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Sample records for failure swine models

  1. Iron chelation attenuates intracranial pressure and improves survival in a swine model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Vlahakos, Demetrios; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Karvouni, Eleni; Routsi, Christina; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Andreadou, Ioanna; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain edema in acute liver failure (ALF). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of iron-catalyzed oxidative reactions through iron chelation using deferoxamine could attenuate brain edema in a swine model of ischemic ALF. Following ALF induction (end-to-side portacaval anastomosis and ligation of the hepatoduodenal ligament), 14 animals were randomized to a study group that received an intravenous infusion of 150 mg/kg deferoxamine (group DF; n = 7) or a control group (group C; n = 7). Six sham-operated animals were also assigned to a deferoxamine-treated group (n = 3) or a control group (n = 3). Hemodynamic, neurological, and hematological parameters were monitored postoperatively. All sham animals maintained normal hemodynamics and intracranial pressure. At 18 hours, group DF animals had higher mean arterial pressure (mean +/- standard deviation: 98.0 +/- 15.9 versus 69.9 +/- 15.8 mmHg, P < 0.004), lower intracranial pressure (18.1 +/- 8.6 versus 32.7 +/- 13.4 mmHg, P < 0.032), and higher cerebral perfusion pressure (76.4 +/- 16.4 versus 37.1 +/- 25.6 mmHg, P < 0.006) in comparison with group C. Similar differences were recorded up to the 24th postoperative hour, leading to a significant difference in animal survival (88% in group DF versus 17% in group C, P < 0.001). Furthermore, group DF exhibited an attenuated increase of serum malondialdehyde from the baseline (16% versus 74%, P < 0.05) and lower brain malondialdehyde concentrations (3.7 +/- 1.3 versus 5.7 +/- 2.0 microM/mg of protein, P < 0.05) in comparison with controls. In conclusion, deferoxamine delayed the development of intracranial hypertension and improved survival in pigs with ischemic ALF.

  2. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adrienne L.; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  3. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  4. Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive physiology. Swine have been used extensively for studies of infectious disease processes and analyses of preventative strategies, inc...

  5. The failure of the 1976 swine influenza immunization program.

    PubMed

    Begley, S L

    1977-01-01

    The program to immunize 210 million Americans against swine flu failed. It set back the Federal government's relations with state health agencies, private physicians, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the insurance industry. It increased mistrust of immunization programs and of government health programs in general.The well-intentioned plan had far-reaching consequences because its scope and the speed with which it was implemented were overreactions to the threat. Its size magnified every one of its faults, legal, medical and political. Organizational and scientific capacity were less than expected. Local health agencies could not administer the program with the inadequate funds from HEW and pharmaceutical companies could not produce a safe, effective children's vaccine.Because of the urgency given the program, Congress neglected the opposition of consumer advocates and state health officials, and did not spend time trying to include immunization against childhood disease in the swine flu program.The failure illustrates the dangers of hasty decisions, of considering only direct medical costs and benefits and not social and political effects on health policy, of launching a public health program whose scientific basis is weak and whose administrative requirements are untested.

  6. Completion of the swine genome will simplify the production of swine as a large animal biomedical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anatomic and physiological similarities to the human make swine an excellent large animal model for human health and disease. Methods Cloning from a modified somatic cell, which can be determined in cells prior to making the animal, is the only method available for the production of targeted modifications in swine. Results Since some strains of swine are similar in size to humans, technologies that have been developed for swine can be readily adapted to humans and vice versa. Here the importance of swine as a biomedical model, current technologies to produce genetically enhanced swine, current biomedical models, and how the completion of the swine genome will promote swine as a biomedical model are discussed. Conclusions The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions. PMID:23151353

  7. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3-4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1-2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  8. Failure of protection and enhanced pneumonia with a US H1N2 swine influenza virus in pigs vaccinated with an inactivated classical swine H1N1 vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated two US swine influenza virus (SIV) isolates, A/Swine/Iowa/15/1930 H1N1 (IA30) and A/Swine/Minnesota/00194/2003 H1N2 (MN03), with substantial genetic variation in the HA gene and failure to cross-react in the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, in an in vivo vaccination and challenge...

  9. The failure of earthquake failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  10. Modeling risk of occupational zoonotic influenza infection in swine workers.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Jones, Rachael M; Gibbs, Shawn; Kane, Michael J; Torremorell, Montserrat; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-08-01

    Zoonotic transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) between swine and workers in swine production facilities may play a role in the emergence of novel influenza strains with pandemic potential. Guidelines to prevent transmission of influenza to swine workers have been developed but there is a need for evidence-based decision-making about protective measures such as respiratory protection. A mathematical model was applied to estimate the risk of occupational IAV exposure to swine workers by contact and airborne transmission, and to evaluate the use of respirators to reduce transmission.  The Markov model was used to simulate the transport and exposure of workers to IAV in a swine facility. A dose-response function was used to estimate the risk of infection. This approach is similar to methods previously used to estimate the risk of infection in human health care settings. This study uses concentration of virus in air from field measurements collected during outbreaks of influenza in commercial swine facilities, and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction.  It was found that spending 25 min working in a barn during an influenza outbreak in a swine herd could be sufficient to cause zoonotic infection in a worker. However, this risk estimate was sensitive to estimates of viral infectivity to humans. Wearing an excellent fitting N95 respirator reduced this risk, but with high aerosol levels the predicted risk of infection remained high under certain assumptions.  The results of this analysis indicate that under the conditions studied, swine workers are at risk of zoonotic influenza infection. The use of an N95 respirator could reduce such risk. These findings have implications for risk assessment and preventive programs targeting swine workers. The exact level of risk remains uncertain, since our model may have overestimated the viability or infectivity of IAV. Additionally, the potential for partial immunity in swine workers associated with repeated low

  11. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  12. Swine hybrid aneurysm model for endovascular surgery training.

    PubMed

    Namba, K; Mashio, K; Kawamura, Y; Higaki, A; Nemoto, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  13. Swine Hybrid Aneurysm Model for Endovascular Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    Namba, K.; Mashio, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Higaki, A.; Nemoto, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  14. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  15. DNA Vaccines: Experiences in the Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Accensi, Francesc; Rodríguez, Fernando; Monteagudo, Paula L

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is one of the most fascinating vaccine-strategies currently in development. Two of the main advantages of DNA immunization rely on its simplicity and flexibility, being ideal to dissect both the immune mechanisms and the antigens involved in protection against a given pathogen. Here, we describe several strategies used to enhance the immune responses induced and the protection afforded by experimental DNA vaccines tested in swine and provide with very basic protocol describing the generation and in vivo application of a prototypic DNA vaccine. Only time will tell the last word regarding the definitive implementation of DNA vaccination in the field.

  16. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  18. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  19. Swine as models in biomedical research and toxicology testing.

    PubMed

    Swindle, M M; Makin, A; Herron, A J; Clubb, F J; Frazier, K S

    2012-03-01

    Swine are considered to be one of the major animal species used in translational research, surgical models, and procedural training and are increasingly being used as an alternative to the dog or monkey as the choice of nonrodent species in preclinical toxicologic testing of pharmaceuticals. There are unique advantages to the use of swine in this setting given that they share with humans similar anatomic and physiologic characteristics involving the cardiovascular, urinary, integumentary, and digestive systems. However, the investigator needs to be familiar with important anatomic, histopathologic, and clinicopathologic features of the laboratory pig and minipig in order to put background lesions or xenobiotically induced toxicologic changes in their proper perspective and also needs to consider specific anatomic differences when using the pig as a surgical model. Ethical considerations, as well as the existence of significant amounts of background data, from a regulatory perspective, provide further support for the use of this species in experimental or pharmaceutical research studies. It is likely that pigs and minipigs will become an increasingly important animal model for research and pharmaceutical development applications.

  20. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  1. Failure models for textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the `Binary Model,` was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  2. Modeling Classical Swine Fever Outbreak-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes, such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. These scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N = 6) and non-clustered (N = 9) groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles) epidemic duration (days) was 224 (24, 343) in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251) and 210 (167, 302) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles) number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488) in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662) and 465 (295, 640) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distributions of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on the management of swine operations and continuity of business, so that potential losses

  3. Modeling Classical Swine Fever Outbreak-Related Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes, such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. These scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N = 6) and non-clustered (N = 9) groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles) epidemic duration (days) was 224 (24, 343) in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251) and 210 (167, 302) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles) number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488) in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662) and 465 (295, 640) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distributions of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak's characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on the management of swine operations and continuity of business, so that potential losses could

  4. A new twist on an old idea part 2: cyclosporine preserves normal mitochondrial but not cardiomyocyte function in mini‐swine with compensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Jessica A.; Gutiérrez‐Aguilar, Manuel; Marshall, Kurt D.; McCommis, Kyle S.; Zgoda, Pamela J.; Cruz‐Rivera, Noelany; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Krenz, Maike; Domeier, Timothy L.; Baines, Christopher P.; Emter, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We recently developed a clinically relevant mini‐swine model of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), in which diastolic dysfunction was associated with increased mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Early diastolic function is ATP and Ca2+‐dependent, thus, we hypothesized chronic low doses of cyclosporine (CsA) would preserve mitochondrial function via inhibition of MPT and subsequently maintain normal cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling and contractile characteristics. Left ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from aortic‐banded Yucatan mini‐swine divided into three groups; control nonbanded (CON), HFpEF nontreated (HF), and HFpEF treated with CsA (HF‐CsA). CsA mitigated the deterioration of mitochondrial function observed in HF animals, including functional uncoupling of Complex I‐dependent mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to MPT. Attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction in the HF‐CsA group was not associated with commensurate improvement in cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling or contractility. Ca2+ transient amplitude was reduced and transient time to peak and recovery (tau) prolonged in HF and HF‐CsA groups compared to CON. Alterations in Ca2+ transient parameters observed in the HF and HF‐CsA groups were associated with decreased cardiomyocyte shortening and shortening rate. Cellular function was consistent with impaired in vivo systolic and diastolic whole heart function. A significant systemic hypertensive response to CsA was observed in HF‐CsA animals, and may have played a role in the accelerated the development of heart failure at both the whole heart and cellular levels. Given the significant detriment to cardiac function observed in response to CsA, our findings suggest chronic CsA treatment is not a viable therapeutic option for HFpEF. PMID:24963034

  5. Myocardial infarction and intramyocardial injection models in swine

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Frederic C; Telukuntla, Kartik S; Karantalis, Vasileios; Suncion, Viky Y; Heldman, Alan W; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Williams, Adam R; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable and reproducible large animal models that closely replicate the clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI) are important for the translation of basic science research into bedside medicine. Swine are well accepted by the scientific community for cardiovascular research, and they represent an established animal model for preclinical trials for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of novel therapies. Here we present a protocol for using porcine models of MI created with a closed-chest coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion technique. This creates a model of MI encompassing the anteroapical, lateral and septal walls of the left ventricle. This model infarction can be easily adapted to suit individual study design and enables the investigation of a variety of possible interventions. This model is therefore a useful tool for translational research into the pathophysiology of ventricular remodeling and is an ideal testing platform for novel biological approaches targeting regenerative medicine. This model can be created in approximately 8–10 h. PMID:22790084

  6. Investigating the metabolic syndrome: Contributions of swine models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes, and an important contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, occurs in nearly 35% of adults and 50% of the aging population in the United States. However, the underlying mechanisms by which MetS orchestrates and amplifies cardiovascular events remain elusive. Furthermore, traditional therapeutic strategies addressing lifestyle modifications and individual components of MetS are often unsuccessful in decreasing morbidity due to MetS. The availability of an adequate experimental platform that mimics the complexity of MetS may allow development of novel management techniques. Swine models, including domestic pigs and minipigs, have made important contributions to our understanding of many aspects of MetS. Given their similarity to human anatomy and physiology, those models may have significant predictive power for elucidating the pathophysiology of MetS in a manner applicable to humans. Moreover, experimental maneuvers and drugs can be tested in these pre-clinical models before application in patients with MetS. This review highlights the utility of the pig as an animal model for metabolic disorders, which may play a crucial role in novel drug development to optimize management of MetS. PMID:26933085

  7. Model for heart failure education.

    PubMed

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting. PMID:25140745

  8. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants. PMID:24798317

  9. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants.

  10. Cardiac I-1c overexpression with reengineered AAV improves cardiac function in swine ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth M; Tilemann, Lisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Aguero, Jaume; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Lee, Ahyoung; Karakikes, Ioannis; Xie, Chaoqin; Akar, Fadi G; Shimada, Yuichi J; Gwathmey, Judith K; Asokan, Aravind; McPhee, Scott; Samulski, Jade; Samulski, Richard Jude; Sigg, Daniel C; Weber, Thomas; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac gene therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat advanced heart failure (HF). Advances in molecular biology and gene targeting approaches are offering further novel options for genetic manipulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to improve cardiac function in chronic HF by overexpressing constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) using a novel cardiotropic vector generated by capsid reengineering of adeno-associated virus (BNP116). One month after a large anterior myocardial infarction, 20 Yorkshire pigs randomly received intracoronary injection of either high-dose BNP116.I-1c (1.0 × 10(13) vector genomes (vg), n = 7), low-dose BNP116.I-1c (3.0 × 10(12) vg, n = 7), or saline (n = 6). Compared to baseline, mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 5.7% in the high-dose group, and by 5.2% in the low-dose group, whereas it decreased by 7% in the saline group. Additionally, preload-recruitable stroke work obtained from pressure-volume analysis demonstrated significantly higher cardiac performance in the high-dose group. Likewise, other hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume and contractility index indicated improved cardiac function after the I-1c gene transfer. Furthermore, BNP116 showed a favorable gene expression pattern for targeting the heart. In summary, I-1c overexpression using BNP116 improves cardiac function in a clinically relevant model of ischemic HF. PMID:25023328

  11. Limitations and Failures of the Layzer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2007-12-21

    We report several limitations and failure modes of the recently expanded Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities. The failures occur for large initial amplitudes, for stable accelerations, and for spikes in two-fluid systems.

  12. A simplified model for assessing the impact to groundwater of swine farms at regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabo, Marco; Viterbo, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Swine manure can be an excellent source of nutrients for crop production. Several swine farms are present in the territory of Regione Umbria and more than 200.000 of swine heads are present yearly in the whole territory while some municipalities host more than 30.000 heads over a relatively limited land. Municipality with elevated number of swine heads has registered particularly higher Nitrate concentration in groundwater that requires a management plan and intervention in order to determine the maximum allowed N loads in the specific region. Use of manure and fertilizers in agricultural field produce diffuse nitrogen (N) losses that are a major cause of excessive nitrate concentrations in ground and surface waters and have been of concern since decades. Excessive nitrate concentrations in groundwater can have toxic effects when used as drinking water and cause eutrophication in surface waters. For management and environmental planning purposes, it is necessary to assess the magnitude of diffuse N losses from agricultural fields and how they are influenced by factors such as management practices, type of fertilizers -organic or inorganic - climate and soil etc. There are several methods for assessing N leaching, they span from methods based on field test to complex models that require many input data. We use a simple index method that accounts for the type of fertilizer used - inorganic, swine or cattle manure- and hydrological and hydrogeological conditions. Hydrological conditions such as infiltration rates are estimated by a fully distributed hydrological model. Data on inorganic and organic fertilization are estimated at municipal level by using the nutrient crops needs and the statistics of swine and cattle heads within the municipality. The index method has been calibrated by using groundwater concentration as a proxy of N losses from agriculture. A time series of three years of data has been analyzed. The application of the simple index method allowed to

  13. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H.; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E.; Ulery, Eva S.; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. PMID:21074235

  14. Swine models in the design of more effective medical countermeasures against organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dorandeu, F; Mikler, J R; Thiermann, H; Tenn, C; Davidson, C; Sawyer, T W; Lallement, G; Worek, F

    2007-04-20

    Although the three most commonly used large mammal species in the safety assessment of drugs remain the dog, the macaque and the marmoset, swine, especially minipigs, have also been widely used over the years in many toxicological studies. Swine present a number of interesting biological and physiological characteristics. Similarities in skin properties with humans have led to extensive in vitro and in vivo studies. There is a specific interest in cardiovascular research, as well as in anaesthesiology and critical care medicine due to common features of swine and human physiology. Although knowledge of swine brain structure and functions remains incomplete, data does exist. The multiple blood sampling that is necessary in pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic studies are possible, as well as multiparametric monitoring and interventions with equipment used in human clinical settings. Practicality (handling), scientific (stress reduction) and ethical (invasive monitoring) reasons have led research teams to incorporate anaesthesia into their paradigms which makes the analysis of data increasingly difficult. Although not substantiated by scientific data, the swine appears to have an intermediate position in the scale of public perception between non-human primates and animals commonly referred to as pets (i.e. dogs and cats) and rodents. The benefits of the swine model justify the use of these animals in the design of more effective medical countermeasures against known chemical warfare agents (nerve agents, vesicants and lung damaging agents). Exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides represents a severe health issue in developing countries, while OP intoxication with the more lethal military nerve agents is not only of military concern but also a terrorist threat. Tailoring therapeutic regimens to the reality of OP poisoning is of the utmost importance when little experimental data and sparse human clinical data are available in the decision making process. We will

  15. ASPH modeling of Material Damage and Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, J M

    2010-04-30

    We describe our new methodology for Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) and its application to problems in modeling material failure. We find that ASPH is often crucial for properly modeling such experiments, since in most cases the strain placed on materials is non-isotropic (such as a stretching rod), and without the directional adaptability of ASPH numerical failure due to SPH nodes losing contact in the straining direction can compete with or exceed the physical process of failure.

  16. A novel ECMO circuit using a SYNERGY circulite pump in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Biscotti, Mauer; Singh, Gopal; Downey, Peter; Bacchetta, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used in the management of refractory cardiopulmonary failure. With improvements in technology, patients can be transferred between hospitals, ambulated, and supported for extended periods of time while on ECMO. The SYNERGY CircuLite micropump is a blood pump that has been used as a ventricular assist device for partial support. In this study, we assessed the blood biocompatibility of the SYNERGY blood pump in conjunction with a Quadrox D oxygenator for use in a novel ECMO circuit in a swine model. This clinical design was used to demonstrate early feasibility of this pump system. Four pigs were placed on venovenous ECMO circuit, which consisted of a SYNERGY pump, Quadrox D oxygenator, and Cobe E Pack 3/8 inch tubing. All animals survived the 6 hour ECMO run without catastrophic biocompatibility issues. There was no statistically discernible change from baseline in hematologic parameters, including hemoglobin, plasma-free hemoglobin, total bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer, fibrinogen, platelets, and P-selectin. We believe that this study serves as a proof of concept and basis for further studies using the SYNERGY pump as a component of ECMO systems.

  17. Model the Deformation and Failure of Solids

    2001-10-19

    EMU models the deformation and failure of solids based on a reformulated theory of continuum mechanics known as the Peridynamic model. This approach allows dynamic fracture and other failure mechanisms to be simulated with a minimum of mesh effeces and without a need for supplementary kinetic relations for crack growth. Penetration by a rigid projectile is also included in the code.

  18. Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, S.; Berkhout, V.; Mayer, J.; Siebenlist, D.

    2016-09-01

    Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines is an essential part of offshore wind farm simulation software as it leads to optimized decision making when specifying the necessary resources for the operation and maintenance of wind farms. In order to optimize O&M strategies, a thorough understanding of a wind turbine's failure behaviour is vital and is therefore being developed at Fraunhofer IWES. Within this article, first the failure models of existing offshore O&M tools are presented to show the state of the art and strengths and weaknesses of the respective models are briefly discussed. Then a conceptual framework for modelling different failure mechanisms of wind turbines is being presented. This framework takes into account the different wind turbine subsystems and structures as well as the failure modes of a component by applying several influencing factors representing wear and break failure mechanisms. A failure function is being set up for the rotor blade as exemplary component and simulation results have been compared to a constant failure rate and to empirical wind turbine fleet data as a reference. The comparison and the breakdown of specific failure categories demonstrate the overall plausibility of the model.

  19. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  20. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  1. Explanatory Models of Heart Failure Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Angela P.; McDougall, Graham J.; Joiner-Rogers, Glenda; Innerarity, Sheri; Delville, Carol; Meraviglia, Marty; Davila, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Chronic health failure is a leading cause of hospital readmissions and is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Explanatory models of illness can provide insight about how people with heart failure perceive their etiology of heart failure. Six themes were found in this descriptive, qualitative study to explore the perceived origin of heart failure in 50 participants. Forty percent of the people were unaware of why they had the diagnosis. Misconceptions and misinformation were common, including confusion about whether the symptoms themselves caused the disease. PMID:22156813

  2. One-Health Simulation Modelling: A Case Study of Influenza Spread between Human and Swine Populations using NAADSM.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2016-02-01

    The circulation of zoonotic influenza A viruses including pH1N1 2009 and H5N1 continue to present a constant threat to animal and human populations. Recently, an H3N2 variant spread from pigs to humans and between humans in limited numbers. Accordingly, this research investigated a range of scenarios of the transmission dynamics of pH1N1 2009 virus at the swine-human interface while accounting for different percentages of swine workers initially immune. Furthermore, the feasibility of using NAADSM (North American Animal Disease Spread Model) applied as a one-health simulation model was assessed. The study population included 488 swine herds and 29, 707 households of people within a county in Ontario, Canada. Households were categorized as follows: (i) rural households with swine workers, (ii) rural households without swine workers, and (iii) urban households without swine workers. Forty-eight scenarios were investigated, based on the combination of six scenarios around the transmissibility of the virus at the interface and four vaccination coverage levels of swine workers (0-60%), all under two settings of either swine or human origin of the virus. Outcomes were assessed in terms of stochastic 'die-out' fraction, size and time to peak epidemic day, overall size and duration of the outbreaks. The modelled outcomes indicated that minimizing influenza transmissibility at the interface and targeted vaccination of swine workers had significant beneficial effects. Our results indicate that NAADSM can be used as a framework to model the spread and control of contagious zoonotic diseases among animal and human populations, under certain simplifying assumptions. Further evaluation of the model is required. In addition to these specific findings, this study serves as a benchmark that can provide useful input to a future one-health influenza modelling studies. Some pertinent information gaps were also identified. Enhanced surveillance and the collection of high

  3. Continued breathing followed by gasping or apnea in a swine model of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Continued breathing following ventricular fibrillation has here-to-fore not been described. Methods We analyzed the spontaneous ventilatory activity during the first several minutes of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in our isoflurane anesthesized swine model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The frequency and type of ventilatory activity was monitored by pneumotachometer and main stream infrared capnometer and analyzed in 61 swine during the first 3 to 6 minutes of untreated VF. Results During the first minute of VF, the air flow pattern in all 61 swine was similar to those recorded during regular spontaneous breathing during anesthesia and was clearly different from the patterns of gasping. The average rate of continued breathing during the first minute of untreated VF was 10 breaths per minute. During the second minute of untreated VF, spontaneous breathing activity either stopped or became typical of gasping. During minutes 2 to 5 of untreated VF, most animals exhibited very slow spontaneous ventilatory activity with a pattern typical of gasping; and the pattern of gasping was crescendo-decrescendo, as has been previously reported. In the absence of therapy, all ventilatory activity stopped 6 minutes after VF cardiac arrest. Conclusion In our swine model of VF cardiac arrest, we documented that normal breathing continued for the first minute following cardiac arrest. PMID:20691123

  4. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or ‑mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  5. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or -mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  6. Physical modelling of failure in composites.

    PubMed

    Talreja, Ramesh

    2016-07-13

    Structural integrity of composite materials is governed by failure mechanisms that initiate at the scale of the microstructure. The local stress fields evolve with the progression of the failure mechanisms. Within the full span from initiation to criticality of the failure mechanisms, the governing length scales in a fibre-reinforced composite change from the fibre size to the characteristic fibre-architecture sizes, and eventually to a structural size, depending on the composite configuration and structural geometry as well as the imposed loading environment. Thus, a physical modelling of failure in composites must necessarily be of multi-scale nature, although not always with the same hierarchy for each failure mode. With this background, the paper examines the currently available main composite failure theories to assess their ability to capture the essential features of failure. A case is made for an alternative in the form of physical modelling and its skeleton is constructed based on physical observations and systematic analysis of the basic failure modes and associated stress fields and energy balances. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242307

  7. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Host Factors Modulated during Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rogée, Sophie; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Bouquet, Jérôme; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Frederici, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute enterically transmitted hepatitis. In industrialized countries, it is a zoonotic disease, with swine being the major reservoir of human HEV contamination. The occurrence and severity of the disease are variable, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In the absence of a robust cell culture system or small-animal models, the HEV life cycle and pathological process remain unclear. To characterize HEV pathogenesis and virulence mechanisms, a quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify cellular factors and pathways modulated during acute infection of swine. Three groups of pigs were inoculated with three different strains of swine HEV to evaluate the possible role of viral determinants in pathogenesis. Liver samples were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach, two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and 61 modulated proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the three HEV strains replicate similarly in swine and that they modulate several cellular pathways, suggesting that HEV impairs several cellular processes, which can account for the various types of disease expression. Several proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, apolipoprotein E, and prohibitin, known to be involved in other viral life cycles, were upregulated in HEV-infected livers. Some differences were observed between the three strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability may induce variations in pathogenesis. This comparative analysis of the liver proteome modulated during infection with three different strains of HEV genotype 3 provides an important basis for further investigations on the factors involved in HEV replication and the mechanism of HEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for acute hepatitis, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic

  8. Modelling early failures in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    A major problem encountered in planning for Space Station Freedom is the amount of maintenance that will be required. To predict the failure rates of components and systems aboard Space Station Freedom, the logical approach is to use data obtained from previously flown spacecraft. In order to determine the mechanisms that are driving the failures, models can be proposed, and then checked to see if they adequately fit the observed failure data obtained from a large variety of satellites. For this particular study, failure data and truncation times were available for satellites launched between 1976 and 1984; no data past 1984 was available. The study was limited to electrical subsystems and assemblies, which were studied to determine if they followed a model resulting from a mixture of exponential distributions.

  9. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m(2)-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10(-7) µg/yr-m(2)-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels.

  10. Use of AERMOD to determine a hydrogen sulfide emission factor for swine operations by inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 μg m -2 s -1 was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10 -7 μg yr -1 m -2 kg -1 was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1 M kg), concentrations within 0.5 km from the CAFO exceeded 25 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels.

  11. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m(2)-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10(-7) µg/yr-m(2)-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels. PMID:21804761

  12. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling

    PubMed Central

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m2-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10−7 µg/yr-m2-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels. PMID:21804761

  13. A swine model of infarct-related reentrant ventricular tachycardia: Electroanatomic, magnetic resonance, and histopathological characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Roujol, Sébastien; Nezafat, Reza; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly; Buxton, Alfred E.; Josephson, Mark E.; Anter, Elad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human ventricular tachycardia (VT) after myocardial infarction usually occurs because of subendocardial reentrant circuits originating in scar tissue that borders surviving myocardial bundles. Several preclinical large animal models have been used to further study postinfarct reentrant VT, but with varied experimental methodologies and limited evaluation of the underlying substrate or induced arrhythmia mechanism. OBJECTIVE We aimed to develop and characterize a swine model of scar-related reentrant VT. METHODS Thirty-five Yorkshire swine underwent 180-minute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Thirty-one animals (89%) survived the 6–8-week survival period. These animals underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by electrophysiology study, detailed electroanatomic mapping, and histopathological analysis. RESULTS Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction measured using CMR imaging was 36% ± 6.6% with anteroseptal wall motion abnormality and late gadolinium enhancement across 12.5% ± 4.1% of the LV surface area. Low voltage measured using endocardial electroanatomic mapping encompassed 11.1% ± 3.5% of the LV surface area (bipolar voltage ≤1.5 mV) with anterior, anteroseptal, and anterolateral involvement. Reentrant circuits mapped were largely determined by functional rather than fix anatomical barriers, consistent with “pseudo-block” due to anisotropic conduction. Sustained monomorphic VT was induced in 28 of 31 swine (90%) (67 VTs; 2.4 ± 1.1; range 1–4) and characterized as reentry. VT circuits were subendocardial, with an arrhythmogenic substrate characterized by transmural anterior scar with varying degrees of fibrosis and myocardial fiber disarray on the septal and lateral borders. CONCLUSION This is a well-characterized swine model of scar-related subendocardial reentrant VT. This model can serve as the basis for further investigation in the physiology and therapeutics of humanlike postinfarction

  14. Parameter Values for Epidemiological Models of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Swine.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, Amy C; Patterson, Gilbert; VanderWaal, Kimberly L; Craft, Meggan E; Perez, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    In the event of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) incursion, response strategies are required to control, contain, and eradicate the pathogen as efficiently as possible. Infectious disease simulation models are widely used tools that mimic disease dispersion in a population and that can be useful in the design and support of prevention and mitigation activities. However, there are often gaps in evidence-based research to supply models with quantities that are necessary to accurately reflect the system of interest. The objective of this study was to quantify values associated with the duration of the stages of FMD infection (latent period, subclinical period, incubation period, and duration of infection), probability of transmission (within-herd and between-herd via spatial spread), and diagnosis of a vesicular disease within a herd using a meta-analysis of the peer-reviewed literature and expert opinion. The latent period ranged from 1 to 7 days and incubation period ranged from 1 to 9 days; both were influenced by strain. In contrast, the subclinical period ranged from 0 to 6 days and was influenced by sampling method only. The duration of infection ranged from 1 to 10 days. The probability of spatial spread between an infected and fully susceptible swine farm was estimated as greatest within 5 km of the infected farm, highlighting the importance of possible long-range transmission through the movement of infected animals. Finally, while most swine practitioners are confident in their ability to detect a vesicular disease in an average sized swine herd, a small proportion expect that up to half of the herd would need to show clinical signs before detection via passive surveillance would occur. The results of this study will be useful in within- and between-herd simulation models to develop efficient response strategies in the event an FMD in swine populations of disease-free countries or regions.

  15. Parameter Values for Epidemiological Models of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Kinsley, Amy C.; Patterson, Gilbert; VanderWaal, Kimberly L.; Craft, Meggan E.; Perez, Andres M.

    2016-01-01

    In the event of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) incursion, response strategies are required to control, contain, and eradicate the pathogen as efficiently as possible. Infectious disease simulation models are widely used tools that mimic disease dispersion in a population and that can be useful in the design and support of prevention and mitigation activities. However, there are often gaps in evidence-based research to supply models with quantities that are necessary to accurately reflect the system of interest. The objective of this study was to quantify values associated with the duration of the stages of FMD infection (latent period, subclinical period, incubation period, and duration of infection), probability of transmission (within-herd and between-herd via spatial spread), and diagnosis of a vesicular disease within a herd using a meta-analysis of the peer-reviewed literature and expert opinion. The latent period ranged from 1 to 7 days and incubation period ranged from 1 to 9 days; both were influenced by strain. In contrast, the subclinical period ranged from 0 to 6 days and was influenced by sampling method only. The duration of infection ranged from 1 to 10 days. The probability of spatial spread between an infected and fully susceptible swine farm was estimated as greatest within 5 km of the infected farm, highlighting the importance of possible long-range transmission through the movement of infected animals. Finally, while most swine practitioners are confident in their ability to detect a vesicular disease in an average sized swine herd, a small proportion expect that up to half of the herd would need to show clinical signs before detection via passive surveillance would occur. The results of this study will be useful in within- and between-herd simulation models to develop efficient response strategies in the event an FMD in swine populations of disease-free countries or regions. PMID:27314002

  16. Swine experimental model to evaluate stem cells implant post myocardial infarction by perfusion gated-SPET.

    PubMed

    Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferlan, Giovanni; Crovace, Antonio; Notaristefano, Antonio; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna; Pisani, Antonio; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) implant after swine experimental myocardial infarct (MI) was investigated by serial technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-tetrofosmin gated single photon emission tomography (G-SPET) and compared with immuno-histochemical findings. The aim was to evaluate if intramyocardial BMSC implant produces any prolonged effect in the left ventricle (LV) perfusion and function. Eleven pigs underwent left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligature; in seven of them BMSC were injected in the border zone of the MI, while in the remaining four saline solution was injected at the same site. After LAD ligature G-SPET scans at 48h and at 5 and 10 weeks (w) after the implant were performed. Uptake defect size and LV function analysis were performed comparing 48h to 5w and 10w studies. Statistical evaluation was performed with Friedman test and unpaired Wilcoxon test. The comparison between a progressive reduction of Perfusion Image Score was observed from 48h to 5w and to 10w in the treated group (Friedman test: χ²= 13.56; P=0.01). No variation was observed in the control group (Friedman test: χ²=3; P= 0.223). Comparison of the absolute variation (Δ) between treated and control group resulted significant (Wilcoxon test W=10; P=0.007). Similar positive results were also observed for the relative extension of the uptake defect, wall motion and LVEF analysis. Histological data of our swine model demonstrated that autologous BMSC implanted in the damaged myocardium area had survived and differentiated into cells with typical features of myocardiocytes. Gated SPET is a reliable tool to evaluate prolonged positive effects of autologous BMSC implant in swine experimental MI model. In conclusion, autologous BMSC implanted can improve perfusion, induce cell regeneration, reduce wall motion abnormalities and prevent severe LV dysfunction in swines.

  17. Analysis of multistate models for electromigration failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, V. M.

    2010-02-01

    The application of a multistate Markov chain is considered as a model of electromigration interconnect degradation and eventual failure. Such a model has already been used [Tan et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 103703 (2007)], maintaining that, in general, it leads to a failure distribution described by a gamma mixture, and that as a result, this type of distribution (rather than a lognormal) should be used as a prior in any Bayesian mode fitting and subsequent reliability budgeting. Although it appears that the model is able to produce reasonably realistic resistance curves R(t), we are unable to find any evidence that the failure distribution is a simple gamma mixture except under contrived conditions. The distributions generated are largely sums of exponentials (phase-type distributions), convolutions of gamma distributions with different scales, or roughly normal. We note also some inconsistencies in the derivation of the gamma mixture in the work cited above and conclude that, as it stands, the Markov chain model is probably unsuitable for electromigration modeling and a change from lognormal to gamma mixture distribution generally cannot be justified in this way. A hidden Markov model, which describes the interconnect behavior at time t rather than its resistance, in terms of generally observed physical processes such as void nucleating, slitlike growth (where the growth is slow and steady), transverse growth, current shunting (where the resistance jumps in value), etc., seems a more likely prospect, but treating failure in such a manner would still require significant justification.

  18. A Cellular Automaton Model of Catastrophic Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, C. A.; Klein, W.

    2009-03-01

    We introduce a two-dimensional cellular automaton model for studying the catastrophic failure of materials under stress. Our model is similar to the Olami-Feder-Christensen earthquake model [Z. Olami et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1244 (1992)] except that after a site fails f-times, it no longer can receive stress from its neighbors. In the limit that the interaction range, R, goes to infinity, our model is equivalent to the global load sharing fiber bundle model of Pierce [F. T.Pierce, J. Text. Ind. 17, 355 (1926)] and Daniels [H. E. Daniels, Proc. Roy. Soc. London A 183, 405 (1945)]. By varying the interaction range, we observe two qualitatively different failure modes. For R 1 catastrophic failure resembles a nucleation-like event which grows symmetrically from a single initiating site and fails every site in the lattice. In contrast, for R 1 a percolating cluster of failed sites spans the system despite the many active sites that persist, even after catastrophic failure. We use the stress-fluctuation metric to study the ergodicity of our model and hence the validity of equilibrium descriptions of fracture.

  19. Accelerated Failure-Time Models of Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimka, Justin R.; Wang, Qilu

    2009-01-01

    This third article in a series describing survival analysis of engineering student retention and graduation introduces accelerated failure-time as an alternative to the Cox proportional hazards model to the context of student data. The new survival analysis of graduation data presented here assumes different distributions including exponential,…

  20. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  1. Modeling of microstructural effects on electromigration failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ceric, H.; Orio, R. L. de; Zisser, W.; Selberherr, S.

    2014-06-19

    Current electromigration models used for simulation and analysis of interconnect reliability lack the appropriate description of metal microstructure and consequently have a very limited predictive capability. Therefore, the main objective of our work was obtaining more sophisticated electromigration tools. The problem is addressed through a combination of different levels of atomistic modeling and already available, continuum level macroscopic models. A novel method for an ab initio calculation of the effective valence for electromigration is presented and its application on the analysis of EM behavior is demonstrated. Additionally, a simple analytical model for the early electromigration lifetime is obtained. We have shown that its application provides a reasonable estimate for the early electromigration failures including the effect of microstructure. A simulation study is also applied on electromigration failure in tin solder bumps, where it contributed the understanding of the role of tin crystal anisotropy in the degradation mechanism of solder bumps.

  2. Modelling of failure of structural textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, N.; Gilchrist, M. D.

    This paper summarizes extensive experimental work regarding the manufacture, mechanical characterization and modelling of textile thermoplastic composites produced by means of commingled yarns. These composites are believed to have a high potential for applications in structural automotive components. However, methods need to be developed for faster manufacturing and reliable prediction of the component mechanical performance and failure. A practical approach of finite element modelling of the stiffness and strength behaviour of these composites is briefly discussed.

  3. Scenario tree model for animal disease freedom framed in the OIE context using the example of a generic swine model for Aujeszky's disease in commercial swine in Canada.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André

    2016-01-01

    "Freedom from animal disease" is an ambiguous concept that may have a different meaning in trade and science. For trade alone, there are different levels of freedom from OIE listed diseases. A country can: be recognized by OIE to be "officially free"; self-declare freedom, with no official recognition by the OIE; or report animal disease as absent (no occurrence) in six-monthly reports. In science, we apply scenario tree models to calculate the probability of a population being free from disease at a given prevalence to provide evidence of freedom from animal disease. Here, we link science with application by describing how a scenario tree model may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease. We combine the idea of a standardized presentation of scenario tree models for disease freedom and having a similar model for two different animal diseases to suggest that a simple generic model may help veterinary authorities to build and evaluate scenario tree models for disease freedom. Here, we aim to develop a generic scenario tree model for disease freedom that is: animal species specific, population specific, and has a simple structure. The specific objectives were: to explore the levels of freedom described in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code; to describe how scenario tree models may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease; and to present a generic swine scenario tree model for disease freedom in Canada's domestic (commercial) swine applied to Aujeszky's disease (AD). In particular, to explore how historical survey data, and data mining may affect the probability of freedom and to explore different sampling strategies. Finally, to frame the generic scenario tree model in the context of Canada's claim of freedom from AD. We found that scenario tree models are useful to support a country's claim of freedom either as "recognized officially free" or as part of a self-declaration but the models should not stand alone in a

  4. Interspecies Mixed-Effect Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Penicillin G in Cattle and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses. PMID:24867969

  5. Modeling the biomechanics of swine mastication--an inverse dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Basafa, Ehsan; Murphy, Ryan J; Gordon, Chad R; Armand, Mehran

    2014-08-22

    A novel reconstructive alternative for patients with severe facial structural deformity is Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplantation (FJTT). To date, however, only ten surgeries have included underlying skeletal and jaw-teeth components, all yielding sub-optimal results and a need for a subsequent revision surgery, due to size mismatch and lack of precise planning. Numerous studies have proven swine to be appropriate candidates for translational studies including pre-operative planning of transplantation. An important aspect of planning FJTT is determining the optimal muscle attachment sites on the recipient's jaw, which requires a clear understanding of mastication and bite mechanics in relation to the new donated upper and/or lower jaw. A segmented CT scan coupled with data taken from literature defined a biomechanical model of mandible and jaw muscles of a swine. The model was driven using tracked motion and external force data of one cycle of chewing published earlier, and predicted the muscle activation patterns as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces and condylar motions. Two methods, polynomial and min/max optimization, were used for solving the muscle recruitment problem. Similar performances were observed between the two methods. On average, there was a mean absolute error (MAE) of <0.08 between the predicted and measured activation levels of all muscles, and an MAE of <7 N for TMJ reaction forces. Simulated activations qualitatively followed the same patterns as the reference data and there was very good agreement for simulated TMJ forces. The polynomial optimization produced a smoother output, suggesting that it is more suitable for studying such motions. Average MAE for condylar motion was 1.2mm, which reduced to 0.37 mm when the input incisor motion was scaled to reflect the possible size mismatch between the current and original swine models. Results support the hypothesis that the model can be used for planning of facial

  6. Modeling the Biomechanics of Swine Mastication – An Inverse Dynamics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Basafa, Ehsan; Murphy, Ryan J.; Gordon, Chad R.; Armand, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    A novel reconstructive alternative for patients with severe facial structural deformity is Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplantation (FJTT). To date, however, only ten surgeries have included underlying skeletal and jaw-teeth components, all yielding sub-optimal results and a need for a subsequent revision surgery, due to size mismatch and lack of precise planning. Numerous studies have proven swine to be appropriate candidates for translational studies including pre-operative planning of transplantation. An important aspect of planning FJTT is determining the optimal muscle attachment sites on the recipient’s jaw, which requires a clear understanding of mastication and bite mechanics in relation to the new donated upper and/or lower jaw. A segmented CT scan coupled with data taken from literature defined a biomechanical model of mandible and jaw muscles of a swine. The model was driven using tracked motion and external force data of one cycle of chewing published earlier, and predicted the muscle activation patterns as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces and condylar motions. Two methods, polynomial and min/max optimization, were used for solving the muscle recruitment problem. Similar performances were observed between the two methods. On average, there was a mean absolute error (MAE) of <0.08 between the predicted and measured activation levels of all muscles, and an MAE of <7N for TMJ reaction forces. Simulated activations qualitatively followed the same patterns as the reference data and there was very good agreement for simulated TMJ forces. The polynomial optimization produced a smoother output, suggesting that it is more suitable for studying such motions. Average MAE for condylar motion was 1.2mm, which reduced to 0.37mm when the input incisor motion was scaled to reflect the possible size mismatch between the current and original swine models. Results support the hypothesis that the model can be used for planning of facial

  7. Detection and evaluation of renal biomarkers in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Su-Yan; Xing, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is increasing and strongly associated with long-term mortality. However, lack of reliable animal models and well-defined measures of renoprotection, made early diagnosis and therapy difficult. We previously successfully established the swine acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model of ischemia-reperfusion by blocking left anterior descending branch (LAD). Reperfusion was performed after 90-minute occlusion of the LAD. AMI was confirmed by ECG and left ventricular angiography (LVG). Then those 52 survived AMI reperfusion swine, including ventricular fibrillation-cardiac arrest after restoration of blood flow, were randomly divided into four groups (four/group) according to different interventions: resuscitation in room temperature, resuscitation with 500 ml saline in room temperature, resuscitation with 4°C 500 ml saline and normal control (with no intervention of resuscitation). Each group was further observed in four groups according to different time of resuscitation after ventricular arrhythmias: 1, 3, 5, 10-minute reperfusion after ventricular arrhythmias. Plasma and random urine were collected to evaluate renal function and test renal biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI). Our swine AMI model of ischemia-reperfusion provoked subclinical AKI with the elevation of the tubular damage biomarker, NGAL, IL-18 and L-FABP. Renal damage rapidly observed after hemodynamic instability, rather than observation after several hours as previously reported. The increasing rate of biological markers declined after interventions, however, its impact on the long-term prognosis remains to be further studied. These data show that elevation of tubular damage biomarkers without glomerular function loss may indicate appropriate timing for effective renoprotections like hypothermia resuscitation in type 1 CRS. PMID:26339403

  8. Detection and evaluation of renal biomarkers in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Su-Yan; Xing, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is increasing and strongly associated with long-term mortality. However, lack of reliable animal models and well-defined measures of renoprotection, made early diagnosis and therapy difficult. We previously successfully established the swine acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model of ischemia-reperfusion by blocking left anterior descending branch (LAD). Reperfusion was performed after 90-minute occlusion of the LAD. AMI was confirmed by ECG and left ventricular angiography (LVG). Then those 52 survived AMI reperfusion swine, including ventricular fibrillation-cardiac arrest after restoration of blood flow, were randomly divided into four groups (four/group) according to different interventions: resuscitation in room temperature, resuscitation with 500 ml saline in room temperature, resuscitation with 4°C 500 ml saline and normal control (with no intervention of resuscitation). Each group was further observed in four groups according to different time of resuscitation after ventricular arrhythmias: 1, 3, 5, 10-minute reperfusion after ventricular arrhythmias. Plasma and random urine were collected to evaluate renal function and test renal biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI). Our swine AMI model of ischemia-reperfusion provoked subclinical AKI with the elevation of the tubular damage biomarker, NGAL, IL-18 and L-FABP. Renal damage rapidly observed after hemodynamic instability, rather than observation after several hours as previously reported. The increasing rate of biological markers declined after interventions, however, its impact on the long-term prognosis remains to be further studied. These data show that elevation of tubular damage biomarkers without glomerular function loss may indicate appropriate timing for effective renoprotections like hypothermia resuscitation in type 1 CRS.

  9. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  10. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model.

