of the

  14. Patterns of Locoregional Failure After Exclusive IMRT for Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe Gunn, G. Brandon; Endres, Eugene J.; Chaljub, Gregory; Cheruvu, Praveena; Parker, Brent

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the patterns of failure after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We analyzed patients treated at the University of Texas Medical Branch between May 2002 and February 2006 who met the following criteria: (1) definitive IMRT without chemotherapy for oropharyngeal SCC; (2) no pretreatment radical surgery; (3) minimal follow-up of 1 year. The location of each nodal/primary failure was co-registered to the pretreatment planning computed tomography scan and then expanded by 5 mm to a planning target volume (PTV) of the failure (PTV-f). We then investigated whether the prescription dose to the PTV-f had been appropriate for the amount of disease present before treatment and whether the PTV-f had been adequately covered. Results: A total of 50 patients were eligible. With a median follow-up of 32.6 months (range, 12.1-58.6), three local and six regional failures were observed in 8 patients. All but one failure, that had been neglected, were recorded within 14 months of the treatment end. Of the nine failures, four developed in the neck treated electively to the lowest dose level; in all of them, we could retrospectively identify initial positive lymph nodes that might have justified the subsequent failure. The remaining five failures developed in proximity of the high-dose volume. In all but one, the volume of region of interest receiving {>=}95% of the dose of the PTV-f was >95%, suggesting adequate coverage. In 1 patient, about 20% of PTV-f was outside the 95% isodose, so that marginal underdosing could not be ruled out. Conclusions: A potential cause could be identified in all the failures in the lowest dose level. The implications and possible remedies are discussed. Most failures around the high-dose region were 'true failures' with no apparent technical caus000.

  15. Contraceptive failure: levels, trends and determinants in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bairagi, R; Islam, M M; Barua, M K

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the levels, trends and determinants of contraceptive use-failure in Matlab, Bangladesh, using a set of prospective data on 25,960 women of reproductive age. The data were extracted from the Record Keeping System (RKS) of Matlab for the period 1978-94. If there was any live birth during the use or within 7 months after the discontinuation of use, it was considered as a failure. The life table technique and hazard model were used as analytical tools. The results suggest that use-failure for pills, IUDs (TCu 200) and injectables and other temporary methods increased from 1978 to 1988, but began to decline after 1988. The cumulative probability of first-method failure within 1 year of method acceptance of the cohort of 1990-94 acceptors was 12.9% for pills, 2.0% for IUDs, 0.5% for injectables, 22.0% for condoms and 13.4% for 'other' methods (sampoon, foam, jelly and traditional methods). For pills, condoms and 'other' methods, the likelihood of failure declined with the duration of use; by contrast, the probability of an IUD failure increased over time, peaking at 3 years of use. The injectables maintained a low likelihood of failure regardless of the duration of use. The quality of Community Health Workers' (CHWs) performance was associated with the risk of failure of all temporary methods except condoms; women's background characteristics associated with failure varied by method. The effect of the quality of the CHWs' performance and the background variables on failure did not change much over time. It is felt that contraceptive failure deserves the serious attention of programme managers and policy makers to make the Bangladesh national family planning programme more successful.

  16. Estimation procedures to measure and monitor failure rates of components during thermal-vacuum testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. E.; Kruger, R.

    1980-01-01

    Estimation procedures are described for measuring component failure rates, for comparing the failure rates of two different groups of components, and for formulating confidence intervals for testing hypotheses (based on failure rates) that the two groups perform similarly or differently. Appendix A contains an example of an analysis in which these methods are applied to investigate the characteristics of two groups of spacecraft components. The estimation procedures are adaptable to system level testing and to monitoring failure characteristics in orbit.

  17. Intelligent Design and Intelligent Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerman, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Good Evening, my name is Greg Jerman and for nearly a quarter century I have been performing failure analysis on NASA's aerospace hardware. During that time I had the distinct privilege of keeping the Space Shuttle flying for two thirds of its history. I have analyzed a wide variety of failed hardware from simple electrical cables to cryogenic fuel tanks to high temperature turbine blades. During this time I have found that for all the time we spend intelligently designing things, we need to be equally intelligent about understanding why things fail. The NASA Flight Director for Apollo 13, Gene Kranz, is best known for the expression "Failure is not an option." However, NASA history is filled with failures both large and small, so it might be more accurate to say failure is inevitable. It is how we react and learn from our failures that makes the difference.

  18. Right side of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Verma, Sameer

    2012-05-01

    The function of the right ventricle (RV) in heart failure (HF) has been mostly ignored until recently. A 2006 report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute identified a gap between RV research efforts and its clinical importance compared with that of the left ventricle. This recent shift in paradigm is fueled by the prognostic value ascribed to RV failure in HF and morbidity/mortality after myocardial infarction and surgery. In this review, we examine the significance of RV failure in the HF setting, its clinical presentation and pathophysiology, and ways to evaluate RV function using echocardiographic measurements. Furthermore, we discuss the medical management of RV failure including traditional therapies like beta-blockers and newer options like nitric oxide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and calcium sensitizers. Mechanical support is also examined. Finally, this review places an emphasis on RV failure in the setting of left ventricular assist devices and heart transplantation.

