Science.gov

Sample records for failure pressure evaluation

  1. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  2. Evaluation of a fracture failure mode in the Space Shuttle hydrogen pressurization system flow control valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauver, S. E.; Sueme, D. R.

    1992-07-01

    During acceptance testing of the Space Shuttle Endeavor hydrogen flow control valves, which are used in the Orbiter's fuel tank pressurization system, two of the valves experienced fracture of the poppet flange. The poppets are made of 440 C, a high strength, wear-resistant, low ductility, martensitic stainless steel. The investigation which was initiated to determine the cause of these failures is traced. All aspects of the poppet processing that may have introduced a defect were assessed. This included machining, heat treating, passivation, assembly, and test. In addition, several potential failure modes were investigated. The extensive investigation revealed no obvious cause of the failures, but did result in a recommendation for a different material application.

  3. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation of PRSEUS Pressure Cube Article in Support of Load Test to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test was a joint development effort between the Boeing Company and NASA Langley Research Center, sponsored in part by the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project and Boeing internal R&D. This Technical Memorandum presents the results of ultrasonic inspections in support of the PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test, and is a companion document with the NASA test report and a report on the acoustic emission measurements made during the test.

  4. Usefulness of the Sum of Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure and Right Atrial Pressure as a Congestion Index that Prognosticates Heart Failure Survival (from the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness Trial).

    PubMed

    Ma, Tony S; Paniagua, David; Denktas, Ali E; Jneid, Hani; Kar, Biswajit; Chan, Wenyaw; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-09-15

    In the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness (ESCAPE) trial, use of a pulmonary artery catheter did not significantly affect advanced heart failure outcomes. However, the success of achieving the targeted hemodynamic goals of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of 15 mm Hg and right atrial pressure (RAP) of 8 mm Hg and the association of these goals with clinical outcomes were not addressed. Furthermore, goals with 2 independent variables, PCWP and RAP, left room for uncertainties. We assessed the ability of a single hemodynamic target to achieve a threshold sum of PCWP and RAP as a predictor of all-cause mortality, death-or-transplantation (DT), or death-or-rehospitalization (DR) at 6 months in the pulmonary artery catheter-guided treatment arm of ESCAPE (n = 206). Patients with a posttreatment PCWP + RAP of <30 mm Hg had characteristics similar to those of the population who achieved the ESCAPE hemodynamic goals. This group had 8.7% mortality, 13.0% DT, and 58.7% DR at 6 months. The contrasting cohort with PCWP + RAP of ≥30 mm Hg had 45.3% mortality, 54.7% DT, and 84.9% DR at 6 months, with greater relative risk (RR) of death (RR 5.76), DT (RR 4.92), and DR (RR 1.80) and higher prevalence of jugular venous pulsation, edema, hepatomegaly, and ascites at admission and discharge. In conclusion, PCWP + RAP of 30 mm Hg posttreatment, obtained early in the index hospitalization, may represent as a simple congestion index that has prognostic value for heart failure survival and readmission rates at 6 months and as a warning signal for more aggressive intervention, thus warranting further validation.

  5. Usefulness of the Sum of Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure and Right Atrial Pressure as a Congestion Index that Prognosticates Heart Failure Survival (from the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness Trial).

    PubMed

    Ma, Tony S; Paniagua, David; Denktas, Ali E; Jneid, Hani; Kar, Biswajit; Chan, Wenyaw; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-09-15

    In the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness (ESCAPE) trial, use of a pulmonary artery catheter did not significantly affect advanced heart failure outcomes. However, the success of achieving the targeted hemodynamic goals of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of 15 mm Hg and right atrial pressure (RAP) of 8 mm Hg and the association of these goals with clinical outcomes were not addressed. Furthermore, goals with 2 independent variables, PCWP and RAP, left room for uncertainties. We assessed the ability of a single hemodynamic target to achieve a threshold sum of PCWP and RAP as a predictor of all-cause mortality, death-or-transplantation (DT), or death-or-rehospitalization (DR) at 6 months in the pulmonary artery catheter-guided treatment arm of ESCAPE (n = 206). Patients with a posttreatment PCWP + RAP of <30 mm Hg had characteristics similar to those of the population who achieved the ESCAPE hemodynamic goals. This group had 8.7% mortality, 13.0% DT, and 58.7% DR at 6 months. The contrasting cohort with PCWP + RAP of ≥30 mm Hg had 45.3% mortality, 54.7% DT, and 84.9% DR at 6 months, with greater relative risk (RR) of death (RR 5.76), DT (RR 4.92), and DR (RR 1.80) and higher prevalence of jugular venous pulsation, edema, hepatomegaly, and ascites at admission and discharge. In conclusion, PCWP + RAP of 30 mm Hg posttreatment, obtained early in the index hospitalization, may represent as a simple congestion index that has prognostic value for heart failure survival and readmission rates at 6 months and as a warning signal for more aggressive intervention, thus warranting further validation. PMID:27474338

  6. High pressure gate valve failure

    SciTech Connect

    Place, M. Jr.; Kochera, J.W.

    1995-10-01

    Shell Oil Company was attempting to develop CRA (Corrosion Resistant Alloy) valves for use in those completions utilizing CRA tubing. The testing and development of new materials for CRA valves of both the solid and clad version were pursued. As part of this CRA valve development program, Shell Oil Company tried to reconcile the apparent discrepancy between unacceptable laboratory test results on 410 SS in sour environments with both the apparent success (when properly heat treated and at an acceptable hardness level) of this alloy in commercial sour use and the fact that it is fully accepted in NACE MR-01-75. A410 stainless steel valve was tested near the material yield strength at low H{sub 2}S partial pressures at the STF (Static Test Facility) in Mississippi. The valve failed by crack growth and body wall leakage while under test.

  7. Positive airway pressure therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takao; Suda, Shoko; Kasai, Takatoshi

    2014-11-26

    Heart failure (HF) is a life-threatening disease and is a growing public health concern. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management for HF, the morbidity and mortality from HF remain high. Therefore, non-pharmacological approaches for HF are being developed. However, most non-pharmacological approaches are invasive, have limited indication and are considered only for advanced HF. Accordingly, the development of less invasive, non-pharmacological approaches that improve outcomes for patients with HF is important. One such approach may include positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. In this review, the role of PAP therapy applied through mask interfaces in the wide spectrum of HF care is discussed. PMID:25429330

  8. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.

  9. Code System to Calculate Pressure Vessel Failure Probabilities.

    2001-03-27

    Version 00 OCTAVIA (Operationally Caused Transients And Vessel Integrity Analysis) calculates the probability of pressure vessel failure from operationally-caused pressure transients which can occur in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). For specified vessel and operating environment characteristics the program computes the failure pressure at which the vessel will fail for different-sized flaws existing in the beltline and the probability of vessel failure per reactor year due to the flaw. The probabilities are summed over themore » various flaw sizes to obtain the total vessel failure probability. Sensitivity studies can be performed to investigate different vessel or operating characteristics in the same computer run.« less

  10. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ≤ μ′ ≤ 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter μ′ is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, μ′ is not a material constant, and −∞ ≤ μ′ ≤ +∞. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  11. Strategies for the prevention of continuous positive airway pressure failure.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Rakesh; Schiaratura, Maria; Polin, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in preterm infants. Current modalities of respiratory support range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to various modes of mechanical ventilation. Data from recent randomized control trials suggest that the use of nasal (n)CPAP as the initial mode of respiratory support in critically ill very low birth weight infants is associated with a lower incidence of chronic lung disease. The practice of early initiation of nasal-prong CPAP in all spontaneously breathing infants at Columbia University has resulted in very low rates of chronic lung disease for decades. Many institutions have attempted to replicate the practices and results at Columbia University. However, success rates with nCPAP are highly variable, which may in part be attributable to how well it is utilized. With recent renewed interest in non-invasive respiratory support, particularly bubble nCPAP, it is essential to evaluate strategies for the prevention of CPAP failure. This review discusses strategies that address these issues and shares the practical aspects for replicating success with bubble nCPAP. In addition, it reviews desirable features, major components, and physiological consequences of various bubble CPAP systems along with clinical experience of CPAP use. PMID:26936186

  12. Relationship between colloid osmotic pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure in patients with acute cardiorespiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Weil, M H; Henning, R J; Morissette, M; Michaels, S

    1978-04-01

    Close relationships between progressive respiratory failure, roentgenographic signs of pulmonary opacification and decreases in the difference between colloid osmotic pressure of plasma and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (colloid-hydrosatic pressure gradient) were demonstrated in 49 critically ill patients with multisystem failure, in patients in shock. The potential importance of this relationship is underscored by the observation that fatal progression of pulmonary edema was related to a critical reduction in the colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient to levels of less than 0 mm Hg. More often, reduction in colloid osmotic pressure rather than increases in left ventricular filling pressure (pulmonary artery wedge pressure) accounted for the decline in colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient. Routine measurement of colloid osmotic pressure, preferably in conjunction with pulmonary artery wedge pressure, is likely to improve understanding of the mechanisms of acute pulmonary edema.

  13. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  14. Failure analysis of thick composite cylinders under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    Failure of thick section composites due to local compression strength and overall structural instability is treated. Effects of material nonlinearity, imperfect fiber architecture, and structural imperfections upon anticipated failure stresses are determined. Comparisons with experimental data for a series of test cylinders are described. Predicting the failure strength of composite structures requires consideration of stability and material strength modes of failure using linear and nonlinear analysis techniques. Material strength prediction requires the accurate definition of the local multiaxial stress state in the material. An elasticity solution for the linear static analysis of thick anisotropic cylinders and rings is used herein to predict the axisymmetric stress state in the cylinders. Asymmetric nonlinear behavior due to initial cylinder out of roundness and the effects of end closure structure are treated using finite element methods. It is assumed that local fiber or ply waviness is an important factor in the initiation of material failure. An analytical model for the prediction of compression failure of fiber composites, which includes the effects of fiber misalignments, matrix inelasticity, and multiaxial applied stresses is used for material strength calculations. Analytical results are compared to experimental data for a series of glass and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy cylinders subjected to external pressure. Recommendations for pretest characterization and other experimental issues are presented. Implications for material and structural design are discussed.

  15. VISA: a computer code for predicting the probability of reactor pressure-vessel failure. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Strosnider, J. Jr.; Klecker, R.W.; Engel, D.W.; Johnson, K.I.

    1983-09-01

    The VISA (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) code was developed as part of the NRC staff evaluation of pressurized thermal shock. VISA uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the failure probability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to a pressure and thermal transient specified by the user. Linear elastic fracture mechanics are used to model crack initiation and propagation. parameters for initial crack size, copper content, initial RT/sub NDT/, fluence, crack-initiation fracture toughness, and arrest fracture toughness are treated as random variables. This report documents the version of VISA used in the NRC staff report (Policy Issue from J.W. Dircks to NRC Commissioners, Enclosure A: NRC Staff Evaluation of Pressurized Thermal Shock, November 1982, SECY-82-465) and includes a user's guide for the code.

  16. Renal failure and abdominal hypertension after liver transplantation: determination of critical intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Gianni; Bindi, Lucia; Romanelli, Anna Maria; Bisà, Massimo; Boldrini, Antonella; Consani, Giovanni; Danella, Augusta; Urbani, Lucio; Filipponi, Franco; Mosca, Franco

    2002-12-01

    There is growing interest in measuring intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in postsurgical and critically ill patients because increased pressure can impair various organs and functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different IAP levels on the postoperative renal function of subjects undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. IAP was measured every 8 hours with the urinary bladder pressure method for at least 72 hours after surgery. At the end of the study, the patients were classified on the basis of their IAP values: < or = 18 mm Hg (group A), 19 to 24 mm Hg (group B), > or = 25 mm Hg (group C). The three groups were compared in terms of the incidence of acute renal failure (defined as blood creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL or an increase in the same of > 1.1 mg/dL within 72 hours of surgery), hourly diuresis, blood creatinine, the filtration gradient, hemodynamic variations, and outcome. The incidence of renal failure was higher among the subjects in group C (P < .05 versus group A and < .01 versus group B), who also had higher creatinine levels (P < .01), a greater need for diuretics (P < .01) and a worse outcome (P < .05). Receiver Operator Characteristic curve analysis showed that an abdominal pressure of 25 mm Hg had the best sensitivity/specificity ratio for renal failure. An intra-abdominal pressure of > or = 25 mm Hg is an important risk factor for renal failure in subjects undergoing liver transplant.

  17. Strain to failure of pressurized thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.; Roach, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a highly pressurized vessel is of considerable importance in design. The plastic-strain response during and following autofrettage operations, in comparison with the limiting strain condition, is of special interest. This paper presents the results of an analysis method for thick wall, high pressure, cylinders where the effective plastic strain distribution through the thickness is the material response variable of primary interest. The limiting value of this effective plastic strain depends on the level of tensile-stress triaxiality which also varies through the thickness. This strain-to-failure criterion is used to predict the complete pressure versus strain response and the maximum pressure for test cylinders. A simple model of effective-stress versus effective plastic strain is employed. This model is quantified by data taken from uniaxial, tension, true-stress-strain curves and from the fracture zone of the tensile specimen. A sample calculation is included and, in a companion paper, a series of burst tubes having properties ranging from brittle to ductile are compared with this analytical method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. The influence of gouge defects on failure pressure of steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alang, N. A.; Razak, N. A.; Zulfadli, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Failure pressure of API X42 steel pipes with gouge defects was estimated through a nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis. The effect of gouge length on failure pressure of different pipe diameters was investigated. Stress modified critical strain (SMCS) model was applied as in predicting the failure of the pipe. The model uses strain based criteria to predict the failure. For validation of the model, the FE results were compared to experimental data in literature showing overall good agreement. The results show that the gouge length has significant influence on failure pressure. A smaller pipe diameter gives highest value of failure pressure.

  19. Effects of Practice and Psychological Pressure on Interpersonal Coordination Failures.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akane; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Although sports players in the same team try to manage their interpersonal coordination for improved performance, failures such as hesitations and collisions are often seen in interpersonal coordination between teammates. However, it is unclear what factors influence the occurrence of such hesitations and collisions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of practice and psychological pressure on the occurrence of hesitations and collisions. A total of 80 right-handed university students (aged 19.1 years ± 0.8; 32 males and 48 females) were randomly assigned into pairs and were instructed to perform a serial-tapping task cooperatively. An apparatus had five buttons in a row, which flashed once in each trial in a quasi-random order. When a flashing button was hit, a corresponding light went off and another button flashed. The participants were instructed that the task was to hit a flashing button as quickly and accurately as possible, and either member of the pair could hit the button. They performed 80 practice trials, 10 trials as a control test, and 10 trials as a pressure test. Before the pressure test, pressure was added by informing them about audience and confiscation of the prize if they could not fulfill a criterion. As a result, the occurrence rates of hesitations and collisions and the performance time significantly decreased from the first 40 trials to the next 40 trials of the practice session. Under pressure, state anxiety, the intention to cooperate, and the occurrence rates of hesitations and collisions increased, though heart rate and performance time did not change. These results suggested that interpersonal coordination improved with practice but deteriorated under pressure. PMID:27173664

  20. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements

  1. Influence of pore pressure on the successive failures of intact slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, Chrysoula; Utili, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The presence of water can significantly change the stability of a slope and as a result the evolution of a slope in time. In this paper the influence of pore water pressure on the morphological evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat is investigated. The upper bound theorem of limit analysis is employed to evaluate the stability number and the failure mechanism of successive failures of uniform c, φ slopes with the presence of water. This model extends the existing analytical framework on the evolution of slopes subjected to weathering by accounting for the presence of water. Pore-water pressure is considered in the model by using the coefficient ru, a description of the pore-water pressure distribution that is approximate, but is commonly used in slope stability analyses. To account for the influence of the pore pressure, the work of pore-water pressure on the deformation of the soil along the failure surface had to be included in the model leading to modified analytical expressions of the energy balance equation (the balance between external work and dissipated energy) and as a consequence, of the function whose minimum provides the solution in terms of failure mechanisms and associated values of soil strength. With this model it is possible to relate the evolution of natural slopes with the presence of water by a sequence of rotational sliding block failures to the degradation of material strength properties. Computations were carried out for a wide range of parameters (friction angle φ and initial slope inclination β) and a set of normalized solutions is presented for different values of ru coefficient.

  2. Primary prevention of stroke: blood pressure, lipids, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Endres, Matthias; Heuschmann, Peter U; Laufs, Ulrich; Hakim, Antoine M

    2011-03-01

    Stroke contributes significantly to morbidity, mortality, and disability worldwide. Despite the successes accomplished in the acute treatment and rehabilitation of stroke, the global burden of this disease can only be tackled with co-ordinated approaches for primary prevention. Stroke is a heterogeneous disease and the contribution of individual risk factors to its occurrence estimated by population attributable risk differs from coronary heart disease. Here, we review evidence to demonstrate the prominent role of elevated blood pressure (BP) and heart disease on risk of stroke, while the influence of lipids on stroke is less clear; we also demonstrate that stroke is an important complication of heart failure. Current approaches to primary preventive action emphasize the need to target the absolute risk of cardiovascular diseases rather than individual risk factors. Lifestyle interventions serve as a basis for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that 70% of strokes are potentially preventable by lifestyle modification but prospective evidence is needed to support these hypotheses derived from epidemiological studies. Different strategies for drug interventions in primary prevention are discussed, including the polypill strategy. Additional measures are needed for the primary prevention of stroke which focus on BP, chronic heart failure, and possibly lipids.

  3. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  4. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  5. Updating the FORECAST formative evaluation approach and some implications for ameliorating theory failure, implementation failure, and evaluation failure

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jason; Wandersman, Abraham; Goodman, Robert M.; Griffin, Sarah; Wilson, Dawn K.; Schillaci, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Historically, there has been considerable variability in how formative evaluation has been conceptualized and practiced. FORmative Evaluation Consultation And Systems Technique (FORECAST) is a formative evaluation approach that develops a set of models and processes that can be used across settings and times, while allowing for local adaptations and innovations. FORECAST integrates specific models and tools to improve limitations in program theory, implementation, and evaluation. In the period since its initial use in a federally funded community prevention project in the early 1990s, evaluators have incorporated important formative evaluation innovations into FORECAST, including the integration of feedback loops and proximal outcome evaluation. In addition, FORECAST has been applied in a randomized community research trial. In this article, we describe updates to FORECAST and the implications of FORECAST for ameliorating failures in program theory, implementation, and evaluation. PMID:23624204

  6. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Ramirez, Claudia E; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5-10 mg), or ergotamine and caffeine (1 and 100 mg, respectively) in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 min, at baseline and at 1 h post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131 ± 19 and 95 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.003 for time effect). Midodrine also significantly increased seated SBP (121 ± 19 mmHg at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.015 for time effect vs. placebo), but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p = 0.621). There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p = 0.034). These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease.

  7. High Pressure Electrolyzer System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, Kevin; Coloza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the continuing efforts to evaluate the operational state of a high pressure PEM based electrolyzer located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This electrolyzer is a prototype system built by General Electric and refurbished by Hamilton Standard (now named Hamilton Sunstrand). It is capable of producing hydrogen and oxygen at an output pressure of 3000 psi. The electrolyzer has been in storage for a number of years. Evaluation and testing was performed to determine the state of the electrolyzer and provide an estimate of the cost for refurbishment. Pressure testing was performed using nitrogen gas through the oxygen ports to ascertain the status of the internal membranes and seals. It was determined that the integrity of the electrolyzer stack was good as there were no appreciable leaks in the membranes or seals within the stack. In addition to the integrity testing, an itemized list and part cost estimate was produced for the components of the electrolyzer system. An evaluation of the system s present state and an estimate of the cost to bring it back to operational status was also produced.

  8. Statistical Performance Evaluation Of Soft Seat Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Stephen P.; Gross, Robert E.

    2013-03-26

    Risk-based inspection methods enable estimation of the probability of failure on demand for spring-operated pressure relief valves at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This paper presents a statistical performance evaluation of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves. These pressure relief valves are typically smaller and of lower cost than hard seat (metal to metal) pressure relief valves and can provide substantial cost savings in fluid service applications (air, gas, liquid, and steam) providing that probability of failure on demand (the probability that the pressure relief valve fails to perform its intended safety function during a potentially dangerous over pressurization) is at least as good as that for hard seat valves. The research in this paper shows that the proportion of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves failing is the same or less than that of hard seat valves, and that for failed valves, soft seat valves typically have failure ratios of proof test pressure to set pressure less than that of hard seat valves.

  9. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure and physical activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Kuei; Meininger, Janet C; Frazier, Lorraine Q; Chan, Wenyaw

    2010-01-01

    This observational study used repeated measures over 24 hr to investigate ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and physical activity (PA) profiles in community-based individuals with heart failure (HF). The aims were to (a) compare BP dipping and PA between two groups of HF patients with different functional statuses, and (b) determine whether the strength of the association between ambulatory BP and PA varies by functional status in HF. Ambulatory BP was measured every 30 min with a SpaceLabs 90207; a Basic Motionlogger actigraph was used to measure PA minute-by-minute. Fifty-six participants (54% female, age 66.96 + or - 12.35 years) completed data collection. Functional status was based on New York Heart Association (NYHA) ratings. Twenty-seven patients had no limitation of PA (NYHA Class I HF), whereas 29 had some limitation of PA but no discomfort at rest (NYHA Class II or III HF). Patients with Class I HF had a significantly greater degree of BP dipping than those with Class II/III HF after controlling for left ventricular ejection fraction. In a mixed-model analysis, PA was significantly related to ambulatory systolic and diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure. The strength of the association between PA and BP was not significantly different for the two groups of patients. These findings demonstrate differences between Class I and Class II/II HF in BP dipping status and ambulatory BP but not PA. Longitudinal research is recommended to improve understanding of the influence of disease progression on changes in 24-hr PA and BP profiles of patients with HF. PMID:19617234

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Amit K; Penny, William F; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Amit K.; Penny, William F.; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N. Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  13. Failure and Life Cycle Evaluation of Watering Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-01-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves’ internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a ‘drying out’ period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure. PMID:22330720

  14. Evaluation Methodologies for Estimating the Likelihood of Program Implementation Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, Roger; Decker, Phillip J.; Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our best efforts as evaluators, program implementation failures abound. A wide variety of valuable methodologies have been adopted to explain and evaluate the "why" of these failures. Yet, typically these methodologies have been employed concurrently (e.g., project monitoring) or to the post-hoc assessment of program activities.…

  15. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  16. International Space Station (ISS) Low Pressure Intramodule Quick Disconnect Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Harris, Danny; Link, Dwight; Morrison, Russel

    2004-01-01

    A failure of an ISS intermodule Quick Disconnect (QD) during protoflight vibration testing of ISS regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) hardware led to the discovery of QD design, manufacturing, and test flaws which can yield the male QD susceptible to failure of the secondary housing seal and inadequate housing assembly locking mechanisms. Discovery of this failure had large implications when considering that currently there are 399 similar units on orbit and approximately 1100 units on the ground integrated into flight hardware. Discovery of the nature of the failure required testing and analysis and implementation of a recovery plan requiring part screening and review of element level and project hazard analysis to determine if secondary seals are required. Implementation also involves coordination with the Nodes and MPLM project offices, Regenerative ECLS Project, ISS Payloads, JAXA, ESA, and ISS Logistics and Maintenance.

  17. Acute Effects of Continuous Positive Air way Pressure on Pulse Pressure in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Rocha, Nazareth de Novaes; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Methods Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60 ± 11 years; BMI 29 ± 5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. Results CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72 ± 9; vs. Post 5 min: 67 ± 10 bpm; p < 0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87 ± 11; vs. control 96 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47 ± 20 pre to 38 ± 19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42 ± 12 mmHg, pre to 41 ± 18 post p < 0.05 post 5 min). Conclusion NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:24676373

  18. Evaluation and treatment of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, A; Bagga, A

    1999-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is the irreversible deterioration of renal function that gradually progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The chief causes of CRF include obstructive uropathy, primary glomerular diseases, reflux nephropathy and hypoplastic or dysplastic kidneys. Progressive hyperperfusion and hyperfiltration causes increasing glomerular injury and further renal damage. Symptoms of CRF are usually seen when GFR is between 10-25% of normal. Children with severe CRF often suffer from failure to thrive, growth retardation, acidosis, anemia and renal osteodystrophy. Management of CRF aims at retarding progression of renal damage and treatment of complications related to renal dysfunction. Measures suggested to retard progression include protein restriction, strict control of hypertension, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and control of hyperlipidemia. Appropriate amounts of protein and calories are recommended to prevent growth failure. Nutritional supplements are often required. The availability of recombinant erythropoietin, calcitriol and human growth hormone has significantly improved the management of these patients. Once ESRD supervenes, renal replacement therapy in the form of chronic peritoneal or hemodialysis and transplantation is necessary.

  19. Choking under Pressure: Multiple Routes to Skill Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCaro, Marci S.; Thomas, Robin D.; Albert, Neil B.; Beilock, Sian L.

    2011-01-01

    Poor performance in pressure-filled situations, or "choking under pressure," has largely been explained by two different classes of theories. Distraction theories propose that choking occurs because attention needed to perform the task at hand is coopted by task-irrelevant thoughts and worries. Explicit monitoring theories claim essentially the…

  20. A Study of Failure in Small Pressurized Cylindrical Shells Containing a Crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwell, Craig A.; Eber, Lorenz; Fyfe, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental models. The loading applied was either symmetric or unsymmetric about the crack plane, the latter being caused by structural constraints such as stringers. The objective was two fold - one, to provide the experimental results which will allow computer modeling techniques to be evaluated for deformations that are significantly different from that experienced by flat plates, and the other to examine the deformations and conditions associated with the onset of crack kinking which often precedes crack curving. The stresses which control crack growth in a cylindrical geometry depend on conditions introduced by the axial bulging, which is an integral part of this type of failure. For the symmetric geometry, both the hoop and radial strain just ahead off the crack, r = a, were measured and these results compared with those obtained from a variety of structural analysis codes, in particular STAGS [1], ABAQUS and ANSYS. In addition to these measurements, the pressures at the onset of stable and unstable crack growth were obtained and the corresponding crack deformations measured as the pressures were increased to failure. For the unsymmetric cases, measurements were taken of the crack kinking angle, and the displacements in the vicinity of the crack. In general, the strains ahead of the crack showed good agreement between the three computer codes and between the codes and the experiments. In the case of crack behavior, it was determined that modeling stable tearing with a crack-tip opening displacement fracture criterion could be successfully combined with the finite-element analysis techniques as used in structural analysis codes. The analytic results obtained in this study were very compatible with the experimental observations of crack growth

  1. Failure pressure analysis of corroded moderate-to-high strength pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chen-liang; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Based on the elastic-plastic, large-deformation finite element method, burst capacity of steel pipeline with longitudinal corrosion defect subjected to internal pressure is studied. The appropriate stress-based criterion is used to predict the failure pressure of finite element model of corroded pipeline under internal pressure. By considering the pipe steel grades and geometries of corrosion defects, a series of finite element analyses is conducted. The effects of corrosion depth, length and width on burst capacity are also discussed. A specific failure pressure solution for the assessment of corrosion defects in moderate-to-high strength pipeline is proposed on the base of numerical results. The failure pressures predicted by the proposed method are in better agreement with the experimental results than the results by the other methods.

  2. Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  3. Influence of bilevel positive airway pressure on autonomic tone in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Diego; Costa, Dirceu; Reis, Michel; Gomes, Evelim Leal de F. Dantas; Costa, Ivan Peres; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Marsico, Aline; Stirbulov, Roberto; Arena, Ross; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of Bilevel Positive Airway (BiPAP) on the autonomic control of heart rate, assessed by heart rate variability (HRV), in patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure. [Subjects and Methods] This prospective cross-sectional study included 20 subjects (age: 69±8 years, 12 male, left ventricular ejection fraction: 36 ±8%) diagnosed with heart failure who were admitted to a semi-intensive care unit with acute decompensation. Date was collected for HRV analysis during: 10 minutes spontaneous breathing in the resting supine position; 30 minutes breathing with BiPAP application (inspiratory pressure = 20 cmH2O and expiratory pressure = 10 cmH2O); and 10 minutes immediately after removal of BiPAP, during the return to spontaneous breathing. [Results] Significantly higher values for indices representative of increased parasympathetic activity were found in the time and frequency domains as well as in nonlinear Poincaré analysis during and after BiPAP in comparison to baseline. Linear HRV analysis: standard deviation of the average of all R-R intervals in milliseconds = 30.99±4.4 pre, 40.3±6.2 during, and 53.3±12.5 post BiPAP. Non-linear HRV analysis: standard deviations parallel in milliseconds = 8.31±4.3 pre, 12.9±5.8 during, and 22.8 ±6.3 post BiPAP. [Conclusion] The present findings demonstrate that BiPAP enhances vagal tone in patients with heart failure, which is beneficial for patients suffering from acute decompensation. PMID:26957719

  4. Vessel failure time for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-4

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident sequence has been analyzed using the MELCOR code, version 1.8.1, in a boiling water reactor (BWR)-4. This paper presents a sensitivity study evaluating the effect of several MELCOR input parameters on vessel failure time. Results using the MELCOR/CORBH package and the BWRSAR code are also presented and compared to the MELCOR results. These calculated vessel failure times are discussed, and a judgment is offered as to which is the most realistic.

  5. Prediction of Composite Pressure Vessel Failure Location using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Steven T.; Taylor, F. Tad; Ortyl, Nicholas E.; Grant, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors in order to assess the strain levels of the vessel under various loading conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and present a possible methodology for predicting the failure location and strain level of composite pressure vessels.

  6. Explosive Event in MON-3 Oxidizer System Resulting from Pressure Transducer Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Reynolds, Michael; Anderson, John

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, a Druck(Registered Trademark) pressure transducer failed catastrophically in a test system circulating nitrogen tetroxide at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. The cause of the explosion was not immediately obvious since the wetted areas of the pressure transducer were constructed of materials compatible with nitrogen tetroxide. Chemical analysis of the resulting residue and a materials analysis of the diaphragm and its weld zones were used to determine the chain of events that led to the catastrophic failure. Due to excessive dynamic pressure loading in the test system, the diaphragm in the pressure transducer suffered cyclic failure and allowed the silicon oil located behind the isolation diaphragm to mix with the nitrogen tetroxide. The reaction between these two chemicals formed a combination of 2,4-di and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, which are shock sensitive explosives that caused the failure of the pressure transducer. Further research indicated numerous manufacturers offer similar pressure transducers with silicone oil separated from the test fluid by a thin stainless steel isolation diaphragm. Caution must be exercised when purchasing a pressure transducer for a particular system to avoid costly failures and test system contamination.

  7. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  8. [Echocardiography for the evaluation of patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Mele, Donato

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is the most widely used technique for evaluating patients with heart failure owing to its widespread use, non-invasiveness and ability to provide diagnostic, functional, hemodynamic and prognostic information. However, echocardiography is not always used appropriately as regards both clinical indications to the examination and the information gathered in the course of the examination itself. This can lead to repeated, unnecessary or unhelpful echocardiographic evaluations, that is, non-optimal consumption of available resources. The purpose of this article is to describe how to use echocardiography appropriately for assessing patients with heart failure, and to highlight the advantages and limitations of this technique. PMID:26901256

  9. Stress analysis and failure of an internally pressurized composite-jacketed steel cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter C. T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear stress analysis of a thick-walled compound tube subjected to internal pressure. The compound tube is constructed of a steel liner and a graphite-bismaleimide outer shell. Analytical expressions for the stresses, strains, and displacements are derived for all loading ranges up to failure. Numerical results for the stresses and the maximum value that the compound tube can contain without failure are presented.

  10. Evaluation Model of Life Loss Due to Dam Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongjing

    2016-04-01

    Dam failure poses a serious threat to human life, however there is still lack of systematic research on life loss which due to dam failure in China. From the perspective of protecting human life, an evaluation model for life loss caused by dam failure is put forward. The model building gets three progressive steps. Twenty dam failure cases in China are preferably chosen as the basic data, considering geographical location and construction time of dams, as well as various conditions of dam failure. Then twelve impact factors of life loss are selected, including severity degree of flood, population at risk, understanding of dam failure, warning time, evacuation condition, number of damaged buildings, water temperature, reservoir storage, dam height, dam type, break time and distance from flood area to dam. And through principal component analysis, it gets four principal components consisting of the first flood character principle component, the second warning system principle component, the third human character principle component and the fourth space-time impact principle component. After multivariate nonlinear regression and ten-fold validation in combination, the evaluation model for life loss is finally established. And the result of the proposed model is closer to the true value and better in fitting effect in comparison with the results of RESCDAM method and M. Peng method. The proposed model is not only applied to evaluate life loss and its rate under various kinds of dam failure conditions in China, but also provides reliable cause analysis and prediction approach to reduce the risk of life loss.

  11. A preliminary evaluation of a failure detection filter for detecting and identifying control element failures in a transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the failure detection filter to the detection and identification of aircraft control element failures was evaluated in a linear digital simulation of the longitudinal dynamics of a B-737 Aircraft. Simulation results show that with a simple correlator and threshold detector used to process the filter residuals, the failure detection performance is seriously degraded by the effects of turbulence.

  12. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  13. Impact of changes in blood pressure during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure on renal and clinical outcomes†

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Coca, Steven G.; McCauley, Brian D.; Shannon, Richard P.; Kimmel, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims One of the primary determinants of blood flow in regional vascular beds is perfusion pressure. Our aim was to investigate if reduction in blood pressure during the treatment of decompensated heart failure would be associated with worsening renal function (WRF). Our secondary aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of this potentially treatment-induced form of WRF. Methods and results Subjects included in the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness (ESCAPE) trial limited data were studied (386 patients). Reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) was greater in patients experiencing WRF (−10.3 ± 18.5 vs. −2.8 ± 16.0 mmHg, P < 0.001) with larger reductions associated with greater odds for WRF (odds ratio = 1.3 per 10 mmHg reduction, P < 0.001). Systolic blood pressure reduction (relative change > median) was associated with greater doses of in-hospital oral vasodilators (P ≤ 0.017), thiazide diuretic use (P = 0.035), and greater weight reduction (P = 0.023). In patients with SBP-reduction, WRF was not associated with worsened survival [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76, P = 0.58]. However, in patients without SBP-reduction, WRF was strongly associated with increased mortality (adjusted HR = 5.3, P < 0.001, P interaction = 0.001). Conclusion During the treatment of decompensated heart failure, significant blood pressure reduction is strongly associated with WRF. However, WRF that occurs in the setting of SBP-reduction is not associated with an adverse prognosis, whereas WRF in the absence of this provocation is strongly associated with increased mortality. These data suggest that WRF may represent the final common pathway of several mechanistically distinct processes, each with potentially different prognostic implications. PMID:21693504

  14. Failure of a titanium metal-matrix composite cylinder shell under internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hooke, D.A.; Armanios, E.A.; Dancila, D.S.; Thakker, A.; Doorbar, P.

    1997-12-31

    An investigation into the failure of a SCS-6/Ti-6-4 thin-walled cylindrical shell subjected to internal pressure is presented. The stress field in the middle section is predicted based on an anisotropic shell solution and the failure based on laminate strength data. An experimental setup is designed to allow the application of an internal pressure to the shell using a hydraulic system while maintaining a zero axial load. Strain gages placed at selected locations on the specimen monitor the state of strain during the test, and acoustic emission is used to monitor damage onset and progression. The results indicate that the ultimate load is in good agreement with theoretical predictions from the anisotropic shell solution and the engineering thin-walled theory. Acoustic emission provides a correlation with damage initiation and progression. Fracture surface analysis gives an insight into the initiation and the progression of failure.

  15. Pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a complex syndrome characterized by worsening heart failure (HF) symptoms that requires escalation of therapy. Intrinsic cardiac abnormalities and comorbid conditions, including lung and renal disease, and sleep-disordered breathing, can contribute to the development of AHF. In this Review, we summarize and discuss the literature on the clinical evaluation and underlying pathophysiology of AHF. Important features of AHF evaluation include identification of precipitating factors to the disease, and assessment of circulatory-renal limitations associated with use of HF medications, prior HF hospitalizations, congestion and perfusion profiles, and end-organ dysfunction. The pathophysiological contributions of endothelial dysfunction, neurohormonal activation, venous congestion, and myocardial injury to the development of AHF are also discussed. These potential causative mechanisms provide a framework for clinicians to evaluate and manage patients with AHF and highlight possible future targets for therapies designed to improve clinical outcomes.

  16. Permeability and pressure measurements in Lesser Antilles submarine slides: Evidence for pressure-driven slow-slip failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Manga, Michael; Genecov, Michael; Valdez, Robert; Miller, Peter; Saffer, Demian; Adelstein, Esther; Lafuerza, Sara; Adachi, Tatsuya; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Jutzeler, Martin; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu; Morgan, Sally; Slagle, Angela; Talling, Peter J.; Fraass, Andrew; Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Stroncik, Nicole A.; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Kataoka, Kyoko; Maeno, Fukashi; Martinez-Colon, Michael; McCanta, Molly; Palmer, Martin; Stinton, Adam; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Villemant, Benoît; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Wang, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies hypothesize that some submarine slides fail via pressure-driven slow-slip deformation. To test this hypothesis, this study derives pore pressures in failed and adjacent unfailed deep marine sediments by integrating rock physics models, physical property measurements on recovered sediment core, and wireline logs. Two drill sites (U1394 and U1399) drilled through interpreted slide debris; a third (U1395) drilled into normal marine sediment. Near-hydrostatic fluid pressure exists in sediments at site U1395. In contrast, results at both sites U1394 and U1399 indicate elevated pore fluid pressures in some sediment. We suggest that high pore pressure at the base of a submarine slide deposit at site U1394 results from slide shearing. High pore pressure exists throughout much of site U1399, and Mohr circle analysis suggests that only slight changes in the stress regime will trigger motion. Consolidation tests and permeability measurements indicate moderately low (~10-16-10-17 m2) permeability and overconsolidation in fine-grained slide debris, implying that these sediments act as seals. Three mechanisms, in isolation or in combination, may produce the observed elevated pore fluid pressures at site U1399: (1) rapid sedimentation, (2) lateral fluid flow, and (3) shearing that causes sediments to contract, increasing pore pressure. Our preferred hypothesis is this third mechanism because it explains both elevated fluid pressure and sediment overconsolidation without requiring high sedimentation rates. Our combined analysis of subsurface pore pressures, drilling data, and regional seismic images indicates that slope failure offshore Martinique is perhaps an ongoing, creep-like process where small stress changes trigger motion.

  17. The Comparison and Evaluation of Three Fiber Composite Failure Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R M

    2005-02-08

    Three specific failure criteria for the transversely isotropic fiber composite case will be discussed. All three use the polynomial expansion method. The three criteria are the Tsai-Wu criterion, the Hashin criterion and the Christensen criterion. All three criteria will be given in forms that admit direct and easy comparison, which has not usually been done. The central differences between these three criteria will be discussed, and steps will be taken toward the evaluation of them.

  18. Evaluation of Brazed Joints Using Failure Assessment Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for service approach was used to perform structural analysis of the brazed joints consisting of several base metal / filler metal combinations. Failure Assessment Diagrams (FADs) based on tensile and shear stress ratios were constructed and experimentally validated. It was shown that such FADs can provide a conservative estimate of safe combinations of stresses in the brazed joints. Based on this approach, Margins of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading conditions can be evaluated..

  19. Failure Pressure Estimates of Steam Generator Tubes Containing Wear-type Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Suk Chang; Jong-Min Kim; Nam-Su Huh; Young-Jin Kim; Seong Sik Hwang; Joung-Soo Kim

    2006-07-01

    It is commonly requested that steam generator tubes with defects exceeding 40% of wall thickness in depth should be plugged to sustain all postulated loads with appropriate margin. The critical defect dimensions have been determined based on the concept of plastic instability. This criterion, however, is known to be too conservative for some locations and types of defects. In this context, the accurate failure estimation for steam generator tubes with a defect draws increasing attention. Although several guidelines have been developed and are used for assessing the integrity of defected tubes, most of these guidelines are related to stress corrosion cracking or wall-thinning phenomena. As some of steam generator tubes are also failed due to fretting and so on, alternative failure estimation schemes for relevant defects are required. In this paper, three-dimensional finite element (FE) analyses are carried out under internal pressure condition to simulate the failure behavior of steam generator tubes with different defect configurations; elliptical wastage type, wear scar type and rectangular wastage type defects. Maximum pressures based on material strengths are obtained from more than a hundred FE results to predict the failure of the steam generator tube. After investigating the effect of key parameters such as wastage depth, wastage length and wrap angle, simplified failure estimation equations are proposed in relation to the equivalent stress at the deepest point in wastage region. Comparison of failure pressures predicted according to the proposed estimation scheme with some corresponding burst test data shows good agreement, which provides a confidence in the use of the proposed equations to assess the integrity of steam generator tubes with wear-type defects. (authors)

  20. Continued research on the strain to failure of thick-walled cylinders subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a pressure vessel is of considerable importance in design. In-house experience in weapon development, new aerospace applications and autofrettage operations all require in-depth knowledge of the strength of high pressure containment structures. This paper presents additional results to support the strain-to-failure analysis of thick-walled cylindrical vessels. Both aluminum and steel, with material properties ranging from ductile to brittle, were tested at stress levels through plastic and strain hardening ranges to fracture. From these tests, the pressure-expansion and through thickness yielding characteristics were determined for these specimens. The critical effective plastic strain depends on the level of tensile stress triaxiality which varies through the wall thickness. It is shown that the proposed strain-to-failure criterion is based on this triaxiality of stress in the critical region and can be used to predict the complete pressure versus strain relations and maximum pressure for the test cylinders. 17 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  2. Experimental Constraints on the Effective Pressure Law for Failure at the Base of the Seismogenic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2012-12-01

    We are characterizing the Brittle-Ductile Transition (BDT) for quartz sandstone under elevated pore pressures to test whether the depth of the BDT increases with pore pressure - wherein fracture strength is reduced following the effective pressure law. The effects of pore pressure on the BDT are investigated through undrained, triaxial compression experiments on Fontainebleau Sandstone weld-sealed with 0 to 4 weight % pore water at a confining pressure of 1 GPa, temperature of 900 °C, and strain rate of 10-5 s-1, at which ductile flow has been observed without a significant pore pressure. The retainment of significant pore-spaces and -water suggests extreme pore pressures maintained throughout the experiments. However, the sandstone displays ductile deformation at all pore-fluid contents tested, distinguished by steady or increasing stress-strain relations, macroscopically distributed deformation, and dislocation creep microstructures. The flow strengths of the sandstone are relatively high overall at all pore-fluid contents, although the strength appears to decrease with an increase in retained pore-fluid content. Microstructures produced in high pore-fluid content tests indicate less pronounced grain boundary migration than in room dry tests, but nonetheless suggest dislocation creep remains the predominant deformation mechanism. Our observations are incompatible with the assumption in many crustal strength models that extreme pore pressures promote brittle failure at low stresses at depths greater than the BDT under dry conditions. The apparent break-down of the effective pressure law is consistent with the hypothesis that extensive inelastic deformation at grain junctions leads to a reduction in solid-pore fluid interfacial area and in turn the degree to which pore pressures act against the stresses applied from the exterior. Our results may have important implications for the processes of slow slip failure, many models of which assume the fully

  3. Experiments on Corium Dispersion after Lower Head Failure at Moderate Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    BLANCHAT,THOMAS K.; GARGALLO,M.; JACOBS,G.; MEYER,L.; WILHELM,D.

    1999-09-21

    Concerning the mitigation of high pressure core melt scenarios, the design objective for future PWRS is to transfer high pressure core melt to low pressure core melt sequences, by means of pressure relief valves at the primary circuit, with such a discharge capacity to limit the pressure in the reactor coolant system to less than 20 bar. Studies have shown that in late in-vessel reflooding scenarios there may be a time window where the pressure is indeed in this range, at the moment of the reactor vessel rupture. It has to be verified that large quantities of corium released from the vessel after failure at pressures <20 bar cannot be carried out of the reactor pit, because the melt collecting and cooling concept of future PWRs would be rendered useless. Existing experiments investigated the melt dispersal phenomena in the context of the DCH resolution for existing power plants in the USA, most of them having cavities with large instrument tunnels leading into subcompartments. For such designs, breaches with small cross sections at high vessel failure pressures had been studied. However, some present and future European PWRs have an annular cavity design without a large pathway out of the cavity other than through the narrow annular gap between the RPV and the cavity wall. Therefore, an experimental program was launched, focusing on the annular cavity design and low pressure vessel failure. The first part of the program comprises two experiments which were performed with thermite melt steam and a prototypic atmosphere in the containment in a scale 1:10. The initial pressure in the RPV-model was 11 and 15 bars, and the breach was a hole at the center of the lower head with a scaled diameter of 100 cm and 40 cm, respectively. The main results were: 78% of melt mass were ejected out of the cavity with the large hole and 21% with the small hole; the maximum pressures in the model containment were 6 bar and 4 bar, respectively. In the second part of the experimental

  4. Failure Pressure and Leak Rate of Steam Generator Tubes With Stress Corrosion Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.; Park, J.Y.; Bakhitiari, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an 'equivalent rectangular crack' approach to predict leak rates through laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks. A comparison between predicted and observed test data on rupture and leak rate from laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks are provided. Specimen flaws were sized by post-test fractography in addition to pre-test advanced eddy current technique. The test failure pressures and leak rates are shown to be closer to those predicted on the basis of fractography than on NDE. However, the predictions based on NDE results are encouraging, particularly because they have the potential to determine a more detailed geometry of ligamentous cracks from which more accurate predictions of failure pressure and leak rate can be made in the future. (authors)

  5. Clinical evaluation of the failure rates of metallic brackets

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, Fábio Lourenço; CORRER, Américo Bortolazzo; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço; MAGNANI, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; RUELLAS, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bonding of metallic orthodontic brackets with different adhesive systems. Material and Methods Twenty patients (10.5-15.1 years old) who had sought corrective orthodontic treatment at a University Orthodontic Clinic were evaluated. Brackets were bonded from the right second premolar to the left second premolar in the upper and lower arches using: Orthodontic Concise, conventional Transbond XT, Transbond XT without primer, and Transbond XT associated with Transbond Plus Self-etching Primer (TPSEP). The 4 adhesive systems were used in all patients using a split-mouth design; each adhesive system was used in one quadrant of each dental arch, so that each group of 5 patients received the same bonding sequence. Initial archwires were inserted 1 week after bracket bonding. The number of bracket failures for each adhesive system was quantified over a 6-month period. Results The number of debonded brackets was: 8- Orthodontic Concise, 2- conventional Transbond XT, 9- Transbond XT without primer, and 1- Transbond XT + TPSEP. By using the Kaplan-Meier methods, statistically significant differences were found between the materials (p=0.0198), and the Logrank test identified these differences. Conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT + TPSEP adhesive systems were statistically superior to Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the dental arches (upper and lower), between the dental arch sides (right and left), and among the quadrants. Conclusions The largest number of bracket failures occurred with Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer systems and few bracket failures occurred with conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT+TPSEP. More bracket failures were observed in the posterior region compared with the anterior region. PMID:22666842

  6. Nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized composite cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, R. L.; Johnson, E. R.; Starnes, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical study of the nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized 4- to 16-ply-thick graphite-epoxy cylindrical panels are presented. Specimens with clamped boundaries simulating the skin between two frames and two stringers of a typical transport fuselage were tested to failure. Failure results of aluminum specimens are compared with the graphite-epoxy test results. The specimens failed at their edges where the local bending gradients and interlaminar stresses are maximum. STAGS nonlinear two-dimensional shell analysis computer code results are used to identify regions of the panels where the response is independent of the axial coordinate. A geometrically nonlinear one-dimensional cylindrical panel analysis was derived and used to determine panel response and interlaminar stresses. Inclusion of the geometric nonlinearity was essential for accurate prediction of panel response. The maximum stress failure criterion applied to the predicted tensile stress in the fiber direction agreed best with the experimentally determined first damage pressures.

  7. Evaluation of aortic stiffness in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bakiler, Ali Rahmi; Yavascan, Onder; Harputluoglu, Nilgun; Kara, Orhan Deniz; Aksu, Nejat

    2007-11-01

    The measurement of aortic stiffness (As) [aortic strain (S), pressure strain elastic modulus (Ep) and pressure strain normalized by diastolic pressure (Ep*)] is suggested as an excellent marker of subclinical arterial sclerosis. We aimed to investigate the presence of As and to determine the relationship between As and some risk factors in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Twenty-six pre-dialysis (PreD) [female/male (F/M) 7/19] patients and 23 chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) (F/M 13/10) patients were assessed. Twenty-nine healthy children were selected as a control group (F/M 14/15). We determined anemia, abnormal calcium/phosphate metabolism, hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, increased left ventricular mass (LVM), hypertriglyceridemia, increased stiffness (Ep, Ep*), and decreased strain (S) in the CRF (PreD and CPD) group compared with the controls (P < 0.05). Presence of renal disease, LVM and usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) in all groups; female gender, duration of disease and the usage of anti-hypertensive drug therapy in CRF patients; and LVM and LVM index in healthy children were found to be independent predictors for aortic stiffness and/or strain. In conclusion, CRF is associated with significant arterial functional abnormalities in uremic children and not controlled by dialysis treatment. These results suggest that, even in young children, uremia has a profound impact on arterial function.

  8. Sensor failure detection and management scheme for pressure probes using Kalman filtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Shantha

    1995-06-01

    For high performance, high angle of attack fighter aircraft, accurate and high fidelity airdata parameters are crucial for the flight control system. At high angle of attack, where small changes in angle of attack can greatly influence aerodynamic properties of the aircraft, the problem of flight control augmentation is extremely complicated. In this flight regime, it is critical that accurate measurements of airdata parameters including angle of attack, angle of sideslip and dynamic pressure are made available for use by the flight augmentation system. But at high angle of attack, it is difficult to measure airdata accurately using conventional intrusive sensing devices, because of upstream vortices and flow separation. To overcome this difficulty, a non-intrusive Flush Airdata Sensing system (FADS) has been developed. The FADS is a simple hardware item with the basic fixture being a hemispherical or conical cap mounted at the nose of the fuselage. A number of small holes are drilled around the cap in annular rings. The pressure at each hole is measured by pressure transducers and related to airdata parameters by a non-linear aerodynamic model derived from potential flow. A 7-hole pressure probe, proposed by the DLR for implementation on an advanced experimental fighter aircraft for airdata measurements at high angle of attack, has redundant measurements in angle of attack, angle of side slip and dynamic pressure to ensure control system augmentation at high angle of attack, in spite of some pressure sensor failure or malfunctioning. Such a system requires an algorithm which detects pressure sensor failure and performs fault management in real time. In this report, a concept for an algorithm using a recursive Kalman filtering technique has been proposed and developed. The algorithm is tested on a 5 hole pressure probe which is used in experimental flights of C-160 Transall aircraft.