  11. A Multiscale Computational Model of the Response of Swine Epidermis After Acute Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events can lead to very high skin dose for astronauts on exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth s magnetic field [1]. Assessing the detrimental effects to human skin under such adverse conditions could be predicted by conducting territorial experiments on animal models. In this study we apply a computational approach to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis [2]. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters into a multiscale tissue modeling framework, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation index comparable to unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments [3]. It is noted the basal cell doubling time is 10 to 16 days in the intact population, but drops to 13.6 hr in the regenerating populations surviving irradiation. This complex 30-fold variation is proposed to be attributed to the shortening of the G1 phase duration. We investigate this radiation induced effect by considering at the sub-cellular level the expression and signaling of TGF-beta, as it is recognized as a key regulatory factor of tissue formation and wound healing [4]. This integrated model will allow us to test the validity of various basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and should lead to a fuller understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  12. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  13. Comparison of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an anesthetized swine model of acute pulmonary embolism producing right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beam, Daren M; Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Tune, Johnathan D; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death, and a model is needed for testing potential treatments. In developing a model, we compared the hemodynamic effects of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an acute swine model of PE because the choice of anesthesia will likely affect the cardiovascular responses of an animal to PE. At baseline, swine that received α-chloralose (n = 6) had a lower heart rate and cardiac output and higher SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and mean arterial pressure than did those given isoflurane (n = 9). After PE induction, swine given α-chloralose compared with isoflurane exhibited a lower heart rate (63 ± 10 compared with 116 ± 15 bpm) and peripheral arterial pressure (52 ± 12 compared with 61 ± 12 mm Hg); higher SpO2 (98% ± 3% compared with 95% ± 1%), end-tidal CO2 (35 ± 4 compared with 32 ± 5), and systolic blood pressure (121 ± 8 compared with 104 ± 20 mm Hg); and equivalent right ventricular:left ventricular ratios (1.32 ± 0.50 compared with 1.23 ± 0.19) and troponin I mean values (0.09 ± 0.07 ng/mL compared with 0.09 ± 0.06 ng/mL). Isoflurane was associated with widely variable fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin time. Intraexperiment mortality was 0 of 6 animals for α-chloralose and 2 of 9 swine for isoflurane. All swine anesthetized with α-chloralose survived with sustained pulmonary hypertension, RV-dilation-associated cardiac injury without the confounding vasodilatory or coagulatory effects of isoflurane. These data demonstrate the physiologic advantages of α-chloralose over isoflurane for anesthesia in a swine model of severe submassive PE. PMID:25730758

  14. Prognostic modeling in pediatric acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vandana; Dhawan, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only proven treatment for pediatric acute liver failure (PALF). However, over a period of time, spontaneous native liver survival is increasingly reported, making us wonder if we are overtransplanting children with acute liver failure (ALF). An effective prognostic model for PALF would help direct appropriate organ allocation. Only patients who would die would undergo LT, and those who would spontaneously recover would avoid unnecessary LT. Deriving and validating such a model for PALF, however, encompasses numerous challenges. In particular, the heterogeneity of age and etiology in PALF, as well as a lack of understanding of the natural history of the disease, contributed by the availability of LT has led to difficulties in prognostic model development. Several prognostic laboratory variables have been identified, and the incorporation of these variables into scoring systems has been attempted. A reliable targeted prognostic model for ALF in Wilson's disease has been established and externally validated. The roles of physiological, immunological, and metabolomic parameters in prognosis are being investigated. This review discusses the challenges with prognostic modeling in PALF and describes predictive methods that are currently available and in development for the future. Liver Transplantation 22 1418-1430 2016 AASLD. PMID:27343006

  15. Ulinastatin suppresses burn-induced lipid peroxidation and reduces fluid requirements in a Swine model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Min; Du, Ming-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Long; Hu, Quan; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Li; Wang, Huan; Wen, Yu; Lv, Yi; Lin, Hong-Yuan; Pi, Yu-Li; Hu, Sen; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Lipid peroxidation plays a critical role in burn-induced plasma leakage, and ulinastatin has been reported to reduce lipid peroxidation in various models. This study aims to examine whether ulinastatin reduces fluid requirements through inhibition of lipid peroxidation in a swine burn model. Methods. Forty miniature swine were subjected to 40% TBSA burns and were randomly allocated to the following four groups: immediate lactated Ringer's resuscitation (ILR), immediate LR containing ulinastatin (ILR/ULI), delayed LR resuscitation (DLR), and delayed LR containing ulinastatin (DLR/ULI). Hemodynamic variables, net fluid accumulation, and plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations were measured. Heart, liver, lung, skeletal muscle, and ileum were harvested at 48 hours after burn for evaluation of TBARS concentrations, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and tissue water content. Results. Ulinastatin significantly reduced pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) and extravascular lung water index (ELWI), net fluid accumulation, and water content of heart, lung, and ileum in both immediate or delayed resuscitation groups. Furthermore, ulinastatin infusion significantly reduced plasma and tissue concentrations of TBARS in both immediate or delayed resuscitation groups. Conclusions. These results indicate that ulinastatin can reduce fluid requirements through inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  16. Unique transcriptomic signature of omental adipose tissue in Ossabaw swine: a model of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Toedebusch, Ryan G; Roberts, Michael D; Wells, Kevin D; Company, Joseph M; Kanosky, Kayla M; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Perfield, James W; Ibdah, Jamal A; Booth, Frank W; Rector, R Scott

    2014-05-15

    To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on intra-abdominal adipose tissue phenotype, a complete transcriptomic analysis using deep RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on omental adipose tissue (OMAT) obtained from lean and Western diet-induced obese juvenile Ossabaw swine. Obese animals had 88% greater body mass, 49% greater body fat content, and a 60% increase in OMAT adipocyte area (all P < 0.05) compared with lean pigs. RNA-seq revealed a 37% increase in the total transcript number in the OMAT of obese pigs. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed transcripts in obese OMAT were primarily enriched in the following categories: 1) development, 2) cellular function and maintenance, and 3) connective tissue development and function, while transcripts associated with RNA posttranslational modification, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry were reduced. DAVID and Gene Ontology analyses showed that many of the classically recognized gene pathways associated with adipose tissue dysfunction in obese adults including hypoxia, inflammation, angiogenesis were not altered in OMAT in our model. The current study indicates that obesity in juvenile Ossabaw swine is characterized by increases in overall OMAT transcript number and provides novel data describing early transcriptomic alterations that occur in response to excess caloric intake in visceral adipose tissue in a pig model of childhood obesity.

  17. Juvenile Swine Surgical Alveolar Cleft Model to Test Novel Autologous Stem Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Montserrat; Morse, Justin C.; Halevi, Alexandra E.; Emodi, Omri; Pharaon, Michael R.; Wood, Jeyhan S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of craniofacial congenital bone defects has historically relied on autologous bone grafts. Engineered bone using mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord on electrospun nanomicrofiber scaffolds offers an alternative to current treatments. This preclinical study presents the development of a juvenile swine model with a surgically created maxillary cleft defect for future testing of tissue-engineered implants for bone generation. Five-week-old pigs (n=6) underwent surgically created maxillary (alveolar) defects to determine critical-sized defect and the quality of treatment outcomes with rib, iliac crest cancellous bone, and tissue-engineered scaffolds. Pigs were sacrificed at 1 month. Computed tomography scans were obtained at days 0 and 30, at the time of euthanasia. Histological evaluation was performed on newly formed bone within the surgical defect. A 1 cm surgically created defect healed with no treatment, the 2 cm defect did not heal. A subsequently created 1.7 cm defect, physiologically similar to a congenitally occurring alveolar cleft in humans, from the central incisor to the canine, similarly did not heal. Rib graft treatment did not incorporate into adjacent normal bone; cancellous bone and the tissue-engineered graft healed the critical-sized defect. This work establishes a juvenile swine alveolar cleft model with critical-sized defect approaching 1.7 cm. Both cancellous bone and tissue engineered graft generated bridging bone formation in the surgically created alveolar cleft defect. PMID:25837453

  18. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  19. A simple approach to modeling ductile failure.

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Gerald William

    2012-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the need to predict the behavior of structures after the occurrence of an initial failure. In some cases determining the extent of failure, beyond initiation, is required, while in a few cases the initial failure is a design feature used to tailor the subsequent load paths. In either case, the ability to numerically simulate the initiation and propagation of failures is a highly desired capability. This document describes one approach to the simulation of failure initiation and propagation.

  20. Semi-empirical process-based models for ammonia emissions from beef, swine, and poultry operations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuilling, Alyssa M.; Adams, Peter J.

    2015-11-01

    Farm-level ammonia emissions factors in the literature vary by an order of magnitude due to variations in manure management practices and meteorology, and it is essential to capture this variability in emission inventories used for atmospheric modeling. Loss of ammonia to the atmosphere is modeled here through a nitrogen mass balance with losses controlled by mass transfer resistance parameters, which vary with meteorological conditions and are tuned to match literature-reported emissions factors. Variations due to management practices are captured by having tuned parameters that are specific to each set of management practices. The resulting farm emissions models (FEMs) explain between 20% and 70% of the variability in published emissions factors and typically estimate emission factors within a factor of 2. The r2 values are: 0.53 for swine housing (0.67 for shallow-pit houses); 0.48 for swine storage; 0.29 for broiler chickens; 0.70 for layer chickens; and 0.21 for beef feedlots (0.36 for beef feedlots with more farm-specific input data). Mean fractional error was found to be 22-44% for beef feedlots, swine housing, and layer housing; fractional errors were greater for swine lagoons (90%) and broiler housing (69%). Unexplained variability and errors result from model limitations, measurement errors in reported emissions factors, and a lack of information about measurement conditions.

  1. Environmental Effectiveness of Swine Sewage Management: A Multicriteria AHP-Based Model for a Reliable Quick Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizzari, Marco; Modica, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Environmental issues related to swine production are still a major concern for the general public and represent a key challenge for the swine industry. The environmental impact of higher livestock concentration is particularly significant where it coincides with weaker policy standards and poor manure management. Effective tools for environmental monitoring of the swine sewage management process become essential for verifying the environmental compatibility of farming facilities and for defining suitable policies aimed at increasing swine production sustainability. This research aims at the development and application of a model for a quick assessment of the environmental effectiveness of the pig farming sewage management process. In order to define the model, multicriteria techniques, and in particular, Saaty's analytic hierarchy process, were used to develop an iterative process in which the various key factors influencing the process under investigation were analyzed. The model, named EASE (Environmental Assessment of Sewages management Effectiveness), was optimized and applied to the Lake Trasimeno basin (Umbria, Italy), an area of high natural, environmental and aesthetic value. In this context, inadequate disposal of pig sewage represents a potential source of very considerable pollution. The results have demonstrated how the multicriteria model can represent a very effective and adaptable tool also in those decision-making processes aimed at the sustainable management of livestock production.

  2. Environmental effectiveness of swine sewage management: a multicriteria AHP-based model for a reliable quick assessment.

    PubMed

    Vizzari, Marco; Modica, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Environmental issues related to swine production are still a major concern for the general public and represent a key challenge for the swine industry. The environmental impact of higher livestock concentration is particularly significant where it coincides with weaker policy standards and poor manure management. Effective tools for environmental monitoring of the swine sewage management process become essential for verifying the environmental compatibility of farming facilities and for defining suitable policies aimed at increasing swine production sustainability. This research aims at the development and application of a model for a quick assessment of the environmental effectiveness of the pig farming sewage management process. In order to define the model, multicriteria techniques, and in particular, Saaty's analytic hierarchy process, were used to develop an iterative process in which the various key factors influencing the process under investigation were analyzed. The model, named EASE (Environmental Assessment of Sewages management Effectiveness), was optimized and applied to the Lake Trasimeno basin (Umbria, Italy), an area of high natural, environmental and aesthetic value. In this context, inadequate disposal of pig sewage represents a potential source of very considerable pollution. The results have demonstrated how the multicriteria model can represent a very effective and adaptable tool also in those decision-making processes aimed at the sustainable management of livestock production. PMID:23974904

  3. Analysis of air pollution from swine production by using air dispersion model and GIS in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Joachim H; Goïta, Kalifa; Desmarais, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Swine production, the second most important contributor to Quebec's agricultural revenue, faces many problems. Intensive piggeries, with up to 599 animal units, are used to raise finishing pigs for slaughter. Among the great number of gaseous species emitted to the atmospheric environment from livestock buildings and manure storage units is NH3, which is one of the most important and most offensive with respect to human health. Under appropriate meteorological and topographical conditions, gaseous contaminants can spread and cause a public nuisance--up to a 1-km radius around the farm. To mitigate these effects, the Quebec Government adopted regulations that set minimum buffer distances to be observed by any expansion of an existing or new pig farm. The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the efficiency of the current buffer distance prescriptions in Quebec in mitigating effects of air pollution from swine units and (ii) to identify potential areas for establishing pig farm operations that will not be offensive to people. The air dispersion American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) with receptors distributed at 1.6 km around each source was used first, followed by a spatial geographic information system (GIS) model. Results from the dispersion model showed that the highest hourly concentration with a 99.5% compliance frequency for a single farm was 3078.1 microg/m3 and exceeded the NH3 odor criterion hourly standard set by the Quebec Government at 183.4 microg/m3. Thus, for public safety, densely populated areas like housing developments must be located >1300 m from a pig farm. This distance is in the range of setback distances (723 to 1447 m) obtained by using abacuses defined in the L'Erable Regional County Municipality. That is why we can say the current rules established by the Quebec Government, if rigorously applied, can prevent odor nuisance, due to NH3 emission, from swine farms. In the spatial model

  4. Dispersion modeling to compare alternative technologies for odor remediation at swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Susan S; Graham, Brevick G; Williams, C Mike

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of 18 alternative technologies for reducing odor dispersion at and beyond the boundary of swine facilities was assessed in conjunction with an initiative sponsored through agreements between the Attorney General of North Carolina and Smithfield Foods, Premium Standard Farms, and Frontline Farmers. The trajectory and spatial distribution of odor emitted at each facility were modeled at 200 and 400 m downwind from each site under two meteorological conditions (daytime and nighttime) using a Eulerian-Lagrangian model. To predict the dispersion of odor downwind, the geographical area containing the odorant sources at each facility was partitioned into 10-m2 grids on the basis of satellite photographs and architectural drawings. Relative odorant concentrations were assigned to each grid point on the basis of intensity measurements made by the trained odor panel at each facility using a 9-point rating scale. The results of the modeling indicated that odor did not extend significantly beyond 400 m downwind of any of the test sites during the daytime when the layer of air above the earth's surface is usually turbulent. However, modeling indicated that odor from all full-scale farms extended beyond 400 m onto neighboring property in the evenings when deep surface cooling through long-wave radiation to space produces a stable (nocturnal) boundary layer. The results also indicated that swine housing, independent of waste management type, plays a significant role in odor downwind, as do odor sources of moderate to moderately high intensity that emanate from a large surface area such as a lagoon. Human odor assessments were utilized for modeling rather than instrument measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or particulates less than 10 microm in diameter (PM10) because these physical measurements obtained simultaneously with human panel ratings were not found to accurately predict human odor intensity in the field.

  5. Empowering Translational Research in Fetal Growth Restriction: Sheep and Swine Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Astiz, Susana; Parraguez, Victor H; Garcia-Contreras, Consolación; Vazquez-Gomez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Fetal or intrauterine growth restriction (FGR or IUGR) is a concerning health issue not only due to its implications in mortality and morbidity of neonates but also because of its long-term consequences on health and disease risk of the individuals. Its main cause is an insufficient supply of nutrients and oxygen by maternal (malnutrition or hypobaric hypoxia) or placental factors (placental insufficiency) during late gestation, when the requirements of fetus are higher. The availability of reliable animal models would be highly useful for the future development of diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies. Most of the studies using animal models have been performed in rodents, while the use of large animals (sheep and swine) has been scarce. The objective of the current review is to offer an overview on the possibilities of using large animals for conducting translational research on IUGR related to inadequate maternal conditions and/or placental dysfunction. PMID:27194361

  6. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  7. [Evaluation of a new technique of extracorporeal perfusion of the swine liver on a swine-primate model].

    PubMed

    Beaufigeau, M; Wolf, P; Azimzadeh, A; Godfrin, Y; Beller, J P; Boudjema, K; Jaeck, D; Kieny, R; Cinqualbre, J

    1996-01-01

    With the increasing success of liver transplantation there is an urgent need for developing an artificial liver support system to be used in patients with liver failure. An extracorporeal porcine liver perfusion machine was successfully tested in animals with experimental liver failure. Livers were flushed, removed from 35 kg pigs and placed in a heated sterile cassette. The portal vein and the hepatic artery of the graft were connected to the arterial system of the animals. The perfusion pressure of the hepatic artery was regulated via a pressure-flow computerized feed-back device. The venous flow was reinfused from the hepatic veins of the graft to the jugular vein of the animals. The experimental work consisted in two steps: 1. evaluation of clinical and biological consequences of liver perfusion in healthy animals (Group A = pigs, n = 3; group B = primates, n = 3); 2. evaluation of the efficiency of the liver perfusion in animals with ischemic liver failure (Groupe D = pigs, n = 6). The control group (Group C = pigs, n = 7) consisted of pigs with ischemic liver failure without hepatic support. No major clinical or biological adverse effects are reported in groups A and B excepted a thrombocytmia and a marked increase in serum transaminases levels in group B. Liver function as assessed by the bile flow was good in both groups. Comatose pigs with ischemic hepatic failure (group D) recovered a subnormal neurological status in five out of six cases. Serum ammoniemia level were significantly decreased (from 1076 +/- 163 to 255 +/- 32 umol/l). A decrease in serum bilirubine levels and an improvement in the coagulation profile were observed in the perfused animals. Pigs and primates tolerated the perfusion procedure well and beneficial effects were observed in perfused pigs with experimental liver failure.

  8. Inferential model estimates of ammonia dry deposition in the vicinity of a swine production facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, John; Spence, Porche'; Kimbrough, Sue; Robarge, Wayne

    This project investigates NH 3 dry deposition around a commercial swine production facility in eastern North Carolina. Passive diffusion-tube samplers were used to measure weekly integrated NH 3 concentrations at 22 locations along horizontal gradients from the barn/lagoon emissions complex (source) out to a distance of 700 m. A two-layer canopy compensation point model was used to predict bi-directional NH 3 exchange within a 500 m circular buffer surrounding the source. The model takes into account differences in soil and vegetation emission potential, as well as canopy physical characteristics, among three primary surfaces surrounding the site: forest, crops spray fertilized with swine waste, and other fertilized crops. Between June 2003 and July 2005, mean observed NH 3 concentrations ranged from 169.0 μg NH 3 m -3 at a distance of 10 m from the source to 7.1 and 13.0 μg NH 3 m -3 at 612 and 698 m in the predominant upwind and downwind directions, respectively. Median predicted dry deposition rates ranged from 145 kg NH 3-N ha -1 yr -1 at 10 m from the source to 16 kg NH 3-N ha -1 yr -1 at 500 m, which is ≈3.5× wet deposition of NH 4+-N. Assuming a steady-state emission factor of 7.0 kg NH 3 animal -1 yr -1 and a median population of 4900 animals, NH 3 dry deposition over the nearest 500 m from the barn/lagoon complex accounted for 10.4% (3567 kg NH 3) of annual emissions (34,300 kg NH 3). A model sensitivity analysis shows that predicted deposition rates are more sensitive to assumptions regarding cuticular uptake relative to soil and vegetation emission potentials.

  9. A wind tunnel study of air flow near model swine confinement buildings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most significant and persistent environmental concerns regarding swine production is the transport of odor constituents, trace gases, and particulates from animal production and manure storage facilities. The objectives of this study were to determine how swine housing unit orientation af...

  10. Ventricular Fibrillation Waveform Changes during Controlled Coronary Perfusion Using Extracorporeal Circulation in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Christopher L.; Baetiong, Alvin; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai

    2016-01-01

    Background Several characteristics of the ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveform have been found predictive of successful defibrillation and hypothesized to reflect the myocardial energy state. In an open-chest swine model of VF, we modeled “average CPR” using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and assessed the time course of coronary blood flow, myocardial metabolism, and myocardial structure in relation to the amplitude spectral area (AMSA) of the VF waveform without artifacts related to chest compression. Methods VF was induced and left untreated for 8 minutes in 16 swine. ECC was then started adjusting its flow to maintain a coronary perfusion pressure of 10 mmHg for 10 minutes. AMSA was calculated in the frequency domain and analyzed continuously with a 2.1 s timeframe and a Tukey window that moved ahead every 0.5 s. Results AMSA progressively declined during untreated VF. With ECC, AMSA increased from 7.0 ± 1.9 mV·Hz (at minute 8) to 12.8 ± 3.3 mV·Hz (at minute 14) (p < 0.05) without subsequent increase and showing a modest correlation with coronary blood flow of borderline statistical significance (r = 0.489, p = 0.0547). Myocardial energy measurements showed marked reduction in phosphocreatine and moderate reduction in ATP with increases in ADP, AMP, and adenosine along with myocardial lactate, all indicative of ischemia. Yet, ischemia did not resolve during ECC despite a coronary blood flow of ~ 30% of baseline. Conclusion AMSA increased upon return of coronary blood flow during ECC. However, the maximal level was reached after ~ 6 minutes without further change. The significance of the findings for determining the optimal timing for delivering an electrical shock during resuscitation from VF remains to be further explored. PMID:27536996

  11. Effects of Intraluminal Irradiation with Holmium-166 for TIPS Stenosis: Experimental Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Seon; Kim, Deog Yoon; Park, Yong Koo; Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Soo Joong

    2007-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal irradiation with Holmium-166 (166Ho) for reducing the pseudointimal hyperplasia (PIH) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tract in a swine model. Materials and Methods TIPS was performed in 12 domestic pigs, after the creation of portal hypertension by intraportal injection of a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and lipiodol. Five pigs first underwent intraluminal irradiation (30 Gy) in the parenchymal tract with using a 166Ho solution-filled balloon catheter, and this was followed by the placement of a nitinol stent in the TIPS tract. For the seven control pigs, the balloon was filled with saline and contrast media mixture. Two weeks later, follow-up portography and histological analysis were performed. Results TIPS was successfully performed in all twelve pigs with achieving artificially induced portal hypertension. Portography performed two weeks after TIPS showed the patent tracts in the TIPS tracts that were irradiated with 166Ho (5/5, 100%), whereas either completely (5/6, 83.3%) or partially (1/6, 16.7%) occluded TIPS were seen in the seven pigs of the nonirradiated control group, except in one pig that experienced periprocedural death due to bleeding. Histological analysis showed a statistically significant difference for the maximal PIH (irradiated: 32.8%, nonirradiated: 76.0%, p < 0.001) between the two groups. Conclusion Intraluminal irradiation with 30 Gy of 166Ho for TIPS significantly improved the TIPS patency in a swine model of portal hypertension during a 2-week period of follow-up. PMID:17420630

  12. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  13. UPDATE ON SWINE DISEASE AND GENOMICS RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review will summarize advances in swine genomics and how it has altered approaches for swine disease and vaccination research. The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive p...

  14. Multiscale modeling of failure in composites under model parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanor, Michael J.; Oskay, Caglar; Clay, Stephen B.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript presents a multiscale stochastic failure modeling approach for fiber reinforced composites. A homogenization based reduced-order multiscale computational model is employed to predict the progressive damage accumulation and failure in the composite. Uncertainty in the composite response is modeled at the scale of the microstructure by considering the constituent material (i.e., matrix and fiber) parameters governing the evolution of damage as random variables. Through the use of the multiscale model, randomness at the constituent scale is propagated to the scale of the composite laminate. The probability distributions of the underlying material parameters are calibrated from unidirectional composite experiments using a Bayesian statistical approach. The calibrated multiscale model is exercised to predict the ultimate tensile strength of quasi-isotropic open-hole composite specimens at various loading rates. The effect of random spatial distribution of constituent material properties on the composite response is investigated.

  15. Fibrinogen concentrate improves survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in a Swine model.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Xu; Liles, Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4-mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (n = 7 per group) were then randomized to receive (i) no fluid resuscitation (neg control) or (ii) limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10 mL/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution given 30 min apart (HEX group), or (iii) the same fluid regimen with one dose of 120-mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first hydroxyethyl starch bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 h with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 h. Survival to 6 h was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) versus HEX (2/7, 29%) and neg control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan-Meier log-rank P = 0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4 mL/kg per minute) when compared with FBG (0.1 mg/kg per minute, P = 0.047) and neg control (0.1 mL/kg per minute, P = 0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG versus HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

  16. Eprosartan improves cardiac function in swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Konertz, Wolfgang; Modersohn, Diethelm; Dohmen, Pascal M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Eprosartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used as an antihypertensive. We sought to evaluate the regional effect of Eprosartan on postinfarct ventricular remodeling and myocardial function in an isolated swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Material/Methods 22 swine hearts were perfused with the Langendorff perfusion apparatus under standard experimental conditions. Myocardial ischemia was induced by a 10-min left anterior descending artery ligation. Hearts were reperfused with either saline (control group, n=11), or Eprosartan (treatment group, n=11). Left ventricular pressure (LVP) and regional heart parameters such as intramyocardial pressure (IMP), wall thickening rate (WTh), and pressure-length-loops (PLL) were measured at baseline and after 30 min of reperfusion. Results Measured parameters were statistically similar between the 2 groups at baseline. The administration of Eprosartan led to a significantly better recovery of IMP and WTh: 44.4±2.5 mmHg vs. 51.2±3.3 mmHg, p<0.001 and 3.8±0.4 μm vs. 4.4±0.3 μm, p=0.001, respectively. PLL were also significantly higher in the treatment group following reperfusion (21694±3259 units vs. 31267±3429 units, p<0.01). There was no difference in the LVP response to Eprosartan versus controls (63.6±3.0 mmHg vs. 62.5±3.1 mmHg, p=0.400). Conclusions Pre-treatment with Eprosartan is associated with a significant improvement in regional cardiac function under ischemic conditions. Pharmacological treatment with eprosartan may exert a direct cardioprotective effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:24762635

  17. Experimental model of swine pneumonic pasteurellosis using crude Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin and Pasteurella multocida given endobronchially.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, W B; Bäckström, L R; Collins, M T

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to develop and characterize a swine pneumonic pasteurellosis model by concurrent introduction of Pasteurella multocida type A and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin. After a series of preliminary experiments, a combination of 4 x 10(9) P. multocida and 4,000 toxic units of A. pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin was determined to produce optimal results. A total of 48 pigs were divided into four groups of 12 pigs each. The control group received buffered saline only. Four pigs from each group were randomly selected for necropsy 3, 7 and 14 days postinoculation (PI). Inoculation of pigs with P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin (group 1) resulted in moderate to severe pneumonia. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from pneumonic lesions, grossly normal lung, and bronchial lymph nodes of all group 1 pigs throughout the 14 day experimental period. Pathological changes typical of field cases of swine pneumonic pasteurellosis were produced. Pigs inoculated with P. multocida alone (group 2) had pneumonic lesions and P. multocida was reisolated from lungs at three days PI. Pasteurella multocida was not isolated from these pigs at 7 and 14 days PI, except for one pig in which an abscess developed in the thorax. Pulmonary lesions induced by A. pleuropneumoniae crude cytotoxin alone (group 3) were transient and resolved by seven days PI. Group 1 pigs had significantly greater lung lesion volumes than group 2 and 3 pigs at 3, 7 and 14 days PI. Statistical analysis indicated a significant interactive effect of P. multocida and A. pleuropneumoniae cytotoxin on the development of lung lesion volumes at 7 and 14 days PI (p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:8143249

  18. Modeled Effectiveness of Ventilation with Contaminant Control Devices on Indoor Air Quality in a Swine Farrowing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5°C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s−1 (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures. PMID:24433305

  19. Modeled effectiveness of ventilation with contaminant control devices on indoor air quality in a swine farrowing facility.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5 °C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s(-1) (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures. PMID:24433305

  20. Modeled effectiveness of ventilation with contaminant control devices on indoor air quality in a swine farrowing facility.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5 °C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s(-1) (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures.

  1. Modeling Pathologies of Diastolic and Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Genet, M; Lee, L C; Baillargeon, B; Guccione, J M; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a medical condition that involves structural and functional changes of the heart and a progressive reduction in cardiac output. Heart failure is classified into two categories: diastolic heart failure, a thickening of the ventricular wall associated with impaired filling; and systolic heart failure, a dilation of the ventricles associated with reduced pump function. In theory, the pathophysiology of heart failure is well understood. In practice, however, heart failure is highly sensitive to cardiac microstructure, geometry, and loading. This makes it virtually impossible to predict the time line of heart failure for a diseased individual. Here we show that computational modeling allows us to integrate knowledge from different scales to create an individualized model for cardiac growth and remodeling during chronic heart failure. Our model naturally connects molecular events of parallel and serial sarcomere deposition with cellular phenomena of myofibrillogenesis and sarcomerogenesis to whole organ function. Our simulations predict chronic alterations in wall thickness, chamber size, and cardiac geometry, which agree favorably with the clinical observations in patients with diastolic and systolic heart failure. In contrast to existing single- or bi-ventricular models, our new four-chamber model can also predict characteristic secondary effects including papillary muscle dislocation, annular dilation, regurgitant flow, and outflow obstruction. Our prototype study suggests that computational modeling provides a patient-specific window into the progression of heart failure with a view towards personalized treatment planning. PMID:26043672

  2. Measurement and modeling of hydrogen sulfide lagoon emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, Ian C; Aneja, Viney P

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions were determined from an anaerobic lagoon at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in North Carolina. Measurements of H2S were made continuously from an anaerobic lagoon using a dynamic flow-through chamber for ∼ 1 week during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 through April 2008. H2S lagoon fluxes were highest in the summer with a flux of 3.81 ± 3.24 μg m(-2) min(-1) and lowest in the winter with a flux of 0.08 ± 0.09 μg m(-2) min(-1). An air-manure interface (A-MI) mass transfer model was developed to predict H2S manure emissions. The accuracy of the A-MI mass transfer model in predicting H2S manure emissions was comprehensively evaluated by comparing the model predicted emissions to the continuously measured lagoon emissions using data from all four seasonal periods. In comparison to this measurement data, the A-MI mass transfer model performed well in predicting H2S fluxes with a slope of 1.13 and an r(2) value of 0.60, and a mean bias value of 0.655 μg m(-2) min(-1). The A-MI mass transfer model also performed fairly well in predicting diurnal H2S lagoon flux trends. PMID:24387076

  3. Measurements and modeling of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia from swine facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep Singh

    Ammonia has recently gained importance for its increasing atmospheric concentrations and its role in the formation of aerosols. Studies have shown increasing atmospheric concentration levels of NH3 and NH 4+, especially in the regions of concentrated animal feeding operations. Atmospheric inputs of reduced nitrogen as ammonia and ammonium by dry and wet deposition may represent a substantial contribution to the acidification of semi natural ecosystems and could also affect sensitive coastal ecosystems and estuaries. The anaerobic lagoon and spray method, commonly used for waste storage and disposal in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO), is a significant source of ammonia emissions. An accurate emission model for ammonia from aqueous surfaces can help in the development of emission factors. Study of dispersion and dry deposition patterns of ammonia downwind of a hog farm will help us to understand how much ammonia gets dry deposited near the farm, and how remaining ammonia gets transported farther away. An experimental and modeling study is conducted of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one swine farm as a unit. Measurements of ammonia flux were made at 11 swine facilities in North Carolina using dynamic flow-through chamber system over the anaerobic waste treatment lagoons. Continuous measurements of ammonia flux, meteorological and lagoon parameters were made for 8-10 days at each farm during each of the warm and cold seasons. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in the chamber placed over the lagoon using a Thermo Environmental Instrument Incorporated (TECO) Model 17c chemiluminescnce ammonia analyzer. A similar ammonia analyzer was used to measure ammonia concentrations at selected locations on the farm. Barn emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. A 10 m meteorological tower was erected at each site to measure wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity

  4. Swine in biomedical research. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: hemodynamic characteristics of the conscious resting pig; cardiovascular and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise in swine (ILLEGIBLE) a large animal model for studies (ILLEGIBLE) effects of heparin-protamine interaction in swine - intravenous vs. intraarterial; swine as animal models in cardiovascular research; studies of coronary thrombosis in swine with von Willebrand's disease; role of plasma intermediate and low density lipoproteins in early atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic swine; swine as a model in renal physiology and nephrology; the pig as a model for studying kidney disease in man; hypertension of renal origin and the effects of Captopril in miniature pigs; porcine natural killer/killer cell system; the behavior of pig lymphocyte populations in vivo; a review of spontaneous and experimental porcine eperythrozoonosis; and Sinclair swine melanoma.

  5. Empirical model of odor emission from deep-pit swine finishing barns to derive a standardized odor emission factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauberger, Günther; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Ni, Ji-Qin; Bundy, Dwaine S.; Haymore, Barry L.; Diehl, Claude A.; Duggirala, Ravi K.; Heber, Albert J.

    2013-02-01

    Odor emission from swine housing is influenced by the herd characteristics and building environment. The following three specific factors were identified as inputs to a swine house odor emission model: indoor temperature, barn ventilation rate, and pig activity. Model input parameters were determined based on tests of four, identical, 1000-head, mechanically-ventilated swine finishing houses. Each building had two sidewall curtains, a curtain on the west end wall, five exhaust fans on the east end wall, four pit ventilation fans, and long-term manure storage beneath a fully slatted floor. Odor concentrations of 112 odor samples were determined using dynamic forced-choice olfactometry with four to six trained panelists. The emission model showed that the standard live mass specific odor emission factor was 48 OU s-1 per 500 kg live mass or animal unit (AU), and it corresponded to an indoor temperature of T0 = 20 °C, a ventilation rate of V0 = 200 m3 h-1 (55.6 × 10-3 m3 s-1) per pig (maximum capacity for summer time), and the daily mean animal activity. The rate of odor emission from a swine finishing house can be calculated based on these parameters coupled with the number of animals, the mean live mass, and the standard live mass specific odor emission factor. Using this process-based odor emission model, the odor emission estimation and therefore the input for odor dispersion models can be improved to obtain more reliable estimates of separation distance for siting future pig farms.

  6. Cone Photoreceptors Develop Normally in the Absence of Functional Rod Photoreceptors in a Transgenic Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez de Castro, Juan P.; Scott, Patrick A.; Fransen, James W.; Demas, James; DeMarco, Paul J.; Kaplan, Henry J.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Human and swine retinas have morphological and functional similarities. In the absence of primate models, the swine is an attractive model to study retinal function and disease, with its cone-rich visual streak, our ability to manipulate their genome, and the differences in susceptibility of rod and cone photoreceptors to disease. We characterized the normal development of cone function and its subsequent decline in a P23H rhodopsin transgenic (TgP23H) miniswine model of autosomal dominant RP. Methods. Semen from TgP23H miniswine 53-1 inseminated domestic swine and produced TgP23H and Wt hybrid littermates. Retinal function was evaluated using ERGs between postnatal days (P) 14 and 120. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses were recorded to full-field stimuli at several intensities. Retinal morphology was assessed using light and electron microscopy. Results. Scotopic retinal function matures in Wt pigs up to P60, but never develops in TgP23H pigs. Wt and TgP23H photopic vision matures similarly up to P30 and diverges at P60 where TgP23H cone vision declines. There are fewer TgP23H RGCs with visually evoked responses at all ages and their response to light is compromised. Photoreceptor morphological changes mirror these functional changes. Conclusions. Lack of early scotopic function in TgP23H swine suggests it as a model of an aggressive form of RP. In this mammalian model of RP, normal cone function develops independent of rod function. Therefore, its retina represents a system in which therapies to rescue cones can be developed to prolong photopic visual function in RP patients. PMID:24618325

  7. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English Español ...

  8. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  9. User-Defined Material Model for Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F. Jr.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An overview of different types of composite material system architectures and a brief review of progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model (or UMAT) for use with the ABAQUS/Standard1 nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details and use of the UMAT subroutine are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented.

  10. A modeling framework for system restoration from cascading failures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems.

  11. Experimental Model of Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swines with Pericardium Sac

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Maurício de Amorim; de Barros, Svetlana Maria Wanderley; Castro, Aldemar Araújo; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To consider modifications in an experimental model of saccular aortic aneurysm, aiming at better reproducibility, to be used in the development of vascular prostheses. Methods: Experimental study in two phases, developed in the Center of Experimental Surgery and Bioterium (CCEB) of the University of Health Sciences of Alagoas (UNCISAL), with 11 hybrid swine, female, mean weight of 20 ± 5 kg, according to modifications in the Perini technique was performed. In the first phase, the aneurysm was confectioned with bovine pericardial patch. In the second phase, fifteen days later, the patency of the aneurysms was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. The described variables were aortic and aneurysm sac patency, incidence of rupture, morbidity and mortality. The statistical analysis program used was STATA v.8. Results: All animals survived to the procedures. Surgical mean time was 73 minutes. Aneurysm rupture, proximal or distal aortic thrombosis, visceral or legs ischemia weren't observed. Parietal thrombus formation was observed in all of the aneurysms, two of which (18%; IC 95% = 3.98 - 48.84) were occluded and nine (82%; IC 95% = 51.15 - 96.01) were patent. Conclusion: In this series, the modifications carried out in the technique related to the surgical approach, race, anesthesia, and imaging exams reproduced the experimental model, reducing its costs, without hindering the analysis of the variables. The satisfactory patency ratio allows the method to be used in experimental models for the development of vascular prostheses. PMID:27074279

  12. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  13. Network analysis of swine shipments in Ontario, Canada, to support disease spread modelling and risk-based disease management.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    Understanding contact networks are important for modelling and managing the spread and control of communicable diseases in populations. This study characterizes the swine shipment network of a multi-site production system in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Data were extracted from a company's database listing swine shipments among 251 swine farms, including 20 sow, 69 nursery and 162 finishing farms, for the 2-year period of 2006 to 2007. Several network metrics were generated. The number of shipments per week between pairs of farms ranged from 1 to 6. The medians (and ranges) of out-degree were: sow 6 (1-21), nursery 8 (0-25), and finishing 0 (0-4), over the entire 2-year study period. Corresponding estimates for in-degree of nursery and finishing farms were 3 (0-9) and 3 (0-12) respectively. Outgoing and incoming infection chains (OIC and IIC), were also measured. The medians (ranges) of the monthly OIC and IIC were 0 (0-8) and 0 (0-6), respectively, with very similar measures observed for 2-week intervals. Nursery farms exhibited high measures of centrality. This indicates that they pose greater risks of disease spread in the network. Therefore, they should be given a high priority for disease prevention and control measures affecting all age groups alike. The network demonstrated scale-free and small-world topologies as observed in other livestock shipment studies. This heterogeneity in contacts among farm types and network topologies should be incorporated in simulation models to improve their validity. In conclusion, this study provided useful epidemiological information and parameters for the control and modelling of disease spread among swine farms, for the first time from Ontario, Canada.

  14. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1)

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Brian J; Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1), formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0). The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1) has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918–1919 pandemic strain (mean R0~2: range 1.4 to 2.8) and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1). By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza. PMID:19545404

  15. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Coburn, Brian J; Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2009-06-22

    Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1), formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0). The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1) has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918-1919 pandemic strain (mean R0 approximately 2: range 1.4 to 2.8) and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1). By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza.

  16. A model for methane production in anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongnan; Deng, Liangwei; Liu, Gangjin; Yang, Di; Liu, Yi; Chen, Ziai

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted using a laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch digester to investigate the quantitative influence of organic loading rates (OLRs) on the methane production rate during digestion of swine wastewater at temperatures between 15 °C and 35 °C. The volumetric production rate of methane (Rp) at different OLRs and temperatures was obtained. The maximum volumetric methane production rates (Rpmax) were 0.136, 0.796, 1.294, 1.527 and 1.952 LCH4 L(-1) d(-1) at corresponding organic loading rates of 1.2, 3.6, 5.6, 5.6 and 7.2 g volatile solids L(-1) d(-1), respectively, which occurred at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. A new model was developed to describe the quantitative relationship between Rp and OLR. In addition to the maximum volumetric methane production rate (Rpmax) and the half-saturation constant (KLR) commonly used in previous models such as the modified Stover-Kincannon model and Deng model, the new model introduced a new index (KD) that denoted the speed of volumetric methane production rate approaching the maximum as a function of temperature. The new model more satisfactorily described the influence of OLR on the rate of methane production than other models as confirmed by higher determination coefficients (R(2)) (0.9717-0.9900) and lower bias between the experimental and predicted data in terms of the root mean square error and the Akaike Information Criterion. Data from other published research also validated the applicability and generality of the new kinetic model to different types of wastewater.

  17. An Effective and Reproducible Model of Ventricular Fibrillation in Crossbred Yorkshire Swine (Sus scrofa) for Use in Physiologic Research

    PubMed Central

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose C; Craig, W John; O'Sullivan, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical induction (TCEI) has been used to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF) in laboratory swine for physiologic and resuscitation research. Many studies do not describe the method of TCEI in detail, thus making replication by future investigators difficult. Here we describe a detailed method of electrically inducing VF that was used successfully in a prospective, experimental resuscitation study. Specifically, an electrical current was passed through the heart to induce VF in crossbred Yorkshire swine (n = 30); the current was generated by using two 22-gauge spinal needles, with one placed above and one below the heart, and three 9V batteries connected in series. VF developed in 28 of the 30 pigs (93%) within 10 s of beginning the procedure. In the remaining 2 swine, VF was induced successfully after medial redirection of the superior parasternal needle. The TCEI method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective. TCEI may be especially valuable to researchers with limited access to funding, sophisticated equipment, or colleagues experienced in interventional cardiology techniques. The TCEI method might be most appropriate for pharmacologic studies requiring VF, VF resulting from the R-on-T phenomenon (as in prolonged QT syndrome), and VF arising from other ectopic or reentrant causes. However, the TCEI method does not accurately model the most common cause of VF, acute coronary occlusive disease. Researchers must consider the limitations of TCEI that may affect internal and external validity of collected data, when designing experiments using this model of VF. PMID:26473349

  18. Catheter‐based induction of renal ischemia/reperfusion in swine: description of an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Malagrino, Pamella A.; Venturini, Gabriela; Yogi, Patrícia S.; Dariolli, Rafael; Padilha, Kallyandra; Kiers, Bianca; Gois, Tamiris C.; da Motta‐Leal‐Filho, Joaquim M.; Takimura, Celso K.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.; Carnevale, Francisco C.; Zeri, Ana C. M.; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Several techniques to induce renal ischemia have been proposed: clamp, PVA particles, and catheter‐balloon. We report the development of a controlled, single‐insult model of unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) without contralateral nephrectomy, using a suitable model, the pig. This is a balloon‐catheter‐based model using a percutaneous, interventional radiology procedure. One angioplasty balloon‐catheter was placed into the right renal artery and inflated for 120 min and reperfusion over 24 h. Serial serums were sampled from the inferior vena cava and urine was directly sampled from the bladder throughout the experiment, and both kidneys were excised after 24 h of reperfusion. Analyses of renal structure and function were performed by hematoxylin–eosin/periodic Acid‐Schiff, serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), fractional excretion of ions, and glucose, SDS‐PAGE analysis of urinary proteins, and serum neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL). Total nitrated protein was quantified to characterize oxidative stress. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was identified in every animal, but only two animals showed levels of SCr above 150% of baseline values. As expected, I/R increased SCr and BUN. Fractional sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate excretion were modulated during ischemia. Serum‐nitrated proteins and NGAL had two profiles: decreased with ischemia and increased after reperfusion. This decline was associated with increased protein excretion during ischemia and early reperfusion. Altogether, these data show that the renal I/R model can be performed by percutaneous approach in the swine model. This is a suitable translational model to study new early renal ischemic biomarkers and pathophysiological mechanisms in renal ischemia. PMID:25263203

  19. Early Cellular Changes in the Ascending Aorta and Myocardium in a Swine Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Feroze; Owais, Khurram; Bardia, Amit; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Liu, David; Senthilnathan, Venkatachalam; Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Sellke, Frank; Matyal, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is associated with pathological remodeling of the heart and adjacent vessels. The early biochemical and cellular changes underlying the vascular damage are not fully understood. In this study, we sought to establish the nature, extent, and initial timeline of cytochemical derangements underlying reduced ventriculo-arterial compliance in a swine model of metabolic syndrome. Methods Yorkshire swine (n = 8 per group) were fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-cholesterol (HCD) for 12 weeks. Myocardial function and blood flow was assessed before harvesting the heart. Immuno-blotting and immuno-histochemical staining were used to assess the cellular changes in the myocardium, ascending aorta and left anterior descending artery (LAD). Results There was significant increase in body mass index, blood glucose and mean arterial pressures (p = 0.002, p = 0.001 and p = 0.024 respectively) in HCD group. At the cellular level there was significant increase in anti-apoptotic factors p-Akt (p = 0.007 and p = 0.002) and Bcl-xL (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01) in the HCD aorta and myocardium, respectively. Pro-fibrotic markers TGF-β (p = 0.01), pSmad1/5 (p = 0.03) and MMP-9 (p = 0.005) were significantly increased in the HCD aorta. The levels of pro-apoptotic p38MAPK, Apaf-1 and cleaved Caspase3 were significantly increased in aorta of HCD (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 and p = 0.007 respectively). Similar changes in coronary arteries were not observed in either group. Functionally, the high cholesterol diet resulted in significant increase in ventricular end systolic pressure and–dp/dt (p = 0.05 and p = 0.007 respectively) in the HCD group. Conclusion Preclinical metabolic syndrome initiates pro-apoptosis and pro-fibrosis pathways in the heart and ascending aorta, while sparing coronary arteries at this early stage of dietary modification. PMID:26766185

  20. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Andres H; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E; Brockmeier, Susan L; Hughes, Holly R; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  1. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  2. A Mathematical Model that Simulates Control Options for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV)

    PubMed Central

    Barongo, Mike B.; Bishop, Richard P; Fèvre, Eric M; Knobel, Darryn L; Ssematimba, Amos

    2016-01-01

    A stochastic model designed to simulate transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in a free-ranging pig population under various intervention scenarios is presented. The model was used to assess the relative impact of the timing of the implementation of different control strategies on disease-related mortality. The implementation of biosecurity measures was simulated through incorporation of a decay function on the transmission rate. The model predicts that biosecurity measures implemented within 14 days of the onset of an epidemic can avert up to 74% of pig deaths due to ASF while hypothetical vaccines that confer 70% immunity when deployed prior to day 14 of the epidemic could avert 65% of pig deaths. When the two control measures are combined, the model predicts that 91% of the pigs that would have otherwise succumbed to the disease if no intervention was implemented would be saved. However, if the combined interventions are delayed (defined as implementation from > 60 days) only 30% of ASF-related deaths would be averted. In the absence of vaccines against ASF, we recommend early implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures. Active surveillance and use of pen-side diagnostic assays, preferably linked to rapid dissemination of this data to veterinary authorities through mobile phone technology platforms are essential for rapid detection and confirmation of ASF outbreaks. This prediction, although it may seem intuitive, rationally confirms the importance of early intervention in managing ASF epidemics. The modelling approach is particularly valuable in that it determines an optimal timing for implementation of interventions in controlling ASF outbreaks. PMID:27391689

  3. A Mathematical Model that Simulates Control Options for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV).

    PubMed

    Barongo, Mike B; Bishop, Richard P; Fèvre, Eric M; Knobel, Darryn L; Ssematimba, Amos

    2016-01-01

    A stochastic model designed to simulate transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in a free-ranging pig population under various intervention scenarios is presented. The model was used to assess the relative impact of the timing of the implementation of different control strategies on disease-related mortality. The implementation of biosecurity measures was simulated through incorporation of a decay function on the transmission rate. The model predicts that biosecurity measures implemented within 14 days of the onset of an epidemic can avert up to 74% of pig deaths due to ASF while hypothetical vaccines that confer 70% immunity when deployed prior to day 14 of the epidemic could avert 65% of pig deaths. When the two control measures are combined, the model predicts that 91% of the pigs that would have otherwise succumbed to the disease if no intervention was implemented would be saved. However, if the combined interventions are delayed (defined as implementation from > 60 days) only 30% of ASF-related deaths would be averted. In the absence of vaccines against ASF, we recommend early implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures. Active surveillance and use of pen-side diagnostic assays, preferably linked to rapid dissemination of this data to veterinary authorities through mobile phone technology platforms are essential for rapid detection and confirmation of ASF outbreaks. This prediction, although it may seem intuitive, rationally confirms the importance of early intervention in managing ASF epidemics. The modelling approach is particularly valuable in that it determines an optimal timing for implementation of interventions in controlling ASF outbreaks. PMID:27391689

  4. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  5. Test of a novel miniature blood pressure sensor in the coronary arteries of a swine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Sun, Kai; Zou, Xiaotian; Barringhaus, Kurt; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has proven to be very useful in diagnosis of narrowed coronary arteries. It is a technique that is used in coronary catheterization to measure blood pressure difference across a coronary artery stenosis in maximal flow. In-vivo blood pressure measurement is critical in FFR diagnosis. This paper presents a novel miniature all-optical fiber blood pressure sensor. It is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometry principle. The FP cavity was fabricated by directly wet etching the fiber tip. Then, a diaphragm with well-controlled thickness was bonded to the end face of the fiber using the thermal bonding technique. Finally, the sensor was packaged with a bio-compatible and flexible coil for animal tests. A 25-50 kg Yorkshire swine model was introduced as the animal test target. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was exposed, and beyond the takeoff of the largest diagonal branch, a 3.0 mm vascular occluder was secured. Firstly, standard invasive manometry was used to obtain the blood pressure as baseline. Next, a guiding catheter was introduced into the ostium of the left main coronary artery, and the miniature blood pressure sensor was advanced into the LAD at a point beyond the vascular occlude. The blood pressure beyond the vascular occlude was recorded. The sensor successfully recorded the blood pressure at both near-end and far-end of the vascular occluder.

  6. Comparison of Two Foreign Body Retrieval Devices with Adjustable Loops in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, Andras

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to compare two similar foreign body retrieval devices, the Texan{sup TM} (TX) and the Texan LONGhorn{sup TM} (TX-LG), in a swine model. Both devices feature a {<=}30-mm adjustable loop. Capture times and total procedure times for retrieving foreign bodies from the infrarenal aorta, inferior vena cava, and stomach were compared. All attempts with both devices (TX, n = 15; TX-LG, n = 14) were successful. Foreign bodies in the vasculature were captured quickly using both devices (mean {+-} SD, 88 {+-} 106 sec for TX vs 67 {+-} 42 sec for TX-LG) with no significant difference between them. The TX-LG, however, allowed significantly better capture times than the TX in the stomach (p = 0.022), Overall, capture times for the TX-LG were significantly better than for the TX (p = 0.029). There was no significant difference between the total procedure times in any anatomic region. TX-LG performed significantly better than the TX in the stomach and therefore overall. The better torque control and maneuverability of TX-LG resulted in better performance in large anatomic spaces.

  7. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  8. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  9. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  10. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  11. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  12. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure.