  19. Pure autonomic failure without synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Isonaka, Risa; Holmes, Courtney; Cook, Glen A; Sullivan, Patti; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2017-04-01

    Pure autonomic failure is a rare form of chronic autonomic failure manifesting with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and evidence of sympathetic noradrenergic denervation unaccompanied by signs of central neurodegeneration. It has been proposed that pure autonomic failure is a Lewy body disease characterized by intra-neuronal deposition of the protein alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies and neurites. A middle-aged man with previously diagnosed pure autonomic failure experienced a sudden, fatal cardiac arrest. He was autopsied, and tissues were harvested for neurochemical and immunofluorescence studies. Post-mortem microscopic neuropathology showed no Lewy bodies, Lewy neurites, or alpha-synuclein deposition by immunohistochemistry anywhere in the brain. The patient had markedly decreased immunofluorescent tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic ganglion tissue without detectable alpha-synuclein even in rare residual nests of tyrosine hydroxylase-containing ganglionic fibers. In pure autonomic failure, sympathetic noradrenergic denervation can occur without concurrent Lewy bodies or alpha-synuclein deposition in the brain or sympathetic ganglion tissue.

  20. [Premature ovarian failure: present aspects].

    PubMed

    Vilodre, Luiz Cesar; Moretto, Marcelo; Kohek, Maria Beatriz da Fonte; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2007-08-01

    Premature ovarian failure occurs in approximately 1:1000 women before 30 years, 1:250 by 35 years and 1:100 by the age of 40. It is characterized by primary or secondary amenorrhea and cannot be considered as definitive because spontaneous conception may occur in 5 to 10% of cases. In 95% of cases, premature ovarian failure is sporadic. The known causes of premature ovarian failure include chromosomal defects, autoimmune diseases, exposure to radiation or chemotherapy, surgical procedures, and certain drugs. Frequently, however, the etiology is not clear and these cases are considered to be idiopathic. Premature ovarian failure is defined by gonadal failure and high serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. Clinical approach includes emotional support, hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterone or progestogens, infertility treatment, and prevention of osteoporosis and potential cardiovascular risk.

  1. Medical therapy for spermatogenic failure

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Stahl, Peter J; Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-01-01

    Medical treatment of men with primary spermatogenic failure remains largely ineffective in contrast to those with secondary testicular failure. Treatment has been attempted with a multitude of agents ranging from hormones to nutritional supplements (antioxidants). While some studies have demonstrated benefit to some treatments, no treatments have consistently demonstrated efficacy nor has it been possible to reliably identify patients likely to benefit. Idiopathic spermatogenic failure likely results from multiple discrete defects in sperm production that are as yet unidentified. A better understanding of these defects will yield more effective treatment options and appropriate triage of patients to specific therapeutic regimens. This review focuses on the rationale and current evidence for hormonal and antioxidant therapy in medical treatment of male infertility, spermatogenic failure in particular. Although empiric medical therapy for spermatogenic failure has been largely replaced by assisted reproductive techniques, both treatment modalities could play a role, perhaps as combination therapy. PMID:22179517

  2. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-07-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. STS-3 main parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R.; Henson, K.

    1982-01-01

    A failure analysis of the parachute on the Space Transportation System 3 flight's solid rocket booster's is presented. During the reentry phase of the two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs), one 115 ft diameter main parachute failed on the right hand SRB (A12). This parachute failure caused the SRB to impact the Ocean at 110 ft/sec in lieu of the expected 3 parachute impact velocity of 88 ft/sec. This higher impact velocity relates directly to more SRB aft skirt and more motor case damage. The cause of the parachute failure, the potential risks of losing an SRB as a result of this failure, and recommendations to ensure that the probability of chute failures of this type in the future will be low are discussed.

  5. Boiler tube failure reduction program

    SciTech Connect

    Lamping, G.A. ); Jonas, O. ); Niebo, R.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Boiler tube failures are generally recognized as the major cause of forced outages of fossil power generating units for US electric utilities. In almost all cases of serious availability losses, the boiler tube failures are repeat in nature and result in multiple forced outages. Primary factors influencing repeat, rather than random, tube failures are usually found to result from not following state-of-the-art operating, maintenance and/or engineering practices, lack of proper tube failure analysis, wrong choice of corrective/preventive action or solution, and lack of a tube failure reporting and monitoring system. A proven way to prevent costly repeat failures is to implement a formalized Boiler Tube Failure Prevention Program that is supported by senior management and focuses attention and resources on operating, maintenance and engineering controllable parameters that influence repeat tube failures. This report describes such a program, implemented at sixteen utilities under EPRI Research Project RP 1890-7, Boiler Tube Failure Reduction Program.'' Results are presented for ten utilities that began the program in the summer of 1986 with over four years of participation, and for six additional utilities from June of 1988 through December 1990. Both sets of utilities have produced remarkable improvements, the most tangible being substantial reductions in equivalent availability factor losses due to BTF of between 1.5 to 4.5%. Failure mechanism data submitted to the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) over the project term has also made it possible to delineate the leading BTF mechanisms causing problems for the participating utilities. Corrosion fatigue, fly ash erosion and high temperature creep accounted for over 28% of the total reported. 3 figs.

  6. Heart Failure in North America

    PubMed Central

    Blair, John E. A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During the epidemiologic transition from rural to industrial in countries such as the United States and Canada, nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases made way for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. This in turn has resulted in an increase in heart failure incidence in these countries, especially as overall life expectancy increases. Mexico, on the other hand, has a less developed economy and infrastructure, and has a wide distribution in the level of urbanization as it becomes more industrialized. Mexico is under a period of epidemiologic transition and the etiology and incidence of heart failure is rapidly changing. Ethnic differences within the populations of the United States and Canada highlight the changing demographics of each country as well as potential disparities in heart failure care. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction makes up approximately half of all hospital admissions throughout North America; however, important differences in demographics and etiology exist between countries. Similarly, acute heart failure etiology, severity, and management differ between countries in North America. The overall economic burden of heart failure continues to be large and growing worldwide, with each country managing this burden differently. Understanding the inter-and within-continental differences may help improve understanding of the heart failure epidemic, and may aid healthcare systems in delivering

  7. Estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Keith W.; Morell, Larry J.; Noonan, Robert E.; Park, Stephen K.; Nicol, David M.; Murrill, Branson W.; Voas, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    Formulas for estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no errors are introduced. These formulas incorporate random testing results, information about the input distribution, and prior assumptions about the probability of failure of the software. The formulas are not restricted to equally likely input distributions, and the probability of failure estimate can be adjusted when assumptions about the input distribution change. The formulas are based on a discrete sample space statistical model of software and include Bayesian prior assumptions. Reusable software and software in life-critical applications are particularly appropriate candidates for this type of analysis.