  9. Evaluation of Alternative Control for Prevention and or Mitigation of HEPA Filter Failure Accidents at Tank Farm Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    This study evaluates the adequacy and benefit of use of HEPA filter differential pressure limiting setpoints to initiate exhauster shut down as an alternative safety control for postulated accidents that might result in filtration failure and subsequent unfiltered release from Tank Farm primary tank ventilators.

  10. Continuous positive airway pressure increases heart rate variability in heart failure patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Matthew P; Floras, John S; Usui, Kengo; Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Leung, Richard S T; Bradley, T Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Patients with heart failure or OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea) have reduced HF-HRV (high-frequency heart rate variability), indicating reduced cardiac vagal modulation, a marker of poor prognosis. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) abolishes OSA in patients with heart failure, but effects on daytime HF-HRV have not been determined. We hypothesized that, in patients with heart failure, treatment of coexisting OSA by CPAP would increase morning HF-HRV. In 19 patients with heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction <45%) and OSA (>/=20 apnoeas and hypopnoeas/h of sleep), HF-HRV was quantified before and 1 month after randomization to a control or CPAP-treated group. In the control group (n=7), there were no changes in HF-HRV over the 1 month study during wakefulness in the morning. In the CPAP-treated group (n=12) HF-HRV increased significantly during wakefulness in the morning [from 2.43+/-0.55 to 2.82+/-0.50 log(ms(2)/Hz); P=0.002] due to an increase in transfer function between changes in lung volume and changes in HF-HRV (92.37+/-96.03 to 219.07+/-177.14 ms/l; P=0.01). In conclusion, treatment of coexisting OSA by nocturnal CPAP in patients with heart failure increases HF-HRV during morning wakefulness, indicating improved vagal modulation of heart rate. This may contribute to improved prognosis.

  11. Evaluation of ANF fuel failures in oyster creek

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, T.M.; Van Swam, L.F.; Piascik, T.G.; Spence, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the refueling outrage following cycle-10 operations of Oyster Creek nuclear generating station, fuel sipping identified 47 failed Advance Nuclear Fuels (ANF) fuel assemblies. The failed fuel was an unpressurized 8 x 8 design manufactured by ANF prior to 1980. Subsequent inspection of 46 of these 47 assemblies with the ANF ULTRATEST ultrasonic testing system indicated 104 either failed of suspect fuel rods in 44 assemblies. Two of the assemblies were identified as being sound. Selected fuel rods were removed from three of the assemblies and inspected both visually and with an eddycurrent coil. An evaluation has been performed to determine the cause of the failures. The failures were primarily the result of pellet/cladding interaction (PCI). Detailed analyses of several of the failed fuel rods were performed with ANF's fuel rod modeling code RAMPX2. RAMPX2 includes several state-of-the-art models, including a model describing the formation of fission product deposits called coins on the inside surface of the cladding, a model that accounts for axial PCI, and a trapped fuel stack model. The analyses provided an explanation for the failures.

  12. Failure Analysis and Regeneration Performances Evaluation on Engine Lubricating Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Zhang, G. N.; Zhang, J. Y.; Yin, Y. L.; Xu, Y.

    To investigate the behavior of failure and recycling of lubricating oils, three sorts of typical 10w-40 lubricating oils used in heavy-load vehicle including the new oil, waste oil and regeneration oil regenerated by self-researched green regeneration technology were selected. The tribology properties were tested by four-ball friction wear tester as well. The results indicated that the performance of anti-extreme pressure of regeneration oil increase by 34.1% compared with the waste one and its load- carrying ability is close to the new oil; the feature of wear spot are better than those of the waste oil and frictional coefficient almost reach the level of the new oil's. As a result, the performance of anti-wear and friction reducing are getting better obviously.

  13. Efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.K.; Walker, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article will present the steps necessary to perform a comprehensive analysis of complex pressure relief systems. The goal is not to discuss detailed calculations for proper valve sizing and selection, but rather to analyze and verify existing system configurations. Sizing and selection have been covered in detail by the American Petroleum Institute (API) RP 520, API RP 521, various AIChE Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) publications, and other sources. In their work with industry, the authors have noticed a tendency for some engineers to proceed with detailed calculations without first preparing an overall strategy and implementation plan to make sure that the calculations yield the desired results. They have seen detailed pressure relief system analyses costing hundreds of thousands of dollars which, for any number of reasons, are incorrect. The old adage GIGO (garbage in/garbage out) certainly applies to pressure relief system analysis. They will address the thought processes and actions necessary to correctly and efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems.

  14. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  15. Evaluation of the failure of the HP nozzle block at the Nebraska City Station

    SciTech Connect

    Karloff, J.A.; Weins, W.N.

    1995-12-31

    Since the start-up of the Nebraska City Station unit in 1978, the nozzle block section of the high pressure turbine has had to be replaced or repaired each time this section of the turbine was disassembled. In nearly all cases the damage was limited to the lower half of the nozzle block, where many airfoils had been chipped away. This damage not only dramatically increased maintenance costs, but also reduced the efficiency of the nozzle block. The objective of this report is to evaluate if corrosion-fatigue is part of the failure mechanism and what role if any solid particle erosion played in this process. Results and analysis show that both corrosion and SPE were shown to be minor contributors in the failure analysis process. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs revealed that fatigue was the major contributor in the failure. It is speculated that the blade passing pressure disturbance caused the trailing edge of the nozzle to vacillate. As the metal reached its fatigue limit, minute fatigue cracks began to form parallel and in a direction opposite to the steam flow. When a crack grew large enough, part of the metal would be torn away leaving the ``chipped`` away appearance. SPE may have initially accelerated the crack growth by decreasing the thickness of the trailing edge. Intergranular corrosion; which was shown to be present, could have weakened the metal at its grain boundaries essentially reducing its fatigue strength.

  16. The effect of preignition on cylinder temperatures, pressures, power output, and piston failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrington, Lester C; Fisher, William F

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a cylinder of a V-type liquid-cooled engine to observe the behavior of the cylinder when operated under preignition conditions. Data were recorded that showed cylinder-head temperatures, time of ignition, engine speed, power output, and change in maximum cylinder pressure as a function of time as the engine entered preignition and was allowed to operate under preignition conditions for a short time. The effects of the following variables on the engine behavior during preignition were investigated: fuel-air ratio, power level, aromatic content of fuel, engine speed, mixture temperature, and preignition source. The power levels at which preignition would cause complete piston failure for the selected engine operating conditions and the types of failure encountered when using various values of clearance between the piston and cylinder barrel were determined. The fuels used had performance numbers high enough to preclude any possibility of knock throughout the test program.

  17. Randomized comparison of oxygen mask treatment vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure in dengue shock syndrome with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Cam, B V; Tuan, D T; Fonsmark, L; Poulsen, A; Tien, N M; Tuan, H M; Heegaard, E D

    2002-12-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is caused by dengue virus. Patients with DHF grade 3-4, termed Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS), may develop acute respiratory failure after initial fluid resuscitation. Previously, these patients were treated with oxygen on a nasal cannula, or if necessary with tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. In the present prospective randomized study, we compared the effectiveness of oxygen treatment administered by a face mask vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Morbidity, mortality, and supportive treatment was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients with DSS complicated by respiratory failure were enrolled. On admission and after 30 min of treatment, clinical and paraclinical data were obtained. Chest X-ray revealed pleural effusion in 92 per cent and showed interstitial oedema in 33 per cent. After 30 min of treatment the respiratory rate decreased significantly in the NCPAP group (p < 0.05), while SaO2 and PaO2 increased in both groups (p < 0.01). However, subsequently a significant difference of unresponsiveness to treatment between the oxygen mask group and the NCPAP group (13/19 vs. 4/18,p < 0.01) was noted. Complications of NCPAP or oxygen mask treatment were not documented. We conclude that NCPAP is useful in improving the management of acute respiratory failure in children with DHF/DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  18. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  19. Failure assessment of aluminum liner based filament-wound hybrid riser subjected to internal hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Seng, Ong Lin; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Asundi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes the burst behavior of aluminum liner based prototype filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic pressure. The main objective of present study is to developed an internal pressure test rig set-up for filament-wound hybrid riser and investigate the failure modes of filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic burst pressure loading. The prototype filament-wound hybrid riser used for burst test consists of an internal aluminum liner and outer composite layer. The carbon-epoxy composites as part of the filament-wound hybrid risers were manufactured with [±55o] lay-up pattern with total composite layer thickness of 1.6 mm using a CNC filament-winding machine. The burst test was monitored by video camera which helps to analyze the failure mechanism of the fractured filament-wound hybrid riser. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor was used to monitor and record the strain changes during burst test of prototype filament-wound hybrid riser. This study shows good improvements in burst strength of filament-wound hybrid riser compared to the monolithic metallic riser. Since, strain measurement using FBG sensors has been testified as a reliable method, we aim to further understand in detail using this technique.

  20. Nitric oxide (NO) modulates the neurogenic control of blood pressure in rats with chronic renal failure (CRF).

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S; Nosrati, S; Campese, V M

    1997-01-01

    Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity plays a role in the genesis of hypertension in rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). Because nitric oxide (NO) modulates the activity of the SNS, a deficit of NO synthesis could be responsible for the increased SNS activity in these animals. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of L-arginine and L-NAME on blood pressure and SNS activity-in Sprague Dawley 5/6 nephrectomized or sham-operated rats. SNS activity was determined by measuring norepinephrine turnover rate in several brain nuclei involved in the regulation of blood pressure. In the same brain nuclei, we measured NO content and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene expression by semiquantitative measurements of NOS mRNA reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In CRF rats, norepinephrine turnover rate was increased in the posterior hypothalamic nuclei, locus coeruleus, paraventricular nuclei, and the rostral ventral medulla, whereas NOS mRNA gene expression and NO2/NO3 content were increased in all brain nuclei tested. L-NAME increased blood pressure and NE turnover rate in several brain nuclei of both control and 5/6 nephrectomized rats. In CRF rats, a significant relationship was present between the percent increment in NOS mRNA gene expression related to the renal failure, and the percent increase in norepinephrine turnover rate caused by L-NAME. This suggests that endogenous NO may partially inhibit the activity of the SNS in brain nuclei involved in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure, and this inhibition is enhanced in CRF rats. In summary, the increase in SNS activity in the posterior hypothalamic nuclei and in the locus coeruleus of CRF rats is partially mitigated by increased local expression of NOS m-RNA. PMID:9022090

  1. Evaluation of Corrosion Failure in Tractor-Trailer Brake System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, DF

    2002-10-22

    As reported to ORNL, concomitant with the introduction of different deicing and anti-icing compounds, there was an increase in the brake failure rate of tractor-trailer trucks. A forensic evaluation of a failed brake system was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopic evaluation showed corrosion to be mostly confined to the brake table/lining interface. The corrosion is non-uniform as is to be expected for plain carbon steel in chloride environments. This initial analysis found no evidence for the chlorides of calcium and magnesium, which are the newly introduced deicing and antiicing compounds and are less soluble in water than the identified chlorides of sodium and potassium, in the scale. The result could be as a result of non-exposure of the examined brake table to calcium and magnesium chloride. The mechanisms for the increased failure rate are postulated as being an increased rate of corrosion due to positive shifts in the corrosion potential, and an increased amount of corrosion due to an increased ''time of wetness'' that results from the presence of hygroscopic salts. Laboratory scale evaluation of the corrosion of plain carbon steel in simulated deicing and anti-icing solutions need to be performed to determine corrosion rates and morphological development of corrosion product, to compare laboratory data to in-service data, and to rank economically feasible replacement materials for low carbon steel. In addition, the mechanical behavior of the lining attached to the brake shoe table needs to be assessed. It is opined that an appropriate adjustment of materials could easily allow for a doubling of a brake table/lining lifetime. Suggestions for additional work, to clarify the mechanisms of rust jacking and to develop possible solutions, are described.

  2. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  3. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  4. Scare Tactics: Evaluating Problem Decompositions Using Failure Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helm, B. Robert; Fickas, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Our interest is in the design of multi-agent problem-solving systems, which we refer to as composite systems. We have proposed an approach to composite system design by decomposition of problem statements. An automated assistant called Critter provides a library of reusable design transformations which allow a human analyst to search the space of decompositions for a problem. In this paper we describe a method for evaluating and critiquing problem decompositions generated by this search process. The method uses knowledge stored in the form of failure decompositions attached to design transformations. We suggest the benefits of our critiquing method by showing how it could re-derive steps of a published development example. We then identify several open issues for the method.

  5. 209-E Building -- Response to ventilation failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, D.J.

    1998-07-27

    This document provides an evaluation and recommendations for radiological workplace air monitoring and response to ventilation failure for the Critical Mass Laboratory, 209-E Building. The Critical Mass Laboratory, part of the 209-E Building, was designed to provide a heavily shielded room where plutonium and uranium liquid solutions could be brought into various critical configurations under readily controlled and monitored conditions. The facility is contained within a one-story L-shaped concrete block and reinforced concrete building. One wing houses offices, a control room, shops, and a common area while the other wing includes an equipment room, the change room, work areas, and the two-story Critical Assembly Room (CAR). Three of the rooms contain radiologically contaminated equipment and materials.

  6. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  7. Prognostic significance of blood pressure response to exercise in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kallistratos, Manolis S; Poulimenos, Leonidas E; Pavlidis, Antonios N; Dritsas, Athanasios; Laoutaris, Ioannis D; Manolis, Athanasios J; Cokkinos, Dennis V

    2012-01-01

    High systolic blood pressure (SBP) has been linked to worse cardiovascular outcomes. However, emerging data suggest that in patients with heart failure (HF), low SBP correlates with increased mortality. The purpose was to examine the impact of baseline and post-exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), as well as pulse pressure (PP), on cardiac mortality in patients with systolic HF. One hundred sixty patients with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction 33 ± 8) were studied. Blood pressure (BP) levels were determined at rest and at peak exercise during a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Patients were followed up for a period of 2.5 ± 0.8 years. During this period 22 patients died and 5 subjects underwent heart transplantation. Patients with higher SBP and DBP at rest, and patients with SBP ≥160 mmHg and PP ≥75 mmHg at peak exercise had the most favorable prognosis. There was a fourfold increase in cardiac mortality risk for patients with SBP <160 mmHg at peak exercise (hazard ratio: 3.97, 95% confidence interval: 1.60-9.84) and a threefold increase for patients with PP <75 mmHg at peak exercise (hazard ratio: 2.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.29-6.82). There is an inverse relationship between SBP and cardiac mortality in patients with systolic HF. BP response to exercise could serve as a simple risk stratification model in HF patients.

  8. SEM evaluation of advanced refractory failures in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W.Keith; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Rawers, James C.

    2005-08-01

    The SEM is an invaluable tool in the evaluation of advanced refractories and their failure. A reaction vessel?s refractory liner, at minimum, must protect the reaction vessel from elevated temperatures, corrosive slag and thermal cycling. To understand the failure mechanisms ARC staff had first to determine how an advanced chrome rich refractory was attacked by various components that make up a slag. Refractory cups were made from the refractory of interest and various compounds that can be found in a slag such as CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3, NaCl were placed into the test cups and fired for 24 hours at the required temperature with the desired atmosphere. The cups are prepared for examination by embedding in epoxy and cross sectioning. SEM examination revealed how various slag compositions attacked and penetrated the refractory. The slag could corrode, free refractory grains or react with the refractory and from a new compound. It was found that the only way to measure slag component penetration was with multiple elemental X-ray maps. SiO2 penetrated deeply and in many instances moved through the cup. The knowledge of slag refractory interactions gather during cup testing was applied to actual spent refractory from reaction vessels. Obtaining samples from the reaction vessel itself proved difficult due to time constraints imposed in relining. Samples were selected based on spent brick shape, color or location in the heap of spent refractory. Sample preparation affected the results dry, water or oil coolant during cutting may dissolve reaction products. The complex reactions between the slag and refractory made for very interesting and time consuming evaluation. Elemental X-ray maps at low and high magnification combined with point analysis aided in locating regions of interest. Crystals were found growing in voids and appear to be from vapor deposition. Other crystal structures are from the slag refractory interaction. Knowledge gathered from this and other supporting

  9. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  10. Contrasting effects of vasodilators on blood pressure and sodium balance in the hypertension of autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Pohar, B.; Paranjape, S. Y.; Robertson, D.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1999-01-01

    Supine hypertension, which is very common in patients with autonomic failure, limits the use of pressor agents and induces nighttime natriuresis. In 13 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure (7 women, 6 men, 72 +/- 3 yr) and supine hypertension, the effect of 30 mg nifedipine (n = 10) and 0.025 to 0.2 mg/h nitroglycerin patch (n = 11) on supine BP, renal sodium handling, and orthostatic tolerance was determined. Medications were given at 8 p.m.; patients stood up at 8 a.m. Nitroglycerin was removed at 6 a.m. Compared with placebo, nifedipine and nitroglycerin decreased systolic BP during the night by a maximum of 37 +/- 9 and 36 +/- 10 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). At 8 a.m., supine systolic BP was 23 +/- 7 mmHg lower with nifedipine than with placebo (P < 0.05), but was similar with nitroglycerin and placebo. Sodium excretion during the night was not reduced with nitroglycerin (0.13 +/- 0.02 mmol/mg creatinine [Cr] versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 mmol/mg Cr with placebo), but it was increased with nifedipine (0.35 +/- 0.06 mmol/mg Cr versus 0.13 +/- 0.02 mmol/mg Cr with placebo, P < 0.05). Nifedipine but not nitroglycerin worsened orthostatic hypotension in the morning. It is concluded that nifedipine and transdermal nitroglycerin are effective in controlling supine hypertension in patients with autonomic failure. However, nifedipine has a prolonged depressor effect and worsens orthostatic hypotension in the morning. The decrease in pressure natriuresis that would be expected with the substantial decrease in BP obtained with nitroglycerin and nifedipine may be offset by a direct effect of both drugs on renal sodium handling.

  11. MRI Assessment of Diastolic and Systolic Intraventricular Pressure Gradients in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jain, Snigdha; Londono, Francisco J; Segers, Patrick; Gillebert, Thierry C; De Buyzere, Marc; Chirinos, Julio A

    2016-02-01

    A deep phenotypic characterization of heart failure (HF) is important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In particular, novel noninvasive techniques for the characterization of functional abnormalities in HF with preserved ejection fraction are currently needed. While echocardiography is widely used to assess ventricular function, standard echocardiographic techniques provide a limited understanding of ventricular filling. The application of fluid dynamics theory, along with assessments of flow velocity fields in multiple dimensions in the ventricle, can be used to assess intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPGs), which in turn may provide valuable insights into ventricular diastolic and systolic function. Advances in imaging techniques now allow for accurate estimations of systolic and diastolic IVPGs, using noninvasive methods that are easily applicable in clinical research. In this review, we describe the basic concepts regarding intraventricular flow measurements and the derivation of IVPGs. We also review existing literature exploring the role of IVPGs in HF. PMID:26780916

  12. TMI-2 pressure transmitter examination program year-end report: examination and evaluation of pressure transmitters CF-1-PT3 and CF-2-LT3

    SciTech Connect

    Strahm, R C; Yancey, M E

    1983-02-01

    This report discusses the pressure transmitter portion of the DOE-sponsored Data Acquisition program at TMI-2. In particular, two transmitters were removed from the TMI-2 Reactor Building and evaluated in the laboratory in order to establish their operational characteristics. One unit, a Foxboro gauge pressure unit, survived the accident and subsequent handling, shipping, and storage with no apparent problems. The other unit, a Bailey differential pressure unit, apparently failed in operation at an unknown time, probably from water in the unit, and subsequently corroded so badly as to make failure analysis extremely difficult. A compilation of information on pressure transmitters located in the Reactor Builidng is presented.

  13. Iron chelation attenuates intracranial pressure and improves survival in a swine model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Vlahakos, Demetrios; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Karvouni, Eleni; Routsi, Christina; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Andreadou, Ioanna; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain edema in acute liver failure (ALF). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of iron-catalyzed oxidative reactions through iron chelation using deferoxamine could attenuate brain edema in a swine model of ischemic ALF. Following ALF induction (end-to-side portacaval anastomosis and ligation of the hepatoduodenal ligament), 14 animals were randomized to a study group that received an intravenous infusion of 150 mg/kg deferoxamine (group DF; n = 7) or a control group (group C; n = 7). Six sham-operated animals were also assigned to a deferoxamine-treated group (n = 3) or a control group (n = 3). Hemodynamic, neurological, and hematological parameters were monitored postoperatively. All sham animals maintained normal hemodynamics and intracranial pressure. At 18 hours, group DF animals had higher mean arterial pressure (mean +/- standard deviation: 98.0 +/- 15.9 versus 69.9 +/- 15.8 mmHg, P < 0.004), lower intracranial pressure (18.1 +/- 8.6 versus 32.7 +/- 13.4 mmHg, P < 0.032), and higher cerebral perfusion pressure (76.4 +/- 16.4 versus 37.1 +/- 25.6 mmHg, P < 0.006) in comparison with group C. Similar differences were recorded up to the 24th postoperative hour, leading to a significant difference in animal survival (88% in group DF versus 17% in group C, P < 0.001). Furthermore, group DF exhibited an attenuated increase of serum malondialdehyde from the baseline (16% versus 74%, P < 0.05) and lower brain malondialdehyde concentrations (3.7 +/- 1.3 versus 5.7 +/- 2.0 microM/mg of protein, P < 0.05) in comparison with controls. In conclusion, deferoxamine delayed the development of intracranial hypertension and improved survival in pigs with ischemic ALF.

  14. Evaluation of failure criterion for graphite/epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Wharram, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is described. Emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Narmco Rigidite 5208-WT300, a plain weave fabric of Thornel 300 Graphite fibers impregnated with Narmco 5208 Resin. The quadratic-failure criterion with F sub 12=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the graphite/epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was recast into an operationally easier form, providing design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from orthotropic woven fabric prepregs. In the form presented, no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exist at present to generalize this approach for all prepreg constructions, and its use must be restricted to the generic materials and configurations investigated to date.

  15. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  16. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  17. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  18. Studies and analyses of the space shuttle main engine: High-pressure oxidizer turbopump failure information propagation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, R. C.; Rudy, S. W.; Tischer, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    The high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) failure information propagation model (FIPM) is presented. The text includes a brief discussion of the FIPM methodology and the various elements which comprise a model. Specific details of the HPOTP FIPM are described. Listings of all the HPOTP data records are included as appendices.

  19. Endothelial lipase modulates pressure overload-induced heart failure through alternative pathway for fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideto; Ishida, Tatsuro; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Mori, Kenta; Hara, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Naoto; Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Toh, Ryuji; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase has been considered as the only enzyme capable of generating lipid-derived fatty acids for cardiac energy. Endothelial lipase is another member of the triglyceride lipase family and hydrolyzes high-density lipoproteins. Although endothelial lipase is expressed in the heart, its function remains unclear. We assessed the role of endothelial lipase in the genesis of heart failure. Pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy was generated in endothelial lipase(-/-) and wild-type mice by ascending aortic banding. Endothelial lipase expression in cardiac tissues was markedly elevated in the early phase of cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type mice, whereas lipoprotein lipase expression was significantly reduced. Endothelial lipase(-/-) mice showed more severe systolic dysfunction with left-ventricular dilatation compared with wild-type mice in response to pressure overload. The expression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase, was significantly lower in the heart of endothelial lipase(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Also, endothelial lipase(-/-) mice had lower myocardial adenosine triphosphate levels than wild-type mice after aortic banding. In cultured cardiomyocytes, endothelial lipase was upregulated by inflammatory stimuli, whereas lipoprotein lipase was downregulated. Endothelial lipase-overexpression in cardiomyocytes resulted in an upregulation of fatty acid oxidation-related enzymes and intracellular adenosine triphosphate accumulation in the presence of high-density lipoprotein. Endothelial lipase may act as an alternative candidate to provide fatty acids to the heart and regulate cardiac function. This effect seemed relevant particularly in the diseased heart, where lipoprotein lipase action is downregulated. PMID:23460280

  20. Low-intensity noninvasive ventilation: Lower pressure, more exacerbations of chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Toru; Wakabayashi, Kiryo; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu; Yano, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF) who are treated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), a little is known regarding the effects of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) on the clinical course of CRF and the frequency of adjustments in these patients. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effects of LI-NPPV on the clinical course of patients with CRF as compared with patients who were treated with conventional NPPV (C-NPPV) and determined how frequently NPPV was adjusted during therapy. METHODS: Clinical data from 21 patients who received long-term NPPV were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the level of initial pressure support (PS): C-NPPV group (PS ≥ 10 cm H2O) and LI-NPPV group (PS < 10 cm H2O). RESULTS: Patients in the LI-NPPV group had significantly more exacerbations of CRF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of patients who required adjustments of NPPV settings between the two groups. There was no significant difference in PaCO2 levels 1 month after the start of NPPV between the two groups; however, PaCO2 levels were significantly lower after 1 year in the C-group (P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of LI-NPPV patients and 43% of C-NPPV patients needed NPPV adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to CRF patients who are initially administered LI-NPPV; they should be carefully observed because they can develop more exacerbations of CRF than patients undergoing C-NPPV. If possible, higher initial PS should be administered to prevent CRF exacerbations. PMID:27168863

  1. The evaluation of failure detection and isolation algorithms for restructurable control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motyka, P.; Bonnice, W.; Hall, S.; Wagner, E.

    1984-01-01

    Three failure detection and identification techniques were compared to determine their usefulness in detecting and isolating failures in an aircraft flight control system; excluding sensor and flight control computer failures. The algorithms considered were the detection filter, the Generalized Likelihood Ratio test and the Orthogonal Series Generalized Likelihood Ratio test. A modification to the basic detection filter is also considered which uses secondary filtering of the residuals to produce unidirectional failure signals. The algorithms were evaluated by testing their ability to detect and isolate control surface failures in a nonlinear simulation of a C-130 aircraft. It was found that failures of some aircraft controls are difficult to distinguish because they have a similar effect on the dynamics of the vehicle. Quantitative measures for evaluating the distinguishability of failures are considered. A system monitoring strategy for implementing the failure detection and identification techniques was considered. This strategy identified the mix of direct measurement of failures versus the computation of failure necessary for implementation of the technology in an aircraft system.

  2. Evaluation of a Multi-Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding the response of the structural adhesives used in the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle, an extensive effort has been conducted to characterize in detail the failure properties of these adhesives. This effort involved the development of a failure model that includes the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature, and time. An understanding of the effects of these parameters on the failure of the adhesive is crucial to the understanding and prediction of the safety of the RSRM nozzle. This paper documents the use of this newly developed multi-axial, temperature, and time (MATT) dependent failure model for modeling failure for the adhesives TIGA 321, EA913NA, and EA946. The development of the mathematical failure model using constant load rate normal and shear test data is presented. Verification of the accuracy of the failure model is shown through comparisons between predictions and measured creep and multi-axial failure data. The verification indicates that the failure model performs well for a wide range of conditions (loading, temperature, and time) for the three adhesives. The failure criterion is shown to be accurate through the glass transition for the adhesive EA946. Though this failure model has been developed and evaluated with adhesives, the concepts are applicable for other isotropic materials.

  3. Design and evaluation of a failure detection and isolation algorithm for restructurable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.; Hsu, John Y.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a decentralized approach to failure detection and isolation for use in restructurable control systems is examined. This work has produced: (1) A method for evaluating fundamental limits to FDI performance; (2) Application using flight recorded data; (3) A working control element FDI system with maximal sensitivity to critical control element failures; (4) Extensive testing on realistic simulations; and (5) A detailed design methodology involving parameter optimization (with respect to model uncertainties) and sensitivity analyses. This project has concentrated on detection and isolation of generic control element failures since these failures frequently lead to emergency conditions and since knowledge of remaining control authority is essential for control system redesign. The failures are generic in the sense that no temporal failure signature information was assumed. Thus, various forms of functional failures are treated in a unified fashion. Such a treatment results in a robust FDI system (i.e., one that covers all failure modes) but sacrifices some performance when detailed failure signature information is known, useful, and employed properly. It was assumed throughout that all sensors are validated (i.e., contain only in-spec errors) and that only the first failure of a single control element needs to be detected and isolated. The FDI system which has been developed will handle a class of multiple failures.

  4. Unrehearsed circuit failure during neonatal ECMO: critical trans-heat exchanger pressure.

    PubMed

    Henrick, Basil M

    2006-01-01

    A newborn infant who could not be weaned from bypass after undergoing corrective surgery for atrioventricular septal defect was placed on arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Thirty-six hours later, a sudden violent gush of water was observed from the heater cooler system at the point where the outlet tubing had become detached from the machine. It was quickly established that this event had been caused by a massive pressure buildup at the integrated ECMO heat exchanger. A series of attempts were made to identify the cause of the problem and so rectify the situation: changing the heater cooler system, reversal of water flow through the heat exchanger, and, finally, insertion of a bridge between the outlet and inlet water tubing to moderate flow through the device. A complete circuit change-out and the associated risks were thus avoided, and the patient was successfully weaned from ECMO after 83 hours. Subsequent analysis of this incident identified three key elements as factors in this systems failure: heater cooler system cleaning protocol, heat exchange device construction, and incongruous heater cooler system application, which, together under these exact conditions, contributed to creating a situation with the realistic potential for a negative outcome.

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Phenylbutyrate Exaggerates Heart Failure in Pressure Overloaded Mice independently of HDAC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Zhi; Fu, Haiying; Asano, Yoshihiro; Liao, Yulin; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    4-Sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) has been reported to inhibit endoplasmic reticulum stress and histone deacetylation (HDAC), both of which are novel therapeutic targets for cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, it is unclear whether PBA can improve heart function. Here, we tested the effects of PBA and some other HDAC inhibitors on cardiac dysfunction induced by pressure overload. Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed on male C57BL/6 mice. PBA treatment (100 mg/kg, 6 weeks) unexpectedly led to a higher mortality, exacerbated cardiac remodelling and dysfunction. Similar results were noted in TAC mice treated with butyrate sodium (BS), a PBA analogue. In contrast, other HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid (VAL) and trichostatin A (TSA), improved the survival. All four HDAC inhibitors induced histone H3 acetylation and inhibited HDAC total activity. An individual HDAC activity assay showed that rather than class IIa members (HDAC4 and 7), PBA and BS predominantly inhibited class I members (HDAC2 and 8), whereas VAL and TSA inhibited all of them. These findings indicate that PBA and BS accelerate cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, whereas VAL and TSA have opposing effects. PMID:27667442

  6. Elastic geobarometry and the role of brittle failure on pressure release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Rustioni, Greta; Milani, Sula; Nimis, Paolo; Chiara Domeneghetti, Maria; Marone, Federica; Harris, Jeff W.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Mineral inclusions trapped in their hosts can provide fundamental information about geological processes. Recent developments in elastic geobarometry, for example, allow the retrieval of encapsulation pressures for host-inclusion pairs. In principle this method can be applied to any mineral-mineral pair so long as both the residual pressure on an inclusion (Pinc), and the equations of state for both host and inclusion are either known or determined (Angel et al., 2015). However, Angel et al. (2014) outlined some boundary conditions, one of which was that deformation in the host-inclusion pair has to be purely elastic. Thus this caveat would exclude from analysis all the inclusions that are surrounded by cracks, indicative of brittle deformation, which may result in partial or complete release of the Pinc. If however the effects of cracks surrounding trapped mineral inclusions could be quantitatively modelled, then the applicability of "elastic" geobarometry might be extended to a much larger number of inclusion-host pairs. We report the results of a pilot experiment in which the stress states (i.e. the residual pressure) have been determined for 10 olivine inclusions still entrapped in 5 diamonds. Inclusion pressures were determined from the unit-cell volumes of the olivines measured in-situ in the diamonds by X-ray diffraction. The olivine equations of state were determined from the olivine compositions by in-situ X-ray structure refinement. Values of Pinc range from 0.19 to 0.53 GPa. In order to quantify the degree of brittle failure surrounding the inclusions, the same set of samples were also investigated by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (SRXTM at TOMCAT, Swiss LightSource). Preliminary results showed that at the spatial resolution of our experiments (pixel size of 0.34μm), 90% of the inclusions trapped in our set of diamonds were surrounded by cracks. The volume of the cracks has been determined from 3D reconstruction with an accuracy of about 4%. Our

  7. Optical zero-differential pressure switch and its evaluation in a multiple pressure measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a clamped-diaphragm pressure switch is described in which diaphragm motion is detected by a simple fiber-optic displacement sensor. The switch was evaluated in a pressure measurement system where it detected the zero crossing of the differential pressure between a static test pressure and a tank pressure that was periodically ramped from near zero to fullscale gage pressure. With a ramping frequency of 1 hertz and a full-scale tank pressure of 69 N/sq cm gage (100 psig), the switch delay was as long as 2 milliseconds. Pressure measurement accuracies were 0.25 to 0.75 percent of full scale. Factors affecting switch performance are also discussed.

  8. [Heart failure. Importance and utility of the echocardiographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Echeverri-Rico, Jorge Valente; Aceves-Millán, Rocío; Amezcua-Gómez, Lilia; Ixcamparij-Rosales, Carlos Haroldo; Ruiz-Rivero, Antonio; Torres, Armando; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Millions of people die every year due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective against these diseases is primary prevention, but secondary prevention is the major goal in those individuals who already suffered an event. The order of the cardiovascular complication is the next one: arrhythmia, heart failure, myocardial infarction or stroke, and death. Approximately between 1 and 2 % of adults present heart failure, but this percentage rises to more than 10 % in adults over 70 years. Therefore, it is necessary to diagnose and to treat this complication. Left ventricular ejection fraction is the most important prognosis factor in these patients, because it decreases in 50 % of them. Almost 50 % of patients with heart failure have a conserved systolic function, but a decreased diastolic function. Treatment must improve the structural and functional heart abnormalities. Echocardiography is a useful tool in these patients due to its exactitude, accessibility, safety, and low cost. It provides information about the characteristics of the cardiac chambers and its volumes, the diameter in the walls, and about the diastolic, systolic and valvular function. Recently, echocardiography evolved to third dimension techniques, which seem to be more exact. In the next years, we will have more evidence about this diagnostic modality.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  10. Thin-metal lined PRD 49-III composite vessels. [evaluation of pressure vessels for burst strength and fatigue performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels of various configurations were evaluated for burst strength and fatigue performance. The dimensions and characteristics of the vessels are described. The types of tests conducted are explained. It was determined that all vessels leaked in a relatively few cycles (20 to 60 cycles) with failure occurring in all cases in the metallic liner. The thin liner would de-bond from the composite and buckling took place during depressurization. No composite failures or indications of impeding composite failures were obtained in the metal-lined vessels.

  11. Sildenafil ameliorates left ventricular T-tubule remodeling in a pressure overload-induced murine heart failure model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-kai; Chen, Bi-yi; Guo, Ang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Yan-qi; Kutschke, William; Hong, Jiang; Song, Long-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, has been shown to exert beneficial effects in heart failure. The purpose of this study was to test whether sildenafil suppressed transverse-tubule (T-tubule) remodeling in left ventricular (LV) failure and thereby providing the therapeutic benefits. Methods: A pressure overload-induced murine heart failure model was established in mice by thoracic aortic banding (TAB). One day after TAB, the mice received sildenafil (100 mg·kg−1·d−1, sc) or saline for 5 weeks. At the end of treatment, echocardiography was used to examine LV function. Then the intact hearts were dissected out and placed in Langendorff-perfusion chamber for in situ confocal imaging of T-tubule ultrastructure from epicardial myocytes. Results: TAB surgery resulted in heart failure accompanied by remarkable T-tubule remodeling. Sildenafil treatment significantly attenuated TAB-induced cardiac hypertrophy and congestive heart failure, improved LV contractile function, and preserved T-tubule integrity in LV cardiomyocytes. But sildenafil treatment did not significantly affect the chamber dilation. The integrity of LV T-tubule structure was correlated with cardiac hypertrophy (R2=0.74, P<0.01) and global LV function (R2=0.47, P<0.01). Conclusion: Sildenafil effectively ameliorates LV T-tubule remodeling in TAB mice, revealing a novel mechanism underlying the therapeutic benefits of sildenafil in heart failure. PMID:26972492

  12. On-line detection of key radionuclides for fuel-rod failure in a pressurized water reactor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guoxiu; Chen, Xilin; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ni, Ning

    2016-08-01

    For early on-line detection of fuel rod failure, the key radionuclides useful in monitoring must leak easily from failing rods. Yield, half-life, and mass share of fission products that enter the primary coolant also need to be considered in on-line analyses. From all the nuclides that enter the primary coolant during fuel-rod failure, (135)Xe and (88)Kr were ultimately chosen as crucial for on-line monitoring of fuel-rod failure. A monitoring system for fuel-rod failure detection for pressurized water reactor (PWR) based on the LaBr3(Ce) detector was assembled and tested. The samples of coolant from the PWR were measured using the system as well as a HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. A comparison showed the method was feasible. Finally, the γ-ray spectra of primary coolant were measured under normal operations and during fuel-rod failure. The two peaks of (135)Xe (249.8keV) and (88)Kr (2392.1keV) were visible, confirming that the method is capable of monitoring fuel-rod failure on-line.

  13. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    The aim of this work is to examine the effectiveness of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings as long term lubrication coatings in microsystems, to examine the failure regimes of SAM coated devices, to examine the role of mobility in adsorbed lubricating films, and to examine evolution of the coefficient of friction of devices surrounded by ultralow partial pressures of alcohols up to saturation. Finally the role of self assembled monlayers in vapor phase lubrication is examined. Self-assembled monolayers are ubiquitous in fabrication of free-standing microdevices because of their ability to prevent release related and dormancy related stiction. However their ability to lubricate under sliding and normal contact conditions is not well documented. It can be shown that the energy dissipated per unit area in one sliding cycle due to friction is significant under general loading conditions. Therefore from an energy dissipated standpoint the bond energies of the silane molecules should not be enough to withstand even a short number of cycles. An extension of this is the energy imparted to the surface through a normal loading cycle through a loss of kinetic energy. It can also be shown that this is enough to break the silicon oxygen bonds however this is over a longer time scale than in sliding. Also there is an open question on the role of mobile and non-mobile adsorbed species on friction. Is the mobility of a molecule/layer on a surface an indicator of the effectiveness of the lubrication potential of the layer? Do submonolayer coverages of alcohols "lock-up" to contacting surfaces by disrupting non-corrogated potentials? Is there a distinct lowering of frictional forces at the formation of a monolayer? Controlled adsorption of mobile and non-mobile species on rubbing contacts is necessary to elucidate this physical relationship. To accomplish this one must take into account that friction measurements are highly scale dependant. Therefore to ensure the accuracy of

  14. Current management and future directions for the treatment of patients hospitalized for heart failure with low blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Ambrosy, Andrew; Böhm, Michael; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G F; Fedele, Francesco; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maggioni, Aldo P; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mehra, Mandeep; Metra, Marco; Nodari, Savina; Pang, Peter S; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sabbah, Hani N; Komajda, Michel; Butler, Javed

    2013-03-01

    Although patients hospitalized with heart failure have relatively low in-hospital mortality, the post-discharge rehospitalization and mortality rates remain high despite advances in treatment. Most patients admitted for heart failure have normal or high blood pressure, but 15-25 % have low systolic blood pressure with or without signs and/or symptoms of hypoperfusion. All pharmacological agents known to improve the prognosis of patients with heart failure also reduce blood pressure, and this limits their use in patients with heart failure and low blood pressure (HF-LBP). However, patients with HF-LBP have much higher in-hospital and post-discharge mortality. In these patients, a conceptually important therapeutic target is to improve cardiac output in order to alleviate signs of hypoperfusion. Accordingly, the majority of these patients will require an inotrope as cardiac dysfunction is the cause of their low cardiac output. However, the short-term use of currently available inotropes has been associated with further decreases in blood pressure and increases in heart rate, myocardial oxygen consumption and arrhythmias. Agents that improve cardiac contractility without this undesirable effects should be developed. To the best of our knowledge, the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapy of patients with HF-LBP have not been addressed thoroughly. In June 2010, a workshop that included scientists and clinicians was held in Rome, Italy. The objectives of this meeting were to (1) develop a working definition for HF-LBP, (2) describe its clinical characteristics and pathophysiology, (3) review current therapies and their limitations, (4) discuss novel agents in development and (5) create a framework for the design and conduct of future clinical trials.

  15. Survival benefits of different antiadrenergic interventions in pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy/failure.

    PubMed

    Perlini, Stefano; Ferrero, Ivana; Palladini, Giuseppina; Tozzi, Rossana; Gatti, Chiara; Vezzoli, Monia; Cesana, Francesca; Janetti, Maria Bianchi; Clari, Francesca; Busca, Giuseppe; Mancia, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Alberto U

    2006-07-01

    We observed previously that in rats with aortic banding (Bd), development of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is opposed by beta-blockade, whereas interventions interfering with alpha-adrenoceptor function also inhibit interstitial fibrosis. To assess whether these differential structural effects do translate into different effects on LV function and on heart failure mortality, Bd or sham Bd 8-week-old rats were randomized to vehicle treatment (Vh), chemical sympathectomy ([Sx] 6-hydroxydopamine, 150 mg/kg IP twice a week), beta-adrenoceptor blockade (propranolol [Pro], 40 mg/kg per day PO), or alpha-adrenoceptor blockade (doxazosin [Dox], 5 mg/kg per day PO). After monitoring survival for 10 weeks, the survivors were anesthetized to undergo echocardiography and intraarterial blood pressure measurement. Bd-Vh rats showed increased LV and lung weights, as well as LV dilation, depressed endocardial and midwall fractional shortening and a restrictive transmitral diastolic flow velocity pattern. Compared with Bd-Vh rats, all of the actively treated Bd rats showed less LV hypertrophy, LV dilation, and lung congestion but no less depression of midwall fractional shortening. In contrast, Sx and Dox but not Pro treatment were also associated with lesser degrees of diastolic dysfunction and, even more importantly, with a striking increase in survival (sham banded rats, 100%; Bd-Vh, 40%; Bd-Pro, 51%; Bd-Sx, 83%; and Bd-Dox, 82%). Although Pro, Sx, and Dox provide similar midterm protection from development of LV hypertrophy and dysfunction and from circulatory congestion, only Sx and Dox favorably affected mortality. These findings indicate that in the aortic banding rat model, alpha-adrenoceptors are importantly involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular deterioration and disease progression.

  16. Evaluation of transient fuel pin cladding failure criteria for application to inherently safe LMFBR designs

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J M; DiMelfi, R J

    1984-03-01

    Purpose of report is to evaluate the methods for determining time-temperature-stress limits for cladding failure under accident conditions for inherently safe LMFBR designs. The range of expected thermal-mechanical cladding loading conditions is outlined for generic accident events, and application of existing mechanistic and empirical cladding failure models to these conditions is evaluated. The study is restricted to reference oxide fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding.

  17. Comparison of the reliability of E/E' to estimate pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction versus those with reduced ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Minamishima, Toshinori; Goda, Ayumi; Ishiguro, Haruhisa; Kosho, Hideyasu; Sakata, Konomi; Satoh, Toru; Yoshino, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is essential for physicians to effectively manage patients with acute decompensated heart failure. The ratio of early transmittal velocity to tissue Doppler mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/E') is used to estimate PCWP noninvasively in a wide range of cardiac patients. However, it remains contentious as to whether mitral E/E' is a reliable predictor of PCWP. In the present study, acute heart failure patients were divided into two groups on the basis of left ventricular (LV) systolic function: those with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and those with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The usefulness of mitral E/E' in estimating PCWP was compared between the two groups. Fifty consecutive patients who were admitted with acute decompensated heart failure and underwent both right-sided cardiac catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization were analyzed retrospectively. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate associations between Doppler parameters and PCWP. E/E' was positively correlated with PCWP (r = 0.56, P = 0.01) in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction group. However, no significant relationship was observed between PCWP and mitral E/E' (P = 0.85) in the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction group. There were no significant correlations between any of the conventional parameters considered (LVEF, left atrial dimension, E/A, IVRT, and DT) with PCWP in either group. In conclusion, mitral E/E' is useful for estimating PCWP in patients with acute heart failure with preserved ejection fraction but may not in those with reduced ejection fraction.

  18. Episodic Sediment Failure in Northern Flemish Pass, Eastern Canadian Margin: Interplay of Seismicity, Contour Current Winnowing, and Excess Pore Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, D.

    2015-12-01

    Episodic sediment failures are recognised on continental slopes around Flemish Pass and Orphan Basin from multibeam bathymetry, seismic reflection profiles and piston cores. Seismic stratigraphy is tied to published long cores with O-isotope data back to before MIS 6 and carbonate rich Heinrich layers in places produce marker reflections in high-resolution sparker profiles. Heinrich layers, radiocarbon dates and peaks in diatom abundance provide core chronology. Slope sedimentation was strongly influenced by the Labrador Current and the silty muds show architecture characteristic of contourites. Variation in Labrador Current strength is known from the sortable silt proxy over the past 125 ka. Large slope failures were mapped from seismic reflection profiles and their age estimated from seismic stratigraphy (3-5 ka resolution) and in some cases refined from cores (1-3 ka resolution). Large slope failures occurred apparently synchronously over margin lengths of 50-350 km. Such failures were earthquake triggered: other mechanisms for producing laterally extensive synchronous failure do not apply. Triaxial shear measurements show a Su/σ' ratio of typical slope sediment of 0.48, implying considerable stability. However, some silty muds have Atterberg limits that suggest susceptibility to liquefaction under cyclic loading, particularly in Holocene deposits and by analogy those of past full interglacials. Basal failure planes of some large failures correspond with either the last interglacial or the MIS 6 glacial maximum. Comparison with seismological models suggests that the observed slope failures represent earthquakes ranging from Mw ~5.6 to ~7.6. Mean recurrence interval of M = 7 earthquakes at any point on the margin is estimated at 30 ka from seismological models and 40 ka from the sediment failure record. In northern Flemish Pass, a spatial cluster of several failures over 30 ka preceded by a long interval with no failures suggests that some other mechanism has

  19. Chronic mitral regurgitation and Doppler estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temporelli, P. L.; Scapellato, F.; Corra, U.; Eleuteri, E.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Thomas, J. D.; Giannuzzi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies relating Doppler parameters and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWP) typically exclude patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We evaluated the effects of varying degrees of chronic MR on the Doppler estimation of PCWP. PCWP and mitral Doppler profiles were obtained in 88 patients (mean age 55 +/- 8 years) with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 23% +/- 5%). Patients were classified by severity of MR. Patients with severe MR had greater left atrial areas, LV end-diastolic volumes, and mean PCWPs and lower ejection fractions (each P <.01). In patients with mild MR, multiple echocardiographic parameters correlated with PCWP; however, with worsening MR, only deceleration time strongly related to PCWP. From stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time was the best independent predictor of PCWP overall, and it was the only predictor in patients with moderate or severe MR. Doppler-derived early mitral deceleration time reliably predicts PCWP in patients with severe LV dysfunction irrespective of degree of MR.

  20. Evaluation of pressurized water cleaning systems for hardware refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, Terry W.; Deweese, Charles D.; Hoppe, David T.; Vickers, John H.; Swenson, Gary J.; Hutchens, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Historically, refurbishment processes for RSRM motor cases and components have employed environmentally harmful materials. Specifically, vapor degreasing processes consume and emit large amounts of ozone depleting compounds. This program evaluates the use of pressurized water cleaning systems as a replacement for the vapor degreasing process. Tests have been conducted to determine if high pressure water washing, without any form of additive cleaner, is a viable candidate for replacing vapor degreasing processes. This paper discusses the findings thus far of Engineering Test Plan - 1168 (ETP-1168), 'Evaluation of Pressurized Water Cleaning Systems for Hardware Refurbishment.'

  1. Evaluating a pressure-redistribution mattress replacement system.

    PubMed

    Newton, Heather

    2014-11-01

    Pressure ulcer prevention is high on the quality agenda and provision of pressure-relieving equipment to meet patients' needs is an essential part of this process. This can be challenging in today's NHS and this article explores the evaluation process that supported the procurement of the AtmosAir™ 4000 pressure-redistributing mattress replacement system. Outcomes suggest that, when combined with a robust repositioning and skin assessment regime, the AtmosAir 4000 performed well and dynamic mattress usage was reduced. Further evaluation over a longer period of time will be undertaken in future.

  2. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion.

  3. AE measurements for evaluation of defects in FRP pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Masanori; Takatsu, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    AE (acoustic emission) measurement was conducted in a series of pressuring tests of FRP pressure vessels in order to examine its applicability to the safety evaluation of vessels. Tested vessels were commercial FRP pressure vessels fabricated by filament winding of high strength glass fibers, impregnated epoxy resin, on a Al alloy liner. At the final stage of fabrication, they were subjected to autofrettage, an overpressuring treatment to produce compressive residual stresses in metal liner. AE measurement results showed a strong Kaiser`s effect and high felicity ratios. In a virgin vessel, very few AE signals were detected below the autofrettage pressure. Vessels containing artificial defects showed distinct increase in AE signals at the level of test pressure. AE origin map were obtained by triangular-zone calculation. Discussions are directed, in particular, to the selection of threshold and to the applicability of AE measurement to the in-service inspection of FRP pressure vessel.

  4. [Thinking on the efficacy evaluation of TCM for treatment of heart failure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-xia; Zhu, Ming-jun

    2008-12-01

    Through dissertating the current status and trend in efficacy evaluation of traditional and Western medicine for treatment of heart failure, aiming at the difference between TCM and Western medicine in efficacy evaluation and existent problems for diagnosis and treatment of heart failure. The authors proposed to establish a method for evaluating TCM clinical studies, a systematic method and thinking of indexes rating, depending upon the guidance of clinical methodologies of systematology, clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine, to make the efficacy evaluation founded upon the superiority of TCM and meeting to the international requisition, thus to facilitate the goingahead of TCM to the world.

