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Sample records for failure swine models

  1. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adrienne L.; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  2. Completion of the swine genome will simplify the production of swine as a large animal biomedical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anatomic and physiological similarities to the human make swine an excellent large animal model for human health and disease. Methods Cloning from a modified somatic cell, which can be determined in cells prior to making the animal, is the only method available for the production of targeted modifications in swine. Results Since some strains of swine are similar in size to humans, technologies that have been developed for swine can be readily adapted to humans and vice versa. Here the importance of swine as a biomedical model, current technologies to produce genetically enhanced swine, current biomedical models, and how the completion of the swine genome will promote swine as a biomedical model are discussed. Conclusions The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions. PMID:23151353

  3. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  4. Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lunney, Joan K.

    2007-01-01

    This review is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease progression. The pig model allows for deliberately timed studies, imaging of internal vessels and organs using standard human technologies, and collection of repeated peripheral samples and, at kill, detailed mucosal tissues. The ability to use pigs from the same litter, or cloned or transgenic pigs, facilitates comparative analyses and genetic mapping. The availability of numerous well defined cell lines, representing a broad range of tissues, further facilitates testing of gene expression, drug susceptibility, etc. Thus the pig is an excellent biomedical model for humans. For genomic applications it is an asset that the pig genome has high sequence and chromosome structure homology with humans. With the swine genome sequence now well advanced there are improving genetic and proteomic tools for these comparative analyses. The review will discuss some of the genomic approaches used to probe these models. The review will highlight genomic studies of melanoma and of infectious disease resistance, discussing issues to consider in designing such studies. It will end with a short discussion of the potential for genomic approaches to develop new alternatives for control of the most economically important disease of pigs, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), and the potential for applying knowledge gained with this virus for human viral infectious disease studies. PMID:17384736

  5. Multiacquisition T1-mapping MRI during tidal respiration for quantification of myocardial T1 in swine with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hood, Maureen N; Song, Ting; Bedocs, Peter; Capacchione, John F; Kasper, Christine E; Haigney, Mark C; Ho, Vincent B

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a free-breathing pulse sequence to quantify myocardial T1 changes in a swine model of tachycardia-induced heart failure. Yorkshire swine were implanted with pacemakers and were ventricularly paced at 200 beats/min to induce heart failure. Animals were scanned twice with a 1.5-T MRI scanner, once at baseline and once at heart failure. A T1-mapping sequence was performed during tidal respiration before and 5 minutes after the administration of a gadolinium-chelate contrast agent. T1-mapping values were compared between the baseline and heart failure scans. The percentage of fibrosis of heart failure myocardial tissue was compared with similar left ventricular tissue from control animals using trichrome blue histologic analysis. In the study cohort, differences were found between the baseline and heart failure T1-mapping values before the administration of contrast agent (960 ± 96 and 726 ± 94 ms, respectively; p = 0.02) and after contrast agent administration (546 ± 180 and 300 ± 171 ms, respectively; p = 0.005). The animals with heart failure also had a difference histologically in the percentage of myocardial collagen compared with tissue from healthy control animals (control, 5.4% ± 1.0%; heart failure, 9.4% ± 1.6%; p < 0.001). The proposed T1-mapping technique can quantify diffuse myocardial changes associated with heart failure without the use of a contrast agent and without breath-holding. These T1 changes appear to be associated with increases in the percentage of myocardial collagen that in this study were not detected by traditional myocardial delayed enhancement imaging. T1 mapping may be a useful technique for detecting early but clinically significant myocardial fibrosis.

  6. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3-4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1-2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  7. Longitudinal Hemodynamic Measurements in Swine Heart Failure Using a Fully Implantable Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jenny S.; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease

  8. Longitudinal hemodynamic measurements in swine heart failure using a fully implantable telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jenny S; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease progression and

  9. Translational Relevance of Swine Models of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Dominic T; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Chopra, Abhishek; Patel, Kush; Meudt, Jennifer J; Tellez, Armando; Resnick, Daniel K; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan

    2017-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a physically and psychologically devastating clinical condition. The typical treatment regimens of decompressive surgery and rehabilitation therapy still leave many patients with permanent disability. The development of new therapies and devices can be accelerated if relevant translational animal models are more effectively used in pre-clinical stages. Swine is a highly relevant model for SCI research, especially with respect to spine and spinal cord anatomy, spine vasculature, immune responses to injury, and functional assessments. Several spine injury models have recently been developed for swine and are beginning to be used to evaluate new therapies. Swine models of SCI offer tremendous advantages for efficient translation of pre-clinical discoveries and the development of new therapies and devices. Future swine models will also be enhanced by advances in gene-editing technology to further elucidate the complex pathophysiology associated with SCI and provide a means to engineer specific spinal pathologies.