  8. Estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Keith W.; Morell, Larry J.; Noonan, Robert E.; Park, Stephen K.; Nicol, David M.; Murrill, Branson W.; Voas, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    Formulas for estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no errors are introduced. These formulas incorporate random testing results, information about the input distribution, and prior assumptions about the probability of failure of the software. The formulas are not restricted to equally likely input distributions, and the probability of failure estimate can be adjusted when assumptions about the input distribution change. The formulas are based on a discrete sample space statistical model of software and include Bayesian prior assumptions. Reusable software and software in life-critical applications are particularly appropriate candidates for this type of analysis.

  9. Photovoltaic failure and degradation modes

    DOE PAGES

    Jordan, Dirk C.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; ...

    2017-01-30

    The extensive photovoltaic field reliability literature was analyzed and reviewed. Future work is prioritized based upon information assembled from recent installations, and inconsistencies in degradation mode identification are discussed to help guide future publication on this subject. Reported failure rates of photovoltaic modules fall mostly in the range of other consumer products; however, the long expected useful life of modules may not allow for direct comparison. In general, degradation percentages are reported to decrease appreciably in newer installations that are deployed after the year 2000. However, these trends may be convoluted with varying manufacturing and installation quality world-wide. Modules inmore » hot and humid climates show considerably higher degradation modes than those in desert and moderate climates, which warrants further investigation. Delamination and diode/j-box issues are also more frequent in hot and humid climates than in other climates. The highest concerns of systems installed in the last 10 years appear to be hot spots followed by internal circuitry discoloration. Encapsulant discoloration was the most common degradation mode, particularly in older systems. In newer systems, encapsulant discoloration appears in hotter climates, but to a lesser degree. Lastly, thin-film degradation modes are dominated by glass breakage and absorber corrosion, although the breadth of information for thin-film modules is much smaller than for x-Si.« less

  10. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  11. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    . The question of "scaling" is an essential concern in any structural materials investigation. For example, experiments in the past have shown that the "strength" of a composite depends on hole size. As a consequence the validity of traditional fracture mechanics concepts applied to composite materials failure must be questioned. The size of the fibers, the dimensions of the laminae, etc. together with the fact that, because of the layered anisotropy, the stress field is no longer two-dimensional, prevent the otherwise obviously confident use of "similarity concepts". Therefore, the question needs to be raised of whether in composites "size matters or not", i.e., whether the results obtained in a laboratory using small coupons are truly representative of the situation involving a full scale component.

  12. Premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Persani, Luca

    2006-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea) or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years (secondary amenorrhea). It is a heterogeneous disorder affecting approximately 1% of women <40 years, 1:10,000 women by age 20 and 1:1,000 women by age 30. The most severe forms present with absent pubertal development and primary amenorrhea (50% of these cases due to ovarian dysgenesis), whereas forms with post-pubertal onset are characterized by disappearance of menstrual cycles (secondary amenorrhea) associated with premature follicular depletion. As in the case of physiological menopause, POF presents by typical manifestations of climacterium: infertility associated with palpitations, heat intolerance, flushes, anxiety, depression, fatigue. POF is biochemically characterized by low levels of gonadal hormones (estrogens and inhibins) and high levels of gonadotropins (LH and FSH) (hypergonadotropic amenorrhea). Beyond infertility, hormone defects may cause severe neurological, metabolic or cardiovascular consequences and lead to the early onset of osteoporosis. Heterogeneity of POF is also reflected by the variety of possible causes, including autoimmunity, toxics, drugs, as well as genetic defects. POF has a strong genetic component. X chromosome abnormalities (e.g. Turner syndrome) represent the major cause of primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Despite the description of several candidate genes, the cause of POF remains undetermined in the vast majority of the cases. Management includes substitution of the hormone defect by estrogen/progestin preparations. The only solution presently available for the fertility defect in women with absent follicular reserve is ovum donation. PMID:16722528

  13. Static strength and failure mechanism of CFRP under biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Hwang, W.; Park, H. C.; Han, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of cross-ply composite tubes were performed under combined axial and torsional loading up to failure. Strength properties and failure mechanisms were evaluated with reference to the biaxiality ratio of the loading. The scattering of the biaxial strength data was analyzed using the Weibull distribution. The axial contraction of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes under biaxial loading was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Artificial neural networks were introduced to predict the failure strength using the algorithm of the error back-propagation. The prediction was also made by the Tsai-Wu theory using the experimental data and by the combined optimized tensor-polynomial theory. A comparison shows that the artificial neural network has the smallest root-mean square (RMS) error of the three prediction methods. The prediction of the axial contraction of the tubes correlates well with the results of a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) of the testing machine. From the phenomenological analysis of the failure and the fractographic observations of the fracture surface, three types of failure modes and microscopic failure were investigated, depending on the biaxiality ratio, and the corresponding failure mechanisms are suggested.