  5. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof cycle was longer than that without the proof cycle because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  6. Weighted Fuzzy Risk Priority Number Evaluation of Turbine and Compressor Blades Considering Failure Mode Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Luping; Li, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2014-06-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) and Fault tree analysis (FTA) are powerful tools to evaluate reliability of systems. Although single failure mode issue can be efficiently addressed by traditional FMECA, multiple failure modes and component correlations in complex systems cannot be effectively evaluated. In addition, correlated variables and parameters are often assumed to be precisely known in quantitative analysis. In fact, due to the lack of information, epistemic uncertainty commonly exists in engineering design. To solve these problems, the advantages of FMECA, FTA, fuzzy theory, and Copula theory are integrated into a unified hybrid method called fuzzy probability weighted geometric mean (FPWGM) risk priority number (RPN) method. The epistemic uncertainty of risk variables and parameters are characterized by fuzzy number to obtain fuzzy weighted geometric mean (FWGM) RPN for single failure mode. Multiple failure modes are connected using minimum cut sets (MCS), and Boolean logic is used to combine fuzzy risk priority number (FRPN) of each MCS. Moreover, Copula theory is applied to analyze the correlation of multiple failure modes in order to derive the failure probabilities of each MCS. Compared to the case where dependency among multiple failure modes is not considered, the Copula modeling approach eliminates the error of reliability analysis. Furthermore, for purpose of quantitative analysis, probabilities importance weight from failure probabilities are assigned to FWGM RPN to reassess the risk priority, which generalize the definition of probability weight and FRPN, resulting in a more accurate estimation than that of the traditional models. Finally, a basic fatigue analysis case drawn from turbine and compressor blades in aeroengine is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the presented method. The result provides some important insights on fatigue reliability analysis and risk priority assessment of structural

  7. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  8. Evaluation of pressure sensing concepts: A technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.L.; Thacker, L.H.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced distributed control systems for electric power plants will require more accurate and reliable pressure gauges than those now installed. Future developments in power plant control systems are expected to use digital/optical networks rather than the analog/electric data transmission used in existing plants. Many pressure transmitters now installed use oil filling to separate process fluids from the gauge mechanism and are subject to insidious failures when the oil leaks. Testing and maintenance of pressure channels occupy a disproportionately large amount of effort to restore their accuracy and verify their operability. These and similar concerns have prompted an assessment of a broad spectrum of sensor technologies to aid in selecting the most likely candidates for adaptation to power plant applications. Ten representative conventional and thirty innovational pressure sensors are described and compared. Particular emphasis is focused on two categories: Silicon-integrated pressure sensors and fiber-optic sensors, and both of these categories are discussed in detail. Additional attractive concepts include variable reluctance gauges and resonant structure gauges that may not require oil buffering from the process fluid.

  9. Effect of material properties on the strain to failure of thick-walled cylinders subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Priddy, T.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a pressure vessel is of considerable importance in design, especially in autofrettage considerations. This paper presents the results of an experimental study which measured the maximum internal pressure which can be applied to thick-walled cylindrical vessels. Both aluminum and steel, with material properties ranging from ductile to brittle, were tested at stress levels through plastic and strain hardening ranges to fracture. From these tests, the pressure-expansion and through-thickness yielding characteristics were determined for these specimens. It is shown that a strain-to-failure criterion, based on the triaxiality of stress in the critical region, can be used to predict the complete pressure versus strain relations and maximum pressure for these cylinders. A simple tension-true stress-strain relation of the material is employed to analytically predict the response of the cylinder into the plastic regime. Finally, simplified theoretical and empirical formulas for bursting pressures are checked against the experimental results.

  10. A disproportionate elevation in right ventricular filling pressure, in relation to left ventricular filling pressure, is associated with renal impairment and increased mortality in advanced decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Grodin, Justin L.; Drazner, Mark H.; Dupont, Matthias; Mullens, Wilfried; Taylor, David O.; Starling, Randall C.; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Background Discordance between left- and right-sided filling pressures occurs in a subset of patients presenting with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We hypothesized that a disproportionately increased right atrial pressure (RAP) relative to the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) would be associated with both renal dysfunction and mortality in ADHF. Methods A total of 367 patients admitted with ADHF with elevated intracardiac filling pressures were treated with intensive medical therapy guided by invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Baseline characteristics, hemodynamics, and renal function at admission were stratified by RAP/PCWP quartiles. The association of RAP/PCWP quartile with all-cause mortality after a median follow-up of 2.4 years was assessed in univariable and multivariable models, which included adjustment for the RAP. Results The median RAP/PCWP was 0.58 (interquartile range 0.43-0.75). Increasing RAP/PCWP was inversely associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline and with treatment (P < .0001) independently of RAP. High RAP/PCWP was associated with increased mortality (quartile 4 vs 1: hazard ratio [95% CI] 2.1 [1.3-3.5], P = .002). The association of RAP/PCWP with mortality persisted after adjustment for age, gender, mean arterial pressure, RAP, cardiac index, pulmonary vascular resistance, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio 2.4 [1.4-3.9], P = .007). Conclusion A disproportionate increase in right to left ventricular filling pressures is associated with renal dysfunction and mortality, independently of the right atrial pressure. PMID:26027618

  11. Experimental evaluation of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for the design of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental measures and techniques are described which are used to obtain the strength tensor components, including cubic terms. Based on a considerable number of biaxial pressure tests together with specimens subjected to a constant torque and internal pressure, a modified form of the plane stress tensor polynomial failure equation was obtained that was capable of predicting ultimate strength results well. Preliminary data were obtained to determine the effect of varying post cure times and ambient temperatures (-80 F to 250 F) on the change in two tensor strength terms, F sub 2 and F sub 22. Other laminate configurations yield corresponding variations for the remaining strength parameters.

  12. Hybrid Modeling for Scenario-Based Evaluation of Failure Effects in Advanced Hardware-Software Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an incremental scenario-based simulation approach to evaluation of intelligent software for control and management of hardware systems. A hybrid continuous/discrete event simulation of the hardware dynamically interacts with the intelligent software in operations scenarios. Embedded anomalous conditions and failures in simulated hardware can lead to emergent software behavior and identification of missing or faulty software or hardware requirements. An approach is described for extending simulation-based automated incremental failure modes and effects analysis, to support concurrent evaluation of intelligent software and the hardware controlled by the software

  13. Utilizing ambulatory blood pressure recordings to evaluate antihypertensive drug therapy.

    PubMed

    White, W B

    1992-04-30

    Until recently, the efficacy and pharmacodynamics of antihypertensive agents were assessed by resting blood pressure measurements in the doctor's office or a research clinic. The limitations of the office or clinic blood pressure measurement include the lack of representation (from recording only 1 point of time in the dosing schedule), the effects of the doctor's office on the patient's blood pressure, and, perhaps more relevant, observer bias. Ambulatory monitoring of the blood pressure has gained worldwide acceptance as an alternative method to assess antihypertensive drug efficacy and the time-effect relation of a drug. The ambulatory monitoring devices have been refined and are smaller, more precise, and more reliable than earlier recording models. Although there are no reference standards for analysis of ambulatory blood pressure data, international consensus groups are presently addressing this problem. Key roles for ambulatory blood pressure recordings in clinical trials of antihypertensive agents now include determination of the entry criteria for patients, improving the assessment of peak/trough pharmacodynamics in the patient's own environment (including nocturnal/sleep readings), and evaluating efficacy through calculation of the hypertensive burden, or blood pressure load. PMID:1575177

  14. Evaluation of insulated pressure vessels for cryogenic hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Garcia-Villazana, O; Martinez-Frias, J

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental evaluation of the applicability of insulated pressure vessels for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH?) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The purpose of this work is to verify that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber- wrapped vessels can be used for cryogenic hydrogen storage. The paper reports on previous and ongoing tests and analyses that have the purpose of improving the system design and assure its safety.

  15. Evaluation of high pressure Freon decontamination. I. Preliminary tests

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.

    1983-10-31

    High-pressure Freon blasting techniques are being evaluated for applications involving the removal of non-adherent radioactive particulate contamination at SRP. Very little waste is generated by this technique because the used Freon can be easily distilled and reused. One of the principle advantages of this technique is that decontaminated electrical equipment can be returned to service immediately without drying, unlike high-pressure water blasting techniques. Preliminary scoutin tests evaluating high-pressure Freon blasting for decontamination at SRP were carried out at Quadrex Co., Oak Ridge, TN, October 12 and 13. DWPF-type contamination (raw sludge plus volatiles) and separations area-type contamination (diluted boiling point (47.6/sup 0/C) allow it to rapidly separate from higher boiling contaminants via distillation with filtration to remove particulate material, and distillation with condensation, the solvent may be recovered for indefinite reuse while reducing the radioactive waste to a minimum. 3 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  16. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  17. Effect of Combined Loading Due to Bending and Internal Pressure on Pipe Flaw Evaluation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure.

  18. Pulmonary artery balloon counterpulsation for right ventricular failure. An experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jett, G K; Siwek, L G; Picone, A L; Applebaum, R E; Jones, M

    1983-09-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure frequently occurs in patients undergoing correction of congenital cardiac defects, as well as in other clinical settings. RV hypertrophy was created in 10 neonatal lambs by pulmonary artery (PA) banding. Twelve months later RV hypertrophy was present (RV weight/body weight = 2.71 +/- 0.31 gm/kg); RV systolic pressures were elevated (65 +/- 9 mm Hg) and the average gradient across the PA band was 38 +/- 9 mm Hg. RV failure was produced in all animals by performing a right ventriculotomy. Four unassisted (control) animals died shortly after separation from bypass. Six experimental animals underwent pulmonary artery balloon counterpulsation (PABCP). A Dacron graft anastomosed to the proximal PA served as a reservoir for a 40 ml intra-aortic balloon pump system. PABCP effectively reversed RV failure, low cardiac output, and systemic arterial hypotension. Periods with PABCP on and off in each animal were compared. PABCP increased cardiac output from 1.45 +/- 0.16 to 2.03 +/- 0.13 L/min (p less than 0.0001) and increased aortic systolic pressure from 78 +/- 7 to 99 +/- 6 mm Hg (p less than 0.0004). PABCP produced a significant reduction in RV peak systolic pressure from 56 +/- 5 to 41 +/- 3 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001). PA peak pressure distal to the band increased from 31 +/- 2 to 40 +/- 1 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001). Right atrial pressure decreased from 14 +/- 1 to 11 +/- 1 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001) with PABCP, and RV end-diastolic pressure fell from 15 +/- 1 to 11 +/- 1 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001). RV stroke work index increased 49% from 0.081 +/- 0.011 to 0.121 +/- 0.017 gm X m/kg/beat (p less than 0.01), and RV systolic pressure time index decreased 38% from 1140 +/- 79 to 710 +/- 65 mm Hg sec/min (p less than 0.0001). Thus PABCP in the presence of RV dysfunction can produce substantial improvement in RV function and in overall cardiac function and may prove clinically useful in managing patients in refractory RV failure.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of ginger, Arabic gum, and Boswellia in acute and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Diaai, Abdalla Ahmed; Ahmed, Fahmy

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger), Arabic gum (AG), and Boswellia on both acute and chronic renal failure (CRF) and the mechanisms underlying their effects. Acute renal failure was induced by 30 min ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion, while CRF was induced by adenine feeding for 8 weeks. Prophylactic oral administration of ginger, AG, Boswellia, or vehicle (in control groups) was started 3 days before and along with adenine feeding in different groups or 7 days before ischemia-reperfusion. Ginger and AG showed renoprotective effects in both models of renal failure. These protective effects may be attributed at least in part to their anti-inflammatory properties as evident by attenuating serum C-reactive protein levels and antioxidant effects as evident by attenuating lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde levels, and increasing renal superoxide dismutase activity. Ginger was more potent than AG in both models of renal failure. However, Boswellia showed only partial protective effect against both acute renal failure and CRF and it had no antioxidant effects. Finally, we can say that ginger and AG could be beneficial adjuvant therapy in patients with acute renal failure and CRF to prevent disease progression and delay the need for renal replacement therapy. PMID:22017619

  20. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion. PMID:22486634

  1. Low Temperature and High Pressure Evaluation of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    2000-06-25

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Association of Diurnal Blood Pressure Pattern with Risk for Hospitalization or Death in Men with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaekyu; Kline, Sharoen; Moore, Mariellen; Gong, Yan; Bhanderi, Viralkumar; Schmalfuss, Carsten M.; Johnson, Julie A.; Schofield, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Background An altered diurnal blood pressure (BP) pattern has been linked to risk of developing heart failure (HF). We tested whether an altered diurnal BP pattern is associated with adverse outcomes (hospitalization due to HF exacerbation or death) in HF patients. Methods and Results One hundred eighteen HF patients were enrolled from a tertiary care HF clinic and followed for death or heart failure hospitalization for up to 4 years. 24-hour ambulatory BP was monitored. Forty patients (34%) had normal BP dipping pattern (night-day ambulatory BP ratio < 0.9), 44 (37%) had a non-dipping pattern (0.9 ≤ night-day ambulatory BP ratio < 1.0) and 34 (29%) had a reverse dipping BP pattern (night-day ambulatory BP ratio ≥ 1.0). A total of 39 patients had an adverse outcome. Adverse outcome rates were the lowest in dippers and the highest in reverse dippers (Log rank p=0.052). Predictors of adverse outcomes, selected based on log likelihood contrast, were NYHA functional class (Hazard ratio (HR) 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-3.44), anemia (HR 2.50, 95% CI 1.23-5.08) and dipping status (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.08-2.50). Conclusions In addition to other traditional predictors, blood pressure dipping status may be an important prognostic factor in HF. PMID:17923358

  3. PS1 satellite refrigerator heat exchanger: Failure of the LN2 heat exchanger to low pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.

    1992-11-01

    The PS1 heat exchanger is one of three prototype heat exchangers built by Atomic Welders before Meyer was given the contract to build the Satellite Refrigerator Heat Exchanger components. This heat exchanger was first put into operation in July 1983. In November 1991, this heat exchanger experienced a failure in the shell of heat exchanger 1 causing nitrogen to contaminate the helium in the refrigerator. The resulting contamination plugged heat exchanger 3. The break occurred at a weld that connects a 0.25 inch thick ring to heat exchanger 1. The failure appears to be a fatigue of the shell due to temperature oscillations. The flow rate through the break was measured to be 1.0 scfm for a pressure drop over the crack of 50 psi. An ANSYS analysis of the failure area indicates that the stress would be 83,000 psi if the metal did not yield. This is based on cooling down the shell to 80K from 300K with the shell side helium on the outside of the shell at 300K. This is the largest change in temperature that occurs during operation. During normal operations, the temperature swings are not nearly this large, however temperatures down to 80K are not unusual (LN2 overflowing pot). The highest temperatures are typically 260K. The analysis makes no attempt to estimate the stress concentration factor at this weld but there is no doubt that it is greater than 1. No estimate as to the number of cycles to cause failure was calculated nor any estimate as to the actual number of cycles was made.

  4. Immunity-based detection, identification, and evaluation of aircraft sub-system failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncayo, Hever Y.

    This thesis describes the design, development, and flight-simulation testing of an integrated Artificial Immune System (AIS) for detection, identification, and evaluation of a wide variety of sensor, actuator, propulsion, and structural failures/damages including the prediction of the achievable states and other limitations on performance and handling qualities. The AIS scheme achieves high detection rate and low number of false alarms for all the failure categories considered. Data collected using a motion-based flight simulator are used to define the self for an extended sub-region of the flight envelope. The NASA IFCS F-15 research aircraft model is used and represents a supersonic fighter which include model following adaptive control laws based on non-linear dynamic inversion and artificial neural network augmentation. The flight simulation tests are designed to analyze and demonstrate the performance of the immunity-based aircraft failure detection, identification and evaluation (FDIE) scheme. A general robustness analysis is also presented by determining the achievable limits for a desired performance in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. For the purpose of this work, the integrated AIS scheme is implemented based on three main components. The first component performs the detection when one of the considered failures is present in the system. The second component consists in the identification of the failure category and the classification according to the failed element. During the third phase a general evaluation of the failure is performed with the estimation of the magnitude/severity of the failure and the prediction of its effect on reducing the flight envelope of the aircraft system. Solutions and alternatives to specific design issues of the AIS scheme, such as data clustering and empty space optimization, data fusion and duplication removal, definition of features, dimensionality reduction, and selection of cluster/detector shape are also

  5. Evaluation of tracheal cuff pressure variation in spontaneously breathing patients

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikow, Gustavo A; Roux, Nicolas; Feld, Viviana; Gogniat, Emiliano; Villalba, Dario; Ribero, Noelia Vairo; Sartore, Marisa; Bosso, Mauro; Quiroga, Corina; Leiva, Valeria; Scrigna, Mariana; Puchulu, Facundo; Distéfano, Eduardo; Scapellato, Jose Luis; Intile, Dante; Planells, Fernando; Noval, Diego; Buñirigo, Pablo; Jofré, Ricardo; Nielsen, Ernesto Díaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most of the studies referring cuff tubes’ issues were conducted on intubated patients. Not much is known about the cuff pressure performance in chronically tracheostomized patients disconnected from mechanical ventilation. Objective: To evaluate cuff pressure (CP) variation in tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients in a weaning rehabilitation center. Materials and Methods: Experimental setup to test instruments in vitro, in which the gauge (TRACOE) performance at different pressure levels was evaluated in six tracheostomy tubes, and a clinical setupin which CP variation over 24 h, every 4 h, and for 6 days was measured in 35 chronically tracheostomized clinically stable, patients who had been disconnected from mechanical ventilation for at least 72 h. The following data were recorded: Tube brand, type, and size; date of the tube placed; the patient's body position; the position of the head; axillary temperature; pulse and respiration rates; blood pressure; and pulse oximetry. Results: In vitro difference between the initial pressure (IP) and measured pressure (MP) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The difference between the IP and MP was significant when selecting for various tube brands (P < 0.05). In the clinical set-up, 207 measurements were performed and the CP was >30 cm H2O in 6.28% of the recordings, 20-30 cm H2O in 42.0% of the recordings, and <20 cm H2O in 51.69% of the recordings. Conclusion: The systematic CP measurement in chronically tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing patients showed high variability, which was independent of tube brand, size, type, or time of placement. Consequently, measurements should be made more frequently. PMID:24459624

  6. Geotechnical evaluation of slope and ground failures during the 8 October 2005 Muzaffarabad earthquake, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ömer; Ohta, Yoshimi; Hamada, Masanori

    2009-07-01

    A large devastating earthquake with a magnitude of 7.6 struck in Kashmir on Oct. 8, 2005. The largest city influenced by the earthquake was Muzaffarabad. Balakot town was the nearest settlement to the epicenter, and it was the most heavily damaged. The earthquake caused extensive damage to housing and structures founded on loose deposits or weathered/sheared rock masses. Furthermore, extensive slope failures occurred along Neelum and Jhelum valleys, which obstructed both river flow and roadways. In this article, failures of natural and cut slopes as well as other ground failures induced by the earthquake and their geotechnical evaluation are presented, and their implications on civil infrastructures and site selection for reconstruction and rehabilitation are discussed. It is suggested that if housing and constructions on soil slopes containing boulders as observed in Balakot and Muzaffarabad are allowed, there should be a safety zone between the slope crest and allowable construction boundary.

  7. Preparation and evaluation of thiomer nanoparticles via high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Herbert; Schlocker, Wolfgang; Greindl, Melanie; Ostermann, Thomas; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a high pressure homogenization method for the preparation of thiomer nanoparticles. Particles were formulated by incorporation of the model protein horseradish peroxidase in chitosan-glutathione (Ch-GSH) and poly(acrylic acid)-glutathione (PAA-GSH) via co-precipitation followed by air jet milling. The resulting microparticles were suspended in distilled water using an Ultraturax and subsequently micronized by high pressure homogenization. Finally, resulting particles were evaluated regarding size distribution, shape, zeta potential, drug load, protein activity and release behaviour. The mean particle size after 30 cycles with a pressure of 1500 bar was 538 +/- 94 nm for particles consisting of Ch-GSH and 638 +/- 94 nm for particles consisting of PAA-GSH. Nanoparticles of Ch-GSH had a positive zeta-potential of +1.03 mv, whereas nanoparticles from PAA-GSH had a negative zeta potential of -6.21 mv. The maximum protein load for nanoparticles based on Ch-GSH and based on PAA-GSH was 45 +/- 2% and 37 +/- %, respectively. The release profile of nanoparticles followed a first order release kinetic. Thiolated nanoparticles prepared by a high pressure homogenization technique were shown to be stable and provide controlled drug release characteristics. The preparation method described here might be a useful tool for a more upscaled production of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. PMID:20367028

  8. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  9. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  10. Microseparation, fluid pressure and flow in failures of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewski, B. M.; Siney, P. D.; Fleming, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing was introduced into clinical practice because it was perceived to be a better alternative to conventional total hip replacement for young and active patients. However, an increasing number of reports of complications have arisen focusing on design and orientation of the components, the generation of metallic wear particles and serum levels of metallic ions. The procedure introduced a combination of two elements: large-dimension components and hard abrasive particles of metal wear. The objective of our study was to investigate the theory that microseparation of the articular surfaces draws in a high volume of bursal fluid and its contents into the articulation, and at relocation under load would generate high pressures of fluid ejection, resulting in an abrasive water jet. Methods This theoretical concept using MoM resurfacing components (head diameter 55 mm) was modelled mathematically and confirmed experimentally using a material-testing machine that pushed the head into the cup at a rate of 1000 mm/min until fully engaged. Results The mathematical model showed the pattern but not the force of fluid ejection, the highest pressures were expected when the separation of the components was only a fraction of one millimetre. The experimental work confirmed the results; with the mean peak ejection pressure of 43 763 N/m2 equivalent to 306 mmHg or 5 psi. Conclusions The mechanical effect of the high-pressure abrasive water jet is the likely cause of the spectrum of complications reported with metal-on-metal resurfacing. Investigating serum levels of metallic elements may not be the best method for assessing the local mechanical effects of the abrasive water jet. PMID:23610667

  11. Opposite predictive value of pulse pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity on heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: insights from an Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) substudy.

    PubMed

    Regnault, Veronique; Lagrange, Jérémy; Pizard, Anne; Safar, Michel E; Fay, Renaud; Pitt, Bertram; Challande, Pascal; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Lacolley, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although hypertension contributes significantly to worsen cardiovascular risk, blood pressure increment in subjects with heart failure is paradoxically associated with lower risk. The objective was to determine whether pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) remain prognostic markers, independent of treatment in heart failure with reduced left ventricular function. The investigation involved 6632 patients of the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study. All subjects had acute myocardial infarction with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and signs/symptoms of heart failure. Carotid-femoral PWV was measured in a subpopulation of 306 subjects. In the overall population, baseline mean arterial pressure <90 mm Hg was associated with higher all-cause death (hazard ratio, 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30]; P<0.05), whereas higher left ventricular ejection fraction or pulse pressure was associated with lower rates of all-cause death, cardiovascular death/hospitalization, and cardiovascular death. In the subpopulation, increased baseline PWV was associated with worse outcomes (all-cause death: 1.16 [1.03-1.30]; P<0.05 and cardiovascular deaths: 1.16 [1.03-1.31]; P<0.05), independent of age and left ventricular ejection fraction. Using multiple regression analysis, systolic blood pressure and age were the main independent factors positively associated with pulse pressure or PWV, both in the entire population or in the PWV substudy. In heart failure and low ejection fraction, our results suggest that pulse pressure, being negatively associated with outcome, is more dependent on left ventricular function and thereby no longer a marker of aortic elasticity. In contrast, increased aortic stiffness, assessed by PWV, contributes significantly to cardiovascular death.

  12. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  13. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  14. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  15. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  16. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  17. The Overexpression of Twinkle Helicase Ameliorates the Progression of Cardiac Fibrosis and Heart Failure in Pressure Overload Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Onitsuka, Ken; Ikeda, Masataka; Takehara, Takako; Hata, Yuko; Ylikallio, Emil; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number decreases in heart failure. In post-myocardial infarction mice, increasing mtDNA copy number by overexpressing mitochondrial transcription factor attenuates mtDNA deficiency and ameliorates pathological remodeling thereby markedly improving survival. However, the functional significance of increased mtDNA copy number in hypertensive heart disease remains unknown. We addressed this question using transgenic mice that overexpress Twinkle helicase (Twinkle; Tg), the mtDNA helicase, and examined whether Twinkle overexpression protects the heart from left ventricular (LV) remodeling and failure after pressure overload created by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Twinkle overexpression increased mtDNA copy number by 2.2±0.1-fold. Heart weight, LV diastolic volume and wall thickness were comparable between Tg and wild type littermates (WT) at 28 days after TAC operation. LV end-diastolic pressure increased in WT after TAC (8.6±2.8 mmHg), and this increase was attenuated in Tg (4.6±2.6 mmHg). Impaired LV fractional shortening after TAC operation was also suppressed in Tg, as measured by echocardiography (WT: 16.2±7.2% vs Tg: 20.7±6.2%). These LV functional improvements were accompanied by a decrease in interstitial fibrosis (WT: 10.6±1.1% vs Tg: 3.0±0.6%). In in vitro studies, overexpressing Twinkle using an adenovirus vector in cultured cardiac fibroblasts significantly suppressed mRNA of collagen 1a, collagen 3a and connective tissue growth factor, and angiotensin II-induced transforming growth factor β1 expression. The findings suggest that Twinkle overexpression prevents LV function deterioration. In conclusion, Twinkle overexpression increases mtDNA copy number and ameliorates the progression of LV fibrosis and heart failure in a mouse pressure overload model. Increasing mtDNA copy number by Twinkle overexpression could be a novel therapeutic strategy for hypertensive heart disease. PMID:23840758

  18. Interrelationship of Nondestructive Evaluation Methodologies Applied to Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifeste, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are commonly used in spacecraft for containment of pressurized gases and fluids, incorporating strength and weight savings. The energy stored is capable of extensive spacecraft damage and personal injury in the event of sudden failure. These apparently simple structures, composed of a metallic media impermeable liner and fiber/resin composite overwrap are really complex structures with numerous material and structural phenomena interacting during pressurized use which requires multiple, interrelated monitoring methodologies to monitor and understand subtle changes critical to safe use. Testing of COPVs at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands T est Facility (WSTF) has employed multiple in-situ, real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies as well as pre- and post-test comparative techniques to monitor changes in material and structural parameters during advanced pressurized testing. The use of NDE methodologies and their relationship to monitoring changes is discussed based on testing of real-world spacecraft COPVs. Lessons learned are used to present recommendations for use in testing, as well as a discussion of potential applications to vessel health monitoring in future applications.

  19. The role of exercise testing in the evaluation and management of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D; Tan, L

    1999-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of heart failure has been investigated so extensively that it may now almost be regarded as a metabolic disorder. Although an initial insult reduces cardiac pump efficacy, the resultant physiological response culminates in complex neurohormonal dysfunction. This has created confusion and prevented the acceptance of a universal definition of cardiac failure. With much current research concentrating on the pharmacological modification of neuro-endocrine imbalance, it is easy to lose sight of the fundamental principles behind heart failure management, namely, to improve cardiac function. In attempting to achieve this, the issues of morbidity and mortality must be addressed jointly; they are not mutually exclusive entities. Discrepant results between mortality studies and changes in exercise capacity have undermined the value of exercise testing. Because a treatment enhances longevity we should not ignore its effect on symptomatic status, and likewise we should not discard a therapy, which improves function because adverse events result in occasional premature deaths. Informed patient choice must exist.
Historically, exercise testing has been quintessential in our understanding and evaluation of heart failure. Peak oxygen consumption remains the best overall indicator of symptomatic status, exercise capacity, prognosis and hospitalisation. Unfortunately, muddling of surrogate and true end-points has confused many of these issues. Improved comprehension may be gained by applying the concept of cardiac reserve which has been described in a variety of heart conditions and used in cardiac failure patients to provide an indication of prognosis and functional capacity.


Keywords: exercise testing; heart failure PMID:10646020

  20. Usability Evaluation of a Web-Based Symptom Monitoring Application for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Bonnie; Pham, Kassie; Scherubel, Melody

    2015-07-01

    Symptom recognition and reporting by patients with heart failure are critical to avoid hospitalization. This project evaluated a patient symptom tracking application. Fourteen end users (nine patients, five clinicians) from a Midwestern Veterans Affairs Medical Center evaluated the website using a think aloud protocol. A structured observation protocol was used to assess success or failure for each task. Measures included task time, success, and satisfaction. Patients had a mean age of 70 years; clinicians averaged 42 years in age. Patients took 9.3 min and clinicians took less than 3 min per scenario. Most patients needed some assistance, but few patients were completely unable to complete some tasks. Clinicians demonstrated few problems navigating the site. Patient System Usability Scale item scores ranged from 2.0 to 3.6; clinician item scores ranged from 1.8 to 4.0. Further work is needed to determine whether using the web-based tool improves symptom recognition and reporting.

  1. Right ventricular effects of intracoronary delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an animal model of pressure overload heart failure.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ezequiel J; Palma, Jon; Gupta, Dipin; Gaughan, John P; Houser, Steven; Macha, Mahender

    2009-12-01

    In a rat model of left ventricular pressure overload hypertrophy with biventricular failure, we studied the effects of intracoronary delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MCS) upon right ventricular hemodynamic performance, profiles of local inflammation and apoptosis, and determinants of extracellular matrix remodeling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent aortic banding and were followed by echocardiography. After a decrease in left ventricular fractional shortening of 25% from the baseline (relative 50% reduction), animals were randomized to an intracoronary injection of MSC (n=28) or PBS (n=20). Right ventricular hemodynamic assessment and measurement of local inflammatory markers, proapoptotic factors, and determinants of extracellular matrix remodeling were performed on post-transplantation day 7, 14, 21 or 28. MSC injection improved right ventricular systolic function in the MSC group compared to the control group (mean+/-SD, max dP/dt 772+/-272 mm Hg/s vs. 392+/-132 at 28 days, P<0.01). Diastolic function was similarly improved (mean+/-SD, max -dP/dt -558+/-171 mm Hg/s vs. -327+/-131 at 28 days, P<0.05). Right ventricular levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, bax, bak and p38 were significantly decreased in the MSC treated animals. Expression of MMP-3, MMP-6, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 declined in the MSC group compared with controls after 28 days. In this model of left ventricular pressure overload hypertrophy and biventricular failure, intracoronary delivery of MSC was associated with an improvement in the right ventricular hemodynamic performance, profiles of local inflammation and apoptosis, and determinants of extracellular matrix remodeling.

  2. Effect of Pore Pressure on Slip Failure of an Impermeable Fault: A Coupled Micro Hydro-Geomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geomechanical processes associated with subsurface fluid injection/extraction is of central importance for many industrial operations related to energy and water resources. However, the mechanisms controlling the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood and are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a coupled hydro-geomechanical model to investigate the effect of fluid injection induced pressure perturbation on the slip behavior of a sealing fault. The model couples single-phase flow in the pores and mechanics of the solid phase. Granular packs (see example in Fig. 1a) are numerically generated where the grains can be either bonded or not, depending on the degree of cementation. A pore network is extracted for each granular pack with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on geometry of the local pore space. The pore fluid pressure is solved via an explicit scheme, taking into account the effect of deformation of the solid matrix. The mechanics part of the model is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). We first test the validity of the model with regard to the classical one-dimensional consolidation problem where an analytical solution exists. We then demonstrate the ability of the coupled model to reproduce rock deformation behavior measured in triaxial laboratory tests under the influence of pore pressure. We proceed to study the fault stability in presence of a pressure discontinuity across the impermeable fault which is implemented as a plane with its intersected pore throats being deactivated and thus obstructing fluid flow (Fig. 1b, c). We focus on the onset of shear failure along preexisting faults. We discuss the fault stability criterion in light of the numerical results obtained from the DEM simulations coupled with pore fluid flow. The implication on how should faults be treated in a large-scale continuum model is also presented.

  3. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  4. Postural effects on intracranial pressure: modeling and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qvarlander, Sara; Sundström, Nina; Malm, Jan; Eklund, Anders

    2013-11-01

    The physiological effect of posture on intracranial pressure (ICP) is not well described. This study defined and evaluated three mathematical models describing the postural effects on ICP, designed to predict ICP at different head-up tilt angles from the supine ICP value. Model I was based on a hydrostatic indifference point for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system, i.e., the existence of a point in the system where pressure is independent of body position. Models II and III were based on Davson's equation for CSF absorption, which relates ICP to venous pressure, and postulated that gravitational effects within the venous system are transferred to the CSF system. Model II assumed a fully communicating venous system, and model III assumed that collapse of the jugular veins at higher tilt angles creates two separate hydrostatic compartments. Evaluation of the models was based on ICP measurements at seven tilt angles (0-71°) in 27 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. ICP decreased with tilt angle (ANOVA: P < 0.01). The reduction was well predicted by model III (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P = 0.65), which showed excellent fit against measured ICP. Neither model I nor II adequately described the reduction in ICP (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P < 0.01). Postural changes in ICP could not be predicted based on the currently accepted theory of a hydrostatic indifference point for the CSF system, but a new model combining Davson's equation for CSF absorption and hydrostatic gradients in a collapsible venous system performed well and can be useful in future research on gravity and CSF physiology.

  5. A Survey of and Evaluation Methodology for Fiber Composite Material Failure Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.M.

    2000-07-11

    The long-standing problem of characterizing failure for fiber composite materials will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the lamina level involving nominally aligned fibers in a matrix phase. However, some consideration will also be given to laminate failure using the lamina form as the basic building block along with the concept of progressive damage. The many different lamina level theories will be surveyed along with the commitment necessary to produce critical experimental data. Four particular theories will be reviewed and compared in some detail, these being the Tsai-Wu, Hashin, Puck, and Christensen forms. These four theories are reasonably representative of the great variety of different forms with widely different physical effects that can be encountered; also for comparison, the rudimentary forms of maximum normal stress and maximum normal strain criteria will be given. The controversial problem of how many different individual modes of failure are necessary to describe general failure will receive attention. A specific and detailed methodology for evaluation of all the various theories will be formulated.

  6. The deterministic prediction of failure of low pressure steam turbine disks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun; Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-05-01

    Localized corrosion phenomena, including pitting corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue, are the principal causes of corrosion-induced damage in electric power generating facilities and typically result in more than 50% of the unscheduled outages. Prediction of damage, so that repairs and inspections can be made during scheduled outages, could have an enormous impact on the economics of electric power generation. To date, prediction of corrosion damage has been made on the basis of empirical/statistical methods that have proven to be insufficiently robust and accurate to form the basis for the desired inspection/repair protocol. In this paper, we describe a deterministic method for predicting localized corrosion damage. We have used the method to illustrate how pitting corrosion initiates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low pressure steam turbine disks downstream of the Wilson line, where a thin condensed liquid layer exists on the steel disk surfaces. Our calculations show that the SCC initiation and propagation are sensitive to the oxygen content of the steam, the environment in the thin liquid condensed layer, and the stresses that the disk experiences in service.

  7. Socioeconomic factors influencing the failure to measure the blood pressure of children during clinical examinations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewhan; Philips, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The authors measured the percentage of children aged 6 through 17 whose blood pressure (BP) was not measured during recent nonemergency clinical examination and assessed the relative importance of health, ability-to-pay, language, and race-ethnic factors in determining whether BP was measured. Using a pooled dataset from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) for 2006 and 2007, the authors calculated the percentage of children whose BP was not measured using a sample of children aged 6 through 17 and constructed a logistic regression model to estimate the relative importance of health, economic, and social factors in the examiner's decision to measure BP. A total of 28.9% of children did not have their BP measured. Within this unmeasured group, 31% had a family history of hypertension, 9% had a family history of diabetes, and 5% had a body mass index ≥32 kg/m2 . The logistic regression model of examiners' decisions indicates that social and economic factors strongly compete with health factors in determining which children not to measure. While examiners place many children at risk for hypertension in the measured pool, they also place many at-risk children in the unmeasured pool for economic and social reasons.

  8. Bi-modal dose-dependent cardiac response to tetrahydrobiopterin in pressure-overload induced hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Moens, An L; Ketner, Elizabeth A; Takimoto, Eiki; Schmidt, Tim S; O'Neill, Charles A; Wolin, Michael S; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M; Kass, David A

    2011-10-01

    The exogenous administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), has been shown to reduce left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cardiac dysfunction in mice with pre-established heart disease induced by pressure-overload. In this setting, BH4 re-coupled endothelial NOS (eNOS), with subsequent reduction of NOS-dependent oxidative stress and reversal of maladaptive remodeling. However, recent studies suggest the effective BH4 dosing may be narrower than previously thought, potentially due to its oxidation upon oral consumption. Accordingly, we assessed the dose response of daily oral synthetic sapropterin dihydrochloride (6-R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin, 6R-BH4) on pre-established pressure-overload cardiac disease. Mice (n=64) were administered 0-400mg/kg/d BH4 by ingesting small pre-made pellets (consumed over 15-30 min). In a dose range of 36-200mg/kg/d, 6R-BH4 suppressed cardiac chamber remodeling, hypertrophy, fibrosis, and oxidative stress with pressure-overload. However, at both lower and higher doses, BH4 had less or no ameliorative effects. The effective doses correlated with a higher myocardial BH4/BH2 ratio. However, BH2 rose linearly with dose, and at the 400mg/kg/d, this lowered the BH4/BH2 ratio back toward control. These results expose a potential limitation for the clinical use of BH4, as variability of cellular redox and perhaps heart disease could produce a variable therapeutic window among individuals. This article is part of a special issue entitled ''Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.'' PMID:21645517

  9. Adhesion failure behavior of sputtered calcium phosphate thin film coatings evaluated using microscratch testing.

    PubMed

    Toque, J A; Herliansyah, M K; Hamdi, M; Ide-Ektessabi, A; Sopyan, I

    2010-05-01

    It is generally accepted that calcium phosphate (CaP) is one of the most important biomaterials in implant coating applications mainly because of its excellent bioactivity. However, its relatively poor mechanical properties limits its application. This entails that a better understanding of the mechanical properties of a CaP coating is a must especially its behavior and the mechanisms involved when subjected to stresses which eventually lead to failure. The mechanical properties of the coating may be evaluated in terms of its adhesion strength. In this study, a radio frequency-magnetron (RF-MS) sputtering technique was used to deposit CaP thin films on 316L stainless steel (SS). The coatings were subjected to series of microscratch tests, taking careful note of its behavior as the load is applied. The adhesion behavior of the coatings showed varying responses. It was revealed that several coating process-related factors such as thickness, post-heat treatment and deposition parameters, to name a few, affect its scratching behavior. Scratch testing-related factors (i.e. loading rate, scratch speed, scratch load, etc.) were also shown to influence the mechanisms involved in the coating adhesion failure. Evaluation of the load-displacement graph combined with optical inspection of the scratch confirmed that several modes of failure occurred during the scratching process. These include trackside cracking, tensile cracking, radial cracking, buckling, delamination and combinations of one or more modes.

  10. Using simulation to evaluate the performance of resilience strategies and process failures

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Scott N.; Topp, Bryan Embry; Arnold, Dorian C.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Widener, Patrick; Hoefler, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fault-tolerance has been identified as a major challenge for future extreme-scale systems. Current predictions suggest that, as systems grow in size, failures will occur more frequently. Because increases in failure frequency reduce the performance and scalability of these systems, significant effort has been devoted to developing and refining resilience mechanisms to mitigate the impact of failures. However, effective evaluation of these mechanisms has been challenging. Current systems are smaller and have significantly different architectural features (e.g., interconnect, persistent storage) than we expect to see in next-generation systems. To overcome these challenges, we propose the use of simulation. Simulation has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating performance characteristics of applications on future systems. In this work, we: identify the set of system characteristics that are necessary for accurate performance prediction of resilience mechanisms for HPC systems and applications; demonstrate how these system characteristics can be incorporated into an existing large-scale simulator; and evaluate the predictive performance of our modified simulator. We also describe how we were able to optimize the simulator for large temporal and spatial scales-allowing the simulator to run 4x faster and use over 100x less memory.

  11. Evaluation of a new miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.; Maule, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter (tag) was evaluated and field tested as a tool for determining the depths of juvenile salmonids. The tag had an effective radiated power of −19.7 decibels (1 mW reference), dimensions of 23 mm × 7 mm, and a weight of 2.2 g in air. The pulse rate of the tag increased with pressure, resulting in an expected tag life of approximately 11 d at the water surface and 7.5 d at 10.5 m. The tags were accurate to within 16 mm with 95% of observations within ±0.32 m of the true depth. The resolution of the tags was 0.2 m. Errors in indicated depth resulting from differences between the calibration and operating temperatures were minimized by means of a correction factor. Tags surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss indicated a depth 0.2 m less than the same tags in water. This difference was not affected by pressure or temperature and was rectified by adjusting data from tags in fish. A test tag in a Columbia River reservoir was detected from distances of 1,133 m at a depth of 2 m and 148 m at a depth of 14 m. Results ind

  12. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  13. SPH calculations of asteroid disruptions: The role of pressure dependent failure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present recent improvements of the modeling of the disruption of strength dominated bodies using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The improvements include an updated strength model and a friction model, which are successfully tested by a comparison with laboratory experiments. In the modeling of catastrophic disruptions of asteroids, a comparison between old and new strength models shows no significant deviation in the case of targets which are initially non-porous, fully intact and have a homogeneous structure (such as the targets used in the study by Benz and Asphaug, 1999). However, for many cases (e.g. initially partly or fully damaged targets and rubble-pile structures) we find that it is crucial that friction is taken into account and the material has a pressure dependent shear strength. Our investigations of the catastrophic disruption threshold Q D * as a function of target properties and target sizes up to a few 100 km show that a fully damaged target modeled without friction has a Q D * which is significantly (5-10 times) smaller than in the case where friction is included. When the effect of the energy dissipation due to compaction (pore crushing) is taken into account as well, the targets become even stronger ( Q D * is increased by a factor of 2-3). On the other hand, cohesion is found to have an negligible effect at large scales and is only important at scales ≲ 1 km. Our results show the relative effects of strength, friction and porosity on the outcome of collisions among small (≲ 1000 km) bodies. These results will be used in a future study to improve existing scaling laws for the outcome of collisions (e.g. Leinhardt and Stewart, 2012).

  14. Technical evaluation: pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S A; Vogel, G J; Gehl, S M; Hanway, Jr, J E; Henry, R F; Parker, K M; Smyk, E B; Swift, W M; Podolski, W F

    1982-04-01

    The technology of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, particularly in its application to a coal-burning combined-cycle plant, is evaluated by examining the technical status of advanced-concept plant components - boiler system (combustor, air-handling and air-injection equipment, and heat exchangers); solids handling, injection, and ejection system; hot-gas cleanup equipment; instrumentation/control system; and the gas turbine - along with materials of plant construction. Environmental performance as well as energy efficiency are examined, and economic considerations are reviewed briefly. The evaluation concludes with a broad survey of the principal related research and development programs in the United States and other countries, a foreview of the most likely technological developments, and a summary of unresolved technical issues and problems.

  15. Evaluating the risk of water distribution system failure: A shared frailty model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Thurnau, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    Condition assessment (CA) Modeling is drawing increasing interest as a technique that can assist in managing drinking water infrastructure. This paper develops a model based on the application of a Cox proportional hazard (PH)/shared frailty model and applies it to evaluating the risk of failure in drinking water networks using data from the Laramie Water Utility (located in Laramie, Wyoming, USA). Using the risk model a cost/ benefit analysis incorporating the inspection value method (IVM), is used to assist in making improved repair, replacement and rehabilitation decisions for selected drinking water distribution system pipes. A separate model is developed to predict failures in prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). Various currently available inspection technologies are presented and discussed.

  16. The development of a risk of failure evaluation tool for small dams in Mzingwane Catchment, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufute, N. L.; Senzanje, A.; Kaseke, E.

    Small dams in Mzingwane Catchment in southern Zimbabwe are mostly in poor physical condition mainly due to lack of resources for repair and maintenance. Most of these dams are likely to fail thereby adversely affecting water availability and livelihoods in the area. To assist those involved in maintenance, repair and rehabilitation of small dams in resource poor and data sparse areas such as Mzingwane Catchment, a non-probabilistic but numerical risk of failure evaluation tool was developed. The tool helps to systematically, and objectively classify risk of failure of small dams, hence assist in the ranking of dams to prioritise and attend to first. This is important where resources are limited. The tool makes use of factors such as seepage, erosion and others that are traditionally used to assess condition of dams. In the development of the tool, an assessment of the physical condition of 44 (1 medium sized and 43 small dams) dams was done and the factors were identified and listed according to guidelines for design and maintenance of small dams. The description of the extent to which the factors affect the physical condition of small dams was then standardised. This was mainly guided by standard based and risk-based approaches to dam safety evaluation. Cause-effect diagrams were used to determine the stage at which each factor is involved in contributing to dam failure. Weights were then allocated to each factor depending on its stage or level in the process of causing dam failure. Scores were allocated to each factor based on its description and weight. Small dams design and maintenance guidelines were also used to guide the ranking and weighting of the factors. The tool was used to classify 10 dams. The risk of failure was low for one dam, moderate for one, high for four and very high for four dams, two of which had already failed. It was concluded that the tool could be used to rank the risk of failure of small dams in semi-arid areas. The tool needs to be

  17. The effects of 17-methoxyl-7-hydroxy-benzene-furanchalcone on the pressure overload-induced progression of cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianchun; Tang, XiaoJun; Liang, Xingmei; Wen, Qingwei; Zhang, Shijun; Xuan, Feifei; Jian, Jie; Lin, Xing; Huang, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 17-methoxyl-7-hydroxy-benzene-furanchalcone (MHBFC), which was isolated from the roots of Millettia pulchra (Benth.) Kurz var. Laxior (Dunn) Z.Wei (Papilionaceae) (MKL), on the progression of cardiac hypertrophy to failure in a rat model of abdominal aortic banding (AAB)-induced pressure overloading. Endothelial dysfunction is central to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and failure. It would be useful to clarify whether MHBFC could prevent this dysfunction. The effects of pressure overload were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats 6 weeks after AAB using the progression of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure as the endpoint. The AAB-treated rats exhibited a greater progression to heart failure and had significantly elevated blood pressure, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). LVH was characterized by increases in the ratios of heart and left ventricular weights to body weight, increased myocyte cross-sectional areas, myocardial and perivascular fibrosis, and elevated cardiac hydroxyproline. These symptoms could be prevented by treatment with MHBFC at daily oral doses of 6 and 12 mg/kg for 6 weeks. The progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by increases in relative lung and right ventricular weights, cardiac function disorders and overexpression of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) mRNA, could also be prevented. Furthermore, MHBFC partialy rescued the downregulated nitric oxide signaling system, whereas inhibited the upregulated endothelin signaling system, normalizing the balance between these two systems. MHBFC protected the endothelium and prevented the pressure overload-induced progression of cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac failure. PMID:24622486

  18. The Effects of 17-Methoxyl-7-Hydroxy-Benzene-Furanchalcone on the Pressure Overload-Induced Progression of Cardiac Hypertrophy to Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xingmei; Wen, Qingwei; Zhang, Shijun; Xuan, Feifei; Jian, Jie; Lin, Xing; Huang, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 17-methoxyl-7-hydroxy-benzene-furanchalcone (MHBFC), which was isolated from the roots of Millettia pulchra (Benth.) Kurz var. Laxior (Dunn) Z.Wei (Papilionaceae) (MKL), on the progression of cardiac hypertrophy to failure in a rat model of abdominal aortic banding (AAB)-induced pressure overloading. Endothelial dysfunction is central to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and failure. It would be useful to clarify whether MHBFC could prevent this dysfunction. The effects of pressure overload were assessed in male Sprague–Dawley rats 6 weeks after AAB using the progression of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure as the endpoint. The AAB-treated rats exhibited a greater progression to heart failure and had significantly elevated blood pressure, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). LVH was characterized by increases in the ratios of heart and left ventricular weights to body weight, increased myocyte cross-sectional areas, myocardial and perivascular fibrosis, and elevated cardiac hydroxyproline. These symptoms could be prevented by treatment with MHBFC at daily oral doses of 6 and 12 mg/kg for 6 weeks. The progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by increases in relative lung and right ventricular weights, cardiac function disorders and overexpression of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) mRNA, could also be prevented. Furthermore, MHBFC partialy rescued the downregulated nitric oxide signaling system, whereas inhibited the upregulated endothelin signaling system, normalizing the balance between these two systems. MHBFC protected the endothelium and prevented the pressure overload-induced progression of cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac failure. PMID:24622486

  19. EVALUATION OF THE FAILURE OF A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINE JACKET

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; Alan03 Plummer, A; Karthik Subramanian, K; Charles Jenkins, C; William Hinz, W; A Fellinger, A

    2007-04-06

    Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste is transported between tanks primarily via an underground transfer piping system. Due to the hazardous nature of the waste, the inner core stainless steel pipe is typically surrounded by a carbon steel pipe jacket, which provides secondary containment. Recently several through-wall penetrations were discovered on a segment of one of the jackets. An evaluation was performed to verify the failure mechanism and to estimate the degree of damage that occurred to the pipe segment. Failure analysis of a section of the jacket confirmed that pitting corrosion on the exterior of the pipe led to the through-wall penetration. Ultrasonic measurements on sections of the pipe were utilized to determine the remaining wall thickness in adjacent areas of the pipe. Based on these measurements, the degree of pitting and general corrosion was determined. Pit growth rate models were then developed to estimate the life expectancy of sections of the pipe that had not been excavated. The calculations estimated that the occurrence of through-wall failures in this jacket will begin to increase substantially in 12 years. Given that this pipe segment will be utilized beyond this time, short-term and long-term solutions to this failure were proposed. The short-term solutions focused on the repair or replace decisions that must be made to return the jacket to service as soon as practical. The long-term solutions focused on a broader strategy to address jacket integrity issues in the entire tank farm facility. These solutions included the evaluation of innovative remote inspection and repair techniques.

  20. Evaluation of assisted positive pressure breathing on +Gz tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shaffstall, R M; Burton, R R

    1979-08-01

    The effect of both assisted and unassisted positive pressure (PPB) breathing on +Gz tolerance was evaluated. A GOR (gradual onset rate = 0.1 G/s) acceleration profile was used to evaluate five different experimental conditions: 1) G-suit-only, 2) G suit + unassisted PPB, 3) G suit + PPB assisted by the English jerkin, 4) G suit + PPB assisted by the Canadian waistcoat, and 5) the Swedish counterpressure garment G suit combination. Acceleration tolerances for these experimental conditions (excluding the Swedish garment) with the subjects performing M-1 maneuvers were measured using an exhaustive ACM (Aerial Combat Maneuvers) acceleration profile. GOR tolerances were similar for both assisted and unassisted PPB with the pressure breathing experimental conditions providing a significant GOR tolerance increase over the G suit only condition. Assisted PPB increased ACM tolerances over both unassisted PPB and G suit only conditions. It appears that assisted PPB may offer a practical method for reducing the fatigue associated with exposure to high G.