  13. Multiaxial Temperature- and Time-Dependent Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David; McLennan, Michael; Anderson, Gregory; Macon, David; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    A temperature- and time-dependent mathematical model predicts the conditions for failure of a material subjected to multiaxial stress. The model was initially applied to a filled epoxy below its glass-transition temperature, and is expected to be applicable to other materials, at least below their glass-transition temperatures. The model is justified simply by the fact that it closely approximates the experimentally observed failure behavior of this material: The multiaxiality of the model has been confirmed (see figure) and the model has been shown to be applicable at temperatures from -20 to 115 F (-29 to 46 C) and to predict tensile failures of constant-load and constant-load-rate specimens with failure times ranging from minutes to months..

  14. A Modified Heterotopic Swine Hind Limb Transplant Model for Translational Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Research

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Cooney, Damon S.; Shores, Jaimie T.; Sacks, Justin M.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Gordon, Chad; Ruben, Dawn; Schneeberger, Stefan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) such as hand and face transplants represent a viable treatment option for complex musculoskeletal trauma and devastating tissue loss. Despite favorable and highly encouraging early and intermediate functional outcomes, rejection of the highly immunogenic skin component of a VCA and potential adverse effects of chronic multi-drug immunosuppression continue to hamper widespread clinical application of VCA. Therefore, research in this novel field needs to focus on translational studies related to unique immunologic features of VCA and to develop novel immunomodulatory strategies for immunomodulation and tolerance induction following VCA without the need for long term immunosuppression. This article describes a reliable and reproducible translational large animal model of VCA that is comprised of an osteomyocutaneous flap in a MHC-defined swine heterotopic hind limb allotransplantation. Briefly, a well-vascularized skin paddle is identified in the anteromedial thigh region using near infrared laser angiography. The underlying muscles, knee joint, distal femur, and proximal tibia are harvested on a femoral vascular pedicle. This allograft can be considered both a VCA and a vascularized bone marrow transplant with its unique immune privileged features. The graft is transplanted to a subcutaneous abdominal pocket in the recipient animal with a skin component exteriorized to the dorsolateral region for immune monitoring. Three surgical teams work simultaneously in a well-coordinated manner to reduce anesthesia and ischemia times, thereby improving efficiency of this model and reducing potential confounders in experimental protocols. This model serves as the groundwork for future therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing and potentially eliminating the need for chronic multi-drug immunosuppression in VCA. PMID:24145603

  15. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  16. Testing the Efficacy of Pharmacological Agents in a Pericardial Target Delivery Model in the Swine.

    PubMed

    Iles, Tinen L; Howard, Brian; Howard, Stephen; Quallich, Stephen; Rolfes, Christopher; Richardson, Eric; Iaizzo, Hanna R; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    To date, many pharmacological agents used to treat or prevent arrhythmias in open-heart cases create undesired systemic side effects. For example, antiarrhythmic drugs administered intravenously can produce drops in systemic pressure in the already compromised cardiac patient. While performing open-heart procedures, surgeons will often either create a small port or form a pericardial cradle to create suitable fields for operation. This access yields opportunities for target pharmacological delivery (antiarrhythmic or ischemic preconditioning agents) directly to the myocardial tissue without undesired side effects. We have developed a swine model for testing pharmacological agents for target delivery within the pericardial fluid. While fully anesthetized, each animal was instrumented with a Swan-Ganz catheter as well as left and right ventricle pressure catheters, and pacing leads were placed in the right atrial appendage and the right ventricle. A medial sternotomy was then performed and a pericardial access cradle was created; a plunge pacing lead was placed in the left atrial appendage and a bipolar pacing lead was placed in the left ventricle. Utilizing a programmer and a cardiac mapping system, the refractory period of the atrioventricular node (AVN), atria and ventricles was determined. In addition, atrial fibrillation (AF) induction was produced utilizing a Grass stimulator and time in AF was observed. These measurements were performed prior to treatment, as well as 30 min and 60 min after pericardial treatment. Additional time points were added for selected studies. The heart was then cardiopleged and reanimated in a four chamber working mode. Pressure measurements and function were recorded for 1 hr after reanimation. This treatment strategy model allowed us to observe the effects of pharmacological agents that may decrease the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and/or ischemic damage, during and after open-heart surgery. PMID:27500319

  17. On a Stochastic Failure Model under Random Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ji Hwan

    2013-02-01

    In most conventional settings, the events caused by an external shock are initiated at the moments of its occurrence. In this paper, we study a new classes of shock model, where each shock from a nonhomogeneous Poisson processes can trigger a failure of a system not immediately, as in classical extreme shock models, but with delay of some random time. We derive the corresponding survival and failure rate functions. Furthermore, we study the limiting behaviour of the failure rate function where it is applicable.

  18. Monitoring of Liver Cell Transplantation in a Preclinical Swine Model Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf; Billecke, Nils; Zielinski, Anja; Steinz, Kirsten; Kammer, Nora N.; Morgul, Mehmet H.; Schmeisser, Sarah; Adonopoulou, Michaela K.; Morawietz, Lars; Hiebl, Bernhard; Schwartlander, Ruth; Rüdinger, Wolfgang; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Sauer, Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation (LCT) is a promising treatment approach for certain liver diseases, but clinical implementation requires methods for noninvasive follow-up. Labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles can enable the detection of cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the feasibility of monitoring transplanted liver cells by MRI in a preclinical swine model and used this approach to evaluate different routes for cell application. Liver cells were isolated from landrace piglets and labeled with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIO) in adhesion. Labeled cells (n = 10), native cells (n = 3), or pure particles (n = 4) were transplanted to minipigs via intraportal infusion into the liver, direct injection into the splenic parenchyma, or intra-arterial infusion to the spleen. Recipients were investigated by repeated 3.0 Tesla MRI and computed tomography angiography up to 8 weeks after transplantation. Labeling with MPIO, which are known to have a strong effect on the magnetic field, enabled noninvasive detection of cell aggregates by MRI. Following intraportal application, which is commonly applied for clinical LCT, MRI was able to visualize the microembolization of transplanted cells in the liver that were not detected by conventional imaging modalities. Cells directly injected into the spleen were retained, whereas cell infusions intra-arterially into the spleen led to translocation and engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver, with significantly fewer microembolisms compared to intraportal application. These findings demonstrate that MRI can be a valuable tool for noninvasive elucidation of cellular processes of LCT and—if clinically applicable MPIO are available—for monitoring of LCT under clinical conditions. Moreover, the results clarify mechanisms relevant for clinical practice of LCT, suggesting that the intra-arterial route to the spleen deserves further evaluation. PMID:27004132

  19. Efficacy and safety of a new single-port model for appendectomy: Experimental study on swine

    PubMed Central

    Olijnyk, José Gustavo; Ferreira, Paulo Walter; Nácul, Miguel Prestes; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: With the cooperation of surgeons and the engineering division of the company Bhio supply© (Esteio-RS, Brazil), a permanent single port was developed. AIMS: An experimental study assessed the safety and efficacy of the device using a swine laparoscopic appendectomy model (right salpingo-oophorectomy). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Experimental randomised study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 pigs were randomised for the conventional laparoscopic (CL) three-trocar technique or the single Centry port (CPort) with two working channels, aided by a transparietal thread. Operative times, surgical complications, CO2 use, and pneumoperitoneal pressure were checked. Pressure and chromopertubation tests assessed the ligatures. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: For quantitative outcomes, the Fisher's exact test analysed the samples to compare the surgeons in each group, the ANOVA test for parametric data (volume and pressure) and the Student's t-test for analysis of the fascial incision length. The binaries and isolated occurrence events were described in percentages. RESULTS: For all cases, pneumoperitoneum was maintained. The CPort group, however, resulted in higher CO2 use (26.18 l; standard deviation [SD] ± 11.09) than CL group (5.69 l; SD ± 2.44) (P < 0.01). The mean pressure in CPort group (6.604 mmHg, SD ± 1.793) was comparatively lower than in CL group (7.382 mmHg, SD ± 1.833) (P = 0.363). There was no statistical difference between operative times, ligature safety or adverse surgical events between the different groups and surgeons. CONCLUSION: The surgical technique used with the single port showed no differences in safety and efficacy. Though it does require more CO2 use, its working dynamics did not lead to increased operative times. The results were similar between the two surgeons in the study, suggesting that they can be reproduced. PMID:27073304

  20. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  1. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  2. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  3. Resuscitation with lactated ringer's does not increase inflammatory response in a Swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jennifer M; Brundage, Susan I; Todd, S Rob; Zautke, Nathan A; Stefater, J A; Lam, J C; Muller, Patrick J; Malinoski, Darren; Schreiber, Martin A

    2004-09-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are widely and interchangeably used for resuscitation of trauma victims. Studies show LR to be superior to NS in the physiologic response to resuscitation. Recent in vitro studies demonstrate equivalent effects of LR and NS on leukocytes. We aimed to determine whether LR resuscitation would produce an equivalent inflammatory response compared with normal saline (NS) resuscitation in a clinically relevant swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. Thirty-two swine were randomized. Control animals (n = 6) were sacrificed following induction of anesthesia for baseline data. Sham animals (n = 6) underwent laparotomy and 2 h of anesthesia. Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock animals (n = 10/group) underwent laparotomy, grade V liver injury, and blinded resuscitation with LR or NS to maintain baseline blood pressure for 1.5 h before sacrifice. Lung was harvested, and tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were determined using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR). Sections of lung were processed and examined for neutrophils sequestered within the alveolar walls. Cytokine analysis showed no difference in IL-6 gene transcription in any group (P = 0.99). Resuscitated swine had elevated G-CSF and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but LR and NS groups were not different from each other (P= 0.96 and 0.10, respectively). Both resuscitation groups had significantly more alveolar neutrophils present than controls (P < 0.01) and shams (P < 0.05) but were not different from one another (P= 0.83). LR and NS resuscitation have equivalent effects on indices of inflammation in the lungs in our model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

  4. A Pro23His Mutation Alters Prenatal Rod Photoreceptor Morphology in a Transgenic Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P.; Kaplan, Henry J.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Functional studies have detected deficits in retinal signaling in asymptomatic children from families with inherited autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whether retinal abnormalities are present earlier during gestation or shortly after birth in a subset of children with autosomal dominant RP is unknown and no appropriate animal RP model possessing visual function at birth has been available to examine this possibility. In a recently developed transgenic P23H (TgP23H) rhodopsin swine model of RP, we tracked changes in pre- and early postnatal retinal morphology, as well as early postnatal retinal function. Methods. Domestic swine inseminated with semen from a TgP23H miniswine founder produced TgP23H hybrid and wild type (Wt) littermates. Outer retinal morphology was assessed at light and electron microscopic levels between embryonic (E) and postnatal (P) day E85 to P3. Retinal function was evaluated using the full field electroretinogram at P3. Results. Embryonic TgP23H rod photoreceptors are malformed and their rhodopsin expression pattern is abnormal. Consistent with morphological abnormalities, rod-driven function is absent at P3. In contrast, TgP23H and Wt cone photoreceptor morphology (E85–P3) and cone-driven retinal function (P3) are similar. Conclusions. Prenatal expression of mutant rhodopsin alters the normal morphological and functional development of rod photoreceptors in TgP23H swine embryos. Despite this significant change, cone photoreceptors are unaffected. Human infants with similarly aggressive RP might never have rod vision, although cone vision would be unaffected. Such aggressive forms of RP in preverbal children would require early intervention to delay or prevent functional blindness. PMID:24618321

  5. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  6. Failure analysis and modeling of a VAXcluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Dong; Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Subramani, Sujatha S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a measurement-based analysis of real error data collected from a DEC VAXcluster multicomputer system. In addition to evaluating basic system dependability characteristics such as error and failure distributions and hazard rates for both individual machines and for the VAXcluster, reward models were developed to analyze the impact of failures on the system as a whole. The results show that more than 46 percent of all failures were due to errors in shared resources. This is despite the fact that these errors have a recovery probability greater than 0.99. The hazard rate calculations show that not only errors, but also failures occur in bursts. Approximately 40 percent of all failures occur in bursts and involved multiple machines. This result indicates that correlated failures are significant. Analysis of rewards shows that software errors have the lowest reward (0.05 vs 0.74 for disk errors). The expected reward rate (reliability measure) of the VAXcluster drops to 0.5 in 18 hours for the 7-out-of-7 model and in 80 days for the 3-out-of-7 model.

  7. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSCs) Improve Heart Function in Swine Myocardial Infarction Model through Paracrine Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Min; Shen, Rui; Song, Lei; Lu, Minjie; Wang, Jianguang; Zhao, Shihua; Tang, Yue; Meng, Xianmin; Li, Zongjin; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are promising for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) and large animal models should be used to better understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidences. In this study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were transplanted into swine heart ischemia model. To detect glucose metabolism in global left ventricular myocardium and regional myocardium, combined with assessment of cardiac function, positron emission tomography-computer tomography (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. To study the changes of glucose transporters and glucose metabolism-related enzymes and the signal transduction pathway, RT-PCR, Western-blot, and immunohistochemistry were carried out. Myocardium metabolic evaluation by PET-CT showed that mean signal intensity (MSI) increased in these segments at week 4 compared with that at week 1 after BM-MSCs transplantation. Moreover, MRI demonstrated significant function enhancement in BM-MSCs group. The gene expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT4), glucose metabolism-related enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k) in BM-MSCs injected areas were up-regulated at week 4 after BM-MSCs transplantation and this was confirmed by Western-blot and immunohistochemistry. In conclusions, BM-MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function in swine MI model by activation of mTOR signal transduction pathway. PMID:27321050

  8. Evaluation Model of Life Loss Due to Dam Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongjing

    2016-04-01

    Dam failure poses a serious threat to human life, however there is still lack of systematic research on life loss which due to dam failure in China. From the perspective of protecting human life, an evaluation model for life loss caused by dam failure is put forward. The model building gets three progressive steps. Twenty dam failure cases in China are preferably chosen as the basic data, considering geographical location and construction time of dams, as well as various conditions of dam failure. Then twelve impact factors of life loss are selected, including severity degree of flood, population at risk, understanding of dam failure, warning time, evacuation condition, number of damaged buildings, water temperature, reservoir storage, dam height, dam type, break time and distance from flood area to dam. And through principal component analysis, it gets four principal components consisting of the first flood character principle component, the second warning system principle component, the third human character principle component and the fourth space-time impact principle component. After multivariate nonlinear regression and ten-fold validation in combination, the evaluation model for life loss is finally established. And the result of the proposed model is closer to the true value and better in fitting effect in comparison with the results of RESCDAM method and M. Peng method. The proposed model is not only applied to evaluate life loss and its rate under various kinds of dam failure conditions in China, but also provides reliable cause analysis and prediction approach to reduce the risk of life loss.

  9. Prediction failure of a wolf landscape model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    I compared 101 wolf (Canis lupus) pack territories formed in Wisconsin during 1993-2004 to the logistic regression predictive model of Mladenoff et al. (1995, 1997, 1999). Of these, 60% were located in putative habitat suitabilities 50% remained unoccupied by known packs after 24 years of recolonization. This model was a poor predictor of wolf re-colonizing locations in Wisconsin, apparently because it failed to consider the adaptability of wolves. Such models should be used cautiously in wolf-management or restoration plans.

  10. In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Model (PolyFermS) of the Swine Proximal Colon for Simultaneous Testing on the Same Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Sabine A.; Zihler Berner, Annina; Rigozzi, Eugenia; Grattepanche, Franck; Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling provides a useful platform for a fast and reproducible assessment of treatment-related changes. Currently, pig intestinal fermentation models are mainly batch models with important inherent limitations. In this study we developed a novel in vitro continuous fermentation model, mimicking the porcine proximal colon, which we validated during 54 days of fermentation. This model, based on our recent PolyFermS design, allows comparing different treatment effects on the same microbiota. It is composed of a first-stage inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal swine microbiota and used to constantly inoculate (10% v/v) five second-stage reactors, with all reactors fed with fresh nutritive chyme medium and set to mimic the swine proximal colon. Reactor effluents were analyzed for metabolite concentrations and bacterial composition by HPLC and quantitative PCR, and microbial diversity was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing. The novel PolyFermS featured stable microbial composition, diversity and metabolite production, consistent with bacterial activity reported for swine proximal colon in vivo. The constant inoculation provided by the inoculum reactor generated reproducible microbial ecosystems in all second-stage reactors, allowing the simultaneous investigation and direct comparison of different treatments on the same porcine gut microbiota. Our data demonstrate the unique features of this novel PolyFermS design for the swine proximal colon. The model provides a tool for efficient, reproducible and cost-effective screening of environmental factors, such as dietary additives, on pig colonic fermentation. PMID:24709947

  11. In vitro continuous fermentation model (PolyFermS) of the swine proximal colon for simultaneous testing on the same gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Sabine A; Zihler Berner, Annina; Rigozzi, Eugenia; Grattepanche, Franck; Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling provides a useful platform for a fast and reproducible assessment of treatment-related changes. Currently, pig intestinal fermentation models are mainly batch models with important inherent limitations. In this study we developed a novel in vitro continuous fermentation model, mimicking the porcine proximal colon, which we validated during 54 days of fermentation. This model, based on our recent PolyFermS design, allows comparing different treatment effects on the same microbiota. It is composed of a first-stage inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal swine microbiota and used to constantly inoculate (10% v/v) five second-stage reactors, with all reactors fed with fresh nutritive chyme medium and set to mimic the swine proximal colon. Reactor effluents were analyzed for metabolite concentrations and bacterial composition by HPLC and quantitative PCR, and microbial diversity was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing. The novel PolyFermS featured stable microbial composition, diversity and metabolite production, consistent with bacterial activity reported for swine proximal colon in vivo. The constant inoculation provided by the inoculum reactor generated reproducible microbial ecosystems in all second-stage reactors, allowing the simultaneous investigation and direct comparison of different treatments on the same porcine gut microbiota. Our data demonstrate the unique features of this novel PolyFermS design for the swine proximal colon. The model provides a tool for efficient, reproducible and cost-effective screening of environmental factors, such as dietary additives, on pig colonic fermentation. PMID:24709947

  12. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  13. Non-local models for ductile failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César de Sá, José; Azinpour, Erfan; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Ductile damage can be dealt with continuous descriptions of material, resorting, for example, to continuous damage mechanic descriptions or micromechanical constitutive models. When it comes to describe material behaviour near and beyond fracture these approaches are no longer sufficient or valid and continuous/discontinuous approaches can be adopted to track fracture initiation and propagation. Apart from more pragmatic solutions like element erosion or remeshing techniques more advanced approaches based on the X-FEM concept, in particular associated with non-local formulations, may be adopted to numerically model these problems. Nevertheless, very often, for practical reasons, some important aspects are somewhat left behind, specially energetic requirements to promote the necessary transition of energy release associated with material damage and fracture energy associated to a crack creation and evolution. Phase-field methods may combine advantages of regularised continuous models by providing a similar description to non-local thermodynamical continuous damage mechanics, as well as, a "continuous" approach to numerically follow crack evolution and branching

  14. Modeling the in-plane tension failure of composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Trinh, K.V.

    1997-11-01

    This study developed a modeling method to predict the final failure load of laminated composite plates which may contain cutouts and are subjected to quasi-static in-plane tensile loads. This study focused on overcoming numerical problems often encountered in analyses that exhibit significant stable damage growth in the composite materials. To keep the computational cost at a reasonable level, the modeling method uses a quasi-static solution procedure to solve composite plate problems with quasi-static load. The numerical problems in the quasi-static analyses are nonconvergence problems caused by the discontinuous material behavior from brittle fiber failure. This study adds artificial damping to the material model to suppress the discontinuous material behavior. The artificial damping essentially changes the material behavior, and could adversely change the final failure load prediction. Thus, a selective scheme for adding the damping was developed to minimize adverse damping effects. In addition, this modeling method uses multiple analyses at different levels of artificial damping to determine damping effects on the failure load prediction. Fracture strength experimental data for small coupons with small cutouts and large panels with larger cutouts available in the literature were selected and used to verify failure predictions of the developed modeling method. Results show that, without the artificial damping treatment, progressive damage analyses reasonably predicted the fracture strength of the small coupons, but severely underpredicted the fracture strength of the large panels. With the artificial damping treatment, the analyses predicted the failure load of both the small coupons and the large panels reasonably well.

  15. Preventing Phrenic Nerve Stimulation by a Patch Insulation in an Intact Swine Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Wen; Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chien-Ming; Wang, Kuo-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) could be prevented by a silastic patch over the epicardial lead. We studied the effects in preventing PNS by placing a silastic patch directly over an epicardial lead or placing a graft around the phrenic nerve (PN). Methods and Results Fourteen Lanyu swine were enrolled. A bipolar lead was placed epicardially on the left ventricle (LV) inferior to the PN. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) lead was placed into the right ventricle (RV). The maximal influential distance (MID) was measured under 3 pacing configurations to express the influential electrical field on the PN. The threshold of the LV and PN were evaluated epicardially. Then, PTFE patches of different sizes (10×10 mm, 20×20 mm and 30×30 mm) were placed between the LV lead and PN to study the rise in PN threshold in 7 swine. On the other hand, the PN were surrounded by a PTFE graft of different lengths (10 mm, 20 mm, and 30 mm) in the remaining 7 swine. LV-bipolar pacing showed the shortest MID when compared to the other 2 unipolar pacing configurations at pacing voltage of 10 V. The patch was most effective in preventing PNS during LV-bipolar pacing. PNS was prevented under all circumstances with a larger PTFE patch (30×30 mm) or long graft (30 mm). Conclusions PNS was avoided by placing a PTFE patch over the LV lead or a graft around the PN despite pacing configurations. Hence if PNS persisted during CRT implantation, a PTFE patch on the LV lead or a graft around the PN could be considered. PMID:25033271

  16. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  17. Diet-induced swine model with obesity/leptin resistance for the study of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rovira, L; Astiz, S; Caro, A; Lopez-Bote, C; Ovilo, C; Pallares, P; Perez-Solana, M L; Sanchez-Sanchez, R; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases.

  18. Diet-Induced Swine Model with Obesity/Leptin Resistance for the Study of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rovira, L.; Astiz, S.; Caro, A.; Lopez-Bote, C.; Ovilo, C.; Pallares, P.; Perez-Solana, M. L.; Sanchez-Sanchez, R.; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases. PMID:22629144

  19. Bayesian failure probability model sensitivity study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has developed a system-level approach for estimating the effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the connectivity of telecommunications networks. This approach incorporates a Bayesian statistical model which estimates the HEMP-induced failure probabilities of telecommunications switches and transmission facilities. The purpose of this analysis is to address the sensitivity of the Bayesian model. This is done by systematically varying two model input parameters--the number of observations, and the equipment failure rates. Throughout the study, a non-informative prior distribution is used. The sensitivity of the Bayesian model to the noninformative prior distribution is investigated from a theoretical mathematical perspective.

  20. Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Procedure in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, Jacqueline; Davies, Roger P.

    2004-01-15

    A new method is described for guiding hepato-portalvenous puncture using a longitudinal side-view intravascular ultrasound(L-IVUS) transducer to assist in the performance of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in three Australian swine.Simultaneous L-IVUS with an AcuNav (registered) 5-10 MHz 10 Fr transducer(Acuson Corporation, Mountain View, CA, USA) and fluoroscopy guidance was used to image and monitor the hepatic to portal venous puncture,dilatation of the tract, and deployment of the TIPS stent. Flow through the shunt could be demonstrated with both L-IVUS and angiography. TIPS was successful in all swine. The time for portal vein puncture once the target portal vein was identified was reduced at each attempt. The number of portal vein puncture attempts was 2, 1, and 1. No post-procedural complication was evident. L-IVUS-guided TIPS is practical and has the potential to improve safety by permitting simultaneous ultrasound and fluoroscopic imaging of the needle and target vascular structures. This technique allows for a more streamlined approach to TIPS, decreasing the fluoroscopic time (hence,decreasing the radiation exposure to the staff and patient) and anesthetic time. In addition, there are improved safety benefits obviating the need for wedged portography, facilitating avoidance of bile duct and hepatic arterial puncture, and minimizing hepatic injury by decreasing liver capsular puncture and the attendant risks.

  1. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  2. SUMO-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in a large-animal model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tilemann, Lisa; Lee, Ahyoung; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Rapti, Kleopatra; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Fish, Kenneth M; Kho, Changwon; Hajjar, Roger J

    2013-11-13

    Recently, the impact of small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (SUMO-1) on the regulation and preservation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2a) function was discovered. The amount of myocardial SUMO-1 is decreased in failing hearts, and its knockdown results in severe heart failure (HF) in mice. In a previous study, we showed that SUMO-1 gene transfer substantially improved cardiac function in a murine model of pressure overload-induced HF. Toward clinical translation, we evaluated in this study the effects of SUMO-1 gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic HF. One month after balloon occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion, the animals were randomized to receive either SUMO-1 at two doses, SERCA2a, or both by adeno-associated vector type 1 (AAV1) gene transfer via antegrade coronary infusion. Control animals received saline infusions. After gene delivery, there was a significant increase in the maximum rate of pressure rise [dP/dt(max)] that was most pronounced in the group that received both SUMO-1 and SERCA2a. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved after high-dose SUMO-1 with or without SERCA2a gene delivery, whereas there was a decline in LVEF in the animals receiving saline. Furthermore, the dilatation of LV volumes was prevented in the treatment groups. SUMO-1 gene transfer therefore improved cardiac function and stabilized LV volumes in a large-animal model of HF. These results support the critical role of SUMO-1 in SERCA2a function and underline the therapeutic potential of SUMO-1 for HF patients.

  3. On rate-state and Coulomb failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.; Blanpied, M.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the predictions of Coulomb failure stress and rate-state frictional models. We study the change in failure time (clock advance) Δt due to stress step perturbations (i.e., coseismic static stress increases) added to "background" stressing at a constant rate (i.e., tectonic loading) at time t0. The predictability of Δt implies a predictable change in seismicity rate r(t)/r0, testable using earthquake catalogs, where r0 is the constant rate resulting from tectonic stressing. Models of r(t)/r0, consistent with general properties of aftershock sequences, must predict an Omori law seismicity decay rate, a sequence duration that is less than a few percent of the mainshock cycle time and a return directly to the background rate. A Coulomb model requires that a fault remains locked during loading, that failure occur instantaneously, and that Δt is independent of t0. These characteristics imply an instantaneous infinite seismicity rate increase of zero duration. Numerical calculations of r(t)/r0 for different state evolution laws show that aftershocks occur on faults extremely close to failure at the mainshock origin time, that these faults must be "Coulomb-like," and that the slip evolution law can be precluded. Real aftershock population characteristics also may constrain rate-state constitutive parameters; a may be lower than laboratory values, the stiffness may be high, and/or normal stress may be lower than lithostatic. We also compare Coulomb and rate-state models theoretically. Rate-state model fault behavior becomes more Coulomb-like as constitutive parameter a decreases relative to parameter b. This is because the slip initially decelerates, representing an initial healing of fault contacts. The deceleration is more pronounced for smaller a, more closely simulating a locked fault. Even when the rate-state Δt has Coulomb characteristics, its magnitude may differ by some constant dependent on b. In this case, a rate-state model behaves like a modified

  4. Translational value of animal models of kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Izquierdo, Maria C; Martin-Cleary, Catalina; Garcia-Bermejo, Laura; Moreno, Juan A; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Draibe, Juliana; Cruzado, Josep M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M; Soler, Maria J; Sanz, Ana B

    2015-07-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with decreased renal function and increased mortality risk, while the therapeutic armamentarium is unsatisfactory. The availability of adequate animal models may speed up the discovery of biomarkers for disease staging and therapy individualization as well as design and testing of novel therapeutic strategies. Some longstanding animal models have failed to result in therapeutic advances in the clinical setting, such as kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and diabetic nephropathy models. In this regard, most models for diabetic nephropathy are unsatisfactory in that they do not evolve to renal failure. Satisfactory models for additional nephropathies are needed. These include anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, IgA nephropathy, anti-phospholipase-A2-receptor (PLA2R) membranous nephropathy and Fabry nephropathy. However, recent novel models hold promise for clinical translation. Thus, the AKI to CKD translation has been modeled, in some cases with toxins of interest for human CKD such as aristolochic acid. Genetically modified mice provide models for Alport syndrome evolving to renal failure that have resulted in clinical recommendations, polycystic kidney disease models that have provided clues for the development of tolvaptan, that was recently approved for the human disease in Japan; and animal models also contributed to target C5 with eculizumab in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some ongoing trials explore novel concepts derived from models, such TWEAK targeting as tissue protection for lupus nephritis. We now review animal models reproducing diverse, genetic and acquired, causes of AKI and CKD evolving to kidney failure and discuss the contribution to clinical translation and prospects for the future. PMID:25814248

  5. Translational value of animal models of kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Izquierdo, Maria C; Martin-Cleary, Catalina; Garcia-Bermejo, Laura; Moreno, Juan A; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Draibe, Juliana; Cruzado, Josep M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M; Soler, Maria J; Sanz, Ana B

    2015-07-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with decreased renal function and increased mortality risk, while the therapeutic armamentarium is unsatisfactory. The availability of adequate animal models may speed up the discovery of biomarkers for disease staging and therapy individualization as well as design and testing of novel therapeutic strategies. Some longstanding animal models have failed to result in therapeutic advances in the clinical setting, such as kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and diabetic nephropathy models. In this regard, most models for diabetic nephropathy are unsatisfactory in that they do not evolve to renal failure. Satisfactory models for additional nephropathies are needed. These include anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, IgA nephropathy, anti-phospholipase-A2-receptor (PLA2R) membranous nephropathy and Fabry nephropathy. However, recent novel models hold promise for clinical translation. Thus, the AKI to CKD translation has been modeled, in some cases with toxins of interest for human CKD such as aristolochic acid. Genetically modified mice provide models for Alport syndrome evolving to renal failure that have resulted in clinical recommendations, polycystic kidney disease models that have provided clues for the development of tolvaptan, that was recently approved for the human disease in Japan; and animal models also contributed to target C5 with eculizumab in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some ongoing trials explore novel concepts derived from models, such TWEAK targeting as tissue protection for lupus nephritis. We now review animal models reproducing diverse, genetic and acquired, causes of AKI and CKD evolving to kidney failure and discuss the contribution to clinical translation and prospects for the future.

  6. A predictive model for failure properties of thermoset resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruthers, James M.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1989-01-01

    A predictive model for the three-dimensional failure behavior of engineering polymers has been developed in a recent NASA-sponsored research program. This model acknowledges the underlying molecular deformation mechanisms and thus accounts for the effects of different chemical compositions, crosslink density, functionality of the curing agent, etc., on the complete nonlinear stress-strain response including yield. The material parameters required by the model can be determined from test-tube quantities of a new resin in only a few days. Thus, we can obtain a first-order prediction of the applicability of a new resin for an advanced aerospace application without synthesizing the large quantities of material needed for failure testing. This technology will effect order-of-magnitude reductions in the time and expense required to develop new engineering polymers.

  7. On predicting and modeling material failure under impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.

    1998-09-01

    A method for predicting and modeling material failure in solids subjected to impact loading is outlined. The method uses classical void growth models of Gurson and Tvergaard in a material point method (MPM). Because of material softening, material stability is lost. At this point, the character of the governing partial differential equations changes, and localization occurs. This localization results in mesh dependence for many problems of interest. For many problems, predicting the occurrence of material failure and its extent is necessary. To enable this modeling, it is proposed that a discontinuity be introduced into the displacement field. By including a dissipation-based force-displacement relationship, the mesh dependence of energy dissipation can be avoided. Additionally, the material point method provides a means of allowing large deformations without mesh distortion or introduction of error through remapping.

  8. Product component genealogy modeling and field-failure prediction

    DOE PAGES

    King, Caleb; Hong, Yili; Meeker, William Q.

    2016-04-13

    Many industrial products consist of multiple components that are necessary for system operation. There is an abundance of literature on modeling the lifetime of such components through competing risks models. During the life-cycle of a product, it is common for there to be incremental design changes to improve reliability, to reduce costs, or due to changes in availability of certain part numbers. These changes can affect product reliability but are often ignored in system lifetime modeling. By incorporating this information about changes in part numbers over time (information that is readily available in most production databases), better accuracy can bemore » achieved in predicting time to failure, thus yielding more accurate field-failure predictions. This paper presents methods for estimating parameters and predictions for this generational model and a comparison with existing methods through the use of simulation. Our results indicate that the generational model has important practical advantages and outperforms the existing methods in predicting field failures.« less

  9. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals. PMID:25711878

  10. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Mónica; Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals.

  11. Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of Severe Cyanide Poisoning in a Swine (Sus scrofa) Model

    PubMed Central

    Bebarta, Lt Col Vikhyat S.; Tanen, David A.; Boudreau, Susan; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A.; Vargas, Toni; Boss, Gerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective Hydroxocobalamin is a Food and Drug Administration–approved antidote for cyanide poisoning. Cobinamide is a potential antidote that contains 2 cyanide-binding sites. To our knowledge, no study has directly compared hydroxocobalamin with cobinamide in a severe, cyanide-toxic large-animal model. Our objective is to compare the time to return of spontaneous breathing in swine with acute cyanide-induced apnea treated with intravenous hydroxocobalamin, intravenous cobinamide, or saline solution (control). Methods Thirty-three swine (45 to 55 kg) were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented (continuous mean arterial pressure and cardiac output monitoring). Anesthesia was adjusted to allow spontaneous breathing with FiO2 of 21% during the experiment. Cyanide was continuously infused intravenously until apnea occurred and lasted for 1 minute (time zero). Animals were then randomly assigned to receive intravenous hydroxocobalamin (65 mg/kg), cobinamide (12.5 mg/kg), or saline solution and monitored for 60 minutes. A sample size of 11 animals per group was selected according to obtaining a power of 80%, an α of .05, and an SD of 0.17 in mean time to detect a 20% difference in time to spontaneous breathing. We assessed differences in time to death among groups, using Kaplan-Meier estimation methods, and compared serum lactate, blood pH, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation time curves with repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Baseline weights and vital signs were similar among groups. The time to apnea and cyanide dose required to achieve apnea were similar. At time zero, mean cyanide blood and lactate concentrations and reduction in mean arterial pressure from baseline were similar. In the saline solution group, 2 of 11 animals survived compared with 10 of 11 in the hydroxocobalamin and cobinamide groups (P<.001 between the 2 treated groups and the saline solution group). Time to return of spontaneous breathing

  12. Failure-recovery model with competition between failures in complex networks: a dynamical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, L. D.; Di Muro, M. A.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    Real systems are usually composed by units or nodes whose activity can be interrupted and restored intermittently due to complex interactions not only with the environment, but also with the same system. Majdandžić et al (2014 Nat. Phys. 10 34) proposed a model to study systems in which active nodes fail and recover spontaneously in a complex network and found that in the steady state the density of active nodes can exhibit an abrupt transition and hysteresis depending on the values of the parameters. Here we investigate a model of recovery-failure from a dynamical point of view. Using an effective degree approach we find that the systems can exhibit a temporal sharp decrease in the fraction of active nodes. Moreover we show that, depending on the values of the parameters, the fraction of active nodes has an oscillatory regime which we explain as a competition between different failure processes. We also find that in the non-oscillatory regime, the critical fraction of active nodes presents a discontinuous drop which can be related to a ‘targeted’ k-core percolation process. Finally, using mean field equations we analyze the space of parameters at which hysteresis and oscillatory regimes can be found.

  13. A statistical model of carbon/carbon composite failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1991-01-01

    A failure model which considers the stochastic nature of the damage accumulation process is essential to assess reliability and to accurately scale the results from standard test specimens to composite structures. A superior filamentary composite for high temperature applications is composed of carbon fibers in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites are the strongest known material at very high temperatures. Since there appears to be a significant randomness in C-C material strength which cannot be controlled or detected with current technology, a better model of the material failure based upon statistical principles should be used. Simple applications of the model based upon the limited data provide encouraging results that indicate that better design of test specimens would provide a substantially higher prediction for the design strength of C-C composites. An A-basis strength for the C-C tensile rings from a first stage D-5 billets was estimated. A statistical failure model was developed for these rings which indicates that this strength may be very conservative for larger C-C parts. The analysis may be improved by use of a heterogeneous/noncontinuum finite element approach on the minimechanical level.

  14. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  15. Evaluation of the Role of Cisplatin-conjugated-soluble Gelatin Sponge: Feasibility Study in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Kouhei; Nakai, Motoki; Sanda, Hiroki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kanayama, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and the delivery function of cisplatin-conjugated-soluble gelatin sponge in a swine model.MethodsFifteen healthy young swine were assigned into three groups: transarterial cisplatin infusion group, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with cisplatin-conjugated 120-min soluble gelatin sponge (TACE-120) group, and TACE with cisplatin-conjugated 360-min soluble gelatin sponge (TACE-360) group. A total volume of 0.8 mL/kg cisplatin in each group and 8 mg/kg soluble gelatin sponge in TACE-120 and TACE-360 groups were injected from the left hepatic artery in small increments for 10 min. Common hepatic angiography and whole-blood sampling via the left hepatic vein were conducted to explore recanalization immediately after the procedure and again at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 min later. The area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC) of non-protein-bound platinum was compared among the three groups. Each liver was removed and cut into 10-cm-thick sections for calculating liver-damaged volume ratio.ResultsSequential angiography depicted gradual recanalization of the occluded hepatic artery and total recanalization at 120 and 360 min after embolization in the TACE-120 and TACE-360 groups, respectively. Of the three groups, AUC{sub 0-30}, AUC{sub 30-120}, and AUC{sub 120-420} were significantly highest in the transarterial cisplatin infusion group (p < 0.001), the TACE-120 group (p < 0.001), and the TACE-360 group (p < 0.001), respectively. The liver-damaged volume ratio in the TACE-360 group was small (8.20 %) but significantly higher than that in the TACE-120 group (2.67 %, p = 0.014).ConclusionCisplatin-conjugated soluble gelatin sponge functions as a cisplatin carrier and is associated with tolerable liver damage.

  16. Comparison of thromboelastography parameters between different catheter lumen diameters in an uncontrolled haemorrhagic shock model in swine.

    PubMed

    Neate, Sean L; Boysen, Søren R; Wagg, Catherine R; Radics, Stacy L; Caulkett, Nigel A

    2013-09-01

    Sampling technique is a concern for standardization of thromboelastography (TEG), as it contributes towards preanalytical variation in TEG tracings. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of catheter lumen diameter on TEG parameters with kaolin-activated native blood in a swine haemorrhagic shock model, using standardized sampling techniques. We hypothesized that one or more TEG parameters will differ between venous samples collected from catheters with different diameter lumens. Ten male landrace swine were included in the study. Standard cut-down techniques on both femoral veins were performed and catheterized with a 14-gauge (14G) and a 20-gauge (20G) catheter of the same length. Blood withdrawal times were standardized to 3 s and TEG parameters (R, K, α, maximum amplitude, G and coagulation index) were measured or calculated. Significant differences were detected for R (14G < 20G; P = 0.002), K (14G < 20G; P = 0.026), maximum amplitude (14G > 20G; P = 0.02), G (14G > 20G; P = 0.001) and coagulation index (14G > 20G; P < 0.001). No significant differences were measured for α (P = 0.058). Bias values (method A: 20G; method B: 14G) for R, K, α, maximum amplitude, G and coagulation index were 1.00, 0.14, -1.88, -1.56, -1.39 and -1.07, respectively. Using TEG analysis, kaolin-activated native whole blood samples obtained from 14G catheters are hypercoagulable (clotted faster and stronger clot) compared with samples obtained from 20G catheters. Sampling methodology should be standardized and systematic when comparing TEG parameters.

  17. Approach to failure in a discrete element model of the compressive failure of porous rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, F.; Varga, I.; Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how a porous rock sample approaches failure under uniaxial compression. Computer simulations are carried out in the framework of a discrete element model (DEM) which takes into account both the microstructure of the material and the dynamics of local fracturing, revealing much more detail and observation bandwidth in then granular mechanics than possible during standard laboratory tests. The synthetic sample is generated by sedimentation of randomly-sized spherical particles with a log-normal size distribution inside a cylindrical container. The cohesive interaction of particles is represented by beam elements that break when overstressed. The breaking rule takes into account both stretching and shear of particle contacts. When particles not connected by a beam come into contact their interaction is described by the Hertz contact law. The time evolution of the system is generated by molecular dynamics simulations in three dimensions. Computer simulations showed that under strain controlled uniaxial loading of the system micro-cracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds localization occurs, i.e. the damage concentrates into a narrow damage band. Inside the damage band the material is crushed, into a poorly sorted mixture of fine powder and larger fragments with a power-law mass distribution, as observed in fault wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments, are identified as correlated trails of local fracture emerging as the consequence of stress redistribution. Characteristic quantities of burst such as size/rupture area, released elastic energy, and duration proved to have power law probability-size distributions over a broad range. The energy and duration of bursts have power law dependence on the rupture area created. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become

  18. FEM simulation of TBC failure in a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, P.; Bäker, M.; Beck, T.; Schweda, M.; Rösier, J.

    2010-07-01

    In order to study the behavior of the complex failure mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings on turbine blades, a simplified model system is used to reduce the number of system parameters. The artificial system consists of a bond-coat material (fast creeping Fecralloy or slow creeping MA956) as the substrate with a Y2O3 partially stabilized plasma sprayed zircon oxide TBC on top and a TGO between the two layers. A 2-dimensional FEM simulation was developed to calculate the growth stress inside the simplified coating system. The simulation permits the study of failure mechanisms by identifying compression and tension areas which are established by the growth of the oxide layer. This provides an insight into the possible crack paths in the coating and it allows to draw conclusions for optimizing real thermal barrier coating systems.

  19. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  20. Two-scale Modelling of material degradation and failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Ferri M. H.

    2016-08-01

    It is widely recognized that macroscopic material properties depend on the features of the microstructure. The understanding of the links between microscopic and macroscopic material properties, main topic of Micromechanics, is of relevant technological interest, as it may enable deep understanding of the mechanisms governing materials degradation and failure. Polycrystalline materials are used in many engineering applications. Their microstructure is determined by distribution, size, morphology, anisotropy and orientation of the crystals [1]. At temperature below 0.3-0.5 Tmelting there are no ductile or creep mechanisms and two are the main failure patterns: intergranular, where the damage follows the grain boundaries and transgranular where instead the damage goes through the grain by splitting it into two parts. In this talk a two-scale approach to degradation and failure in polycrystalline materials will be presented. The formulation involves the engineering component level (macro-scale) and the material grain level (micro-scale). The macro-continuum is modelled using two- and three-dimensional boundary element formulation in which the presence of damage is formulated through an initial stress approach to account for the local softening in the neighborhood of points experiencing degradation at the micro-scale. The microscopic degradation is explicitly modelled by associating Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) to relevant points of the macro continuum, for representing the polycrystalline microstructure in the neighbourhood of the selected points. A grainboundary formulation is used to simulate intergranular/transgranular degradation and failure in the microstructure, whose morphology is generated using the Voronoi tessellations. Intergranular/transgranular degradation and failure are modeled through cohesive and frictional contact laws. To couple the two scales, macro-strains are transferred to the RVEs as periodic boundary conditions, while overall macro

  1. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  2. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  3. Conceptual modeling of coincident failures in multiversion software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlewood, Bev; Miller, Douglas R.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work by Eckhardt and Lee (1985) shows that independently developed program versions fail dependently (specifically, simultaneous failure of several is greater than would be the case under true independence). The present authors show there is a precise duality between input choice and program choice in this model and consider a generalization in which different versions can be developed using diverse methodologies. The use of diverse methodologies is shown to decrease the probability of the simultaneous failure of several versions. Indeed, it is theoretically possible to obtain versions which exhibit better than independent failure behavior. The authors try to formalize the notion of methodological diversity by considering the sequence of decision outcomes that constitute a methodology. They show that diversity of decision implies likely diversity of behavior for the different verions developed under such forced diversity. For certain one-out-of-n systems the authors obtain an optimal method for allocating diversity between versions. For two-out-of-three systems there seem to be no simple optimality results which do not depend on constraints which cannot be verified in practice.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improve myocardial function in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Kong, Feng; Qi, Tong-Gang; Cheng, Guang-Hui; Wang, Jue; Sun, Chao; Luan, Yun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to confirm the effect and elucidate the mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI was induced in mini‑swine by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery, and BMSCs (1x107) were injected via a sterile microinjection into the ischemic area. Six months postoperatively, electrocardiograph‑gated single photon emission computed tomography revealed that the myocardial filling defect was reduced and the left ventricular ejection fraction was improved in the BMSC group compared with the control group (P<0.05). Histopathological examination indicated that, in the BMSC treatment group, the percentage of survived myocardial tissue and the vessel density were increased, and the percentage of apoptosis was decreased compared with controls (P<0.05). Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction results indicated that the expression levels of multiple inflammatory factors were significantly upregulated in the BMSC group compared with levels in the control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that BMSC injection significantly improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size in six months, indicating that this method may be valuable for future study in clinical trials.

  5. ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH PROBABILISTIC FAILURE MODELING OF DIGITAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,T.L.; MARTINEZ-GURIDI,G.; LEHNER,J.; OVERLAND,D.

    2004-09-19

    The current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process of instrumentation and control (I&C) systems is based on deterministic requirements, e.g., single failure criteria, and defense in depth and diversity. Probabilistic considerations can be used as supplements to the deterministic process. The National Research Council has recommended development of methods for estimating failure probabilities of digital systems, including commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment, for use in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). NRC staff has developed informal qualitative and quantitative requirements for PRA modeling of digital systems. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed a review of the-state-of-the-art of the methods and tools that can potentially be used to model digital systems. The objectives of this paper are to summarize the review, discuss the issues associated with probabilistic modeling of digital systems, and identify potential areas of research that would enhance the state of the art toward a satisfactory modeling method that could be integrated with a typical probabilistic risk assessment.

  6. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Eamon B.; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread. PMID:26947420

  7. Failure behavior and constitutive model of weakly consolidated soft rock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-ming; Zhao, Zeng-hui; Wang, Yong-ji; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Mining areas in western China are mainly located in soft rock strata with poor bearing capacity. In order to make the deformation failure mechanism and strength behavior of weakly consolidated soft mudstone and coal rock hosted in Ili No. 4 mine of Xinjiang area clear, some uniaxial and triaxial compression tests were carried out according to the samples of rocks gathered in the studied area, respectively. Meanwhile, a damage constitutive model which considered the initial damage was established by introducing a damage variable and a correction coefficient. A linearization process method was introduced according to the characteristics of the fitting curve and experimental data. The results showed that samples under different moisture contents and confining pressures presented completely different failure mechanism. The given model could accurately describe the elastic and plastic yield characteristics as well as the strain softening behavior of collected samples at postpeak stage. Moreover, the model could precisely reflect the relationship between the elastic modulus and confining pressure at prepeak stage.

  8. Failure Behavior and Constitutive Model of Weakly Consolidated Soft Rock

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-ming; Zhao, Zeng-hui; Wang, Yong-ji; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Mining areas in western China are mainly located in soft rock strata with poor bearing capacity. In order to make the deformation failure mechanism and strength behavior of weakly consolidated soft mudstone and coal rock hosted in Ili No. 4 mine of Xinjiang area clear, some uniaxial and triaxial compression tests were carried out according to the samples of rocks gathered in the studied area, respectively. Meanwhile, a damage constitutive model which considered the initial damage was established by introducing a damage variable and a correction coefficient. A linearization process method was introduced according to the characteristics of the fitting curve and experimental data. The results showed that samples under different moisture contents and confining pressures presented completely different failure mechanism. The given model could accurately describe the elastic and plastic yield characteristics as well as the strain softening behavior of collected samples at postpeak stage. Moreover, the model could precisely reflect the relationship between the elastic modulus and confining pressure at prepeak stage. PMID:24489511

  9. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald Murray; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-09-01

    Despite human laboratory and field studies that have demonstrated a reasonable safety profile for TASER brand conducted electrical weapons (CEW), the results of some swine studies and arrest related deaths temporal to the use of the CEWs continue to raise questions regarding cardiac safety. TASER International, Inc., has released a new CEW, the TASER X2, touted to have a better safety profile than its long-standing predecessor, the TASER X26. We have developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs and used it to compare the TASER X2 and the TASER X26. This safety model was also used to assess the relative safety of an experimental probe design as compared to the standard steel probe. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 has an improved safety margin over the TASER X26. The new probe design also has promise for enhanced cardiac safety, although may have some disadvantages when compared to the existing design which would make field use impractical.