  14. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within it, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  15. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  16. Energy metabolism in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome resulting from the inability of the cardiac pump to meet the energy requirements of the body. Despite intensive work, the pathogenesis of the cardiac intracellular abnormalities that result from HF remains incompletely understood. Factors that lead to abnormal contraction and relaxation in the failing heart include metabolic pathway abnormalities that result in decreased energy production, energy transfer and energy utilization. Heart failure also affects the periphery. Patients suffering from heart failure always complain of early muscular fatigue and exercise intolerance. This is linked in part to intrinsic alterations of skeletal muscle, among which decreases in the mitochondrial ATP production and in the transfer of energy through the phosphotransfer kinases play an important role. Alterations in energy metabolism that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles argue for a generalized metabolic myopathy in heart failure. Recent evidence shows that decreased expression of mitochondrial transcription factors and mitochondrial proteins are involved in mechanisms causing the energy starvation in heart failure. This review will focus on energy metabolism alterations in long-term chronic heart failure with only a few references to compensated hypertrophy when necessary. It will briefly describe the energy metabolism of normal heart and skeletal muscles and their alterations in chronic heart failure. It is beyond the scope of this review to address the metabolic switches occurring in compensated hypertrophy; readers could refer to well-documented reviews on this subject. PMID:14660709

  17. Lock-up failure of a four-bar linkage deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A successful failure investigation of a four-bar linkage deployment mechanism has been performed. Possible failure causes such as the mismatch of material coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), excessive hinge friction, limit switch interference, and thermal gradient induced resistive preload were investigated and are discussed. The final conclusions and corrective actions taken are described. Finally, valuable lessons learned during the investigation are discussed.

  18. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  19. Probabilistic analysis of cascade failure dynamics in complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ding-Xue; Zhao, Dan; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Yonghong; Chi, Ming; Zheng, Gui-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The impact of initial load and tolerance parameter distribution on cascade failure is investigated. By using mean field theory, a probabilistic cascade failure model is established. Based on the model, the damage caused by certain attack size can be predicted, and the critical attack size is derived by the condition of cascade failure end, which ensures no collapse. The critical attack size is larger than the case of constant tolerance parameter for network of random distribution. Comparing three typical distributions, simulation results indicate that the network whose initial load and tolerance parameter both follow Weibull distribution performs better than others.

  20. Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure processes in solid continua using Lagrangian finite element techniques is the subject of discussion in this investigation. The specific configurations in this study include penetration of steel projectiles into aluminum blocks and concrete slabs. The failure mode in the aluminum block is excessive deformation while the concrete slab fails by hole growth, spallation, and scabbing. The transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA2D was used for the numerical analysis. The erosion capability in LS-DYNA2D was exercised to carry out the fracture and failure simulations. Calculated results were compared to the experimental data. Good correlations were obtained.

  1. Mars Exploration Rover potentiometer problems, failures and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    During qualification testing of three types of nonwire-wound precision potentiometers for the Mars Exploration Rover, a variety of problems and failures were encountered. This paper will describe some of the more interesting problems, detail their investigations and present their final solutions. The failures were found to be caused by design errors, manufacturing errors, improper handling, test errors, and carelessness. A trend of decreasing total resistance was noted, and a resistance histogram was used to identify an outlier. A gang fixture is described for simultaneously testing multiple pots, and real time X-ray imaging was used extensively to assist in the failure analyses. Lessons learned are provided.

  2. Mars Exploration Rover Potentiometer Problems, Failures and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark

    2006-01-01

    During qualification testing of three types of non-wire-wound precision potentiometers for the Mars Exploration Rover, a variety of problems and failures were encountered. This paper will describe some of the more interesting problems, detail their investigations and present their final solutions. The failures were found to be caused by design errors, manufacturing errors, improper handling, test errors, and carelessness. A trend of decreasing total resistance was noted, and a resistance histogram was used to identify an outlier. A gang fixture is described for simultaneously testing multiple pots, and real time X-ray imaging was used extensively to assist in the failure analyses. Lessons learned are provided.

  3. Failure probability under parameter uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, R; Tsanakas, A

    2011-05-01

    In many problems of risk analysis, failure is equivalent to the event of a random risk factor exceeding a given threshold. Failure probabilities can be controlled if a decisionmaker is able to set the threshold at an appropriate level. This abstract situation applies, for example, to environmental risks with infrastructure controls; to supply chain risks with inventory controls; and to insurance solvency risks with capital controls. However, uncertainty around the distribution of the risk factor implies that parameter error will be present and the measures taken to control failure probabilities may not be effective. We show that parameter uncertainty increases the probability (understood as expected frequency) of failures. For a large class of loss distributions, arising from increasing transformations of location-scale families (including the log-normal, Weibull, and Pareto distributions), the article shows that failure probabilities can be exactly calculated, as they are independent of the true (but unknown) parameters. Hence it is possible to obtain an explicit measure of the effect of parameter uncertainty on failure probability. Failure probability can be controlled in two different ways: (1) by reducing the nominal required failure probability, depending on the size of the available data set, and (2) by modifying of the distribution itself that is used to calculate the risk control. Approach (1) corresponds to a frequentist/regulatory view of probability, while approach (2) is consistent with a Bayesian/personalistic view. We furthermore show that the two approaches are consistent in achieving the required failure probability. Finally, we briefly discuss the effects of data pooling and its systemic risk implications.

  4. Development of failure criterion for Kevlar-epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is discussed. In particular, emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Kevlar-49 fabric (Style 285)/Narmco 5208 Epoxy. The quadratic-failure criterion with F(12)=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the Kevlar/Epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was re-cast into an operationally easier form, providing the engineer with design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from unidirectional prepregs. In the form presented no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exists at present to generalize this approach for all undirectional prepregs and its use must be restricted to the generic materials investigated to-date.