  1. Become the PPUPET Master: Mastering Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment With the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

    PubMed

    Sterken, David J; Mooney, JoAnn; Ropele, Diana; Kett, Alysha; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) are serious, debilitating, and preventable complications in all inpatient populations. Despite evidence of the development of pressure ulcers in the pediatric population, minimal research has been done. Based on observations gathered during quarterly HAPU audits, bedside nursing staff recognized trends in pressure ulcer locations that were not captured using current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools. Together, bedside nurses and nursing leadership created and conducted multiple research studies to investigate the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Prediction and Evaluation Tool (PPUPET).

  2. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  3. How is success or failure in river restoration projects evaluated? Feedback from French restoration projects.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Bertrand; Piégay, Hervé; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Vaudor, Lise

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1990s, French operational managers and scientists have been involved in the environmental restoration of rivers. The European Water Framework Directive (2000) highlights the need for feedback from restoration projects and for evidence-based evaluation of success. Based on 44 French pilot projects that included such an evaluation, the present study includes: 1) an introduction to restoration projects based on their general characteristics 2) a description of evaluation strategies and authorities in charge of their implementation, and 3) a focus on the evaluation of results and the links between these results and evaluation strategies. The results show that: 1) the quality of an evaluation strategy often remains too poor to understand well the link between a restoration project and ecological changes; 2) in many cases, the conclusions drawn are contradictory, making it difficult to determine the success or failure of a restoration project; and 3) the projects with the poorest evaluation strategies generally have the most positive conclusions about the effects of restoration. Recommendations are that evaluation strategies should be designed early in the project planning process and be based on clearly-defined objectives.

  4. Endothelial p53 Deletion Improves Angiogenesis and Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis and Heart Failure Induced by Pressure Overload in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Xu, Xingbo; Bochenek, Magdalena L.; Steinbrecher, Julia H.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Wenzel, Philip; Kessel, Michael; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M.; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Schäfer, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction developing in response to chronic pressure overload is associated with apoptotic cell death and myocardial vessel rarefaction. We examined whether deletion of tumor suppressor p53 in endothelial cells may prevent the transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. Methods and Results Mice with endothelial‐specific deletion of p53 (End.p53‐KO) were generated by crossing p53fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of an inducible Tie2 promoter. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction. Serial echocardiography measurements revealed improved cardiac function in End.p53‐KO mice that also exhibited better survival. Cardiac hypertrophy was associated with increased p53 levels in End.p53‐WT controls, whereas banded hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited lower numbers of apoptotic endothelial and non‐endothelial cells and altered mRNA levels of genes regulating cell cycle progression (p21), apoptosis (Puma), or proliferation (Pcna). A higher cardiac capillary density and improved myocardial perfusion was observed, and pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of p53 also promoted endothelial sprouting in vitro and new vessel formation following hindlimb ischemia in vivo. Hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited markedly less fibrosis compared with End.p53‐WT controls, and lower mRNA levels of p53‐regulated genes involved in extracellular matrix production and turnover (eg, Bmp‐7, Ctgf, or Pai‐1), or of transcription factors involved in controlling mesenchymal differentiation were observed. Conclusions Our analyses reveal that accumulation of p53 in endothelial cells contributes to blood vessel rarefaction and fibrosis during chronic cardiac pressure overload and suggest that endothelial cells may be a therapeutic target for preserving cardiac function during hypertrophy. PMID:25713289

  5. Competitive evaluation of failure detection algorithms for strapdown redundant inertial instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Algorithms for failure detection, isolation, and correction of redundant inertial instruments in the strapdown dodecahedron configuration are competitively evaluated in a digital computer simulation that subjects them to identical environments. Their performance is compared in terms of orientation and inertial velocity errors and in terms of missed and false alarms. The algorithms appear in the simulation program in modular form, so that they may be readily extracted for use elsewhere. The simulation program and its inputs and outputs are described. The algorithms, along with an eight algorithm that was not simulated, also compared analytically to show the relationships among them.

  6. Pore pressure regime leading to shallow failures in a mountain slope: monitoring and interpretation by soil-atmosphere coupled model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaunat, Jean; Hürlimann, Marcel; Luna, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The study deals with the onset of debris flows in the "El Rebaixader" basin, located in South Central Pyrenees. The initiation area of debris flows is located on a lateral moraine with a thickness of tens of meters, in which torrential processes and other shallow mass movements have generated a large scarp with steep slopes. To follow slope evolution towards shallow failure, different sensors have been installed to monitor meteorological data and hydraulic variables at shallow depths (positive and negative pore pressure, water content). Measurements are interpreted by means of a thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled Finite Element code provided with a specific boundary condition to model water mass and heat flux exchanged between the ground and the atmosphere, including infiltration, evaporation, sensible heat and solar radiation. Results evidence the different modes of pore regime variation imposed, on the one hand, by surface infiltration and evaporation and, on the other hand, by the settlement of a slope parallel flow in a loose layer at some decimetres depth. As a conclusion, the analysis highlights the strong dependency of slope stability to the water regime taking place in slightly more permeable horizons connected to the top of the catchment area rather than to surficial climatic input. On this basis, some keys about debris flow mitigation are finally put forward.

  7. UQ and V&V techniques applied to experiments and simulations of heated pipes pressurized to failure.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Vicente Jose; Dempsey, J. Franklin; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2014-05-01

    This report demonstrates versatile and practical model validation and uncertainty quantification techniques applied to the accuracy assessment of a computational model of heated steel pipes pressurized to failure. The Real Space validation methodology segregates aleatory and epistemic uncertainties to form straightforward model validation metrics especially suited for assessing models to be used in the analysis of performance and safety margins. The methodology handles difficulties associated with representing and propagating interval and/or probabilistic uncertainties from multiple correlated and uncorrelated sources in the experiments and simulations including: material variability characterized by non-parametric random functions (discrete temperature dependent stress-strain curves); very limited (sparse) experimental data at the coupon testing level for material characterization and at the pipe-test validation level; boundary condition reconstruction uncertainties from spatially sparse sensor data; normalization of pipe experimental responses for measured input-condition differences among tests and for random and systematic uncertainties in measurement/processing/inference of experimental inputs and outputs; numerical solution uncertainty from model discretization and solver effects.

  8. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  9. Evaluation of a Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Wang, John T.

    1997-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis methodology has been developed for predicting the nonlinear response and failure of laminated composite structures. The progressive failure analysis uses C plate and shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms. The progressive failure analysis model is implemented into a general purpose finite element code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure.

  10. Evaluating the Phoenix Definition of Biochemical Failure After {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy: Can PSA Kinetics Distinguish PSA Failures From PSA Bounces?

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Anna; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics of PSA failure (PSAf) and PSA bounce (PSAb) after permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy (PB). Methods and Materials: The study included 1,006 consecutive low and 'low tier' intermediate-risk patients treated with {sup 125}I PB, with a potential minimum follow-up of 4 years. Patients who met the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL{sup -1}) were identified. If the PSA subsequently fell to {<=}0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}without intervention, this was considered a PSAb. All others were scored as true PSAf. Patient, tumor and dosimetric characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test and analysis of variance to evaluate factors associated with PSAf or PSAb. Results: Median follow-up was 54 months. Of the 1,006 men, 57 patients triggered the Phoenix definition of PSA failure, 32 (56%) were true PSAf, and 25 PSAb (44%). The median time to trigger nadir + 2 was 20.6 months (range, 6-36) vs. 49 mo (range, 12-83) for PSAb vs. PSAf groups (p < 0.001). The PSAb patients were significantly younger (p < 0.0001), had shorter time to reach the nadir (median 6 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.001) and had a shorter PSA doubling time (p = 0.05). Men younger than age 70 who trigger nadir +2 PSA failure within 38 months of implant have an 80% likelihood of having PSAb and 20% chance of PSAf. Conclusions: With adequate follow-up, 44% of PSA failures by the Phoenix definition in our cohort were found to be benign PSA bounces. Our study reinforces the need for adequate follow-up when reporting PB PSA outcomes, to ensure accurate estimates of treatment efficacy and to avoid unnecessary secondary interventions.

  11. Evaluating Failures and near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Studies done in the past have drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents can be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Binary pass/fail launch history is often used for risk, but this also has limitations. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. This paper intends to show how near-miss lessons learned can provide crucial data for any new human spaceflight programs that are interested in sending man into space

  12. Evaluating Failures and Near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2010-09-01

    Studies done in the past have drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents can be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Binary pass/fail launch history is often used for risk, but this also has limitations. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. This paper intends to show how near-miss lessons learned can provide crucial data for any new human spaceflight programs that are interested in sending man into space.

  13. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  14. Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for 'collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel J; McLeod, Damian D; Logan, Caitlin L; Murtha, Lucy A; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; van Helden, Dirk F; Spratt, Neil J

    2015-05-01

    Recent human imaging studies indicate that reduced blood flow through pial collateral vessels ('collateral failure') is associated with late infarct expansion despite stable arterial occlusion. The cause for 'collateral failure' is unknown. We recently showed that intracranial pressure (ICP) rises dramatically but transiently 24 hours after even minor experimental stroke. We hypothesized that ICP elevation would reduce collateral blood flow. First, we investigated the regulation of flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles arising from them during stroke reperfusion. Wistar rats were subjected to intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAo). Individual pial collateral and associated penetrating arteriole blood flow was quantified using fluorescent microspheres. Baseline bidirectional flow changed to MCA-directed flow and increased by >450% immediately after MCAo. Collateral diameter changed minimally. Second, we determined the effect of ICP elevation on collateral and watershed penetrating arteriole flow. Intracranial pressure was artificially raised in stepwise increments during MCAo. The ICP increase was strongly correlated with collateral and penetrating arteriole flow reductions. Changes in collateral flow post-stroke appear to be primarily driven by the pressure drop across the collateral vessel, not vessel diameter. The ICP elevation reduces cerebral perfusion pressure and collateral flow, and is the possible explanation for 'collateral failure' in stroke-in-progression.

  15. Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for 'collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel J; McLeod, Damian D; Logan, Caitlin L; Murtha, Lucy A; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; van Helden, Dirk F; Spratt, Neil J

    2015-05-01

    Recent human imaging studies indicate that reduced blood flow through pial collateral vessels ('collateral failure') is associated with late infarct expansion despite stable arterial occlusion. The cause for 'collateral failure' is unknown. We recently showed that intracranial pressure (ICP) rises dramatically but transiently 24 hours after even minor experimental stroke. We hypothesized that ICP elevation would reduce collateral blood flow. First, we investigated the regulation of flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles arising from them during stroke reperfusion. Wistar rats were subjected to intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAo). Individual pial collateral and associated penetrating arteriole blood flow was quantified using fluorescent microspheres. Baseline bidirectional flow changed to MCA-directed flow and increased by >450% immediately after MCAo. Collateral diameter changed minimally. Second, we determined the effect of ICP elevation on collateral and watershed penetrating arteriole flow. Intracranial pressure was artificially raised in stepwise increments during MCAo. The ICP increase was strongly correlated with collateral and penetrating arteriole flow reductions. Changes in collateral flow post-stroke appear to be primarily driven by the pressure drop across the collateral vessel, not vessel diameter. The ICP elevation reduces cerebral perfusion pressure and collateral flow, and is the possible explanation for 'collateral failure' in stroke-in-progression. PMID:25669909

  16. Intracranial pressure elevation reduces flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles they supply. A possible explanation for ‘collateral failure' and infarct expansion after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Daniel J; McLeod, Damian D; Logan, Caitlin L; Murtha, Lucy A; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; van Helden, Dirk F; Spratt, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Recent human imaging studies indicate that reduced blood flow through pial collateral vessels (‘collateral failure') is associated with late infarct expansion despite stable arterial occlusion. The cause for ‘collateral failure' is unknown. We recently showed that intracranial pressure (ICP) rises dramatically but transiently 24 hours after even minor experimental stroke. We hypothesized that ICP elevation would reduce collateral blood flow. First, we investigated the regulation of flow through collateral vessels and the penetrating arterioles arising from them during stroke reperfusion. Wistar rats were subjected to intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAo). Individual pial collateral and associated penetrating arteriole blood flow was quantified using fluorescent microspheres. Baseline bidirectional flow changed to MCA-directed flow and increased by >450% immediately after MCAo. Collateral diameter changed minimally. Second, we determined the effect of ICP elevation on collateral and watershed penetrating arteriole flow. Intracranial pressure was artificially raised in stepwise increments during MCAo. The ICP increase was strongly correlated with collateral and penetrating arteriole flow reductions. Changes in collateral flow post-stroke appear to be primarily driven by the pressure drop across the collateral vessel, not vessel diameter. The ICP elevation reduces cerebral perfusion pressure and collateral flow, and is the possible explanation for ‘collateral failure' in stroke-in-progression. PMID:25669909

  17. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  18. Connective tissue growth factor inhibition attenuates left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in pressure overload-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán; Magga, Johanna; Alakoski, Tarja; Ulvila, Johanna; Piuhola, Jarkko; Vainio, Laura; Kivirikko, Kari I; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Lipson, Kenneth E; Signore, Pierre; Kerkelä, Risto

    2014-06-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is involved in the pathogenesis of various fibrotic disorders. However, its role in the heart is not clear. To investigate the role of CTGF in regulating the development of cardiac fibrosis and heart failure, we subjected mice to thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) or angiotensin II infusion, and antagonized the function of CTGF with CTGF monoclonal antibody (mAb). After 8 weeks of TAC, mice treated with CTGF mAb had significantly better preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function and reduced LV dilatation compared with mice treated with control immunoglobulin G. CTGF mAb-treated mice exhibited significantly smaller cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and reduced expression of hypertrophic marker genes. CTGF mAb treatment reduced the TAC-induced production of collagen 1 but did not significantly attenuate TAC-induced accumulation of interstitial fibrosis. Analysis of genes regulating extracellular matrix proteolysis showed decreased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in mice treated with CTGF mAb. In contrast to TAC, antagonizing the function of CTGF had no effect on LV dysfunction or LV hypertrophy in mice subjected to 4-week angiotensin II infusion. Further analysis showed that angiotensin II-induced expression of hypertrophic marker genes or collagens was not affected by treatment with CTGF mAb. In conclusion, CTGF mAb protects from adverse LV remodeling and LV dysfunction in hearts subjected to pressure overload by TAC. Antagonizing the function of CTGF may offer protection from cardiac end-organ damage in patients with hypertension.

  19. Systolic blood pressure response to exercise as a predictor of mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Morita, Hirohiko; Harada, Haruhito; Katoh, Atsushi; Adachi, Hisashi; Koga, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Hisao

    2010-03-01

    It is well known that peak oxygen consumption and heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise obtained from the cardiopulmonary exercise test are prognostic parameters in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is unclear whether exercise-induced parameters obtained from the routine exercise stress test predict mortality in patients with CHF. We studied 136 patients (93 males/43 females) with CHF. All patients underwent symptom-limited exercise stress testing. Exercise parameters included exercise duration, exercise-induced HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP), and metabolic equivalents (METs). During the follow-up period (mean 6.2 years), 34 patients died. Survival rates at the 3rd and 5th years were 90% and 83%, respectively. Body mass index was significantly smaller in the nonsurvival group than in the survival group (P < 0.01). The incidence of patients with New York Heart Association III class was higher in the nonsurvival group than in the survival group (P < 0.05). In univariate analysis, predictors of mortality included peak HR and SBP, increases in HR and SBP during exercise, HR and SBP at the 1st minute after exercise, HR at the 3rd minute after exercise, and METs. The use of beta-adrenergic blocking agents was not associated with prognosis. In Cox hazard model analysis, the increase in SBP (P < 0.002), HR at the 3rd minute after exercise (P < 0.05), and METs (P < 0.05) were independent predictors of mortality. SBP response to exercise, HR recovery after exercise, and METs obtained from the routine exercise test predicted mortality in patients with CHF irrespective of the use of beta-adrenergic blocking agents.

  20. Evaluation of a strain based failure criterion for the multi-constituent composite model under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.; Alexander, C. Scott

    2015-09-01

    This study details and demonstrates a strain-based criterion for the prediction of polymer matrix composite material damage and failure under shock loading conditions. Shock loading conditions are characterized by high-speed impacts or explosive events that result in very high pressures in the materials involved. These material pressures can reach hundreds of kbar and often exceed the material strengths by several orders of magnitude. Researchers have shown that under these high pressures, composites exhibit significant increases in stiffness and strength. In this work we summarize modifications to a previous stress based interactive failure criterion based on the model initially proposed by Hashin, to include strain dependence. The failure criterion is combined with the multi-constituent composite constitutive model (MCM) within a shock physics hydrocode. The constitutive model allows for decomposition of the composite stress and strain fields into the individual phase averaged constituent level stress and strain fields, which are then applied to the failure criterion. Numerical simulations of a metallic sphere impacting carbon/epoxy composite plates at velocities up to 1000 m/s are performed using both the stress and strain based criterion. These simulation results are compared to experimental tests to illustrate the advantages of a strain-based criterion in the shock environment.

  1. Design, fabrication and metrological evaluation of wearable pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Goy, C B; Menichetti, V; Yanicelli, L M; Lucero, J B; López, M A Gómez; Parodi, N F; Herrera, M C

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sensors are valuable transducers that are necessary in a huge number of medical application. However, the state of the art of compact and lightweight pressure sensors with the capability of measuring the contact pressure between two surfaces (contact pressure sensors) is very poor. In this work, several types of wearable contact pressure sensors are fabricated using different conductive textile materials and piezo-resistive films. The fabricated sensors differ in size, the textile conductor used and/or the number of layers of the sandwiched piezo-resistive film. The intention is to study, through the obtaining of their calibration curves, their metrological properties (repeatability, sensitivity and range) and determine which physical characteristics improve their ability for measuring contact pressures. It has been found that it is possible to obtain wearable contact pressure sensors through the proposed fabrication process with satisfactory repeatability, range and sensitivity; and that some of these properties can be improved by the physical characteristics of the sensors.

  2. Evaluating Failures and Near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    There have been a number of studies done in the past drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. Generally, the systemic causes and proximate causes for fatal events have both been examined in considerable detail. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents and failures that narrowly missed being fatal could be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Additionally, review of risk factors for upcoming or future programs will often look at trending statistics, generally focusing on failure/success statistics. Unfortunately, doing so can give a skewed or misleading view of past reliability or a reliability that cannot be presumed to apply to a new program. One reason for this might be that failure/success criteria aren't the same across programs, but also that apparent success can hide systemic faults that, under other circumstances, can be fatal to a program with different parameters. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure and provide very misleading data if it is not examined in detail. This is particularly true for a manned space program where failure/success includes more than making a particular orbit. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. Even more importantly, a thorough understanding of these near miss events can identify conditions that prevented fatalities. Those conditions may be key to a programs reliability, but, without insight to the repercussions if such conditions were not in place, their importance may not be readily clear. As programs mature and political and fiscal responsibilities come to the fore, often there is considerable incentive to eliminate unnecessary

  3. Evaluation of marginal failures of dental composite restorations by acoustic emission analysis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ja-Uk; Choi, Nak-Sam

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a nondestructive method based on acoustic emission (AE) analysis was developed to evaluate the marginal failure states of dental composite restorations. Three types of ring-shaped substrates, which were modeled after a Class I cavity, were prepared from polymethyl methacrylate, stainless steel, and human molar teeth. A bonding agent and a composite resin were applied to the ring-shaped substrates and cured by light exposure. At each time-interval measurement, the tooth substrate presented a higher number of AE hits than polymethyl methacrylate and steel substrates. Marginal disintegration estimations derived from cumulative AE hits and cumulative AE energy parameters showed that a signification portion of marginal gap formation was already realized within 1 min at the initial light-curing stage. Estimation based on cumulative AE energy gave a higher level of marginal failure than that based on AE hits. It was concluded that the AE analysis method developed in this study was a viable approach in predicting the clinical survival of dental composite restorations efficiently within a short test period.

  4. Failure Potential Evaluation in Engineering Experiments Using Load/Unload Response Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lang-ping; Yu, Huai-zhong; Yin, Xiang-chu

    2013-01-01

    The Load/Unload Response Ratio (LURR) method is proposed for prediction of the failure of brittle heterogeneous materials. Application of the method typically involves evaluating the external load on materials or structures, differentiating between loading and unloading periods, determining the failure response during both periods from data input, and calculating the ratio between the two response rates. According to the method, the LURR time series usually climbs to an anomalously high peak prior to the macro-fracture. To show the validity of the approach in engineering practice, we applied it to the loading and unloading experimental data associated with a two-floor concrete-brick structure. Results show that the LURR time series of the two floors consists of the damage evolution of the structure: they are at low level for most of the time, and reach the maxima prior to the final fracture. We then attempt to combine the LURR values with damage variable ( D) to provide the health assessment of the structure. The relationship between LURR and D, defined as a function of Weibull stochastic distribution, is set up to provide more detailed underlying physical means to study damage evolution of the structure. The fact that the damage evolution of the structure correlates well with the variation of LURR time series may suggest that the LURR approach can be severed as a useful tool to provide the health assessment to big scale structures or ancient buildings.

  5. Studies and analyses of the Space Shuttle Main Engine: SSME failure data review, diagnostic survey and SSME diagnostic evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, R. C.; Kelley, B. A.; Tischer, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a review of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) failure data for the period 1980 through 1983 are presented. The data was collected, evaluated, and ranked according to procedures established during this study. A number of conclusions and recommendations are made based upon this failure data review. The results of a state-of-the-art diagnostic survey are also presented. This survey covered a broad range of diagnostic sensors and techniques and the findings were evaluated for application to the SSME. Finally, a discussion of the initial activities for the on-going SSME diagnostic evaluation is included.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  7. [Echocardiographic evaluation of systolic left ventricular function in heart failure: value of alternative parameters for determination of ejection fraction].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, V; Dittrich, H D; Busch, R

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of the left ventricular ejection fraction plays a key role in the echocardiographic diagnosis of heart failure. The parameter most commonly used is the ejection fraction computed with the biplane disc summation method of Simpson; however, there are numerous limitations to this method, such as the assumption of geometrical symmetry, a substantial intraobserver and interobserver variability, foreshortening of the left ventricle and insufficient image quality for endocardial tracking. Alternative parameters for the evaluation of left ventricular function should be taken into consideration. Speckle tracking echocardiography has proven to be a reliable prognostic factor and a good tool for differentiating cardiomyopathies. Simple measurements, which are also feasible with poor image quality, are mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) and the velocity of mitral annular movement (Sm or S'). In mitral regurgitation, left ventricular dP/dt represents the time to build up a certain pressure gradient and is therefore a measure of the contractile force exerted. Three-dimensional echocardiography has proven to be an important tool not only for three-dimensional measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction but also for multivectoral speckle tracking analysis.

  8. Evaluation of Genotoxic Pressure along the Sava River

    PubMed Central

    Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Simonović, Predrag; Simić, Vladica; Milošković, Aleksandra; Reischer, Georg; Farnleitner, Andreas; Gačić, Zoran; Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Vidmar, Janja; Pergal, Marija; Piria, Marina; Paunović, Momir; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have performed a comprehensive genotoxicological survey along the 900 rkm of the Sava River. In total, 12 sites were chosen in compliance with the goals of GLOBAQUA project dealing with the effects of multiple stressors on biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The genotoxic potential was assessed using a complex battery of bioassays performed in prokaryotes and aquatic eukaryotes (freshwater fish). Battery comprised evaluation of mutagenicity by SOS/umuC test in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The level of DNA damage as a biomarker of exposure (comet assay) and biomarker of effect (micronucleus assay) and the level of oxidative stress as well (Fpg—modified comet assay) was studied in blood cells of bleak and spirlin (Alburnus alburnus/Alburnoides bipunctatus respectively). Result indicated differential sensitivity of applied bioassays in detection of genotoxic pressure. The standard and Fpg—modified comet assay showed higher potential in differentiation of the sites based on genotoxic potential in comparison with micronucleus assay and SOS/umuC test. Our data represent snapshot of the current status of the river which indicates the presence of genotoxic potential along the river which can be traced to the deterioration of quality of the Sava River by communal and industrial wastewaters. The major highlight of the study is that we have provided complex set of data obtained from a single source (homogeneity of analyses for all samples). PMID:27631093

  9. Evaluation of Genotoxic Pressure along the Sava River.

    PubMed

    Kolarević, Stoimir; Aborgiba, Mustafa; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Simonović, Predrag; Simić, Vladica; Milošković, Aleksandra; Reischer, Georg; Farnleitner, Andreas; Gačić, Zoran; Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Vidmar, Janja; Pergal, Marija; Piria, Marina; Paunović, Momir; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have performed a comprehensive genotoxicological survey along the 900 rkm of the Sava River. In total, 12 sites were chosen in compliance with the goals of GLOBAQUA project dealing with the effects of multiple stressors on biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The genotoxic potential was assessed using a complex battery of bioassays performed in prokaryotes and aquatic eukaryotes (freshwater fish). Battery comprised evaluation of mutagenicity by SOS/umuC test in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The level of DNA damage as a biomarker of exposure (comet assay) and biomarker of effect (micronucleus assay) and the level of oxidative stress as well (Fpg-modified comet assay) was studied in blood cells of bleak and spirlin (Alburnus alburnus/Alburnoides bipunctatus respectively). Result indicated differential sensitivity of applied bioassays in detection of genotoxic pressure. The standard and Fpg-modified comet assay showed higher potential in differentiation of the sites based on genotoxic potential in comparison with micronucleus assay and SOS/umuC test. Our data represent snapshot of the current status of the river which indicates the presence of genotoxic potential along the river which can be traced to the deterioration of quality of the Sava River by communal and industrial wastewaters. The major highlight of the study is that we have provided complex set of data obtained from a single source (homogeneity of analyses for all samples). PMID:27631093

  10. Comparative clinical evaluation of Boerhavia diffusa root extract with standard Enalapril treatment in Canine chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Oburai, Nethaji Lokeswar; Rao, V. Vaikunta; Bonath, Ram Babu Naik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complementing herbal drugs with conservative modern treatment could improve renal condition in canine chronic renal failure (CRF). Objective: In this study, clinical evaluation of Boerhavia diffusa root extract was carried out in CRF in dogs in comparison with standard enalapril. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 dogs of mixed breeds suffering from CRF from 1 to 2 months were divided into two groups (n = 10) and treated as follows: Group I - Enalapril at 0.5 mg/kg p.o. once daily for 90 days + amoxicillin and cloxacillin at 25 mg/kg i.m. once daily for 1-week; Group II - B. diffusa root extract at 500 mg p.o per dog daily for 90 days. Both groups were maintained on a supportive fluid therapy. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's post-hoc test. Results: CRF caused a significant (P < 0.05) increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, urinary protein, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and glutamyl transferase (GGT). A significant (P < 0.05) decrease in hemoglobin and total erythrocyte count (TEC) was also observed. Nephrosonography revealed indistinct corticomedullary junction, altered renal architecture, hyper-echoic cortex, medulla, and sunken kidneys. Both the treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by day 30. Serum Creatinine, urea nitrogen, phosphorus, urinary protein, ALP, and GGT showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction by day 60 in both the treatments. However, potassium levels were normalized only by B. diffusa root extract treatment by day 30. Both the treatments failed to show a significant improvement in nephrosonographic picture even after 90 days posttreatment. Conclusion: In conclusion, the efficacy of B. diffusa root extract was comparable to standard enalapril treatment of CRF in dogs. PMID:26604549

  11. 14 CFR 25.841 - Pressurized cabins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... feet after any probable failure condition in the pressurization system. (2) The airplane must be...) Fuselage structure, engine and system failures are to be considered in evaluating the cabin decompression... after decompression from any failure condition not shown to be extremely improbable: (i)...

  12. Risk assessment of turbine rotor failure using probabilistic ultrasonic non-destructive evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xuefei; Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub; Abbasi, Waheed A.

    2014-02-18

    The study presents a method and application of risk assessment methodology for turbine rotor fatigue failure using probabilistic ultrasonic nondestructive evaluations. A rigorous probabilistic modeling for ultrasonic flaw sizing is developed by incorporating the model-assisted probability of detection, and the probability density function (PDF) of the actual flaw size is derived. Two general scenarios, namely the ultrasonic inspection with an identified flaw indication and the ultrasonic inspection without flaw indication, are considered in the derivation. To perform estimations for fatigue reliability and remaining useful life, uncertainties from ultrasonic flaw sizing and fatigue model parameters are systematically included and quantified. The model parameter PDF is estimated using Bayesian parameter estimation and actual fatigue testing data. The overall method is demonstrated using a realistic application of steam turbine rotor, and the risk analysis under given safety criteria is provided to support maintenance planning.

  13. In-Flight Validation of a Pilot Rating Scale for Evaluating Failure Transients in Electronic Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, Kevin F.; Tucker, George E.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    2006-01-01

    Engineering development and qualification of a Research Flight Control System (RFCS) for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A has motivated the development of a pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems. The RASCAL RFCS includes a highly-reliable, dual-channel Servo Control Unit (SCU) to command and monitor the performance of the fly-by-wire actuators and protect against the effects of erroneous commands from the flexible, but single-thread Flight Control Computer. During the design phase of the RFCS, two piloted simulations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to help define the required performance characteristics of the safety monitoring algorithms in the SCU. Simulated failures, including hard-over and slow-over commands, were injected into the command path, and the aircraft response and safety monitor performance were evaluated. A subjective Failure/Recovery Rating (F/RR) scale was developed as a means of quantifying the effects of the injected failures on the aircraft state and the degree of pilot effort required to safely recover the aircraft. A brief evaluation of the rating scale was also conducted on the Army/NASA CH-47B variable stability helicopter to confirm that the rating scale was likely to be equally applicable to in-flight evaluations. Following the initial research flight qualification of the RFCS in 2002, a flight test effort was begun to validate the performance of the safety monitors and to validate their design for the safe conduct of research flight testing. Simulated failures were injected into the SCU, and the F/RR scale was applied to assess the results. The results validate the performance of the monitors, and indicate that the Failure/Recovery Rating scale is a very useful tool for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems.

  14. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  15. Analysis of blood pressure rhythms for drug efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Germanò, G; Federico, L; Angotti, S; Codispoti, P; Muscolo, M; Bravo, S; Damiani, S

    1996-08-15

    This study analyzes some methods of evaluating the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure circadian rhythm. We reviewed four different approaches: hourly averages, trough-to-peak ratio, cosinor method, and Fourier series applied to the same data to prove the time course of the effects of isradipine administered once daily. A total of 141 patients of both sexes (mean age 53 years, range 30-76) with mild to moderate essential hypertension were enrolled in this multicenter trial after a 2-week placebo run-in. Treatment with isradipine SRO 5 mg/day administered between 8 and 9 AM was started. Each patient underwent ambulatory BP monitoring at the time of entry and after 6 weeks of treatment. Calculation of hourly averages showed decreases after 4 AM, and from about 8-9 AM, when the drug was administered, and the decreases practically did not vary until about 10 PM. Subsequently, the decreases became smaller and indicated reduced drug activity. However, this hypothesis no longer held after 4 AM. The trough-to-peak ratio was calculated including hourly averages after the dose divided by the lowest hourly average. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure showed constant reduction from 3 PM (time of peak) to 11 PM. However, after 11 PM, higher trough-to-peak ratios paradoxically occurred due to a major reduction obtained with placebo, and the negative percentages just before the next dose cannot be attributed to treatment. Applying the cosinor method, maximal values were greatly underestimated, nocturnal values were overestimated, and the absolute maximum occurred in proximity to the minimum relating to postprandial dip. The generalized cosinor model, known as Fourier partial series, was always curtailed to the third harmonic. Fourier analysis was able to describe the daily trend of BP both before and after isradipine administration. We used statistical tests to determine if the differences described by the models were significant. The tests indicated

  16. Evaluation Of Liner Back-pressure Due To Concrete Pore Pressure At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Liu, A.S.; Gou, B.

    2006-07-01

    GE's latest evolution of the boiling water reactor, the ESBWR, has innovative passive design features that reduce the number and complexity of active systems, which in turn provide economic advantages while also increasing safety. These passive systems used for emergency cooling also mean that the primary containment system will experience elevated temperatures with longer durations than conventional plants in the event of design basis accidents. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the drywell in the primary containment structure for the ESBWR will be exposed to saturated steam conditions for up to 72 hours following the accident. A containment spray system may be activated that sprays the drywell area with water to condense the steam as part of the recovery operations. The liner back-pressure will build up gradually over the 72 hours as the concrete temperatures increase, and a sudden cool down could cause excessive differential pressure on the liner to develop. For this analysis, it is assumed that the containment spray is activated at the end of the 72-hour period. A back-pressure, acting between the liner and the concrete wall of the containment, can occur as a result of elevated temperatures in the concrete causing steam and saturated vapor pressures to develop from the free water remaining in the pores of the concrete. Additional pore pressure also develops under the elevated temperatures from the non-condensable gases trapped in the concrete pores during the concrete curing process. Any buildup of this pore pressure next to the liner, in excess of the drywell internal pressure, will act to push the liner away from the concrete with a potential for tearing at the liner anchorages. This paper describes the methods and analyses used to quantify this liner back-pressure so that appropriate measures are included in the design of the liner and anchorage system. A pore pressure model is developed that calculates the pressure distribution across the concrete

  17. Experimental Evaluation of Dynamic Power Supply Noise and Logical Failures in Microprocessor Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Mitsuya; Kurimoto, Masanori; Akiyama, Rei; Takata, Hidehiro; Nagata, Makoto

    Logical operations in CMOS digital integration are highly prone to fail as the amount of power supply (PS) drop approaches to failure threshold. PS voltage variation is characterized by built-in noise monitors in a 32-bit microprocessor of 90-nm CMOS technology, and related with operation failures by instruction-level programming for logical failure analysis. Combination of voltage drop size and activated logic path determines failure sensitivity and class of failures. Experimental observation as well as simplified simulation is applied for the detailed understanding of the impact of PS noise on logical operations of digital integrated circuits.

  18. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  19. Effect of changes in intrathoracic pressure on cardiac function at rest and during moderate exercise in health and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Sophie; Luoma, Charles E; Miller, Andrew D; Johnson, Bruce D

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of changes in inspiratory intrathoracic pressure on stroke volume at rest and during moderate exercise in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) as well as healthy individuals. Stroke volume was obtained by echocardiography during 2 min of spontaneous breathing (S), two progressive levels of inspiratory unloading (UL1 and UL2) using a ventilator, and two progressive levels of inspiratory loading using resistors in 11 patients with HFREF (61 ± 9 years old; ejection fraction 32 ± 4%; NYHA class I-II) and 11 age-matched healthy individuals at rest and during exercise at 60% of maximal aerobic capacity on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer. At rest, inspiratory unloading progressively decreased stroke volume index (SVI; S, 35.2 ± 5.4 ml m(-2); UL1, 33.3 ± 5.1 ml m(-2); and UL2, 32.2 ± 4.4 ml m(-2)) in healthy individuals, while it increased SVI (S, 31.4 ± 4.6 ml m(-2); UL1, 32.0 ± 5.9 ml m(-2); and UL2, 34.0 ± 7.2 ml m(-2)) in patients with HFREF (P = 0.04). During moderate exercise, inspiratory unloading decreased SVI in a similar manner (S, 43.9 ± 7.1 ml m(-2); UL1, 40.7 ± 4.7 ml m(-2); and UL2, 39.9 ± 3.7 ml m(-1)) in healthy individuals, while it increased SVI (S, 40.8 ± 6.5 ml m(-2); UL1, 42.8 ± 6.9 ml m(-2); and UL2, 44.1 ± 4. ml m(-2)) in patients with HFREF (P = 0.02). Inspiratory loading did not significantly change SVI at rest or during moderate exercise in both groups. It is concluded that inspiratory unloading improved SVI at rest and during moderate exercise in patients with HFREF, possibly due to a reduction in left ventricular afterload.

  20. Validation of a protocol to evaluate maximal expiratory pressure using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner.

    PubMed

    Soares, Viviane; Rodrigues, Fábio B; Vieira, Marcus F; Silva, Maria Sebastiana

    2011-09-01

    The respiratory muscles can present fatigue and even chronic inability to generate force. So, reliable devices are necessary to their evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the MEP (Maximal Expiratory Pressure) values of individuals between 20 and 25 years old and to validate a protocol using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner comparing it with the digital manometer. We evaluated the MEP of 10 participants. They remained seated and made six respiratory maneuvers from Total Lung Capacity (TLC) to Residual Volume (RV). The results in the study showed no statistically significant differences when compared to values reported in the literature, and that the pressure transducer provides reliable values for MEP. PMID:21969962

  1. Applicability of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to healthcare epidemiology: evaluation of the sterilization and use of surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Linkin, Darren R; Sausman, Caroline; Santos, Lilly; Lyons, Clarence; Fox, Catherine; Aumiller, Linda; Esterhai, John; Pittman, Beverly; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2005-10-01

    Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) is a methodology for correcting latent system errors before they lead to adverse events. We examined the utility of HFMEA in evaluating the sterilization and use of surgical instruments. First, a multidisciplinary team graphed the process in a flow diagram. A hazard analysis was then used to examine potential failure modes (i.e., ways in which a process can fail) and their causes and to score the severity and other factors for each failure mode cause. Actions were then planned to address the selected failure mode causes. Flow charts were created for 3 foci: sterilization process, reading of biologicals, and use of equipment. Information was gathered through interviews and a review of the literature. Multiple clinically significant system errors were identified, and actions to correct them were developed. The HFMEA methodology facilitated the detection of previously unrecognized system errors, demonstrating its potential utility in addressing healthcare epidemiology-related adverse events.

  2. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  3. Safety evaluation design of filament wound structures - Cases of pressure vessels and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Masanori; Mori, Takao; Hirase, Yosihiro; Katoh, Akihiko; Ishihara, Toshio

    Procedures are presented for the safety-related evaluation of filament-wound composite products, such as pressure vessels and pipes. In order to increase the fatigue strength of pressure vessel metallic liners subject to cyclic internal pressures, by controlling residual stresses, the 'autofrettage' overpressuring treatment has been devised.

  4. Program Evaluation of Remote Heart Failure Monitoring: Healthcare Utilization Analysis in a Rural Regional Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A. Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. “Care Beyond Walls and Wires,” a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Materials and Methods: Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. Results: HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. Conclusions: The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems. PMID:25025239

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are ... treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  6. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  7. New Approaches to Evaluating and Monitoring Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Elizabeth M; Levy, Phillip D

    2016-06-01

    Digital health innovations for hypertension include cuffless blood pressure sensors, wireless smartphone-enabled upper arm blood pressure monitors, mobile applications, and remote monitoring technologies. Wearable trackers have drawn interest from medical professionals and patients alike. They have the potential to improve hypertension control and medication adherence through easier logging of repeated blood pressure measurements, better connectivity with health-care providers, and medication reminder alerts. With increasing emphasis on home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to confirm hypertension prior to treatment, such devices also can help improve the diagnostic landscape. However, privacy, accuracy, and cost concerns have prevented widespread clinical uptake. To foster implementation, device designers and clinical researchers should collaborate on development of rigorous clinical trials that test cardiovascular outcomes associated with emerging technologies. We review the current literature on mobile health technologies and novel diagnostic and management protocols and make recommendations on how to incorporate these innovations into practice. PMID:27137524

  8. Utility of home blood pressure monitoring to evaluate postprandial blood pressure in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Alfie, José

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hypotension, defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 20 mmHg or greater within 2 hours after a meal, is a risk factor for stroke, coronary events and mortality. The clinical suspicion is typically raised by episodes of postprandial syncope or falls, whereas asymptomatic postprandial hypotension is mostly neglected. The magnitude of the postprandial fall in SBP, as detected by 24-hour recording in apparently healthy middle-aged to elderly subjects, was proportional to the severity of the silent cerebrovascular damage. Postprandial hypotension can also be detected by self-measured blood pressure before and within 2 hours after meals using automatic devices. The review highlights the value of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as a screening test for asymptomatic postprandial hypotension in hypertensive patients. Using a HBPM protocol that included duplicated blood pressure measurements before and after three consecutive lunches, we detected unsuspected postprandial hypotension in 27.4% of the 230 hypertensive patients screened. The prevalence of postprandial hypotension was 13.2% in controlled and 42.2% in uncontrolled hypertensive patients (p < 0.001), raising the dilemma of further lowering blood pressure in the setting of postprandial hypotension. The inclusion of preprandial and postprandial measurements in the protocol of HBPM is useful to identify hypertensive patients with postprandial hypotension and may guide adjustments in antihypertensive treatment according to postprandial blood pressure.

  9. Cerebral microdialysis reflects the neuroprotective effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption in acute liver failure better and earlier than intracranial pressure: a controlled study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral edema is a well-recognized and potentially fatal complication of acute liver failure (ALF). The effectiveness of treatments that address intracranial hypertension is generally assessed by measuring intracranial pressure (ICP). The aim of this study was to determine the role of cerebral microdialysis in monitoring the efficacy of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA) treatment for ALF. We hypothesized that in ALF cerebral microdialysis reflects the benefits of FPSA treatment on cerebral edema before ICP. Methods A surgical resection model of ALF was used in 21 pigs. We measured plasma ammonia concentration, brain concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glutamine, and ICP. Animals were randomized into three groups: in one group eight animals received 6 hours of FPSA treatment 2 hours after induction of ALF; in another group 10 animals received supportive treatment for ALF only; and in the final group three underwent sham surgery. Results The ICP was significantly higher in the ALF group than in the FPSA group 9 hours after surgery. The lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group 5 hours after surgery, before any significant difference in ICP was detected. Indeed, significant changes in the L/P ratio could be observed within 1 hour of treatment. Glutamine levels were significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group between 6 hours and 10 hours after surgery. Conclusions Brain lactate/pyruvate ratio and concentration of glutamine measured by cerebral microdialysis reflected the beneficial effects of FPSA treatment on cerebral metabolism more precisely and rapidly than ICP in pigs with fulminant ALF. The role of glutamine as a marker of the efficacy of FPSA treatment for ALF appears promising, but needs further evaluation. PMID:23758689

  10. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bellera, Carine A.; Hanley, James A.; Joseph, Lawrence; Albertsen, Peter C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  11. [EVALUATION OF THE REGULATORY-ADAPTIVE STATUS FOR PROGNOSTICATION IN SYSTOLIC CHRONIC HEART FAILURE].

    PubMed

    Tregubov, V G; Kanorsky, S G; Pokrovsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    We studied a new approach to prognostication in systolic chronic heart failure (CHF) based on the quantitative evaluation of the regulatory-adaptive status (RAS) in 100 patients with FC III CHF and compromised LV systolic function associated with hypertensive disease and/or ischemic heart disease. The patients managed by combined therapy (quinapril, torasemid, spironolactone) were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 included 56 patients (57.5 ± 21.7 yr) treated with metoprolol succinate (59.1 ± 12.1 mg/d), group 2 contained 44 patients (57.5 ± 21.4 yr) treated with ivabradine (12.1 ± 4.6 mg/d). A test of cardio-respiratory synchronism for quantitative RAS evaluation, echocardiography, treadmill exercise, determination of N-terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide in blood plasma, and 6 min walk test were performed before and 6 months after the onset of the study. A 12 month follow up study with controlled pharmacotherapy was carried out to analyse cardiovascular complications. The clinical efficiency of pharmacotherapy was found to be identical in both groups. The frequency of hospitalization for the treatment of CHF, ischemic stroke, and myocardial infarction as well as the number of deaths from cardiovascular disorders were not significantly different. Cardiovascular complications occurred more frequently in patients with initially low or inadequate RAS associated with an enhanced risk of sudden cardiac death. These data are comparable with results of conventional diagnostic tests and reflect independent significance of RAS evaluation for prognostication of the outcome of systolic CHE PMID:26987135

  12. You Want Me to Do What? Evaluators and the Pressure to Misrepresent Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael; Clark, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators' experiences with being pressured by a key stakeholder to misrepresent findings were investigated in an anonymous survey of a random sample of over 2500 American Evaluation Association members; a response rate of 37% was obtained. Overall, 42% of the respondents had encountered misrepresentation pressure, with 70% of this subgroup…

  13. Design and evaluation of candidate pressure ports for the HYFLITE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.; Cleckner, Craig S.; Vontheumer, Alfred E.

    1994-01-01

    A concept for placing a pressure transducer directly in a shuttle type tile was developed at Langley Research Center. A 5 inch long quartz with a .020 inch inner diameter provides the thermal isolation necessary to allow 2800 F surface pressure measurements to be taken by pressure transducer rated at 250 F. The assembly is potted in place with RTV 560 in a piece of FRCI-12 thermal protection system insulation tile. The integrity of the thermal protection system is maintained even with the intrusion of the pressure port assembly and the pressure port does not disrupt the air flow across the lifting body. Approximately 200 of these pressure ports are to be used in each of the Hypersonic Flight Experiment (HYFLITE) flight tests. Initial vibroacoustic and aerothermal testing of the pressure port designs have been completed at Langley Research vibration laboratory and the 20 MWatt 2 x 9 turbulent duct facility at Ames Research Center. The performance of the pressure ports were found to be well within the required design limits for all cases. In addition, a failure mode in which the entire pressure port assembly was removed proved to be a begin case.

  14. Oxygen saturation/FiO2 ratio is a simple predictor of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation failure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Carol; Gandhi, Rikesh; Patel, Sanjay R.; Nuccio, Paul; Weinhouse, Gerald L.; Lee, Po-Shun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) can improve outcomes of critically ill patients. Early and simple predictors of NPPV outcome could improve clinical management of patients with respiratory failure. Materials and Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary medical center. Patients requiring NPPV were included and followed. Clinical data including respiratory mechanics at the time of NPPV initiation, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Data were analyzed to identify variables that distinguished NPPV success or failure. Results A total of 133 patients were included in the study. NPPV success rate was 41%. Patients diagnosed with malignancy had only 29% NPPV success rate. Among patients without malignancy, higher oxygen saturation, oxygen saturation/FiO2 (SF) ratios, and SF/minute ventilation (MV) ratios were associated with NPPV success. Receiver operating curve analyses identify SF < 98.5 to be a specific (89% specificity, P=0.013) predictor of NPPV failure. Furthermore, for patients requiring at least 24hr of NPPV support, tidal volume (TV)/predicted body weight (PBW) ratio inversely correlated with respiratory improvement. Conclusions For patients without malignancy, SF ratios at the time of NPPV initiation discriminated NPPV success and failure, and could be used to help guide the management of critically ill patients who require ventilatory support. PMID:21036535

  15. Vascular Physiology according to Clinical Scenario in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Evaluation using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Mori, Kento; Kikuchi, Shohei; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness may be an important cause of acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical scenario (CS), which classifies the pathophysiology of AHF based on the initial systolic blood pressure (sBP), was proposed to provide the most appropriate therapy for AHF patients. In CS, elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, has been considered as a feature of patients categorized as CS1 (sBP > 140 mmHg at initial presentation). However, whether elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, is present in such patients has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we assessed aortic stiffness in AHF patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), which is considered to be independent of instantaneous blood pressure. Sixty-four consecutive AHF patients (mean age, 70.6 ± 12.8 years; 39 men) were classified with CS, based on their initial sBP: CS1: sBP > 140 mmHg (n = 29); CS2: sBP 100-140 mmHg (n = 22); and CS3: sBP < 100 mmHg (n = 13). There were significant group differences in CAVI (CS1 vs. CS2 vs. CS3: 9.7 ± 1.4 vs. 8.4 ± 1.7 vs. 8.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.006, analysis of variance). CAVI was significantly higher in CS1 than in CS2 (p = 0.02) and CS3 (p = 0.04). CAVI did not significantly correlate with sBP at the time of measurement of CAVI (r = 0.24 and p = 0.06). Aortic stiffness assessed using blood pressure-independent methodology apparently increased in CS1 AHF patients. We conclude that vascular failure is a feature of CS1 AHF initiation. PMID:27594650

  16. A preliminary evaluation of the generalized likelihood ratio for detecting and identifying control element failures in a transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the Generalized Likelihood Ratio technique to the detection and identification of aircraft control element failures has been evaluated in a linear digital simulation of the longitudinal dynamics of a B-737 aircraft. Simulation results show that the technique has potential but that the effects of wind turbulence and Kalman filter model errors are problems which must be overcome.

  17. Prototype development and comparative evaluation of wheelchair pressure mapping system.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M D

    1993-01-01

    Wheelchair pressure mapping devices used in the prescription of seat cushions and postural supports have been limited in durability, data presentation, and/or clinical efficiency. This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system (Tekscan "Seat"). Technology, previously developed for measurement of forces of dental occlusion and of the foot during gait, was applied to wheelchair seat mapping. Tests were designed to compare the performance of three pressure mapping systems: the Tekscan system, the FSA system, and the Talley TPM3. Bench tests were done to measure reproducibility, hysteresis, and creep of each of the pressure mapping systems. A contoured loader gauge was developed to test for the influence of hammocking. Tests were also performed using spinal cord-injured subjects to demonstrate the relative performance of the pressure mapping systems in a clinical setting. A focus group session was conducted with seating specialists to review the strengths and weakness of the systems for routine clinical use. The TPM3 was found to be the most accurate, stable, and reproducible but limited in ease of use, speed, and data presentation. FSA was rated well in clinical application and data management but demonstrated a pronounced hysteresis (+/-19%) and creep (4%). The Tekscan system also showed substantial hysteresis (+/-20%) and creep (19%) but was preferred by clinicians for its real-time display capabilities, resolution, and display options. Some trends in system performance on varied support surfaces were identified and can be a valuable guide to interpretation of measurements and prescription decision making in the clinic. Problems identified with the accuracy and stability of the Tekscan and FSA systems may be amenable to resolution with software correction and changes in fabrication. With these

  18. Evaluation of an alginate dressing for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, E; Papen, J C

    1991-08-01

    Pressure ulcers that secrete moderate to large amounts of fluid often cause leakage from under dressings, odor, staining of clothing, denuding of the skin, and pain. Two highly absorbent dressings derived from seaweed have been introduced into the U.S. market for use in the management of exuding wounds. Severely debilitated patients with full-thickness pressure ulcers were treated for one week to three months with one of these alginate dressings (Kaltostat). The handling and performance characteristics of the dressing are discussed.