  10. Utilization of laser Doppler flowmetry and tissue spectrophotometry for burn depth assessment using a miniature swine model.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Oliver; Held, Manuel; Schiefer, Jennifer; Werner, Ole; Medved, Fabian; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Jaminet, Patrick; Rothenberger, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the diagnosis of burn depth is primarily based on a visual assessment and can be dependent on the surgeons' experience. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of laser Doppler flowmeter combined with a tissue spectrophotometer to discriminate burn depth in a miniature swine burn model. Burn injuries of varying depth, including superficial-partial, deep-partial, and full thickness, were created in seven Göttingen minipigs using an aluminium bar (100 °C), which was applied to the abdominal skin for periods of 1, 3, 6, 12, 30, and 60 seconds with gravity alone. The depth of injury was evaluated histologically using hematoxylin and eosin staining. All burns were assessed 3 hours after injury using a device that combines a laser light and a white light to determine blood flow, hemoglobin oxygenation, and relative amount of hemoglobin. The blood flow (41 vs. 124 arbitrary units [AU]) and relative amount of hemoglobin (32 vs. 52 AU) were significantly lower in full thickness compared with superficial-partial thickness burns. However, no significant differences in hemoglobin oxygenation were observed between these depths of burns (61 vs. 60%). These results show the ability of laser Doppler flowmeter and tissue spectrophotometer in combination to discriminate between various depths of injury in the minipig model, suggesting that this device may offer a valuable tool for burn depth assessment influencing burn management.

  11. Modeling Stakeholder/Value Dependency through Mean Failure Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier series of works, Boehm et al. discuss the nature of information system dependability and highlight the variability of system dependability according to stakeholders. In a recent paper, the dependency patterns of this model are analyzed. In our recent works, we presented a stakeholder dependent quantitative security model, where we quantify security for a given stakeholder by the mean of the loss incurred by the stakeholder as a result of security threats. We show how this mean can be derived from the security threat configuration (represented as a vector of probabilities that reflect the likelihood of occurrence of the various security threats). We refer to our security metric as MFC, for Mean Failure Cost. In this paper, we analyze Boehm's model from the standpoint of the proposed metric, and show whether, to what extent, and how our metric addresses the issues raised by Boehm's Stakeholder/Value definition of system dependability.

  12. Intracoronary artery transplantation of cardiomyoblast-like cells from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improve left ventricular dysfunction and survival in a swine model of chronic myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Hanayuki; Saga, Ayami; Soeda, Mayumi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Daimon, Takashi; Ichinose, Akihiro; Matsuyama, Akifumi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We administered human CLCs in a swine model of MI via intracoronary artery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histological studies demonstrated engraftment of hCLCs into the scarred myocardium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Echocardiography showed rescue of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted swine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of hCLCs is an effective therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. -- Abstract: Transplantation of human cardiomyoblast-like cells (hCLCs) from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improved left ventricular function and survival of rats with myocardial infarction. Here we examined the effect of intracoronary artery transplantation of human CLCs in a swine model of chronic heart failure. Twenty-four pigs underwent balloon-occlusion of the first diagonal branch followed by reperfusion, with a second balloon-occlusion of the left ascending coronary artery 1 week later followed by reperfusion. Four weeks after the second occlusion/reperfusion, 17 of the 18 surviving animals with severe chronic MI (ejection fraction <35% by echocardiography) were immunosuppressed then randomly assigned to receive either intracoronary artery transplantation of hCLCs hADMPCs or placebo lactic Ringer's solution with heparin. Intracoronary artery transplantation was followed by the distribution of DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardial milieu. Echocardiography at post-transplant days 4 and 8 weeks showed rescue and maintenance of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted group, but not in the control animals, indicating myocardial functional recovery by hCLCs intracoronary transplantation. At 8 week post-transplantation, 7 of 8 hCLCs transplanted animals were still alive compared with only 1 of the 5 control (p = 0.0147). Histological studies at week 12 post-transplantation demonstrated engraftment of the pre DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardium and their expression of

  13. Cerebrovascular autoregulation after rewarming from hypothermia in a neonatal swine model of asphyxic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Larson, Abby C; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Wang, Bing; Yang, Zeng-Jin; Shaffner, Donald H; Koehler, Raymond C; Lee, Jennifer K

    2013-11-01

    After hypoxic brain injury, maintaining blood pressure within the limits of cerebral blood flow autoregulation is critical to preventing secondary brain injury. Little is known about the effects of prolonged hypothermia or rewarming on autoregulation after cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that rewarming would shift the lower limit of autoregulation (LLA), that this shift would be detected by indices derived from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and that rewarming would impair autoregulation during hypertension. Anesthetized neonatal swine underwent sham surgery or hypoxic-asphyxic cardiac arrest, followed by 2 h of normothermia and 20 h of hypothermia, with or without rewarming. Piglets were further divided into cohorts for cortical laser-Doppler flow (LDF) measurements during induced hypotension or hypertension. We also tested whether indices derived from NIRS could identify the LDF-derived LLA. The LLA did not differ significantly among groups with sham surgery and hypothermia (29 ± 8 mmHg), sham surgery and rewarming (34 ± 7 mmHg), arrest and hypothermia (29 ± 10 mmHg), and arrest and rewarming (38 ± 11 mmHg). The LLA was not affected by arrest (P = 0.60), temperature (P = 0.08), or interaction between arrest and temperature (P = 0.73). The NIRS-derived indices detected the LLA accurately, with the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves of 0.81-0.96 among groups. In groups subjected to arrest and hypothermia, with or without rewarming, the slope of LDF relative to cerebral perfusion pressure during hypertension was not significantly different from zero (P > 0.10). In conclusion, rewarming did not shift the LLA during hypotension or affect autoregulation during hypertension after asphyxic cardiac arrest. The NIRS-derived autoregulation indices identified the LLA accurately.

  14. A Model for Assessment of Failure of LWR Fuel during an RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenfeng; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a model for Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) failure of LWR fuel during an RIA. The model uses the J-integral as a driving parameter to characterize the failure potential during PCMI. The model is implemented in the FRAPTRAN code and is validated by CABRI and NSRR simulated RIA test data. Simulation of PWR and BWR conditions are conducted by FRAPTRAN to evaluate the fuel failure potential using this model. Model validation and simulation results are compared with the strain-based failure model of PNNL and the SED/CSED model of EPRI. Our fracture mechanics model has good capability to differentiate failure from non-failure cases. The results reveal significant effects of power pulse width: a wider pulse width generally increases the threshold for fuel failure. However, this effect is less obvious for highly corroded cladding. (authors)

  15. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  16. An approach to model monitoring and surveillance data of wildlife diseases-exemplified by Classical Swine Fever in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, N; Liebscher, V; Staubach, C; Ziller, M

    2013-11-01

    The analysis of epidemiological field data from monitoring and surveillance systems (MOSSs) in wild animals is of great importance in order to evaluate the performance of such systems. By parameter estimation from MOSS data, conclusions about disease dynamics in the observed population can be drawn. To strengthen the analysis, the implementation of a maximum likelihood estimation is the main aim of our work. The new approach presented here is based on an underlying simple SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) model for a disease scenario in a wildlife population. The three corresponding classes are assumed to govern the intensities (number of animals in the classes) of non-homogeneous Poisson processes. A sampling rate was defined which describes the process of data collection (for MOSSs). Further, the performance of the diagnostics was implemented in the model by a diagnostic matrix containing misclassification rates. Both descriptions of these MOSS parts were included in the Poisson process approach. For simulation studies, the combined model demonstrates its ability to validly estimate epidemiological parameters, such as the basic reproduction rate R0. These parameters will help the evaluation of existing disease control systems. They will also enable comparison with other simulation models. The model has been tested with data from a Classical Swine Fever (CSF) outbreak in wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa L.) from a region of Germany (1999-2002). The results show that the hunting strategy as a sole control tool is insufficient to decrease the threshold for susceptible animals to eradicate the disease, since the estimated R0 confirms an ongoing epidemic of CSF.

  17. Maternal malnutrition and offspring sex determine juvenile obesity and metabolic disorders in a swine model of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Alicia; Astiz, Susana; Lopez-Bote, Clemente J; Perez-Solana, Maria L; Ayuso, Miriam; Garcia-Real, Isabel; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine, in a swine model of leptin resistance, the effects of type and timing of maternal malnutrition on growth patterns, adiposity and metabolic features of the progeny when exposed to an obesogenic diet during their juvenile development and possible concomitant effects of the offspring sex. Thus, four groups were considered. A CONTROL group involved pigs born from sows fed with a diet fulfilling their daily maintenance requirements for pregnancy. The treated groups involved the progeny of females fed with the same diet but fulfilling either 160% or 50% of pregnancy requirements during the entire gestation (OVERFED and UNDERFED, respectively) or 100% of requirements until Day 35 of pregnancy and 50% of such amount from Day 36 onwards (LATE-UNDERFED). OVERFED and UNDERFED offspring were more prone to higher corpulence and fat deposition from early postnatal stages, during breast-feeding; adiposity increased significantly when exposed to obesogenic diets, especially in females. The effects of sex were even more remarkable in LATE-UNDERFED offspring, which had similar corpulence to CONTROL piglets; however, females showed a clear predisposition to obesity. Furthermore, the three groups of pigs with maternal malnutrition showed evidences of metabolic syndrome and, in the case of individuals born from OVERFED sows, even of insulin resistance and the prodrome of type-2 diabetes. These findings support the main role of early nutritional programming in the current rise of obesity and associated diseases in ethnics with leptin resistance.

  18. Development of a Fatal Noncompressible Truncal Hemorrhage Model with Combined Hepatic and Portal Venous Injury in Normothermic Normovolemic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Yanala, Ujwal R.; Johanning, Jason M.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34–36 kg) underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1) central stellate injury (N = 6); 2) excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6); or 3) hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10). The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms. PMID:25251401

  19. Development of a fatal noncompressible truncal hemorrhage model with combined hepatic and portal venous injury in normothermic normovolemic swine.

    PubMed

    Yanala, Ujwal R; Johanning, Jason M; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H; Carlson, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼ 50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34-36 kg) underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1) central stellate injury (N = 6); 2) excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6); or 3) hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10). The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms.

  20. Domestic swine model for the assessment of chemical warfare agent-anesthetic interactions: some effects of sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Conley, J; Hunter, K; Lundy, P; Hamilton, M; Sawyer, T W

    2000-08-01

    A domestic swine model was developed to examine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with anesthetics and other drugs used during general anesthesia. Animals were fully instrumented, and clinically relevant physiological parameters were monitored throughout the experimental procedures. Exposure of animals under halothane anesthesia to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD; 1 mg/kg intravenous) produced mild signs of systemic intoxication during the subsequent 5 hours. Induction doses of ketamine 1 hour after HD exposure resulted in periods of profound apnea, with continued respiratory distress for the next 2 hours. When animals were treated with HD 1 hour after the initiation of ketamine anesthesia, severe and persistent convulsion-like muscular activity was observed within 45 minutes of HD administration. This nonpurposeful activity was not ameliorated by diazepam but was dramatically reduced or eliminated by resumption of halothane anesthesia. Treatment of HD-intoxicated pigs with succinylcholine produced a prolonged apnea resulting in death. In these apparently mildly HD-intoxicated animals, the introduction of ketamine or succinylcholine can rapidly induce potentially life-threatening situations.

  1. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    PubMed

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  2. Failure in laboratory fault models in triaxial tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    A model of a fault in the Earth is a sand-filled saw cut in a granite cylinder subjected to a triaxial test. The saw cut is inclined at an angle a to the cylinder axis, and the sand filling is intended to represent gouge. The triaxial test subjects the granite cylinder to a constant confining pressure and increasing axial stress to maintain a constant rate of shortening of the cylinder. The required axial stress increases at a decreasing rate to a maximum, beyond which a roughly constant axial stress is sufficient to maintain the constant rate of shortening: Such triaxial tests were run for saw cuts inclined at angles ?? of 20??, 25??, 30??, 35??, 40??, 45??, and 50?? to the cylinder axis, and the apparent coefficient of friction ??a (ratio of the shear stress to the normal stress, both stresses resolved onto the saw cut) at failure was determined. Subject to the assumption that the observed failure involves slip on Coulomb shears (orientation unspecified), the orientation of the principal compression axis within the gouge can be calculated as a function of ??a for a given value of the coefficient of internal friction ??i. The rotation of the principal stress axes within the gouge in a triaxial test can then be followed as the shear strain across the gouge layer increases. For ??i ??? 0.8, an appropriate value for highly sheared sand, the observed values ??a imply that the principal-axis of compression within the gouge rotates so as to approach being parallel to the cylinder axis for all saw cut angles (20?? < ?? < 50??). In the limiting state (principal compression axis parallel to cylinder axis) the stress state in the gouge layer would be the same as that in the granite cylinder, and the failure criterion would be independent of the saw cut angle.

  3. Swine in biomedical research. V. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the effect of dietary fiber on growing pigs; preparation of a cerebral perfusion model in the pig - anatomic considerations; a review of the utilization of lactose, glucose, sucrose, and cornstarch by neonatal piglets reared artificially; histology of piglet liver, swine hematology; use of swine as a model of musculoskeletal growth in animals; boar and human sperm as cellular models for membrane phospholipiid biosynthesis and degradation; a stereotaxic atlas of the developing swine (Sus Scrofa) forebrain; the effect of ethanol on liver mitochondrial Ca++-uptake; control of feed intake in pigs; the pig as a model of abberations associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; whey and cholesterol in swine; vitamin and mineral nutrition and malnutrition; cadmium absorption, distribution and excretion in young and adult minature swine; a piglet model for infant total parenteral nutrition studies; swine in perinatal research; the endocrine pancreas of the fetal pig; cardiovascular physiology of the pig fetus; and the effect of sow's milk versus formula on the superior mesenteric blood flow of newborn piglets.

  4. An Integrated Approach to Modeling and Mitigating SOFC Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A.; Haynes, C.; Qu, J.

    2005-01-27

    The objective of this project is to develop first-order failure criteria to be used for the initial design, material selection and optimization against thermomechanical failure of the PEN structure in high temperature SOFCs.

  5. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  6. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Reirradiation With Single-Fraction Radiosurgery: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine swine spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation 1 year after receiving uniform irradiation to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Methods and Materials: A 10-cm length of spinal cord (C3-T1) was uniformly irradiated to 30 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions and reirradiated 1 year later with a single radiosurgery dose centered within the previously irradiated segment. Radiosurgery was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter, which was positioned laterally to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. Twenty-three pigs were stratified into six dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 14.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 2), 17.1 {+-} 0.3 Gy (n = 3), 19.0 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 21.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 23.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy (n = 5), and 25.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (n = 3). The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 34% {+-} 1%, 40% {+-} 1%, 46% {+-} 3%, 52% {+-} 1%, 56 {+-} 3%, and 57% {+-} 1%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit as determined by a change in gait during a 1- year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED{sub 50}) for the maximum point dose of 19.7 Gy (95% confidence interval, 17.4-21.4). With two exceptions, histology was unremarkable in animals with normal neurologic status, while all animals with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of gray matter. Histologic comparison with a companion study of de novo irradiated animals revealed that retreatment responders had more extensive tissue damage, including infarction of gray matter, only at prescription doses >20 Gy. Conclusion: Pigs receiving spinal radiosurgery 1 year after

  7. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Single-Fraction Partial-Volume Irradiation: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. Methods and Materials: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter that was positioned lateral to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. The dose was prescribed to the 90% isodose line. A total of 26 pigs were stratified into eight dose groups of 12-47 Gy. The mean maximum spinal cord dose was 16.9 {+-} 0.1, 18.9 {+-} 0.1, 21.0 {+-} 0.1, 23.0 {+-} 0.2, and 25.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy in the 16-, 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-Gy dose groups, respectively. The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 43% {+-} 3%, 48% {+-} 4%, 51% {+-} 2%, 57% {+-} 2%, and 59% {+-} 4%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait during a 1-year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a median effective dose for the maximum dose point of 20.0 Gy (95% confidence interval, 18.3-21.7). Excellent agreement was observed between the occurrence of neurologic change and the presence of histologic change. All the minipigs with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of the gray matter. The histologic findings were unremarkable in the minipigs with normal neurologic status. Conclusions: Our results have indicated that for a dose distribution with a steep lateral gradient, the pigs had a lower median effective dose for paralysis than has been observed in rats and more closely resembles that for rats, mice, and guinea pigs receiving uniform spinal cord irradiation.

  8. Stage Separation Failure: Model Based Diagnostics and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kulikov, Igor; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Hanson, John; Hill, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Safety of the next-generation space flight vehicles requires development of an in-flight Failure Detection and Prognostic (FD&P) system. Development of such system is challenging task that involves analysis of many hard hitting engineering problems across the board. In this paper we report progress in the development of FD&P for the re-contact fault between upper stage nozzle and the inter-stage caused by the first stage and upper stage separation failure. A high-fidelity models and analytical estimations are applied to analyze the following sequence of events: (i) structural dynamics of the nozzle extension during the impact; (ii) structural stability of the deformed nozzle in the presence of the pressure and temperature loads induced by the hot gas flow during engine start up; and (iii) the fault induced thrust changes in the steady burning regime. The diagnostic is based on the measurements of the impact torque. The prognostic is based on the analysis of the correlation between the actuator signal and fault-induced changes in the nozzle structural stability and thrust.

  9. Heartbeat Model for Component Failure in Simulation of Plant Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Youngblood; R. R. Nourgaliev; D. L. Kelly; C. L. Smith; T-N. Dinh

    2011-03-01

    As part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), tools and methodology for risk-informed characterization of safety margin are being developed for use in supporting decision-making on plant life extension after the first license renewal. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize realistic probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system behavior. This way of thinking about margin comports with work done in the last 10 years. However, current capabilities to model in this way are limited: it is currently possible, but difficult, to validly simulate enough time histories to support quantification in realistic problems, and the treatment of environmental influences on reliability is relatively artificial in many existing applications. The INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability (widely referred to as “R7”) that will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin. In this paper, we show how to implement cumulative damage (“heartbeat”) models for component reliability that lend themselves naturally to being included as part of the phenomenology simulation. Implementation of this modeling approach relies on the way in which the phenomenology simulation implements its dynamic time step management. Within this approach, component failures influence the phenomenology, and the phenomenology influences the component failures.

  10. Using Runoff Hydrograph Model for Early Detecting Landslide Dam Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chompuchan, C.; Chen, W. L.; Lin, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    In mountainous areas, many studies explored that during extreme rainfall event induced landslide dams failure and consequently caused the catastrophe damage of lives and infrastructures at the downstream of the watershed. The detection of initial landslide dam formation and the estimation of its occurrence position in the upstream were essential to warn the residents and evacuate in advance. The devices currently used, such as wire sensor, geophone sensor, and infrared cameras (CCD) are classified as the post-event type sensor, which only has a shorter response time, and can just hardly satisfy the requirement which people expect from precaution system. To predict disasters earlier and increase response time, this study used the change point derived from comparing theoretical and observing runoff hydrograph. Chishan River watershed was selected as a case study. Grid Rational Algorithm for Predicting Hydrograph (GRAPH), the dynamic rainfall - runoff model, was used to calibrate watershed runoff hydrograph parameter. The landslide dams were simulated at difference distances along the river, and the runoff hydrographs were compared. Then, the rainfall data and landslide dam failure during Typhoon Morakot in August 2009 was verified the model.The result showed that, during the initial landslide dam formation, the observed accumulate and peak flow hydrograph reduced significantly in comparison with theoretical flow. This model can be applied to establish an efficient warning system for debris flow occurring precaution. In addition, this study has been improved for a longer response time by integrating traditional observation system and runoff hydrograph warning systems and can provide to the references of related authorities.

  11. Statistical modeling of corrosion-induced wirebond failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the initial results of one portion of a project to develop effective analytical tools for predicting the effect of atmospheric corrosion on the reliability of electronic devices. The specific objectives of this work were to experimentally characterize the atmospheric corrosion of aluminum-gold wirebonds and to develop a statistical-based model that describes the effect of the resulting stochastic process on the reliability of a selected electronic assembly. The experimental characterization included an attempt at accelerated aging. Modeling involved: (1) the development and validation of empirical models that describe the effects of environmental parameters on corrosion rate, and (2) the formulation and validation of a reliability-prediction model using the accelerated aging data and long-term field information as it becomes available. A preliminary assessment of the effect of three environmental factors on wirebond failure rate was performed and an empirical rate model defined. Subsequently, a statistical treatment of the rate information was used in a Monte Carlo simulation technique to determine the service life of a hypothetical electronic assembly. This work demonstrated that stochastic, corrosion-induced degradation can be successfully incorporated in classical techniques to analyze component reliability. 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Failure Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) Analyzer Model SP-1000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) subcontractor Wiltech contacted the NASA Electrical Lab (NE-L) and requested a failure analysis of a Solvent Purity Meter; model SP-IOOO produced by the VerTis Instrument Company. The meter, used to measure the contaminate in a solvent to determine the relative contamination on spacecraft flight hardware and ground servicing equipment, had been inoperable and in storage for an unknown amount of time. NE-L was asked to troubleshoot the unit and make a determination on what may be required to make the unit operational. Through the use of general troubleshooting processes and the review of a unit in service at the time of analysis, the unit was found to be repairable but would need the replacement of multiple components.

  13. Code System for the Analysis of Component Failure Data with a Compound Statistical Model.

    2000-08-22

    Version 00 Two separate but similar Fortran computer codes have been developed for the analysis of component failure data with a compound statistical model: SAFE-D and SAFE-R. The SAFE-D code (Statistical Analysis for Failure Estimation-failure-on-Demand) analyzes data which give the observed number of failures (failure to respond properly) in a specified number of demands for several similar components that should change their condition upon demand. The second program, SAFE-R (Statistical Analysis for Failure Estimation-failure Rate)more » is to be used to analyze normally operating components for which the observed number of failures in a specified operating time is given. In both these codes the failure parameter (failure probability per demand for SAFE-D or failure rate for SAFE-R) may be assumed equal for all similar components (the homogeneous failure model) or may be assumed to be a random variable distributed among similar components according to a prior distribution (the heterogeneous or compound failure model). Related information can be found at the developer's web site: http://www.mne.ksu.edu/~jks/.« less

  14. Evaluation of a Multi-Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding the response of the structural adhesives used in the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle, an extensive effort has been conducted to characterize in detail the failure properties of these adhesives. This effort involved the development of a failure model that includes the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature, and time. An understanding of the effects of these parameters on the failure of the adhesive is crucial to the understanding and prediction of the safety of the RSRM nozzle. This paper documents the use of this newly developed multi-axial, temperature, and time (MATT) dependent failure model for modeling failure for the adhesives TIGA 321, EA913NA, and EA946. The development of the mathematical failure model using constant load rate normal and shear test data is presented. Verification of the accuracy of the failure model is shown through comparisons between predictions and measured creep and multi-axial failure data. The verification indicates that the failure model performs well for a wide range of conditions (loading, temperature, and time) for the three adhesives. The failure criterion is shown to be accurate through the glass transition for the adhesive EA946. Though this failure model has been developed and evaluated with adhesives, the concepts are applicable for other isotropic materials.

  15. Enalapril protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) protect against local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study was designed to explore whether ACEIs exert cardioprotective effects in a swine model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-operated group, saline treatment group and enalapril treatment group. Thirty minutes after drug infusion, the animals in the saline and enalapril groups were subjected to ventricular fibrillation (8 min) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min). Cardiac function was monitored, and myocardial tissue and blood were collected for analysis. Enalapril pre-treatment did not improve cardiac function or the 6-h survival rate after CA and resuscitation; however, this intervention ameliorated myocardial ultrastructural damage, reduced the level of plasma cardiac troponin I and decreased myocardial apoptosis. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1–7) levels were enhanced in the model of CA and resuscitation. Enalapril reduced the plasma Ang II level at 4 and 6 h after the return of spontaneous circulation whereas enalapril did not affect the plasma Ang-(1–7) level. Enalapril pre-treatment decreased the myocardial mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Enalapril treatment also reduced the myocardial ACE/ACE2 ratio, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Enalapril pre-treatment did not affect the upregulation of ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and MAS after CA and resuscitation. Taken together, these findings suggest that enalapril protects against ischemic injury through the attenuation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis after CA and resuscitation in pigs. These results suggest the potential therapeutic value of ACEIs in patients with CA. PMID:27633002

  16. Evaluation of ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds for treatment of anaerobically digested swine slurry: Experimental optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kizito, Simon; Wu, Shubiao; Wandera, Simon Mdondo; Guo, Luchen; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of influent concentration, flow rate, and adsorbent bed depth on ammonium adsorption from anaerobically digested swine slurry using three types of biochar made from corncobs (MCB), hardwood (WB), and mixed sawdust pellets (MSB). WB performed better than the other two biochar types with a maximum sorption capacity of 67-114mg/g due to its superior surface area and larger pore volume. Ammonium adsorption kinetics and dynamics depended on the influent NH4(+)-N concentration, applied inflow flow rate, and the depth of the fixed bed. Maximum sorption capacities under influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 500mg/L, were identified to be 114.2mg/g, 108.9mg/g, and 24.7mg/g at inflow rate of 15mL/min for WB, MCB, and MSB, respectively. The data shows that using deeper beds and applying lower flow rates could be a better strategy to increase ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds. Moreover, three kinetic models (Thomas, Adams-Bohart (BDST), and Yoon-Nelson) were applied to the experimental data to predict breakthrough curves and determine characteristic adsorption parameters for process design. The applied models fitted data in the order: Thomas (R(2)=0.971)>BDST (R(2)=0.960)>Yoon-Nelson (R(2)=0.940). It was concluded that ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds could be an effective method for routine cyclic treatment of slurry. However, further effluent polishing is required to meet discharge requirements. PMID:27241205

  17. Evaluation of ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds for treatment of anaerobically digested swine slurry: Experimental optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kizito, Simon; Wu, Shubiao; Wandera, Simon Mdondo; Guo, Luchen; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of influent concentration, flow rate, and adsorbent bed depth on ammonium adsorption from anaerobically digested swine slurry using three types of biochar made from corncobs (MCB), hardwood (WB), and mixed sawdust pellets (MSB). WB performed better than the other two biochar types with a maximum sorption capacity of 67-114mg/g due to its superior surface area and larger pore volume. Ammonium adsorption kinetics and dynamics depended on the influent NH4(+)-N concentration, applied inflow flow rate, and the depth of the fixed bed. Maximum sorption capacities under influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 500mg/L, were identified to be 114.2mg/g, 108.9mg/g, and 24.7mg/g at inflow rate of 15mL/min for WB, MCB, and MSB, respectively. The data shows that using deeper beds and applying lower flow rates could be a better strategy to increase ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds. Moreover, three kinetic models (Thomas, Adams-Bohart (BDST), and Yoon-Nelson) were applied to the experimental data to predict breakthrough curves and determine characteristic adsorption parameters for process design. The applied models fitted data in the order: Thomas (R(2)=0.971)>BDST (R(2)=0.960)>Yoon-Nelson (R(2)=0.940). It was concluded that ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds could be an effective method for routine cyclic treatment of slurry. However, further effluent polishing is required to meet discharge requirements.

  18. Agent autonomy approach to probabilistic physics-of-failure modeling of complex dynamic systems with interacting failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromek, Katherine Emily

    A novel computational and inference framework of the physics-of-failure (PoF) reliability modeling for complex dynamic systems has been established in this research. The PoF-based reliability models are used to perform a real time simulation of system failure processes, so that the system level reliability modeling would constitute inferences from checking the status of component level reliability at any given time. The "agent autonomy" concept is applied as a solution method for the system-level probabilistic PoF-based (i.e. PPoF-based) modeling. This concept originated from artificial intelligence (AI) as a leading intelligent computational inference in modeling of multi agents systems (MAS). The concept of agent autonomy in the context of reliability modeling was first proposed by M. Azarkhail [1], where a fundamentally new idea of system representation by autonomous intelligent agents for the purpose of reliability modeling was introduced. Contribution of the current work lies in the further development of the agent anatomy concept, particularly the refined agent classification within the scope of the PoF-based system reliability modeling, new approaches to the learning and the autonomy properties of the intelligent agents, and modeling interacting failure mechanisms within the dynamic engineering system. The autonomous property of intelligent agents is defined as agent's ability to self-activate, deactivate or completely redefine their role in the analysis. This property of agents and the ability to model interacting failure mechanisms of the system elements makes the agent autonomy fundamentally different from all existing methods of probabilistic PoF-based reliability modeling. 1. Azarkhail, M., "Agent Autonomy Approach to Physics-Based Reliability Modeling of Structures and Mechanical Systems", PhD thesis, University of Maryland, College Park, 2007.

  19. Numerical investigations of rib fracture failure models in different dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Jikuang; Miller, Karol; Li, Guibing; Joldes, Grand R; Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rib fracture is one of the most common thoracic injuries in vehicle traffic accidents that can result in fatalities associated with seriously injured internal organs. A failure model is critical when modelling rib fracture to predict such injuries. Different rib failure models have been proposed in prediction of thorax injuries. However, the biofidelity of the fracture failure models when varying the loading conditions and the effects of a rib fracture failure model on prediction of thoracic injuries have been studied only to a limited extent. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three rib failure models on prediction of thoracic injuries using a previously validated finite element model of the human thorax. The performance and biofidelity of each rib failure model were first evaluated by modelling rib responses to different loading conditions in two experimental configurations: (1) the three-point bending on the specimen taken from rib and (2) the anterior-posterior dynamic loading to an entire bony part of the rib. Furthermore, the simulation of the rib failure behaviour in the frontal impact to an entire thorax was conducted at varying velocities and the effects of the failure models were analysed with respect to the severity of rib cage damages. Simulation results demonstrated that the responses of the thorax model are similar to the general trends of the rib fracture responses reported in the experimental literature. However, they also indicated that the accuracy of the rib fracture prediction using a given failure model varies for different loading conditions.

  20. A Dynamic Approach to Modeling Dependence Between Human Failure Events

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-09-01

    In practice, most HRA methods use direct dependence from THERP—the notion that error be- gets error, and one human failure event (HFE) may increase the likelihood of subsequent HFEs. In this paper, we approach dependence from a simulation perspective in which the effects of human errors are dynamically modeled. There are three key concepts that play into this modeling: (1) Errors are driven by performance shaping factors (PSFs). In this context, the error propagation is not a result of the presence of an HFE yielding overall increases in subsequent HFEs. Rather, it is shared PSFs that cause dependence. (2) PSFs have qualities of lag and latency. These two qualities are not currently considered in HRA methods that use PSFs. Yet, to model the effects of PSFs, it is not simply a matter of identifying the discrete effects of a particular PSF on performance. The effects of PSFs must be considered temporally, as the PSFs will have a range of effects across the event sequence. (3) Finally, there is the concept of error spilling. When PSFs are activated, they not only have temporal effects but also lateral effects on other PSFs, leading to emergent errors. This paper presents the framework for tying together these dynamic dependence concepts.

  1. Transmission parameters estimated for Salmonella typhimurium in swine using susceptible-infectious-resistant models and a Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transmission models can aid understanding of disease dynamics and are useful in testing the efficiency of control measures. The aim of this study was to formulate an appropriate stochastic Susceptible-Infectious-Resistant/Carrier (SIR) model for Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs and thus estimate the transmission parameters between states. Results The transmission parameters were estimated using data from a longitudinal study of three Danish farrow-to-finish pig herds known to be infected. A Bayesian model framework was proposed, which comprised Binomial components for the transition from susceptible to infectious and from infectious to carrier; and a Poisson component for carrier to infectious. Cohort random effects were incorporated into these models to allow for unobserved cohort-specific variables as well as unobserved sources of transmission, thus enabling a more realistic estimation of the transmission parameters. In the case of the transition from susceptible to infectious, the cohort random effects were also time varying. The number of infectious pigs not detected by the parallel testing was treated as unknown, and the probability of non-detection was estimated using information about the sensitivity and specificity of the bacteriological and serological tests. The estimate of the transmission rate from susceptible to infectious was 0.33 [0.06, 1.52], from infectious to carrier was 0.18 [0.14, 0.23] and from carrier to infectious was 0.01 [0.0001, 0.04]. The estimate for the basic reproduction ration (R 0 ) was 1.91 [0.78, 5.24]. The probability of non-detection was estimated to be 0.18 [0.12, 0.25]. Conclusions The proposed framework for stochastic SIR models was successfully implemented to estimate transmission rate parameters for Salmonella Typhimurium in swine field data. R 0 was 1.91, implying that there was dissemination of the infection within pigs of the same cohort. There was significant temporal-cohort variability, especially at the

  2. A Modified Collagen Gel Enhances Healing Outcome in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model of Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; DasGhatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action in a wound setting in vivo is scanty. This work providesfirst results from a pre-clinical swine model of excisional wounds elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days post-wounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophages recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced MCP-1 expression in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG treated wound tissue displayed elevated VEGF expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson’s Trichrome and Picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a pre-clinical experimental setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms as compared to standard of care i.e., Tegadem treated wounds. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other modified or unmodified collagen based products used in clinical setting. PMID:23607796

  3. A Modified Collagen Gel Dressing Promotes Angiogenesis in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model of Chronic Ischemic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Ganesh, Kasturi; Dickerson, Jennifer; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Ghatak, Piya Das; Dixit, Sriteja; Bergdall, Valerie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    We recently performed proteomic characterization of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing and reported promising effects of the gel in healing full-thickness excisional wounds. In this work, we test the translational relevance of our aforesaid findings by testing the dressing in a swine model of chronic ischemic wounds recently reported by our laboratory. Full thickness excisional wounds were established in the center of bi- pedicle ischemic skin flaps on the backs of animals. Ischemia was verified by Laser Doppler imaging and MCG was applied to the test group of wounds. Seven days post- wounding, macrophage recruitment to the wound was significantly higher in MCG- treated ischemic wounds. In vitro, MCG up-regulated expression of Mrc-1 (a reparative M2 macrophage marker) and induced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and of β-FGF. An increased expression of CCR2, a M2 macrophage marker, was noted in the macrophages from MCG treated wounds. Furthermore, analyses of wound tissues 7 days post wounding showed up-regulation of TGF-β, VEGF, vWF, and collagen type I expression in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. At 21 days post-wounding, MCG-treated ischemic wounds displayed higher abundance of proliferating endothelial cells that formed mature vascular structures and increased blood flow to the wound. Fibroblast count was markedly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wound-edge tissue. In addition, MCG-treated wound-edge tissues displayed higher abundance of mature collagen with increased collagen type I:III deposition. Taken together, MCG helped mount a more robust inflammatory response which resolved in a timely manner, followed by an enhanced proliferative phase, angiogenic outcome and post-wound tissue remodeling. Findings of the current study warrant clinical testing of MCG in a setting of ischemic chronic wounds. PMID:25224310

  4. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Olson, Aaron K; Isern, Nancy G; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1) as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon ((13)C)-labeled substrates ([2-(13)C]lactate, [5,6,7-(13)C3]heptanoate, and [U-(13)C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the (13)C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate. PMID:26232235

  5. Improved bleeding scores using Gelfoam(®) Powder with incremental concentrations of bovine thrombin in a swine liver lesion model.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Silva, Elif; Bartrom, Jolee; Young, Kelli; Bass, Eric J; Potter, David; Bieber, Trevor

    2016-10-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used intra-operatively to prevent uncontrolled bleeding. Gelfoam(®) Powder contains a hemostatic agent prepared from purified pork skin gelatin, the efficacy of which is increased when combined with thrombin. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of thrombin on resultant hemostasis is not known. This study sought to evaluate the ability of various concentrations of thrombin in combination with Gelfoam Powder to control bleeding using a swine liver lesion model. Ten pigs underwent a midline laparotomy. Circular lesions were created in the left medial, right medial, and left lateral lobes; six lesions per lobe. Gelfoam Powder was hydrated with Thrombin-JMI(®) diluted to 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL. Each concentration was applied to two lesion sites per lobe. Bleeding scores were measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 min using a 6-point system; comparison of bleeding scores was performed using ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey test. The bleeding scores with thrombin concentrations at 770 IU/mL were significantly lower than at 250 and 375 IU/mL at all four time points. The percentage of biopsies with a clinically acceptable bleeding score rose from 37.9, 46.6, and 71.2 % at 3 min to 55.2, 69.0, and 88.1 % at 12 min in the 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL thrombin groups, respectively. The study showed that the hemostatic response to thrombin was dose-related: using higher concentrations of thrombin with Gelfoam Powder yielded improved hemostasis, as determined by lower bleeding scores. PMID:27334382

  6. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M; Harding, John C S

    2013-04-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research.

  7. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Olson, Aaron K; Isern, Nancy G; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1) as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon ((13)C)-labeled substrates ([2-(13)C]lactate, [5,6,7-(13)C3]heptanoate, and [U-(13)C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the (13)C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate.

  8. Differential Effects Of Octanoate And Heptanoate On Myocardial Metabolism During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation In An Infant Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Oddnumbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant betaoxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Methods: Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-hour ECMO were received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA) or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol/kg body wt/min as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5 per group). The 13-Carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 minutes before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]/[ADP] ratio compared with other http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpen Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition For Peer Review groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC as well as heptanoate. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in fractional protein synthesis rate. Conclusion: Octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate, while preserving protein synthesis.

  9. Intracoronary Delivery of Human Mesenchymal/Stromal Stem Cells: Insights from Coronary Microcirculation Invasive Assessment in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fiarresga, António; Mata, Márcia F.; Cavaco-Gonçalves, Sandra; Selas, Mafalda; Simões, Irina N.; Oliveira, Eunice; Carrapiço, Belmira; Cardim, Nuno; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; da Silva, Cláudia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have unique properties favorable to their use in clinical practice and have been studied for cardiac repair. However, these cells are larger than coronary microvessels and there is controversy about the risk of embolization and microinfarctions, which could jeopardize the safety and efficacy of intracoronary route for their delivery. The index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) is an invasive method for quantitatively assessing the coronary microcirculation status. Objectives To examine heart microcirculation after intracoronary injection of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with the index of microcirculatory resistance. Methods Healthy swine were randomized to receive by intracoronary route either 30x106 MSC or the same solution with no cells (1% human albumin/PBS) (placebo). Blinded operators took coronary pressure and flow measurements, prior to intracoronary infusion and at 5 and 30 minutes post-delivery. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) and the IMR were compared between groups. Results CFR and IMR were done with a variance within the 3 transit time measurements of 6% at rest and 11% at maximal hyperemia. After intracoronary infusion there were no significant differences in CFR. The IMR was significantly higher in MSC-injected animals (at 30 minutes, 14.2U vs. 8.8U, p = 0.02) and intragroup analysis showed a significant increase of 112% from baseline to 30 minutes after cell infusion, although no electrocardiographic changes or clinical deterioration were noted. Conclusion Overall, this study provides definitive evidence of microcirculatory disruption upon intracoronary administration of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, in a large animal model closely resembling human cardiac physiology, function and anatomy. PMID:26479722

  10. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M.; Harding, John C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research. PMID:24082397

  11. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-09-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models show a strong dependence on the level of hydrostatic tension. Even though the reason for this pressure dependence is different in the two models, as the shear-extended Gurson model does not describe voids flattening out and the associated failure mechanism by micro-cracks interacting with neighbouring micro-cracks, it is shown that the trends of the predictions are in good agreement.

  12. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  13. An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Richard A; Ling, Geoffrey; Tong, Lawrence; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Agoston, Dennis; Delanerolle, Nihal; Kim, Young; Ritzel, Dave; Bell, Randy; Ecklund, James; Armonda, Rocco; Bandak, Faris; Parks, Steven

    2009-06-01

    Explosive blast has been extensively used as a tactical weapon in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and more recently in Operation Enduring Freedom(OEF). The polytraumatic nature of blast injuries is evidence of their effectiveness,and brain injury is a frequent and debilitating form of this trauma. In-theater clinical observations of brain-injured casualties have shown that edema, intracranial hemorrhage, and vasospasm are the most salient pathophysiological characteristics of blast injury to the brain. Unfortunately, little is known about exactly how an explosion produces these sequelae as well as others that are less well documented. Consequently, the principal objective of the current report is to present a swine model of explosive blast injury to the brain. This model was developed during Phase I of the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) PREVENT (Preventing Violent Explosive Neurotrauma) blast research program. A second objective is to present data that illustrate the capabilities of this model to study the proximal biomechanical causes and the resulting pathophysiological, biochemical,neuropathological, and neurological consequences of explosive blast injury to the swine brain. In the concluding section of this article, the advantages and limitations of the model are considered, explosive and air-overpressure models are compared, and the physical properties of an explosion are identified that potentially contributed to the in-theater closed head injuries resulting from explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

  14. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  15. Life Prediction and Classification of Failure Modes in Solid State Luminaires Using Bayesian Probabilistic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Sakalaukus, Peter

    2014-05-27

    A new method has been developed for assessment of the onset of degradation in solid state luminaires to classify failure mechanisms by using metrics beyond lumen degradation that are currently used for identification of failure. Luminous Flux output, Correlated Color Temperature Data on Philips LED Lamps has been gathered under 85°C/85%RH till lamp failure. The acquired data has been used in conjunction with Bayesian Probabilistic Models to identify luminaires with onset of degradation much prior to failure through identification of decision boundaries between lamps with accrued damage and lamps beyond the failure threshold in the feature space. In addition luminaires with different failure modes have been classified separately from healthy pristine luminaires. It is expected that, the new test technique will allow the development of failure distributions without testing till L70 life for the manifestation of failure.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica Swine Isolate KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Bayles, Darrell O; Register, Karen B; Kingsley, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22. PMID:25013141

  17. Draft genome sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22....

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica Swine Isolate KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Bayles, Darrell O; Register, Karen B; Kingsley, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22.

  19. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  20. A robust Bayesian approach to modeling epistemic uncertainty in common-cause failure models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias C. M. Troffaes; Gero Walter; Dana Kelly

    2014-05-01

    In a standard Bayesian approach to the alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, a precise Dirichlet prior distribution models epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. This Dirichlet prior is then updated with observed data to obtain a posterior distribution, which forms the basis for further inferences. In this paper, we adapt the imprecise Dirichlet model of Walley to represent epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. In this approach, epistemic uncertainty is expressed more cautiously via lower and upper expectations for each alpha-factor, along with a learning parameter which determines how quickly the model learns from observed data. For this application, we focus on elicitation of the learning parameter, and find that values in the range of 1 to 10 seem reasonable. The approach is compared with Kelly and Atwood's minimally informative Dirichlet prior for the alpha-factor model, which incorporated precise mean values for the alpha-factors, but which was otherwise quite diffuse. Next, we explore the use of a set of Gamma priors to model epistemic uncertainty in the marginal failure rate, expressed via a lower and upper expectation for this rate, again along with a learning parameter. As zero counts are generally less of an issue here, we find that the choice of this learning parameter is less crucial. Finally, we demonstrate how both epistemic uncertainty models can be combined to arrive at lower and upper expectations for all common-cause failure rates. Thereby, we effectively provide a full sensitivity analysis of common-cause failure rates, properly reflecting epistemic uncertainty of the analyst on all levels of the common-cause failure model.

  1. Investigation of rainfall infiltration and slope failure using numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Chang, K.; Wen, J.

    2012-12-01

    This research simulated the real condition of the rain period at Ping Ding Village, Yunlin, Taiwan using FEMWATER and STABLE PRO in order to investigate the effects of infiltration on landslide behavior. We established a three-dimensional numerical groundwater model (FEMWATER) to simulate water infiltration and flow during the rain period in Ping Ding Village, estimated water content of the soil layer, and used STABLEPRO to analysis the stability of the slope. The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of infiltration on the slope instability. According to the results of sensitivity analysis, we found the pressure head of Layer-2 was affected by every parameter discussed in this research. And the affect from the Layer-1 and the Layer-3 also played an important role on pressure head of the Layer-2. According to the numerical simulation of rainfall infiltration, the simulation result on the borehole BH02 was satisfied (L1=0.013, L2=0.021, COR=0.997). The result of slope stability analysis showed that the B-B' profile had lower safety factor (0.989) which indicated higher potential of slope failure. The history records also sustained the result of our study. However, the A-A' profile had higher safety (1.142) factor than B-B' profile.

  2. Ureteral Obstruction Swine Model through Laparoscopy and Single Port for Training on Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Güemes Martín-Portugués, Idoia; Hernández-Hurtado, Laura; Usón-Casaús, Jesús; Sánchez-Hurtado, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2013-01-01

    This study aims firstly to assess the most adequate surgical approach for the creation of an ureteropelvic juntion obstruction (UPJO) animal model, and secondly to validate this model for laparoscopic pyeloplasty training among urologists. Thirty six Large White pigs (28.29±5.48 Kg) were used. The left ureteropelvic junction was occluded by means of an endoclip. According to the surgical approach for model creation, pigs were randomized into: laparoscopic conventional surgery (LAP) or single port surgery (LSP). Each group was further divided into transperitoneal (+T) or retroperitoneal (+R) approach. Time needed for access, surgical field preparation, wound closure, and total surgical times were registered. Social behavior, tenderness to the touch and wound inflammation were evaluated in the early postoperative period. After ten days, all animals underwent an Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty carried out by 9 urologists, who subsequently assessed the model by means of a subjective validation questionnaire. Total operative time was significantly greater in LSP+R (p=0.001). Tenderness to the touch was significantly increased in both retroperitoneal approaches, (p=0.0001). Surgeons rated the UPJO porcine model for training on laparoscopic pyeloplasty with high or very high scores, all above 4 on a 1-5 point Likert scale. Our UPJO animal model is useful for laparoscopic pyeloplasty training. The model created by retroperitoneal single port approach presented the best score in the subjective evaluation, whereas, as a whole, transabdominal laparoscopic approach was preferred. PMID:23801892

  3. Minimally Invasive Swine Experimental Model for the In Vivo Study of Liver Metabolism of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, O; Romano, R; Scarpati, G; Esposito, C; Cavaglià, E; Corona, M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop a clinically relevant porcine model for the study of hepatic metabolism of drugs by means of hepatic vein catheterization. Materials and Methods: review of literature and elaboration of a hypothesis, design of an experimental method. Results: recent clinical studies were conducted by withdrawing cirrhotic patients’ blood from right hepatic vein during hepatic vein pressure gradient measurements. Basing on our personal clinical experience and evaluation of research needs, an experimental model is proposed. Conclusions: contemporary measurement of peripheral and hepatic concentration of drugs by peripheral vein and hepatic vein catheterization can be used to create a reliable and reproducible porcine model to study liver metabolism of drugs in vivo. PMID:23905064

  4. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling for failure in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Russell K.