  5. Failure above and below the elastic limit in AD995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Neil; Millett, Jeremy; Chen, M. W.; Dandekar, Datta; Maccauley, James

    2007-06-01

    There is an ongoing interest in identifying inexpensive armour materials for use in protection of personnel and vehicles. The response of AD995 under shock loading is one of the materials most extensively investigated. Over recent years, workers have reported failure occurring in various polycrystalline ceramics behind the shock front. This phenomenon has been investigated using embedded stress sensors and a recovery technique that has allowed observation of the microstructure above and below the HEL and these results are brought together here to explain the observed behaviour. The failure front velocity is found to change with the applied stress, in particular it slows markedly as the HEL is exceeded. The evidence in the microstructure shows the response below HEL is dominated by intergranular failure whilst above HEL the response dominated by plasticity in grains (including twinning), which alters failure characteristics.

  6. Evaluation of failure criterion for graphite/epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Wharram, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is described. Emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Narmco Rigidite 5208-WT300, a plain weave fabric of Thornel 300 Graphite fibers impregnated with Narmco 5208 Resin. The quadratic-failure criterion with F sub 12=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the graphite/epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was recast into an operationally easier form, providing design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from orthotropic woven fabric prepregs. In the form presented, no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exist at present to generalize this approach for all prepreg constructions, and its use must be restricted to the generic materials and configurations investigated to date.

  7. Outpatient Emergencies: Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Malgorzata; Bonita, Raphael E

    2017-05-01

    Heart failure is an epidemic in the United States and a major health problem worldwide. The syndrome of acute heart failure is marked by a recent onset of symptoms usually in terms of days to a few weeks of worsening fatigue, shortness of breath, orthopnea, swelling, and sudden onset of weight gain. Physicians caring for patients with heart failure must know the risk factors for this disease, pathophysiology, symptomatology, important examination findings, key diagnostic tests, and management approach so as to improve symptoms and reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  10. Electron transport chain defects in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Casademont, Jordi; Miró, Oscar

    2002-04-01

    , contractile protein defects, ischemic factors and familial conditions have been thoroughly investigated [1]. It is possible that several mechanisms combine to produce the clinical syndrome of heart failure. In recent years the possibility that disorders of energy metabolism, either isolated or in combination with the other aforementioned factors, may play a role in the development of heart failure in susceptible patients has attracted much attention. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on mitochondrial function in the failing myocardium. We restrain our discussion to heart failure where an impaired inotropic state leads to a weakened systolic contraction (i.e. the so-called systolic heart failure). Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) is the prototype of the conditions under discussion. Other circumstances where a defect in myocardial contraction is due to a chronic excessive work load (i.e., hypertension, valvular or congenital heart diseases), and states in which the principal abnormality involves impaired relaxation of the ventricle (i.e. diastolic heart failure), as well as mitochondrial defects outside the electron transport chain (i.e., defects in Krebs cycle or beta-oxidation of fatty acids) are only approached circumstantially.

  11. AIDS in an infant causing severe failure to thrive.

    PubMed

    Elias-Jones, A C; Larcher, V F; Price, E H

    1987-07-01

    A nine-month-old female Jamaican infant presented with a history of severe failure to thrive, recurrent pneumonia and developmental delay. She was found to have hepatosplenomegaly, generalised lymphadenopathy and hypotonia. Investigations revealed polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia, cytomegalovirus in her urine, and patchy lung infiltrates on her chest radiographs. Three separate tests were positive for human immunodeficiency virus in both the infant and her mother, suggesting vertical transmission, and confirming AIDS as the cause of the severe failure to thrive.

  12. Saturated fat intake predicts biochemical failure after prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Strom, Sara S; Yamamura, Yuko; Forman, Michele R; Pettaway, Curtis A; Barrera, Stephanie L; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-06-01

    Previous reports show that obesity predicts biochemical failure after treatment for localized prostate cancer. Since obesity is associated with increased fat consumption, we investigated the role that dietary fat intake plays in modulating obesity-related risk of biochemical failure. We evaluated the association between saturated fat intake and biochemical failure among 390 men from a previously described prostatectomy cohort. Participants completed a food frequency questionnaire collecting nutrient information for the year prior to diagnosis. Because fat and energy intake are highly correlated, the residual method was used to adjust fat (total and saturated) intakes for energy. Biochemical-failure-free-survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Crude and adjusted effects were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During a mean follow-up of 70.6 months, 78 men experienced biochemical failure. Men who consumed high- saturated fat (HSF) diets were more likely to experience biochemical failure (p = 0.006) and had significantly shorter biochemical-failure-free-survival than men with low saturated fat (LSF) diets (26.6 vs. 44.7 months, respectively, p = 0.002). After adjusting for obesity and clinical variables, HSF-diet patients were almost twice as likely to experience biochemical failure (hazard ratio = 1.95, p = 0.008) compared to LSF diet patients. Men who were both obese and consumed HSF diets had the shortest biochemical-failure-free-survival (19 months), and nonobese men who consumed LSF diets had the longest biochemical-failure-free-survival (46 months, p < 0.001). Understanding the interplay between modifiable factors, such as diet and obesity, and disease characteristics may lead to the development of behavioral and/or targeted interventions for patients at increased risk of progression. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. 29 CFR 502.21 - Failure to cooperate with investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WHD shall report each such occurrence to ETA, and ETA may debar the employer from future certification. The WHD may also recommend to ETA that an existing certification be revoked. The taking of any...

  14. An Investigation of Theories of Failure for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to further advance the understanding of the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), acoustic emission (AE) techniques were imple mented to monitor and identify damage mechanisms in CMCs under tensile loading. In addition to real-time AE monitoring techniques, a data acquisition system was developed and implemented in order to capture AE waveforms resulting from stress-induced damage. Waveforms were inspected for multiple events, separated in distinct events, and then analyzed to determine waveform characteristics in the time and frequency domains. Waveform characteristics included peak amplitude, event duration, MARSE, energy, and dominant and centroidal frequency. In addition to conventional methods for determining a damage discrimination criteria, a study of the distribution and correlation the waveform characteristics was performed to aid in the determination of a damage discrimination criteria. The damage discrimination criteria was tested for "uniqueness", i.e., the effectiveness of the criteria to identify and monitor damage independent of the stress-strain relationship. Insitu radiography was used to substantiate the damage accumulation.