  19. Analytical Method to Evaluate Failure Potential During High-Risk Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Communicating failure mode information during design and manufacturing is a crucial task for failure prevention. Most processes use Failure Modes and Effects types of analyses, as well as prior knowledge and experience, to determine the potential modes of failures a product might encounter during its lifetime. When new products are being considered and designed, this knowledge and information is expanded upon to help designers extrapolate based on their similarity with existing products and the potential design tradeoffs. This paper makes use of similarities and tradeoffs that exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of each component/product. In this light, a function-failure method is developed to help the design of new products with solutions for functions that eliminate or reduce the potential of a failure mode. The method is applied to a simplified rotating machinery example in this paper, and is proposed as a means to account for helicopter failure modes during design and production, addressing stringent safety and performance requirements for NASA applications.

  20. 123I-MIBG SPECT for Evaluation of Patients with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu-Leen, Aukelien C; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Jacobson, Arnold F

    2015-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by activation of the sympathetic cardiac nerves. The condition of cardiac sympathetic nerves can be evaluated by (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging. Most cardiac (123)I-MIBG studies have relied on measurements from anterior planar images of the chest. However, it has become progressively more common to include SPECT imaging in clinical and research protocols. This review examines recent trends in (123)I-MIBG SPECT imaging and evidence that provides the basis for the increased use of the procedure in the clinical management of patients with HF. (123)I-MIBG SPECT has been shown to be complementary to planar imaging in patients with HF in studies of coronary artery disease after an acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, (123)I-MIBG SPECT has been used in numerous studies to document regional denervation for arrhythmic event risk assessment. For better quantification of the size and severity of innervation abnormalities in (123)I-MIBG SPECT, programs and protocols specifically for (123)I have been developed. Also, the introduction of new solid-state cameras has created the potential for more rapid SPECT acquisitions or a reduction in radiopharmaceutical activity. Although PET imaging has superior quantitative capabilities, (123)I-MIBG SPECT is, for the foreseeable future, the only widely available nuclear imaging method for assessing regional myocardial sympathetic innervation.

  1. High pressure inactivation of relevant target microorganisms in poultry meat products and the evaluation of pressure-induced protein denaturation of marinated poultry under different high pressure treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidgall, Johanna; Hertel, Christian; Bindrich, Ute; Heinz, Volker; Toepfl, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the possibility of extending shelf life of marinated poultry meat products by high pressure processing was evaluated. Relevant spoilage and pathogenic strains were selected and used as target microorganisms (MOs) for challenge experiments. Meat and brine were inoculated with MOs and treated at 450 MPa, 4 °C for 3 min. The results of inactivation show a decreasing pressure tolerance in the series Lactobacillus > Arcobacter > Carnobacterium > Bacillus cereus > Brochothrix thermosphacta > Listeria monocytogenes. Leuconostoc gelidum exhibited the highest pressure tolerance in meat. A protective effect of poultry meat was found for L. sakei and L. gelidum. In parallel, the influence of different marinade formulations (pH, carbonates, citrates) on protein structure changes during a pressure treatment was investigated. Addition of sodium carbonate shows a protection against denaturation of myofibrillar proteins and provides a maximum water-holding capacity. Caustic marinades allowed a higher retention of product characteristics than low-pH marinades.

  2. A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

  3. [Results and evaluation of long-term blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Krönig, B

    1994-02-01

    Using validated equipment for ABPM (by the indirect, intermittent, oscillometric and/or auscultatory method) reproducible results for day- and night-time blood-pressure, early morning readings, and blood-pressure variability may be obtained. The frequency of recordings should be about 15-min while awake and about 30-min during sleep-time, with at least 50 validated readings in 24-h to get an informative recording. Standardization could be achieved for the normotensive mean day-time value (upper limit 135/85 mmHg) and mean night-time recording (at least minus 10% compared to the day-time mean value). Using ABPM the diagnosis of arterial hypertension may be optimized, e.g. patients with white-coat hypertension could be discovered as well as those with diminished day-night rhythm ("non-dippers"); with the latter condition cerebral or myocardial damage might occur as consequence of primary hypertension; even more so, secondary hypertension may be discovered in patients with "non-dipper" constellation. In respect to therapy, a "profile-adjusted" medication may be obtained by ABPM; side-effects, which could be produced by "overtreatment", may be discovered. Since day- as well as night-time values, possibly even early morning pressures and the blood-pressure variability are positively correlated to cerebral and cardiovascular complications, ABPM becomes an important prognostic tool.

  4. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  5. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  6. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers. PMID:22911414

  7. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers.

  8. Neural Network Prediction of Failure of Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels from Strain Field Data Acquired by a Computer Vision Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1997-01-01

    This effort used a new and novel method of acquiring strains called Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation (SDVIC) on impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels during a proof test. To predict the burst pressure, the hoop strain field distribution around the impact location from three vessels was used to train a neural network. The network was then tested on additional pressure vessels. Several variations on the network were tried. The best results were obtained using a single hidden layer. SDVIC is a fill-field non-contact computer vision technique which provides in-plane deformation and strain data over a load differential. This method was used to determine hoop and axial displacements, hoop and axial linear strains, the in-plane shear strains and rotations in the regions surrounding impact sites in filament wound pressure vessels (FWPV) during proof loading by internal pressurization. The relationship between these deformation measurement values and the remaining life of the pressure vessels, however, requires a complex theoretical model or numerical simulation. Both of these techniques are time consuming and complicated. Previous results using neural network methods had been successful in predicting the burst pressure for graphite/epoxy pressure vessels based upon acoustic emission (AE) measurements in similar tests. The neural network associates the character of the AE amplitude distribution, which depends upon the extent of impact damage, with the burst pressure. Similarly, higher amounts of impact damage are theorized to cause a higher amount of strain concentration in the damage effected zone at a given pressure and result in lower burst pressures. This relationship suggests that a neural network might be able to find an empirical relationship between the SDVIC strain field data and the burst pressure, analogous to the AE method, with greater speed and simplicity than theoretical or finite element modeling. The process of testing SDVIC

  9. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  10. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  11. Evaluation of SSME high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of the bearings produced conclusive evidence that a very high axial load was applied to bearing 8517903 during a significant portion of the service time. The high loads caused serious ball and race wear and surface fatigue pitting. In all likelihood, continued operation of this bearing with the high axial load would have caused increasing deterioration and catastrophic failure. In contrast, bearing 8517900 showed much less deterioration and probably had experienced only the axial loads deliberately applied by the preload spring. Bearing 8517900 represents the best-case operation with the loads controlled to the levels intended in the design. Fatigue life calculations on bearing 8517903 with an axial load of 27,000 N showed the intolerance of the bearing to such load levels.

  12. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  13. Evaluation of worn SSME low pressure liquid oxygen turbopump bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The larger of two ball bearings used to support the rotor of the low pressure liquid oxygen turbopump in each of the shuttle main engines was analyzed to identify the cause of severe internal wear. The actual operating loads were calculated along with their direction and length of time at each load based on the size and location of the race contact paths. It is suggested that the engine component design be modified to reduce bearing stress and enhance lubrication.

  14. Evaluation of the energy barrier for failure of Au atomic contact based on temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Akira; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the mechanical stability of single gold atomic contacts at an applied bias voltage of 0-1 V using a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction technique at 300-400 K under ambient conditions. The single atomic contact shows the quantized conductance (G0 = 2e(2)/h) and can carry considerably large current, which results in the current-induced failure of the contact. The contact failure behaviour under the applied bias conditions was studied by statistical analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves of the single Au contacts. We demonstrated that, at the elevated temperature of 300-400 K, the current-induced local heating effect is negligibly small and current-induced forces in the contact are responsible for the observed failure of the single gold contacts under the high bias voltage conditions (>0.4 V). Furthermore, based on the temperature dependence of the contact failure behaviour in the I-V curves, the energy barrier of the contact-failure was evaluated to be ca. 0.1 V. PMID:27427285

  15. Evaluation of some scale effects in the response and failure of composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using scale model testing for predicting full-scale behavior of composite beams loaded in tension and flexure was investigated. Classical laws of similitude were applied to fabricate and test replica model beams to identify scaling effects in the load response, strength, and mode of failure. Experiments were conducted using graphite-epoxy composite beams having different laminate stacking sequences and a range of scaled sizes. Results indicated that the elastic response of scaled composite beams was independent of specimen size. However, a significant scale effect in strength was observed. In addition, a transition in failure mode was observed among scaled beams of certain laminate stacking sequences. Weibull statistical and fracture mechanics based models were applied to predict the strength scale effect since standard failure criteria cannot account for the influence of absolute specimen size in failure.

  16. Clinical evaluation of amylase-creatinine clearance ratio and amylase isoenzyme clearance in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Otsuki, M; Okano, K; Yamasaki, T; Baba, S

    1981-01-01

    Amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) and amylase isoenzyme clearance were determined simultaneously in patients with chronic renal failure. ACCR in patients with compensated renal failure (3.5 +/- 0.4%) was not significantly different from normals (2.6 +/- 0.2%), while that in patients with non-compensated renal failure (6.7 +/- 0.4%) was significantly higher than that in normals. Clearance ratio of pancreatic isoamylase (Amylase-1) relative to creatinine clearance (CAmy . 1/Ccr) in patients with both compensated (5.9 +/- 1.0%) and non-compensated (6.8 +/- 0.4%) renal failure was as high as that in patients with acute pancreatitis (6.6 +/- 0.5%). On the other hand, clearance ratio of salivary isoamylase (Amylase-3) relative to creatinine clearance (CAmy . 3/CCr) in patients with compensated renal failure (1.5 +/- 0.3%) was almost the same as that in normals (2.1 +/- 0.1%), while that in patients with non-compensated renal failure was 5.9 +/- 0.7%, which was significantly higher than that in normals. The present study revealed that elevated ACCR in patients with severely impaired renal function was due to the increase of the clearance ratio for both pancreatic and salivary amylase. These facts suggested that glomerular permeability and tubular reabsorption for pancreatic and salivary amylase might play an important role on ACCR in patients with severely impaired renal function.

  17. Clinical evaluation of amylase-creatinine clearance ratio and amylase isoenzyme clearance in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Otsuki, M; Okano, K; Yamasaki, T; Baba, S

    1981-01-01

    Amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) and amylase isoenzyme clearance were determined simultaneously in patients with chronic renal failure. ACCR in patients with compensated renal failure (3.5 +/- 0.4%) was not significantly different from normals (2.6 +/- 0.2%), while that in patients with non-compensated renal failure (6.7 +/- 0.4%) was significantly higher than that in normals. Clearance ratio of pancreatic isoamylase (Amylase-1) relative to creatinine clearance (CAmy . 1/Ccr) in patients with both compensated (5.9 +/- 1.0%) and non-compensated (6.8 +/- 0.4%) renal failure was as high as that in patients with acute pancreatitis (6.6 +/- 0.5%). On the other hand, clearance ratio of salivary isoamylase (Amylase-3) relative to creatinine clearance (CAmy . 3/CCr) in patients with compensated renal failure (1.5 +/- 0.3%) was almost the same as that in normals (2.1 +/- 0.1%), while that in patients with non-compensated renal failure was 5.9 +/- 0.7%, which was significantly higher than that in normals. The present study revealed that elevated ACCR in patients with severely impaired renal function was due to the increase of the clearance ratio for both pancreatic and salivary amylase. These facts suggested that glomerular permeability and tubular reabsorption for pancreatic and salivary amylase might play an important role on ACCR in patients with severely impaired renal function. PMID:6167484

  18. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  19. Evaluation of a theory for pressure-strain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, J.; Shariff, K.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical expression for the slow part (the nonlinear fluctuation part) of the pressure-strain rate is compared with simulations of anisotropic homogeneous flows. The objective is to determine the quantitative accuracy of the theory and to test its prediction that the generalized Rotta coefficient, a non-dimensionalized ratio of slow term to the Reynolds stress anisotropy, varies with direction and can be negative. Comparisons are made between theoretical and simulation values of the slow term itself and of the generalized Rotta coefficients. The implications of the comparison for two-point closure theories and for Reynolds stress modeling are pointed out.

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac dyssynchrony in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zi-Ming; Wang, Bin; Ye, Zhou; Wang, Yong; Nanda, Navin C; Xie, Ming-Xing

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated the application of echocardiography to evaluation of cardiac dyssynchrony in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). A total of 348 consecutive CHF patients who were admitted for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) and presented with low ejection fraction (EF) and wide QRS duration were enrolled in this study, along with 388 healthy individuals. Dyssynchrony was assessed based on filling time ratio (FT/RR), left ventricular pre-ejection delay (PED), interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), longitudinal opposing wall delay (LOWD) and radial septal to posterior wall delay (RSPWD). Response to CRT was defined as a ≥15% increase in EF. The results showed that FT/RR was decreased while PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD were increased in the CHF group compared with the control group (P<0.01). In the CHF group, FT/RR was negatively correlated with the QRS duration, LV end-diastolic diameter (LVESd), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV end-systolic volume (LVESV) (P<0.01), but positively with the LVEF (P<0.01). Additionally, PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD were positively correlated with the QRS duration, LVESd, LVEDV and LVESV (P<0.01), but negatively with the LVEF (P<0.01). The CHF group was divided into three subgroups according to the varying degrees of LVEF. FT/RR decreased successively from the LVEF-1 group to the LVEF-2 group to the LVEF-3 group, while the PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD successively increased in the same order (P<0.01). The CHF group was divided into three subgroups according to the varying degrees of QRS duration, and FT/RR decreased successively in a sequence from the QRS-1 group to the QRS-2 group to the QRS-3 group, while the PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD successively increased in the same order (P<0.01). Speckle tracking radial dyssynchrony ≥130 ms was predictive of an EF response in patients in QRS-1 group (78% sensitivity, 83% specificity), those in QRS-2 group (83% sensitivity, 77% specificity) and in QRS-3 group (89

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure.

  2. Evaluation of embedded FBGs in composite overwrapped pressure vessels for strain based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Francisco; Strutner, Scott M.; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) in space and commercial applications, and the explosive nature of pressure vessel ruptures, make it crucial to develop techniques for early condition based damage detection. The need for a robust health monitoring system for COPVs is a high priority since the mechanisms of stress rupture are not fully understood. Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been proposed as a potential solution that may be utilized to anticipate and potentially avoid catastrophic failures. The small size and light weight of optical fibers enable manufactures to integrate FBGs directly into composite structures for the purpose of structural health monitoring. A challenging aspect of embedding FBGs within composite structures is the risk of potentially impinging the optical fiber while the structure is under load, thus distorting the optical information to be transferred. As the COPV is pressurized, an embedded optical sensor is compressed between the expansion of the inner bottle, and the outer overwrap layer of composite. In this study, FBGs are installed on the outer surface of a COPV bottle as well as embedded underneath a composite overwrap layer for comparison of strain measurements. Experimental data is collected from optical fibers containing multiple FBGs during incremental pressurization cycles, ranging from 0 to 10,000 psi. The graphical representations of high density strain maps provide a more efficient process of monitoring structural integrity. Preliminary results capture the complex distribution of strain, while furthering the understanding of the failure mechanisms of COPVs.

  3. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  4. Evaluation of the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model among Families Reporting Economic Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandsburger, Etty; Biggerstaff, Marilyn A.

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model (double ABCX model) examining the effects resiliency resources on family functioning when families experience economic pressure. Families (N = 128) with incomes at or below the poverty line from a rural area of a southern state completed measures of perceived economic pressure,…

  5. High pressure inactivation kinetics of a Thermomyces lanuginosus xylanase evaluated as a process indicator.

    PubMed

    Gogou, Eleni; Katapodis, Petros; Taoukis, Petros S

    2010-08-01

    The potential use of Thermomyces lanuginosus xylanase to develop a pressure-temperature-time integrator (PTTI) for high pressure processing was investigated. The combined effect of pressure and temperature on the inactivation of xylanase was studied in the pressure range of 100 to 600 MPa and temperature range of 50 to 70 degrees C. A synergistic effect of pressure and temperature was observed. Xylanase inactivation at the studied processing conditions followed first-order kinetics and was found to be very sensitive to changes in pressure and temperature. The values of activation energy and activation volume were estimated as 92.8 kJ/mol and -23.3 mL/mol at a reference pressure of 450 MPa and a reference temperature of 60 degrees C, respectively. A mathematical model of xylanase inactivation, having as variables time, pressure, and temperature allows the calculation of remaining enzyme activity at any combination of processing conditions within the studied domain. Practical Application: To ensure the optimization and control of high pressure processing, evaluation of the process impact on both safety and quality attributes of foods is essential. Enzymes can serve as effective tools in evaluating the impact of high pressure processes of foods.

  6. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  7. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  8. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations: Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses an anechoic chamber evaluation of a fiber-optic interferometric sensor (fiber-optic microphone), which is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for measurements of pressure fluctuations in wind tunnels.

  9. Evaluation of blood pressure changes using vascular transit time.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel; Lim, Chu Sing; Wang, Ping

    2006-08-01

    Imbalance of the human haemodynamic system can provide a prognosis of syncope, dizziness or hypertension. This can be assessed by monitoring its responses to postural change. Examining variations in blood pressure (BP) is deemed an effective means to identify symptoms of this associated condition. However, conventional methods do not promote prolonged monitoring due to the discomfort caused to patients. Established correlations between BP and pulse wave transmission have shown its usefulness in clinical applications. In this study, photoplethysmography and phonocardiography were used to estimate BP changes via observed variations in delay transmission or vascular transit time (VTT) at the upper limb. Thirty-one healthy adults (21 male) were recruited to perform three test activities, namely the arm held at heart level, fully raised up and held down. Association of the three BP indices and heart rate variations with transit time changes was then computed. The results showed that observed VTT changes were related to systolic BP (R(2) = 0.820; p < 0.05), diastolic BP (R(2) = 0.517; p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (R(2) = 0.673; p < 0.05) and heart rate (R(2) = 0.000; p > 0.05). As systolic BP had the strongest correlation, a regression equation was formulated to associate the two parameters. The non-invasive measuring nature of VTT can be more accommodating to patients, especially during continual monitoring. Moreover, it has the added advantage that the pre-ejection period is not included in its time-related derivations.

  10. Compressive and tensile failure at high fluid pressure where preexisting fractures have cohesive strength, with application to the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    In thrusting and strike-slip situations, when the maximum principal horizontal stress S1 acts nearly normal to a fault (a misoriented fault, such as the San Andreas), pore-fluid pressure > the lithostatic load, Pf > Sv, is required to reactivate movement on that fault. Pf > Sv may be achieved without causing hydraulic tensile fracturing if (1) previously existing cracks have regained cohesive strength by chemical processes, (2) subcritical crack growth has been blunted, and (3) the least principal horizontal stress S3 nearly equals Sv. Where Pf > Sv has been attained within a misaligned fault, increasing the stress difference (S1 - S3) at constant Pf > Sv will not lead to shear failure, while a decrease in (S1 - S3) can lead to shear failure of that fault. However, where the cohesive strength of material in a broad misaligned fault zone is less than that of the surrounding intact rock, increasing (S1 - S3) while Pf > Sv can result in shear failure of fractures at near optimum angles to S1, but confined within this weak fault zone. If this faulting results in the local short-lived attainment of Pf > Sv (cataclastic deformation and frictional heating overcoming dilation) and a simultaneous decrease in (S1 - S3), this combination of effects can trigger movement along the main trace of the misaligned fault. When increasing Pf results in hydraulic failure, anisotropy in tensile strength or fracture toughness resulting from foliation within faults allows fractures to propagate along the planes of weakness rather than across the foliation perpendicular to S3.

  11. Intracranial pressure monitoring in pediatric and adult patients with hydrocephalus and tentative shunt failure: a single-center experience over 10 years in 146 patients.

    PubMed

    Sæhle, Terje; Eide, Per Kristian

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT In patients with hydrocephalus and shunts, lasting symptoms such as headache and dizziness may be indicative of shunt failure, which may necessitate shunt revision. In cases of doubt, the authors monitor intracranial pressure (ICP) to determine the presence of over- or underdrainage of CSF to tailor management. In this study, the authors reviewed their experience of ICP monitoring in shunt failure. The aims of the study were to identify the complications and impact of ICP monitoring, as well as to determine the mean ICP and characteristics of the cardiac-induced ICP waves in pediatric versus adult over- and underdrainage. METHODS The study population included all pediatric and adult patients with hydrocephalus and shunts undergoing diagnostic ICP monitoring for tentative shunt failure during the 10-year period from 2002 to 2011. The patients were allocated into 3 groups depending on how they were managed following ICP monitoring: no drainage failure, overdrainage, or underdrainage. While patients with no drainage failure were managed conservatively without further actions, over- or underdrainage cases were managed with shunt revision or shunt valve adjustment. The ICP and ICP wave scores were determined from the continuous ICP waveforms. RESULTS The study population included 71 pediatric and 75 adult patients. There were no major complications related to ICP monitoring, but 1 patient was treated for a postoperative superficial wound infection and another experienced a minor bleed at the tip of the ICP sensor. Following ICP monitoring, shunt revision was performed in 74 (51%) of 146 patients, while valve adjustment was conducted in 17 (12%) and conservative measures without any actions in 55 (38%). Overdrainage was characterized by a higher percentage of episodes with negative mean ICP less than -5 to -10 mm Hg. The ICP wave scores, in particular the mean ICP wave amplitude (MWA), best differentiated underdrainage. Neither mean ICP nor MWA levels showed any

  12. Mechanisms of soil aggregate failure by rapid increase in internal gas pressure during low-intensity burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berli, M.

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of low-intensity natural and managed fire is on the rise, especially in the arid and semi-arid parts of the U.S. Southwest. Yet, there is little understanding of the ramifications of such burns on soil characteristics and their associated ecological processes. In particular, effects of low-intensity fires on soil structure have generally been ignored because such fires have little effect on soil organic matter. Recently, we showed that soil aggregates subjected to rapid low-intensity heating (<200°C) deteriorate more than aggregates subjected to the same temperature but at slow heating rate. We hypothesized that rapid heating rate results in high internal gas pressure due to vaporization of pore water that exerts disruptive mechanical stress that exceeds the internal strength of the aggregates. Here, we present in situ measurements of gas pressure of aggregates subjected to low-intensity burns. We compared a wide range of aggregate wetness and temperature levels. In addition, we report direct visualization of aggregate breakdown during rapid gas expansion using dynamic environment scanning electron microscopy. Our observation to date show that the interior gas pressure of moist aggregates rise rapidly to 1.5-4kPa, whereas the pressure inside dry aggregates remain unchanged during rapid heating. These observations show that weakly aggregated soils of arid and semi-arid regions are very vulnerable to low-intensity burns.

  13. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrabak, R. R.; Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of pressure differentials in a flight control system was evaluated. The pressure profile around the test surface was determined using two techniques: (1) windtunnel data (actual); and (2) NASA/Langley Single Element Airfoil Computer Program (theoretical). The system designed to evaluate the concept of using pressure differentials is composed of a sensor drive and power amplifiers, actuator, position potentiometer, and a control surface. The characteristics (both desired and actual) of the system and each individual component were analyzed. The desired characteristics of the system as a whole are given. The flight control system developed, the testing procedures and data reduction methods used, and theoretical frequency response analysis are described.

  14. Evaluation of the Del Mar Avionics automatic ambulatory blood pressure-recording device.

    PubMed

    Sheps, S G; Elveback, L R; Close, E L; Kleven, M K; Bissen, C

    1981-12-01

    We have the opportunity to evaluate a portable ambulatory device for the recording of sequential indirect arterial blood pressure and continuous electrocardiogram (Del Mar Avionics automatic ambulatory blood pressure recording device). With careful attention to technique, only 11% of systolic and 5% of diastolic blood pressure readings differed by more than 10 mm Hg as compared with a trained technician's observations simultaneously in the same arm. The device has been useful in the evaluation of borderline (labile) hypertension, hypertensive drug therapy programs, and various episodic cardiovascular phenomena--for example, vasodepressor syncope and pheochromocytoma crises.

  15. Determining of Factors Influencing the Success and Failure of Hospital Information System and Their Evaluation Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Kimiafar, Khalil; Ahmadi, Maryam; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, using new information technology (IT) has provided remarkable opportunities to decrease medical errors, support health care specialist, increase the efficiency and even the quality of patient’s care and safety. Objectives: The purpose of this study was the identification of Hospital Information System (HIS) success and failure factors and the evaluation methods of these factors. This research emphasizes the need to a comprehensive evaluation of HISs which considers a wide range of success and failure factors in these systems. Materials and Methods: We searched for relevant English language studies based on keywords in title and abstract, using PubMed, Ovid Medline (by applying MeSH terms), Scopus, ScienceDirect and Embase (earliest entry to march 17, 2012). Studies which considered success models and success or failure factors, or studied the evaluation models of HISs and the related ones were chosen. Since the studies used in this systematic review were heterogeneous, the combination of extracted data was carried out by using narrative synthesis method. Results: We found 16 articles which required detailed analysis. Finally, the suggested framework includes 12 main factors (functional, organizational, behavioral, cultural, management, technical, strategy, economy, education, legal, ethical and political factors), 67 sub factors, and 33 suggested methods for the evaluation of these sub factors. Conclusions: The results of the present research indicates that the emphasis of the HIS evaluation moves from technical subjects to human and organizational subjects, and from objective to subjective issues. Therefore, this issue entails more familiarity with more qualitative evaluation methods. In most of the reviewed studies, the main focus has been laid on the necessity of using multi-method approaches and combining methods to obtain more comprehensive and useful results. PMID:24693386

  16. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of aerodynamic pressure differentials to position a control surface is evaluated. The system is a differential pressure command loop, analogous to a position command loop, where the surface is commanded to move until a desired differential pressure across the surface is achieved. This type of control is more direct and accurate because it is the differential pressure which causes the control forces and moments. A frequency response test was performed in a low speed wind tunnel to measure the performance of the system. Both pressure and position feedback were tested. The pressure feedback performed as well as position feedback implying that the actuator, with a break frequency on the order of 10 Rad/sec, was the limiting component. Theoretical considerations indicate that aerodynamic lags will not appear below frequencies of 50 Rad/sec, or higher.

  17. Evaluation for Additional Resistance by Lightweight Thrust Restraint on Pressure Pipe Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yutaka; Kawabata, Toshinori; Mohri, Yoshiyuki; Uchida, Kazunori

    Thrust force acts on pipe bend due to internal pressure. In previous study, the lightweight thrust restraint with geogrid and anchor plate has proposed and the effect has been proved by conducting lateral loading model tests. In the present study, a series of model tests for changing depth of cover and length of restraint were carried out, and image analysis for the ground surface in the model tests were carried out to discuss the failure mechanism of proposed method. Furthermore, the failure mechanisms in front of the anchor plate were assumed and the additional resistances due to the proposed method were calculated based on the force equilibrium. In addition, in order to examine the accuracy for the proposed formula, calculated values were compared with experimental values. As the results, additional resistance from calculation was corresponding to experimental value.

  18. TAK1 is activated in the myocardium after pressure overload and is sufficient to provoke heart failure in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, D.; Gaussin, V.; Taffet, G. E.; Belaguli, N. S.; Yamada, M.; Schwartz, R. J.; Michael, L. H.; Overbeek, P. A.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The transforming-growth-factor-beta-activated kinase TAK1 is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, which couples extracellular stimuli to gene transcription. The in vivo function of TAK1 is not understood. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of TAK1 in cardiac hypertrophy. In adult mouse myocardium, TAK1 kinase activity was upregulated 7 days after aortic banding, a mechanical load that induces hypertrophy and expression of transforming growth factor beta. An activating mutation of TAK1 expressed in myocardium of transgenic mice was sufficient to produce p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo, cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, severe myocardial dysfunction, 'fetal' gene induction, apoptosis and early lethality. Thus, TAK1 activity is induced as a delayed response to mechanical stress, and can suffice to elicit myocardial hypertrophy and fulminant heart failure.

  19. Risk assessment of failure by stress corrosion cracking in shrunk-on disks of low pressure turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D.A.; Roberts, B.W.; Steakley, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    Several large LP turbines in the TVA system utilize shrunk-on disks which are keyed to the shaft. The 7th, 8th, and 9th stage disks experience wetness in operation which renders them potentially subject to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the keyway of the shrink fit area. To minimize SCC concerns in the disk keyway, TVA has embarked on a phased approach to refurbish the LP rotors with a fat shaft and a tab design replacing the rectangular keyways. Nondestructive examinations have been performed on rotors being refurbished and those continuing in service to assure that the schedule for refurbishment does not place operating units with the original design at undue risk. Many variables are involved in the quantification of the risk of disk failure from SCC: incubation time, stress intensity distribution as a function of crack size, material SCC rate as a function of strength and environment, fatigue crack growth rate, loading history (especially overspeed events), and fracture toughness. For a given set of assumptions and parameters, a deterministic model may be used to assess the risk of failure. Unfortunately, if mostly conservative assumptions are made for the random variables, it can be concluded that small initial flaws will grow to critical sizes in two years of additional operation. As an alternative to the deterministic approach, a probabilistic Monte Carlo simulation was performed using ten critical variables. Variable distributions were examined by binning data values within three standard deviations above and below the mean. One million iterations were performed for each disk.

  20. Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Sperling, E.J.; Shen, G.; Yin, H.; Rana, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach; The welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

  1. Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Sperling, E.J.; Shen, G.; Yin, H.; Rana, M.D.

    1999-08-01

    An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics-based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication-related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack, and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach, The Welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach, and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen-charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

  2. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in congestive heart failure: continuous positive airway pressure of 5-8 cm H2O for 1 year in five cases.

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Fumihiko

    2005-01-01

    Five adult patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) due to dilated cardiomyopathy complicated by Cheyne-Stokes respiration/central sleep apnea (CSR/CSA) were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with an initial pressure of 5 cm H2O. Four patients were followed up for 12 months with CPAP of 5 cm H2O. The rest, a 93-year-old patient, was followed up for 30 months, and the CPAP was reset at 8 cm H2O due to worsened cardiac function after 6 months and it was reset at 6 cm H2O due to dryness of the nose after 23 months. For all the patients with nightly CPAP use for 6.0+/-1.4 h per day for a year, frequency of CSR/CSA was significantly reduced after 3 and 12 months with CPAP (p<0.05). Moreover, their symptoms, cardiac function and sleep quality were significantly improved after 3 months (p<0.05), and were maintained above the pre-CPAP levels after 12 months, except for the oldest patient whose cardiac function tended to deteriorate. The results suggest that CSR/CSA in CHF can be treated with CPAP set at a lower pressure than the conventional method, and that CPAP at 5-8 cm H2O is often effective in eliminating CSR/CSA, improving sleep quality, and presumably maintaining cardiac function.

  3. Expansion duroplasty improves intraspinal pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure, and vascular pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: injured spinal cord pressure evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-06-15

    We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone.

  4. Evaluation of pressure response in the Los Alamos controlled air incinerator during three incident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Vavruska, J.S.; Elsberry, K.; Thompson, T.K.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is a system designed to accept radioactive mixed waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides. A mathematical model was developed to predict the pressure response throughout the offgas treatment system of the CAI during three hypothetical incident scenarios. The scenarios examined included: (1) loss of burner flame and failure of the flame safeguard system with subsequent reignition of fuel gas in the primary chamber, (2) pyrolytic gas buildup from a waste package due to loss of induced draft and subsequent restoration of induced draft, and (3) accidental charging of propellant spray cans in a solid waste package to the primary chamber during a normal feed cycle. For each of the three scenarios, the finite element computer model was able to determine the transient pressure surge and decay response throughout the system. Of particular interest were the maximum absolute pressures attainable at critical points in the system as well as maximum differential pressures across the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Modeling results indicated that all three of the scenarios resulted in maximum HEPA filter differential pressures well below the maximum allowable levels.

  5. Feasibility for development of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution: Sensitivity analyses and NDE (nondestructive evaluation) capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rosinski, S.T. ); Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor pressure vessels operate under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) rules and regulatory guides that are intended to maintain a low probability of vessel failure. The NRC has also addressed neutron embrittlement of pressurized water reactor pressure vessels by imposing regulations on plant operation. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified by these rules and regulations are required, among other things, to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue safe operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. A fracture mechanics sensitivity study was performed to quantify the effect of the assumed flaw distribution on the predicted vessel performance under a specified pressurized thermal shock transient and to determine the critical crack size. Results of the analysis indicate that vessel performance in terms of the estimated probability of failure is very sensitive to the assumed flaw distribution. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Impact failure of MHW fuel sphere MHFT 65: report on interagency task force investigation and SRL evaluation of failure, November 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Following a safety verification impact test failure of a Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) fuel sphere made at Savannah River Plant, from which 2.1 g of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ escaped containment, the Department of Energy organized a task force to investigate the cause of the test failure and to assess the failure probability of MHW fuel made at SRP. The task force described a two-part failure mechanism: embrittlement of the iridium containment shell by phosphorus which may have been picked up from the fuel; and large shear strains in the iridium caused by shearing or push-through of large chunks of fuel. Because the likelihood of push-through in this failure model depends on preexisting cracks in the fuel and their orientation to the impact face, the probability of further impact failures could not be easily assessed. From independent analysis of the available data at the Savannah River Laboratory, we concluded that the impact failure was caused by phosphorus embrittlement of the iridium, and breaching during impact of the graphite impact shell surrounding and cushioning the iridium-clad fuel. Excessive strain in the iridium is caused by extrusion of the iridium into the breach. This model predicts that impact failure is essentially independent of pre-existing cracks in the fuel and that SRP fuel, upon impact, should have no more failures than previously used fuel made at Mound Facility. Impact data to date indicate that SRP fuel clad in DOP-26 iridium cladding actually has fewer impact failures than earlier fuel clad in undoped iridium at MF.

  7. A service evaluation of women attending the menopause/premature ovarian failure clinic of a tertiary referral centre.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, B; Holloway, D; Grace, J; Robinson, J; Rymer, J

    2012-05-01

    This service evaluation aimed to characterise the referrals to the premature ovarian failure clinic, including the type of referral and patient needs, in order to plan for future service provision. The majority of women seen in the clinic experienced idiopathic premature ovarian failure, were aged 30-39 and were nulliparous at the time of diagnosis. Our service requires to be tailored to their needs. For many women, this includes a fertility consultation in the clinic and this part of the service is well used. Our data support the long-term follow-up of women both on treatment and those who initially decline treatment. Most women who initially decline treatment accept it after a few clinic visits. This may be due to consistent advice on the benefits of oestrogen treatment or due to yearly bone scans showing a change in bone density. There was a high non-attendance rate in this group: 21% of appointments were not attended. PMID:22519481

  8. Chronobiological analysis of blood pressure in a patient with atrial fibrillation at the development of heart failure and its therapeutic and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Chibisov, Sergey; Katinas, George; Brodskaya, Inna; Ertman, Aleksandr; Gromyko, Grigory; Konradi, Aleksandra; Mamontov, Oleg; Merkuryeva, Anna; Polunicheva, Ekaterina; Shlyakhto, Evgeny; Soboleva, Anna; Yashin, Sergey; Bhavdip, Bharadva

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) was traced by automatic monitoring every 30 min uninterruptedly along several months in a patient suffering from combined atrial fibrillation and heart failure during the development of disease and its therapeutic and surgical treatment (pacemaker implanting and atrioventricular ablation). Analyses of spectral components as well as signal's shape revealed instabilities in circadian and semicircadian parameters. A new approach for signal's form description without using cosine approximation is suggested. The meaning that referring a patient as dipper, night peaker, or nondipper might be useful at choosing tactics of his treatment is impugned, because all these "types" can transform themselves in the same person in few days. Optimization timing of treatment provides better results if not the "types" of daily profile would be taken to account but the real form of the BP-signal and timing its first and second derivatives. PMID:23533942

  9. Evaluation of bioprosthetic heart valve failure using a matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Barber, Asa H; Bucchi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    A matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach is devised and developed in this paper to analyse the primary biomechanical factors which initiate the structural degeneration of the bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). Using this approach, the critical length of the collagen fibrils l c and the interface shear acting on the fibrils in both BHV and natural aortic valve (AV) tissues under physiological loading conditions are calculated and presented. It is shown that the required critical fibril length to provide effective reinforcement to the natural AV and the BHV tissue is l c  = 25.36 µm and l c  = 66.81 µm, respectively. Furthermore, the magnitude of the required shear force acting on fibril interface to break a cross-linked fibril in the BHV tissue is shown to be 38 µN, while the required interfacial force to break the bonds between the fibril and the surrounding extracellular matrix is 31 µN. Direct correlations are underpinned between these values and the ultimate failure strength and the failure mode of the BHV tissue compared with the natural AV, and are verified against the existing experimental data. The analyses presented in this paper explain the role of fibril interface shear and critical length in regulating the biomechanics of the structural failure of the BHVs, for the first time. This insight facilitates further understanding into the underlying causes of the structural degeneration of the BHVs in vivo. PMID:26715134

  10. [The psychological evaluation of patients with severe heart failure awaiting a heart transplant].

    PubMed

    Gentili, P; De Biase, L; Franzese, A; Malgarini, R B; Vaccaro, M; Giorda, G P; Della Monica, P L; Grutter, G; Marino, B; Campa, P P

    1997-02-01

    Because of the limitations resulting from the severity of heart failure, patients in the waiting list for cardiac transplantation often show a worsening in their social life. They usually present with psychological problems caused by symptoms, medical or surgical therapies and consequences on their own work. We have devised and utilized an experimental psychodiagnostic protocol to study the psychological characteristics of a sample of patients with heart failure (NYHA functional class III and IV) candidate to heart transplantation. Our study was particularly aimed at investigating the quality of life and the psychological mechanisms of adaptation. Findings show a strong attempt of denying the discomfort deriving from the disease and the expectation for transplant. Patients seem to have an adequate reaction to the illness and, otherwise, they feel anxiety and trouble that make very fragile their psychological adaptation. This behaviour is probably correlated with symptoms and the clinical history of heart failure, and does not match with a visible state of well-being that can be detected with a superficial analysis. Nevertheless patients have a good availability in receiving a psychological support from the whole medical staff (physicians, nurses): this suggests that the benefits deriving from a contemporary medical and psychological therapy are able to prevent the appearance of clear psychiatric symptoms. Additional studies involving larger samples of selected populations are needed to confirm the results of the present investigation.

  11. Evaluation of bioprosthetic heart valve failure using a matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Barber, Asa H; Bucchi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    A matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach is devised and developed in this paper to analyse the primary biomechanical factors which initiate the structural degeneration of the bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). Using this approach, the critical length of the collagen fibrils l c and the interface shear acting on the fibrils in both BHV and natural aortic valve (AV) tissues under physiological loading conditions are calculated and presented. It is shown that the required critical fibril length to provide effective reinforcement to the natural AV and the BHV tissue is l c  = 25.36 µm and l c  = 66.81 µm, respectively. Furthermore, the magnitude of the required shear force acting on fibril interface to break a cross-linked fibril in the BHV tissue is shown to be 38 µN, while the required interfacial force to break the bonds between the fibril and the surrounding extracellular matrix is 31 µN. Direct correlations are underpinned between these values and the ultimate failure strength and the failure mode of the BHV tissue compared with the natural AV, and are verified against the existing experimental data. The analyses presented in this paper explain the role of fibril interface shear and critical length in regulating the biomechanics of the structural failure of the BHVs, for the first time. This insight facilitates further understanding into the underlying causes of the structural degeneration of the BHVs in vivo.

  12. Effectiveness of an Interventional Program to Improve Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk for Developing Heart Failure: HEROIC study.

    PubMed

    De Rivas, Beatriz; Barrios, Vivencio; Redón, Josep; Calderón, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    The Efectividad de un Programa de Intervención en el Control de la Presión Arterial de los Hipertensos en Riesgo de Desarrollar Insuficiencia Cardiaca (HEROIC) study was designed to assess whether an educational program for primary care physicians could improve blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients at high risk for developing heart failure. The program contained a combination of educational training (live group sessions or online training) and information feedback. Two hundred twenty-six physicians completed the program and provided valid data in 2489 patients before and 2168 after 1 year. There was a small but significant reduction of -1.1 mm Hg (P=.009) in systolic BP and a higher proportion of patients achieved their BP target (13.6% vs 15.6%, P=.055). Thus, the authors concluded that there was a slight improvement in BP control after the educational program, but this change was not sufficient to avoid development of heart failure. More complex and intensive programs are needed for this type of prevention.

  13. Loss of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 protects mice from pressure overload induced congestive heart failure without affecting ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Kwak, Dongmin; Liu, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinli; Wang, Huan; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Yan, Shuo; McFalls, Edward O.; Lu, Fei; Bache, Robert J.; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    In response to a number of stresses, including nutrient deprivation, General Control Nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) attenuates mRNA translation by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2αSer51). Energy starvation is known to exacerbate congestive heart failure (CHF) and eIF2αSer51 phosphorylation is increased in the failing heart. However, the impact of GCN2 during the evolution of CHF has not been tested. In this study we examined the influence of GCN2 expression in response to a cardiac stress by inducing chronic pressure overload with Transverse Aortic Constriction (TAC) in Wild Type (WT) and GCN2 knockout (GCN2−/−) mice. Under basal conditions, GCN2−/− had normal LV structure or function but following TAC, demonstrated less contractile dysfunction, less increase of lung weight, less increase of lung inflammation and vascular remodeling, and less myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis compared with WT mice, despite an equivalent degree of LV hypertrophy. As expected, GCN2−/− attenuated TAC induced cardiac eif2αSer51 phosphorylation and preserved Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (Serca2a) expression compared with WT mice. Interestingly, expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly elevated in GCN2−/− hearts, while in isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes, selective knockdown of GCN2 increased Bcl-2 protein expression and enhanced myocyte resistance to an apoptotic stress. Collectively, our data support the notion that GCN2 impairs the ventricular adaptation to chronic pressure overload by reducing Bcl-2 expression and increasing cardiomyocyte susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Our findings suggest that strategies to reduce GCN2 activity in cardiac tissue may be a novel approach to attenuate congestive heart failure development. PMID:24166753

  14. Equations for gas releasing process from pressurized vessels in ODH evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L. X.; Wang, L.

    2002-05-01

    The evaluation of Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) is a critical part in the design of any cryogenic system. The high-pressure gas tank or low-temperature liquid container that contain asphyxiated fluid could be the sources to bring about the oxygen deficiency hazard. In the evaluation of ODH, the calculation of the spill rate from the pressurized vessel is the central task. The accuracy of the engineering estimation becomes one of the safety design issues. This paper summarizes the equations for the oxygen concentration calculation in different cases, and discusses the equations for the gas release process calculation both for the high-pressure gas tank and the low-temperature liquid container. Some simplified formulas for engineering estimation are presented along with the theoretical background that involves the process analyses under variable mass, variable pressure and variable temperature.

  15. Functionalization of overbased calcium sulfonates-synthesis and evaluation of antiwear and extreme-pressure performances

    SciTech Connect

    Delfort, B.; Born, M.; Daoudal, B.

    1995-12-01

    To improve antiwear and extreme-pressure performances of overbased calcium sulfonates, three overbased substrates with different colloidal characteristics were modified by partial neutralization with two sulfur-containing carboxylic acids, dithiodigylcolic acid and 4,4{prime} -(1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-diyl) bis (thiabutanoic) acid (DMTD/AA). In this way, six modified overbased calcium sulfonates were prepared. For each product, the colloidal nature of the calcium carboxylate was demonstrated, and all modified and non-modified compounds were evaluated as antiwear and extreme-pressure additives at different concentrations in oil in four-ball tests. The results of this evaluation show that the antiwear performances of basic overbased calcium sulfonates depends on the colloidal structure, while extreme-pressure properties depend on the total calcium carbonate amount in oil. Functionalization significantly enhances the extreme-pressure performances without affecting the initial good antiwear behavior. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  17. Geotechnical properties of Kentucky`s AML landslides and slope failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Iannacchione, A.T.; Bhatt, S.K.; Sefton, J.

    1995-12-31

    A large body of geotechnical data, obtained from the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) and the Kentucky Division of Abandoned Lands, is analyzed in this paper. The analysis includes causes of subsurface failures, phreatic levels, soil profiles, and soil composition data. Soil properties calculated from laboratory procedures and stability analysis techniques were also reviewed. Employing prudent engineering practices and parameters, seven failed slopes were subjected to back analysis for estimating realistic factors of safety. Important factors affecting landslides in eastern Kentucky are presented with appropriate examples.

  18. Evaluation of an Intervention to Maintain Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Within Therapeutic Range

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Mary Lou; Su, Xiaogang; Talbert, Steve; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Kalita, Samar; Jimenez, Edgar; Ludy, Jeffery E.; Bennett, Melody

    2012-01-01

    Background Endotracheal tube cuff pressure must be kept within an optimal range that ensures ventilation and prevents aspiration while maintaining tracheal perfusion. Objectives To test the effect of an intervention (adding or removing air) on the proportion of time that cuff pressure was between 20 and 30 cm H2O and to evaluate changes in cuff pressure over time. Methods A repeated-measure crossover design was used to study 32 orally intubated patients receiving mechanical ventilation for two 12-hour shifts (randomized control and intervention conditions). Continuous cuff pressure monitoring was initiated, and the pressure was adjusted to a minimum of 22 cm H2O. Caregivers were blinded to cuff pressure data, and usual care was provided during the control condition. During the intervention condition, cuff pressure alarm or clinical triggers guided the intervention. Results Most patients were men (mean age, 61.6 years). During the control condition, 51.7% of cuff pressure values were out of range compared with 11.1% during the intervention condition (P < .001). During the intervention, a mean of 8 adjustments were required, mostly to add air to the endotracheal tube cuff (mean 0.28 [SD, 0.13] mL). During the control condition, cuff pressure decreased over time (P < .001). Conclusions The intervention was effective in maintaining cuff pressure within an optimal range, and cuff pressure decreased over time without intervention. The effect of the intervention on outcomes such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheal damage requires further study. PMID:21362715

  19. Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage: Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Garcia-Villazana, O; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2001-06-26

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Future activities also include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining certification for insulated pressure vessels.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of a nurse practitioner-led home-based congestive heart failure clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jo-Ann Mary

    2016-01-01

    Frequent exacerbations of symptoms and financial penalties for 30-day hospital readmissions of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have led to new disease management approaches. A nurse practitioner (NP)-led interdisciplinary program for CHF management that included home telemonitoring and early NP assessments and interventions was piloted by a home health agency. A 4-month evaluation of the efficacy of a clinical pathway for CHF patients resulted in the enrollment of 22 CHF patients in the program. Two clients were readmitted within 30 days. The new program was effective in reducing 30-day readmission rates to 9% compared to the national average of 23%.

  1. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM.

  2. Evaluation of Viking Lander barometric pressure sensor. [performance related to Viking mission environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M.

    1977-01-01

    Variable reluctance type pressure sensors were evaluated to determine their performance characteristics related to Viking Mission environment levels. Static calibrations were performed throughout the evaluation over the full range of the sensors using two point contact manometer standards. From the beginning of the evaluation to the end of the evaluation, the zero shift in the two sensors was within 0.5 percent, and the sensitivity shift was 0.05 percent. The maximum thermal zero coefficient exhibited by the sensors was 0.032 percent over the temperature range of -28.89 C to 71.11 C. The evaluation results indicated that the sensors are capable of making high accuracy pressure measurements while being exposed to the conditions mentioned.

  3. Ischemic penumbra as a trigger for intracranial pressure rise - A potential cause for collateral failure and infarct progression?

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel J; Logan, Caitlin L; McLeod, Damian D; Hood, Rebecca J; Pepperall, Debbie; Murtha, Lucy A; Spratt, Neil J

    2016-05-01

    We have recently shown that intracranial pressure (ICP) increases dramatically 24 h after minor intraluminal thread occlusion with reperfusion, independent of edema. Some of the largest ICP rises were observed in rats with the smallest final infarcts. A possible alternate mechanism for this ICP rise is an increase of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume secondary to choroid plexus damage (a known complication of the intraluminal stroke model used). Alternatively, submaximal injury may be needed to induce ICP elevation. Therefore, we aimed to determine (a) if choroid plexus damage contributes to the ICP elevation, (b) if varying the patency of an important internal collateral supply to the middle cerebral artery (MCA), the anterior choroidal artery (AChA), produces different volumes of ischemic penumbra and (c) if presence of ischemic penumbra (submaximal injury) is associated with ICP elevation. We found (a) no association between choroid plexus damage and ICP elevation, (b) animals with a good internal collateral supply through the AChA during MCAo had significantly larger penumbra volumes and (c) ICP elevation at ≈24 h post-stroke only occurred in rats with submaximal injury, shown in two different stroke models. We conclude that active cellular processes within the ischemic penumbra may be required for edema-independent ICP elevation. PMID:26759431

  4. Evaluation of renal function in elderly heart failure patients on ACE inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jolobe, O

    1999-01-01

    A total of 187 heart failure patients aged 65-92 years, with pretreatment serum creatinine levels below 200 µmol/l, were monitored for more than 12 months on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy. Optimal ACE inhibitor dosage was found in 27% of patients, while a significant deterioration in renal function, characterised by >20% increase in serum creatinine to >200 µmol/l, occurred in 25 patients. This was most closely attributable to ACE inhibitor treatment per se (implying co-existence of bilateral renal artery stenosis) in only four cases, including one in whom renal deterioration was reproducible on inadvertent rechallenge. In the other 21, renal deterioration was attributable to diuretic-related blood volume depletion (two cases), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (two cases), obstructive uropathy (two cases), preterminal renal shutdown (two cases), and the interaction between diuretic and ACE inhibitor dosage (including long-acting vs short-acting drugs) (13 cases). This study could serve as the basis for future comparisons of ACE-inhibitor-related renal deterioration when the entry requirement is optimal ACE inhibitor dosage.


Keywords: heart failure; elderly patients; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; renal deterioration PMID:10533630

  5. Evaluation of 3 Inch SN-219 Failure and S and SX Tank Farm Saltwell Piping

    SciTech Connect

    ELSEN, J.J.

    2000-02-11

    Evaluation of direct buried piping currently in use or designated for future Saltwell pumping in S and SX Farms. Documented evaluation of failed S-103 saltwell pumping transfer line 3 inch SN-219. This evaluation is intended to reflect current status of Saltwell piping, when taken in context with referenced documents.