    It is generally regarded to be a difficult task to model multiple fractures leading to fragmentation in metals subjected to high strain rates using numerical methods. Meshless methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) are well suited to the application of fracture mechanics, since they are not prone to the problems associated with mesh tangling. This research demonstrates and validates a numerical inter-particle fracture model for the initiation, growth and subsequent failure in metals at high strain rate, applicable within a Total Lagrangian SPH scheme. Total Lagrangian SPH performs calculations in the reference state of a material and therefore the neighbourhoods remain fixed throughout the computation; this allows the inter-particle bonds to be stored and tracked as material history parameters. Swegle (2000) showed that the SPH momentum equation can be rearranged in terms of a particle-particle interaction area. By reducing this area to zero via an inter-particle damage parameter, the principles of continuum damage mechanics can be observed without the need for an effective stress term, held at the individual particles.. This research makes use of the Cochran-Banner damage growth model which has been updated for 3D damage and makes the appropriate modifications for inter-particle damage growth. The fracture model was tested on simulations of a 1D flyer plate impact test and the results were compared to experimental data. Some limited modelling was also conducted in 2 and 3 dimensions and promising results were observed. Research was also performed into the mesh sensitivity of the explosively driven Mock- Holt experiment. 3D simulations using the Eulerian SPH formulation were conducted and the best results were observed with a radial packing arrangement. An in-depth assessment of the Monaghan repulsive force correction was also conducted in attempt to eliminate the presence of the SPH tensile instability and stabilise the available Eulerian SPH code

  5. Is Embolization of the Pancreas Safe? Pancreatic Histological Changes after Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Takahashi, Takuya; Izaki, Kenta; Uotani, Kensuke; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in a swine model in terms of histological changes in the pancreas. Methods: Three groups of two female swine (58-64 kg) per group underwent TAE of the dorsal pancreatic artery, under anesthesia, with 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. Blood parameters were evaluated at days 1, 4, and 10 after TAE, after which the animals were sacrificed and pancreatic tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results: All of the animals were asymptomatic and survived for 10 days. Cone beam computed tomographic angiography revealed occlusion of the dorsal pancreatic artery and no enhancement in the embolized area. The white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level were elevated slightly on day 1 after TAE (mean {+-} SD: 252.7 {+-} 27.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2}/{mu}l and 0.15 {+-} 0.07 mg/l, respectively), but they normalized or remained near the upper normal limit thereafter. The serum amylase and lipase levels also were elevated on day 1 (8831.7 {+-} 2169.2 U/l and 130 {+-} 53.4 U/l, respectively) but normalized thereafter. Histologically, necrosis and fibrosis were noted only in the embolized segment, and necrosis and acute inflammatory reactions were absent in the nonembolized segment. The border between both segments was well defined. Lymphocytic infiltration and foreign body reaction were noted around the embolized vessels. Conclusions: Selective TAE with NBCA in the pancreas caused localized ischemic necrosis without clinically significant pancreatitis; therefore, this procedure is tolerable in swine.

  6. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  7. Improved Patency of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: The Efficacy of Cilostazol for the Prevention of Pseudointimal Hyperplasia in Swine TIPS Models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Woo Cha, In Ho; Kim, Chul Hwan; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee; Hong, Suk Joo; Lee, In Sik

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of oral administration of cilostazol to inhibit pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models. Methods. Successful TIPS creation was carried out in 11 of 12 healthy young pigs (20-25 kg). In the treatment group (n = 6), both cilostazol and aspirin were administered daily, from the first day of TIPS creation. The control group (n = 5) was administered only aspirin. The animals were followed-up for 2 weeks and then killed. The specimen (including portal vein, hepatic parenchymal tract, hepatic vein, and inferior vena cava) and stents were carefully bisected in a longitudinal fashion. The control group was compared with the treatment group by means of a gross and histologic evaluation of the degree of pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in the shunt. Results. At the gross evaluation, the control group showed considerably more pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia than the treatment group. Using microscopic evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the mean maximum pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia thickness between the control group (2.97 {+-} 0.33 mm) and treatment group (0.73 {+-} 0.27 mm). Conclusion. Oral administration of cilostazol may have been effective in reducing pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models.

  8. New reassortant and enzootic European swine influenza viruses transmit efficiently through direct contact in the ferret model

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Thomas P.; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Hansen, Mette Sif; Webby, Richard J.; Larsen, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    The reverse zoonotic events that introduced the 2009 pandemic influenza virus into pigs have drastically increased the diversity of swine influenza viruses in Europe. The pandemic potential of these novel reassortments is still unclear, necessitating enhanced surveillance of European pigs with additional focus on risk assessment of these new viruses. In this study, four European swine influenza viruses were assessed for their zoonotic potential. Two of the four viruses were enzootic viruses of subtype H1N2 (with avian-like H1) and H3N2, and two were new reassortants, one with avian-like H1 and human-like N2 and one with 2009 pandemic H1 and swine-like N2. All viruses replicated to high titres in nasal wash and nasal turbinate samples from inoculated ferrets and transmitted efficiently by direct contact. Only the H3N2 virus transmitted to naïve ferrets via the airborne route. Growth kinetics using a differentiated human bronchial epithelial cell line showed that all four viruses were able to replicate to high titres. Further, the viruses revealed preferential binding to the 2,6-α-silalylated glycans and investigation of the antiviral susceptibility of the viruses revealed that all were sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. These findings suggested that these viruses have the potential to infect humans and further underline the need for continued surveillance as well as biological characterization of new influenza A viruses. PMID:25701826

  9. New reassortant and enzootic European swine influenza viruses transmit efficiently through direct contact in the ferret model.

    PubMed

    Fobian, Kristina; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Hansen, Mette Sif; Webby, Richard J; Larsen, Lars E

    2015-07-01

    The reverse zoonotic events that introduced the 2009 pandemic influenza virus into pigs have drastically increased the diversity of swine influenza viruses in Europe. The pandemic potential of these novel reassortments is still unclear, necessitating enhanced surveillance of European pigs with additional focus on risk assessment of these new viruses. In this study, four European swine influenza viruses were assessed for their zoonotic potential. Two of the four viruses were enzootic viruses of subtype H1N2 (with avian-like H1) and H3N2, and two were new reassortants, one with avian-like H1 and human-like N2 and one with 2009 pandemic H1 and swine-like N2. All viruses replicated to high titres in nasal wash and nasal turbinate samples from inoculated ferrets and transmitted efficiently by direct contact. Only the H3N2 virus transmitted to naïve ferrets via the airborne route. Growth kinetics using a differentiated human bronchial epithelial cell line showed that all four viruses were able to replicate to high titres. Further, the viruses revealed preferential binding to the 2,6-α-silalylated glycans and investigation of the antiviral susceptibility of the viruses revealed that all were sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. These findings suggested that these viruses have the potential to infect humans and further underline the need for continued surveillance as well as biological characterization of new influenza A viruses.

  10. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  11. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  12. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  13. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  14. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  15. Myocardial Drug Distribution Generated from Local Epicardial Application: Potential Impact of Cardiac Capillary Perfusion in a Swine Model Using Epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Wei, Abraham E.; Wakim, Matthew G.; Murray, Michael R.; Tsukada, Hisashi; Gerogiannis, Iraklis S.; Groothuis, Adam; Lovich, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies in small mammals have shown that local epicardial application of inotropic compounds drives myocardial contractility without systemic side effects. Myocardial capillary blood flow, however, may be more significant in larger species than in small animals. We hypothesized that bulk perfusion in capillary beds of the large mammalian heart enhances drug distribution after local release, but also clears more drug from the tissue target than in small animals. Epicardial (EC) drug releasing systems were used to apply epinephrine to the anterior surface of the left heart of swine in either point-sourced or distributed configurations. Following local application or intravenous (IV) infusion at the same dose rates, hemodynamic responses, epinephrine levels in the coronary sinus and systemic circulation, and drug deposition across the ventricular wall, around the circumference and down the axis, were measured. EC delivery via point-source release generated transmural epinephrine gradients directly beneath the site of application extending into the middle third of the myocardial thickness. Gradients in drug deposition were also observed down the length of the heart and around the circumference toward the lateral wall, but not the interventricular septum. These gradients extended further than might be predicted from simple diffusion. The circumferential distribution following local epinephrine delivery from a distributed source to the entire anterior wall drove drug toward the inferior wall, further than with point-source release, but again, not to the septum. This augmented drug distribution away from the release source, down the axis of the left ventricle, and selectively towards the left heart follows the direction of capillary perfusion away from the anterior descending and circumflex arteries, suggesting a role for the coronary circulation in determining local drug deposition and clearance. The dominant role of the coronary vasculature is further suggested by

  16. Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Luchun; Palanisami, Thavamani; Liu, Yanju; Dong, Zhaomin; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Kuchel, Tim; Semple, Kirk T; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    Oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was studied in a swine model using eight spiked soil samples after incubation for 50 and/or 90 days. Silica sand was used as a reference material and the relative bioavailability (RB) of B[a]P in soils was calculated as the quotient of the area under the plasma B[a]P curve (AUC) for soil and AUC for the silica sand. Significantly reduced RB was observed in all study soils after 90 days ageing, ranging from 22.1±0.4% to 62.7±10.1%, except for one very sandy soil (sand content 87.6%) where RB was unchanged (108.1±8.0%). Apart from this, bioavailability decreased during ageing with the decrease (from day 50 to day 90) being only significant for a clayey soil containing expandable clay minerals. Statistical analyses of B[a]P RB at day 90 (eight soils) and soil properties showed no direct correlation between RB and specific soil properties such as total organic carbon (TOC) and clay content which were commonly linked to organic contaminant sequestration. However, strongly significant relationships (p<0.001) were found between RB and the fine particle associated carbon (FPAC) defined as (Silt+Clay)/TOC, and between RB and the soil mesopore (<6nm; p<0.001) fraction, after two samples with high pH and high EC being excluded from the analyses. The bioaccessibility estimated by four in vitro extraction methods: dichloromethane/acetone sonication (DCM/Ace), butanol vortex (BuOH), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin extraction (HPCD) and Milli Q water leaching methods at different sampling time (1 day, 50 days and 90 days after spiking) also showed a decreasing trend. Significant correlations were found between B[a]P RB and DCM/Ace (R(2)=0.67, p<0.05) extractable fraction and BuOH (R(2)=0.75, p<0.01) extractable fraction. PMID:24937044

  17. Heterogeneous Microinfarcts Caused by Coronary Microemboli: Evaluation with Multidetector CT and MR Imaging in a Swine Model1

    PubMed Central

    Saloner, David; Martin, Alastair J.; Ursell, Philip C.; Saeed, Maythem

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the sensitivity of 64-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) with that of 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction and measurement of heterogeneous 7–8-week-old microinfarcts and the quantification of regional left ventricular (LV) function and perfusion in the territory of coronary intervention in a swine model. Materials and Methods: Approval was obtained from the institutional animal committee. An x-ray/MR system was used to catheterize the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery with x-ray guidance and to delineate the perfusion territory. The vessel was selectively microembolized in six pigs with small-diameter embolic material (40–120 µm, 250000 count). At 7–8 weeks after microembolization, multidetector CT and MR imaging were used to assess LV function, first-pass perfusion, and delayed contrast enhancement in remote myocardium and microinfarct scars. Histochemical staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) was used to confirm and quantify heterogeneous microinfarct scars. The two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to detect differences between modalities and myocardial regions. Results: The LAD territory was 32.4% ± 3.8(stadard error of the mean) of the LV mass. Multidetector CT and MR imaging have similar sensitivity in the detection of regional and global LV dysfunction and extent of microinfarct. The mean LV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were 93 mL ± 8, 46 mL ± 4, and 50% ± 3, respectively, on multidetector CT images and 92 mL ± 8, 48 mL ± 5, and 48% ± 3, respectively, on MR images (P ≥ .05). The extent of heterogeneous microinfarct was not significantly different between multidetector CT (6.3% ± 0.8 of the LV mass), MR imaging (6.6% ± 0.5 of the LV mass), and TTC staining (7.0% ± 0.6 of the LV mass). First-pass multidetector CT and MR imaging demonstrated significant regional differences (P < .05) in time to peak between the

  18. Predictive modelling of fatigue failure in concentrated lubricated contacts.

    PubMed

    Evans, H P; Snidle, R W; Sharif, K J; Bryant, M J

    2012-01-01

    Reducing frictional losses in response to the energy agenda will require use of less viscous lubricants causing hydrodynamically-lubricated bearings to operate with thinner films leading to "mixed lubrication" conditions in which a degree of direct interaction occurs between surfaces protected only by boundary tribofilms. The paper considers the consequences of thinner films and mixed lubrication for concentrated contacts such as those occurring between the teeth of power transmission gears and in rolling element bearings. Surface fatigue in gears remains a serious problem in demanding applications, and its solution will become more pressing with the tendency towards thinner oils. The particular form of failure examined here is micropitting, which is identified as a fatigue phenomenon occurring at the scale of the surface roughness asperities. It has emerged recently as a systemic difficulty in the operation of large scale wind turbines where it occurs in both power transmission gears and their support bearings. Predictive physical modelling of these contacts requires a transient mixed lubrication analysis for conditions in which the predicted lubricant film thickness is of the same order or significantly less than the height of surface roughness features. Numerical solvers have therefore been developed which are able to deal with situations in which transient solid contacts occur between surface asperity features under realistic engineering conditions. Results of the analysis, which reveal the detailed time-varying behaviour of pressure and film clearance, have been used to predict fatigue and damage accumulation at the scale of surface asperity features with the aim of improving understanding of the micropitting phenomenon. The possible consequences on fatigue of residual stress fields resulting from plastic deformation of surface asperities is also considered.

  19. Predictive modelling of fatigue failure in concentrated lubricated contacts.

    PubMed

    Evans, H P; Snidle, R W; Sharif, K J; Bryant, M J

    2012-01-01

    Reducing frictional losses in response to the energy agenda will require use of less viscous lubricants causing hydrodynamically-lubricated bearings to operate with thinner films leading to "mixed lubrication" conditions in which a degree of direct interaction occurs between surfaces protected only by boundary tribofilms. The paper considers the consequences of thinner films and mixed lubrication for concentrated contacts such as those occurring between the teeth of power transmission gears and in rolling element bearings. Surface fatigue in gears remains a serious problem in demanding applications, and its solution will become more pressing with the tendency towards thinner oils. The particular form of failure examined here is micropitting, which is identified as a fatigue phenomenon occurring at the scale of the surface roughness asperities. It has emerged recently as a systemic difficulty in the operation of large scale wind turbines where it occurs in both power transmission gears and their support bearings. Predictive physical modelling of these contacts requires a transient mixed lubrication analysis for conditions in which the predicted lubricant film thickness is of the same order or significantly less than the height of surface roughness features. Numerical solvers have therefore been developed which are able to deal with situations in which transient solid contacts occur between surface asperity features under realistic engineering conditions. Results of the analysis, which reveal the detailed time-varying behaviour of pressure and film clearance, have been used to predict fatigue and damage accumulation at the scale of surface asperity features with the aim of improving understanding of the micropitting phenomenon. The possible consequences on fatigue of residual stress fields resulting from plastic deformation of surface asperities is also considered. PMID:23285624

  20. A Leasing Model to Deal with Partial Failures in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Boix, Elisa; van Cutsem, Tom; Vallejos, Jorge; de Meuter, Wolfgang; D'Hondt, Theo

    In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) many partial failures are the result of temporary network partitions due to the intermittent connectivity of mobile devices. Some of these failures will be permanent and require application-level failure handling. However, it is impossible to distinguish a permanent from a transient failure. Leasing provides a solution to this problem based on the temporal restriction of resources. But to date no leasing model has been designed specifically for MANETs. In this paper, we identify three characteristics required for a leasing model to be usable in a MANET, discuss the issues with existing leasing models and then propose the leased object references model, which integrates leasing with remote object references. In addition, we describe an implementation of the model in the programming language AmbientTalk. Leased object references provide an extensible framework that allows programmers to express their own leasing patterns and enables both lease holders (clients) and lease grantors (services) to deal with permanent failures.

  1. Evolution of Coronary Flow in an Experimental Slow Flow Model in Swines: Angiographic and Pathological Insights

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yupeng; Hu, Liqun; Yu, Delong; Peng, Sheng; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Mingjing; Gu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Pathomechanism of coronary slow flow phenomenon remains largely unclear now. Present study observed the pathological and angiographic evolution in a pig model of coronary slow flow. Methods. Coronary slow flow was induced by repeat coronary injection of small doses of 40 µm microspheres in 18 male domestic pigs and angiographic and pathological changes were determined at 3 hours, 7 days, and 28 days after microspheres injection. Results. Compared to control group treated with coronary saline injection (n = 6) and baseline level, coronary flow was significantly reduced at 3 hours and 7 days but completely recovered at 28 days after coronary microsphere injection in slow flow group. Despite normal coronary flow at 28 days after microsphere injection, enhanced myocardial cytokine expression, left ventricular dysfunction, adverse remodelling, and ischemia/microembolism related pathological changes still persisted or even progressed from 3 hours to 28 days after coronary microsphere injection. Conclusions. Our results show that this large animal slow flow model could partly reflect the chronic angiographic, hemodynamic, and pathological changes of coronary slow flow and could be used to test new therapy strategies against the slow flow phenomenon. PMID:26539516

  2. Multiscale Model Predicts Tissue-Level Failure From Collagen Fiber-Level Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Mohammad F.; Sander, Edward A.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive tissue-level forces communicated to the microstructure and extracellular matrix of soft tissues can lead to damage and failure through poorly understood physical processes that are multiscale in nature. In this work, we propose a multiscale mechanical model for the failure of collagenous soft tissues that incorporates spatial heterogeneity in the microstructure and links the failure of discrete collagen fibers to the material response of the tissue. The model, which is based on experimental failure data derived from different collagen gel geometries, was able to predict the mechanical response and failure of type I collagen gels, and it demonstrated that a fiber-based rule (at the micrometer scale) for discrete failure can strongly shape the macroscale failure response of the gel (at the millimeter scale). The model may be a useful tool in predicting the macroscale failure conditions for soft tissues and engineered tissue analogs. In addition, the multiscale model provides a framework for the study of failure in complex fiber-based mechanical systems in general. PMID:22938372

  3. Participation of senior citizens in the swine flu inoculation program: an analysis of Health Belief Model variables in preventive health behavior.

    PubMed

    Aho, W R

    1979-03-01

    Evidence is presented of statistically significant and strong relationships between Swine Flu Inoculation status and nine variables in the reformulated Health Belief Model with 122 randomly selected subjects, primarily Black and Portuguese-American, who are active members of two Providence, Rhode Island senior centers. No statistically significant relationship was discovered between inoculation status and previously having had the flu. The variables which were found related are: Efficacy, Safety, Knowledge of Side Effects, Prior Flu Shot Status, Proportion of Friends and Relatives Who Got the Shot, Sex, Race, Future Plans for Flu Shots, and Future Plans for Other Inoculations. The data were obtained through personal interviews in the Spring of 1977. It is suggested that the results provide some basis for optimism for successful intervention designed to change the future preventive health behaviors of nonparticipants in the Swine Flu Inoculation Program. Many nonparticipants had fears and doubts about the effectiveness and safety of the shot and are amendable to suggestions from physicians about future inoculation participation. Full information should be provided to high-risk groups such as senior citizens about the relative risks of suffering serious side effects, the effectiveness and safety of the procedure for persons their age with the typical health problems of senior citizens, and the relative risks and dangers to them of contracting the illness against which the shot is designed to protect them.

  4. Selective Recovery From Failures In A Task Parallel Programming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, James S.; Singri, Arjun; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram

    2010-05-17

    We present a fault tolerant task pool execution environment that is capable of performing fine-grain selective restart using a lightweight, distributed task completion tracking mechanism. Compared with conventional checkpoint/restart techniques, this system offers a recovery penalty that is proportional to the degree of failure rather than the system size. We evaluate this system using the Self Consistent Field (SCF) kernel which forms an important component in ab initio methods for computational chemistry. Experimental results indicate that fault tolerant task pools are robust in the presence of an arbitrary number of failures and that they offer low overhead in the absence of faults.

  5. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  6. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration and Modeling of Enrofloxacin in Swine for Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianyi; Hao, Haihong; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Chen, Dongmei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dose regimens of enrofloxacin to reduce the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli (E.coli) using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach. The single dose (2.5 mg/kg body weight) of enrofloxacin was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the healthy pigs. Using cannulation, the pharmacokinetic properties, including peak concentration (Cmax), time to reach Cmax (Tmax), and area under the curve (AUC), were determined in plasma and ileum content. The Cmax, Tmax, and AUC in the plasma were 1.09 ± 0.11 μg/mL, 1.27 ± 0.35 h, and 12.70 ± 2.72 μg·h/mL, respectively. While in ileum content, the Cmax, Tmax, and AUC were 7.07 ± 0.26 μg/mL, 5.54 ± 0.42 h, and 136.18 ± 12.50 μg·h/mL, respectively. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 918 E. coli isolates, an E. coli O101/K99 strain (enrofloxacin MIC = 0.25 μg/mL) was selected for pharmacodynamic studies. The in vitro minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), mutant prevention concentration (MPC), and ex vivo time-killing curves for enrofloxacin in ileum content were established against the selected E. coli O101/K99 strain. Integrating the in vivo pharmacokinetic data and ex vivo pharmacodynamic data, a sigmoid Emax (Hill) equation was established to provide values for ileum content of AUC24h/MIC producing, bactericidal activity (52.65 h), and virtual eradication of bacteria (78.06 h). A dosage regimen of 1.96 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days should be sufficient in the treatment of E. coli. PMID:26870006

  7. Vesicular exanthema of swine.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Akers, T G

    1976-10-01

    Vesicular exanthema of swine (VES) was first recognized in 1932. At the time, eradication measures and, later, quarantine procedures were instituted and extension of the disease to surrounding farms appeared to have been prevented. Between 1932 and 1936, however, seemingly unrelated epizootics continued among swine herds being fed raw garbage. In 1936, VES disappeared only to reappear in 1939. The disease was contained within California until 1952, at which time it spread to all the major swine producing areas of the United States. The disease was eradicated in 1959, through the enforcement of laws prohibiting the feeding of raw garbage to swine. Other than the association with raw garbage, a reservoir for VES virus (VESV) was never found. In 1972, a virus isolated from California sea lions--and thus named the San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV)--proved to be distinguishable from VESV. When SMSV was injected into swine, clinical signs of vesicular exanthema developed, leading to the conclusion that, for all practical purposes, SMSV and VESV were the same. To date, 5 species of marine mammals and 2 species of terrestrial mammals, including feral swine, have been shown to possess antibodies to 1 or more of the 4 distinct SMSV serotypes. Current evidence suggests that SMSV infections occur among both terrestrial and marine mammals inhabiting the California coastal zones. This and the practice of shipping frozen meats known to contain SMSV to mink ranches in Utah point to the possibility that domestic swine in the United States are occasionally being exposed to SMSV. Although marine mammals are a source of SMSV, the primary virus reservoir is thought to be 1 or more submammalian marine species common to the southern California coastline. Such a primary reservoir presumably is the source of a new SMSV serotypes infecting marine mammals and may have been the original source of the VESV serotypes that infected swine through the intermediary of raw garbage.

  8. Model-Biased, Data-Driven Adaptive Failure Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, Todd K.

    2004-01-01

    This final report, which contains a research summary and a viewgraph presentation, addresses clustering and data simulation techniques for failure prediction. The researchers applied their techniques to both helicopter gearbox anomaly detection and segmentation of Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite imagery.

  9. Common Cause Failure Modeling in Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFs are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused for example by system environments, manufacturing, transportation, storage, maintenance, and assembly. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, they can be reduced, but are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and dependent CCF. Because common cause failure data is limited in the aerospace industry, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Team at Bastion Technology Inc. is estimating CCF risk using generic data collected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Consequently, common cause risk estimates based on this database, when applied to other industry applications, are highly uncertain. Therefore, it is important to account for a range of values for independent and CCF risk and to communicate the uncertainty to decision makers. There is an existing methodology for reducing CCF risk during design, which includes a checklist of 40+ factors grouped into eight categories. Using this checklist, an approach to produce a beta factor estimate is being investigated that quantitatively relates these factors. In this example, the checklist will be tailored to space launch vehicles, a quantitative approach will be described, and an example of the method will be presented.

  10. Predicting Time Series Outputs and Time-to-Failure for an Aircraft Controller Using Bayesian Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yuning

    2015-01-01

    Safety of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is paramount, but the large number of dynamically changing controller parameters makes it hard to determine if the system is currently stable, and the time before loss of control if not. We propose a hierarchical statistical model using Treed Gaussian Processes to predict (i) whether a flight will be stable (success) or become unstable (failure), (ii) the time-to-failure if unstable, and (iii) time series outputs for flight variables. We first classify the current flight input into success or failure types, and then use separate models for each class to predict the time-to-failure and time series outputs. As different inputs may cause failures at different times, we have to model variable length output curves. We use a basis representation for curves and learn the mappings from input to basis coefficients. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our prediction methods on a NASA neuro-adaptive flight control system.

  11. Extension of pipe failure models to consider the absence of data from replaced pipes.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Andreas; Scholten, Lisa; Maurer, Max; Reichert, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Predictions of the expected number of failures of water distribution network pipes are important to develop an optimal management strategy. A number of probabilistic pipe failure models have been proposed in the literature for this purpose. They have to be calibrated on failure records. However, common data management practices mean that replaced pipes are often absent from available data sets. This leads to a 'survival selection bias', as pipes with frequent failures are more likely to be absent from the data. To address this problem, we propose a formal statistical approach to extend the likelihood function of a pipe failure model by a replacement model. Frequentist maximum likelihood estimation or Bayesian inference can then be applied for parameter estimation. This approach is general and is not limited to a particular failure or replacement model. We implemented this approach with a Weibull-exponential failure model and a simple constant probability replacement model. Based on this distribution assumptions, we illustrated our concept with two examples. First, we used simulated data to show how replacement causes a 'survival selection bias' and how to successfully correct for it. A second example with real data illustrates how a model can be extended to consider covariables.

  12. Improved Multi-Axial, Temperature and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    An extensive effort has recently been completed by the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle program to completely characterize the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature and time on the failure characteristics of three filled epoxy adhesives (TIGA 321, EA913NA, EA946). As part of this effort, a single general failure criterion was developed that accounted for these effects simultaneously. This model was named the Multi- Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent or MATT failure criterion. Due to the intricate nature of the failure criterion, some parameters were required to be calculated using complex equations or numerical methods. This paper documents some simple but accurate modifications to the failure criterion to allow for calculations of failure conditions without complex equations or numerical techniques.

  13. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  14. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  15. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  16. Anti‐Remodeling and Anti‐Fibrotic Effects of the Neuregulin‐1β Glial Growth Factor 2 in a Large Animal Model of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Kasasbeh, Ehab; Murphy, Abigail; Ryzhov, Sergey; Lenihan, Sean; Ahmad, Farhaan A.; Williams, Philip; Nunnally, Amy; Adcock, Jamie; Song, Yanna; Harrell, Frank E.; Tran, Truc‐Linh; Parry, Tom J.; Iaci, Jen; Ganguly, Anindita; Feoktistov, Igor; Stephenson, Matthew K.; Caggiano, Anthony O.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Cleator, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuregulin‐1β (NRG‐1β) is a growth factor critical for cardiac development and repair with therapeutic potential for heart failure. We previously showed that the glial growth factor 2 (GGF2) isoform of NRG‐1β improves cardiac function in rodents after myocardial infarction (MI), but its efficacy in a large animal model of cardiac injury has not been examined. We therefore sought to examine the effects of GGF2 on ventricular remodeling, cardiac function, and global transcription in post‐MI swine, as well as potential mechanisms for anti‐remodeling effects. Methods and Results MI was induced in anesthetized swine (n=23) by intracoronary balloon occlusion. At 1 week post‐MI, survivors (n=13) received GGF2 treatment (intravenous, biweekly for 4 weeks; n=8) or were untreated (n=5). At 5 weeks post‐MI, fractional shortening was higher (32.8% versus 25.3%, P=0.019), and left ventricular (LV) end‐diastolic dimension lower (4.5 versus 5.3 cm, P=0.003) in GGF2‐treated animals. Treatment altered expression of 528 genes, as measured by microarrays, including collagens, basal lamina components, and matricellular proteins. GGF2‐treated pigs exhibited improvements in LV cardiomyocyte mitochondria and intercalated disk structures and showed less fibrosis, altered matrix structure, and fewer myofibroblasts (myoFbs), based on trichrome staining, electron microscopy, and immunostaining. In vitro experiments with isolated murine and rat cardiac fibroblasts demonstrate that NRG‐1β reduces myoFbs, and suppresses TGFβ‐induced phospho‐SMAD3 as well as αSMA expression. Conclusions These results suggest that GGF2/NRG‐1β prevents adverse remodeling after injury in part via anti‐fibrotic effects in the heart. PMID:25341890

  17. Common-Cause Failure Treatment in Event Assessment: Basis for a Proposed New Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Song-Hua Shen; Gary DeMoss; Kevin Coyne; Don Marksberry

    2010-06-01

    Event assessment is an application of probabilistic risk assessment in which observed equipment failures and outages are mapped into the risk model to obtain a numerical estimate of the event’s risk significance. In this paper, we focus on retrospective assessments to estimate the risk significance of degraded conditions such as equipment failure accompanied by a deficiency in a process such as maintenance practices. In modeling such events, the basic events in the risk model that are associated with observed failures and other off-normal situations are typically configured to be failed, while those associated with observed successes and unchallenged components are assumed capable of failing, typically with their baseline probabilities. This is referred to as the failure memory approach to event assessment. The conditioning of common-cause failure probabilities for the common cause component group associated with the observed component failure is particularly important, as it is insufficient to simply leave these probabilities at their baseline values, and doing so may result in a significant underestimate of risk significance for the event. Past work in this area has focused on the mathematics of the adjustment. In this paper, we review the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, which underlies most current risk modelling, discuss the limitations of this model with respect to event assessment, and introduce a proposed new framework for common-cause failure, which uses a Bayesian network to model underlying causes of failure, and which has the potential to overcome the limitations of the Basic Parameter Model with respect to event assessment.

  18. Absence of Gal epitope prolongs survival of swine lungs in an ex vivo model of hyperacute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc H.; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Schroeder, Carsten; Buddensick, Thomas; Zhang, Tianshu; Laaris, Amal; Cochrane, Megan; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Sachs, David H.; Allan, James S.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Galactosyl transferase gene knock-out (GalTKO) swine offer a unique tool to evaluate the role of the Gal antigen in xenogenic lung hyperacute rejection. Methods We perfused GalTKO miniature swine lungs with human blood. Results were compared with those from previous studies using wild-type and human decay-accelerating factor-transgenic (hDAF+/+) pig lungs. Results GalTKO lungs survived 132 ± 52 min compared to 10 ± 9 min for wild-type lungs (P = 0.001) and 45 ± 60 min for hDAF+/+ lungs (P = 0.18). GalTKO lungs displayed stable physiologic flow and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) until shortly before graft demise, similar to autologous perfusion, and unlike wild-type or hDAF+/+ lungs. Early (15 and 60 min) complement (C3a) and platelet activation and intrapulmonary platelet deposition were significantly diminished in GalTKO lungs relative to wild-type or hDAF+/+ lungs. However, GalTKO lungs adsorbed cytotoxic anti-non-Gal antibody and elaborated high levels of thrombin; their demise was associated with increased PVR, capillary congestion, intravascular thrombi and strong CD41 deposition not seen at earlier time points. Conclusions In summary, GalTKO lungs are substantially protected from injury but, in addition to anti-non-Gal antibody and complement, platelet adhesion and non-physiologic intravascular coagulation contribute to Gal-independent lung injury mechanisms. PMID:21496117

  19. Meniscus maturation in the swine model: changes occurring along with anterior to posterior and medial to lateral aspect during growth.

    PubMed

    Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Deponti, Daniela; Addis, Alessandro; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2014-10-01

    The meniscus plays important roles in knee function and mechanics and is characterized by a heterogeneous matrix composition. The changes in meniscus vascularization observed during growth suggest that the tissue-specific composition may be the result of a maturation process. This study has the aim to characterize the structural and biochemical variations that occur in the swine meniscus with age. To this purpose, menisci were collected from young and adult pigs and divided into different zones. In study 1, both lateral and medial menisci were divided into the anterior horn, the body and the posterior horn for the evaluation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), collagen 1 and 2 content. In study 2, the menisci were sectioned into the inner, the intermediate and the outer zones to determine the variations in the cell phenotype along with the inner-outer direction, through gene expression analysis. According to the results, the swine meniscus is characterized by an increasing enrichment in the cartilaginous component with age, with an increasing deposition in the anterior horn (GAGs and collagen 2; P < 0.01 both); moreover, this cartilaginous matrix strongly increases in the inner avascular and intermediate zone, as a consequence of a specific differentiation of meniscal cells towards a cartilaginous phenotype (collagen 2, P < 0.01). The obtained data add new information on the changes that accompany meniscus maturation, suggesting a specific response of meniscal cells to the regional mechanical stimuli in the knee joint.

  20. Multifunctional Photopolymerized Semi-Interpenetrating Network (sIPN) System Containing Bupivacaine And Silver Sulfadiazine Is An Effective Donor Site Treatment In A Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Lee D.; Kleinbeck, Kyle R.; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Previously, we have shown in a cross-comparison study that multifunctional photopolymerized semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) system is an effective donor site treatment in a swine model. The advantages of sIPN include spray-on application, in-situ photopolymerization, and ability to cover large contoured areas. sIPN has also been shown to be an effective delivery vehicle for keratinocyte growth factor, dexamethasone, bupivacaine, and silver sulfadiazine in vitro. Our aim for this study was to show that these products delivered to the wound bed with sIPN would not change the wound healing characteristics compared to the control site through qualitative clinical evaluation and to compare the rate and quality of donor site healing through histologic evaluation. Methods Eight Yucatan swine of 40lbs each were randomly divided into four groups of two pigs prior to surgery. Each animal had 5.6 % total body surface area of skin harvested from two different dorsal regions, with one at 22/1000th inch and the other at 30/1000th inch setting on the dermatome. Each test site on each animal was then sequentially dressed with 50 cm2 of Xeroform gauze, sIPN, sIPN loaded with 0.5% bupivacaine, or sIPN loaded with 1% silver sulfadiazine. sIPN with or without soluble drugs were applied as liquid then photopolymerized in situ to form an elastic covering. Each of the test areas was separated by 50 cm2 of autograft which was used to divide the test areas. Wound assessment and euthanasia occurred at days 7, 9, 14, and 21 days. A full thickness biopsy was taken from each of the study areas for histological analysis. Results By 14 days, all areas show complete epidermal coverage histologically. The 30/1000th inch site revealed a thicker, more irregular dermis compared to the 22/1000th site. Evaluation of the day 21 sites revealed equal thinning and flattening of the new epidermis. No site showed full restoration of the rete ridges. No signs of infection were seen in

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Is Involved in Myocardial Injury in a Miniature Swine Model of Coronary Artery Stenosis Exposed to Acceleration-Associated Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Chai, Meng; Liu, Chaozhong; Sun, Jinjin; Huang, Congchun; Yu, Xinya; Tian, Yi; Luo, Huilan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of myocardial injury in a minimally-invasive miniature swine model with different levels of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) and exposed to maximal tolerated +Gz. Proximal left anterior descending branch was ligated in 20 swine. Five swine underwent a sham operation. A trapezoid acceleration curve was used for +Gz stress. Pathological changes of myocardial tissue were detected by H&E staining. Apoptotic cardiomyocytes were detected by TUNEL. GRP78 and CHOP were investigated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. CAS models were successful in 18 animals.Compared with the sham-operated group (+8.00±0.71 Gz), the maximal tolerated +Gz values of the moderate stenosis (+6.00±0.89 Gz, P<0.05) and severe stenosis groups (+5.20±0.84 Gz, P<0.05) were decreased.Compared with sham animals (12.16±1.25%), after exposure to maximum +Gz, apoptotic cells of the moderate (43.53±8.42%, P<0.05) and severe stenosis group (60.50±9.35%, P<0.05) were increased, MDA content was increased (1.89 and 4.91 folds, respectively, P<0.05), and SOD activity was reduced (-13.66% and -21.71%, respectively). After exposure to maximum +Gz, GRP78 protein expression was low in the sham-operated (0.29±0.05) and mild stenosis groups (0.35±0.04), while expression was high in the moderate (0.72±0.04, P<0.05) and severe stenosis groups (0.65±0.07, P<0.05). CHOP protein expression was not observed in the sham-operated group, while expression was high in the moderate and severe stenosis groups. These results indicated that Under maximum exposure to +Gz stress, different levels of CAS led to different levels of myocardial injury. Endoplasmic reticulum response is involved in the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes after +Gz stress. PMID:26167928

  2. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi Collagen Binding Outer Membrane Protein NcaA Is Required for Virulence in Swine and Human Challenge Models of Chancroid

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Robert A.; Cole, Leah E.; Janowicz, Diane M.; Toffer, Kristen L.; Fortney, Kate R.; Katz, Barry P.; Orndorff, Paul E.; Spinola, Stanley M.; Kawula, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection. PMID:16622201

  3. Collateral Ventilation Quantification Using Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: Differences between Canine and Swine Models of Bronchial Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Ah; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. Results A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 ± 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 ± 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 ± 1.8% vs. -5.4 ± 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Conclusion Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction. PMID:25995696

  4. Maternally Derived Immunity Extends Swine Influenza A Virus Persistence within Farrow-to-Finish Pig Farms: Insights from a Stochastic Event-Driven Metapopulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Cador, Charlie; Rose, Nicolas; Willem, Lander; Andraud, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Swine Influenza A Viruses (swIAVs) have been shown to persist in farrow-to-finish pig herds with repeated outbreaks in successive batches, increasing the risk for respiratory disorders in affected animals and being a threat for public health. Although the general routes of swIAV transmission (i.e. direct contact and exposure to aerosols) were clearly identified, the transmission process between batches is still not fully understood. Maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) were stressed as a possible factor favoring within-herd swIAV persistence. However, the relationship between MDAs and the global spread among the different subpopulations in the herds is still lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to understand the mechanisms induced by MDAs in relation with swIAV spread and persistence in farrow-to-finish pig herds. A metapopulation model has been developed representing the population dynamics considering two subpopulations—breeding sows and growing pigs—managed according to batch-rearing system. This model was coupled with a swIAV-specific epidemiological model, accounting for partial passive immunity protection in neonatal piglets and an immunity boost in re-infected animals. Airborne transmission was included by a between-room transmission rate related to the current prevalence of shedding pigs. Maternally derived partial immunity in piglets was found to extend the duration of the epidemics within their batch, allowing for efficient between-batch transmission and resulting in longer swIAV persistence at the herd level. These results should be taken into account in the design of control programmes for the spread and persistence of swIAV in swine herds. PMID:27662592

  5. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  6. Murine models of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Horgan, S; Watson, C; Glezeva, N; Baugh, J

    2014-12-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction leads to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, an increasingly prevalent condition largely driven by modern day lifestyle risk factors. As heart failure with preserved ejection fraction accounts for almost one-half of all patients with heart failure, appropriate nonhuman animal models are required to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome and to provide a platform for preclinical investigation of potential therapies. Hypertension, obesity, and diabetes are major risk factors for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. This review focuses on murine models reflecting this disease continuum driven by the aforementioned common risk factors. We describe various models of diastolic dysfunction and highlight models of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction reported in the literature. Strengths and weaknesses of the different models are discussed to provide an aid to translational scientists when selecting an appropriate model. We also bring attention to the fact that heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is difficult to diagnose in animal models and that, therefore, there is a paucity of well described animal models of this increasingly important condition.

  7. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  8. Developing a predictive risk model for first-line antiretroviral therapy failure in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Julia K; Ive, Prudence; Horsburgh, C Robert; Berhanu, Rebecca; Shearer, Kate; Maskew, Mhairi; Long, Lawrence; Sanne, Ian; Bassett, Jean; Ebrahim, Osman; Fox, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients with HIV in South Africa have failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although individual predictors of first-line ART failure have been identified, few studies in resource-limited settings have been large enough for predictive modelling. Understanding the absolute risk of first-line failure is useful for patient monitoring and for effectively targeting limited resources for second-line ART. We developed a predictive model to identify patients at the greatest risk of virologic failure on first-line ART, and to estimate the proportion of patients needing second-line ART over five years on treatment. Methods A cohort of patients aged ≥18 years from nine South African HIV clinics on first-line ART for at least six months were included. Viral load measurements and baseline predictors were obtained from medical records. We used stepwise selection of predictors in accelerated failure-time models to predict virologic failure on first-line ART (two consecutive viral load levels >1000 copies/mL). Multiple imputations were used to assign missing baseline variables. The final model was selected using internal-external cross-validation maximizing model calibration at five years on ART, and model discrimination, measured using Harrell's C-statistic. Model covariates were used to create a predictive score for risk group of ART failure. Results A total of 72,181 patients were included in the analysis, with an average of 21.5 months (IQR: 8.8–41.5) of follow-up time on first-line ART. The final predictive model had a Weibull distribution and the final predictors of virologic failure were men of all ages, young women, nevirapine use in first-line regimen, low baseline CD4 count, high mean corpuscular volume, low haemoglobin, history of TB and missed visits during the first six months on ART. About 24.4% of patients in the highest quintile and 9.4% of patients in the lowest quintile of risk were predicted to experience

  9. Developing a predictive risk model for first-line antiretroviral therapy failure in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Julia K; Ive, Prudence; Horsburgh, C Robert; Berhanu, Rebecca; Shearer, Kate; Maskew, Mhairi; Long, Lawrence; Sanne, Ian; Bassett, Jean; Ebrahim, Osman; Fox, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients with HIV in South Africa have failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although individual predictors of first-line ART failure have been identified, few studies in resource-limited settings have been large enough for predictive modelling. Understanding the absolute risk of first-line failure is useful for patient monitoring and for effectively targeting limited resources for second-line ART. We developed a predictive model to identify patients at the greatest risk of virologic failure on first-line ART, and to estimate the proportion of patients needing second-line ART over five years on treatment. Methods A cohort of patients aged ≥18 years from nine South African HIV clinics on first-line ART for at least six months were included. Viral load measurements and baseline predictors were obtained from medical records. We used stepwise selection of predictors in accelerated failure-time models to predict virologic failure on first-line ART (two consecutive viral load levels >1000 copies/mL). Multiple imputations were used to assign missing baseline variables. The final model was selected using internal-external cross-validation maximizing model calibration at five years on ART, and model discrimination, measured using Harrell's C-statistic. Model covariates were used to create a predictive score for risk group of ART failure. Results A total of 72,181 patients were included in the analysis, with an average of 21.5 months (IQR: 8.8–41.5) of follow-up time on first-line ART. The final predictive model had a Weibull distribution and the final predictors of virologic failure were men of all ages, young women, nevirapine use in first-line regimen, low baseline CD4 count, high mean corpuscular volume, low haemoglobin, history of TB and missed visits during the first six months on ART. About 24.4% of patients in the highest quintile and 9.4% of patients in the lowest quintile of risk were predicted to experience

  10. Learned Helplessness: A Model to Understand and Overcome a Child's Extreme Reaction to Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balk, David

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews literature on childrens' reactions to perceived failure and offers "learned helplessness" as a model to explain why a child who makes a mistake gives up. Suggestions for preventing these reactions are given. (Author/JMK)

  11. Why won’t you do what I want? The informative failures of children and models

    PubMed Central

    Chatham, Christopher H.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Munakata, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    Computational models are powerful tools – too powerful, according to some. We argue that the idea that models can “do anything” is wrong, and describe how their failures have been informative. We present new work showing surprising diversity in the effects of feedback on children’s task-switching, such that some children perseverate despite this feedback, other children switch as instructed, and yet others play an “opposites” game without truly switching to the newly-instructed task. We present simulations that demonstrate the failure of an otherwise-successful neural network model to capture this failure of children. Simulating this pattern motivates the inclusion of updating mechanisms that make contact with a growing literature on frontostriatal function, despite their absence in extant theories of the development of cognitive flexibility. We argue from this and other examples that computational models are more constrained than is typically acknowledged, and that their resulting failures can be theoretically illuminating. PMID:24453404

  12. ARRA: Reconfiguring Power Systems to Minimize Cascading Failures - Models and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Ian; Hiskens, Ian; Linderoth, Jeffrey; Wright, Stephen

    2013-12-16

    Building on models of electrical power systems, and on powerful mathematical techniques including optimization, model predictive control, and simluation, this project investigated important issues related to the stable operation of power grids. A topic of particular focus was cascading failures of the power grid: simulation, quantification, mitigation, and control. We also analyzed the vulnerability of networks to component failures, and the design of networks that are responsive to and robust to such failures. Numerous other related topics were investigated, including energy hubs and cascading stall of induction machines

  13. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Aujesky’s Disease or pseudorabies, is one of the oldest recognized swine diseases. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus that can induce respiratory disease, reproductive failure, and affect the central nervous system. PRV vaccines, in conjunction with serologi...

  14. Use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) as pre-hospital treatment in a swine model of fluid percussion traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bobby; Haque, Ashraful; Arnaud, Françoise G.; Teranishi, Kohsuke; Steinbach, Thomas; Auker, Charles R.; McCarron, Richard M.; Freilich, Daniel; Scultetus, Anke H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has been used as an adjunctive therapy for acute post-traumatic hemorrhage and reversal of iatrogenic coagulopathy in trauma patients in the hospital setting. However, investigations regarding its potential use in pre-hospital management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been conducted extensively. Aims: In the present study, we investigated the physiology, hematology and histology effects of a single pre-hospital bolus injection of rFVIIa compared to current clinical practice of no pre-hospital intervention in a swine model of moderate fluid percussion TBI. Materials and Methods: Animals were randomized to receive either a bolus of rFVIIa (90 μg/kg) or nothing 15 minutes (T15) post-injury. Hospital arrival was simulated at T60, and animals were euthanized at experimental endpoint (T360). Results: Survival was 100% in both groups; baseline physiology parameters were similar, vital signs were comparable. Animals that received rFVIIa demonstrated less hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (P = 0.0037) and less neuronal degeneration in left hippocampus, pons, and cerebellum (P = 0.00009, P = 0.00008, and P = 0.251, respectively). Immunohistochemical staining of brain sections showed less overall loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and less Flouro-Jade B positive cells in rFVIIa-treated animals. Conclusions: Early pre-hospital administration of rFVIIa in this swine TBI model reduced neuronal necrosis and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). These results merit further investigation of this approach in pre-hospital trauma care. PMID:24812455

  15. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation.

  16. Multiscale Modeling Methods for Analysis of Failure Modes in Foldcore Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Schatrow, P.; Klett, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents an homogenised core model suitable for use in the analysis of fuselage sandwich panels with folded composite cores under combined loading conditions. Within a multiscale numerical design process a failure criterion was derived for describing the macroscopic behaviour of folded cores under combined loading using a detailed foldcore micromodel. The multiscale modelling method was validated by simulation of combined compression/bending failure of foldcore sandwich panels.

  17. The human subject: an integrative animal model for 21(st) century heart failure research.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Pippin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a leading cause of death and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting tens of millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of extensive research conducted at enormous expense, only a handful of interventions have significantly impacted survival in heart failure. Even the most widely prescribed treatments act primarily to slow disease progression, do not provide sustained survival advantage, and have adverse side effects. Since mortality remains about 50% within five years of diagnosis, the need to increase our understanding of heart failure disease mechanisms and development of preventive and reparative therapies remains critical. Currently, the vast majority of basic science heart failure research is conducted using animal models ranging from fruit flies to primates; however, insights gleaned from decades of animal-based research efforts have not been proportional to research success in terms of deciphering human heart failure and developing effective therapeutics for human patients. Here we discuss the reasons for this translational discrepancy which can be equally attributed to the use of erroneous animal models and the lack of widespread use of human-based research methodologies and address why and how we must position our own species at center stage as the quintessential animal model for 21(st) century heart failure research. If the ultimate goal of the scientific community is to tackle the epidemic status of heart failure, the best way to achieve that goal is through prioritizing human-based, human-relevant research.

  18. The human subject: an integrative animal model for 21st century heart failure research

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Pippin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a leading cause of death and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting tens of millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of extensive research conducted at enormous expense, only a handful of interventions have significantly impacted survival in heart failure. Even the most widely prescribed treatments act primarily to slow disease progression, do not provide sustained survival advantage, and have adverse side effects. Since mortality remains about 50% within five years of diagnosis, the need to increase our understanding of heart failure disease mechanisms and development of preventive and reparative therapies remains critical. Currently, the vast majority of basic science heart failure research is conducted using animal models ranging from fruit flies to primates; however, insights gleaned from decades of animal-based research efforts have not been proportional to research success in terms of deciphering human heart failure and developing effective therapeutics for human patients. Here we discuss the reasons for this translational discrepancy which can be equally attributed to the use of erroneous animal models and the lack of widespread use of human-based research methodologies and address why and how we must position our own species at center stage as the quintessential animal model for 21st century heart failure research. If the ultimate goal of the scientific community is to tackle the epidemic status of heart failure, the best way to achieve that goal is through prioritizing human-based, human-relevant research. PMID:26550463

  19. Cascading Failures in Bi-partite Graphs: Model for Systemic Risk Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008–2011. PMID:23386974

  20. A Multiscale Progressive Failure Modeling Methodology for Composites that Includes Fiber Strength Stochastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Hutchins, John W.