  15. X-Ray Computed Tomography for Failure Analysis Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    means to evaluate aircraft /aerospace components. The program is "task assigned" so that specific CT applications or application areas can be addressed...volumes, often in very complex assemblies, that cannot be adequately evaluated by disassembly or destructive methods. The two autobrake modules...DESCRIPTION CLASS REQUIRED UTIL1TY OF CT (Ait FORCE CrAD RFOR) EVALUATION Autobrake Module, Electro- Out of specification Internal visualization of part Type 1

  16. Program for Experimental Investigation of Failure Prognosis of Helicopter Gearboxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    238 source, 0.03 millicurie of americium 241 is electrodeposited as americium oxide on a stainless steel support. The americium...1000 pk g, sinusoidal, any direction. Shock: 2000 g, any direction -WCto +177,C(-65, Fto +350^) 10 equivalent g at 250 u strain, nominal...the end of test hour 166, large concentrations of lead, copper , and nickel were observed in the SOA, These metals probably came

  17. An Investigation of Gear Mesh Failure Prediction Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    detailed tooth crack propagation analysis was done on this tooth, however by visual inspection, there appeared to be only three distinct bands in the...modulation function from the Hilbert transform technique, the crest factor, and the sideband level factor are all conditioned to react to tooth cracks to

  18. Failure Investigation of WB-57 Aircraft Engine Cowling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. E.; Gafka, T.; Figert, J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the home of the NASA WB-57 High Altitude Research Program. Three fully operational WB-57 aircraft are based near JSC at Ellington Field. The aircraft have been flying research missions since the early 1960's, and continue to be an asset to the scientific community with professional, reliable, customer-oriented service designed to meet all scientific objectives. The NASA WB-57 Program provides unique, high-altitude airborne platforms to US Government agencies, academic institutions, and commercial customers in order to support scientific research and advanced technology development and testing at locations around the world. Mission examples include atmospheric and earth science, ground mapping, cosmic dust collection, rocket launch support, and test bed operations for future airborne or spaceborne systems. During the return from a 6 hour flight, at 30,000 feet, in the clean configuration, traveling at 175 knots indicated airspeed, in un-accelerated flight with the auto pilot engaged, in calm air, the 2-man crew heard a mechanical bang and felt a slight shudder followed by a few seconds of high frequency vibration. The crew did not notice any other abnormalities leading up to, or for the remaining 1 hour of flight and made an uneventful landing. Upon taxi into the chocks, the recovery ground crew noticed the high frequency long wire antenna had become disconnected from the vertical stabilizer and was trailing over the left inboard wing, and that the left engine upper center removable cowling panel was missing, with noticeable damage to the left engine inboard cowling fixed structure. The missing cowling panel was never recovered. Each engine cowling panel is attached to the engine nacelle using six bushings made of 17-4 PH steel. The cylinder portions of four of the six bushings were found still attached to the aircraft (Fig 1). The other two bushings were lost with the panel. The other four bushings exhibited ratchet marks (multiple fatigue origins) which initiated in the sharp radius of the flange/cylinder fillet and were observed 300 degrees around the flange perimeter (Fig 2-3). Low stress, high cycle fatigue (HCF) was observed on the fracture surfaces of all four bushings (Fig 4). To improve the cowling panel joint design and enable return to flight, new cowling bushings with thicker flanges and a larger machined flange/cylinder fillet radius were installed on all cowling panels. In addition, a spacer was added to the joint to achieve the proper stack tolerance. Finally, a time change requirement for all cowling bushings was instituted.

  19. Microstructural Investigation of Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Polypropylene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-08

    copolymerize with PP and establish a strong bond between the phases. In addition, various filling materials, such as glass beads, talc, CaCO3 or reinforcing...load- release. Specifically, at the yield point, the strain changed from elastic to plastic. According to the graph in Figure 3, as the load...Figure 8 Image with highlighted pores obtained form ImageAnalyzer program (a) freqeuncy to area graph (b), frequency to diameter graph (c), and

  20. Investigation of fatigue failure in bituminous base mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, G. W., Jr.

    1980-02-01

    A correlation between the results obtained with the fatigue test and those from the indirect tensile test on two base mixes was attempted in anticipation of the possible use of the latter test to design base mixes for maximum fatigue life. Two base mixes at several asphalt contents were tested at two test temperatures. Flexural fatigue tests and indirect tensile tests were performed for each mix and temperature condition. The asphalt content corresponding to the maximum fatigue life agreed generally with the asphalt content corresponding to maximum work in the indirect tensile test. The work computed from the indirect tensile test is useful in selecting the asphalt content for the maximum fatigue life of base mixes.

  1. 29 CFR 501.21 - Failure to cooperate with investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS FOR TEMPORARY ALIEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER... employment or improperly laid off or displaced, WHD may make such information available to OFLC and may...