  6. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, ... failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  8. Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet reduces blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress in hypertensive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Scott L; Seymour, E Mitchell; Brook, Robert D; Kolias, Theodore J; Sheth, Samar S; Rosenblum, Hannah R; Wells, Joanna M; Weder, Alan B

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction contribute to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). In salt-sensitive HFPEF animal models, diets low in sodium and high in potassium, calcium, magnesium, and antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would have similar effects in human hypertensive HFPEF. Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD for 21 days (all food/most beverages provided). The DASH/SRD reduced clinic systolic (155-138 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (79-72 mm Hg; P=0.04), 24-hour ambulatory systolic (130-123 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (67-62 mm Hg; P=0.02), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (12.4-11.0 m/s; P=0.03). Urinary F2-isoprostanes decreased by 31% (209-144 pmol/mmol Cr; P=0.02) despite increased urinary aldosterone excretion. The reduction in urinary F2-isoprostanes closely correlated with the reduction in urinary sodium excretion on the DASH/SRD. In this cohort of HFPEF patients with treated hypertension, the DASH/SRD reduced systemic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress. These findings are characteristic of salt-sensitive hypertension, a phenotype present in many HFPEF animal models and suggest shared pathophysiological mechanisms linking these 2 conditions. Further dietary modification studies could provide insights into the development and progression of hypertensive HFPEF.

  9. Impact of Epoetin Alfa on LV Structure, Function, and Pressure-Volume Relations as Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance – The Heart Failure Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFPEF) Anemia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A.; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anemia, a common co-morbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. We quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Methods Prospective, randomized single blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa versus placebo for 24 weeks in which a sub-group (n=22) had cardiac MRI at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated Results Subjects (75±10 years, 64% female) with HFPEF (EF=63±15%) with average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dl were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared to placebo (p<0.0001). As compared to baseline, there were no significant changes in end diastolic (−7±8 vs. −3±8 ml, p=0.81) or end systolic (−0.4±2 vs. −0.7±5 ml, p= 0.96) volumes at 6 month follow-up between epoetin alfa compared with placebo. LV function as measured based on EF (−1.5±1.6% vs.−2.6±3.3%, p= 0.91) and pressure volume indices (PVa-iso-EDP at 30 mm Hg, −5071±4308 vs. −1662±4140 p=0.58) did not differ between epoetin alfa and placebo. Conclusion Administration of epoetin alfa to older adult patients with HFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR. PMID:23517485

  10. Blood pressure evaluation using sphygmomanometry assisted by arterial pulse waveform detection by fiber Bragg grating pulse device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharath, Umesh; Sukreet, Raju; Apoorva, Girish; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2013-06-01

    We report a blood pressure evaluation methodology by recording the radial arterial pulse waveform in real time using a fiber Bragg grating pulse device (FBGPD). Here, the pressure responses of the arterial pulse in the form of beat-to-beat pulse amplitude and arterial diametrical variations are monitored. Particularly, the unique signatures of pulse pressure variations have been recorded in the arterial pulse waveform, which indicate the systolic and diastolic blood pressure while the patient is subjected to the sphygmomanometric blood pressure examination. The proposed method of blood pressure evaluation using FBGPD has been validated with the auscultatory method of detecting the acoustic pulses (Korotkoff sounds) by an electronic stethoscope.

  11. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1993-01-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures.

  12. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, D.P.; Zakrajsek, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures. 4 refs.

  13. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  14. Finite element analysis to characterize how varying patellar loading influences pressure applied to cartilage: model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushal S; Saranathan, Archana; Koya, Bharath; Elias, John J

    2015-01-01

    A finite element analysis (FEA) modeling technique has been developed to characterize how varying the orientation of the patellar tendon influences the patellofemoral pressure distribution. To evaluate the accuracy of the technique, models were created from MRI images to represent five knees that were previously tested in vitro to determine the influence of hamstrings loading on patellofemoral contact pressures. Hamstrings loading increased the lateral and posterior orientation of the patellar tendon. Each model was loaded at 40°, 60°, and 80° of flexion with quadriceps force vectors representing the experimental loading conditions. The orientation of the patellar tendon was represented for the loaded and unloaded hamstrings conditions based on experimental measures of tibiofemoral alignment. Similar to the experimental data, simulated loading of the hamstrings within the FEA models shifted the center of pressure laterally and increased the maximum lateral pressure. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were identified for the center of pressure and maximum lateral pressure from paired t-tests carried out at the individual flexion angles. The ability to replicate experimental trends indicates that the FEA models can be used for future studies focused on determining how variations in the orientation of the patellar tendon related to anatomical or loading variations or surgical procedures influence the patellofemoral pressure distribution.

  15. Flight test evaluation of an RAF high altitude partial pressure protective assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, G. R.; Putnam, T. W.; Dana, W. J.; Enevoldson, E. K.; Winter, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A partial pressure suit was evaluated during tests in an F-104 and F-15 as a protective garment for emergency descents. The garment is an pressure jerkin and modified anti-g suit combined with an oronasal mask. The garment can be donned and doffed at the aircraft to minimize thermal buildup. The oronasal mask was favored by the pilots due to its immobility on the face during high g-loading. The garment was chosen to provide optimum dexterity for the pilot, which is not available in a full pressure suit, while protecting the pilot at altitudes up to 18,288 meters, during a cabin decompression, and subsequent aircraft descent. During cabin decompressions in the F-104 and F-15, cabin pressure altitude was measured at various aircraft angles of attack, Mach numbers, and altitudes to determine the effect of the aerodynamic slipstream on the cabin altitude.

  16. Closed-Loop Evaluation of an Integrated Failure Identification and Fault Tolerant Control System for a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine; Khong, thuan

    2006-01-01

    Formal robustness analysis of aircraft control upset prevention and recovery systems could play an important role in their validation and ultimate certification. Such systems developed for failure detection, identification, and reconfiguration, as well as upset recovery, need to be evaluated over broad regions of the flight envelope or under extreme flight conditions, and should include various sources of uncertainty. To apply formal robustness analysis, formulation of linear fractional transformation (LFT) models of complex parameter-dependent systems is required, which represent system uncertainty due to parameter uncertainty and actuator faults. This paper describes a detailed LFT model formulation procedure from the nonlinear model of a transport aircraft by using a preliminary LFT modeling software tool developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, which utilizes a matrix-based computational approach. The closed-loop system is evaluated over the entire flight envelope based on the generated LFT model which can cover nonlinear dynamics. The robustness analysis results of the closed-loop fault tolerant control system of a transport aircraft are presented. A reliable flight envelope (safe flight regime) is also calculated from the robust performance analysis results, over which the closed-loop system can achieve the desired performance of command tracking and failure detection.

  17. A Sample of NASA Langley Unsteady Pressure Experiments for Computational Aerodynamics Code Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Edwards, John W.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics methods mature, code development is rapidly transitioning from prediction of steady flowfields to unsteady flows. This change in emphasis offers a number of new challenges to the research community, not the least of which is obtaining detailed, accurate unsteady experimental data with which to evaluate new methods. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been actively measuring unsteady pressure distributions for nearly 40 years. Over the last 20 years, these measurements have focused on developing high-quality datasets for use in code evaluation. This paper provides a sample of unsteady pressure measurements obtained by LaRC and available for government, university, and industry researchers to evaluate new and existing unsteady aerodynamic analysis methods. A number of cases are highlighted and discussed with attention focused on the unique character of the individual datasets and their perceived usefulness for code evaluation. Ongoing LaRC research in this area is also presented.

  18. Deterministic and probabilistic prediction of the distribution of inter-fiber failure test data of prestrained CFRP tubes composed of thin layers and loaded by radial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntze, R.G.

    1993-12-31

    The limit of usability of a CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) structure is often determined by initiation of Inter Fiber Failure (IFF) indicated by interfibre/matrix cracking. It will be shown how this crack initiation threshold can be delayed. The process used is prestraining in analogy to that of prestressed concrete inducing advantageous compression built in stresses/strains transverse to the fibres. As a certain structural example cylindrical tube specimens were wound, prestrained by hydraulic pressurization, and then loaded while monitoring acoustic emission. Crack counting followed the sectioning of the tube. The theoretical investigations aimed at both a deterministic and a probabilistic prediction of the IFF test results. Basis for the prediction are firstly all design parameters, mainly the material properties of the layers, secondly the classical laminate theory and an IFF-criterion and finally a program for probabilistic computations to treat the large set of the stochastic design parameters respectively uncertain basic variables. Included in the IFF-criterion applied had to be the so called Thin-layer Effect representing the decreasing sensitivity of an embedded layer to IFF with the decrease of it`s thickness. The probabilistic prediction of the test data distribution is compared with as well the deterministically predicted single value for the test mean as the corresponding measured test data distribution. They show a very satisfying agreement. The increase in crack-threshold level is shifted from {var_epsilon}{sub hoop} {approx} 0.75% (0% prestrain) to a higher design strain of 1.0% (0.4% prestrain). In case of 0.8% prestrain the design strain even becomes much higher then the operational strain of {approx} 1.15%. This value is normally defined is tensile failure strain e{sub {parallel}}{sup t} {approx} 1.7% in case of T8OO/epoxide composite divided by the usual design factor j{sub u} = 1.5.

  19. Evaluation of pressure and durability of a low-cost wheelchair cushion designed for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Evandro; Mann, William C

    2003-06-01

    Pressure sores are a medical problem for wheelchair users worldwide. In developing countries this problem is more critical because of lack of access to specialized technologies and medical assessment. Seat cushions to relieve pressure represent one of best ways to prevent pressure sores for people with spinal cord injury, amputation, cerebral palsy, and other disabilities that require use of wheelchairs for long periods of time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a low cost cushion, called the Tuball, designed for low-income communities in developing countries. The Tuball is made from bicycle inner tubes and plastic balls. Its durability and pressure-relieving characteristics were compared with the ROHOTM cushion and the foam cushions now used in Brazil. A sample of 30 participants tested the three cushions: 15 persons with paraplegia and 15 matched able-bodied persons evaluated the capacity of the cushions to distribute pressure. This study also addressed the use of samples of persons without disabilities to test wheelchair cushions.The Tuball cushion provided significantly better pressure distribution than the foam cushion. A t-test was used to compare disabled persons and non-disabled persons as samples in testing cushions. No difference between pressure distribution between non-disabled and disabled participants was found in testing the ROHO cushion or the foam cushion. However, both capacities of pressure distribution and HICPR varied between non-disabled and disabled participants for the Tuball cushion. To determine the useful life of the Tuball cushion, a fatigue test was conducted to simulate sitting and transfer. Both the Tuball and ROHO cushions withstood the equivalent of at least 1 year of use, whereas the foam cushion broke down. PMID:12799609

  20. The Problematic Implementation of Teacher Evaluation Policy: School Failure or Governmental Pitfall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation policy is implemented in many countries to improve the teaching quality in schools. This paper explores the implementation of teacher evaluation policy in secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium). The case study method is used to explore the implementation process in six schools, which are selected based upon teachers'…

  1. Evaluation of Formation Damage Caused by Drilling Fluids Specifically in Pressure-Reduced Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, C.; Rahman, S.S.

    1984-02-01

    The paper describes a method for evaluating formation damage caused by drilling fluid in reservoirs which may have pressure considerably less than hydrostatic pressure. The problem is of specific interest for enhanced oil recovery and/or underground gas storage projects. The method is flexible and practically oriented. It allows formation damage evaluation under the conditions of differential pressure of up to 100 bar (1400 psi) temperature of 140/sup 0/C (300 /sup 0/F), annular velocity of 2 m/s (.6 ft/s), 1 - 2,5 cm (0,4 - 1'') core diameter and length of 25 cm (10 ''). Formation damage is evaluated by 2 factors: damage ratio (DR) and sectional damage ratio (SDR). The residual permeability is expressed in terms of relative values using the initial permeability as reference. The depth of permeability impairment is determined by measuring the permeability of segmented cores of 5 cm (2 '') length (fig. 1). For this criterion the term sectional damage ratio is introduced. The method as described in this paper was applied to evaluate formation damage caused by a KC1-Chalk-Mud in two sandstones of 10 mD and 1000 mD range with pressure difference, temperature, annular velocity and time of contamination as the influencing variables.

  2. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  3. Evaluation of a Community Health Service Center-Based Intervention Program for Managing Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Moli; Ma, Yanlan; Zhou, Ti; Xia, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the role of primary care for the management of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been highly recommended, structural involvement of primary care in heart failure (HF) management programs is extremely limited. Aims: To examine the feasibility and applicability of two most recommended forms of care delivery mode, home visit and telephone support, for CHF management in the setting of community health service center (CHSC). Study Design: Prospective study. Methods: This study was conducted in two CHSCs in Beijing, China. Care delivery was led by trained general practitioners or community nurses via home visits in one CHSC and telephone support in the other. Data regarding the change in mortality and hospitalization rate during 12 months and self-care level at 6 months were prospectively collected and compared across the intervention groups. Results: A total of 329 patients were included, with 142 in the home visit group and 187 in the telephone support group. Patients in both groups had frequent visits to CHSC (8.1±5.9 in the home visit and 7.7±4.1 in the telephone support group, p=0.45) during the follow-up period. Compared to the telephone support group, patients in the home visit group showed a reduction in all-cause mortality (14.1% versus 20.3%, p=0.14), one or more hospitalizations due to any cause (33.8% versus 44.2%, p=0.12) and one or more hospitalizations due to cardiac cause (17.6% versus 24.6%, p=0.13) in the home visit group. The absolute differences were 6.2% (95% CI: 1.9%, 14.3%), 8.4% (95% CI: 2.1%, 18.9%) and 7.3% (95% CI: 1.5%, 16.1%), respectively, although the results were not statistically significant. After 6 months of intervention, patients in both groups achieved marked improvement in self-care with reference to their own baseline values. Conclusion: Although no statistical difference was observed between the two care delivery approaches regarding the clinical outcomes of interest, given the high participation

  4. Evaluating a Web-Based Self-Management Intervention in Heart Failure Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Carol; Douglas, Clint

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions may have the potential to support self-care in patients with chronic disease, yet little is known about the feasibility of Web-based interventions in patients with heart failure (HF). Objective The objective of our study was to develop and pilot a Web-based self-care intervention for patients with HF. Methods Following development and pretesting, we pilot tested a Web-based self-care intervention using a randomized controlled design. A total of 28 participants completed validated measures of HF knowledge, self-care, and self-efficacy at baseline and 1-month follow-up. Results Change scores and effect size estimates showed that the mean differences in HF knowledge (d=0.06), self-care (d=0.32), and self-efficacy (d=0.37) were small. Despite email reminders, 7 of 14 participants (50%) of the sample accessed the site daily and 4 of 14 (28%) had no record of access. Conclusions Larger randomized controlled trials are needed that attend to all sources of self-efficacy and include more comprehensive educational tools to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27324213

  5. Effect of Early Intervention With Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Sleep Disordered Breathing on Six-Month Readmission Rates in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul; Gupta, Ankit; Reeves, Gordon; Rubin, Sharon; Bonita, Raphael; Chowdhury, Anindita; Malloy, Raymond; Willes, Leslee; Whellan, David

    2016-03-15

    Rehospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) is high within 6 months of discharge. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common and underdiagnosed condition in patients with CHF. We hypothesized that early recognition and treatment of SDB in hospitalized patients with CHF will reduce hospital readmissions and emergency room visits. Patients admitted for CHF underwent overnight polysomnography within 4 weeks of discharge. Patients diagnosed with SDB were provided therapy with positive airway pressure therapy. Patients were identified as having good compliance if the device use was for a minimum of 4 hours 70% of the time for a minimum of 4 weeks during the first 3 months of therapy. Hospital admissions for 6 months before therapy were compared with readmission within 6 months after therapy in patients with good and poor compliance. A total of 70 patients were diagnosed with SDB after discharge. Of the 70 patients, 37 (53%) were compliant with positive airway pressure therapy. Compliant patients were more likely to be older (64 ± 12 vs 58 ± 11 years) and women (54% vs 33%) and less likely to be patient with diabetes (40% vs 67%) versus noncompliant patients. Although both groups experienced a decrease in total readmissions, compliant patients had a significant reduction (mean ± SE: -1.5 ± 0.2 clinical events vs -0.2 ± 0.3; p <0.0001). In this single-center analysis, identification and treatment of SDB in admitted patients with CHF with SDB is associated with reduced readmissions over 6 months after discharge. Adherence to the treatment was associated with a greater reduction in clinical events. PMID:26830259

  6. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  7. Evaluating the BD-100R [Bubble Technology Industries] as a neutron spectrometer through pressure variation

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.; Ebert, D.; Munno, F.

    1990-07-01

    Other investigators have evaluated the dose response of neutron bubble dosimeters for possible use as personnel monitors for the U.S. Navy in low level radiation fields. In addition to dose measurements, these devices have been modified to measure the neutron energy spectra. These methods tend to be cumbersome, inaccurate, or both and do not use the same devices as employed in the dosimetry. The BD-100R dosimeter used in this work consists of a test tube containing an elastic polymer with interspersed droplets of two types of Freon; Freon-12 and Freon-114. Each superheated liquid droplet is a potential nucleation site. The minimum energy needed to form a bubble from the nucleation site is given by, E = 16{pi}{gamma}{sup 3}(T)/3({delta}P){sup 2}, where {delta}P is the difference between the vapor pressure of the droplet and the applied pressure. Upon reaching a critical radius, a bubble becomes unstable and grows in size. It may be seen from this equation that the energy deposition required for bubble formation is inversely proportional to the square of the pressure difference. The number of bubbles formed continually decreases with increasing applied pressure, until a pressure is reached where no bubbles are formed since the energy transferred can no longer vaporize the Freon. This investigation is intended to demonstrate the determination of an unknown spectrum utilizing the dosimeter response (number of bubbles formed) as a function of the neutron energy (applied pressure). A set of 12 dosimeters was initially exposed outside the East Beam Port (EBP) at the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The dosimeters were inside a pressure chamber which could accommodate up to 18 dosimeters. The same set of dosimeters were irradiated using a paraffin moderated PuBe source for which the neutron energy spectrum is unknown. There were eight exposures of six dosimeters at varied pressures in the EBP. The average number of bubbles and standard deviation was measured

  8. A stress-state modified strain based failure criterion for evaluating the structural integrity of an inner eutectic barrier.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Russell; Harding, David Cameron; Akin, Lili A.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    A slight modification of a package to transport solid metal contents requires inclusion of a thin titanium liner to protect against possible eutectic formation in 10 CFR 71.74 regulatory fire accident conditions. Under severe transport regulatory impact conditions, the package contents could impart high localized loading of the liner, momentarily pinching it between the contents and the thick containment vessel, and inducing some plasticity near the contact point. Actuator and drop table testing of simulated contents impacts against liner/containment vessel structures nearly bounded the potential plastic strain and stress triaxiality conditions, without any ductile tearing of the eutectic barrier. Additional bounding was necessary in some cases beyond the capability of the actuator and drop table tests, and in these cases a stress-modified evolution integral over the plastic strain history was successfully used as a failure criterion to demonstrate that structural integrity was maintained. The Heaviside brackets only allow the evolution integral to accumulate value when the maximum principal stress is positive, since failure is never observed under pure hydrostatic pressure, where the maximum principal stress is negative. Detailed finite element analyses of myriad possible impact orientations and locations between package contents and the thin eutectic barrier under regulatory impact conditions have shown that not even the initiation of a ductile tear occurs. Although localized plasticity does occur in the eutectic barrier, it is not the primary containment boundary and is thus not subject to ASME stress allowables from NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6. These analyses were used to successfully demonstrate that structural integrity of the eutectic barrier was maintained in all 10 CFR 71.73 and 71.74 regulatory accident conditions. The NRC is currently reviewing the Safety Analysis Report.

  9. A portfolio approach to evaluating natural hazard mitigation policies: An Application to lateral-spread ground failure in Coastal California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernknopf, R.L.; Dinitz, L.B.; Rabinovici, S.J.M.; Evans, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, efforts to prevent catastrophic losses from natural hazards have largely been undertaken by individual property owners based on site-specific evaluations of risks to particular buildings. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage mitigation have focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. This paper develops an alternative, intermediate-scale approach to regional risk assessment and the evaluation of community mitigation policies. Properties are grouped into types with similar land uses and levels of hazard, and hypothetical community mitigation strategies for protecting these properties are modeled like investment portfolios. The portfolios consist of investments in mitigation against the risk to a community posed by a specific natural hazard, and are defined by a community's mitigation budget and the proportion of the budget invested in locations of each type. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated through an integrated assessment of earthquake-induced lateral-spread ground failure risk in the Watsonville, California area. Data from the magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 are used to model lateral-spread ground failure susceptibility. Earth science and economic data are combined and analyzed in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The portfolio model is then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in different locations. Two mitigation policies, one that prioritizes mitigation by land use type and the other by hazard zone, are compared with a status quo policy of doing no further mitigation beyond that which already exists. The portfolio representing the hazard zone rule yields a higher expected return than the land use portfolio does: However, the hazard zone portfolio experiences a higher standard deviation. Therefore, neither portfolio is clearly preferred. The two mitigation policies both reduce expected losses

  10. Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuzhi; Li, Dr. Tianlei; Ren, Prof. Fei; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

  11. Pressure-Relief Features of Fixed and Autotitrating Continuous Positive Airway Pressure May Impair Their Efficacy: Evaluation with a Respiratory Bench Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kaixian; Aouf, Sami; Roisman, Gabriel; Escourrou, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    , Roisman G, Escourrou P. Pressure-relief features of fixed and autotitrating continuous positive airway pressure may impair their efficacy: evaluation with a respiratory bench model. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):385–392. PMID:26564383

  12. An Economic Evaluation of a Self-Care Intervention in Persons with Heart Failure and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Butler, Javed; Culler, Steven D.; Gary, Rebecca A.; Higgins, Melinda; Schindler, Peter; Butts, Brittany; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Persons with concomitant heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus are a growing population whose quality of life is encumbered with worse clinical outcomes as well as high health resource use (HRU) and costs. Methods and Results Extensive data on HRU and costs were collected as part of a prospective cost effectiveness analysis of a self-care intervention to improve outcomes in persons with both HF and diabetes. HRU costs were assigned from a Medicare reimbursement perspective. Patients (n=134) randomized to the self-care intervention and those receiving usual care/attention control were followed for 6 months, revealing significant differences in the number of hospitalization days and associated costs between groups. The mean number of inpatient days (d) was 3d with bootstrapped bias corrected (BCa) confidence intervals (CI) of 1.8d – 4.4d) for intervention group and 7.3d (BCa CI 4.1d – 10.9d) in the control group; p= .044. Total direct HRU costs per participant were an estimated $9,065 (BCa CI $6,496 to $11,936) in the intervention and $16,712 (BCa CI 8,200 to $26,621) in the control group, for a mean difference of −$7,647 (BCa CI −$17,588 to $809, p= .21) in favor of the intervention, including intervention costs estimated to be $130.67 per patient. Conclusions The self-care intervention demonstrated dominance in lowering costs without sacrificing Quality Adjusted Life Years. Clinical Trial Registration– http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01606085 PMID:26164214

  13. Bedside lung ultrasound in the evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leidi, Federica; Casella, Francesco; Cogliati, Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Dyspnea is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED) and a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) and medical wards. Ultrasound (US) has traditionally been considered inadequate to explore the aerated lung. However, in the past 15 years LUS gained broader application, at least in part thanks to the interpretation of the artefacts generated by the interaction of US and lung structures/content. The total reflection of US beam occurring at the pleural level determines the artefactual image of the aerated lung: an homogenous 'foggy-like' picture under the pleural line. As the air content of the lungs decreases due to interstitial imbibition, deposition of collagen or presence of blood, vertical artefacts -arising from the pleural line and moving synchronously with the respiration- called B-lines appear. Multiple and bilateral B-lines identify the alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS). The most common cause of AIS is the wet lung: the more the congestion burden, the more the extent of the B-lines, which become confluent until the so-called white lung in case of pulmonary edema. Many studies showed a higher accuracy of LUS in diagnosing acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) as compared to chest X-ray As recently shown, the integration of LUS to clinical assessment allow to differentiate cardiogenic dyspnea with sensitivity and specificity greater than 95 %. Moreover, LUS can easily detect pleural effusion -frequently present in ADHF-appearing as an anechoic area in the recumbent area of the thorax, delimited inferiorly by the diaphragmatic dome and superiorly by the aerated lung. PMID:26885846

  14. A method for evaluating pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, T.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described to evaluate the susceptibility of gate valves to pressure locking and thermal binding. Binding of the valve disc in the closed position due to high pressure water trapped in the bonnet cavity (pressure locking) or differential thermal expansion of the disk in the seat (thermal binding) represents a potential mechanism that can prevent safety-related systems from functioning when called upon. The method described here provides a general equation that can be applied to a given gate valve design and set of operating conditions to determine the susceptibility of the valve to fail due to disc binding. The paper is organized into three parts. The first part discusses the physical mechanisms that cause disc binding. The second part describes the mathematical equations. The third part discusses the conclusions.

  15. Evaluation of serum Resistin in children with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamshary, Abd El-Hamid Salah; El-Shaaer, Osama Saad; Soliman, Doaa Refaay; El-Mashad, Ghada Mohamed; Hussien, Ahmed Ibraheem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High serum resistin levels are associated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objectives of this study were to determine the serum concentrations of resistin in children that present with chronic renal failure (CRF) and end stage renal disease (ESRD), in order to examine the impact of hemodialysis (HD) on serum resistin levels, and to determine if a correlation exists between resistin and growth retardation in patients with CRF. Methods This case control study was undertaken in the pediatric hemodialysis unit of the Benha and Menoufia University hospitals from April 2014 to March 2015. The case group consisted of 50 patients with CRF aged from 6–18 years (25 of them under HD and 25 of them under conservative treatment) and 30 healthy children who constituted the control group. Urea, creatinine, and serum resistin were measured before and after the HD session for patients with CRF who are already under HD. Results A highly significant difference was found between the resistin levels in the two groups with mean level of 20.2 ± 7.58 ng/ml in the patient case group as compared to 4.9 ± 1.72 ng/ml in the control group. This highly significant difference found in the resistin level differed according to the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage of progression as patients on regular HD had resistin levels with a mean of 24.6 ± 7.28 ng/ml while the CKD patients under conservative treatment have resistin level mean of 15.6 ± 4.72 ng/ml. there was a highly significant difference in resistin levels before HD (mean = 24.6 ± 7.28) and after hemodialysis (mean = 14.7 ± 5.2). Conclusion Patients with CRF experienced higher than normal resistin levels as compared to the case control group and it was found that patients on HD had more elevated levels of resistin than did those patients who were on conservative treatment. HD treatments were found to be capable of lowering a patient’s resistin levels. A highly significant negative correlation

  16. Evaluation of serum Resistin in children with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamshary, Abd El-Hamid Salah; El-Shaaer, Osama Saad; Soliman, Doaa Refaay; El-Mashad, Ghada Mohamed; Hussien, Ahmed Ibraheem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High serum resistin levels are associated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objectives of this study were to determine the serum concentrations of resistin in children that present with chronic renal failure (CRF) and end stage renal disease (ESRD), in order to examine the impact of hemodialysis (HD) on serum resistin levels, and to determine if a correlation exists between resistin and growth retardation in patients with CRF. Methods This case control study was undertaken in the pediatric hemodialysis unit of the Benha and Menoufia University hospitals from April 2014 to March 2015. The case group consisted of 50 patients with CRF aged from 6–18 years (25 of them under HD and 25 of them under conservative treatment) and 30 healthy children who constituted the control group. Urea, creatinine, and serum resistin were measured before and after the HD session for patients with CRF who are already under HD. Results A highly significant difference was found between the resistin levels in the two groups with mean level of 20.2 ± 7.58 ng/ml in the patient case group as compared to 4.9 ± 1.72 ng/ml in the control group. This highly significant difference found in the resistin level differed according to the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage of progression as patients on regular HD had resistin levels with a mean of 24.6 ± 7.28 ng/ml while the CKD patients under conservative treatment have resistin level mean of 15.6 ± 4.72 ng/ml. there was a highly significant difference in resistin levels before HD (mean = 24.6 ± 7.28) and after hemodialysis (mean = 14.7 ± 5.2). Conclusion Patients with CRF experienced higher than normal resistin levels as compared to the case control group and it was found that patients on HD had more elevated levels of resistin than did those patients who were on conservative treatment. HD treatments were found to be capable of lowering a patient’s resistin levels. A highly significant negative correlation

  17. Evaluation of oxygen pressurized microwave-assisted digestion of botanical materials using diluted nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Müller, Edson Irineu; Schmidt, Lucas; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Flores, Erico Marlon Moraes

    2011-02-15

    The feasibility of diluted nitric acid solutions for microwave-assisted decomposition of botanical samples in closed vessels was evaluated. Oxygen pressurized atmosphere was used to improve the digestion efficiency and Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na were determined in digests by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Efficiency of digestion was evaluated taking into account the residual carbon content (RCC) and residual acidity in digests. Samples were digested using nitric acid solutions (2, 3, 7, and 14 mol L(-1) HNO(3)) and the effect of gas phase composition inside the reaction vessels by purging the vessel with Ar (inert atmosphere, 1 bar), air (20% of oxygen, 1 bar) and pure O(2) (100% of oxygen, 1 bar) was evaluated. The influence of oxygen pressure was studied using pressures of 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar. It was demonstrated that a diluted nitric acid solution as low as 3 mol L(-1) was suitable for an efficient digestion of sample masses up to 500 mg of botanical samples using 5 bar of oxygen pressure. The residual acidities in final digests were lower than 45% in relation to the initial amount of acid used for digestion (equivalent to 1.3 mol L(-1) HNO(3)). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated using certified reference materials of olive leaves, apple leaves, peach leaves and pine needles. Using the optimized conditions for sample digestion, the results obtained were in agreement with certified values. The limit of quantification was improved up to a factor of 14.5 times for the analytes evaluated. In addition, the proposed procedure was in agreement with the recommendations of the green chemistry once it was possible to obtain relatively high digestion efficiency (RCC<5%) using only diluted HNO(3), which is important to minimize the generation of laboratory residues. PMID:21238716

  18. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  19. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  20. Avoiding randomization failure in program evaluation, with application to the Medicare Health Support program.

    PubMed

    King, Gary; Nielsen, Richard; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Wells, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    We highlight common problems in the application of random treatment assignment in large-scale program evaluation. Random assignment is the defining feature of modern experimental design, yet errors in design, implementation, and analysis often result in real-world applications not benefiting from its advantages. The errors discussed here cover the control of variability, levels of randomization, size of treatment arms, and power to detect causal effects, as well as the many problems that commonly lead to post-treatment bias. We illustrate these issues by identifying numerous serious errors in the Medicare Health Support evaluation and offering recommendations to improve the design and analysis of this and other large-scale randomized experiments.

  1. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  2. Evaluation of gaseous fluorocarbon adsorption isotherms on porous adsorbents under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliappan, S.; Furuya, E.G.; Noll, K.E.; Chang, H.T.; Wang, H.C.

    1996-11-01

    In this study data have been collected to aid in the design of a control system that will remove fluorocarbons by adsorbing onto porous adsorbents. A bench scale experimental adsorption system had been designed using high accuracy MKS pressure transducers of 10,000 torr (two nos.) and a 100 torr connected to digital readout units. Tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) one of the fluorinated carbon family has been selected to evaluate the adsorption characteristics on porous adsorbents. The CF{sub 4} was charged to a sample reservoir in the test system at 200 psig pressure and at 22 C was allowed into an adsorption chamber at small increment of pressure rise. The pressure drop, using a Valydine PS 309 differential pressure gauge from the sample reservoir and the pressure buildup in the adsorption chamber were measured and the amount of CF{sub 4} adsorbed onto the adsorbents was calculated using ideal gas law. Various adsorbents, molecular sieve 13X, Silicagel (14 x 20), Beads Activated Carbon, Granular Activated Carbons PCB 6 x 16, BPL 4 x 10, F300, and F400 had been studied. It has been found that GAC-PCB 6 x 16 has the highest adsorbing capacity of 0.51 gm/gm at the conditions established. GAC-F300 had the second highest adsorbing capacity of 0.413 gm/gm, among all the adsorbents tested. The isotherms were analyzed using several equations employing both two parameters and three parameters. The relationship between the constants and physical properties of adsorbent solids and adsorbate molecules is discussed. The result of this study will be utilized to design a pressure swing fluorocarbon adsorption system that can be economically (using recycle of the collected fluorocarbons) applied to fluorocarbon removal in the electronic industry.

  3. EVALUATION OF SEISMIC INDUCED WALL PRESSURES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2005-03-30

    The extent to which finite element models of partially buried nuclear power plant structures may be used to compute seismic induced wall pressures is investigated in this paper. Stresses in three dimensional finite elements modeling the soil adjacent to the structure are used and stresses in these elements are used to evaluate wall pressures. Depths of burial of the structure varying from 1/4 to 1 times the height of the structure are considered. The SASSI computer code is used to perform the analyses. The wall pressures for the shallower depths of burial are found to depend on the inertial interaction loads, while the pressures for the deeper embedded structures are found to depend on kinematic interaction loads. The input ground motion for the study has a ZPA equal to 0.3 g. The maximum wall pressures are examined to determine whether non linear effects (separation of the wall and soil or slippage of the soil relative to the wall) are important. Non-linear effects are found to occur for depths of burial less than one half of the height and are found to occur over one half of the buried depth.

  4. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  5. Evaluation and Treatment of Gastric Stimulator Failure in Patients With Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nancy Salloum; Williams, Patrick A.; Walker, Micah R.; Nikitini, Yana; Helling, Thomas S.; Abell, Thomas L.; Lahr, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates treatment of gastroparesis patients refractory to gastric electrical stimulation (GES) therapy with surgical replacement of the entire GES system. Summary Background Data Some patients who have symptomatic improvement with GES later develop recurrent symptoms. Some patients improve by simply altering pulse parameter settings. Others continue to have symptoms with maximized pulse parameters. For these patients, we have shown that surgical implantation of a new device and leads at a different gastric location will improve symptoms of gastroparesis. Methods This study evaluates 15 patients with recurrent symptoms after initial GES therapy who subsequently received a second GES system. Positive response to GES replacement therapy is evaluated by symptoms scores for vomiting, nausea, epigastric pain, early satiety, and bloating using a modified Likert score system, 0 to 4. Results Total symptom scores improved for 12 of 15 patients with GES replacement surgery. Total score for the replacement group decreased from 17.3 ± 1.6 to 13.6 ± 3.7 with a difference of 3.6 (P value = .017). This score is compared with that of the control group with a preoperative symptom score of 15.8 ± 3.6 and postoperative score of 12.3 ± 3.5 with a difference of 3.5 (P value = .011). The control group showed a 20.3% decrease in mean total symptoms score, whereas the study group showed a 22.5% decrease in mean with an absolute reduction of 2.2. Conclusion Reimplantation of a GES at a new gastric location should be considered a viable option for patients who have initially failed GES therapy for gastroparesis. PMID:24056201

  6. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  7. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  8. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [data aquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information regarding the safety limits of hydrocarbons in liquid and gaseous oxygen, the steps taken for hydrocarbon removal from liquified gases, and the analysis of the contaminants was searched and the results are presented. The safety of hydrocarbons in gaseous systems was studied, and the latest hydrocarbon test equipment and methodology is reviewed. A detailed sampling and analysis plan is proposed to evaluate high pressure GN2 and LOX systems.

  9. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  10. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  11. Liquefaction, flow, and associated ground failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youd, T. Leslie

    1973-01-01

    Ambiguities in the use of the term liquefaction and in defining the relation between liquefaction and ground failure have led to encumbered communication between workers in various fields and between specialists in the same field, and the possibility that evaluations of liquefaction potential could be misinterpreted or misapplied. Explicit definitions of liquefaction and related concepts are proposed herein. These definitions, based on observed laboratory behavior, are then used to clarify the relation between liquefaction and ground failure. Soil liquefaction is defined as the transformation of a granular material from a solid into a liquefied state as a consequence of increased pore-water pressures. This definition avoids confusion between liquefaction and possible flow-failure conditions after liquefaction. Flow-failure conditions are divided into two types: (1) unlimited flow if pore-pressure reductions caused by dilatancy during flow deformation are not sufficient to solidify the material and thus arrest flow, and (2) limited flow if they are sufficient to solidify the material after a finite deformation. After liquefaction in the field, unlimited flow commonly leads to flow landslides, whereas limited flow leads at most to lateral-spreading landslides. Quick-condition failures such as loss of bearing capacity form a third type of ground failure associated with liquefaction.

  12. Topical Report ''Corrosion Evaluation of LLW2 Skid-B Weld Failure Mechanisms (44139-92)

    SciTech Connect

    JI Young Chang

    2001-05-31

    An independent investigation of pipe welding leaks from the Low-Level Waste 2 (LLW2) Skid-B System for the possibilities of improper welding (IW), microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), sensitization, chloride pitting corrosion (CPC), and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was conducted. The results show the prevailing mechanisms that caused the leaks are identified as IW, CPC, and the improper selection of weld filler material for the base metals in an environment of the North Plateau underground water. These is no evidence of MIC, sensitization, or IGSCC. The chloride pitting corrosion mechanism that took place at all the welds are also described. All the pipelines were replaced with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for cost saving and the LLW2 Skid B System has been successfully operating since 1999. This report summarizes the findings and recommendations associated with preventive measures for future operations. The LLW2 Facility is a replacement for an existing waste treatment system. The Facility processes two different waste streams through two different ''skids.'' After seven months of operation, one of the two skids began to leak. Extensive evaluation of the corrosion mechanisms and the contributing factors are documented in this report. This report principally evaluates the physical and chemical configurations that led to the corrosion and leaks. Chloride pitting corrosion, exacerbated by weld defects, is the corrosion mechanism. The report also discusses fabrication and Quality Assurance (QA)/Quality Control (QC) actions that would have prevented their occurrence. It is believed that in the absence of either the defects or the chloride concentrations, corrosion would not have occurred. In developing the specification for processing skids to be used in the Facility, high chloride was not identified as a parameter of concern. As such, piping fabrication and inspection standards for the system did not identify more rigorous welding standards

  13. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  14. Robust health evaluation of gearbox subject to tooth failure with wavelet decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Miao, Qiang; Kang, Rui

    2009-07-01

    Machinery condition monitoring is a key step to perform condition-based maintenance (CBM) policy. In this paper, a novel health evaluation method based on wavelet decomposition is proposed. In the process of wavelet decomposition, a new index is defined to choose the optimal detail signal. After that, frequency spectrum growth index (FSGI) is proposed to serve as a quantitative description of machine health condition. This index is helpful for maintenance decision-making. At the same time, a semi-dynamic threshold criterion that can be used to check the existence of fault is established. In order to demonstrate the performance of this index with its semi-dynamic threshold, a comprehensive study with three sets of vibration data collected from a mechanical diagnostics test bed is conducted to validate this method. The analysis results indicate that the proposed method is insensitive to the selection of wavelet function and wavelet decomposition level, which means that FSGI has excellent performance in gear early fault detection.

  15. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis.

  16. Evaluation of the operator protection factors offered by positive pressure air suits against airborne microbiological challenge.

    PubMed

    Steward, Jackie A; Lever, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

  17. Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Jackie A.; Lever, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

  18. Characterization of a pressure measuring system for the evaluation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Bonnaire, Rébecca; Verhaeghe, Marion; Molimard, Jérôme; Calmels, Paul; Convert, Reynald

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possible use of four "FSA" thin and flexible resistive pressure mapping systems, designed by Vista Medical (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), for the measurement of interface pressure exerted by lumbar belts onto the trunk. These sensors were originally designed for the measurement of low pressure applied by medical devices on the skin. Two types of tests were performed: standard metrology tests such as linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, reproducibility and drift, and specific tests for this application such as curvature, surface condition and mapping system superposition. The linear regression coefficient is between 0.86 and 0.98; hysteresis is between 6.29% and 9.41%. Measurements are repeatable. The location, time and operator, measurement surface condition and mapping system superposition have a statistically significant influence on the results. A stable measure is verified over the period defined in the calibration procedure, but unacceptable drift is observed afterward. The measurement stays suitable on a curved surface for an applied pressure above 50 mmHg. To conclude, the sensor has acceptable linearity, hysteresis and repeatability. Calibration must be adapted to avoid drift. Moreover, when comparing different measurements with this sensor, the location, the time, the operator and the measurement surface condition should not change; the mapping system must not be superimposed.

  19. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  20. Right ventricular failure due to chronic pressure load: What have we learned in animal models since the NIH working group statement?

    PubMed

    Borgdorff, Marinus A J; Dickinson, Michael G; Berger, Rolf M F; Bartelds, Beatrijs

    2015-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure determines outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart diseases and in left ventricular failure. In 2006, the Working Group on Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Right Heart Failure of the NIH advocated the development of preclinical models to study the pathophysiology and pathobiology of RV failure. In this review, we summarize the progress of research into the pathobiology of RV failure and potential therapeutic interventions. The picture emerging from this research is that RV adaptation to increased afterload is characterized by increased contractility, dilatation and hypertrophy. Clinical RV failure is associated with progressive diastolic deterioration and disturbed ventricular-arterial coupling in the presence of increased contractility. The pathobiology of the failing RV shows similarities with that of the LV and is marked by lack of adequate increase in capillary density leading to a hypoxic environment and oxidative stress and a metabolic switch from fatty acids to glucose utilization. However, RV failure also has characteristic features. So far, therapies aiming to specifically improve RV function have had limited success. The use of beta blockers and sildenafil may hold promise, but new therapies have to be developed. The use of recently developed animal models will aid in further understanding of the pathobiology of RV failure and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Evaluating rehabilitation efforts following the Milford Flat Fire: successes, failures, and controlling factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Palmquist, Emily C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled wildfire in arid and semiarid ecosystems has become an increasing concern in recent decades. Active rehabilitation of fire-affected areas is often quickly initiated to minimize long-term ecosystem damage. However, the complex soil-geomorphic-vegetation patterns and low and variable moisture conditions in these regions makes restoration challenging. To further inform these post-fire management decisions, we present results from 5 years of vegetation and sediment flux monitoring following the Milford Flat Fire in west-central Utah, USA. Our sampling design includes monitoring plots in areas not burned, areas burned but where no rehabilitation was attempted, and burned areas where various rehabilitation approaches were implemented. At each of the 25 plots, vegetation cover and composition data were collected annually, and wind-driven sediment flux was measured using passive dust traps. To evaluate effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in establishing desired species and limiting dominance of undesired species, we analyzed the temporal response of individual species and functional groups as well as community-level multivariate responses. The warm and dry conditions that persisted for approximately 12 months post-treatment, coupled with the surface disturbing rehabilitation approaches used, resulted in near-surface dust fluxes several orders of magnitude higher in treated areas than in unburned or burned areas where no rehabilitation occurred. These dry conditions and high surface sediment flux limited the establishment of seeded species in rehabilitation areas for nearly 3 years. Post-fire rehabilitation did not limit dominance by invasive annual species of concern. Perennial species composition in the areas burned but not subject to post-fire rehabilitation was relatively similar to unburned throughout the study period. In contrast, the burned plots where rehabilitation was attempted were characterized by no (<3%) perennial cover or, in

  2. Evaluation of Pressure Stable Chip-to-Tube Fittings Enabling High-Speed Chip-HPLC with Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Carsten; Heiland, Josef J; Stein, Volkmar; Klimkait, Michael; Queisser, Marco; Belder, Detlev

    2016-08-01

    Appropriate chip-to-tube interfacing is an enabling technology for high-pressure and high-speed liquid chromatography on chip. For this purpose, various approaches, to connect pressure resistant glass chips with HPLC pumps working at pressures of up to 500 bar, were examined. Three side-port and one top-port connection approach were evaluated with regard to pressure stability and extra column band broadening. A clamp-based top-port approach enabled chip-HPLC-MS analysis of herbicides at the highest pressure and speed. PMID:27397738

  3. Evaluation of Pressure Stable Chip-to-Tube Fittings Enabling High-Speed Chip-HPLC with Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Carsten; Heiland, Josef J; Stein, Volkmar; Klimkait, Michael; Queisser, Marco; Belder, Detlev

    2016-08-01

    Appropriate chip-to-tube interfacing is an enabling technology for high-pressure and high-speed liquid chromatography on chip. For this purpose, various approaches, to connect pressure resistant glass chips with HPLC pumps working at pressures of up to 500 bar, were examined. Three side-port and one top-port connection approach were evaluated with regard to pressure stability and extra column band broadening. A clamp-based top-port approach enabled chip-HPLC-MS analysis of herbicides at the highest pressure and speed.

  4. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  5. G-tunnel pressurized slot-testing evaluations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratories elected to conduct a development program to enhance mechanical-type measurements. The program was focused on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of pressurized slot strength testing results and methods. This report contains data interpretation and evaluations. Included are recommendations for future efforts. This third report contains the interpretations of the testing with emphasis on the measurement results as they apply to describing rock behavior. In particular, emphases are placed on (1) normal stress determinations using the flatjack cancellation (FC) method, (2) modulus of deformation determinations, and (3) high pressure investigations. Most of the material in the first two reports is not repeated here. Appropriate data are repeated in tabular form.

  6. 14 CFR 23.571 - Metallic pressurized cabin structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Fatigue Evaluation § 23.571 Metallic pressurized cabin structures. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR... the following: (a) A fatigue strength investigation in which the structure is shown by tests, or by... both that catastrophic failure of the structure is not probable after fatigue failure, or...

  7. Short Term Survival after Admission for Heart Failure in Sweden: Applying Multilevel Analyses of Discriminatory Accuracy to Evaluate Institutional Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ghith, Nermin; Wagner, Philippe; Frølich, Anne; Merlo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital performance is frequently evaluated by analyzing differences between hospital averages in some quality indicators. The results are often expressed as quality charts of hospital variance (e.g., league tables, funnel plots). However, those analyses seldom consider patients heterogeneity around averages, which is of fundamental relevance for a correct evaluation. Therefore, we apply an innovative methodology based on measures of components of variance and discriminatory accuracy to analyze 30-day mortality after hospital discharge with a diagnosis of Heart Failure (HF) in Sweden. Methods We analyzed 36,943 patients aged 45–80 treated in 565 wards at 71 hospitals during 2007–2009. We applied single and multilevel logistic regression analyses to calculate the odds ratios and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUC). We evaluated general hospital and ward effects by quantifying the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the increment in the AUC obtained by adding random effects in a multilevel regression analysis (MLRA). Finally, the Odds Ratios (ORs) for specific ward and hospital characteristics were interpreted jointly with the proportional change in variance (PCV) and the proportion of ORs in the opposite direction (POOR). Findings Overall, the average 30-day mortality was 9%. Using only patient information on age and previous hospitalizations for different diseases we obtained an AUC = 0.727. This value was almost unchanged when adding sex, country of birth as well as hospitals and wards levels. Average mortality was higher in small wards and municipal hospitals but the POOR values were 15% and 16% respectively. Conclusions Swedish wards and hospitals in general performed homogeneously well, resulting in a low 30-day mortality rate after HF. In our study, knowledge on a patient’s previous hospitalizations was the best predictor of 30-day mortality, and this information did not improve by knowing the sex and country

  8. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 2: High pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.; Heckert, B.; Burge, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    A high pressure thruster effort was conducted with the major objective of demonstrating a duct cooling concept with gaseous propellant in a thruster operating at nominally 300 psia and 1500 lbf. The analytical design methods for the duct cooling were proven in a series of tests with both ambient and reduced temperature propellants. Long duration tests as well as pulse mode tests demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. All tests were conducted with a scaling of the raised post triplet injector design previously demonstrated at 900 lbf in demonstration firings. A series of environmental conditioned firings were also conducted to determine the effects of thermal soaks, atmospheric air and high humidity. This volume presents the results of the high pressure thruster evaluations.

  9. Fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy for evaluating a potentially difficult airway in a patient with elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N; Sandhu, Gurneet; Bergese, Sergio D

    2016-11-01

    A 62-year-old man with a left temporal lobe tumor was scheduled for a semiurgent craniotomy for tumor excision. Previously, the patient had a laryngeal carcinoma that was resected and treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy and a history of laryngeal biopsy with awake fiberoptic intubation. Because a difficult airway was anticipated, awake fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy of the airway was performed under topical anesthesia in the operating room. This revealed a narrow glottic opening with no supraglottic pathology or friable tissue. Based on these airway observations, we proceeded safely with intravenous induction and secured the airway in a controlled fashion, thereby minimizing the risk of increased intracranial pressure and catastrophic complications. Nasopharyngoscopy can be used safely to evaluate the upper airway to stratify airway management in patients with a history of head and neck cancer presenting for neurosurgical procedures in the setting of elevated intracranial pressure. PMID:27687404

  10. Evaluation of Pressurization Fatigue Life of 1441 Al-li Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Dicus, Dennis I.; Fridlyander, Joseph; Davydov, Valentin

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the pressurization fatigue life of fuselage panels with skins fabricated from 1441 Al-Li, an attractive new Russian alloy. The study indicated that 1441 Al-Li has several advantages over conventional aluminum fuselage skin alloy with respect to fatigue behavior. Smooth 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited a fatigue endurance limit similar to that for 1163 Al (Russian version of 2024 Al) sheet. Notched 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited greater fatigue strength and longer fatigue life than 1163 Al. In addition, Tu-204 fuselage panels fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau using Al-Li skin and ring frames with riveted 7000-series aluminum stiffeners had longer pressurization fatigue lives than did panels constructed from conventional aluminum alloys. Taking into account the lower density of this alloy, the results suggest that 1441 Al-Li has the potential to improve fuselage performance while decreasing structural weight.

  11. Creep Damage Evaluation in High-Pressure Rotor Based on Hardness Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, B. R.; Matt, C. F. T.; Furtado, H. C.; de Almeida, L. H.

    2015-07-01

    A creep life consumption study was conducted in a high-pressure turbine rotor belonging to a 363 MW thermal power plant. The component is manufactured with 30CrMoV412 steel, which is a typical 1CrMoV forged rotor steel, having operated for 112,000 h, under a pressure of 17.6 MPa and temperature of 520 °C. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the applicability of hardness tests as a tool for structural integrity analysis in the field. Two methods for estimating creep remaining life based on hardness measurements were used. Furthermore, metallographic replicas made during unit shutdown were observed by scanning electron microscopy, in order to detect creep voids and also to corroborate the results for accumulated creep damage obtained based on hardness measurements.