    2014-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology was developed for continuous fiber composites that incorporates a statistical distribution of fiber strengths into coupled multiscale micromechanics/finite element (FE) analyses. A modified two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function, which accounts for the effect of fiber length on the probability of failure, was used to characterize the statistical distribution of fiber strengths. A parametric study using the NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) was performed to assess the effect of variable fiber strengths on local composite failure within a repeating unit cell (RUC) and subsequent global failure. The NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver were used to analyze the progressive failure of a unidirectional SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S metal matrix composite tensile dogbone specimen at 650 degC. Multiscale progressive failure analyses were performed to quantify the effect of spatially varying fiber strengths on the RUC-averaged and global stress-strain responses and failure. The ultimate composite strengths and distribution of failure locations (predominately within the gage section) reasonably matched the experimentally observed failure behavior. The predicted composite failure behavior suggests that use of macroscale models that exploit global geometric symmetries are inappropriate for cases where the actual distribution of local fiber strengths displays no such symmetries. This issue has not received much attention in the literature. Moreover, the model discretization at a specific length scale can have a profound effect on the computational costs associated with multiscale simulations.models that yield accurate yet tractable results.

  1. Development of A Tabulated Thermo-Viscoplastic Material Model with Regularized Failure for Dynamic Ductile Failure Prediction of Structures under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Murat

    It is important to understand the dynamic failure behavior of structures subjected to impact loading in order to improve the survivability. Materials under impact are utterly affected by large deformations, high strain-rates, temperature softening and varying stress-states, which finally may lead to failure. It is shown that the impact characteristics are prone to change with several independent factors such as; impact speed, material thickness, and shape and orientation of the impacting object. Validated numerical simulations of impact tests reveal that the failure on ductile metals occur at certain locations of the failure locus that is constructed on a space as a function of all three stress invariants, which indicates that the failure depends profoundly on the state-of-stress. It is shown that existing material models are not always successful enough to cover the whole range of the failure locus and predict the failure. Therefore, it is a common practice to use different sets of material model parameters tuned or calibrated to cover a specific region of the failure loci in an ad hoc manner for practical reasons to match particular test results. Even in that case, specially tuned material properties are not capable of predicting these limited cases if differences in the mesh size and pattern need to be considered. In this dissertation a new, generic, thermo-elastic/viscoplastic material model with regularized failure is introduced. The new material model is implemented into a non-linear, explicit dynamics finite element code, LS-DYNA. A von Mises type isotropic, isochoric plasticity is utilized, where isotropic hardening, strain-rate hardening and temperature softening is considered. The model takes adiabatic heating and softening into account due to the plastic work. The constitutive relation is coupled with a new regularized accumulated failure law that is specifically developed to cover a large extent of the failure locus as a function of state

  2. Failure mechanism analysis under compression loading of unidirectional carbon/epoxy composites using micromechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendi, R. R.; Barrau, J.-J.; Guedra-Degeorges, D.

    An experimental study of the compression fracture of unidirectional composites (T300/914, T800/5245C, M40J/913, GY70/V108 and AS4/PEEK) shows that fiber kinking is the main failure mode. All materials tested exhibited a non-linear elastic behavior characterized by a continuous decrease of the tangent modulus as soon as the load was applied. A micromechanical model taking into account initial geometric imperfections was developed. Stress evolution in the constituents was analysed and then compared with their strength. Two failure modes were distinguished: failure due to the fracture of fibers and failure due to the fracture of matrix. This model demonstrates that the non-linear behavior is not due to the initial geometric imperfections. To refine modelling, a numerical analysis using a finite element method with elastoplastic and large displacement hypothesis was developed. This model not only shows the principals governing failure parameters: initial geometric impertions, yield stress of matrix and fiber compressive strength, but also demonstrates two failure mechanisms: fracture of fibers in compression and fiber kinking. This model confirms that the non-linear behavior is not attributed to the initial geometric imperfections.

  3. The Utility of the Swine Model to Assess Biological Rhythms and Their Characteristics during Different Stages of Residence in a Simulated Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Leyden, Katrina N.; Hanneman, Sandra K.; Padhye, Nikhil S.; Smolensky, Michael H.; Kang, Duck-Hee; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the utility of the mammalian swine model under simulated intensive care unit (sICU) conditions and mechanical ventilation for assessment of the trajectory of circadian rhythms of sedation requirement, core body temperature (CBT), pulmonary mechanics (PM), and gas exchange (GE). Data were collected prospectively with an observational time-series design to describe and compare circadian rhythms of selected study variables in four swine mechanically ventilated for up to 7 consecutive days. We derived the circadian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 20–28 h)/ultradian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 1 to <20 h) bandpower ratio to assess the robustness of circadian rhythms, and compare findings between the early (first 3 days) and late (subsequent days) sICU stay. All pigs exhibited statistically significant circadian rhythms (τ between 20–28 h) in CBT, respiratory rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation, but circadian rhythms were detected less frequently for sedation requirement, spontaneous minute volume, arterial oxygen tension, arterial carbon dioxide tension, and arterial pH. Sedation did not appear to mask the circadian rhythms of CBT, PM, and GE. Individual subject observations were more informative than group data, and provided preliminary evidence that (a) circadian rhythms of multiple variables are lost or desynchronized in mechanically ventilated subjects, (b) robustness of circadian rhythm varies with subject morbidity, and (c) healthier pigs develop more robust circadian rhythm profiles over time in the sICU. Comparison of biological rhythm profiles among sICU subjects with similar severity of illness is needed to determine if the results of this pilot study are reproducible. Identification of consistent patterns may provide insight into subject morbidity and timing of such therapeutic interventions as weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26204131

  4. The Utility of the Swine Model to Assess Biological Rhythms and Their Characteristics during Different Stages of Residence in a Simulated Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Leyden, Katrina N; Hanneman, Sandra K; Padhye, Nikhil S; Smolensky, Michael H; Kang, Duck-Hee; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the utility of the mammalian swine model under simulated intensive care unit (sICU) conditions and mechanical ventilation (MV) for assessment of the trajectory of circadian rhythms of sedation requirement, core body temperature (CBT), pulmonary mechanics (PM) and gas exchange (GE). Data were collected prospectively with an observational time-series design to describe and compare circadian rhythms of selected study variables in four swine mechanically ventilated for up to seven consecutive days. We derived the circadian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 20 and 28 h)/ultradian (total variance explained by rhythms of τ between 1 and <20 h) bandpower ratio to assess the robustness of circadian rhythms, and compare findings between the early (first 3 days) and late (subsequent days) sICU stay. All pigs exhibited statistically significant circadian rhythms (τ between 20 and 28 h) in CBT, respiratory rate and peripheral oxygen saturation, but circadian rhythms were detected less frequently for sedation requirement, spontaneous minute volume, arterial oxygen tension, arterial carbon dioxide tension and arterial pH. Sedation did not appear to mask the circadian rhythms of CBT, PM and GE. Individual subject observations were more informative than group data, and provided preliminary evidence that (a) circadian rhythms of multiple variables are lost or desynchronized in mechanically ventilated subjects, (b) robustness of circadian rhythm varies with subject morbidity and (c) healthier pigs develop more robust circadian rhythm profiles over time in the sICU. Comparison of biological rhythm profiles among sICU subjects with similar severity of illness is needed to determine if the results of this pilot study are reproducible. Identification of consistent patterns may provide insight into subject morbidity and timing of such therapeutic interventions as weaning from MV. PMID:26204131

  5. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  6. Transgenic swine for biomedicine and agriculture.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S; Hawley, R J; Carter, D B; Lai, L; Greenstein, J L

    2003-01-01

    Initial technologies for creating transgenic swine only permitted random integration of the construct. However, by combining the technology for homologous recombination in fetal somatic cells with that of nuclear transfer (NT), it is now possible to create specific modifications to the swine genome. The first such example is that of knocking out a gene that is responsible for hyperacute rejection (HAR) when organs from swine are transferred to primates. Because swine are widely used as models of human diseases, there are opportunities for genetic modification to alter these models or to create additional models of human disease. Unfortunately, some of the offspring resulting from NT have abnormal phenotypes. However, it appears that these abnormal phenotypes are a result of epigenetic modifications and, thus, are not transmitted to the offspring of the clones. Although the technique of producing animals with specific genetic modifications by NT has been achieved, improvements to the NT technique as well as improvements in the culture conditions for somatic cells and the techniques for genetic modification are still needed.

  7. Mechanistic Considerations Used in the Development of the PROFIT PCI Failure Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pankaskie, P. J.

    1980-05-01

    A fuel Pellet-Zircaloy Cladding (thermo-mechanical-chemical) Interactions (PC!) failure model for estimating the probability of failure in !ransient increases in power (PROFIT) was developed. PROFIT is based on 1) standard statistical methods applied to available PC! fuel failure data and 2) a mechanistic analysis of the environmental and strain-rate-dependent stress versus strain characteristics of Zircaloy cladding. The statistical analysis of fuel failures attributable to PCI suggested that parameters in addition to power, transient increase in power, and burnup are needed to define PCI fuel failures in terms of probability estimates with known confidence limits. The PROFIT model, therefore, introduces an environmental and strain-rate dependent strain energy absorption to failure (SEAF) concept to account for the stress versus strain anomalies attributable to interstitial-disloction interaction effects in the Zircaloy cladding. Assuming that the power ramping rate is the operating corollary of strain-rate in the Zircaloy cladding, then the variables of first order importance in the PCI fuel failure phenomenon are postulated to be: 1. pre-transient fuel rod power, P{sub I}, 2. transient increase in fuel rod power, {Delta}P, 3. fuel burnup, Bu, and 4. the constitutive material property of the Zircaloy cladding, SEAF.

  8. Experiments for calibration and validation of plasticity and failure material modeling: 304L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for material plasticity and failure model calibration and validation were obtained from 304L stainless steel. Model calibration data were taken from smooth tension, notched tension, and compression tests. Model validation data were provided from experiments using thin-walled tube specimens subjected to path dependent combinations of internal pressure, extension, and torsion.

  9. Numerical Modeling in Geodynamics: Success, Failure and Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2005-12-01

    A real success in numerical modeling of dynamics of the Earth can be achieved only by multidisciplinary research teams of experts in geodynamics, applied and pure mathematics, and computer science. The success in numerical modeling is based on the following basic, but simple, rules. (i) People need simplicity most, but they understand intricacies best (B. Pasternak, writer). Start from a simple numerical model, which describes basic physical laws by a set of mathematical equations, and move then to a complex model. Never start from a complex model, because you cannot understand the contribution of each term of the equations to the modeled geophysical phenomenon. (ii) Study the numerical methods behind your computer code. Otherwise it becomes difficult to distinguish true and erroneous solutions to the geodynamic problem, especially when your problem is complex enough. (iii) Test your model versus analytical and asymptotic solutions, simple 2D and 3D model examples. Develop benchmark analysis of different numerical codes and compare numerical results with laboratory experiments. Remember that the numerical tool you employ is not perfect, and there are small bugs in every computer code. Therefore the testing is the most important part of your numerical modeling. (iv) Prove (if possible) or learn relevant statements concerning the existence, uniqueness and stability of the solution to the mathematical and discrete problems. Otherwise you can solve an improperly-posed problem, and the results of the modeling will be far from the true solution of your model problem. (v) Try to analyze numerical models of a geological phenomenon using as less as possible tuning model variables. Already two tuning variables give enough possibilities to constrain your model well enough with respect to observations. The data fitting sometimes is quite attractive and can take you far from a principal aim of your numerical modeling: to understand geophysical phenomena. (vi) If the number of

  10. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  11. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  12. A Comparison of Functional Models for Use in the Function-Failure Design Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Michael E.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2006-01-01

    When failure analysis and prevention, guided by historical design knowledge, are coupled with product design at its conception, shorter design cycles are possible. By decreasing the design time of a product in this manner, design costs are reduced and the product will better suit the customer s needs. Prior work indicates that similar failure modes occur with products (or components) with similar functionality. To capitalize on this finding, a knowledge base of historical failure information linked to functionality is assembled for use by designers. One possible use for this knowledge base is within the Elemental Function-Failure Design Method (EFDM). This design methodology and failure analysis tool begins at conceptual design and keeps the designer cognizant of failures that are likely to occur based on the product s functionality. The EFDM offers potential improvement over current failure analysis methods, such as FMEA, FMECA, and Fault Tree Analysis, because it can be implemented hand in hand with other conceptual design steps and carried throughout a product s design cycle. These other failure analysis methods can only truly be effective after a physical design has been completed. The EFDM however is only as good as the knowledge base that it draws from, and therefore it is of utmost importance to develop a knowledge base that will be suitable for use across a wide spectrum of products. One fundamental question that arises in using the EFDM is: At what level of detail should functional descriptions of components be encoded? This paper explores two approaches to populating a knowledge base with actual failure occurrence information from Bell 206 helicopters. Functional models expressed at various levels of detail are investigated to determine the necessary detail for an applicable knowledge base that can be used by designers in both new designs as well as redesigns. High level and more detailed functional descriptions are derived for each failed component based

  13. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  14. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  15. NEESROCK: A Physical and Numerical Modeling Investigation of Seismically Induced Rock-Slope Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, K. N.; Wartman, J.; Keefer, D. K.; Maclaughlin, M.; Adams, S.; Arnold, L.; Gibson, M.; Smith, S.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, seismically induced rock-slope failures have been responsible for approximately 30% of the most significant landslide catastrophes of the past century. They are among the most common, dangerous, and still today, least understood of all seismic hazards. Seismically Induced Rock-Slope Failure: Mechanisms and Prediction (NEESROCK) is a major research initiative that fully integrates physical modeling (geotechnical centrifuge) and advanced numerical simulations (discrete element modeling) to investigate the fundamental mechanisms governing the stability of rock slopes during earthquakes. The research is part of the National Science Foundation-supported Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation Research (NEES) program. With its focus on fractures and rock materials, the project represents a significant departure from the traditional use of the geotechnical centrifuge for studying soil, and pushes the boundaries of physical modeling in new directions. In addition to advancing the fundamental understanding of the rock-slope failure process under seismic conditions, the project is developing improved rock-slope failure assessment guidelines, analysis procedures, and predictive tools. Here, we provide an overview of the project, present experimental and numerical modeling results, discuss special considerations for the use of synthetic rock materials in physical modeling, and address the suitability of discrete element modeling for simulating the dynamic rock-slope failure process.

  16. Damage Model and Progressive Failure Analyses for Filament Wound Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Marcelo Leite; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2013-10-01

    Recent improvements in manufacturing processes and materials properties associated with excellent mechanical characteristics and low weight have made composite materials very attractive for application on civil aircraft structures. However, even new designs are still very conservative, because the composite failure phenomenon is very complex. Several failure criteria and theories have been developed to describe the damage process and how it evolves, but the solution of the problem is still open. Moreover, modern filament winding techniques have been used to produce a wide variety of structural shapes not only cylindrical parts, but also “flat” laminates. Therefore, this work presents the development of a damage model and its application to simulate the progressive failure of flat composite laminates made using a filament winding process. The damage model was implemented as a UMAT (User Material Subroutine), in ABAQUSTM Finite Element (FE) framework. Progressive failure analyses were carried out using FE simulation in order to simulate the failure of flat filament wound composite structures under different loading conditions. In addition, experimental tests were performed in order to identify parameters related to the material model, as well as to evaluate both the potential and the limitations of the model. The difference between numerical and the average experimental results in a four point bending set-up is only 1.6 % at maximum load amplitude. Another important issue is that the model parameters are not so complicated to be identified. This characteristic makes this model very attractive to be applied in an industrial environment.

  17. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  18. Mechanics of progressive failures leading to rapid shallow landslides using the fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Denis; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Or, Dani

    2010-05-01

    Shallow landslides are often sudden events caused by the rapid failure of a slip surface. Yet, such global failure is the culmination of a series of steps that begin with the initiation and growth of local cracks and failure planes that, with increased load eventually coalesce to form a continuous surface. The dynamics of such failure events is controlled, in part, by the rate of soil weakening during water infiltration and by distribution of tree roots that span across these failure zones. Conventional approaches rely on static limit-equilibrium analysis to compute the ratio of soil resistive strength to gravitational driving forces (factor of safety) to determine slope stability, often ignoring dynamics leading to failure as well as heterogeneities associated with land cover, subsurface material properties, hydrologic pathways, and presence of biological elements such as roots. Casting the problem in terms of stable or unstable slope does not describe the progressive formation of cracks in heterogeneous soils or the failure of roots that stretch across tension cracks or basal shear planes. Here we use the fiber bundle model (FBM) to describe soil and root failure focusing on landslide initiation. The FBM consists of a bundle of parallel, elastic-brittle fibers of identical length and stiffness stretched quasi-statically between two plates. Heterogeneity is introduced by fibers having finite threshold strength drawn randomly from a probability density function. Step-loading of the bundle causes weak fibers to break and load redistribution (either global or local) among surviving fibers can trigger secondary, tertiary, and so on, failures, a process known as an avalanche. We illustrate the potential utility of the FBM for two cases: (1) modeling of lateral root reinforcement where fibers represent roots of different sizes and strengths, and (2) modeling of progressive weakening of soils by water infiltration where fibers are analogs of bonds between soil aggregates

  19. The Bama miniature swine is susceptible to experimental HEV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zi-Min; Wang, Si-Ling; Ying, Dong; Wen, Gui-Ping; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Ke; Ji, Wen-Fang; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the main causes of enterically transmitted hepatitis worldwide. Although the mortality rates associated with HEV are generally low, they can be up to 28% in HEV-infected pregnant women, and the elderly are more susceptible. The reasons for this selective severity are unclear, partially because there is no suitable, easy-to-use model in which to study HEV infection. Non-human primates and standard swine have been identified as being sensitive to infection with HEV and have been used for HEV infection studies. However, studies in these animals have been limited by high housing costs and the difficulty of manipulating these animals. In the current study, we established a model of HEV infection using Bama miniature swine. The model is easy to use and is sensitive to infections with HEV genotypes 3 and 4, which are classified as zoonotic HEVs. In this model, infection of Bama miniature swine with HEV genotypes 3 and 4 caused the typical features. All Bama miniature swine that were infected with HEV genotypes 3 and 4 exhibited significant HEV viremia, shedding, anti-HEV antibody responses and partial liver inflammation. Bama miniature swine may serve as an alternative to standard swine models for the study of zoonotic HEV infection and HEV genotype specificity research. PMID:27534702

  20. The Bama miniature swine is susceptible to experimental HEV infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Min; Wang, Si-Ling; Ying, Dong; Wen, Gui-Ping; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Ke; Ji, Wen-Fang; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the main causes of enterically transmitted hepatitis worldwide. Although the mortality rates associated with HEV are generally low, they can be up to 28% in HEV-infected pregnant women, and the elderly are more susceptible. The reasons for this selective severity are unclear, partially because there is no suitable, easy-to-use model in which to study HEV infection. Non-human primates and standard swine have been identified as being sensitive to infection with HEV and have been used for HEV infection studies. However, studies in these animals have been limited by high housing costs and the difficulty of manipulating these animals. In the current study, we established a model of HEV infection using Bama miniature swine. The model is easy to use and is sensitive to infections with HEV genotypes 3 and 4, which are classified as zoonotic HEVs. In this model, infection of Bama miniature swine with HEV genotypes 3 and 4 caused the typical features. All Bama miniature swine that were infected with HEV genotypes 3 and 4 exhibited significant HEV viremia, shedding, anti-HEV antibody responses and partial liver inflammation. Bama miniature swine may serve as an alternative to standard swine models for the study of zoonotic HEV infection and HEV genotype specificity research. PMID:27534702

  1. Simple Elasticity Modeling and Failure Prediction for Composite Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makeev, Andrew; Armanios, Erian; OBrien, T. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simple 2D boundary element analysis, suitable for developing cost effective models for tapered composite laminates, is presented. Constant stress and displacement elements are used. Closed-form fundamental solutions are derived. Numerical results are provided for several configurations to illustrate the accuracy of the model.

  2. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references.

  3. A review of failure models for unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, David E.; Hemann, John H.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites offer significant potential for improving the performance of turbine engines. In order to achieve their potential, however, improvements in design methodology are needed. In the past most components using structural ceramic matrix composites were designed by trial and error since the emphasis of feasibility demonstration minimized the development of mathematical models. To understand the key parameters controlling response and the mechanics of failure, the development of structural failure models is required. A review of short term failure models with potential for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads is presented. Phenomenological, semi-empirical, shear-lag, fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, and statistical models for the fast fracture analysis of continuous fiber unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads are surveyed.

  4. A review of failure models for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, David E.; Hemann, John H.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites offer significant potential for improving the performance of turbine engines. In order to achieve their potential, however, improvements in design methodology are needed. In the past most components using structural ceramic matrix composites were designed by trial and error since the emphasis of feasibility demonstration minimized the development of mathematical models. To understand the key parameters controlling response and the mechanics of failure, the development of structural failure models is required. A review of short term failure models with potential for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads is presented. Phenomenological, semi-empirical, shear-lag, fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, and statistical models for the fast fracture analysis of continuous fiber unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads are surveyed.

  5. Finite Element Model for Failure Study of Two-Dimensional Triaxially Braided Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuetao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    A new three-dimensional finite element model of two-dimensional triaxially braided composites is presented in this paper. This meso-scale modeling technique is used to examine and predict the deformation and damage observed in tests of straight sided specimens. A unit cell based approach is used to take into account the braiding architecture as well as the mechanical properties of the fiber tows, the matrix and the fiber tow-matrix interface. A 0 deg / plus or minus 60 deg. braiding configuration has been investigated by conducting static finite element analyses. Failure initiation and progressive degradation has been simulated in the fiber tows by use of the Hashin failure criteria and a damage evolution law. The fiber tow-matrix interface was modeled by using a cohesive zone approach to capture any fiber-matrix debonding. By comparing the analytical results to those obtained experimentally, the applicability of the developed model was assessed and the failure process was investigated.

  6. Electrophysiology of Heart Failure Using a Rabbit Model: From the Failing Myocyte to Ventricular Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ponnaluri, Aditya V S; Perotti, Luigi E; Liu, Michael; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N; Ennis, Daniel B; Klug, William S; Garfinkel, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death, yet its underlying electrophysiological (EP) mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we use a multiscale approach to analyze a model of heart failure and connect its results to features of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The heart failure model is derived by modifying a previously validated electrophysiology model for a healthy rabbit heart. Specifically, in accordance with the heart failure literature, we modified the cell EP by changing both membrane currents and calcium handling. At the tissue level, we modeled the increased gap junction lateralization and lower conduction velocity due to downregulation of Connexin 43. At the biventricular level, we reduced the apex-to-base and transmural gradients of action potential duration (APD). The failing cell model was first validated by reproducing the longer action potential, slower and lower calcium transient, and earlier alternans characteristic of heart failure EP. Subsequently, we compared the electrical wave propagation in one dimensional cables of healthy and failing cells. The validated cell model was then used to simulate the EP of heart failure in an anatomically accurate biventricular rabbit model. As pacing cycle length decreases, both the normal and failing heart develop T-wave alternans, but only the failing heart shows QRS alternans (although moderate) at rapid pacing. Moreover, T-wave alternans is significantly more pronounced in the failing heart. At rapid pacing, APD maps show areas of conduction block in the failing heart. Finally, accelerated pacing initiated wave reentry and breakup in the failing heart. Further, the onset of VF was not observed with an upregulation of SERCA, a potential drug therapy, using the same protocol. The changes introduced at the cell and tissue level have increased the failing heart's susceptibility to dynamic instabilities and arrhythmias under rapid pacing. However, the observed increase in arrhythmogenic potential is

  7. Electrophysiology of Heart Failure Using a Rabbit Model: From the Failing Myocyte to Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Michael; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Klug, William S.; Garfinkel, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death, yet its underlying electrophysiological (EP) mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we use a multiscale approach to analyze a model of heart failure and connect its results to features of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The heart failure model is derived by modifying a previously validated electrophysiology model for a healthy rabbit heart. Specifically, in accordance with the heart failure literature, we modified the cell EP by changing both membrane currents and calcium handling. At the tissue level, we modeled the increased gap junction lateralization and lower conduction velocity due to downregulation of Connexin 43. At the biventricular level, we reduced the apex-to-base and transmural gradients of action potential duration (APD). The failing cell model was first validated by reproducing the longer action potential, slower and lower calcium transient, and earlier alternans characteristic of heart failure EP. Subsequently, we compared the electrical wave propagation in one dimensional cables of healthy and failing cells. The validated cell model was then used to simulate the EP of heart failure in an anatomically accurate biventricular rabbit model. As pacing cycle length decreases, both the normal and failing heart develop T-wave alternans, but only the failing heart shows QRS alternans (although moderate) at rapid pacing. Moreover, T-wave alternans is significantly more pronounced in the failing heart. At rapid pacing, APD maps show areas of conduction block in the failing heart. Finally, accelerated pacing initiated wave reentry and breakup in the failing heart. Further, the onset of VF was not observed with an upregulation of SERCA, a potential drug therapy, using the same protocol. The changes introduced at the cell and tissue level have increased the failing heart’s susceptibility to dynamic instabilities and arrhythmias under rapid pacing. However, the observed increase in arrhythmogenic potential is

  8. A model for predicting embankment slope failures in clay-rich soils; A Louisiana example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    A model for predicting embankment slope failures in clay-rich soils; A Louisiana example It is well known that smectite-rich soils significantly reduce the stability of slopes. The question is how much smectite in the soil causes slope failures. A study of over 100 sites in north and south Louisiana, USA, compared slopes that failed during a major El Nino winter (heavy rainfall) in 1982-1983 to similar slopes that did not fail. Soils in the slopes were tested for per cent clay, liquid limits, plasticity indices and semi-quantitative clay mineralogy. Slopes with the High Risk for failure (85-90% chance of failure in 8-15 years after construction) contained soils with a liquid limit > 54%, a plasticity index over 29%, and clay contents > 47%. Slopes with an Intermediate Risk (55-50% chance of failure in 8-15 years) contained soils with a liquid limit between 36-54%, plasticity index between 16-19%, and clay content between 32-47%. Slopes with a Low Risk chance of failure (< 5% chance of failure in 8-15 years after construction) contained soils with a liquid limit < 36%, a plasticity index < 16%, and a clay content < 32%. These data show that if one is constructing embankments and one wants to prevent slope failure of the 3:1 slopes, check the above soil characteristics before construction. If the soils fall into the Low Risk classification, construct the embankment normally. If the soils fall into the High Risk classification, one will need to use lime stabilization or heat treatments to prevent failures. Soils in the Intermediate Risk class will have to be evaluated on a case by case basis.

  9. Modeling of damage driven fracture failure of fiber post-restored teeth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binting; Wang, Yining; Li, Qing

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical failure of biomaterials, which can be initiated by either violent force, or progressive stress fatigue, is a serious issue. Great efforts have been made to improve the mechanical performances of dental restorations. Virtual simulation is a promising approach for biomechanical investigations, which presents significant advantages in improving efficiency than traditional in vivo/in vitro studies. Over the past few decades, a number of virtual studies have been conducted to investigate the biomechanical issues concerning dental biomaterials, but only with limited incorporation of brittle failure phenomena. Motivated by the contradictory findings between several finite element analyses and common clinical observations on the fracture resistance of post-restored teeth, this study aimed to provide an approach using numerical simulations for investigating the fracture failure process through a non-linear fracture mechanics model. The ability of this approach to predict fracture initiation and propagation in a complex biomechanical status based on the intrinsic material properties was investigated. Results of the virtual simulations matched the findings of experimental tests, in terms of the ultimate fracture failure strengths and predictive areas under risk of clinical failure. This study revealed that the failure of dental post-restored restorations is a typical damage-driven continuum-to-discrete process. This approach is anticipated to have ramifications not only for modeling fracture events, but also for the design and optimization of the mechanical properties of biomaterials for specific clinically determined requirements. PMID:26056997

  10. A Modeling Technique and Representation of Failure in the Analysis of Triaxial Braided Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Quasi-static tests have been performed on triaxially braided carbon fiber composite materials with large unit cell sizes. The effects of different fibers and matrix materials on the failure mode were investigated. Simulations of the tests have been performed using the transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. However, the wide range of failure modes observed for the triaxial braided carbon fiber composites during tests could not be simulated using composite material models currently available within LS-DYNA. A macroscopic approach has been developed that provides better simulation of the material response in these materials. This approach uses full-field optical measurement techniques to measure local failures during quasi-static testing. Information from these experiments is then used along with the current material models available in LS-DYNA to simulate the influence of the braided architecture on the failure process. This method uses two-dimensional shell elements with integration points through the thickness of the elements to represent the different layers of braid along with a new analytical method for the import of material stiffness and failure data directly. The present method is being used to examine the effect of material properties on the failure process. The experimental approaches used to obtain the required data will be described, and preliminary results of the numerical analysis will be presented.

  11. Why Won't You Do What I Want? The Informative Failures of Children and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Christopher H.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Munakata, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    Computational models are powerful tools--too powerful, according to some. We argue that the idea that models can "do anything" is wrong, and we describe how their failures have been informative. We present new work showing surprising diversity in the effects of feedback on children's task-switching, such that some children perseverate despite this…

  12. Creating a Learning Flow: A Hybrid Course Model for High-Failure-Rate Math Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Katherine; Zweier, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Higher education in the United States is facing a failure-rate crisis in entry-level mathematics courses. In this article, the authors describe an innovative, technology-enhanced hybrid course model that has significantly improved course completion and content mastery outcomes in general education (GE) mathematics courses. The model relies on five…

  13. Optimization of intrabone delivery of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a swine model using cell radiolabeling with [89]zirconium.

    PubMed

    Pantin, J M; Hoyt, R F; Aras, O; Sato, N; Chen, M Y; Hunt, T; Clevenger, R; Eclarinal, P; Adler, S; Choyke, P; Childs, R W

    2015-03-01

    Intrabone (IB) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) of umbilical cord blood in humans remains experimental and the technique has not been optimized. It is unknown whether hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) injected IB are initially retained in the marrow or rapidly enter into the venous circulation before homing to the marrow. To develop an IB-injection technique that maximizes HPC marrow-retention, we tracked radiolabeled human HPCs following IB-injection into swine. We developed a method to radionuclide-label HPCs using a long-lived positron emitter (89) Zr and protamine sulfate that resulted in cellular-retention of low-dose radioactivity. This approach achieved radioactivity levels sufficient for detection by positron emission tomography with both high sensitivity and spatial resolution when fused with computed tomography. We found that conditions utilized in pilot IB-HCT clinical trials conducted by others led to both rapid drainage into the central venous circulation and cellular extravasation into surrounding muscle and soft tissues. By optimizing the needle design, using continuous real-time intra-marrow pressure monitoring, and by reducing the infusion-volume and infusion-rate, we overcame this limitation and achieved high retention of HPCs in the marrow. This method of IB cellular delivery is readily applicable in the clinic and could be utilized in future investigational IB-HCT trials aimed at maximizing marrow retention of HPCs.

  14. Renal and cardiac neuropeptide Y and NPY receptors in a rat model of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Callanan, Ean Y; Lee, Edward W; Tilan, Jason U; Winaver, Joseph; Haramati, Aviad; Mulroney, Susan E; Zukowska, Zofia

    2007-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is coreleased with norepinephrine and stimulates vasoconstriction, vascular and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via Y1 receptors (R) and angiogenesis via Y2R. Although circulating NPY is elevated in heart failure, NPY's role remains unclear. Activation of the NPY system was determined in Wistar rats with the aortocaval (A-V) fistula model of high-output heart failure. Plasma NPY levels were elevated in A-V fistula animals (115.7 +/- 15.3 vs. 63.1 +/- 17.4 pM in sham, P < 0.04). Animals either compensated [urinary Na(+) excretion returning to normal with moderate disease (COMP)] or remained decompensated with severe cardiac and renal failure (urinary Na(+) excretion <0.5 meq/day), increased heart weight, decreased mean arterial pressure and renal blood flow (RBF), and death within 5-7 days (DECOMP). Cardiac and renal tissue NPY decreased with heart failure, proportionate to the severity of renal complications. Cardiac and renal Y1R mRNA expression also decreased (1.5-fold, P < 0.005) in rats with heart failure. In contrast, Y2R expression increased up to 72-fold in the heart and 5.7-fold in the kidney (P < 0.001) proportionate to severity of heart failure and cardiac hypertrophy. Changes in receptor expression were confirmed since the Y1R agonist, [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY, had no effect on RBF, whereas the Y2R agonist (13-36)-NPY increased RBF to compensate for disease. Thus, in this model of heart failure, cardiac and renal NPY Y1 receptors decrease and Y2 receptors increase, suggesting an increased effect of NPY on the receptors involved in cardiac remodeling and angiogenesis, and highlighting an important regulatory role of NPY in congestive heart failure.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Damage using an Elastic-Viscoplastic Model with Directional Tensile Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-03-17

    A new continuum model for directional tensile failure has been developed that can simulate weakening and void formation due to directional tensile failure. The model is developed within the context of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory. A second order damage tensor is introduced which allows simulation of weakening to tension applied in one direction, without weakening to subsequent tension applied in perpendicular directions. This damage tensor can be advected using standard methods in computer codes. Porosity is used as an isotropic measure of volumetric void strain and its evolution is influenced by tensile failure. The rate of dissipation due to directional tensile failure takes a particularly simple form, which can be analyzed easily. Specifically, the model can be combined with general constitutive equations for porous compaction and dilation, as well as viscoplasticity. A robust non-iterative numerical scheme for integrating these evolution equations is proposed. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. A number of simulations of complicated shock loading of different materials have been performed including problems of fracture of rock. These simulations show that directionality of damage can play a significant role in material failure.

  16. A computational library for multiscale modeling of material failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Silani, Mohammad; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.; Kerfriden, Pierre; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-05-01

    We present an open-source software framework called PERMIX for multiscale modeling and simulation of fracture in solids. The framework is an object oriented open-source effort written primarily in Fortran 2003 standard with Fortran/C++ interfaces to a number of other libraries such as LAMMPS, ABAQUS, LS-DYNA and GMSH. Fracture on the continuum level is modeled by the extended finite element method (XFEM). Using several novel or state of the art methods, the piece software handles semi-concurrent multiscale methods as well as concurrent multiscale methods for fracture, coupling two continuum domains or atomistic domains to continuum domains, respectively. The efficiency of our open-source software is shown through several simulations including a 3D crack modeling in clay nanocomposites, a semi-concurrent FE-FE coupling, a 3D Arlequin multiscale example and an MD-XFEM coupling for dynamic crack propagation.

  17. Wide-area traffic: The failure of Poisson modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Paxson, V.; Floyd, S.

    1994-08-01

    Network arrivals are often modeled as Poisson processes for analytic simplicity, even though a number of traffic studies have shown that packet interarrivals are not exponentially distributed. The authors evaluate 21 wide-area traces, investigating a number of wide-area TCP arrival processes (session and connection arrivals, FTPDATA connection arrivals within FTP sessions, and TELNET packet arrivals) to determine the error introduced by modeling them using Poisson processes. The authors find that user-initiated TCP session arrivals, such as remote-login and file-transfer, are well-modeled as Poisson processes with fixed hourly rates, but that other connection arrivals deviate considerably from Poisson; that modeling TELNET packet interarrivals as exponential grievously underestimates the burstiness of TELNET traffic, but using the empirical Tcplib[DJCME92] interarrivals preserves burstiness over many time scales; and that FTPDATA connection arrivals within FTP sessions come bunched into ``connection bursts``, the largest of which are so large that they completely dominate FTPDATA traffic. Finally, they offer some preliminary results regarding how the findings relate to the possible self-similarity of wide-area traffic.

  18. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time. PMID:25171521

  19. Original mechanism of failure initiation revealed through modelling of naturally occurring microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatikh, Larissa; Lomov, Stepan V.; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2010-05-01

    Motivated to reveal original mechanisms of failure resistance, we developed a material model that encompasses most reoccurring microstructural features of natural composites. The interesting result of the work is a notion that material failure is governed by the quality of interactions between hierarchical levels in the material microstructure. With intelligent use of the structure, these interactions can be tuned to create a powerful synergetic effect on the material failure behaviour. For example, while exploring different mechanisms of failure initiation in composites with bimodal size reinforcements (an indirect way to model two levels of hierarchy simultaneously) we found that failure initiation could be shifted from stress concentration sites of the higher level to the lower level. One could say that the material behaviour became insensitive to the presence of reinforcements on the higher level—a phenomenon that is counterintuitive to what is commonly known. The new mechanism of failure initiation could only be activated in composites with a highly controlled structural organization—in the studied case, reinforcements of the lower level needed to establish lamellar pathways between reinforcements of the higher level. These pathways lead to formation of an intriguing network-like microstructure. Intelligent communication between reinforcements in such a network created the necessary synergy to change the failure initiation mechanism in a discontinuous fashion. Another finding was that by establishing such a network, tensile stresses near dangerous stress concentration sites were locally transformed into compressive stresses. Resemblance of the revealed mechanism to phenomena on the nano-scale was also discussed. In the course of this work a new method was developed to investigate interactions between reinforcements and their collective input into effective and local properties of a composite. The reinforcement phase was modelled with the use of rigid

  20. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL IGNITION AND GROWTH REACTIVE FLOW MODELING OF PRISM FAILURE TESTS ON PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M L; Tarver, C M

    2006-06-20

    The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives based on triaminotirnitrobenzene (TATB) is applied to three-dimensional detonation wave propagation. The most comprehensive set of three-dimensional detonation wave propagation data is that measured using the trapezoidal prism test. In this test, a PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% Estane, and 2.5% BDNPA/F) line detonator initiates a detonation wave along the trapezoidal face of a PBX 9502 (95% TATB and 5% Kel-F binder) prism. The failure thickness, which has been shown experimentally to be roughly half of the failure diameter of a long cylindrical charge, is measured after 50 mm of detonation wave propagation by impact with an aluminum witness plate. The effects of confinement impedance on the PBX 9502 failure thickness have been measured using air (unconfined), water, PMMA, magnesium, aluminum, lead, and copper placed in contact with the rectangular faces of the prism parallel to the direction of detonation propagation. These prism test results are modeled using the two-dimensional PBX 9502 Ignition and Growth model parameters determined by calculating failure diameter and tested on recent corner turning experiments. Good agreement between experimentally measured and calculated prism failure thicknesses for unconfined and confined PBX 9502 is reported.

  2. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  3. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure.

  4. N-11C-Methyl-Dopamine PET Imaging of Sympathetic Nerve Injury in a Swine Model of Acute Myocardial Ischemia: A Comparison with 13N-Ammonia PET

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weina; Wang, Xiangcheng; He, Yulin; Nie, Yongzhen; Zhang, Guojian; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Using a swine model of acute myocardial ischemia, we sought to validate N-11C-methyl-dopamine (11C-MDA) as an agent capable of imaging cardiac sympathetic nerve injury. Methods. Acute myocardial ischemia was surgically generated in Chinese minipigs. ECG and serum enzyme levels were used to detect the presence of myocardial ischemia. Paired 11C-MDA PET and 13N-ammonia PET scans were performed at baseline, 1 day, and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery to relate cardiac sympathetic nerve injury to blood perfusion. Results. Seven survived the surgical procedure. The ECG-ST segment was depressed, and levels of the serum enzymes increased. Cardiac uptake of tracer was quantified as the defect volume. Both before and immediately after surgery, the images obtained with 11C-MDA and 13N-ammonia were similar. At 1 to 6 months after surgery, however, 11C-MDA postsurgical left ventricular myocardial defect volume was significantly greater compared to 13N-ammonia. Conclusions. In the Chinese minipig model of acute myocardial ischemia, the extent of the myocardial defect as visualized by 11C-MDA is much greater than would be suggested by blood perfusion images, and the recovery from myocardial sympathetic nerve injury is much slower than the restoration of blood perfusion. 11C-MDA PET may provide additional biological information during recovery from ischemic heart disease. PMID:27034950

  5. Failure analysis and modeling of a multicomputer system. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramani, Sujatha Srinivasan

    1990-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of an extensive measurement-based analysis of real error data collected from a 7-machine DEC VaxCluster multicomputer system. In addition to evaluating basic system error and failure characteristics, we develop reward models to analyze the impact of failures and errors on the system. The results show that, although 98 percent of errors in the shared resources recover, they result in 48 percent of all system failures. The analysis of rewards shows that the expected reward rate for the VaxCluster decreases to 0.5 in 100 days for a 3 out of 7 model, which is well over a 100 times that for a 7-out-of-7 model. A comparison of the reward rates for a range of k-out-of-n models indicates that the maximum increase in reward rate (0.25) occurs in going from the 6-out-of-7 model to the 5-out-of-7 model. The analysis also shows that software errors have the lowest reward (0.2 vs. 0.91 for network errors). The large loss in reward rate for software errors is due to the fact that a large proportion (94 percent) of software errors lead to failure. In comparison, the high reward rate for network errors is due to fast recovery from a majority of these errors (median recovery duration is 0 seconds).

  6. Advances in Constitutive and Failure Models for Sheet Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong Whan; Stoughton, Thomas B.

    2016-08-01

    Non-Associated Flow Rule (Non-AFR) can be used as a convenient way to account for anisotropic material response in metal deformation processes, making it possible for example, to eliminate the problem of the anomalous yielding in equibiaxial tension that is mistakenly attributed to limitations of the quadratic yield function, but may instead be attributed to the Associated Flow Rule (AFR). Seeing as in Non-AFR based models two separate functions can be adopted for yield and plastic potential, there is no constraint to which models are used to describe each of them. In this work, the flexible combination of two different yield criteria as yield function and plastic potential under Non-AFR is proposed and evaluated. FE simulations were carried so as to verify the accuracy of the material directionalities predicted using these constitutive material models. The stability conditions for non-associated flow connected with the prediction of yield point elongation are also reviewed. Anisotropic distortion hardening is further incorporated under non-associated flow. It has been found that anisotropic hardening makes the noticeable improvements for both earing and spring-back predictions. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the topic of the forming limit & necking, the evidence in favor of stress analysis, and the motivation for the development of a new type of forming limit diagram based on the polar effective plastic strain (PEPS) diagram. In order to connect necking to fracture in metals, the stress-based necking limit is combined with a stress- based fracture criterion in the principal stress, which provides an efficient method for the analysis of necking and fracture limits. The concept for the PEPS diagram is further developed to cover the path-independent PEPS fracture which is compatible with the stress-based fracture approach. Thus this fracture criterion can be utilized to describe the post-necking behavior and to cover nonlinear strain-path. Fracture

  7. A visco-poroelastic damage model for modelling compaction and brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells is often used to increase heat extraction from deep geothermal reservoirs. Initiation and propagation of fractures due to pore pressure build-up increase the effective permeability of the porous medium. Understanding the processes controlling the initiation of fractures, the evolution of their geometries and the hydro-mechanical impact on transport properties of the porous medium is therefore of great interest for geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes occurring during deformation of a porous rock. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To validate and illustrate the model, simulations of the deformation behaviour of cylindrical porous Bentheimer sandstone samples under different confining pressures are compared to experiments. The first experiment under low confining pressure leads to shear failure, the second for high confining pressure leads to cataclastic compaction and the third one with intermediate confining pressure correspond to a transitional regime between the two firsts. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field

  8. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    PubMed

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  9. Voltage-based Device Tracking in a 1.5 Tesla MRI during Imaging: Initial validation in swine models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion TH; Reichlin, Tobias R; Michaud, Gregory F; Watkins, Ronald D; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Kwong, Raymond Y; Stevenson, William; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Byrd, Israel; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Voltage-based device-tracking (VDT) systems are commonly used for tracking invasive devices in electrophysiological (EP) cardiac-arrhythmia therapy. During EP procedures, electro-anatomic-mapping (EAM) workstations provide guidance by integrating VDT location and intra-cardiac-ECG information with X-ray, CT, Ultrasound, and MR images. MR assists navigation, mapping and radio-frequency-ablation. Multi-modality interventions require multiple patient transfers between an MRI and the X-ray/ultrasound EP suite, increasing the likelihood of patient-motion and image mis-registration. An MRI-compatible VDT system may increase efficiency, since there is currently no single method to track devices both inside and outside the MRI scanner. Methods An MRI-compatible VDT system was constructed by modifying a commercial system. Hardware was added to reduce MRI gradient-ramp and radio-frequency-unblanking-pulse interference. VDT patches and cables were modified to reduce heating. Five swine cardiac VDT EAM-mapping interventions were performed, navigating inside and thereafter outside the MRI. Results Three-catheter VDT interventions were performed at >12 frames-per-second both inside and outside the MRI scanner with <3mm error. Catheters were followed on VDT- and MRI-derived maps. Simultaneous VDT and imaging was possible in repetition-time (TR) >32 msec sequences with <0.5mm errors, and <5% MRI SNR loss. At shorter TRs, only intra-cardiac-ECG was reliable. RF Heating was <1.5C°. Conclusion An MRI-compatible VDT system is feasible. PMID:23580479

  10. Pacing-induced regional differences in adenosine receptors mRNA expression in a swine model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, Silvia; Cabiati, Manuela; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Aquaro, Giovanni D; Martino, Alessandro; Mattii, Letizia; Morales, Maria-Aurora

    2012-01-01

    The adenosinergic system is essential in the mediation of intrinsic protection and myocardial resistance to insult; it may be considered a cardioprotective molecule and adenosine receptors (ARs) represent potential therapeutic targets in the setting of heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to test whether differences exist between mRNA expression of ARs in the anterior left ventricle (LV) wall (pacing site: PS) compared to the infero septal wall (opposite region: OS) in an experimental model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac tissue was collected from LV PS and OS of adult male minipigs with pacing-induced HF (n = 10) and from a control group (C, n = 4). ARs and TNF-α mRNA expression was measured by Real Time-PCR and the results were normalized with the three most stably expressed genes (GAPDH, HPRT1, TBP). Immunohistochemistry analysis was also performed. After 3 weeks of pacing higher levels of expression for each analyzed AR were observed in PS except for A(1)R (A(1)R: C = 0.6±0.2, PS = 0.1±0.04, OS = 0.04±0.01, p<0.0001 C vs. PS and OS respectively; A(2A)R: C = 1.04±0.59, PS = 2.62±0.79, OS = 2.99±0.79; A(2B)R: C = 1.2±0.1, PS = 5.59±2.3, OS = 1.59±0.46; A(3)R: C = 0.76±0.18, PS = 8.40±3.38, OS = 4.40±0.83). Significant contractile impairment and myocardial hypoperfusion were observed at PS after three weeks of pacing as compared to OS. TNF-α mRNA expression resulted similar in PS (6.3±2.4) and in OS (5.9±2.7) although higher than in control group (3.4±1.5). ARs expression was mainly detected in cardiomyocytes. This study provided new information on ARs local changes in the setting of LV dysfunction and on the role of these receptors in relation to pacing-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion and contraction. These results suggest a possible therapeutic role of adenosine in patients with HF and dyssynchronous LV contraction.

  11. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  12. Structural Nested Cumulative Failure Time Models to Estimate the Effects of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Picciotto, Sally; Hernán, Miguel A.; Page, John H.; Young, Jessica G.; Robins, James M.