  2. Fundamental Investigations of Failure during Superplastic Forming Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    size measurements by both lineal intercept and grain area measurements combined with the Johnson- Saltykov method of correcting for the * third...structural components. Recently, however a method has been demonstrated that eliminates or minimizes this cavitation by the sinmiltaneous imposition of a...developing methods for predicting the high temperature deformation behavior of multiphase alloys. 1. INTRODUCTION Titanium alloys in general are relatively

  3. [Failures regarding the treatment plan].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Who has never had a treatment failure? Who has never regretted launching into a treatment plan? And who has never vowed to avoid falling again into the same trap? All of us, of course. Which simply allowed us to fall into other traps once we'd pulled ourselves out of our previous failures. And to start with, do we believe that a successful outcome means achieving a molar and canine bilateral Class I, a normal overjet and overbite, and centered and coinciding midlines? So, does that make any other kind of treatment plan a recipe for failure? In more realistic mode, we should consider a treatment plan a failure when we are unable to achieve the objectives we set ourselves at the beginning of treatment, due to a lack of realism, or excessive optimism...

  4. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  5. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  6. Creep-Fatigue Failure Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Failure diagnosis invariably involves consideration of both associated material condition and the results of a mechanical analysis of prior operating history. This Review focuses on these aspects with particular reference to creep-fatigue failure diagnosis. Creep-fatigue cracking can be due to a spectrum of loading conditions ranging from pure cyclic to mainly steady loading with infrequent off-load transients. These require a range of mechanical analysis approaches, a number of which are reviewed. The microstructural information revealing material condition can vary with alloy class. In practice, the detail of the consequent cracking mechanism(s) can be camouflaged by oxidation at high temperatures, although the presence of oxide on fracture surfaces can be used to date events leading to failure. Routine laboratory specimen post-test examination is strongly recommended to characterise the detail of deformation and damage accumulation under known and well-controlled loading conditions to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of failure diagnosis. PMID:28793676

  7. Creep-Fatigue Failure Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Stuart

    2015-11-16

    Failure diagnosis invariably involves consideration of both associated material condition and the results of a mechanical analysis of prior operating history. This Review focuses on these aspects with particular reference to creep-fatigue failure diagnosis. Creep-fatigue cracking can be due to a spectrum of loading conditions ranging from pure cyclic to mainly steady loading with infrequent off-load transients. These require a range of mechanical analysis approaches, a number of which are reviewed. The microstructural information revealing material condition can vary with alloy class. In practice, the detail of the consequent cracking mechanism(s) can be camouflaged by oxidation at high temperatures, although the presence of oxide on fracture surfaces can be used to date events leading to failure. Routine laboratory specimen post-test examination is strongly recommended to characterise the detail of deformation and damage accumulation under known and well-controlled loading conditions to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of failure diagnosis.

  8. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  9. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  10. The Great Failure of "Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schievella, Pasqual S.

    1975-01-01

    The failure of todays education to develop critical and analytical skills in students is examined. This journal is available from the Department of Philosophy, Jersey City State College, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City, New Jersey 07305. (Author/DE)

  11. Identifying Clients Predisposed To Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Studies are reviewed that report the prediction of rehabilitation failure from personality measures. Related research is discussed that suggest the dynamics underlying a key concept, the "hypochondriacally organized personality" which is identifiable from the Rorschach anatomy response percentage. (Author)

  12. Morphological instability of failure fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Grinfeld, M.A.; Schoenfeld, S.E.; Wright, T.W.

    2006-03-06

    There are various observations and experiments showing that, in addition to standard shock-wave fronts, which propagate with high trans-sonic velocities, some other much slower wave fronts can propagate within substance undergoing intensive damage. These moving fronts propagate within intact substance leaving behind them intensively damaged substance. These fronts were coined as failure waves. The failure waves can be modeled differently--in this letter they are modeled as sharp interfaces separating two states: the intact and comminuted states. Several penetration experiments with transparent glasses and ceramics have shown that failure fronts have an extremely rough morphology. We suggest a simple thermodynamic theory which allows interpreting appearance of the roughness as a manifestation of morphological instability of failure fronts. For the case of isotropic phases the instability criterion is presented in explicit form.

  13. Failure to Thrive (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorb foods that have milk proteins, such as yogurt and cheese, which could lead to failure to ... doctors will ask for a child's detailed health history, including a feeding history. This helps doctors see ...

  14. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... May 9,2017 An important part of shared decision making in advanced heart failure is to clarify what ... discontinue LVAD support should be part of the decision-making process before the device is implanted. A thoughtful ...

  15. Relationship between physical activity and heart failure risk in women.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Iffat; Bellavia, Andrea; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-11-01

    Physical activity is a modifiable health-related behavior shown to be associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. There is some evidence that this could also be the case for heart failure. We investigated whether total physical activity, as well as different domains of physical activity, was associated with heart failure risk. The Swedish Mammography Cohort was used in which 27 895 women were followed up from 1997 to 2011. First event of heart failure was ascertained through the Swedish National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We also analyzed survival percentiles by applying Laplace regression. During an average follow-up time of 13 years (369 207 person-years), we ascertained 2402 first events of heart failure hospitalizations and deaths. We found that moderate to high levels of total physical activity were associated with a reduced risk of future heart failure. When looking into different domains of physical activity, walking/bicycling >20 minutes/d was associated with 29% lower risk of heart failure (95% confidence interval, -36% to -21%), when investigating survival percentiles this could be translated into 18 months longer heart failure-free survival. Our study shows that physical activity could protect against heart failure in women. When looking closer into different domains of physical activity, walking or biking ≥20 minutes every day was associated with the largest risk reduction of heart failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Failure mechanisms of fibrin-based surgical tissue adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, David Hugh