  12. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  13. Voluntary Consensus Organization Standards for Nondestructive Evaluation of Thin-Walled Metallic Liners and Composite Overwraps in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA fracture control requirements outlined in NASA-STD-5009 and NASA-STD-5014 are predicated on the availability and use of sensitive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can detect and monitor defects, thereby providing data that can be used to predict failure or reduce the risk of failure in fracture critical components. However, in the case of composite materials and components, including composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), the effect of defects is poorly understood, the NDE methods used to evaluate locate and size defects are typically at lower technical readiness level than analogous NDE methods used for metals, and demonstration studies to verify the probability of detection (POD) are generally lacking or unavailable. These factors together make failure prediction of fracture critical composite materials and components based on size, quantity, or orientation of defects nearly impossible. Also, when inspecting metal liners in as-manufactured COPVs, sensitivity is lost and only the inner surface of the liner is accessible. Also, NDE of COPVs as applied during manufacturing varies significantly from manufacturer to manufacturer and has not yet been standardized. Although requirements exist to perform NDE immediately after manufacturing to establish initial integrity of the parts, procedural detail for NDE of composites is still nonexistent or under development. For example, in practice, only a visual inspection of COPVs is performed during manufacturing and service, leaving in question whether defects of concern, for example, bridging, overwrap winding anomalies, impact damage below visible threshold, out-of-family strain growth, and liner buckling have been adequately detected and monitored. To address these shortcomings, in 2005 the NASA Nondestructive Evaluation Working Group (NNWG) began funding work to develop and adopt standards for nondestructive evaluation of aerospace composites in collaboration with the American Society for Testing

  14. Evaluation of Very Low Pressure Sprinkler Irrigation and Reservoir Tillage for Efficient Use of Water and Energy : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, Dennis C.

    1987-03-01

    Two types of very low pressure devices were tested, spray nozzles and furrow drops (bubblers). For minimizing spray loss and maintaining uniformity, optimum conditions for spray heads are elevation about 6 feet, spacing 8 to 9 feet and pressure 15 to 20 psi. Use of furrow bubblers is not recommended for most regional conditions. Reservoir tillage with very low pressure systems reduces runoff on sloping fields while maintaining or slightly increasing yield. The total amount of water applied is slightly less because of reduction in spray loss. Effectiveness of reservoir tillage depends on the reservoir storing water until it infiltrates. Failure of the reservoirs during the season may result in increased runoff and erosion. Pressure regulators tested are adequate for their intended use. The uniformity of application using low pressure components was comparable to that of high pressure systems. Energy saving scan result from both low operating pressure and better application efficiency, but the relative importance of these two factors depends on individual circumstances. Payback times for some example systems are four years or less.

  15. Comparative evaluation of essential and toxic elements in the blood of kidney failure patients and healthy referents.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Salma Aslam; Arain, Mariam S; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Ullah, Naeem; Ali, Jamshed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the comparative distribution, correlation, and apportionment of selected elements-aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and lead (Pb)-in the blood samples of male kidney failure patients (KFP) and healthy subjects of age ranged 30-60 years. The blood samples were digested with nitric acid and perchloric acid mixture (2:1), followed by the quantification of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentration of essential elements in blood samples of KFP were found in the range of Ca (97-125), Mg (18-36), Na (2971-3685), and K (177-270) mg/L while, the levels of Al, Cd, and Pb were found in the range of (475-1275), (0.9-9.9), and (211-623) μg/L, respectively. In the healthy referents, concentration of electrolytes in blood samples was lower than KFP, but difference was not significant (p > 0.05). While the levels of toxic elements in blood samples of referents were three- to sixfold lower than KFP (p < 0.01). Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) of the element data manifested diverse apportionment of the selected elements in the blood sample of the KFP compared with the healthy counterparts. PMID:25632899

  16. Portal hypertension in acute liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Navasa, M; Garcia-Pagán, J C; Bosch, J; Riera, J R; Bañares, R; Mas, A; Bruguera, M; Rodés, J

    1992-01-01

    Twenty five patients with acute liver failure were measured for hepatic venous pressure gradient as an index of portal pressure during the course of a transjugular liver biopsy. Hepatic venous pressure gradient ranged from 4 to 24.5 mm Hg with a mean of 12.8 (5.3) mm Hg (normal values less than 5 mm Hg). All patients but one had increased portal pressure gradient. Portal hypertension correlated with the degree of architectural distortion of the liver, as suggested by a direct correlation between hepatic venous pressure gradient and the area of reticulin collapse, evaluated by means of a morphometric analysis on Sirius red stained liver slides (r = 0.43, p less than 0.05). Hepatic venous pressure gradient was significantly higher in patients with ascites (15.1 (5) mm Hg, n = 15) or renal failure (14.4 (5.3) mm Hg, n = 16) than in those without (9.3 (3.4) mm Hg and 10.1 (4) mm Hg, respectively; p less than 0.05). Portal hypertension was associated with systemic vasodilation and a hyperkinetic circulatory state, with decreased arterial pressure, and peripheral resistance and increased cardiac output. PMID:1644339

  17. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  18. Laboratory and in-vehicle evaluation of fiber optic combustion pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Wlodarczyk, Marek T.

    1994-02-01

    We present design considerations of a diaphragm-type fiber optic combustion pressure sensor employing a low-cost optoelectronic transceiver. The key transceiver element is a tapered optical fiber bundle-based coupler design that relaxes critical alignment requirements, and allows the use of low-cost components. Sensor system evaluation data are presented for high-engine-load and high-combustion-temperature conditions, and for known detection. The test results closely resemble outputs of a heat-sunk flame-shielded, instrumentation-grade piezoelectric reference transducer, and demonstrate better temperature stability.

  19. Using fast reactor component evaluation to pressurized water reactor life extension.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J. I.; Kenik, E. A.; Tsai, H.; Ukai, S.; Mizuta, S.; Yoshitake, T.

    1999-10-01

    An understanding of the effects of long-term, low-dose-rate radiation on core components is critical to light-water reactor plant life extension. Following reactor shutdown, materials that had experienced long exposures to low-dose-rate irradiation were retrieved from the EBR-II research reactor for analysis. These components are being analyzed to provide insight into pressurized water reactor life extension. In this work, three examples of EBR-II materials analyses are highlighted: radiation-induced segregation in 304 stainless steel, stress relaxation in Inconel X750, and swelling in 316 stainless steel.;EVALUATION;FAST REACTORS;PWR TYPE REACTORS;

  20. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-03-24

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure), causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure) and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer-Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD) 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method. PMID:27479094

  2. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure), causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure) and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer–Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD) 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method. PMID:27479094

  3. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure), causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure) and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer-Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD) 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method.

  4. Measurement of Intraspinal Pressure After Spinal Cord Injury: Technical Note from the Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Phang, Isaac; Czosnyka, Marek; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Zofia; Smielewski, Peter; Jamous, Ali; Bell, B Anthony; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is routinely measured in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We describe a novel technique that allowed us to monitor intraspinal pressure (ISP) at the injury site in 14 patients who had severe acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), analogous to monitoring ICP after brain injury. A Codman probe was inserted subdurally to measure the pressure of the injured spinal cord compressed against the surrounding dura. Our key finding is that it is feasible and safe to monitor ISP for up to a week in patients after TSCI, starting within 72 h of the injury. With practice, probe insertion and calibration take less than 10 min. The ISP signal characteristics after TSCI were similar to the ICP signal characteristics recorded after TBI. Importantly, there were no associated complications. Future studies are required to determine whether reducing ISP improves neurological outcome after severe TSCI. PMID:27165930

  5. The relationship between calcium, phosphorus, and sodium intake, race, and blood pressure in children with renal insufficiency: a report of the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases (GFRD) Study.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, H; Chan, J C; Boyle, R; Farina, D; Baluarte, H J; Chinchilli, V M; Dresner, I G; Feld, L G

    1995-07-01

    Nutritional data compiled during the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases Clinical Trial were analyzed to determine the relationship between the dietary intake of divalent minerals and sodium, nutritional status, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations and blood pressure in black versus white children. One hundred eighteen patients are included in this report; 25 were black (21%) and 93 were white (79%). Although more of the blacks were male, the age distribution, midarm circumference, midarm muscle circumference, blood pressure, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH concentrations were comparable in the two groups. Phosphorus intake was within the recommended daily allowance in both groups; in contrast, calcium intake was inadequate in all patients: 81% of the recommended daily allowance in whites, and 74% in blacks. Sixteen children were noted to be hypertensive during the observation period; six patients were receiving a variety of antihypertensive medications, including diuretics in two children. Linear regression analysis revealed that systolic and diastolic blood pressures were directly related to calcium and phosphorus intake in black patients. In white children, only dietary phosphorus intake and diastolic blood pressure were directly related. There was no relationship between sodium intake or GFR and blood pressure in the white or black children. PTH levels were directly correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all children. The correlations between PTH and blood pressure were stronger in white versus black patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Evaluation of Encapsulated Liver Cell Spheroids in a Fluidised-Bed Bioartificial Liver for Treatment of Ischaemic Acute Liver Failure in Pigs in a Translational Setting

    PubMed Central

    Selden, Clare; Spearman, Catherine Wendy; Kahn, Delawir; Miller, Malcolm; Figaji, Anthony; Erro, Eloy; Bundy, James; Massie, Isobel; Chalmers, Sherri-Ann; Arendse, Hiram; Gautier, Aude; Sharratt, Peter; Fuller, Barry; Hodgson, Humphrey

    2013-01-01

    Liver failure is an increasing problem. Donor-organ shortage results in patients dying before receiving a transplant. Since the liver can regenerate, alternative therapies providing temporary liver-support are sought. A bioartificial-liver would temporarily substitute function in liver failure buying time for liver regeneration/organ-procurement. Our aim: to develop a prototype bioartificial-liver-machine (BAL) comprising a human liver-derived cell-line, cultured to phenotypic competence and deliverable in a clinical setting to sites distant from its preparation. The objective of this study was to determine whether its use would improve functional parameters of liver failure in pigs with acute liver failure, to provide proof-of-principle. HepG2cells encapsulated in alginate-beads, proliferated in a fluidised-bed-bioreactor providing a biomass of 4–6×1010cells, were transported from preparation-laboratory to point-of-use operating theatre (6000miles) under perfluorodecalin at ambient temperature. Irreversible ischaemic liver failure was induced in anaesthetised pigs, after portal-systemic-shunt, by hepatic-artery-ligation. Biochemical parameters, intracranial pressure, and functional-clotting were measured in animals connected in an extracorporeal bioartificial-liver circuit. Efficacy was demonstrated comparing outcomes between animals connected to a circuit containing alginate-encapsulated cells (Cell-bead BAL), and those connected to circuit containing alginate capsules without cells (Empty-bead BAL). Cells of the biomass met regulatory standards for sterility and provenance. All animals developed progressive liver-failure after ischaemia induction. Efficacy of BAL was demonstrated since animals connected to a functional biomass (+ cells) had significantly smaller rises in intracranial pressure, lower ammonia levels, more bilirubin conjugation, improved acidosis and clotting restoration compared to animals connected to the circuit without cells. In the +cell

  7. Comparing two levels of closed system suction pressure in ICU patients: Evaluating the relative safety of higher values of suction pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yazdannik, Ahmad R.; Haghighat, Somayeh; Saghaei, Mahmoud; Eghbali, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is one of the most common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU). ETS may be associated with complications including hypoxia and tachycardia. Closed system suctioning (CSS) decreases the rate of cardiorespiratory complication mainly due to continuation of ventilatory support and oxygenation during procedure. CSS has questionable efficacy, therefore higher values of negative pressure has been recommended to enhance the efficacy of CSS. This study was designed to evaluate the effects on gas exchange of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure compared with 100 mmHg in CSS. Materials and Methods: Fifty mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients were selected for the study. Two consecutive ten seconds CSS using suction pressures of 100 and 200 mmHg, in random order applied in each subject with the two hours wash out period. Effects of two levels of suction pressure on gas exchange were measured by recording the SPo2 values at 4 times. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance didn't show any significant difference between two levels of pressure (P = 0.315), but within each groups (100 and 200 mmHg) SPO2 changes was significant (P = 0.000). There was a mild but significant and transient increase in heart rate following both suction pressures, but no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: The results show that CSS with suction pressure 200 mmHg has no detrimental effect on cardiorespiratory function of MV ICU patients. Since the safety of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure was approved, using 200 mmHg suction pressures is recommended for ETS of MV patients. PMID:23983740

  8. Evaluation of a work site relaxation training program using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, N; Vivona-Vaughan, E; Gochfeld, M

    1989-07-01

    The rising physical, emotional, and economic costs of excess stress in occupational settings have resulted in a proliferation of many work site stress management programs. These programs have attempted to effect reductions in workers' stress by applying standard psychological interventions (ie, muscle relaxation and meditation) to the general work force. The benefits of these interventions for asymptomatic employee populations remain to be established. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the physical and psychologic effects of an occupational stress management program for asymptomatic hazardous waste workers (N = 66). Both laboratory and ambulatory blood pressure (at home and at work) were monitored, and self-reported psychologic symptoms were measured. The results indicate that the stress management techniques decreased the diastolic blood pressure variability of asymptomatic workers (P less than .001); however, unlike previous studies, no reductions in laboratory blood pressures nor in psychologic symptoms were found. The efficacy of the procedures for asymptomatic employees is questioned and suggestions are made for future research.

  9. Fracture toughness evaluation of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime: Experiment & numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Avinash; Samal, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, fracture behaviour of 20MnMoNi55 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime (DBTT) is characterised. Compact tension (CT) and single edged notched bend (SENB) specimens of two different sizes were tested in the DBTT regime. Reference temperature 'T0' was evaluated according to the ASTM E1921 standard. The effect of size and geometry on the T0 was studied and T0 was found to be lower for SENB geometry. In order to understand the fracture behaviour numerically, finite element (FE) simulations were performed using Beremin's model for cleavage and Rousselier's model for ductile failure mechanisms. The simulated fracture behaviour was found to be in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. An evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an anti-inflammatory, pulmonary enteral formula in the treatment of pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Kagan, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory failure is associated with a high mortality rate in burned children. Recently, a specialized pulmonary enteral formula (SPEF) was commercially introduced as an adjunct intervention in acute lung injury management. SPEF contains condition-specific nutrients to modulate the inflammatory response. The study examined SPEF impact in critically ill, pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure. Medical records of acute burn patients admitted December 1997 to October 2006 were reviewed for SPEF treatment. Respiratory and renal indices were compared on the first and final days of SPEF use. Nineteen patients with respiratory failure received SPEF for a mean of 10.8 +/- 0.9 days during their acute burn course. Mean age was 5.3 +/- 1.5 years. Mean total body surface area burn was 44.3 +/- 5.4% with 32.5 +/- 6.4% full thickness. Patients were admitted 2.3 +/- 0.9 days postburn. Significant improvements in peak pressure, PEEP, FiO2, P:F ratio, Pco2, Po2, and ETco2 were noted. Seventeen of the 19 patients survived despite the fact that 9 of the 19 patients developed severe barotrauma requiring multiple tube thoracotomies, and all 19 had extremely poor prognoses at SPEF initiation. Adult SPEF formula for critically ill, pediatric burn patients with respiratory failure is safe and well tolerated. SPEF seems to facilitate recovery from acute lung injury as evidenced by improvements in oxygenation and pulmonary compliance.

  11. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Topical Negative Pressure Device in Promoting Healing in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Sarah; Walkley, Neal; Ivins, Nicola; Harding, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This observational study evaluated the use of a novel, ultraportable, mechanically powered topical negative pressure device in promoting healing in chronic wounds, including venous and mixed etiology leg ulcers and neuropathic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: Evaluable patients (n=37) received treatment with the SNaP® Wound Care System for up to 6 weeks. The primary objective was percentage change in wound size, with secondary objectives of clinical assessment of wound parameters, ease of use, and impact on quality of life. Results: A 42.64% mean percentage decrease in wound area was observed, with an overall decrease for each wound etiology subgroup. Increased granulation tissue, decreased exudate levels, and decreased wound pain were reported. Quality-of-life scores increased overall, and the device was easy to use, comfortable, portable, and inconspicuous. Conclusion: The SNaP Wound Care System has the potential to promote healing in chronic wounds of different etiologies. PMID:26029485

  12. A Review of Methods for Evaluating Particle Stability in Suspension Based Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-01-01

    Advances in particle engineering techniques, such as spray drying, freeze drying and supercritical fluid precipitation, have greatly enhanced the ability to control the structure, morphology, and solid state phase of inhalable sized particles (1 - 5 µm) for formulation in pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI). To optimize the properties of these engineered particles for formulation in hydrofluoroalkane propellants (HFA 134a / 227) it is necessary to measure both bulk and individual particle properties before, after, and during formulation. This review examines established and recently developed methods for evaluating a variety of particle properties including but not limited to size, surface and internal morphology, chemical composition, and solid state phase. Novel methods for evaluating particle physical and chemical stability directly in propellant or similar environments are also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of a 40 to 1 scale model of a low pressure engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. E., Jr.; Thoenes, J.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of a scale model of a low pressure rocket engine which is used for secondary injection studies was conducted. Specific objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) assess the test conditions required for full scale simulations; (2) recommend fluids to be used for both primary and secondary flows; and (3) recommend possible modifications to be made to the scale model and its test facility to achieve the highest possible degree of simulation. A discussion of the theoretical and empirical scaling laws which must be observed to apply scale model test data to full scale systems is included. A technique by which the side forces due to secondary injection can be analytically estimated is presented.

  14. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  15. Aquifer imaging with pressure waves—Evaluation of low-impact characterization through sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, YaoQuan; Lim, David; Cupola, Fausto; Cardiff, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the detailed spatial variation of hydraulic properties in the subsurface has been the subject of intensive research over the past three decades. A recently developed approach to characterize subsurface properties is hydraulic tomography, in which a series of pumping tests are jointly inverted using a heterogeneous numerical model. Recently, Cardiff et al. (2013) proposed a modified tomography approach named Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT), in which periodic pumping signals of different frequencies serve as the aquifer stimulation, and pressure responses are recorded at observation locations for tomographic analysis. Its key advantages over traditional hydraulic tomography are that: (1) there is no net injection or extraction of water, and (2) the impulse (an oscillatory signal of known frequency) is easily extracted from noisy data. However, OHT has only been evaluated through numerical experiments to date. In this work, we evaluate OHT performance by attempting to image known heterogeneities in a synthetic aquifer. An instrumented laboratory sandbox is filled with material of known hydraulic properties, and we measure aquifer responses due to oscillatory pumping stimulations at periods of 2, 5, 10, and 20 s. Pressure oscillation time series are processed through Fourier Transforms and inverted tomographically to obtain estimates of aquifer heterogeneity, using a fast, steady-periodic groundwater flow model. We show that OHT is able to provide robust estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity even in cases where relatively few pumping tests and observation locations are available. The use of multiple stimulation frequencies is also shown to improve imaging results.

  16. Evaluation of Two New Indices of Blood Pressure Variability Using Postural Change in Older Fallers

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Choon-Hian; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B.; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Poi, Philip J. H.; Chee, Kok Han; Imran, Z. Abidin; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the utility of blood pressure variability (BPV) calculated using previously published and newly introduced indices using the variables falls and age as comparators. While postural hypotension has long been considered a risk factor for falls, there is currently no documented evidence on the relationship between BPV and falls. A case-controlled study involving 25 fallers and 25 nonfallers was conducted. Systolic (SBPV) and diastolic blood pressure variability (DBPV) were assessed using 5 indices: standard deviation (SD), standard deviation of most stable continuous 120 beats (staSD), average real variability (ARV), root mean square of real variability (RMSRV), and standard deviation of real variability (SDRV). Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure was recorded during 10 minutes’ supine rest and 3 minutes’ standing. Standing SBPV was significantly higher than supine SBPV using 4 indices in both groups. The standing-to-supine-BPV ratio (SSR) was then computed for each subject (staSD, ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV). Standing-to-supine ratio for SBPV was significantly higher among fallers compared to nonfallers using RMSRV and SDRV (P = 0.034 and P = 0.025). Using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), 3 indices (ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV) of SSR SBPV provided accuracies of 61.6%, 61.2%, and 60.0% for the prediction of falls which is comparable with timed-up and go (TUG), 64.4%. This study suggests that SSR SBPV using RMSRV and SDRV is a potential predictor for falls among older patients, and deserves further evaluation in larger prospective studies. PMID:27175670

  17. Failure of a fiber composite lamina under three-dimensional stresses

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J

    1999-08-31

    The efficient use of thick-section fiber composites requires a proven three-dimensional failure model. Numerous failure criteria have been proposed, but the lack of critical experimental results makes it difficult to assess the accuracy of these models. It is shown that the various predictions for failure of a lamina due to the simple state of uniaxial stress plus superposed hydrostatic pressure are disparate. These differences are sufficient to allow evaluation of failure criteria using data that has the normal scatter found for composite materials. A high-pressure test system for fiber composites is described and results for the effects of pressure on the transverse and longitudinal compression strengths of a carbon fiber/epoxy lamina are discussed. Results are compared with a few representative failure models.

  18. Evaluation and Optimization of Therapeutic Footwear for Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Patients Using In-Shoe Plantar Pressure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bus, Sicco A.; Haspels, Rob; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic footwear for diabetic foot patients aims to reduce the risk of ulceration by relieving mechanical pressure on the foot. However, footwear efficacy is generally not assessed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to evaluate and optimize the pressure-reducing effects of diabetic therapeutic footwear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressure distribution was measured in 23 neuropathic diabetic foot patients wearing fully customized footwear. Regions of interest (with peak pressure >200 kPa) were selected and targeted for pressure optimization by modifying the shoe or insole. After each of a maximum of three rounds of modifications, the effect on in-shoe plantar pressure was measured. Successful optimization was achieved with a peak pressure reduction of >25% (criterion A) or below an absolute level of 200 kPa (criterion B). RESULTS In 35 defined regions, mean peak pressure was significantly reduced from 303 (SD 77) to 208 (46) kPa after an average 1.6 rounds of footwear modifications (P < 0.001). This result constitutes a 30.2% pressure relief (range 18–50% across regions). All regions were successfully optimized: 16 according to criterion A, 7 to criterion B, and 12 to criterion A and B. Footwear optimization lasted on average 53 min. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that in-shoe plantar pressure analysis is an effective and efficient tool to evaluate and guide footwear modifications that significantly reduce pressure in the neuropathic diabetic foot. This result provides an objective approach to instantly improve footwear quality, which should reduce the risk for pressure-related plantar foot ulcers. PMID:21610125

  19. Clinical evaluation of bond failures and survival between mandibular canine-to-canine retainers made of flexible spiral wire and fiber-reinforced composite

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria F.; Fraticelli, Danilo; Castellazzi, Linda; Gandini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical reliability of two different types of postorthodontic treatment retainers: a silanised-treated glass fibers-reinforced resin composite (FRC) and a directly bonded multistranded stainless steel wire. The hypothesis of the study was to assess if significant differences are present between failure rates of the two retainers. Study Design: This prospective study was based on an assessment of 87 patients (35 men and 52 women),with an average age of 24 years who required a lower arch fixed retainer after orthodontic treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Assignment was carried out with random tables. A follow-up examination was carried out once a month. The number, cause, and date of single bond adhesive failures were recorded for both retainers over 12 months. Teeth that were rebonded after failure were not included in the success analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by means of a Fisher’s exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and log rank test. Results: Bond failure rate was significantly higher (P=0.0392) for multistranded metallic wire than for FRC. Conclusions: Glass fiber-reinforced resin composite retainers and multistranded metallic wires showed no significant difference in single bond failure rates over a one-year follow up. Key words:Fiber reinforced composite, fixed retention, multistranded wire, orthodontics, retainer, splint. PMID:24790714

  20. Residual stress evaluation in martensitic stainless steel as a function of gas quenching pressure using thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Edward D.; Wong, Yat Choy; Ripley, Maurice I.

    2006-11-01

    The distribution of bulk residual stress was evaluated for two modified grades of martensitic stainless steels. Residual stress levels generated in the two steels were evaluated as a function of quenching gas pressure in vacuum heat treatment using neutron diffraction. It was observed that the levels of residual stress increased with increasing gas pressure, with the high hardenability grade showing the greater increase. However, quenching at 6 bar gas pressure resulted in a significant drop in the levels of residual stress, an observation that is interpreted in terms of the accommodation of high levels of strain by the presence of high levels of interlath retained austenite.

  1. The first Iranian recommendations on prevention, evaluation and management of high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Noohi, Feridoun; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Khosravi, Alireza; Andalib, Elham

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the complete report of the first Iranian Recommendations on Prevention, Evaluation and Management of High Blood Pressure. The purpose is to provide an evidence-based approach to the prevention, management and control of hypertension (HTN) by adapting the most internationally known and used guidelines to the local health care status with consideration of the currently available data and based on the locally conducted researches on HTN as well as social and health care requirements. A working group of national and international experts participated in discussions and collaborated in decision-making, writing and reviewing the whole report. Multiple subcommittees worked together to review the recent national and international literature on HTN in different areas. We used the evaluation tool that is called "AGREE" and considered a score of > 60% as a high score. We adapted the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP), the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the US-based joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7). The key topics that are highlighted in this report include: The importance of ambulatory and self-measurement of blood pressure, evaluation of cardiovascular risk in HTN patients, the role of lifestyle modification in the prevention of HTN and its control with more emphasis on salt intake reduction and weight control, introducing pharmacotherapy suitable for uncomplicated HTN or specific situations and the available drugs in Iran, highlighting the importance of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers as the first line therapy in many situations, the non-use of beta blockers as the first time treatment except in specific conditions, treating HTN in women, children, obese and elderly patients, the patient compliance to improve HTN control, practical guidelines to improve

  2. A propagation time difference evaluation for a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for low-pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroshi; Sawayama, Toshiyuki; Nagamune, Kouki

    2016-07-01

    We have been studying the development of a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring the gas flow rate, especially at low-pressure gas such as atmospheric pressure. In this study, we evaluated the propagation time difference of ultrasonic wave for measuring the airflow at atmospheric pressure. We placed a pair of ultrasonic transducers outside a pipe and generated ultrasonic waves aslant to the flow direction. We observed the propagation time difference of the ultrasonic wave as a function of the gas flow velocity, and found that the difference was proportional to the gas flow. Therefore, it was shown that we were able to measure the atmospheric pressure gas flow rate with a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter. Moreover, we evaluated the dependency of ultrasonic wave intensity on gas pressure.

  3. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to the evaluation of exercise performance and limitations in patients with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Exercise performance in patients with heart failure is limited primarily due to a reduction in cardiac output. This results in skeletal muscle hypo-perfusion. Near infrared spectroscopy provides a simple noninvasive method for assessing skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise. In this paper we review the application of this technique to patients with heart failure and describe excessive limb and respiratory muscle oxygenation as compared to normal subjects. The potential of this technology for monitoring clinical improvement and therapeutic efficacy also is discussed.

  4. The failure of earthquake failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in chronic heart failure patients by two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng-Xia; Guo, Rui-Qiang; Chen, Jin-Ling

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (2D-STI), and also to compare the usefulness of three patterns of myocardial deformation in mechanical dyssynchrony assessment. Furthermore, the relationships between left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), QRS duration (QRSd), and LVMD were explored. In total, 78 patients and 60 healthy individuals (group 3) were enrolled. The patients were classified into two subgroups: LVEF≤35% (group 1), 35%0.05). CHF patients have different extents of LVMD. Longitudinal deformation shows the best detectability of dyssynchrony motion. Left ventricular systolic function was closely related to mechanical dyssynchrony, whereas QRSd showed no significant correlation.

  6. Economic Evaluation of the HF-ACTION Randomized Controlled Trial: An Exercise Training Study of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Shelby D.; Whellan, David J.; Li, Yanhong; Friedman, Joëlle Y.; Ellis, Stephen J.; Piña, Ileana L.; Settles, Sharon J.; Davidson-Ray, Linda; Johnson, Johanna L.; Cooper, Lawton S.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulman, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background HF-ACTION assigned 2331 outpatients with medically stable heart failure to exercise training or usual care. We compared medical resource use and costs incurred by these patients during follow-up. Methods and Results Extensive data on medical resource use and hospital bills were collected throughout the trial for estimates of direct medical costs. Intervention costs were estimated using patient-level trial data, administrative records, and published unit costs. Mean follow-up was 2.5 years. There were 2297 hospitalizations in the exercise group and 2332 in the usual care group (P = .92). The mean number of inpatient days was 13.6 (SD, 27.0) in the exercise group and 15.0 (SD, 31.4) in the usual care group (P = .23). Other measures of resource use were similar between groups, except for trends indicating that fewer patients in the exercise group underwent high-cost inpatient procedures. Total direct medical costs per participant were an estimated $50,857 (SD, $81,488) in the exercise group and $56,177 (SD, $92,749) in the usual care group (95% confidence interval for the difference, $–12,755 to $1547; P = .10). The direct cost of exercise training was an estimated $1006 (SD, $337). Patient time costs were an estimated $5018 (SD, $4600). Conclusions The cost of exercise training was relatively low for the health care system, but patients incurred significant time costs. In this economic evaluation, there was little systematic benefit in terms of overall medical resource use with this intervention. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00047437 PMID:20551371

  7. Computational evaluation of intraventricular pressure gradients based on a fluid-structure approach.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Montevecchi, F M

    1996-11-01

    The dynamics of intraventricular blood flow, i.e. its rapid evolution, implies the rise of intraventricular pressure gradients (IPGs) characteristic of the inertia-driven events as experimentally observed by Pasipoularides (1987, 1990) and by Falsetti et al. (1986). The IPG time course is determined by the wall contraction which, in turn, depends on the load applied, namely the intraventricular pressure which is the sum of the aortic pressure (i.e., the systemic net response) and the IPG. Hence the IPGs account, at least in part, for the wall movement. These considerations suggest the necessity of a comprehensive analysis of the ventricular mechanics involving both ventricular wall mechanics and intraventricular fluid dynamics as each domain determines the boundary conditions of the other. This paper presents a computational approach to ventricular ejection mechanics based on a fluid-structure interaction calculation for the evaluation of the IPG time course. An axisymmetric model of the left ventricle is utilized. The intraventricular fluid is assumed to be Newtonian. The ventricle wall is thin and is composed of two sets of counter-rotating fibres which behave according to the modified version of Wong's sarcomere model proposed by Montevecchi and Pietrabissa and Pietrabissa et al. (1987, 1991). The full Navier-Stokes equations describing the fluid domain are solved using Galerkin's weighted residual approach in conjunction with finite element approximation (FIDAP). The wall displacement is solved using the multiplane quasi-Newton method proposed by Buzzi Ferraris and Tronconi (1985). The interaction procedure is performed by means of an external macro which compares the flow fields and the wall displacement and appropriately modifies the boundary conditions to reach the simultaneous and congruous convergence of the two problems. The results refer to a simulation of the ventricular ejection with a heart rate of 72 bpm. In this phase the ventricle ejects 61 cm3

  8. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  9. Evaluation of CD56dim and CD56bright natural killer cells in peripheral blood of women with IVF failures

    PubMed Central

    Mardanian, Farahnaz; Kazeroonizadeh, Moones; Rashidi, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is an increasing medical and social problem. In vitro fertilization (IVF) has become a common and accessible treatment for a wide variety of indications that have variable outcomes. Natural killer (NK) cells have been identified as relevant immunological factors involved in reproductive success or failure. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of peripheral blood CD56+ (CD56dim and CD56bright) cells and the level of NK cell in patients with IVF failure with those of successful IVF control women. Materials and Methods: We assessed the level of CD56dim CD16+ and CD56bright CD16- cells in 50 women under IVF treatment and compared between successful IVF and IVF failure with the flowcytometry technique. Results: Of studied women, 68% did not response to IVF therapy and 32% had successful IVF, the level of CD56dim CD16+ cells in women with IVF failure was significantly higher than successful IVF (p<0.0001) but the level of CD56bright CD16- cells was not significantly different between women with IVF failure and successful IVF (p=0.28). Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrated that the level of NK cells as a risk factor is associated with pregnancy loss in women with IVF failure. However, number of sample in this study is low and further studies with more sample size are needed to be done. We suggest considering treatment option for women undergoing repeated IVF failure with increased percentage of CD56dim cells and the level of peripheral blood NK cell. PMID:26568763

  10. Pressure distribution evaluation of different filling methods for deposition of powders in dies: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyar Roudsari, Saed

    The aim of this research was to measure, analyze, and model the pressure distribution characteristics of powder deposition into rectangular and circular shallow dies using four filling methods. The feed shoe, the rotational rainy, the point feed, and the pneumatic filling methods were used to investigate the deposition characteristics into shallow dies. In order to evaluate the pressure distribution during filling of shallow dies, factors influencing powder deposition were studied. The factors included particle size and shape, particle size distribution, feed shoe speed, and tube cross-section (in case of feed shoe filling) and deposition rates (in case of rotational rainy, point feed, and pneumatic filling). A battery powder mixture (BPM) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102) with median size of 84 and 600mum, respectively, were used to fill a shallow rectangular die 32x30 mm and 6.5 mm deep and a shallow circular die 35 mm in diameter and 6.5 mm deep. The second generation of pressure deposition tester (PDT-II) with circular and square feed shoe tube cross-sections was used to measure the two powders' pressure distribution characteristics. An innovative rotational rainy filling device was designed and fabricated. This versatile device can be used to measure filling characteristics at different rotational speeds (1-10 rpm) for various powders. The point feed (funnel fill) method with a funnel of 30 mm inlet diameter and 4.2 mm outlet diameter opening was used to fill the rectangular and circular shallow dies. The pneumatic filling method was designed and fabricated to fill the die using air as the conveying medium in a rectangular cross-section tube. The pneumatic filling device was limited to using only the BPM powder, since the Avicel powder generated substantial quantity of airborne dust during the test. Symmetry analysis, variance metrics, and uniformity analysis were used to quantify the deposition characteristics. The results showed that: (1) filled

  11. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  12. Reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing home residents: a prospective 6-year evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tippet, Aletha W

    2009-11-01

    Despite numerous clinical efforts and regulatory mandates to reduce occurrence, pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to plague up to one fourth of patients in healthcare facilities. In 2003, staff and administrators of a 151-bed skilled nursing facility in the Midwest started a quality improvement project based on 1992 Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines to reduce the incidence of facility-acquired PUs. Pre-initiative PU data collection suggested a 12% to 25% PU prevalence rate with an average pre-initiative incidence of 5.19% (168 acquired ulcers over 3,234 person-months). During the next 4 years post-initiative, the average incidence was 0.73% (47 acquired ulcers over 6,446 person-months). Implementation of the comprehensive preventive efforts involving an interdisciplinary team with strong leadership, intensive training, use of evidence-based protocols, carefully evaluated support surfaces and wound/skin products, and simplification of processes led to a significant (P <0.0001) and sustained reduction in the incidence and prevalence of PUs. Additional observations included a simultaneous and unexplained reduction in resident falls and an overall cost reduction of more than $124,000 per year. These results confirm that nosocomial pressure ulcers can be significantly reduced in long-term care when well-established standard guidelines are followed.

  13. Evaluation of the heat transfer module (FAHT) of Failure Analysis Nonlinear Thermal And Structural Integrated Code (FANTASTIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyhani, Majid

    1989-01-01

    The heat transfer module of FANTASTIC Code (FAHT) is studied and evaluated to the extend possible during the ten weeks duration of this project. A brief background of the previous studies is given and the governing equations as modeled in FAHT are discussed. FAHT's capabilities and limitations based on these equations and its coding methodology are explained in detail. It is established that with improper choice of element size and time step FAHT's temperature field prediction at some nodes will be below the initial condition. The source of this unrealistic temperature prediction is identified and a procedure is proposed for avoiding this phenomenon. It is further shown that the proposed procedure will converge to an accurate prediction upon mesh refinement. Unfortunately due to lack of time FAHT's ability to accurately account for pyrolysis and surface ablation has not been verified. Therefore, at the present time it can be stated with confidence that FAHT can accurately predict the temperature field for a transient multi-dimensional, orthotropic material with directional dependence, variable property, with nonlinear boundary condition. Such a prediction will provide an upper limit for the temperature field in an ablating decomposing nozzle liner. The pore pressure field, however, will not be known.

  14. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  15. Biocompatibility evaluation of a thermoplastic rubber for wireless telemetric intracranial pressure sensor coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Charif, Andrea C; Puskas, Judit E; Phillips, Hannah; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Garsed, Jessica; Fleischman, Aaron; Goldman, Ken; Roy, Shuvo; Luebbers, Matthew T; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Luciano, Mark G

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the biocompatibility of the experimental thermoplastic rubber Arbomatrix(™) that will be used as the protective coating on a novel intracranial pressure (ICP) sensor silicon chip. Arbomatrix(™) was benchmarked against biocompatible commercial silicone rubber shunt tubing in the brain via a rat model with 60-day implant duration. A bare silicon chip was also implanted. The results showed similar cellular distribution in the brain-implant boundary and surrounding tissues. Quantitative analysis of neuron and glia density did not show significant difference between implants. Through histological and immunohistochemical evaluation we conclude that Arbomatrix(™) is well tolerated by the brain. Due to its exceptional barrier properties Arbomatrix(™) has already been shown to be an excellent protective coating for new ICP monitoring chip.

  16. AN ULTRASONIC PHASED ARRAY EVALUATION OF CAST AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL PRESSURIZER SURGE LINE PIPING WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2010-07-22

    A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing performance of the phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods applied. Four different custom-made PA probes were employed in this study, operating nominally at 800 kHz, 1.0 MHz, 1.5 MHz, and 2.0 MHz center frequencies. The CASS PZR surge-line specimens were polished and chemically etched to bring out the microstructures of both pipe and elbow segments. Additional studies were conducted and documented to address baseline CASS material noise and observe possible ultrasonic beam redirection phenomena.

  17. A protocol design for evaluation of wearable cuff-less blood pressure measuring devices.

    PubMed

    Yan, Iris R F; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Y T

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes one of the unique requirements in the validation protocol of the IEEE P1708 standard in assessing wearable cuff-less blood pressure (BP) measuring devices. Based on principles that are different from that of the conventional cuff-based devices, the cuff-less BP measurement approaches often require an individual calibration procedure. In this study, we used data from an experiment carried out on 28 subjects with a total of 139 sets of BP measurements as an example to show that breakdown of the performance evaluation of cuff-less devices according to the change of BP from the point of calibration is crucial for understanding and interpreting the overall accuracy of the device. PMID:19964197

  18. Evaluation of the effect of pressurized bushings on seismic qualification of SF sub 6 circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, M.; Setoyama, T.; Murase, S. ); Hellested, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Stresses on the porcelain of high voltage switchgear under seismic vibration are statically biased by internal pressure. However, restrictions from the seismic test facility pose some difficulties in practical procedure of test with pressure. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the strain and proposes an equivalent test method to simulate a pressurized condition without actually filling the SF{sub 6} gas to the operating pressure.

  19. On the Fluid Leakage Rate and Pressure Evaluation of Abandoned Non-Penetrating Wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, J.; Zhan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding flow leakage through abandoned wells that are potential pathways of contamination due to injecting unwanted fluids in geologically deep storage aquifers have become an intensively investigated subject in the subsurface hydrology and petroleum engineering. This study represents a semi-analytical transient solution for estimating leakage rate by pressure change evaluation through an abandoned non-penetrating well (ANW) coupled with an injection well. The leakage rate can be estimated using the Darcy's law by evaluating pressure change between the upper and the lower aquifers through ANW. The analysis was conducted by solving the diffusivity equations of fluid flow in the aquifer coupled with the pipe flow through ANW. The single-phase flow is considered in this study that is capable of explaining both fluid and CO2 plume flow in an aquifer system by neglecting the variable density effect. The result is compared with that of Avci's (1994) which dealt with an abandoned fully penetrating well. The result indicates the similar type of curve trend, which is observed by applying a range of aquifer properties as well as distance between the injection and leakage pathway. The important finding is that the leakage rate through ANW is about 50% compared to the fully penetrating well of Avci's (1994). The sensitivity analyses indicate that parameter leakage coefficient (A), transmissivity ratio (TD) and radial distance (R) between injection and ANW are the most sensitive to the leakage rate and the rest of the parameters are less sensitive. Because of availability of limited analytical and complex numerical solution, this simple new approach is going to provide a simple means to estimate leakage flow for realistic field condition.

  20. Ignition of nonmetallic materials by impact of high-pressure oxygen. II - Evaluation of repeatability of pneumatic impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Naomi; Moffett, Gary E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    The gaseous oxygen pneumatic impact test is used to evaluate the suitability of nonmetallic materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems. The test was evaluated by testing the reactivity of four materials over a range of impact pressures. The evaluation also investigated the effect of valve opening time and other test variables on the frequency of reaction. The variability of the data obtained for each test material was too large for the test method to be capable of distinguishing other than gross differences in the reactivity of materials. No relation was found between this variability and changes in valve opening time and other test variables. The materials studied were found to be unacceptable for use as reference standards. Because of the high variability of the test data, it is recommended that new methods be developed for evaluating the suitability of materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems.

  1. Report on task assignment No. 3 for the Waste Package Project; Parts A & B, ASME pressure vessel codes review for waste package application; Part C, Library search for reliability/failure rates data on low temperature low pressure piping, containers, and casks with long design lives

    SciTech Connect

    Trabia, M.B.; Kiley, M.; Cardle, J.; Joseph, M.

    1991-07-01

    The Waste Package Project Research Team, at UNLV, has four general required tasks. Task one is the management, quality assurance, and overview of the research that is performed under the cooperative agreement. Task two is the structural analysis of spent fuel and high level waste. Task three is an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code review for waste package application. Finally, task four is waste package labeling. This report includes preliminary information about task three (ASME Pressure Vessel Code review for Waste package Application). The first objective is to compile a list of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code that can be applied to waste package containers design and manufacturing processes. The second objective is to explore the use of these applicable codes to the preliminary waste package container designs. The final objective is to perform a library search for reliability and/or failure rates data on low pressure, low temperature, containers and casks with long design lives.

  2. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  3. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)–or one’s appraisals about one’s own self-worth, capabilities, and competences–relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees’ coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE. PMID:26579053

  4. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)-or one's appraisals about one's own self-worth, capabilities, and competences-relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees' coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE. PMID:26579053

  5. Re-evaluation of Pre-pump Arterial Pressure to Avoid Inadequate Dialysis and Hemolysis: Importance of Prepump Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Eriko; Nagai, Kojiro; Takeuchi, Risa; Noda, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomomi; Chikata, Yusuke; Hann, Michael; Yoshimoto, Sakiya; Ono, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Sayo; Tamaki, Masanori; Murakami, Taichi; Matsuura, Motokazu; Abe, Hideharu; Doi, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Prepump arterial pressure (PreAP) is monitored to avoid generating excessive negative pressure. The National Kidney Foundation K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for vascular access recommend that PreAP should not fall below -250 mm Hg because excessive negative PreAP can lead to a decrease in the delivery of blood flow, inadequate dialysis, and hemolysis. Nonetheless, these recommendations are consistently disregarded in clinical practice and pressure sensors are often removed from the dialysis circuit. Thus far, delivered blood flow has been reported to decrease at values more negative than -150 mm Hg of PreAP. These values have been analyzed by an ultrasonic flowmeter and not directly measured. Furthermore, no known group has evaluated whether PreAP-induced hemolysis occurs at a particular threshold. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the importance of PreAP in the prediction of inadequate dialysis and hemolysis. By using different diameter needles, human blood samples from healthy volunteers were circulated in a closed dialysis circuit. The relationship between PreAP and delivered blood flow or PreAP and hemolysis was investigated. We also investigated the optimal value for PreAP using several empirical monitoring methods, such as a pressure pillow. Our investigation indicated that PreAP is a critical factor in the determination of delivered blood flow and hemolysis, both of which occured at pressure values more negative than -150 mm Hg. With the exception of direct pressure monitoring, commonly used monitoring methods for PreAP were determined to be ineffective. We propose that the use of a vacuum monitor would permit regular measurement of PreAP. PMID:25940509

  6. Re-evaluation of Pre-pump Arterial Pressure to Avoid Inadequate Dialysis and Hemolysis: Importance of Prepump Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Eriko; Nagai, Kojiro; Takeuchi, Risa; Noda, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomomi; Chikata, Yusuke; Hann, Michael; Yoshimoto, Sakiya; Ono, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Sayo; Tamaki, Masanori; Murakami, Taichi; Matsuura, Motokazu; Abe, Hideharu; Doi, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Prepump arterial pressure (PreAP) is monitored to avoid generating excessive negative pressure. The National Kidney Foundation K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for vascular access recommend that PreAP should not fall below -250 mm Hg because excessive negative PreAP can lead to a decrease in the delivery of blood flow, inadequate dialysis, and hemolysis. Nonetheless, these recommendations are consistently disregarded in clinical practice and pressure sensors are often removed from the dialysis circuit. Thus far, delivered blood flow has been reported to decrease at values more negative than -150 mm Hg of PreAP. These values have been analyzed by an ultrasonic flowmeter and not directly measured. Furthermore, no known group has evaluated whether PreAP-induced hemolysis occurs at a particular threshold. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the importance of PreAP in the prediction of inadequate dialysis and hemolysis. By using different diameter needles, human blood samples from healthy volunteers were circulated in a closed dialysis circuit. The relationship between PreAP and delivered blood flow or PreAP and hemolysis was investigated. We also investigated the optimal value for PreAP using several empirical monitoring methods, such as a pressure pillow. Our investigation indicated that PreAP is a critical factor in the determination of delivered blood flow and hemolysis, both of which occured at pressure values more negative than -150 mm Hg. With the exception of direct pressure monitoring, commonly used monitoring methods for PreAP were determined to be ineffective. We propose that the use of a vacuum monitor would permit regular measurement of PreAP.

  7. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  8. Assessing the Value-Added by the Environmental Testing Process with the Aide of Physics/Engineering of Failure Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, S.; Gibbel, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Code QT Test Effectiveness Program is funding a series of applied research activities focused on utilizing the principles of physics and engineering of failure and those of engineering economics to assess and improve the value-added by the various validation and verification activities to organizations.

  9. Evaluation of pressurized liquid extraction for determination of organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in soybean.

    PubMed

    Yarita, Takashi; Aoyagi, Yoshie; Otake, Takamitsu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical method for the determination of organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in soybean by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). Two organic solvents, acetone and acetonitrile, were evaluated as extraction solvents. In both cases, the amount of extract was enhanced with increasing extraction temperature. The extracts obtained using acetonitrile were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after a cleanup process based on the analytical method for the Japanese Positive List System for Agricultural Chemicals Remaining in Foods. The effect of extraction temperature (range: 40- 130°C) on extraction efficiency was evaluated by a recovery study using 21 organophosphorus pesticides and 10 pyrethroid pesticides as target analytes and acetonitrile as the solvent. The results indicated that at 130°C, some organophosphorus pesticides might be degraded, whereas extraction temperatures between 70°C and 100°C were optimal. Next, a prepared sample containing fenitrothion and permethrin was analyzed. Although the sample was not soaked in water prior to analysis, PLE provided analytical results comparable to those obtained by solvent extraction with homogenization. Therefore, PLE is considered a simple and alternative technique for the extraction of organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in soybean.

  10. Pressure distribution method for ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Mueller, S.

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells for automotive applications consist of cells with large active areas. The active area is generally between 150 cm2 and 400 cm2. The reaction gases and the cooling media are distributed via bipolar plates to the reaction zones. Understanding local and cell wide gas distribution within the flow field at high current densities greater than 2.0 A/cm2 is a key factor regarding efficiency at low stoichiometry, lambda less than 2. In this paper a new method is introduced, which can be used as ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution. The gas pressure distribution is mapped with an array of 5 × 12 membrane differential pressure sensors by measuring the static pressure locally against the outlet pressure. Below a differential pressure of 100 mbar the signal measurement accuracy is ±2.5 mbar. This is demonstrated in a flow field with an active area of 250 cm2. The sensors are located next to the micro porous layer of the gas diffusion layer to avoid any impact of dynamic pressure. The effect of the intrusion of gas diffusion layer material into the flow channels on the fluid distribution is evaluated at clamping pressures between 0.6 MPa and 4.2 MPa.

  11. Friction pressure of foamed stimulation fluids evaluated with an on-site computer

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, D.J.; Baumgartner, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Computerized monitoring of hydraulic fracturing treatments has been an accepted practice for several years. Not only can a continuous record of the treatment parameters be made, but the real-time bottomhole treating pressure can be determined without the use of a reference string or bottomhole pressure tool. However, to calculate the bottomhole treating pressure, the friction pressure of the fluid or slurry must be determined. For conventional, imcompressible oil and water-based fluids friction pressure is a straightforward calculation since rate and proppant concentration are the main considerations. The friction pressure for foam fracturing fluids requires a more complex solution. A computer van was used to monitor carbon dioxide and nitrogen foam treatments incorporating a reference string or bottomhole pressure tool. The foam friction pressure was determined from the continuous knowledge of foam composition and treatment parameters. The treatment data were used to develop a technique to predict foam friction pressures for bottomhole treating pressure calculations. This paper presents a foam friction pressure technique which allows the bottomhole treating pressure to be calculated without the us of a reference string or bottomhole pressure tool.

  12. Evaluation of a new sitting concept designed for prevention of pressure ulcer on the buttock using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dohyung; Lin, Fang; Hendrix, Ronald W.; Moran, Brian; Fasanati, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Excessive compressive load induces pressure related soft tissue damage, i.e. pressure ulcer (PU), in buttock area in wheelchair users. In solving this problem, our previous study has introduced a concept of Off-Loading sitting, which partially removes the ischial support to reduce pressure under buttocks. However, the effect of this sitting concept has only been evaluated using the interface pressure and tissue perfusion measurements. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the Off-Loading posture for its ability to reduce internal pressure and stress in deep buttock tissues. This evaluation was performed on a 3D finite element (FE) model which was established and validated in a sitting posture and has realistic material properties and boundary conditions. FE analysis in this study confirmed that the pressure relief provided by Off-Loading posture created profound effect in reducing the mechanical stress within deep tissues. It was concluded that Off-Loading posture may prove beneficial in preventing sitting related PU. PMID:17922158

  13. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement.

  14. Evaluation of a fiber-optic technique for recording intramuscular pressure in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Andreas; Zhang, Qiuxia; Styf, Jorma

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate a forward-sensing fiber-optic pressure technique for recording of intramuscular pressure (IMP) in the human leg and investigate factors that may influence IMP measurements used in diagnosing compartment syndromes. IMP in the tibialis anterior muscle was recorded simultaneously by a fiber-optic technique and needle-injection technique in 12 legs of 7 healthy subjects. Both measurement catheters were placed in parallel with the muscle fibers to the same depth, as verified by sonography. IMP recordings were performed at rest before, during and after applying a model of abnormally elevated IMP (simulated compartment syndrome). IMP was elevated by venous obstruction induced by a thigh tourniquet of a casted leg. IMP was also measured during injections of 0.1 ml of saline into the muscle through the catheters. IMP at baseline was 5.1 (SD = 2.6) mmHg measured with the fiber-optic technique and 7.1 (SD = 2.5) mmHg with the needle-injection technique (p < 0.001). It increased to 48.5 (SD = 6.9) mmHg and 47.6 (SD = 6.6) mmHg respectively, during simulated compartment syndrome. IMP increased significantly following injection of 0.1 ml of saline, measured by both techniques. It remained increased 1 min after injection. The fiber-optic technique was able to record pulse-synchronous IMP oscillations. The fiber-optic technique may be used for IMP measurements in a muscle with both normal and abnormally elevated IMP. It has good dynamic properties allowing for measurement of IMP oscillations. Saline injection used with needle-injection systems to ensure catheter patency compromises IMP readings at least one minute after injection.