    2013-01-01

    In the presence of time-varying confounders affected by prior treatment, standard statistical methods for failure time analysis may be biased. Methods that correctly adjust for this type of covariate include the parametric g-formula, inverse probability weighted estimation of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models, and g-estimation of structural nested accelerated failure time models. In this article, we propose a novel method to estimate the causal effect of a time-dependent treatment on failure in the presence of informative right-censoring and time-dependent confounders that may be affected by past treatment: g-estimation of structural nested cumulative failure time models (SNCFTMs). An SNCFTM considers the conditional effect of a final treatment at time m on the outcome at each later time k by modeling the ratio of two counterfactual cumulative risks at time k under treatment regimes that differ only at time m. Inverse probability weights are used to adjust for informative censoring. We also present a procedure that, under certain “no-interaction” conditions, uses the g-estimates of the model parameters to calculate unconditional cumulative risks under nondynamic (static) treatment regimes. The procedure is illustrated with an example using data from a longitudinal cohort study, in which the “treatments” are healthy behaviors and the outcome is coronary heart disease. PMID:24347749

  13. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, Evi; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Remmen, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner. Background The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation. Methods This qualitative study describes seven non-invasive home-care telemonitoring projects in patients with heart failure in Belgium. A qualitative design, including interviews and literature review, was used to describe the correspondence of these home-care telemonitoring projects with the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. Results The projects were situated in primary and secondary health care. Their primary goal was to reduce the number of readmissions for chronic heart failure. None of these projects succeeded in a final implementation of telemonitoring in home care after the pilot phase. Not all the projects were initiated to accomplish all of the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. A central role for the patient was sparse. Conclusion Limited financial resources hampered continuation after the pilot phase. Cooperation and coordination in telemonitoring appears to be major barriers but are, within primary care as well as between the lines of care, important links in follow-up. This discrepancy can be prohibitive for deployment of good chronic care. Chronic Care Model is recommended as basis for future. PMID:25114664

  14. Plaque assay for African swine fever virus on swine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bustos, M J; Nogal, M L; Revilla, Y; Carrascosa, A L

    2002-07-01

    A plaque assay developed to detect the infection of African Swine Fever Virus on swine macrophages is described. Plaques were generated by all of the virus isolates tested. The method is suitable not only for virus titration but also for the selection of clones in protocols for isolation/purification of recombinant viruses.

  15. Identification of Modeling Approaches To Support Common-Cause Failure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Experience with applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The impact of CCF vulnerability is to inhibit I&C modernization and, thereby, challenge the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, the issue of CCF vulnerability for highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden resulting in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty regarding which mitigation strategies are acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. The conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the U.S. nuclear industry require crosscutting research to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for usage in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting an investigation into mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive technical basis for establishing the qualification of digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the investigation of modeling approaches for representing failure of I&C systems. Failure models are used when there is a need to analyze how the probability of success (or failure) of a system depends on the success (or failure) of individual elements. If these failure models are extensible to represent CCF, then they can be employed to support analysis of CCF vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies. Specifically, the research findings documented in this report identify modeling approaches that

  16. Experiments for Calibration and Validation of Plasticity and Failure Material Modeling: 6061-T651 Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Sam X.; Korellis, John S.; Lee, Kenneth L.; Rogillio, Brendan R.; Hatch, Paul W.

    2008-03-01

    Experimental data for material plasticity and failure model calibration and validation were obtained from 6061-T651 aluminum, in the form of a 4-in. diameter extruded rod. Model calibration data were taken from smooth tension, notched tension, and shear tests. Model validation data were provided from experiments using thin-walled tube specimens subjected to path-dependent combinations of internal pressure, extension, and torsion.

  17. Failure of climate regulation in a geophysiological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, James E.; Kump, Lee R.

    1994-06-01

    THERE has been much debate about how the Earth responds to changes in climate-specifically, how feedbacks involving the biota change with temperature. There is in particular an urgent need to understand the extent of coupling and feedback between plant growth, global temperature and enhanced atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Here we present a simple, but we hope qualitatively realistic, analysis of the effects of temperature change on the feedbacks induced by changes in surface distribution of marine algae and land plants. We assume that algae affect climate primarily through their emission of dimethyl sulphide1-8 (which may influence cloud albedo), and that land plants do so by fixation of atmospheric CO2 (refs 9-12). When we consider how the planetary area occupied by these two ecosystems varies with temperature, we find that a simple model based on these ideas exhibits three feedback regimes. In glacial conditions, both marine and terrestrial ecosystems provide a negative feedback. As the temperature rises to present-day values, algae lose their strong climate influence, but terrestrial ecosystems continue to regulate the climate. But if global mean temperatures rise above about 20 °C, both terrestrial and marine ecosystems are in positive feedback, amplifying any further increase of temperature. As the latter conditions have existed in the past, we propose that other climate-regulating mechanisms must operate in this warm regime.

  18. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Probabilistic models for flaw propagation and turbine blade failure. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflights systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with analytical modeling of failure phenomena to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in analytical modeling, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which analytical models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. State-of-the-art analytical models currently employed for design, failure prediction, or performance analysis are used in this methodology. The rationale for the statistical approach taken in the PFA methodology is discussed, the PFA methodology is described, and examples of its application to structural failure modes are presented. The engineering models and computer software used in fatigue crack growth and fatigue crack initiation applications are thoroughly documented.

  19. Feral swine contact with domestic swine: a serologic survey and assessment of potential for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, A Christy; Henke, Scott E; Campbell, Tyler A; Hewitt, David G; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2009-04-01

    Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are present in 38 of the 50 United States, and their populations continue to expand. Domestic swine are widely regarded as vulnerable to diseases harbored by feral swine. Our objectives were to determine antibody prevalence for selected pathogens in Texas feral swine populations and identify contact events between feral and domestic swine. Overall prevalence of antibodies against brucellosis and pseudorabies virus was 11% and 30%, respectively. Antibodies to porcine reproductive and respiratory disease virus were detected in 3% of feral swine from southern Texas. All samples tested negative for antibodies to classical swine fever virus. To determine the frequency of contact events between feral swine and domestic swine in neighboring facilities, we analyzed movement data from 37 adult feral swine that were trapped < or =10 km from domestic swine facilities and equipped with geographic positioning system collars. Seven of the 37 feral swine had contact (relocated within 100 m) with domestic swine. We found that contact between feral swine and domestic swine occurred predominantly at night. Additionally, we analyzed 60 consecutive days of experimental track plots around pens that contained domestic swine and empty control pens, and found greater visitation by feral swine to the domestic swine pens. Our data demonstrate that feral swine have direct contact with domestic swine, which presents opportunity for disease transmission.

  20. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine...

  1. Vegetative buffers for swine odor mitigation - wind tunnel evaluation of air flow dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scale model wind tunnel experiments were completed to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of vegetative buffers to mitigate swine odor and particulate transport. Three series of wind tunnel experiments were completed. The first included four swine housing unit models and either a slurry tank...

  2. Swine Worker Precautions During Suspected Outbreaks of Influenza in Swine.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Gibbs, Shawn; Torremorell, Montserrat; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    To assess the behavior and precautions that swine workers take during suspected influenza outbreaks in swine, six commercial swine farms in the Midwest U.S. region were visited when influenza outbreaks were suspected in herds during the fall/winter of 2012-2013. Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and type of task performed by swine workers were recorded based on farm representative reports. Between one to two workers were working on the day of each visit and spent approximately 25 minutes performing work-related tasks that placed them in close contact with the swine. The most common tasks reported were walking the aisles (27%), handling pigs (21%), and handling equipment (21%). The most common PPE were boots (100%), heavy rubber gloves (75%), and dedicated nondisposable clothing (74%). Use of N95 respirators was reported at three farms. Hand hygiene practices were common in most of the farms, but reportedly performed for only 20% to 25% of tasks. PMID:27263180

  3. Cardiac Strain in a Swine Model of Regional Hibernating Myocardium: Effects of CoQ10 on Contractile Reserve Following Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hocum Stone, Laura; Butterick, Tammy A; Duffy, Cayla; Swingen, Corey; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2016-08-01

    There is conflicting clinical evidence whether administration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improves function following coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Using a swine model of hibernating myocardium, we tested whether daily CoQ10 would improve contractile function by MRI at 4-week post-CABG. Twelve pigs underwent a thoracotomy and had a constrictor placed on the left anterior descending (LAD). At 12 weeks, they underwent off-pump bypass and received daily dietary supplements of either CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) or placebo. At 4-week post-CABG, circumferential strain measurements in the hibernating LAD region from placebo and CoQ10 groups were not different and increased to a similar extent with dobutamine (-14.7 ± 0.6 versus -14.8 ± 0.1, respectively (NS)). Post-sacrifice, oxidant stress markers were obtained in the mitochondrial isolates and protein carbonyl in the placebo, and CoQ10 groups were 6.14 ± 0.36 and 5.05 ± 0.32 nmol/mg, respectively (NS). In summary, CoQ10 did not improve contractile reserve or reduce oxidant stress at 4-week post-CABG.

  4. Cardiac Strain in a Swine Model of Regional Hibernating Myocardium: Effects of CoQ10 on Contractile Reserve Following Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hocum Stone, Laura; Butterick, Tammy A; Duffy, Cayla; Swingen, Corey; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2016-08-01

    There is conflicting clinical evidence whether administration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improves function following coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Using a swine model of hibernating myocardium, we tested whether daily CoQ10 would improve contractile function by MRI at 4-week post-CABG. Twelve pigs underwent a thoracotomy and had a constrictor placed on the left anterior descending (LAD). At 12 weeks, they underwent off-pump bypass and received daily dietary supplements of either CoQ10 (10 mg/kg/day) or placebo. At 4-week post-CABG, circumferential strain measurements in the hibernating LAD region from placebo and CoQ10 groups were not different and increased to a similar extent with dobutamine (-14.7 ± 0.6 versus -14.8 ± 0.1, respectively (NS)). Post-sacrifice, oxidant stress markers were obtained in the mitochondrial isolates and protein carbonyl in the placebo, and CoQ10 groups were 6.14 ± 0.36 and 5.05 ± 0.32 nmol/mg, respectively (NS). In summary, CoQ10 did not improve contractile reserve or reduce oxidant stress at 4-week post-CABG. PMID:27184805

  5. Liver Hypertrophy After Percutaneous Portal Vein Embolization: Comparison of N-Butyl-2-Cyanocrylate Versus Sodium Acrylate-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer Particles in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Theocharis, Stamatis; Ptohis, Nikolaos Alexopoulou, Efthimia; Mantziaras, George; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. Brountzos, Elias N.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous portal vein embolization (PPVE) induces hypertrophy of the future liver remnant before hepatic resection. The ideal embolic material has not yet been determined. We compared N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate (NBCA) with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles using a swine model. Materials and Methods: Twelve pigs underwent PPVE. Six pigs (group A) were embolized with NBCA, and 6 pigs (group B) were embolized with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles. Computed tomographic volumetry of the embolized lobe (EL) and the nonembolized lobe (NEL), along with liver function tests, was performed before and at 14 and 28 days after embolization. Tissue samples from both lobes were taken 14 and 28 days after PPVE. Results: NEL-volume and NEL-ratio increases were significantly higher in group A at 14 and 28 days after PPVE (78 and 52% and 91 and 66%, respectively) than in group B (32 and 12% and 28 and 10%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Percent change of the EL-volume was significantly higher for group A at 28 days after PPVE. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding hepatocyte proliferation on the NEL and apoptosis on the EL at both time intervals. Conclusion: PPVE using NBCA is more efficient and causes more NEL hypertrophy than microspheres.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Reperfused Myocardial Infarction: Intraindividual Comparison of ECIII-60 and Gd-DTPA in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jiyang; Teng Gaojun; Feng Yi; Wu Yanping; Jin Qindi; Wang Yu; Wang Zhen; Lu Qin; Jiang Yibo; Wang Shengqi; Chen Feng; Marchal, Guy; Ni Yicheng

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To compare a necrosis-avid contrast agent (NACA) bis-Gd-DTPA-pamoic acid derivative (ECIII-60) after intracoronary delivery with an extracellular agent Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a swine model of acute reperfused myocardial infarction (MI). Methods. Eight pigs underwent 90 min of transcatheter coronary balloon occlusion and 60 min of reperfusion. After intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA at a dose of 0.2 mmol/kg, all pigs were scanned with T1-weighted MRI until the delayed enhancement of MI disappeared. Then they were intracoronarily infused with ECIII-60 at 0.0025 mmol/kg and imaged for 5 hr. Signal intensity, infarct-over-normal contrast ratio and relative infarct size were quantified, compared, and correlated with the results of postmortem MRI and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) histochemical staining. Results. A contrast ratio over 3.0 was induced by both Gd-DTPA and ECIII-60. However, while the delayed enhancement with Gd-DTPA virtually vanished in 1 hr, ECIII-60 at an 80x smaller dose depicted the MI accurately over 5 hr as proven by ex vivo MRI and TTC staining. Conclusion. Both Gd-DTPA and ECIII-60 strongly enhanced acute MI. Comparing with fading contrast in a narrow time window with intravenous Gd-DTPA, intracoronary ECIII-60 persistently demarcated the acute MI, indicating a potential method for postprocedural assessment of myocardial viability after coronary interventions.

  7. Evaluating the risk of water distribution system failure: A shared frailty model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Thurnau, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    Condition assessment (CA) Modeling is drawing increasing interest as a technique that can assist in managing drinking water infrastructure. This paper develops a model based on the application of a Cox proportional hazard (PH)/shared frailty model and applies it to evaluating the risk of failure in drinking water networks using data from the Laramie Water Utility (located in Laramie, Wyoming, USA). Using the risk model a cost/ benefit analysis incorporating the inspection value method (IVM), is used to assist in making improved repair, replacement and rehabilitation decisions for selected drinking water distribution system pipes. A separate model is developed to predict failures in prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). Various currently available inspection technologies are presented and discussed.

  8. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease in feral swine: susceptibility and transmission.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, F; Swafford, S; Petrowski, H; Bracht, A; Schmit, B; Fabian, A; Pacheco, J M; Hartwig, E; Berninger, M; Carrillo, C; Mayr, G; Moran, K; Kavanaugh, D; Leibrecht, H; White, W; Metwally, S

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in feral swine are limited, and data for clinical manifestations and disease transmissibility are lacking. In this report, feral and domestic swine were experimentally infected with FMDV (A24-Cruzeiro), and susceptibility and virus transmission were studied. Feral swine were proved to be highly susceptible to A-24 Cruzeiro FMD virus by intradermal inoculation and by contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Typical clinical signs in feral swine included transient fever, lameness and vesicular lesions in the coronary bands, heel bulbs, tip of the tongue and snout. Domestic swine exhibited clinical signs of the disease within 24 h after contact with feral swine, whereas feral swine did not show clinical signs of FMD until 48 h after contact with infected domestic and feral swine. Clinical scores of feral and domestic swine were comparable. However, feral swine exhibited a higher tolerance for the disease, and their thicker, darker skin made vesicular lesions difficult to detect. Virus titration of oral swabs showed that both feral and domestic swine shed similar amounts of virus, with levels peaking between 2 to 4 dpi/dpc (days post-inoculation/days post-contact). FMDV RNA was intermittently detectable in the oral swabs by real-time RT-PCR of both feral and domestic swine between 1 and 8 dpi/dpc and in some instances until 14 dpi/12 dpc. Both feral and domestic swine seroconverted 6-8 dpi/dpc as measured by 3ABC antibody ELISA and VIAA assays. FMDV RNA levels in animal room air filters were similar in feral and domestic swine animal rooms, and were last detected at 22 dpi, while none were detectable at 28 or 35 dpi. The FMDV RNA persisted in domestic and feral swine tonsils up to 33-36 dpi/dpc, whereas virus isolation was negative. Results from this study will help understand the role feral swine may play in sustaining an FMD outbreak, and may be utilized in guiding surveillance, epidemiologic and economic

  10. Vertical modelling: Analysis of competing risks data with missing causes of failure.

    PubMed

    Nicolaie, M A; van Houwelingen, H C; Putter, H

    2015-12-01

    We propose vertical modelling as a natural approach to the problem of analysis of competing risks data when failure types are missing for some individuals. Under a natural missing-at-random assumption for these missing failure types, we use the observed data likelihood to estimate its parameters and show that the all-cause hazard and the relative hazards appearing in vertical modelling are indeed key quantities of this likelihood. This fact has practical implications in that it suggests vertical modelling as a simple and attractive method of analysis in competing risks with missing causes of failure; all individuals are used in estimating the all-cause hazard and only those with non-missing cause of failure for relative hazards. The relative hazards also appear in a multiple imputation approach to the same problem proposed by Lu and Tsiatis and in the EM algorithm. We compare the vertical modelling approach with the method of Goetghebeur and Ryan for a breast cancer data set, highlighting the different aspects they contribute to the data analysis. PMID:22179822

  11. Self-Conscious Emotions in Response to Perceived Failure: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidjerano, Temi

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the occurrence of self-conscious emotions in response to perceived academic failure among 4th-grade students from the United States and Bulgaria, and the author investigated potential contributors to such negative emotional experiences. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that regardless of country, negative…

  12. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  13. Higher Dimensional Clayton–Oakes Models for Multivariate Failure Time Data

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Clayton–Oakes bivariate failure time model is extended to dimensions m > 2 in a manner that allows unspecified marginal survivor functions for all dimensions less than m. Special cases that allow unspecified marginal survivor functions of dimension q with q < m, while making some provisions for dependencies of dimension greater than q, are also described. PMID:27738350

  14. Developing a Model for Identifying Students at Risk of Failure in a First Year Accounting Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Malcolm; Therry, Len; Whale, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the process involved in attempting to build a predictive model capable of identifying students at risk of failure in a first year accounting unit in an Australian university. Identifying attributes that contribute to students being at risk can lead to the development of appropriate intervention strategies and support…

  15. Children at Risk for Academic Failure: A Model of Individual and Family Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilliams, Laura; Beran, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify individual and family risk factors that may explain why some students are at risk for academic failure. Students' self-concept, academic motivation, and their parents' involvement in education were reported by both students and teachers. A latent variable path model fit the data well (Comparative Fit Index…

  16. Preparation of swine for the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison C; Swindle, M Michael

    2006-01-01

    Swine are an important model in many areas of biomedical research. These animals have been used predominantly as preclinical models involving surgical and interventional protocols. The systems most commonly studied include cardiovascular, integumentary, digestive, and urological. Swine are intelligent social animals and require species-specific socialization and handling techniques. It is important to acclimate the animals to the facility and to personnel before they are placed on chronic protocols. Gentle handling techniques instead of forceful procedures are essential to their socialization. They require sturdy caging with specific construction standards, and toys for environmental enrichment. Because the species is covered by both the Animal Welfare Act and the US Department of Agriculture, interstate transport requires a health certificate with destination state-specific disease screening standards. This manuscript provides an overview of best practices that have been utilized in the authors' facility.

  17. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine. 91.9 Section 91.9 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.9 Swine. (a) No swine shall be exported if they were fed garbage at any time. The swine shall be accompanied by a certification from the owner stating that they...

  18. Handling Qualities of Model Reference Adaptive Controllers with Varying Complexity for Pitch-Roll Coupled Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Jacob; Hanson, Curt; Johnson, Marcus A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    Three model reference adaptive controllers (MRAC) with varying levels of complexity were evaluated on a high performance jet aircraft and compared along with a baseline nonlinear dynamic inversion controller. The handling qualities and performance of the controllers were examined during failure conditions that induce coupling between the pitch and roll axes. Results from flight tests showed with a roll to pitch input coupling failure, the handling qualities went from Level 2 with the baseline controller to Level 1 with the most complex MRAC tested. A failure scenario with the left stabilator frozen also showed improvement with the MRAC. Improvement in performance and handling qualities was generally seen as complexity was incrementally added; however, added complexity usually corresponds to increased verification and validation effort required for certification. The tradeoff between complexity and performance is thus important to a controls system designer when implementing an adaptive controller on an aircraft. This paper investigates this relation through flight testing of several controllers of vary complexity.

  19. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Glasses Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-23

    : In this chapter, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. Both soda-lime and borosilicate glass materials are investigated. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  20. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Soda-lime Glass Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Chen, Weinong W.; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-27

    In this paper, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a soda-lime glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  1. Accurate analytical modelling of cosmic ray induced failure rates of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Friedhelm D.

    2009-06-01

    A new, simple and efficient approach is presented to conduct estimations of the cosmic ray induced failure rate for high voltage silicon power devices early in the design phase. This allows combining common design issues such as device losses and safe operating area with the constraints imposed by the reliability to result in a better and overall more efficient design methodology. Starting from an experimental and theoretical background brought forth a few yeas ago [Kabza H et al. Cosmic radiation as a cause for power device failure and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 9-12, Zeller HR. Cosmic ray induced breakdown in high voltage semiconductor devices, microscopic model and possible countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 339-40, and Matsuda H et al. Analysis of GTO failure mode during d.c. blocking. In: Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on power semiconductor devices and IC's, Davos, Switzerland; 1994. p. 221-5], an exact solution of the failure rate integral is derived and presented in a form which lends itself to be combined with the results available from commercial semiconductor simulation tools. Hence, failure rate integrals can be obtained with relative ease for realistic two- and even three-dimensional semiconductor geometries. Two case studies relating to IGBT cell design and planar junction termination layout demonstrate the purpose of the method.

  2. Estimating distributions with increasing failure rate in an imperfect repair model.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Paul H; Singh, Harshinder; Whitaker, Lyn R

    2002-03-01

    A failed system is repaired minimally if after failure, it is restored to the working condition of an identical system of the same age. We extend the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a system's lifetime distribution function to test units that are known to have an increasing failure rate. Such items comprise a significant portion of working components in industry. The order-restricted MLE is shown to be consistent. Similar results hold for the Brown-Proschan imperfect repair model, which dictates that a failed component is repaired perfectly with some unknown probability, and is otherwise repaired minimally. The estimators derived are motivated and illustrated by failure data in the nuclear industry. Failure times for groups of emergency diesel generators and motor-driven pumps are analyzed using the order-restricted methods. The order-restricted estimators are consistent and show distinct differences from the ordinary MLEs. Simulation results suggest significant improvement in reliability estimation is available in many cases when component failure data exhibit the IFR property. PMID:11878225

  3. Proportional and scale change models to project failures of mechanical components with applications to space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, Vidya S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we develop the mathematical theory of proportional and scale change models to perform reliability analysis. The results obtained will be applied for the Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster valves on an orbiter. With the advent of extended EVA's associated with PROX OPS (ISSA & MIR), and docking, the loss of a thruster valve now takes on an expanded safety significance. Previous studies assume a homogeneous population of components with each component having the same failure rate. However, as various components experience different stresses and are exposed to different environments, their failure rates change with time. In this paper we model the reliability of a thruster valves by treating these valves as a censored repairable system. The model for each valve will take the form of a nonhomogeneous process with the intensity function that is either treated as a proportional hazard model, or a scale change random effects hazard model. Each component has an associated z, an independent realization of the random variable Z from a distribution G(z). This unobserved quantity z can be used to describe heterogeneity systematically. For various models methods for estimating the model parameters using censored data will be developed. Available field data (from previously flown flights) is from non-renewable systems. The estimated failure rate using such data will need to be modified for renewable systems such as thruster valve.

  4. Major complications after angioplasty in patients with chronic renal failure: a comparison of predictive models.

    PubMed

    Lacson, R C; Ohno-Machado, L

    2000-01-01

    Novel modeling approaches were investigated to predict major complications in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). The following hypotheses were explored: (1) Pre-angioplasty patient risk factors, demographic characteristics and procedural information may be used to predict major complications after PTCA; and (2) Rough sets and artificial neural nets (ANN) may be used to build models that are better than standard logistic regression models. Several variables were found to be predictive of major complications for patients with CRF or ESRD undergoing PTCA. The presence of shock at presentation portends poor outcome but congestive heart failure and prior history of myocardial infarction increases the risk tenfold and 25-fold, respectively. The discriminatory ability of the ANN model was better than both Rough Sets and Logistic Regression for the test set.

  5. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Braden A. W.; LeBlanc, Michael P.; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F (t ) , the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρT(t ) =λ ( F (t ) ) P ( F (t ) ) exp[-∫0td τ λ ( F (τ ) ) P ( F (τ ) ) ] , where λ ( F (t )) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F (t ) and P ( F (t )) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F (t ) , it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  6. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Braden A W; LeBlanc, Michael P; Uhl, Jonathan T; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F(t), the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρ_{T}(t)=λ(F(t))P(F(t))exp[-∫_{0}^{t}dτλ(F(τ))P(F(τ))], where λ(F(t)) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F(t) and P(F(t)) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F(t), it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  7. Nucleation phenomena in an annealed damage model: statistics of times to failure.

    PubMed

    Abaimov, S G; Cusumano, J P

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the statistical behavior of an annealed continuous damage model. For different model variations we study distributions of times to failure and compare these results with the classical case of metastable nucleation in statistical physics. We show that our model has a tuning parameter, related to the degree of damage reversibility, that determines the model's behavior. Depending on the value of this parameter, our model exhibits statistical behavior either similar to classical reversible nucleation phenomena in statistical physics or to an absolutely different type of behavior intrinsic to systems with damage. This comparison allows us to investigate possible similarities and differences between damage phenomena and reversible nucleation.

  8. Tsunamis Triggered by Submarine Landslides in the NE Atlantic: Evidences of Mass Failures and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omira, R.; Ramalho, I.; Baptista, M. A.; Miranda, J. M. A.; Batista, L.; Terrinha, P.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis caused by submarine mass failures constitute a widely recognized source of natural hazard. However, in the NE Atlantic the tsunami hazard posed by landslides remains poorly studied. In this study, we attempt to contribute to a better understanding of the tsunami hazard of landslides origin. We investigate the tsunami hazard posed by deepwater submarine landslide failures in the Gorringe Bank (GB) area, NE Atlantic. This investigation requires detailed marine geological data and a robust numerical model to simulate both the mass failure flow and the subsequent tsunami. The analysis of both swath-bathymetric data and the multichannel seismic profiles revealed evidences of the presence of at least three large deepwater mass failures in the GB area of possible tsunamigenic potential. It also allows defining the geomorphologic characteristics of the identified submarine landslides, which include the erosional area (dimensions, scarps) and the depositional area (sediments extent, volume). Some depositional volumes reach ~80km3. To simulate the flow of the mudslide failure and the wave induced by the seafloor motion we employ a multi-layers viscous shallow-water (VSW) model. The lower layer represents the slide assumed to be a viscous-incompressible fluid, and characterized by sediments density, and kinematic viscosity. It is bounded by the upper layer consisting of seawater assumed to be inviscid and incompressible. We solve the VSW equations in a finite-difference scheme considering a "two-way" coupling approach. The results are presented in terms of: i) evidences of submarine mass failures in the area of GB; ii) simulations of seafloor motion due to the occurrence slides failures; ii) simulations of tsunami generation induced by the submarine landslide flow; and iii) simulations of tsunami propagation and coastal impact. Results show that, using the VSW model, we are able to reliably reproduce the sediment deposit induced by slide failures. In some cases, the

  9. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF. PMID:25937546

  10. Failure of Tube Models to Predict the Linear Rheology of Star/Linear Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ryan; Desai, Priyanka; Kang, Beomgoo; Katzarova, Maria; Huang, Qifan; Lee, Sanghoon; Chang, Taihyun; Venerus, David; Mays, Jimmy; Schieber, Jay; Larson, Ronald

    We compare predictions of two of the most advanced versions of the tube model, namely the Hierarchical model by Wang et al. (J. Rheol. 54:223, 2010) and the BOB (branch-on-branch) model by Das et al. (J. Rheol. 50:207-234, 2006), against linear viscoelastic data on blends of monodisperse star and monodisperse linear polybutadiene polymers. The star was carefully synthesized/characterized by temperature gradient interaction chromatography, and rheological data in the high frequency region were obtained through time-temperature superposition. We found massive failures of both the Hierarchical and BOB models to predict the terminal relaxation behavior of the star/linear blends, despite their success in predicting the rheology of the pure star and pure linear. This failure occurred regardless of the choices made concerning constraint release, such as assuming arm retraction in fat or skinny tubes, or allowing for disentanglement relaxation to cut off the constraint release Rouse process at long times. The failures call into question whether constraint release can be described as a combination of constraint release Rouse processes and dynamic tube dilation within a canonical tube model of entanglement interactions.

  11. Left anterior descending coronary artery blood flow and left ventricular unloading during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in a swine model of acute cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Christoph; Schubert, Sarah; Carney, Elizabeth; Ghodsizad, Ali; Koerner, Michael; McCoach, Robert; El-Banayosy, Aly

    2015-02-01

    The impact of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support on coronary blood flow and left ventricular unloading is still debated. This study aimed to further characterize the influence of ECMO on coronary artery blood flow and its ability to unload the left ventricle in a short-term model of acute cardiogenic shock. Seven anesthetized pigs were intubated and then underwent median sternotomy and cannulation for venoarterial (VA) ECMO. Flow in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, left atrial pressure (LAP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured before and after esmolol-induced cardiac dysfunction and after initiating VA-ECMO support. Induction of acute cardiogenic shock was associated with short-term increases in LAP from 8 ± 4 mm Hg to 18 ± 14 mm Hg (P = 0.9) and LVEDP from 5 ± 2 mm Hg to 13 ± 17 mm Hg (P = 0.9), and a decrease in MAP from 63 ± 16 mm Hg to 50 ± 24 mm Hg (P = 0.3). With VA-ECMO support, blood flow in the LAD increased from 28 ± 25 mL/min during acute unsupported cardiogenic shock to 67 ± 50 mL/min (P = 0.003), and LAP and LVEDP decreased to 8 + 5 mm Hg (P = 0.7) and 5 ± 3 mm Hg (P = 0.5), respectively. In this swine model of acute cardiogenic shock, VA-ECMO improved coronary blood flow and provided some degree of left ventricular unloading for the short duration of the study.

  12. A new approach to assist postoperative heart failure in an animal model: juxta-aortic counterpulsation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmundo I Cabrera; Christen, Alejandra I; Risk, Marcelo R; Pessana, Franco M; de Forteza, Eduardo

    2002-10-01

    Aortic counterpulsation is a useful technique frequently used in postcardiotomy heart failure. An acute heart failure model in open chest sheep was chosen to evaluate hemodynamic improvement with a counterpulsation balloon pump in juxta-aortic position. This was achieved with a manufactured Dacron prosthesis and a balloon pump placed between the prosthesis and the aorta. Juxta-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation in acute experimental heart failure resulted in a significant improvement of hemodynamic parameters: increase of cardiac output (from 0.86 +/- 0.04 to 1.29 +/- 0.09 L/min, p < 0.05) and cardiac index (from 0.03 +/- 0.01 to 0.04 +/- 0.01 L/min per kg, p < 0.05), and decrease of systemic vascular resistance (from 89.76 +/- 6.69 to 66.56 +/- 6.02 mm Hg/L per min, p < 0.05). The extent of aortic diastolic pressure change evaluated through the diastolic and systolic areas beneath the aortic pressure curve (DABAC/SABAC) index before cardiac failure induction showed a significant increase compared with unassisted values (from 0.81 +/- 0.10 to 1.12 +/- 0.09, p < 0.05). Assisted values of DABAC/SABAC index after heart failure induction also showed a significant increase compared with unassisted values (from 0.78 +/- 0.21 to 1.17 +/- 0.38, p < 0.05). Treatment of experimental acute heart failure by juxta-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation allows an effective hemodynamic improvement in open chest sheep.

  13. Morphologic Interpretation of Rock Failure Mechanisms Under Uniaxial Compression Based on 3D Multiscale High-resolution Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen; Liang, Zheng-Zhao; Tang, Chun-An

    2015-11-01

    Multiscale continuous lab oratory observation of the progressive failure process has become a powerful means to reveal the complex failure mechanism of rock. Correspondingly, the representative volume element (RVE)-based models, which are capable of micro/meso- to macro-scale simulations, have been proposed, for instance, the rock failure process analysis (RFPA) program. Limited by the computational bottleneck due to the RVE size, multiscale high-resolution modeling of rock failure process can hardly be implemented, especially for three-dimensional (3D) problems. In this paper, the self-developed parallel RFPA3D code is employed to investigate the failure mechanisms and various fracture morphology of laboratory-scale rectangular prism rock specimens under unconfined uniaxial compression. The specimens consist of either heterogeneous rock with low strength or relatively homogeneous rock with high strength. The numerical simulations, such as the macroscopic fracture pattern and stress-strain responses, can reproduce the well-known phenomena of physical experiments. In particular, the 3D multiscale continuum modeling is carried out to gain new insight into the morphologic interpretation of brittle failure mechanisms, which is calibrated and validated by comparing the actual laboratory experiments and field evidence. The advantages of 3D multiscale high-resolution modeling are demonstrated by comparing the failure modes against 2D numerical predictions by other models. The parallel RVE-based modeling tool in this paper can provide an alternative way to investigate the complicated failure mechanisms of rock.

  14. Modeling the effect of heat fluxes on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon using artificial neural network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding factors that affect ammonia and nitrous emissions from anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, s...

  15. Earthquake and failure forecasting in real-time: A Forecasting Model Testing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Boon, Steven; Meredith, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Across Europe there are a large number of rock deformation laboratories, each of which runs many experiments. Similarly there are a large number of theoretical rock physicists who develop constitutive and computational models both for rock deformation and changes in geophysical properties. Here we consider how to open up opportunities for sharing experimental data in a way that is integrated with multiple hypothesis testing. We present a prototype for a new forecasting model testing centre based on e-infrastructures for capturing and sharing data and models to accelerate the Rock Physicist (RP) research. This proposal is triggered by our work on data assimilation in the NERC EFFORT (Earthquake and Failure Forecasting in Real Time) project, using data provided by the NERC CREEP 2 experimental project as a test case. EFFORT is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between Geoscientists, Rock Physicists and Computer Scientist. Brittle failure of the crust is likely to play a key role in controlling the timing of a range of geophysical hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, yet the predictability of brittle failure is unknown. Our aim is to provide a facility for developing and testing models to forecast brittle failure in experimental and natural data. Model testing is performed in real-time, verifiably prospective mode, in order to avoid selection biases that are possible in retrospective analyses. The project will ultimately quantify the predictability of brittle failure, and how this predictability scales from simple, controlled laboratory conditions to the complex, uncontrolled real world. Experimental data are collected from controlled laboratory experiments which includes data from the UCL Laboratory and from Creep2 project which will undertake experiments in a deep-sea laboratory. We illustrate the properties of the prototype testing centre by streaming and analysing realistically noisy synthetic data, as an aid to generating and improving testing methodologies in

  16. A Closed Network Queue Model of Underground Coal Mining Production, Failure, and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohman, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Underground coal mining system production, failures, and repair cycles were mathematically modeled as a closed network of two queues in series. The model was designed to better understand the technological constraints on availability of current underground mining systems, and to develop guidelines for estimating the availability of advanced mining systems and their associated needs for spares as well as production and maintenance personnel. It was found that: mine performance is theoretically limited by the maintainability ratio, significant gains in availability appear possible by means of small improvements in the time between failures the number of crews and sections should be properly balanced for any given maintainability ratio, and main haulage systems closest to the mine mouth require the most attention to reliability.

  17. A simple nonlocal damage model for predicting failure of notched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to predict failure loads in notched composite laminates is a requirement in a variety of structural design circumstances. A complicating factor is the development of a zone of damaged material around the notch tip. The objective of this study was to develop a computational technique that simulates progressive damage growth around a notch in a manner that allows the prediction of failure over a wide range of notch sizes. This was accomplished through the use of a relatively simple, nonlocal damage model that incorporates strain-softening. This model was implemented in a two-dimensional finite element program. Calculations were performed for two different laminates with various notch sizes under tensile loading, and the calculations were found to correlate well with experimental results.

  18. Germ cell deficient (gcd) mouse as a model of premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M; Cummings, L; Chada, K

    1993-08-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) in women is characterized as menopause commencing before age 35. Although some cases of POF appear to be inherited, no experimental animal models of familial POF are available. Recently a mouse mutation has been identified that results in infertility due to a lack of primordial germ cells arising in early embryonic development. It was observed that shortly after puberty, females homozygous for this mutation entered reproductive senescence as defined by high levels of circulating gonadotropins, inability to respond either hormonally or functionally to superovulation, and a disrupted estrous cycle. Also, the ovaries completely lacked developing follicles and the endometrium was inactive. However, these mice had undergone complete sexual development as determined by age of vaginal opening, mammary gland histology, and sexual behavior. Thus, these animals closely mimic familial premature ovarian failure and may be useful models for study of the pathogenesis and treatment of this condition.

  19. Temporary Arterial Embolization of Liver Parenchyma with Degradable Starch Microspheres (EmboCept{sup ®}S) in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, Claus C. Meyer, Carsten; Vollmar, Brigitte; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai E.

    2015-04-15

    BackgroundThis study aimed to evaluate the embolic properties, time to reperfusion, and histologic changes in temporary embolization of liver tissue with degradable starch microspheres (DSM) in a swine model.MethodsIn four adult minipigs, DSMs were injected into the right or left hepatic artery on the lobar level until complete stasis of the blood flow was detectable angiographically. The time required to complete angiographically determined reperfusion was noted. The animals were killed 3 h after complete reperfusion, and samples were taken from the liver. Histologic examinations of the embolized liver parenchyma and untreated tissue were performed.ResultsHepatic arterial embolization using DSMs was technically successful in all cases, with complete blood flow stasis shown by control angiography. A single vial of DSMs (450 mg/7.5 ml) was sufficient to embolize a whole liver lobe in all cases. Angiography showed complete reconstitution of hepatic arterial perfusion after a mean time to reperfusion of 32 ± 6.1 min (range, 26–39 min). Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed no histologically detectable differences between untreated tissue and parenchyma embolized with DSMs except for mild sinusoidal congestion in one case. Indirect in situ DNA nick end labeling staining (TUNEL) showed only single positive hepatocytes, indicating apoptosis.ConclusionTemporary embolization of the hepatic artery using DSMs is feasible with complete reperfusion after 30 min in pigs. Even after complete arterial blood flow stasis, no extensive tissue damage to the embolized liver parenchyma was observed at histologic examinations in this short-term study.

  20. Biological effect on drug distribution and vascular healing via paclitaxel‐coated balloon technology in drug eluting stent restenosis swine model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Tellez, Armando; Rousselle, Serge D.; Dillon, Krista N.; Garza, Javier A.; Barry, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the biological effect of a paclitaxel‐coated balloon (PCB) technology on vascular drug distribution and healing in drug eluting stent restenosis (DES‐ISR) swine model. Background The mechanism of action and healing response via PCB technology in DES‐ISR is not completely understood. Methods A total of 27 bare metal stents were implanted in coronary arteries and 30 days later the in‐stent restenosis was treated with PCB. Treated segments were harvested at 1 hr, 14 days and 30 days post treatment for the pharmacokinetic analysis. In addition, 24 DES were implanted in coronary arteries for 30 days, then all DES‐ISRs were treated with either PCB (n = 12) or uncoated balloon (n = 12). At day 60, vessels were harvested for histology following angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results The paclitaxel level in neointimal tissue was about 18 times higher (P = 0.0004) at 1 hr C max, and retained about five times higher (P = 0.008) at day 60 than that in vessel wall. A homogenous distribution of paclitaxel in ISR was demonstrated by using fluorescently labeled paclitaxel. Notably, in DES‐ISR, both termination OCT and quantitative coronary angioplasty showed a significant neointimal reduction and less late lumen loss (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively) post PCB versus post uncoated balloon. The PES‐ISR + PCB group displayed higher levels of peri‐strut inflammation and fibrin scores compared to the ‐limus DES‐ISR + PCB group. Conclusions In ISR, paclitaxel is primarily deposited in neointimal tissue and effectively retained over time following PCB use. Despite the presence of metallic struts, a uniform distribution was characterized. PCB demonstrated an equivalent biological effect in DES‐ISR without significantly increasing inflammation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26613810

  1. Comparison of the selection of antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli during enrofloxacin administration with a local drug delivery system or with intramuscular injections in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Béraud, Romain; Huneault, Louis; Bernier, Dave; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann; del Castillo, Jérôme R.E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated, for the first time, the selection of antibiotic resistance in fecal Escherichia coli, a potential reservoir of genes of resistance, during the prolonged exposure to fluoroquinolones after the implantation of a local drug delivery system (LDDS) in a swine model. Fourteen pigs were randomly assigned to group IM (5 mg/kg/day of intramuscular enrofloxacin — EFX) or LD (surgical implantation of EFX-polymethyl-methacrylate perifemoral implants). Blood samples were collected daily for determination of plasma EFX and ciprofloxacin (CFX) concentrations. Fecal samples were collected daily to determine the E. coli counts and the susceptibility patterns of its isolates as evaluated by antibiotic disk diffusion tests. In both groups, EFX administration significantly reduced the bacterial counts after 2 days. During recolonization, the bacterial counts remained lower than baseline in group IM but not significantly, and almost reached pre-treatment levels in group LD. Susceptibility to EFX, CFX, and nalidixic acid of recolonizing E. coli in LD pigs slightly decreased but remained within the limit of “susceptible” isolates. In contrast, quinolone susceptibility of recolonizing E. coli in IM pigs dropped dramatically (P < 0.0001). In addition, intramuscular exposure to fluoroquinolones significantly decreased the susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the use of a dosing regimen that minimized the intestinal output of fluoroquinolones also minimized the selection of resistance to several classes of antibiotics. This could represent another advantage of LDDS usage compared to long-lasting systemic administration of fluoroquinolones. PMID:18783019

  2. Odorous VOC emission following land application of swine manure slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David B.; Gilley, John; Woodbury, Bryan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Galvin, Geordie; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Li, Xu; Snow, Daniel D.

    2013-02-01

    Swine manure is often applied to crop land as a fertilizer source. Odor emissions from land-applied swine manure may pose a nuisance to downwind populations if manure is not applied with sufficient forethought. A research project was conducted to assess the time decay of odorous volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions following land application of swine manure. Three land application methods were compared: surface application, incorporation 24 h after surface application, and injection. Emission rates were measured in field plots using a small wind tunnel and sorbent tubes. VOCs including eight volatile fatty acids, five aromatics, and two sulfur-containing compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In most cases, a first order exponential decay model adequately described the flux versus time relationship for the 24 h period following land application, but the model sometimes overestimated flux in the 6-24 h range. The same model but with the time term squared adequately predicted flux over the entire 24 h period. Three compounds (4-methylphenol, skatole, and 4-ethylphenol) accounted for 93 percent of the summed odor activity value. First order decay constants (k) for these three compounds ranged from 0.157 to 0.996 h-1. When compared to surface application, injection of swine manure resulted in 80-95 percent lower flux for the most odorous aromatic compounds. These results show that VOC flux decreases rapidly following land application of swine manure, declining below levels of detection and near background levels after 4 to 8 h.

  3. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  4. A Weibull brittle material failure model for the ABAQUS computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.

    1991-08-01

    A statistical failure theory for brittle materials that traces its origins to the Weibull distribution function is developed for use in the general purpose ABAQUS finite element computer program. One of the fundamental assumptions for this development is that Mode 1 microfractures perpendicular to the direction of the principal stress contribute independently to the fast fracture. The theory is implemented by a user subroutine for ABAQUS. Example problems illustrating the capability and accuracy of the model are given. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  5. An accelerated failure time model for investigating pedestrian crossing behavior and waiting times at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobao; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Huan, Mei; Peng, Yichuan; Gao, Ziyou

    2015-09-01

    The waiting process is crucial to pedestrians in the street-crossing behavior. Once pedestrians terminate their waiting behavior during the red light period, they would cross against the red light and put themselves in danger. A joint hazard-based duration model is developed to investigate the effect of various covariates on pedestrian crossing behavior and to estimate pedestrian waiting times at signalized intersections. A total of 1181 pedestrians approaching the intersections during red light periods were observed in Beijing, China. Pedestrian crossing behaviors are classified into immediate crossing behavior and waiting behavior. The probability and effect of various covariates for pedestrians' immediate crossing behavior are identified by a logit model. Four accelerated failure time duration models based on the exponential, Weibull, lognormal and log-logistic distributions are proposed to examine the significant risk factors affecting duration times for pedestrians' waiting behavior. A joint duration model is developed to estimate pedestrian waiting times. Moreover, unobserved heterogeneity is considered in the proposed model. The results indicate that the Weibull AFT model with shared frailty is appropriate for modelling pedestrian waiting durations. Failure to account for heterogeneity would significantly underestimate the effects of covariates on waiting duration times. The proposed model provides a better understanding of pedestrian crossing behavior and more accurate estimation of pedestrian waiting times. It may be applicable in traffic system analysis in developing countries with high flow of mixed traffic.

  6. A novel distributed model of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions.

    PubMed

    Ravanshadi, Samin; Jahed, Mehran

    2013-04-01

    Conventional models of cardiovascular system frequently lack required detail and focus primarily on the overall relationship between pressure, flow and volume. This study proposes a localized and regional model of the cardiovascular system. It utilizes noninvasive blood flow and pressure seed data and temporal cardiac muscle regional activity to predict the operation of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions. The analysis considers specific regions of the heart, namely, base, mid and apex of left ventricle. The proposed method of parameter estimation for hydraulic electric analogy model is recursive least squares algorithm. Based on simulation results and comparison to clinical data, effect of congestive heart failure in the heart is quantified. Accumulated results for simulated ejection fraction percentage of the apex, mid and base regions of the left ventricle in congestive heart failure condition were 39 ± 6, 36 ± 9 and 38 ± 8, respectively. These results are shown to satisfactorily match those found through clinical measurements. The proposed analytical method can in effect be utilized as a preclinical and predictive tool for high-risk heart patients and candidates for heart transplant, assistive device and total artificial heart.

  7. Comparison of Topical Hemostatic Agents in a Swine Model of Extremity Arterial Hemorrhage: BloodSTOP iX Battle Matrix vs. QuikClot Combat Gauze

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huixi; Wang, Lin; Alwaal, Amjad; Lee, Yung-Chin; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Spangler, Taylor A.; Banie, Lia; O’Hara, Reginald B.; Lin, Guiting

    2016-01-01

    BloodSTOP iX Battle Matrix (BM) and QuikClot Combat Gauze (CG) have both been used to treat traumatic bleeding. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy and initial safety of both products in a swine extremity arterial hemorrhage model, which mimics combat injury. Swine (37.13 ± 0.56 kg, NBM = 11, NCG = 9) were anesthetized and splenectomized. We then isolated the femoral arteries and performed a 6 mm arteriotomy. After 45 s of free bleeding, either BM or CG was applied. Fluid resuscitation was provided to maintain a mean arterial pressure of 65 mmHg. Animals were observed for three hours or until death. Fluoroscopic angiography and wound stability challenge tests were performed on survivors. Tissue samples were collected for histologic examination. Stable hemostasis was achieved in 11/11 BM and 5/9 CG subjects, with recovery of mean arterial pressure and animal survival for three hours (p < 0.05, Odds Ratio (OR) = 18.82 (0.85–415.3)). Time to stable hemostasis was shorter for the BM-treated group (4.8 ± 2.5 min vs. 58 ± 20.1 min; Median = 2, Interquartile Range (IQR) = 0 min vs. Median = 60, IQR = 120 min; p < 0.05) and experienced longer total stable hemostasis (175.2 ± 2.5 min vs. 92.4 ± 29.9 min; Median = 178, IQR = 0 min vs. Median = 120, IQR = 178 min; p < 0.05). Post-treatment blood loss was lower with BM (9.5 ± 2.4 mL/kg, Median = 10.52, IQR = 13.63 mL/kg) compared to CG (29.9 ± 9.9 mL/kg, Median = 29.38, IQR = 62.44 mL/kg) (p = 0.2875). Standard BM products weighed less compared to CG (6.9 ± 0.03 g vs. 20.2 ± 0.4 g) (p < 0.05) and absorbed less blood (3.4 ± 0.8 g vs. 41.9 ± 12.3 g) (p < 0.05). Fluoroscopic angiography showed recanalization in 5/11 (BM) and 0/5 (CG) surviving animals (p = 0.07, OR = 9.3 (0.41–208.8)). The wound stability challenge test resulted in wound re-bleeding in 1/11 (BM) and 5/5 (CG) surviving animals (p < 0.05, OR = 0.013 (0.00045–0.375)). Histologic evidence indicated no wound site, distal limb or

  8. Salt-induced changes in cardiac phosphoproteome in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed.

  9. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  10. An improved model of galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, K; Ong, H S; Soo, K C; Tan, S Y; Prema Raj, J

    1999-04-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is a serious condition with very high mortality. Development of new therapies designed to bridge the patient through the acute period of their disease has been hampered by the lack of a large animal model that closely reproduces the changes in humans. We have established an improved model of fulminant hepatic failure in the pig by administration of an aminosugar d-galactosamine hydrochloride. Galactosamine in a dose of 1.0 g/kg was dissolved in 5% dextrose in water (D5W) and given intravenously to seven young pigs weighing 8 to 15 kg. Seven control pigs received an equal volume of D5W alone. Two days prior to injection, a baseline ultrasound-guided liver biopsy was done in each pig under general anesthesia using isofluorane. Clinical data were recorded and blood for laboratory determinations was drawn at 0 h (baseline), 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after infusion of galactosamine or D5W alone, under general anesthesia. Neurological data were recorded at the same intervals before inducing anesthesia. Galactosamine-treated animals showed 100% mortality. All of them died by 86 h after injection of galactosamine, with death resulting from fulminant hepatic failure characterized by marked increases in total bilirubin, liver enzymes, ammonia, and lactate; associated coagulopathy; hypoglycemia; and coma. Liver histology showed massive hepatocellular necrosis in all seven galactosamine-treated animals. This large and highly reproducible animal model appears promising for future evaluation of bioartificial liver support systems designed to treat fulminant hepatic failure in humans.