    A series of studies was performed to investigate the potential impact of heterogeneity in the matrix of multiple-component fibrin-based tissue adhesives upon their mechanical and biomechanical properties both in vivo and in vitro. Investigations into the failure mechanisms by stereological techniques demonstrated that heterogeneity could be measured quantitatively and that the variation in heterogeneity could be altered both by the means of component mixing and delivery and by the formulation of the sealant. Ex vivo tensile adhesive strength was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of heterogeneity. In contrast, in vivo tensile wound-closure strength was found to be relatively unaffected by the degree of heterogeneity, while in vivo parenchymal organ hemostasis in rabbits was found to be affected: greater heterogeneity appeared to correlate with an increase in hemostasis time and amount of sealant necessary to effect hemostasis. Tensile testing of the bulk sealant showed that mechanical parameters were proportional to fibrin concentration and that the physical characteristics of the failure supported a ductile mechanism. Strain hardening as a function of percentage of strain, and strain rate was observed for both concentrations, and syneresis was observed at low strain rates for the lower fibrin concentration. Blister testing demonstrated that burst pressure and failure energy were proportional to fibrin concentration and decreased with increasing flow rate. Higher fibrin concentration demonstrated predominately compact morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, demonstrating shear or viscous failure in a viscoelastic rubbery adhesive. The lower fibrin concentration sealant exhibited predominately fractal morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, supporting an elastoviscous material condition. The failure mechanism for these was hypothesized and shown to be flow-induced ductile fracture. Based on these findings, the failure mechanism was

  17. Level of Automation and Failure Frequency Effects on Simulated Lunar Lander Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquez, Jessica J.; Ramirez, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator, where instrument-rated pilots completed a simulated terminal descent phase of a lunar landing. Ten pilots participated in a 2 x 2 mixed design experiment, with level of automation as the within-subjects factor and failure frequency as the between subjects factor. The two evaluated levels of automation were high (fully automated landing) and low (manual controlled landing). During test trials, participants were exposed to either a high number of failures (75% failure frequency) or low number of failures (25% failure frequency). In order to investigate the pilots' sensitivity to changes in levels of automation and failure frequency, the dependent measure selected for this experiment was accuracy of failure diagnosis, from which D Prime and Decision Criterion were derived. For each of the dependent measures, no significant difference was found for level of automation and no significant interaction was detected between level of automation and failure frequency. A significant effect was identified for failure frequency suggesting failure frequency has a significant effect on pilots' sensitivity to failure detection and diagnosis. Participants were more likely to correctly identify and diagnose failures if they experienced the higher levels of failures, regardless of level of automation

  18. The role of shear and tensile failure in dynamically triggered landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipprich, T.L.; Snieder, R.K.; Jibson, R.W.; Kimman, W.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses generated by earthquakes can trigger landslides. Current methods of landslide analysis such as pseudo-static analysis and Newmark's method focus on the effects of earthquake accelerations on the landslide mass to characterize dynamic landslide behaviour. One limitation of these methods is their use Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, which only accounts for shear failure, but the role of tensile failure is not accounted for. We develop a limit-equilibrium model to investigate the dynamic stresses generated by a given ground motion due to a plane wave and use this model to assess the role of shear and tensile failure in the initiation of slope instability. We do so by incorporating a modified Griffith failure envelope, which combines shear and tensile failure into a single criterion. Tests of dynamic stresses in both homogeneous and layered slopes demonstrate that two modes of failure exist, tensile failure in the uppermost meters of a slope and shear failure at greater depth. Further, we derive equations that express the dynamic stress in the near-surface in the acceleration measured at the surface. These equations are used to approximately define the depth range for each mechanism of failure. The depths at which these failure mechanisms occur suggest that shear and tensile failure might collaborate in generating slope failure. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  19. A Take Stock of Turbine Blades Failure Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Abhijit

    2017-06-01

    Turbine Blade design and engineering is one of the most complicated and important aspects of turbine technology. Experiments with blades can be simple or very complicated, depending upon parameters of analysis. Turbine blades are subjected to vigorous environments, such as high temperatures, high stresses, and a potentially high vibration environment. All these factors can lead to blade failures, which can destroy the turbine, and engine, so careful design is the prime consideration to resist those conditions. A high cycle of fatigue of compressor and turbine blades due to high dynamic stress caused by blade vibration and resonance within the operating range of machinery is common failure mode for turbine machine. Continuous study and investigation on failure of turbine blades are going on since last five decades. Some review papers published during these days aiming to present a review on recent studies and investigations done on failures of turbine blades. All the detailed literature related with the turbine blades has not been described but emphasized to provide all the methodologies of failures adopted by various researches to investigate turbine blade. This paper illustrate on various factors of failure.

  20. Analyses of Transistor Punchthrough Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.

    1999-01-01

    The failure of two transistors in the Altitude Switch Assembly for the Solid Rocket Booster followed by two additional failures a year later presented a challenge to failure analysts. These devices had successfully worked for many years on numerous missions. There was no history of failures with this type of device. Extensive checks of the test procedures gave no indication for a source of the cause. The devices were manufactured more than twenty years ago and failure information on this lot date code was not readily available. External visual exam, radiography, PEID, and leak testing were performed with nominal results Electrical testing indicated nearly identical base-emitter and base-collector characteristics (both forward and reverse) with a low resistance short emitter to collector. These characteristics are indicative of a classic failure mechanism called punchthrough. In failure analysis punchthrough refers to an condition where a relatively low voltage pulse causes the device to conduct very hard producing localized areas of thermal runaway or "hot spots". At one or more of these hot spots, the excessive currents melt the silicon. Heavily doped emitter material diffuses through the base region to the collector forming a diffusion pipe shorting the emitter to base to collector. Upon cooling, an alloy junction forms between the pipe and the base region. Generally, the hot spot (punch-through site) is under the bond and no surface artifact is visible. The devices were delidded and the internal structures were examined microscopically. The gold emitter lead was melted on one device, but others had anomalies in the metallization around the in-tact emitter bonds. The SEM examination confirmed some anomalies to be cosmetic defects while other anomalies were artifacts of the punchthrough site. Subsequent to these analyses, the contractor determined that some irregular testing procedures occurred at the time of the failures heretofore unreported. These testing