  15. Evaluation of self-measured home vs. clinic intra-arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, S E; Moan, A; Petrin, J; Weder, A B; Zweifler, A J; Julius, S

    1993-03-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring is useful in the clinical management of patients with hypertension and the identification of those with "white-coat" hypertension; i.e. high readings in the clinic but normal BP at home. In the process of evaluating this technique, we compared self-measured home BP with intra-arterial BP. Healthy white men (n = 40) of 20-40 years of age and body weight below 95 kg were recruited by advertising in the local newspaper. Following a standardized procedure, performed within 2-4 weeks of a response to the advertisement, BP was measured by a physician at a clinic screening, by the subject at home (14 readings in 7 days) and finally in the clinic concomitantly intra-arterially and oscillometrically. The correlation coefficient for mean (M) home BP (r = 0.73) and oscillometric BP (r = 0.74) against intra-arterial BP were slightly higher than for screening BP (r = 0.65). However, in plots of the differences for individual MBP between the methods against the average of the methods, it appears that at levels of average MBP above 100 mmHg, screening BP overestimates the BP level, while this was not the case for home BP or oscillometric BP. Thus, by using intra-arterial measurement as standard of comparison, subject self-measured home BP is a reliable method of estimating blood pressure level in young men. Home BP measured shortly after screening and recruitment provides useful information of resting BP in subjects who potentially may have initial anxiety about BP measurement.

  16. 77 FR 69541 - Technical Report Evaluating the Effectiveness of Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . Please send two paper copies... Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) in Proper Tire Pressure Maintenance AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... its existing Safety Standard 138, Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems. The report's title is:...

  17. An Evaluation of the Safety of Shrouded Nozzles used on High-pressure Greasing Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Morley, R.

    1967-01-01

    High-pressure grease guns using a shrouded nozzle were `fired' from varying distances at amputate lower limbs to determine the pressure at which penetration of the skin occurred. It was concluded that a shrouded nozzle would not normally give rise to injury if the grease pressure was below 7,000 lbf./sq. in (492 kgf./cm.2). PMID:6023080

  18. A quantitative evaluation of the Hewlett-Packard 78354A noninvasive blood pressure meter.

    PubMed

    Whalen, P; Ream, A K

    1988-01-01

    Oscillometrically determined brachial artery pressures were compared with simultaneous contralateral radial intraarterial pressures in 19 anesthetized adult cardiac surgical patients throughout their surgical procedures, interrupted only by nonpulsatile, low-pressure, low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass. Radial intraarterial pressure values ranged widely for systolic (55 to 207 torr), mean (43 to 141 torr), and diastolic (26 to 106 torr). Both error specification methods proposed by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation were used and compared. As expected, error method 1 gave consistently lower mean errors, smaller error standard deviations, and higher correlation coefficients than did error method 2. The errors during time periods immediately before and after cardiopulmonary bypass were compared with those from more quiescent times. Higher mean errors, larger error standard deviations, and lower correlation and regression coefficients were found during those time periods surrounding cardiopulmonary bypass. In general, mean errors were lowest for systolic pressure, followed by mean and diastolic pressures in that order, whereas error standard deviations were smallest for mean pressure, followed by systolic and diastolic pressures. Correlation and regression coefficients were highest for systolic pressure, followed by mean and diastolic pressures. In summary, the oscillometric method provides convenient and reproducible estimates of radial intraarterial pressure during most clinical situations, typically with better accuracy than the auscultatory Korotkoff method. The accuracy and reproducibility are diminished during those periods immediately surrounding cardiopulmonary bypass, perhaps due to direct surgical manipulation of the heart with its attendant rapid changes in cardiac output and blood pressure.

  19. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  20. Evaluation of ground failure susceptibility, opportunity, and potential in the urban area of Anchorage, Alaska : final technical report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moriwaki, Yoshiharu; Idriss, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the U.s. Geological Survey's Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The goal of this program is a reduction of earthquake hazards through the incorporation of research findings on these hazards into land-use planning decisions. An important objective of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program is assessment of the potential for earthquake-induced ground failure in areas of high seismicity.

  1. Failure analysis and performance evaluation of NASA inertial reference unit (DRIRU 2) after 50 months of orbital operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, K. N.; Ritter, J. W.; Skinner, D.; Vanalstine, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The first production DRIRU 2 (NASA standard high performance inertial reference unit) system was launched as a subsystem of the Modular Attitude Control System for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft in February 1980. This hardware was retrieved during the repair of the SMM during Shuttle Flight 41-C in April 1984 and returned to Teledyne Systems Company (manufacturer) for investigation and performance measurements as directed by Goddard Space Flight Center. A failure of one of the three gyro channels occurred approximately 6.5 months after launch. The built in redundancy functioned properly, the DRIRU 2 continued to provide the required attitude control function without performance degradation. Subsequent failure of other attitude control subsystems made the SMM a candidate for the first demonstration of the shuttle in-orbit repair capabilty. The in-orbit DRIRU 2 II failure scenario and the results of the analyses/tests conducted after retrieval are discussed. Comparison of this data with similar data prior to launch demonstates the excellent stability of performance parameters achieveable with DRIRU 2.

  2. Clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures 10 years after insertion: success rates, hygienic problems, and technical failures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, B; Kern, M

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the condition and success rate of various designs of removable partial dentures 10 years after placement. Seventy-four patients treated with 101 mainly conical crown-retained dentures (CCRDs), clasp-retained removable partial dentures (RPDs), or a combination of conical crown and clasp-retained dentures (CRPDs) were reexamined. Prosthetic findings were compared to baseline values at insertion and checked for factors that may affect them. Overall, 36.6% of the prostheses were regarded as successes, 23.8% as partial successes, and 39.6% as failures. Also, only one-third of the prostheses showed neither hygienic problems nor technical failures. The statistical analysis identified no single parameter as significantly affecting the success rate of the partial dentures. Prostheses supported by several abutment teeth had improved success, and RPDs had a higher failure rate (66.7%) than CCRDs (33.3%) and CRPDs (44.8%); however, because of the limited number of RPDs these differences were not statistically significant. Although the prostheses were unsupervised in service, the 60.4% overall success rate of the dentures was somewhat higher than in other studies on precision-retained prostheses.

  3. [The evaluation of the end-ejection pressure-length relation as an index of regional contractility].

    PubMed

    Perlini, S; Meyer, T E; Bernardi, L; Soldà, P L; Calciati, A; Finardi, G; Foëx, P

    1992-08-01

    Although end-systolic pressure-length relationship (ESPLR) is now widely used as a regional substitute for the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, there are some reservations about its use as an index of systolic performance. This study aimed at assessing whether by using end-ejection (zero aortic flow) as a definition of end-systole, ESPLR can be used to characterize myocardial performance independent of load, and if the choice of the region where to implant the sonomicrometers is critical. Ten anaesthetized dogs (16 +/- 2 kg) were instrumented with a left ventricular (LV) pressure micromanometer and an aortic flow probe. Sonomicrometers were implanted in the apical (L1) and the mid-ventricular (L2) regions of the anterior LV wall, and in the basal region of the lateral wall (L3). End-systolic pressure-length relationships were obtained during acute preload reduction induced by the inflation of a vena caval balloon. This evaluation was repeated after increasing end-diastolic pressure to 14-18 mmHg (delta PL), after increasing systolic pressure by 15 (delta P-I) and 25 mmHg (delta P-II) with graded descending aorta occlusion, and during dobutamine infusions at 2.5 (Db 2.5) and 5 micrograms/kg/min (Db5). End-systolic pressure-length relationships (r > 0.97; pressure range: 70-100 mmHg) were characterized by their slopes (Ees), the extrapolated intercept at zero pressure (L0) and the values of segment length at a pressure of 75 (L75) and 100 mmHg (L100). In all the myocardial regions studied by sonomicrometry, the increments in preload and afterload did not significantly shift ESPLR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1486579

  4. An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 3, Humidity, Temperature, and Pressure Sensitivity Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of the sensors. This paper reports the performance of the sensors at various relative humidity, temperature, and pressure levels common to building HVAC applications and provides a comparison with manufacturer specifications. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration. The sensors were tested in a chamber specifically fabricated for this research. A description of the apparatus and the method of test are described in Part 1 (Shrestha and Maxwell 2009). The test result showed a wide variation in humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of CO2 sensors among manufacturers. In some cases, significant variations in sensor performance exist between sensors of the same model. Even the natural variation in relative humidity could significantly vary readings of some CO2 sensor readings. The effects of temperature and pressure variation on NDIR CO2 sensors are unavoidable without an algorithm to compensate for the changes. For the range of temperature and pressure variation in an air-conditioned space, the effect of pressure variation is more significant compared to the effect of temperature variation.

  5. [Ecological security evaluation of Heilongjiang Province with pressure-state-response model].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei; Zhao, Qing-liang; Li, Song; Chang, Chein-chi

    2008-04-01

    The ecological security index (ESI) system including 27 indices for Heilongjiang Province was built up with the pressure-state-response (P-S-R) model. The weights of the indices were determined by analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and the ecological security status classification was evaluated by the ESI model for the years of 2000-2005. Then the development trend of ecological security from 2006 to 2010 was forecasted with the grey dynamic model. The results showed that the ecological security ranked the V grade in 2000 and the III grade in 2005, indicating the increase of ecological security. The forecasting results show that the ecological security will be the III grade for 2006, the II grade for 2007-2009, and the I grade for 2010 (ideal security). Thus it can be seen that the ecological security is ascending year by year, and the ecological environment quality is obviously improved with the implementation of eco-province construction since 2000. Through the effective facilitation of eco-province construction etc., the sustainable and healthy development of ecological security will be finally realized in Heilongjiang Province.

  6. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Gupta, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, Pepijn; Sneep, Maarten; deHaan, Johan; Polonsky, Igor; Spurr, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a relatively simple scheme for simulating retrieved cloud optical centroid pressures (OCP) from satellite solar backscatter observations. We have compared simulator results with those from more detailed retrieval simulators that more fully account for the complex radiative transfer in a cloudy atmosphere. We used this fast simulator to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of cloud OCPs from the two OMI algorithms using collocated data from CloudSat and Aqua MODIS, a unique situation afforded by the A-train formation of satellites. We find that both OMI algorithms perform reasonably well and that the two algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the collocated CloudSat data. This indicates that patchy snow/ice, cloud 3D, and aerosol effects not simulated with the CloudSat data are affecting both algorithms similarly. We note that the collocation with CloudSat occurs mainly on the East side of OMI's swath. Therefore, we are not able to address cross-track biases in OMI cloud OCP retrievals. Our fast simulator may also be used to simulate cloud OCP from output generated by general circulation models (GCM) with appropriate account of cloud overlap. We have implemented such a scheme and plan to compare OMI data with GCM output in the near future.

  7. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  8. The evaluation of relationship between blood pressure and dialysate Na concentration in chronic hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zahed, Narges Sadat; Gharooi, Omid; Gachkar, Latif; Nikbakht, Hajar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hypertension is one of the traditional risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extra cellular volume expansion and Na retention remain the main cause of hypertension. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between concentration of Na dialysate and blood pressure (BP) in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patient. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 266 adult patients undergoing HD for at least three months. Pre-HD systolic BP (SBP) and post-HD SBP during 4 weeks were measured in relation to Na dialysate concentration. The other main factors affecting the post-dialysis BP, such as body mass index (BMI), pump speed, dialysis solution temperature, duration of dialysis and intradialysis weight gain (IDWG) were also considered. Mean of ΔSBP (post-HD SBP – pre-HD SBP) in each patient in 12 session of HD was measured and statistically analyzed in relation to dialysate Na with SPSS 21. Backward multivariable linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the correlation between sodium gradient and ΔSBP. Results: SBP was significantly changed before and after dialysis in relation to dialysate Na (P<0.001). The Pearson’s correlation between ΔSBP with dialysate sodium and blood flow rate (pump speed) were statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion: We found that changes in SBP before and after dialysis is significantly associated with dialysate sodium concentration. PMID:27689106

  9. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN SOUTHERN ROCKHOPPER (EUDYPTES CHRYSOCOME) AND MACARONI PENGUINS (EUDYPTES CHRYSOLOPHUS): EVALUATION OF INFLUENCING FACTORS.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Sarah J; Peterson, Edward L; Schmitt, Todd; Aquino, Susette

    2016-03-01

    Ophthalmic examinations were performed on 160 macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) and 90 southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome) at eight North American zoos and aquaria. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured using rebound tonometry while penguins were held in two different body positions. Correlations between IOP and factors including age, body position, eye pathology, and housing parameters were evaluated. Normal macaroni penguins had a mean IOP of 42.0 ± 9.7 mm Hg. Normal rockhopper penguins had a mean IOP of 32.9 ± 6.2 mm Hg. Neither species had significantly different IOP between sexes or between left and right eyes of the same penguin. In both species, there was a negative linear correlation between age and IOP. In the macaroni population, IOP was significantly higher when IOP measurement was performed before ophthalmic exam; this was not true in rockhoppers. In both species, IOP measured in a horizontal body position was significantly higher than IOP measured in a vertical body position. In both species, eyes with corneal lesions had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In the macaroni penguin, eyes with rubeosis iridis had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In macaroni penguins, eyes with cataracts had significantly lower mean IOP than normal eyes; this was not true for rockhoppers.

  10. Evaluation of pathogen inactivation on sliced cheese induced by encapsulated atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hae In; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Alahakoon, Amali U; Kim, Kijung; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation induced by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) (250 W, 15 kHz, air discharge) produced in a rectangular plastic container and the effect of post-treatment storage time on inactivation were evaluated using agar plates and cheese slices. When agar plates were treated with plasma, populations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes showed 3.57, 6.69, and 6.53 decimal reductions at 60 s, 45 s, and 7 min, respectively. When the pathogens tested were inoculated on cheese slices, 2.67, 3.10, and 1.65 decimal reductions were achieved at the same respective treatment times. The post-treatment storage duration following plasma treatment potently affected further reduction in pathogen populations. Therefore, the newly developed encapsulated DBD-plasma system for use in a container can be applied to improve the safety of sliced cheese, and increasing post-treatment storage time can greatly enhance the system's pathogen-inactivation efficiency.

  11. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN SOUTHERN ROCKHOPPER (EUDYPTES CHRYSOCOME) AND MACARONI PENGUINS (EUDYPTES CHRYSOLOPHUS): EVALUATION OF INFLUENCING FACTORS.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Sarah J; Peterson, Edward L; Schmitt, Todd; Aquino, Susette

    2016-03-01

    Ophthalmic examinations were performed on 160 macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) and 90 southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome) at eight North American zoos and aquaria. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured using rebound tonometry while penguins were held in two different body positions. Correlations between IOP and factors including age, body position, eye pathology, and housing parameters were evaluated. Normal macaroni penguins had a mean IOP of 42.0 ± 9.7 mm Hg. Normal rockhopper penguins had a mean IOP of 32.9 ± 6.2 mm Hg. Neither species had significantly different IOP between sexes or between left and right eyes of the same penguin. In both species, there was a negative linear correlation between age and IOP. In the macaroni population, IOP was significantly higher when IOP measurement was performed before ophthalmic exam; this was not true in rockhoppers. In both species, IOP measured in a horizontal body position was significantly higher than IOP measured in a vertical body position. In both species, eyes with corneal lesions had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In the macaroni penguin, eyes with rubeosis iridis had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In macaroni penguins, eyes with cataracts had significantly lower mean IOP than normal eyes; this was not true for rockhoppers. PMID:27010282

  12. Evaluation of a force plate system for measuring center of pressure in railroad ballast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Merryweather, Andrew; Bloswick, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses have focused primarily on the human gait across hard, flat surfaces and provide little information about human locomotion as a function of work environment or terrain. The purpose of this study was evaluation of a force plate system for measure of center of pressure (COP) in railroad ballast by comparing its accuracy across three surface conditions (hard surface, mainline ballast and walking ballast) with two configurations (level and 7° cross-slope). Custom walkways and an isolation fixture were developed to rigidly attach a force plate beneath ballast surfaces to collect the COP. The difference in COP location (ΔCOPx, y, z) between the force plate system and a calibration system (motion capture derived) were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results indicate that the effects of surface condition and configuration were not significant for ΔCOPx, y, z and no differences were found among the three surface conditions during pairwise comparison, though ΔCOPx, y, z were different between the center and corners of the force plate in ballasts for both level and cross-slope configurations. The system presented in this study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring the COP by using an isolation-fixture force plate to expand the scope of biomechanical studies on ballast surfaces that are level or cross-slope. PMID:27131198

  13. Experimental evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting transfer efficiency of a high volume-low pressure air spray gun.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y M; Flynn, M R

    2000-10-01

    The transfer efficiency of a spray-painting gun is defined as the amount of coating applied to the workpiece divided by the amount sprayed. Characterizing this transfer process allows for accurate estimation of the overspray generation rate, which is important for determining a spray painter's exposure to airborne contaminants. This study presents an experimental evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting the transfer efficiency of a high volume-low pressure spray gun. The effects of gun-to-surface distance and nozzle pressure on the agreement between the transfer efficiency measurement and prediction were examined. Wind tunnel studies and non-volatile vacuum pump oil in place of commercial paint were used to determine transfer efficiency at nine gun-to-surface distances and four nozzle pressure levels. The mathematical model successfully predicts transfer efficiency within the uncertainty limits. The least squares regression between measured and predicted transfer efficiency has a slope of 0.83 and an intercept of 0.12 (R2 = 0.98). Two correction factors were determined to improve the mathematical model. At higher nozzle pressure settings, 6.5 psig and 5.5 psig, the correction factor is a function of both gun-to-surface distance and nozzle pressure level. At lower nozzle pressures, 4 psig and 2.75 psig, gun-to-surface distance slightly influences the correction factor, while nozzle pressure has no discernible effect. PMID:11036729

  14. Pressure coefficient evaluation on the surface of the SONDA III model tested in the TTP Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, M. L. C. C.; Falcao Filho, J. B. P.; Basso, E.; Caldas, V. R.

    2015-02-01

    A test campaign of the Brazilian sounding rocket Sonda III was carried out at the Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel, TTP. The aim of the campaign was to investigate aerodynamic phenomena taking place at the connection region of the first and second stages. Shock and expansion waves are expected at this location causing high gradients in airflow properties around the vehicle. Pressure taps located on the surface of a Sonda III half model measure local static pressures. Other measured parameters were freestream static and total pressures of the airflow. Estimated parameters were pressure coefficients and Mach numbers. Uncertainties associated with the estimated parameters were calculated by employing the Law of Propagation of Uncertainty and the Monte Carlo method. It was found that both uncertainty evaluation methods resulted in similar values. A Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation code was elaborated to help understand the changes in the flow field properties caused by the disturbances.

  15. Evaluating effects of wind-induced pressure fluctuations on soil-atmosphere gas exchange at a landfill using stochastic modelling.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Møldrup, Per

    2006-10-01

    The impact of wind turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations at the soil surface on landfill gas transport and emissions to the atmosphere at an old Danish landfill site was investigated using stochastic modelling combined with soil property and gas transport data measured at the site. The impacts of soil physical properties (including air permeability and volumetric water content) and wind-induced pressure fluctuation properties (amplitude and temporal correlation) on landfill gas emissions to the atmosphere were evaluated. Soil-air permeability and pressure fluctuation amplitude were found to be the most important parameters. Wind-induced gas emissions were further compared with gas emissions caused by diffusion and by long-term pressure variations (due to passing weather systems). Here diffusion and wind-induced gas transport were found to be equally important with wind-induced gas transport becoming the most important at lower soil-air contents.

  16. Performance Evaluation Tests of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinoza-Loza, F

    2002-03-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen. This flexibility results in multiple advantages with respect to compressed hydrogen tanks or low-pressure liquid hydrogen tanks. Our work is directed at verifying that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. A series of tests have been conducted, and the results indicate that no significant vessel damage has resulted from cryogenic operation. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for certification of insulated pressure vessels.

  17. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  18. TMI-2 pressure transmitter examination and evaluation of CF-1-PT1, CF-2-LT1, and CF-2-LT2. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, M.E.; Strahm, R.C.

    1984-04-01

    Pressure transmitters CF-1-PT1, CF-2-LT1, and CF-2-LT2 were removed from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor Building and examined during FY-83. The purpose of the examination was to establish the operational characteristics and determine the failure mode of two of the three transmitters.

  19. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... LH . Your doctor may also order a semen analysis to examine the number of healthy sperm you are producing. Sometimes, an ultrasound of the testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to ...

  20. Evaluation of a Quartz Bourdon Pressure Gage of Wind Tunnel Mach Number Control System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the National Transonic Facility's high accuracy Mach number measurement system as part of a closed loop Mach number control system. The theoretical and experimental procedures described are applicable to the engineering design of pressure control systems. The results show that the dynamic response characteristics of the NTF Mach number gage (a Ruska DDR-6000 quartz absolute pressure gage) coupled to a typical length of pressure tubing were only marginally acceptable within a limited range of the facility's total pressure envelope and could not be used in the Mach number control system.

  1. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  2. Intima-media thickness evaluation by B-mode ultrasound. Correlation with blood pressure levels and cardiac structures.

    PubMed

    Plavnik, F L; Ajzen, S; Kohlmann, O; Tavares, A; Zanella, M T; Ribeiro, A B; Ramos, O L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the thickness of the intima-media complex (IMC) using a noninvasive method. The carotid and femoral common arteries were evaluated by noninvasive B-mode ultrasound in 63 normotensive and in 52 hypertensive subjects and the thickness of the IMC was tested for correlation with blood pressure, cardiac structures and several clinical and biological parameters. The IMC was thicker in hypertensive than in normotensive subjects (0.67 +/- 0.13 and 0.62 +/- 0.16 vs 0.54 +/- 0.09 and 0.52 +/- 0.11 mm, respectively, P<0.0001). In normotensive patients, the simple linear regression showed significant correlations between IMC and age, body mass index and 24-h systolic blood pressure for both the carotid and femoral arteries. In hypertensives the carotid IMC was correlated with age and 24-h systolic blood pressure while femoral IMC was correlated only with 24-h diastolic blood pressure. Forward stepwise regression showed that age, body mass index and 24-h systolic blood pressure influenced the carotid IMC relationship (r2 = 0.39) in normotensives. On the other hand, the femoral IMC relationship was influenced by 24-h systolic blood pressure and age (r2 = 0.40). In hypertensives, age and 24-h systolic blood pressure were the most important determinants of carotid IMC (r2 = 0.37), while femoral IMC was influenced only by 24-h diastolic blood pressure (r2 = 0.10). There was an association between carotid IMC and echocardiographic findings in normotensives, while in hypertensives only the left posterior wall and interventricular septum were associated with femoral IMC. We conclude that age and blood pressure influence the intima-media thickness, while echocardiographic changes are associated with the IMC. PMID:10625875

  3. Multiscale monitoring of interface failure of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems: A non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. G.; Wu, D. J.; Yao, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Lu, C.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission techniques. The method was used to in situ monitor interface failure and internal damage of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems with different size scales. The results show that there is a good relationship between digital image correlation and acoustic emission signals, which can be applied to judge cracking formation and coating delamination and to determine fracture toughness of a thermal barrier coating system subjected to bending.

  4. An evaluation of Debrisan in chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Allen, P C; Turmer, A D

    1979-01-01

    Debrisan (Dextranomer) was subjected to a simple open assessment in the treatment of fifty-three chronic leg ulcers and thirty pressure sores in eight hospitals. It was found that 70% of leg ulcers and 76% of pressure sores improved, with a noticeable cleansing effect being evident in 79% and 83% respectively. No side-effects were recorded.

  5. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Cold Plasma for Disinfection of ISS Grown Produce and Metal Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummerick, Mary E.; Hintze, Paul E.; Maloney, Philip R.; Spencer, Lashelle E.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Franco, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Low pressure cold plasma, using breathing air as the plasma gas, has been shown to be effective at precision cleaning aerospace hardware at Kennedy Space Center.Both atmospheric and low pressure plasmas are relatively new technologies being investigated for disinfecting agricultural commodities and medical instruments.

  6. An Experimental Evaluation of the Performance of Two Combination Pitot Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arend, David J.; Saunders, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental tests have been completed which recorded the ability of two combination steady state and high response time varying Pitot probe designs to accurately measure steady stagnation pressure at a single location in a flow field. Tests were conducted of double-barreled and coannular Prati probes in a 3.5 in. diameter free jet probe calibration facility from Mach 0.1 to 0.9. Geometric symmetry and pitch (-40 deg to 40 deg) and yaw (0 deg to 40 deg) angle actuation were used to fully evaluate the probes. These tests revealed that the double-barreled configuration induced error in its steady state measurement at zero incidence that increased consistently with jet Mach number to 1.1 percent at Mach 0.9. For all Mach numbers, the double-barreled probe nulled at a pitch angle of approximately 7.0 deg and provided inconsistent measurements when yawed. The double-barreled probe provided adequate measurements via both its steady state and high response tubes (within +/- 0.15 percent accuracy) over unacceptable ranges of biased pitch and inconsistent yaw angles which varied with Mach number. By comparison, the coannular probe provided accurate measurements (at zero incidence) for all jet Mach numbers as well as over a flow angularity range which varied from +/- 26.0 deg at Mach 0.3 deg to +/- 14.0 deg at Mach 0.9. Based on these results, the Prati probe is established as the preferred design. Further experimental tests are recommended to document the frequency response characteristics of the Prati probe.

  7. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  8. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Adrianus A J; Halliwill, John R; Low, Phillip A; Wieling, Wouter

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression. PMID:10432334

  9. Experimental Evaluation of Permeability in Wellbore Cements under Elevated Temperatue, Pressure and Salinity Using a Liquid Pressure-Pulse Decay Permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, K.; Radonjic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Kolawole Bello (kbello1@tigers.lsu.edu) and Mileva Radonjic (mileva@lsu.edu), Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Geopressured reservoirs in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin along the coast of Louisiana have been determined to be viable source of geothermal energy and also for carbon sequestration. These reservoirs are made of unconsolidated sandstone capped by shale layers and possess temperatures as high as 140°C. In addition, high salinities of 100 g/L are associated with these reservoirs due to the dissolution of surrounding salt domes. In production of geothermal reservoir, cementing cost accounts for 50% of total costs unlike in oil and gas wells where cementing cost is approximately 15%. This difference in cost is caused by the difference in fluid chemistry. In this project, we propose in-situ harvesting of heat energy resulting in differential temperature across the cement. As a result of thermal loading, hydrated cement fractures. In addition, leaching occurs in wellbore cements when exposed to pH less than 13 causing an increase in permeability. This consequently leads to lack of zonal isolation and compromises the mechanical integrity of the cement. This study provides ways of evaluating wellbore cements under conditions experienced in geopressured reservoirs. For the first time, we have state of the art equipment capable of measuring brine permeability of cement using Liquid Pressure-pulse Decay Permeameter (PDPL). Under in-situ confining pressure, brine permeability is more accurate than gas permeability due to the decrease in pore throat diameter. PDPL provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring brine permeability in low permeability materials at reservoir temperature and pressure. This permeability is function of pressure decay over time. Permeability measurements were taken before and after cyclic thermal loading of cement cores at

  10. Evaluation of the Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Upbending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  11. Instrumentation Report No. 2: identification, evaluation, and remedial actions related to transducer failures at the spent fuel test-climax

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Carlson, R.C.; Rector, N.L.

    1981-11-30

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the feasibility of safe and reliable short-term storage and retrieval of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors. In support of operational and technical goals of the test, about 850 channels of instrumentation have been installed at the SFT-C. Failure of several near-field instruments began less than six months after emplacement of 11 canisters of spent fuel and activation of six thermally similar simulators. The failed units were linear potentiometers (used to make displacement measurements) and vibrating wire stressmeters (used to make change-in-stress measurements). This report discusses the observed problems and remedial actions taken to date.

  12. Effect of calcium hydroxide on the bond strength of two bioactive cements and SEM evaluation of failure patterns.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Carolina Fabiana; Santini, Manuela Favarin; da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; Nascimento, Angela Longo do; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of calcium hydroxide on bond strength of two bioactive cements. One-mm thick longitudinal slabs of root dentin were obtained from freshly extracted human monorradicular teeth (n = 60). Simulated root perforations (1 mm in diameter) were prepared in radicular dentin. Thereafter, the specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n = 30), according to the repair material: MTA (n = 30) and Biodentine (BD) (n = 30). Next, the specimens in each group were further randomly divided into 4 equal subgroups (n = 15) according to the prior use of Ca(OH)2: MTA/Ca(OH)2 and BD/Ca(OH)2 groups: perforations were filled with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] and after 7 days, it was removed, and MTA and BD groups: calcium hydroxide dressing were not used. Push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strength values were compared statistically using Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post-test at a significance level of 5%. The failure analysis was performed using a stereoscopic and classified as adhesive, cohesive and mixed. The push-out bond strength of MTA and BD was not affected by the prior use of Ca(OH)2 (p > 0.05). BD yielded higher push-out bond strength values compared with those of MTA, regardless of the use of Ca(OH)2 (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were predominant in all groups. Ca(OH)2 placement for perforations sealing does not alter the bond strength of MTA and BD to the root dentin. BD presented higher bond strength values than MTA. SCANNING 38:240-244, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Long-Term Efficacy and Patterns of Failure After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Molecular Assay-Based Clonality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu; Antonucci, J. Vito; Wallace, Michelle R.N.; Gilbert, Samuel; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry; Chen, Peter; Kunzman, Jonathan; Boike, Thomas; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term efficacy and cosmetic results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by reviewing our institution's experience. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated prospectively with adjuvant APBI after lumpectomy using interstitial brachytherapy. All patients had negative margins, 82% had Stage I disease, median tumor size was 1.1 cm, and 12% had positive lymph nodes. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.6 years. Fifty-three patients (27%) have been followed for {>=}10 years. Results: Six ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) were observed, for a 5-year and 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6% and 3.8%, respectively. A total of three regional nodal failures were observed, for a 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6%. Five contralateral breast cancers developed, for a 5- and 10-year actuarial rate of 2.2% and 5.2%, respectively. The type of IBTR (clonally related vs. clonally distinct) was analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay. Eighty-three percent of IBTRs (n = 5) were classified as clonally related. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for an association with the development of an IBTR, regional nodal failure, or contralateral breast cancer. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with any of these events. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 99% of patients. Conclusions: Long-term results with APBI using interstitial brachytherapy continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local and regional control rates and cosmetic results. According to a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay, 83% of recurrences were classified as clonally related.

  14. An investigation of the stable orientations of orthorhombic particles in a thin film and their effect on its critical failure pressure.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-09-01

    The effects of shape and contact angle on the behaviour of orthorhombic particles at an interface and in thin films were investigated using Surface Evolver. It is shown that the energetically stable orientations of the particle change with its aspect ratio. Long, wide, flat particles with low contact angles are more stable in flat orientations, i.e. with two faces parallel to the flat film surface. More cubic particles with higher contact angles are more stable in twisted orientations, where the opposite sides of the film can be drawn together at the sharp edges of the particle. The combination of contact angle and orientation has been found to have a large effect on the capillary pressure required to rupture the film. A film containing a particle in a flat orientation will rupture at a capillary pressure up to three times greater than one containing an identical particle in a twisted orientation. Wider, flatter particles with low contact angles stabilise thin liquid films to a greater extent than cubic particles with high contact angles.

  15. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Control Through Analysis of Inter Beat Interval, Systolic Blood Pressure and Photoplethysmographic Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, N. P.; Lerma-González, C.; Infante-Vázquez, O.

    2010-12-01

    Most studies of blood pressure control consider only the relationship between blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this work was to study the contribution of blood volume to the stability of blood pressure. Time series analysis was applied to three variables: systolic blood pressure (SBP), inter beat interval (IBI) and pulse volume (PV), in 10 healthy subjects who underwent an orthostatic challenge. During orthostatism, IBI was shortened due to decrease in vagal activity and increase in sympathetic activity to the heart. The mean SBP increased, with a trend of higher sympathetic activity to the blood vessels. However, mean PV decreased without change in the PV variability. Negative linear correlations between SBP and PV were observed in most cases. Moreover, the linear model explained better the variability of SBP in relation to PV than the relation between SBP and IBI.

  16. Economic evaluation of noncontact normothermic wound therapy for treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alex

    2002-06-01

    New adjunctive treatments for pressure ulcers have become available to complement standard care. The economic benefits of new advanced wound care treatments like noncontact normothermic wound therapy are related to: the costs of adequately providing standard care treatment, the baseline probability of healing a pressure ulcer to closure with standard care, the relative improvement in healing rates with the advanced wound care treatment and the acquisition cost of the advanced treatment. Healing data from preliminary clinical trials suggest that pressure ulcer healing in long-term care patients is accelerated two-fold with noncontact normothermic wound therapy. At this healing rate, noncontact normothermic wound therapy for stage III and IV pressure ulcer is an economically attractive intervention. Additional well-controlled clinical trials are necessary.

  17. In search of a new governing failure criterion for torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.; Rana, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    The failure criterion that governs the present design rules of formed heads in Section 8/Div. 2 of the ASME B and PV Code limits crown displacement upon a single application of pressure, and it does so by means of a calculated collapse pressure. One problem with the rules is that they require greater head thicknesses than those of Section 8/Div. 1. Another problem is that recent test data taken for two formed heads have shown no signs of head displacements or deformations that could have rendered the heads unserviceable at pressures substantially higher than the calculated collapse pressures. Any link between the calculated collapse pressures and the failures of the test heads could not be established. The main thesis proposed in the paper is that such a link does not exist for torispherical heads in general. The reason for this is investigated theoretically and attributed to the geometric strengthening of heads, as they deform. It is recommended that the reasons for limiting displacements or deformations for a single application of pressure be reviewed and, if needed, a new failure criterion defined, or other failure modes, such as tensile plastic instability (burst), be considered. The latter mode is described and options for its evaluation are presented in this paper. The protection of torispherical heads against the failure modes of low-cycle fatigue and incremental plastic growth upon cyclic loading, which are controlled by shakedown, is not covered in this paper but is left to future investigations.

  18. Does evaluative pressure make you less or more distractible? Role of top-down attentional control over response selection.

    PubMed

    Normand, Alice; Bouquet, Cédric A; Croizet, Jean-Claude

    2014-06-01

    People's ability to resist cognitive distraction is crucial in many situations. The present research examines individuals' resistance to attentional distraction under conditions of evaluative pressure. In a series of 4 studies, participants had to complete various attentional tasks while believing their intelligence was or was not under the scrutiny of an experimenter. Using a spatial cuing paradigm, Studies 1 through 3 demonstrated that feeling evaluated led participants to implement stronger feature-based attentional control, which resulted in more (or less) distraction when irrelevant information matched (did not match) the searched-for target. Study 4 ruled out the possibility that the above effects were due to voluntary shifts of attention and demonstrated that the control settings implemented under evaluative pressure resulted in stronger goal-contingent response priming. Thus, the way individuals relate to the task-the performance context in which they are-induces strong attentional selection biases. Altogether, the present findings highlight an overlooked form of top-down modulation of attention based on performance self-relevance. Implications for both the current models of attentional control and the current hypotheses on the impact of evaluative pressure on cognition, as well as the consequences for more complex performances, are discussed. PMID:24219022

  19. Ultra fast all-optical fiber pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions or athletes who receive cranial impacts. Protecting people from TBI has recently attracted a significant amount of attention due to recent military operations in the Middle East. Recording pressure transient data in a blast event is very critical to the understanding of the effects of blast events on TBI. However, due to the fast change of the pressure during blast events, very few sensors have the capability to effectively track the dynamic pressure transients. This paper reports an ultra fast, miniature and all-optical fiber pressure sensor which could be mounted at different locations of a helmet to measure the fast changing pressure simultaneously. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. The end face of the fiber is wet etched. A well controlled thickness silicon dioxide diaphragm is thermal bonded on the end face to form an FP cavity. A shock tube test was conducted at Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center, where the sensors were mounted in a shock tube side by side with a reference sensor to measure the rapidly changing pressure. The results of the test demonstrated that the sensor developed had an improved rise time (shorter than 0.4 μs) when compared to a commercially available reference sensor.

  20. Evaluating measurement error in readings of blood pressure for adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Bauldry, Shawn; Bollen, Kenneth A; Adair, Linda S

    2015-04-01

    Readings of blood pressure are known to be subject to measurement error, but the optimal method for combining multiple readings is unknown. This study assesses different sources of measurement error in blood pressure readings and assesses methods for combining multiple readings using data from a sample of adolescents/young adults who were part of a longitudinal epidemiological study based in Cebu, Philippines. Three sets of blood pressure readings were collected at 2-year intervals for 2127 adolescents and young adults as part of the Cebu National Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Study. Multi-trait, multi-method (MTMM) structural equation models in different groups were used to decompose measurement error in the blood pressure readings into systematic and random components and to examine patterns in the measurement across males and females and over time. The results reveal differences in the measurement properties of blood pressure readings by sex and over time that suggest the combination of multiple readings should be handled separately for these groups at different time points. The results indicate that an average (mean) of the blood pressure readings has high validity relative to a more complicated factor-score-based linear combination of the readings. PMID:25548966

  1. Pressure signature and evaluation of hammer pulses during underwater implosion in confining environments.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; Shukla, Arun; LeBlanc, James M

    2016-08-01

    The fluid structure interaction phenomenon occurring in confined implosions is investigated using high-speed three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) experiments. Aluminum tubular specimens are placed inside a confining cylindrical structure that is partially open to a pressurized environment. These specimens are hydrostatically loaded until they naturally implode. The implosion event is viewed, and recorded, through an acrylic window on the confining structure. The velocities captured through DIC are synchronized with the pressure histories to understand the effects of confining environment on the implosion process. Experiments show that collapse of the implodable volume inside the confining tube leads to strong oscillating water hammer waves. The study also reveals that the increasing collapse pressure leads to faster implosions. Both peak and average structural velocities increase linearly with increasing collapse pressure. The effects of the confining environment are better seen in relatively lower collapse pressure implosion experiments in which a long deceleration phase is observed following the peak velocity until wall contact initiates. Additionally, the behavior of the confining environment can be viewed and understood through classical water hammer theory. A one-degree-of-freedom theoretical model was created to predict the impulse pressure history for the particular problem studied. PMID:27586733

  2. The evaluation of the elasto-plastic behavior in case of the honed steel pipes subjected to variable internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Stanciu, M. D.; Szasz, M.; Curtu, I.; Sturzu, T.; Savin, A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyses the elasto-plastic behavior of ten samples of E355 steel pipe of the same inner diameter, but with wall thickness ranging between 1.100 and 2.500 mm and length about 100 mm. The samples were subjected to variable internal pressure which was increased from 0 to 600-800 bar (up to the breaking of the pipe), being used the hydraulic oil, type HM46. The outer diameter of the tested pipes was measured successive for each increase of pressure with 100 bars, thus being determined the flow curve of the pipe material characterized by the elasto-plastic behavior and a tenacious failure. It was found that thin pipes, with the ratio between the inner and outer diameter less than 1.1, shows a different flow curve compare to pipes with thick walls, having the ratio between the inner and outer diameter greater than 1.1, the deformations being about two times higher. The rheological models of each type of pipes were identified.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Home Blood Pressure Monitoring With or Without Telephonic Behavioral Self-Management in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Shelby D.; Li, Yanhong; Oddone, Eugene Z.; Neary, Alice M.; Orr, Melinda M.; Grubber, Janet M.; Graham, Felicia L.; Olsen, Maren K.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Powers, Benjamin J.; Adams, Martha B.; Bosworth, Hayden B.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Take Control of Your Blood Pressure trial evaluated the effect of a multicomponent telephonic behavioral lifestyle intervention, patient self-monitoring, and both interventions combined compared with usual care on reducing systolic blood pressure during 24 months. The combined intervention led to a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure compared with usual care alone. We examined direct and patient time costs associated with each intervention. Methods We conducted a prospective economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial of 636 patients with hypertension participating in each study intervention. Medical costs were estimated using electronic data representing medical services delivered within the health system. Intervention-related costs were derived using information collected during the trial, administrative records, and published unit costs. Results During 24 months, patients incurred a mean of $6965 (SD, $22,054) in inpatient costs and $8676 (SD, $9368) in outpatient costs, with no significant differences among the intervention groups. With base-case assumptions, intervention costs were estimated at $90 (SD, $2) for home blood pressure monitoring, $345 (SD, $64) for the behavioral intervention ($31 per telephone encounter), and $416 (SD, $93) for the combined intervention. Patient time costs were estimated at $585 (SD, $487) for home monitoring, $55 (SD, $16) for the behavioral intervention, and $741 (SD, $529) for the combined intervention. Conclusions Our analysis demonstrated that the interventions are cost-additive to the health care system in the short term and that patients’ time costs are nontrivial. PMID:19927132

  4. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 1: Catalytic ignition and low pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program was conducted to evaluate catalytic igniter operational limits, igniter scaling criteria, and delivered performance of cooled, flightweight gaseous hydrogen-oxygen reaction control thrusters. Specific goals were to: (1) establish operating life and environmental effects for both Shell 405-ABSG and Engelhard MFSA catalysts, (2) provide generalized igniter design guidelines for high response without flashback, and (3) to determine overall performance of thrusters at chamber pressures of 15 and 300 psia (103 and 2068 kN/sq m) and thrust levels of 30 and 1500 lbf, respectively. The experimental results have demonstrated the feasibility of reliable, high response catalytic ignition and the effectiveness of ducted chamber cooling for a high performance flightweight thruster. This volume presents the results of the catalytic igniter and low pressure thruster evaluations are presented.

  5. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  6. Evaluation of seawater exposure on mechanical properties and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite for marine use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yian; Wang, Zhiying; Seah, Leong Keey; Chai, Gin Boay

    2015-03-01

    Since composite material is playing an increasingly important role in the marine and offshore drilling industry, it is essential to have a good understanding on degradation of the material in the seawater environment. This study investigates the influence of seawater exposure on the mechanical and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite. The water diffusion behavior in the composite has been studied through immersing the specimens in seawater under different conditions. The diffusion rate accelerates with increase of temperature, and the material shows irreversible damage due to seawater absorption at the temperature of 80°C. It is also found that external stress would significantly increase the water absorption. The water uptake in the specimen at 50°C showed a two stage behavior dominated by Fickian law and polymeric relaxation respectively, and saturation was not achieved in 8 months. After diffusion, the Tg of the material is considerably lowered due to plasticization effect. However the effect was found to be reversible after drying the specimen. Based on the testing results of tensile, flexure and fatigue properties of the composites, it is concluded that seawater exposure especially at elevated temperature leads to significant degradation on mechanical properties of the composite. However, the flexural strength of BMI composite with seawater absorption becomes less susceptible to temperature change. It is also found that the seawater absorption doesn't show significant effect on the stiffness of the material.

  7. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  8. Evaluation of gas cooling for pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Skok, A. J.; Maru, H. C.; Kothmann, R. E.; Harry, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas cooling has already been demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. This paper presents theoretical and experimental investigation of gas cooling for pressurized PAFC. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  9. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of the Level TROLL 100 manufactured by In-Situ Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.; Fulford, Janice M.; Brooks, Myron H.

    2013-01-01

    The Level TROLL 100 manufactured by In-Situ Inc. was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range. The Level TROLL 100 is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range equivalent to 0 to 30 feet of water over a temperature range of −20 to 50 degrees Celsius (°C). The device met the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of 0 to 50 °C. The device’s accuracy specifications did not meet established USGS requirements for primary water-stage sensors used in the operation of streamgages, but the Level TROLL 100 may be suitable for other hydrologic data-collection applications. As a note, the Level TROLL 100 is not designed to meet USGS accuracy requirements. Manufacturer accuracy specifications were evaluated, and the procedures followed and the results obtained are described in this report. USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the HIF.

  11. Development of a Pressure Box to Evaluate Reusable-Launch-Vehicle Cryogenic-Tank Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Sikora, Joseph; Maguire, James F.; Winn, Peter M.

    1996-01-01

    A cryogenic pressure-box test machine has been designed and is being developed to test full-scale reusable-launch-vehicle cryogenic-tank panels. This machine is equipped with an internal pressurization system, a cryogenic cooling system, and a heating system to simulate the mechanical and thermal loading conditions that are representative of a reusable-launch-vehicle mission profile. The cryogenic cooling system uses liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to simulate liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tank internal temperatures. A quartz lamp heating system is used for heating the external surface of the test panels to simulate cryogenic-tank external surface temperatures during re-entry of the launch vehicle. The pressurization system uses gaseous helium and is designed to be controlled independently of the cooling system. The tensile loads in the axial direction of the test panel are simulated by means of hydraulic actuators and a load control system. The hoop loads in the test panel are reacted by load-calibrated turnbuckles attached to the skin and frame elements of the test panel. The load distribution in the skin and frames can be adjusted to correspond to the tank structure by using these turnbuckles. The seal between the test panel and the cryogenic pressure box is made from a reinforced Teflon material which can withstand pressures greater than 52 psig at cryogenic temperatures. Analytical results and tests on prototype test components indicate that most of the cryogenic-tank loading conditions that occur in flight can be simulated in the cryogenic pressure-box test machine.

  12. Development of a Pressure Box to Evaluate Reusable-Launch-Vehicle Cryogenic-Tank Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Sikora, Joseph; Maguire, James F.; Winn, Peter M.

    1996-01-01

    A cryogenic pressure-box test machine has been designed and is being developed to test full-scale reusable launch vehicle cryogenic-tank panels. This machine is equipped with an internal pressurization system, a cryogenic cooling system, and a heating system to simulate the mechanical and thermal loading conditions that are representative of a reusable launch vehicle mission profile. The cryogenic cooling system uses liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to simulate liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tank internal temperatures. A quartz lamp heating system is used for heating the external surface of the test panels to simulate cryogenic-tank external surface temperatures during re-entry of the launch vehicle. The pressurization system uses gaseous helium and is designed to be controlled independently of the cooling system. The tensile loads in the axial direction of the test panel are simulated by means of hydraulic actuators and a load control system. The hoop loads in the test panel are reacted by load-calibrated turnbuckles attached to the skin and frame elements of the test panel. The load distribution in the skin and frames can be adjusted to correspond to the tank structure by using these turnbuckles. The seal between the test panel and the cryogenic pressure box is made from a reinforced Teflon material which can withstand pressures greater than 52 psig at cryogenic temperatures. Analytical results and tests on prototype test components indicate that most of the cryogenic-tank loading conditions that occur in flight can be simulated in the cryogenic pressure-box test machine.

  13. An Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Regulator for Robotic Lunar Landing Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher; Trinh, Huu; Pedersen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Lunar Lander Development (RLLD) Project Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has studied several lunar surface science mission concepts. These missions focus on spacecraft carrying multiple science instruments and power systems that will allow extended operations on the lunar surface. Initial trade studies of launch vehicle options for these mission concepts indicate that the spacecraft design will be significantly mass-constrained. To minimize mass and facilitate efficient packaging, the notional propulsion system for these landers has a baseline of an ultra-high pressure (10,000 psig) helium pressurization system that has been used on Defense missiles. The qualified regulator is capable of short duration use; however, the hardware has not been previously tested at NASA spacecraft requirements with longer duration. Hence, technical risks exist in using this missile-based propulsion component for spacecraft applications. A 10,000-psig helium pressure regulator test activity is being carried out as part of risk reduction testing for MSFC RLLD project. The goal of the test activity is to assess the feasibility of commercial off-the-shelf ultra-high pressure regulator by testing with a representative flight mission profile. Slam-start, gas blowdown, water expulsion, lock-up, and leak tests are also performed on the regulator to assess performance under various operating conditions. The preliminary test results indicated that the regulator can regulate helium to a stable outlet pressure of 740 psig within the +/- 5% tolerance band and maintain a lock-up pressure less than +5% for all tests conducted. Numerous leak tests demonstrated leakage less than 10-3 standard cubic centimeters per second (SCCS) for internal seat leakage at lock-up and less than10-5 SCCS for external leakage through the regulator ambient reference cavity. The successful tests have shown the potential for 10,000 psig helium systems in NASA spacecraft and have reduced risk

  14. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs) . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of erosive cavitation pressure field from pits in material: fact or myth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Material pitting in a cavitating flow has been used for a long time as an indicator of the vague ‘cavitation intensity’ concept. Periodically, some researchers suggest pitting tests as a “simple” means to provide quantitative measurements of the amplitude of the impulsive pressures in the cavitation field, especially when combined with Tabor's formula or with simple finite element computations with static loads. This paper examines the viability of such a method using fully coupled bubble dynamics and material response, and strongly concludes that the commonly accepted idea is a myth, as different loading scenarios with the same amplitude of the cavitation impulsive pressure result in different pit aspect ratios.

  16. Development of a pressure nociceptive threshold testing device for evaluation of analgesics in cats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M J; Taylor, P M; Steagall, P V M; Brondani, J T; Luna, S P L

    2007-02-01

    A pressure analgesiometric device was developed for unrestrained cats. Eleven cats were studied. Stimulation was via three rounded pins within a bracelet on the forearm. The pins were advanced by manual bladder inflation. Bladder pressure was measured using a strain gauge pressure transducer. The threshold was recorded at the behavioural end point. Thresholds were measured at 5 and 15min intervals for 2-4h, after removal/replacement of the cuff, for 120min after SC butorphanol (0.4mg/kg), and with mild skin inflammation at the testing site. Data were analysed using ANOVA. Pressure thresholds in untreated cats were around 150mmHg. The minimum interval for testing was established as 15min. Data were reproducible over 4h and beyond 24h. Thresholds in 5 cats increased (P<0.05) above baseline for 45min after butorphanol with a maximum increase of 270+/-182mmHg at 10min. Thresholds decreased with inflammation. The method appears suitable for feline analgesia investigations. PMID:16765390

  17. Abrasion and fracture testing in a high-pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneesby, G. V.; Walker, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Two devices are necessary for abrasion and fracture testing of materials evaluated for storage of hydrogen at high pressure for long periods. The first device abrades tensile specimens. The second device tests for fracture toughness of metals. Both devices permit testing in both yield and failure modes in high pressure hydrogen.