  11. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  12. Failure of semiclassical models to describe resistivity of nanometric, polycrystalline tungsten films

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Dooho; Liu, Xuan; Schelling, Patrick K.; Coffey, Kevin R.; Barmak, Katayun

    2014-03-14

    The impact of electron scattering at surfaces and grain boundaries in nanometric polycrystalline tungsten (W) films was studied. A series of polycrystalline W films ranging in thickness from 10 to 310 nm and lateral grain size from 74 to 133 nm were prepared on thermally oxidized Si. The Fuchs-Sondheimer surface-scattering model and Mayadas-Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model were employed for quantitative analyses. Predictions from the theoretical models were found to deviate systematically from the experimental data. Possible reasons for the failure of the theoretical models to describe the experimental data are explored. Finally, a discussion of the crucial features lacking from existing models is presented, along with possible avenues for improving the models to result in better agreement with experimental data.

  13. Failure of CMIP5 climate models in simulating post-1950 decreasing trend of Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anamitra; Ghosh, Subimal; Sahana, A. S.; Rao, E. P.

    2014-10-01

    Impacts of climate change on Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) and the growing population pose a major threat to water and food security in India. Adapting to such changes needs reliable projections of ISMR by general circulation models. Here we find that, majority of new generation climate models from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase5 (CMIP5) fail to simulate the post-1950 decreasing trend of ISMR. The weakening of monsoon is associated with the warming of Southern Indian Ocean and strengthening of cyclonic formation in the tropical western Pacific Ocean. We also find that these large-scale changes are not captured by CMIP5 models, with few exceptions, which is the reason of this failure. Proper representation of these highlighted geophysical processes in next generation models may improve the reliability of ISMR projections. Our results also alert the water resource planners to evaluate the CMIP5 models before using them for adaptation strategies.

  14. A brittle failure model for long-period seismic events recorded at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyre, Thomas S.; Bean, Christopher J.; De Barros, Louis; Martini, Francesca; Lokmer, Ivan; Mora, Mauricio M.; Pacheco, Javier F.; Soto, Gerardo J.

    2015-03-01

    A temporary seismic network, consisting of 23 broadband and six short-period stations, was installed in a dense network at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica, between 8 March and 4 May 2011. During this time 513 long-period (LP) events were observed. Due to their pulse-like waveforms, the hypothesis that the events are generated by a slow-failure mechanism, based on a recent new model by Bean et al. (2014), is tested. A significant number (107) of the LPs are jointly inverted for their source locations and mechanisms, using full-waveform moment tensor inversion. The locations are mostly shallow, with depths < 800 m below the active Southwest Crater. The results of the decompositions of the obtained moment tensor solutions show complex source mechanisms, composed of high proportions of isotropic and low, but seemingly significant, proportions of compensated linear vector dipole and double-couple components. It is demonstrated that this can be explained as mode I tensile fracturing with a strong shear component. The source mechanism is further investigated by exploring scaling laws within the data. The LPs recorded follow relationships very similar to those of conventional earthquakes, exhibiting frequency-magnitude and corner frequency versus magnitude relationships that can be explained by brittle failure. All of these observations indicate that a slow-failure source model can successfully describe the generation of short-duration LP events at Turrialba Volcano.

  15. Modeling of size dependent failure in cardiovascular stent struts under tension and bending.

    PubMed

    Harewood, F J; McHugh, P E

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular stents are cylindrical mesh-like metallic structures that are used to treat atherosclerosis. The thickness of stent struts are typically in the range of 50-150 microm. At this microscopic size scale, the tensile failure strain has been shown to be size dependent. Micromechanically representative computational models have captured this size effect in tension. In this paper polycrystalline models incorporating material fracture are used to investigate size effects for realistic stent strut geometries and loading modes. The specific loading a stent undergoes during deployment is uniquely captured and the implications for stent design are considered. Fracture analysis is also performed, identifying trends in terms of strut thickness and loading type. The results show, in addition to the size effect in tension, further size effects in different loading conditions. The results of the loading analyses are combined to produce a tension and bending failure graph. This design safety diagram is presented as a tool to predict failure of stent struts. This study is particularly significant given the current interest in producing smaller stents.

  16. Overview of Threats and Failure Models for Safety-Relevant Computer-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    This document presents a high-level overview of the threats to safety-relevant computer-based systems, including (1) a description of the introduction and activation of physical and logical faults; (2) the propagation of their effects; and (3) function-level and component-level error and failure mode models. These models can be used in the definition of fault hypotheses (i.e., assumptions) for threat-risk mitigation strategies. This document is a contribution to a guide currently under development that is intended to provide a general technical foundation for designers and evaluators of safety-relevant systems.

  17. Numerical models for the prediction of failure for multilayer fusion Al-alloy sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Gorji, Maysam; Berisha, Bekim; Hora, Pavel; Timm, Jürgen

    2013-12-16

    Initiation and propagation of cracks in monolithic and multi-layer aluminum alloys, called “Fusion”, is investigated. 2D plane strain finite element simulations are performed to model deformation due to bending and to predict failure. For this purpose, fracture strains are measured based on microscopic pictures of Nakajima specimens. In addition to, micro-structure of materials is taken into account by introducing a random grain distribution over the sheet thickness as well as a random distribution of the measured yield curve. It is shown that the performed experiments and the introduced FE-Model are appropriate methods to highlight the advantages of the Fusion material, especially for bending processes.

  18. Proportional hazards model for competing risks data with missing cause of failure.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seunggeun; Lee, Jimin; Sun, Yanqing

    2012-07-01

    We consider the semiparametric proportional hazards model for the cause-specific hazard function in analysis of competing risks data with missing cause of failure. The inverse probability weighted equation and augmented inverse probability weighted equation are proposed for estimating the regression parameters in the model, and their theoretical properties are established for inference. Simulation studies demonstrate that the augmented inverse probability weighted estimator is doubly robust and the proposed method is appropriate for practical use. The simulations also compare the proposed estimators with the multiple imputation estimator of Lu and Tsiatis (2001). The application of the proposed method is illustrated using data from a bone marrow transplant study. PMID:22468017

  19. User-defined Material Model for Thermo-mechanical Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Previously a user-defined material model for orthotropic bimodulus materials was developed for linear and nonlinear stress analysis of composite structures using either shell or solid finite elements within a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. Extensions of this user-defined material model to thermo-mechanical progressive failure analysis are described, and the required input data are documented. The extensions include providing for temperature-dependent material properties, archival of the elastic strains, and a thermal strain calculation for materials exhibiting a stress-free temperature.

  20. Evaluation of the risk of classical swine fever (CSF) spread from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs by using the spatial stochastic disease spread model Be-FAST: the example of Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Beatriz; Ivorra, Benjamin; Ramos, Angel Manuel; Fernández-Carrión, Eduardo; Alexandrov, Tsviatko; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2013-07-26

    The study presented here is one of the very first aimed at exploring the potential spread of classical swine fever (CSF) from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs. Specifically, we used a spatial stochastic spread model, called Be-FAST, to evaluate the potential spread of CSF virus (CSFV) in Bulgaria, which holds a large number of backyards (96% of the total number of pig farms) and is one of the very few countries for which backyard pigs and farm counts are available. The model revealed that, despite backyard pigs being very likely to become infected, infections from backyard pigs to other domestic pigs were rare. In general, the magnitude and duration of the CSF simulated epidemics were small, with a median [95% PI] number of infected farms per epidemic of 1 [1,4] and a median [95% PI] duration of the epidemic of 44 [17,101] days. CSFV transmission occurs primarily (81.16%) due to indirect contacts (i.e. vehicles, people and local spread) whereas detection of infected premises was mainly (69%) associated with the observation of clinical signs on farm rather than with implementation of tracing or zoning. Methods and results of this study may support the implementation of risk-based strategies more cost-effectively to prevent, control and, ultimately, eradicate CSF from Bulgaria. The model may also be easily adapted to other countries in which the backyard system is predominant. It can also be used to simulate other similar diseases such as African swine fever.

  1. Implementation and validation of an economic module in the Be-FAST model to predict costs generated by livestock disease epidemics: Application to classical swine fever epidemics in Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carrión, E; Ivorra, B; Martínez-López, B; Ramos, A M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2016-04-01

    Be-FAST is a computer program based on a time-spatial stochastic spread mathematical model for studying the transmission of infectious livestock diseases within and between farms. The present work describes a new module integrated into Be-FAST to model the economic consequences of the spreading of classical swine fever (CSF) and other infectious livestock diseases within and between farms. CSF is financially one of the most damaging diseases in the swine industry worldwide. Specifically in Spain, the economic costs in the two last CSF epidemics (1997 and 2001) reached jointly more than 108 million euros. The present analysis suggests that severe CSF epidemics are associated with significant economic costs, approximately 80% of which are related to animal culling. Direct costs associated with control measures are strongly associated with the number of infected farms, while indirect costs are more strongly associated with epidemic duration. The economic model has been validated with economic information around the last outbreaks in Spain. These results suggest that our economic module may be useful for analysing and predicting economic consequences of livestock disease epidemics. PMID:26875754

  2. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  3. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  4. Observations, models, and mechanisms of failure of surface rocks surrounding planetary surface loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, R. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Geophysical models of flexural stresses in an elastic lithosphere due to an axisymmetric surface load typically predict a transition with increased distance from the center of the load of radial thrust faults to strike-slip faults to concentric normal faults. These model predictions are in conflict with the absence of annular zones of strike-slip faults around prominent loads such as lunar maria, Martian volcanoes, and the Martian Tharsis rise. We suggest that this paradox arises from difficulties in relating failure criteria for brittle rocks to the stress models. Indications that model stresses are inappropriate for use in fault-type prediction include (1) tensile principal stresses larger than realistic values of rock tensile strength, and/or (2) stress differences significantly larger than those allowed by rock-strength criteria. Predictions of surface faulting that are consistent with observations can be obtained instead by using tensile and shear failure criteria, along with calculated stress differences and trajectories, with model stress states not greatly in excess of the maximum allowed by rock fracture criteria.

  5. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L.; Culhane, Marie R.; Detmer, Susan E.; Wentworth, David E.; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A.; Holmes, Edward C.; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world’s largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighboring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the US and China’s large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia. PMID:25813399

  6. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L; Culhane, Marie R; Detmer, Susan E; Wentworth, David E; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Holmes, Edward C; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world's largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighbouring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the United States and China's large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia. PMID:25813399

  7. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Viboud, Cécile; Vincent, Amy L; Culhane, Marie R; Detmer, Susan E; Wentworth, David E; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Holmes, Edward C; Lemey, Philippe

    2015-03-27

    The complex and unresolved evolutionary origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic exposed major gaps in our knowledge of the global spatial ecology and evolution of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs). Here we undertake an expansive phylogenetic analysis of swIAV sequence data and demonstrate that the global live swine trade strongly predicts the spatial dissemination of swIAVs, with Europe and North America acting as sources of viruses in Asian countries. In contrast, China has the world's largest swine population but is not a major exporter of live swine, and is not an important source of swIAVs in neighbouring Asian countries or globally. A meta-population simulation model incorporating trade data predicts that the global ecology of swIAVs is more complex than previously thought, and the United States and China's large swine populations are unlikely to be representative of swIAV diversity in their respective geographic regions, requiring independent surveillance efforts throughout Latin America and Asia.

  8. The respiratory DC/macrophage network at steady-state and upon influenza infection in the swine biomedical model.

    PubMed

    Maisonnasse, P; Bouguyon, E; Piton, G; Ezquerra, A; Urien, C; Deloizy, C; Bourge, M; Leplat, J-J; Simon, G; Chevalier, C; Vincent-Naulleau, S; Crisci, E; Montoya, M; Schwartz-Cornil, I; Bertho, N

    2016-07-01

    Human and mouse respiratory tracts show anatomical and physiological differences, which will benefit from alternative experimental models for studying many respiratory diseases. Pig has been recognized as a valuable biomedical model, in particular for lung transplantation or pathologies such as cystic fibrosis and influenza infection. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the porcine respiratory immune system. Here we segregated and studied six populations of pig lung dendritic cells (DCs)/macrophages (Mθs) as follows: conventional DCs (cDC) 1 and cDC2, inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), monocyte-derived Mθs, and interstitial and alveolar Mθs. The three DC subsets present migratory and naive T-cell stimulation capacities. As observed in human and mice, porcine cDC1 and cDC2 were able to induce T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 responses, respectively. Interestingly, porcine moDCs increased in the lung upon influenza infection, as observed in the mouse model. Pig cDC2 shared some characteristics observed in human but not in mice, such as the expression of FCɛRIα and Langerin, and an intra-epithelial localization. This work, by unraveling the extended similarities of the porcine and human lung DC/Mθ networks, highlights the relevance of pig, both as an exploratory model of DC/Mθ functions and as a model for human inflammatory lung pathologies.

  9. Model for end-stage liver disease predicts right ventricular failure in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Coyle, Laura; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-03-01

    High rates of right ventricular failure continue to affect postoperative outcomes in patients implanted with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Development of right ventricular failure and implantation with right ventricular assist devices is known to be associated with significantly increased mortality. The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score is an effective means of evaluating liver dysfunction. We investigated the prognostic utility of postoperative MELD on post-LVAD implantation outcomes. MELD scores, demographic data, and outcomes including length of stay, survival, and postoperative right ventricular failure were collected for 256 patients implanted with continuous flow LVADs. Regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to investigate the relationship between MELD and all outcomes. Increased MELD score was found to be an independent predictor of both right heart failure and necessity for RVAD implantation (OR 1.097, CI 1.040-1.158, p = 0.001; OR 1.121, CI 1.015, p = 0.024, respectively). Patients with RV failure and who underwent RVAD implantation had reduced postoperative survival compared to patients with RV dysfunction (no RV failure = 651.4 ± 609.8 days, RV failure = 392.6 ± 444.8 days, RVAD = 89.3 ± 72.8 days; p < 0.001). In conclusion, MELD can be used to reliably predict postoperative right heart failure and the necessity for RVAD implantation. Those patients with RV failure and RVADs experience significantly increased postoperative mortality compared to those without RV dysfunction. PMID:26187243

  10. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent or treat swine flu. There is a vaccine available to protect against swine flu. You can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza by Covering your nose and mouth with a ...

  11. An exact renormalization model for earthquakes and material failure: Statics and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, W.I. |; Gabrielov, A.M. |; Durand, T.A.; Phoenix, S.L.; Turcotte, D.L.

    1993-09-12

    Earthquake events are well-known to prams a variety of empirical scaling laws. Accordingly, renormalization methods offer some hope for understanding why earthquake statistics behave in a similar way over orders of magnitude of energy. We review the progress made in the use of renormalization methods in approaching the earthquake problem. In particular, earthquake events have been modeled by previous investigators as hierarchically organized bundles of fibers with equal load sharing. We consider by computational and analytic means the failure properties of such bundles of fibers, a problem that may be treated exactly by renormalization methods. We show, independent of the specific properties of an individual fiber, that the stress and time thresholds for failure of fiber bundles obey universal, albeit different, staling laws with respect to the size of the bundles. The application of these results to fracture processes in earthquake events and in engineering materials helps to provide insight into some of the observed patterns and scaling-in particular, the apparent weakening of earthquake faults and composite materials with respect to size, and the apparent emergence of relatively well-defined stresses and times when failure is seemingly assured.

  12. Effects of poverty on academic failure and delinquency in boys: a change and process model approach.

    PubMed

    Pagani, L; Boulerice, B; Vitaro, F; Tremblay, R E

    1999-11-01

    Using data from the Montreal Longitudinal-Experimental Study, we examined the impact of poverty (and its correlate, family configuration status) on academic placement and self-reported delinquency in boys at age 16. We then investigated whether the relation between family economic hardship and antisocial behaviour is direct or indirect by considering the value of parenting practices and academic failure as process variables in the model. Data included official records, and parent, teacher, and self-reports. The temporal intensity of poverty was classified into five categories: never-poor; always-poor; poor-earlier; poor-later; and transitory-poverty. Family configuration status was classified by both temporal characteristics and number of marital transitions: intact-family; short-term-single; long-term-single; short-term-remarried; long-term-remarried; and multiple-marital-transitions. Results revealed that when maternal education and early childhood behaviour were controlled, poverty had an effect on both academic failure and extreme delinquency. This effect was independent of family configuration status. Although they both significantly predicted extreme delinquency on their own, academic failure and parental supervision did not mediate the relationship between poverty and delinquency. Divorce increased the risk of theft and fighting at age 16, regardless of financial hardship. Parental supervision only helped explain the effects of divorce on boys' fighting.

  13. Modeling of Electrical Cable Failure in a Dynamic Assessment of Fire Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucknor, Matthew D.

    Fires at a nuclear power plant are a safety concern because of their potential to defeat the redundant safety features that provide a high level of assurance of the ability to safely shutdown the plant. One of the added complexities of providing protection against fires is the need to determine the likelihood of electrical cable failure which can lead to the loss of the ability to control or spurious actuation of equipment that is required for safe shutdown. A number of plants are now transitioning from their deterministic fire protection programs to a risk-informed, performance based fire protection program according to the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 805. Within a risk-informed framework, credit can be taken for the analysis of fire progression within a fire zone that was not permissible within the deterministic framework of a 10 CFR 50.48 Appendix R safe shutdown analysis. To perform the analyses required for the transition, plants need to be able to demonstrate with some level of assurance that cables related to safe shutdown equipment will not be compromised during postulated fire scenarios. This research contains the development of new cable failure models that have the potential to more accurately predict electrical cable failure in common cable bundle configurations. Methods to determine the thermal properties of the new models from empirical data are presented along with comparisons between the new models and existing techniques used in the nuclear industry today. A Dynamic Event Tree (DET) methodology is also presented which allows for the proper treatment of uncertainties associated with fire brigade intervention and its effects on cable failure analysis. Finally a shielding analysis is performed to determine the effects on the temperature response of a cable bundle that is shielded from a fire source by an intervening object such as another cable tray. The results from the analyses demonstrate that models of similar

  14. Toward Failure Modeling In Complex Dynamic Systems: Impact of Design and Manufacturing Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; McAdams, Daniel A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When designing vehicle vibration monitoring systems for aerospace devices, it is common to use well-established models of vibration features to determine whether failures or defects exist. Most of the algorithms used for failure detection rely on these models to detect significant changes during a flight environment. In actual practice, however, most vehicle vibration monitoring systems are corrupted by high rates of false alarms and missed detections. Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center has determined that a major reason for the high rates of false alarms and missed detections is the numerous sources of statistical variations that are not taken into account in the. modeling assumptions. In this paper, we address one such source of variations, namely, those caused during the design and manufacturing of rotating machinery components that make up aerospace systems. We present a novel way of modeling the vibration response by including design variations via probabilistic methods. The results demonstrate initial feasibility of the method, showing great promise in developing a general methodology for designing more accurate aerospace vehicle vibration monitoring systems.

  15. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  16. Modeling cascading failures with the crisis of trust in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chengqi; Bao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Jingchi; Xue, Yibo

    2015-10-01

    In social networks, some friends often post or disseminate malicious information, such as advertising messages, informal overseas purchasing messages, illegal messages, or rumors. Too much malicious information may cause a feeling of intense annoyance. When the feeling exceeds a certain threshold, it will lead social network users to distrust these friends, which we call the crisis of trust. The crisis of trust in social networks has already become a universal concern and an urgent unsolved problem. As a result of the crisis of trust, users will cut off their relationships with some of their untrustworthy friends. Once a few of these relationships are made unavailable, it is likely that other friends will decline trust, and a large portion of the social network will be influenced. The phenomenon in which the unavailability of a few relationships will trigger the failure of successive relationships is known as cascading failure dynamics. To our best knowledge, no one has formally proposed cascading failures dynamics with the crisis of trust in social networks. In this paper, we address this potential issue, quantify the trust between two users based on user similarity, and model the minimum tolerance with a nonlinear equation. Furthermore, we construct the processes of cascading failures dynamics by considering the unique features of social networks. Based on real social network datasets (Sina Weibo, Facebook and Twitter), we adopt two attack strategies (the highest trust attack (HT) and the lowest trust attack (LT)) to evaluate the proposed dynamics and to further analyze the changes of the topology, connectivity, cascading time and cascade effect under the above attacks. We numerically find that the sparse and inhomogeneous network structure in our cascading model can better improve the robustness of social networks than the dense and homogeneous structure. However, the network structure that seems like ripples is more vulnerable than the other two network

  17. Polymerase discordance in novel swine influenza H3N2v constellations is tolerated in swine but not human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Nagy, Tamas; Gabbard, Jon; Lee, Christopher; Tompkins, Stephen M; Tripp, Ralph A

    2014-01-01

    Swine-origin H3N2v, a variant of H3N2 influenza virus, is a concern for novel reassortment with circulating pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1pdm09) in swine because this can lead to the emergence of a novel pandemic virus. In this study, the reassortment prevalence of H3N2v with H1N1pdm09 was determined in swine cells. Reassortants evaluated showed that the H1N1pdm09 polymerase (PA) segment occurred within swine H3N2 with ∼ 80% frequency. The swine H3N2-human H1N1pdm09 PA reassortant (swH3N2-huPA) showed enhanced replication in swine cells, and was the dominant gene constellation. Ferrets infected with swH3N2-huPA had increased lung pathogenicity compared to parent viruses; however, swH3N2-huPA replication in normal human bronchoepithelial cells was attenuated - a feature linked to expression of IFN-β and IFN-λ genes in human but not swine cells. These findings indicate that emergence of novel H3N2v influenza constellations require more than changes in the viral polymerase complex to overcome barriers to cross-species transmission. Additionally, these findings reveal that while the ferret model is highly informative for influenza studies, slight differences in pathogenicity may not necessarily be indicative of human outcomes after infection.

  18. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change,...

  19. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change,...

  20. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  1. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  2. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  3. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change,...

  4. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  5. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned...

  6. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change,...

  7. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change,...

  8. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  9. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section, all breeding swine shall be tested for and show negative test results to... Uniform Methods and Rules, chapter 2, part II, G, 1, 2, and 3. (c) Breeding swine exported to a country that does not require breeding swine from the United States to be tested for brucellosis need...

  10. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section, all breeding swine shall be tested for and show negative test results to... Uniform Methods and Rules, chapter 2, part II, G, 1, 2, and 3. (c) Breeding swine exported to a country that does not require breeding swine from the United States to be tested for brucellosis need...

  11. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section, all breeding swine shall be tested for and show negative test results to... Uniform Methods and Rules, chapter 2, part II, G, 1, 2, and 3. (c) Breeding swine exported to a country that does not require breeding swine from the United States to be tested for brucellosis need...

  12. A coupled biventricular finite element and lumped-parameter circulatory system model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Potter, D Dean; Wallace, Arthur W; Tseng, Elaine; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2013-01-01

    Numerical modelling of the cardiovascular system is becoming an important tool for assessing the influence of heart disease and treatment therapies. In the current study, we present an approach for modelling the interaction between the heart and the circulatory system. This was accomplished by creating animal-specific biventricular finite element (FE) models, which characterise the mechanical response of the heart, and by coupling them to a lumped-parameter model that represents the systemic and pulmonic circulatory system. In order to minimise computation time, the coupling was enforced in a weak (one-way) manner, where the ventricular pressure-volume relationships were generated by the FE models and then passed into the circulatory system model to ensure volume conservation and physiological pressure changes. The models were first validated by tuning the parameters, such that the output of the models matched experimentally measured pressures and volumes. Then the models were used to examine cardiac function and the myofibre stress in a healthy canine heart and a canine heart with dilated cardiomyopathy. The results showed good agreement with experimental measurements. The stress in the case of cardiomyopathy was found to increase significantly, while the pump function was decreased, compared to the healthy case. The total runtime of the simulations is lesser than that of many fully coupled models presented in the literature. This will allow for a much quicker evaluation of possible treatment strategies for combating the effects of heart failure, especially in optimisation schemes that require numerous FE simulations.

  13. ANALYSIS OF MULTIVARIATE FAILURE TIME DATA USING MARGINAL PROPORTIONAL HAZARDS MODEL.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Kani; Ying, Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    The marginal proportional hazards model is an important tool in the analysis of multivariate failure time data in the presence of censoring. We propose a method of estimation via the linear combinations of martingale residuals. The estimation and inference procedures are easy to implement numerically. The estimation is generally more accurate than the existing pseudo-likelihood approach: the size of efficiency gain can be considerable in some cases, and the maximum relative efficiency in theory is infinite. Consistency and asymptotic normality are established. Empirical evidence in support of the theoretical claims is shown in simulation studies. PMID:24307815

  14. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  15. A Mid-Layer Model for Human Reliability Analysis: Understanding the Cognitive Causes of Human Failure Events

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey M. L. Hendrickson; April M. Whaley; Ronald L. Boring; James Y. H. Chang; Song-Hua Shen; Ali Mosleh; Johanna H. Oxstrand; John A. Forester; Dana L. Kelly; Erasmia L. Lois

    2010-06-01

    The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) is sponsoring work in response to a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) directing an effort to establish a single human reliability analysis (HRA) method for the agency or guidance for the use of multiple methods. As part of this effort an attempt to develop a comprehensive HRA qualitative approach is being pursued. This paper presents a draft of the method’s middle layer, a part of the qualitative analysis phase that links failure mechanisms to performance shaping factors. Starting with a Crew Response Tree (CRT) that has identified human failure events, analysts identify potential failure mechanisms using the mid-layer model. The mid-layer model presented in this paper traces the identification of the failure mechanisms using the Information-Diagnosis/Decision-Action (IDA) model and cognitive models from the psychological literature. Each failure mechanism is grouped according to a phase of IDA. Under each phase of IDA, the cognitive models help identify the relevant performance shaping factors for the failure mechanism. The use of IDA and cognitive models can be traced through fault trees, which provide a detailed complement to the CRT.

  16. Modeling the Failure of Magmatic Foams and Application to Infrasonic Signals at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. R.; O'Shaughnessy, C. A.; Brun, F.; Mancini, L.; Fife, J.

    2014-12-01

    The failure of magmatic foams appears to be a fundamental eruption process at open-conduit, basaltic volcanoes. We applied the fiber bundle model using global load sharing to model the failure of magmatic foams. The fiber strengths in the model were taken from bubble wall widths measured in four computer-simulated foams and by X-ray tomographic microscopy in three foams produced in the laboratory by heating hydrated basaltic glasses at 1 atm. to 1200 °C. The strengths of the modeled foams were calibrated based upon the correlation of the strength of one foam with published experimental data. The fiber bundle model successfully reproduced measured tensile strengths of porous volcanic rocks studied by other researchers and confirms published findings of the primary importance of foam porosity, as well as the secondary importance of structural details that affect the number and size of bubble walls and permeability. The success of the fiber bundle model in reproducing foam strengths encouraged us to compare its predictions with infrasonic measurements associated with bubbles at Stromboli (Italy). We found that within uncertainty the power-law exponents of the infrasonic energies and of the fiber bundle model energies are in agreement. They both show a cross-over from an exponent of 5/2 associated with the bursting of small bubbles in the infrasonic measurements to an exponent of 3/2 for normal Strombolian eruptions associated with infrasonic signals from meter-scale bubbles. The infrasonic signals for major explosions and a paroxysmal eruption at Stromboli fall near the extrapolation of the power law defined by the low-amplitude, bubble bursting events. The measurement of small-amplitude infrasonic events at Stromboli thus appear useful in predicting the recurrence interval of paroxysmal eruptions at this volcano and may also provide a tool that uses common, small-amplitude infrasonic events to constrain the frequency of larger eruptions at other volcanoes.

  17. Delayed endoluminal vacuum therapy for rectal anastomotic leaks after rectal resection in a swine model: a new treatment option.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Shada, Amber; Ritter, Lane A; Mauro, David M; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Feldman, Sanford H; Kleiner, Daniel E

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leaks are a dreaded surgical complication following colorectal operations. Creation of a temporary proximal diverting ileostomy is used in high-risk anastomoses, however, additional surgical risk is accumulated with its creation and reversal. Endoluminal vacuum therapy has been shown to seal anastomotic defects in the prophylactic setting in a pig model and we hypothesized it could be utilized in a delayed fashion to rescue subjects with an active anastomotic leak. Yorkshire pigs underwent rectal resection, intentional leak confirmed by fluoroscopy, and endoluminal vacuum therapy device placement to low continuous suction. Following treatment, a contrast enema and necropsy was performed for gross and histopathology. Pigs underwent 2 (or 5) days of free intraperitoneal leak prior to device placement and 5 (or 7) subsequent days of endoluminal vacuum therapy. Six of seven early-treated pigs sealed their anastomotic defect, while two of the four treated pigs in this extended group sealed the defect. Endoluminal vacuum therapy is feasible and well tolerated in a pig model, and it has been shown to seal a significant number of freely leaking anastomoses in the early period (86%). This technology warrants further study as it may provide a noninvasive means to treatment of anastomotic leaks.

  18. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  19. Modelling of damage accumulation and failure of structural members subjected to strong seismic actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Oleg Vladimirovich

    2009-09-01

    Following the total Lagrangian approach, an incremental formulation for three-dimensional Timoshenko beam element taking into account large displacements and rotations is developed. For the failure analysis of reinforced concrete structural members, subjected to extreme loads, a new elastoplastic damage constitutive model is proposed on the level of cross-sectional variables. The model is based on the concept of the yield surface and associated flow rule. The effects of softening and strength deterioration are accounted for by the introduction of damage variables. To assure the objectivity of the numerical simulation a non-local treatment of damage variables is implemented. Comparison to different experimental results on biaxial cyclic tests is performed. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed model effectively reproduces softening, strength deterioration, coupling between different components of the generalized force vector and other nonlinear effects accompanying the inelastic structural response under three-dimensional seismic loading.

  20. An implicit algorithm for a rate-dependent ductile failure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Q. H.; Rice, Jeremy R.

    2008-10-01

    An implicit numerical algorithm has been developed for a rate-dependent model for damage and failure of ductile materials under high-rate dynamic loading [F. L. Addessio and J. N. Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 74, 1640 (1993)]. Over each time step, the algorithm first implicitly determines the equilibrium state on a Gurson surface, and then calculates the final state by solving viscous relaxation equations, also implicitly. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the key features of the algorithm. Compared to the explicit algorithm used previously, the current algorithm allows significantly larger time steps that can be used in the analysis. As the viscosity of the material vanishes, the results of the rate-dependent model are shown here to converge to that of the corresponding rate-independent model, a result not achieved with the explicit algorithm.

  1. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  2. Using Task Analytic Models and Phenotypes of Erroneous Human Behavior to Discover System Failures Using Model Checking.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Matthew L; Bass, Ellen J

    2010-09-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in ways unanticipated by analysts or designers. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. This paper presents a method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both erroneous and normative human behavior from normative task models. The resulting model can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human automation-interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. This method is illustrated with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. In this example, a problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. Future extensions of our method are discussed.

  3. Modeling the failure of magmatic foams with application to Stromboli volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Cedrick; Brun, Francesco; Mancini, Lucia; Fife, Julie L.; Baker, Don R.

    2014-10-01

    The failure of magmatic foams has been implicated as a fundamental process in eruptions occurring at open-conduit, basaltic volcanoes. In order to investigate the failure of magmatic foams we applied the fiber bundle model using global load sharing. The strengths of the fibers for the model were taken from bubble wall widths measured in four computer-simulated foams of low-porosity and from one very low-porosity and two high-porosity foams produced in the laboratory by heating hydrated basaltic glasses to 1200 °C. The relative strength of an individual fiber in the model was calculated from the square of a bubble wall's average width and absolute strengths of the foams were calculated based upon the correlation of the strength of one modeled foam with experimental data. The fiber bundle model is shown to successfully reproduce measured tensile strengths of porous volcanic rocks studied by other researchers and confirms previous findings of the primary importance of foam porosity, as well as the secondary importance of structural details that affect the number and size of bubble walls and permeability. Because of the success of the fiber bundle model in reproducing experimental foam failure, its results are compared to infrasonic measurements associated with bubbles at Stromboli (Italy) and demonstrate that within uncertainty the power-law exponents of the infrasonic energies and of the fiber bundle model energies are in agreement; both show a crossover from an exponent of 5/2 associated with the bursting of small bubbles in the infrasonic measurements to an exponent of 3/2 for normal Strombolian eruptions associated with infrasonic signals from meter-scale bubbles. The infrasonic signals for major explosions and a paroxysmal eruption at Stromboli fall near the extrapolation of the power law defined by the low-amplitude, bubble bursting events and are interpreted to reflect the bursting of multitudes of small bubbles, rather than a few large bubbles. The

  4. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates in Domestic Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudorabies is one of the oldest described swine diseases recognized as reproductive failure, and respiratory and central nervous system disease. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV). The development of vaccines and serologic tests that allow the differentiation of vaccinated pigs from naturall...

  5. Adaptation and failure of pancreatic β cells in murine models with different degrees of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Gomez, Gema; Yetukuri, Laxman; Velagapudi, Vidya; Campbell, Mark; Blount, Margaret; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The events that contribute to the expansion of β-cell mass and enhanced β-cell function in insulin-resistant states have not been elucidated fully. Recently, we showed that β-cell adaptation failed dramatically in adult, insulin-resistant POKO mice, which contrasts with the appropriate expansion of β cells in their ob/ob littermates. Thus, we hypothesised that characterisation of the islets in these mouse models at an early age should provide a unique opportunity to: (1) identify mechanisms involved in sensing insulin resistance at the level of the β cells, (2) identify molecular effectors that contribute to increasing β-cell mass and function, and (3) distinguish primary events from secondary events that are more likely to be present at more advanced stages of diabetes. Our results define the POKO mouse as a model of early lipotoxicity. At 4 weeks of age, it manifests with inappropriate β-cell function and defects in proliferation markers. Other well-recognised pathogenic effectors that were observed previously in 16-week-old mice, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), macrophage infiltration and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, are also present in both young POKO and young ob/ob mice, indicating the lack of predictive power with regards to the severity of β-cell failure. Of interest, the relatively preserved lipidomic profile in islets from young POKO mice contrasted with the large changes in lipid composition and the differences in the chain length of triacylglycerols in the serum, liver, muscle and adipose tissue in adult POKO mice. Later lipotoxic insults in adult β cells contribute to the failure of the POKO β cell. Our results indicate that the rapid development of insulin resistance and β-cell failure in POKO mice makes this model a useful tool to study early molecular events leading to insulin resistance and β-cell failure. Furthermore, comparisons with ob/ob mice might reveal important adaptive mechanisms in β cells with

  6. Excess pregnancy weight gain leads to early indications of metabolic syndrome in a swine model of fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; Buhman, Kimberly K; Ajuwon, Kolapo; Donkin, Shawn S

    2014-03-01

    Few data exist on the impact of maternal weight gain on offspring despite evidence demonstrating that early-life environment precipitates risks for metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that excessive weight gain during pregnancy results in programming that predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We further hypothesized that early postweaning nutrition alters the effects of maternal weight gain on indications of metabolic syndrome in offspring. Pregnant sows and their offspring were used for these experiments due to similarities with human digestive physiology, metabolism, and neonatal development. First parity sows fed a high-energy (maternal nutrition high energy [MatHE]) diet gained 12.4 kg (42%) more weight during pregnancy than sows fed a normal energy (maternal nutrition normal energy) diet. Birth weight and litter characteristics did not differ, but offspring MatHE gilts weighed more (P < .05) at age of 3 weeks (4.35 vs 5.24 ± 0.35 kg). At age of 12 weeks, offspring from MatHE mothers that were weaned onto a high-energy diet had elevated (P < .05) blood glucose (102 vs 64 mg/dL, confidence interval [CI]: 67-91), insulin (0.21 vs 0.10 ng/mL, CI: 0.011-0.019), and lower nonesterified fatty acid (0.31 vs 0.62 mmol/L, CI: 0.34-0.56) than offspring from the same MatHE sows weaned to the normal energy diet. These effects were not observed for offspring from sows fed a normal energy diet during pregnancy. These data indicate that excessive gestational weight gain during pregnancy in a pig model promotes early indications of metabolic syndrome in offspring that are further promoted by a high-energy postweaning diet.

  7. Understanding corrosion protection and failure through model polymers in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Joshua Smith

    When developing a model polymeric system to facilitate in the detection of molecular and microscopic events that preface macroscopic corrosive failure; a better understanding of how polymers can indicate corrosion was accomplished. Initially, the thought that molecular chain scission as a necessity for corrosion to occur had to be tested. Through the utilization of high molecular weight thermoplastic (HMWTP) model polymers, it was found that corrosion protection did not correlate to the quantity of weak bonds within an epoxy-amine polymer matrix. Therefore more sensitive methods of detecting corrosion had to be developed since changes within the polymer matrix did not provide thorough data for pre-failure events. Incorporating small molecules that indicate corrosion events into organic polymer coatings, however, did provide sufficient data into when steel substrates were about to fail. It was determined that these molecules, whether colorimetric or fluorescent, were able to capture events at the metal-polymer interface that would directly lead to rust formation. To further the understanding of predicting corrosion, fluorescent molecules were attached to polymer covalently and were able to quantify corrosion events at the highest confidence that no small molecules were moving and providing false results. The development of this corrosion characterization technique should provide plentiful insight into how polymers and metals fail in a real-time nondestructive manner that is realistic to real-world testing protocols.

  8. Prospective development and validation of a model to predict heart failure hospitalisation

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, R M; Woolston, A; Adams, B; Gale, C P; Gilthorpe, M S; Baxter, P D; Kearney, L C; Mercer, B; Rajwani, A; Batin, P D; Kahn, M; Sapsford, R J; Witte, K K; Kearney, M T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS) is a major cause of hospitalisation and imparts a substantial burden on patients and healthcare systems. Tools to define risk of AHFS hospitalisation are lacking. Methods A prospective cohort study (n=628) of patients with stable chronic heart failure (CHF) secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction was used to derive an AHFS prediction model which was then assessed in a prospectively recruited validation cohort (n=462). Results Within the derivation cohort, 44 (7%) patients were hospitalised as a result of AHFS during 1 year of follow-up. Predictors of AHFS hospitalisation included furosemide equivalent dose, the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, AHFS hospitalisation within the previous year and pulmonary congestion on chest radiograph, all assessed at baseline. A multivariable model containing these four variables exhibited good calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow p=0.38) and discrimination (C-statistic 0.77; 95% CI 0.71 to 0.84). Using a 2.5% risk cut-off for predicted AHFS, the model defined 38.5% of patients as low risk, with negative predictive value of 99.1%; this low risk cohort exhibited <1% excess all-cause mortality per annum when compared with contemporaneous actuarial data. Within the validation cohort, an identically applied model derived comparable performance parameters (C-statistic 0.81 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.87), Hosmer–Lemeshow p=0.15, negative predictive value 100%). Conclusions A prospectively derived and validated model using simply obtained clinical data can identify patients with CHF at low risk of hospitalisation due to AHFS in the year following assessment. This may guide the design of future strategies allocating resources to the management of CHF. PMID:24647052

  9. Homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage model for ductile failure of materials containing heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Bai, Jie; Paquet, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and computationally efficient homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage (HCPD) model for macroscopic analysis of ductile failure in porous ductile materials containing brittle inclusions. Example of these materials are cast alloys such as aluminum and metal matrix composites. The overall framework of the HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) type elasto-plasticity model for porous ductile materials. The HCPD model is assumed to be orthotropic in an evolving material principal coordinate system throughout the deformation history. The GTN model parameters are calibrated from homogenization of evolving variables in representative volume elements (RVE) of the microstructure containing inclusions and voids. Micromechanical analyses for this purpose are conducted by the locally enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) [Hu, C., Ghosh, S., 2008. Locally enhanced Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) for simulating evolving fracture in ductile microstructures containing inclusions. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 76(12), 1955-1992]. The model also introduces a novel void nucleation criterion from micromechanical damage evolution due to combined inclusion and matrix cracking. The paper discusses methods for estimating RVE length scales in microstructures with non-uniform dispersions, as well as macroscopic characteristic length scales for non-local constitutive models. Comparison of results from the anisotropic HCPD model with homogenized micromechanics shows excellent agreement. The HCPD model has a huge efficiency advantage over micromechanics models. Hence, it is a very effective tool in predicting macroscopic damage in structures with direct reference to microstructural composition.

  10. Modeling and Prediction of Thermal Cycle Induced Failure in Epoxy-Silica Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmita, Grzegorz; Nowak, Tomasz; Sekula, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Epoxy resins filled with dielectric mineral particles are frequently used as insulating materials in power industry applications. Due to their excellent dielectric properties and relatively good thermal performance (resistance, ageing and conductivity) their usability is common and extensive. However, the mechanical performance of the resins is influenced by several factors such as resistance to crack propagation, especially in low temperature applications. This phenomenon is normally linked with appearance of two phase systems where particle filled epoxy material interacts with metallic inserts having significantly different thermal expansion coefficients. This kind of epoxy-metal interface can produce relatively high stresses in the product structure during thermal cycle loading. The paper deals with mechanical problems of power industry products and introduces the methodology for numerical modeling of failure in silica filled epoxy systems subjected to severe temperature gradients. Various aspects of material behavior modeling are covered in this article, including polymerization process, viscoelastic stress relaxation as well as stochastic cracking.

  11. Constitutive modeling and simulation at room-temperature deformation and failure of polycrystalline Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiser, Geremy; Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana; Pasiliao, Crystal L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper is presented a systematic experimental investigation of the mechanical response of polycrystalline commercially pure molybdenum (Mo). It was established that the material has ductility in tension at 10-5/s and that the failure strain is strongly dependent on the orientation. A specimen taken along the rolling direction sustains large axial strains (20%), while a specimen cut at an angle of 45o to the rolling direction could only sustain 5% strain. Irrespective of the loading orientation the yield stress in uniaxial compression is larger than in uniaxial tension. While in tension the material has a strong anisotropy in Lankford coefficients, in uniaxial compression it displays weak strain-anisotropy. An elastic- plastic orthotropic model that accounts for all the specificities of the plastic deformation of the material was developed. Validation of the model was done through comparison with data on notched specimens. Quantitative agreement with both global and local strain fields was obtained.

  12. GAUGE RUN-TO-DETONATION DATA AND FAILURE/DEAD ZONE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

    2009-06-26

    Previous shock initiation run-to-detonation experiments on energetic materials were plotted with distance and time to get a single distance/time to detonation. Modern shots utilize enough gauges so that the distance-time data can be differentiated, which shows not only the usual inflection pressure point before detonation, referred to here as P{sub b}, but also a second, low-pressure inflection, referred to here as P{sub a}, that marks rapid ramp-up of the initiation. An analysis of the TATB based LX-17 and PBX 9502 in addition to the LLM-105 based RX-55 data shows that both P{sub a} and P{sub b} increase linearly with the initiation pressure created by the flyer plate. This contradicts the current method in the Tarantula failure/dead zone model, which uses constant pressure boundaries between reaction regions. Modeling changes required by the new data will be considered.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of the Different Failure Mechanisms of a Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.

    2012-12-01

    A new finite element model is used to investigate catastrophic failures of a thermal barrier coatings system due to crack propagation along the interfaces between the ceramic top-coat, thermally grown oxide, and bond-coat layers, as well as between the lamellas structure of the ceramic layer. The thermo-mechanical model is designed to take into account a non-homogenous temperature distribution and the effects of the residual stresses generated during the coating process. Crack propagation is simulated using the contact tool "Debond" present in the ABAQUS finite element code. Simulations are performed with a geometry corresponding to similar or dissimilar amplitudes of asperity, and for different thicknesses of the oxide layer. The numerical results have shown that crack evolution depends crucially on the ratio of the loading rate caused by growth and swelling of the oxide layer and also on the interface roughness obtained during the spraying of coatings.

  14. Hamiltonian-Based Model to Describe the Nonlinear Physics of Cascading Failures in Power-Grid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson

    A local disturbance to the state of a power-grid system can trigger a protective response that disables some grid components, which leads to further responses, and may finally result in large-scale failures. In this talk, I will introduce a Hamiltonian-like model of cascading failures in power grids. This model includes the state variables of generators, which are determined by the nonlinear swing equations and power-flow equations, as well as the on/off status of the network components. This framework allows us to view a cascading failure in the power grid as a phase-space transition from a fixed point with high energy to a fixed point with lower energy. Using real power-grid networks, I will demonstrate that possible cascade outcomes can be predicted by analyzing the stability of the system's equilibria. This work adds an important new dimension to the current understanding of cascading failures.

  15. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or...

  16. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or...

  17. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or...

  18. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  19. Physical modelling of rainfall-induced flow failures in loose granular soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Take, W. A.; Beddoe, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    The tragic consequences of the March 2014 Oso landslide in Washington, USA were particularly high due to the mobility of the landslide debris. Confusingly, a landslide occurred at that exact same location a number of years earlier, but simply slumped into the river at the toe of the slope. Why did these two events differ so drastically in their mobility? Considerable questions remain regarding the conditions required to generate flow failures in loose soils. Geotechnical centrifuge testing, in combination with high-speed cameras and advanced image analysis has now provided the landslides research community with a powerful new tool to experimentally investigate the complex mechanics leading to high mobility landslides. This paper highlights recent advances in our understanding of the process of static liquefaction in loose granular soil slopes achieved through observations of highly-instrumented physical models. In particular, the paper summarises experimental results aimed to identify the point of initiation of the chain-reaction required to trigger liquefaction flow failures, to assess the effect of slope inclination on the likelihood of a flowslide being triggered, and to quantify the effect of antecedent groundwater levels on the distal reach of landslide debris with the objective of beginning to explain why neighbouring slopes can exhibit such a wide variation in landslide travel distance upon rainfall-triggering.

  20. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F.

    2016-08-01

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1-5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  1. Modeling Geometry and Progressive Failure of Material Interfaces in Plain Weave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Cheng, Ron-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A procedure combining a geometrically nonlinear, explicit-dynamics contact analysis, computer aided design techniques, and elasticity-based mesh adjustment is proposed to efficiently generate realistic finite element models for meso-mechanical analysis of progressive failure in textile composites. In the procedure, the geometry of fiber tows is obtained by imposing a fictitious expansion on the tows. Meshes resulting from the procedure are conformal with the computed tow-tow and tow-matrix interfaces but are incongruent at the interfaces. The mesh interfaces are treated as cohesive contact surfaces not only to resolve the incongruence but also to simulate progressive failure. The method is employed to simulate debonding at the material interfaces in a ceramic-matrix plain weave composite with matrix porosity and in a polymeric matrix plain weave composite without matrix porosity, both subject to uniaxial cyclic loading. The numerical results indicate progression of the interfacial damage during every loading and reverse loading event in a constant strain amplitude cyclic process. However, the composites show different patterns of damage advancement.

  2. Triggers for the Collapse of Ice Shelves in Antarctica: Investigating Compressive Arch Failure with Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A