  10. New experimental model of terminal aneurysms in Swine: technical note.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Mitome-Mishima, Yumiko; Nonaka, Sensyu; Yoshida, Kensaku; Oishi, Hidenori; Arai, Hajime

    2012-11-01

    Animal models of intracranial aneurysms are important for training surgeons and creating innovative endovascular treatment. Swine have physical dimensions close to those of humans and so are widely used in cardiology research. swine used as models for intracranial aneurysms have had difficulty maintaining long-term aneurysm patency. We present a swine model that may allow researchers to follow long-term outcomes after endovascular treatment. We developed a terminal aneurysm model in swine (n = 3) using a vein pouch of an end-to-side anastomosis of the right carotid artery. We anastomosed the left carotid artery end and the right carotid artery side, designing it so the blood flows into the aneurysmal neck directly from the opposite side. we also anastomosed the ascending cervical artery and the right carotid artery, with flow reversal in the proximal right carotid artery by ligating the more proximal side. At the same time, a side-wall aneurysm was made, and we compared their patency periods. The terminal aneurysms remained patent for 3 months, and there were no major changes in their size or shape. In contrast, the side-wall aneurysms had become occluded at the 1-month follow-up. Our swine model displayed long-term patency and has the potential to allow long-term evaluation of new techniques and embolic agents. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. The failure of earthquake failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  12. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  13. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  14. Expression of integrin-linked kinase improves cardiac function in a swine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen; Xie, Jun; Gu, Rong; Xu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have described the beneficial effects of overexpressing integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI) in small animal models. However, the effects of ILK in pre-clinical large animals are not known. To move closer to clinical translation, we examined the effects of ILK gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic heart disease. Swine received percutaneous intracoronary injections of adenoviral vector expressing ILK (n=10) or empty ad-null (n=10) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) following LAD occlusion. Four weeks after transfection, we confirmed that transgene expression was restricted to the infarcted area in the cardiac tissue. Imaging studies demonstrated preserved cardiac function in the ILK group. ILK treatment was associated with reduced infarcted scar size and preserved left ventricular (LV) geometry (LV diameter and LV wall thickness). Enhanced angiogenesis was preserved in the ILK animals, along with reduction of apoptosis. ILK gene therapy improves cardiac remodeling and function in swine following MI associated with increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, and increased cardiomyocyte proliferation with no signs of toxicity. These results may deliver a new approach to treat post-infarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure. PMID:28565779

  15. Comparison of Hydroxocobalamin Versus Norepinephrine Versus Saline in a Swine Model of Servere Septic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    Versus Saline in a Swine Model of Severe Septic Shock presented at/published to SURF Conference, San Antonio, TX 20 May 2016 with MDWJ 41-108, and has...PRESENTED: Comparison of hydroxocobalamin versus norepinephrine versus saline in a Swine model of severe septic shock 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS...Comparison of hydroxocbalamin versus norepinephrine versus saline in a swine model of severe septic shock. Background: Sepsis is associated with a mortality

  16. Noninvasive cerebral cooling in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Tadler, S C; Callaway, C W; Menegazzi, J J

    1998-01-01

    Mild cerebral hypothermia improves neurologic outcome in animals resuscitated from cardiac arrest. This study examined whether one practical external cooling method, i.e., local application of ice to the heads and necks of swine, during resuscitation induces cerebral cooling. Local external cerebral cooling was examined in a prospective laboratory investigation using 24 female swine in a model of cardiac arrest. The swine were randomized into hypothermia and normothermia groups. Intracerebral temperature was measured in the parietal cortex. Eight minutes after induction of ventricular fibrillation, chest compressions and mechanical ventilation were initiated. The hypothermia group was treated with 1,500 mL of ice in plastic bags applied to the head and neck, while the normothermia group received no extra interventions. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. In the normothermia group, there was no significant change in nasopharyngeal (-0.8 +/- 0.6 degree C), intracerebral (-0.6 +/- 0.8 degree C), or esophageal (-0.2 +/- 0.6 degree C) temperatures during 20 minutes of resuscitation. However, in the hypothermia group, application of ice during resuscitation significantly reduced nasopharyngeal (-2.9 +/- 1.4 degrees C), intracerebral (-2.1 +/- 0.6 degrees C), and esophageal (-1.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C) temperatures. External application of ice packs during resuscitation effectively reduced intracerebral temperatures in swine by an amount that improved neurologic outcomes in previous large animal studies. These data suggest that clinically significant cerebral cooling could be accomplished with a noninvasive, inexpensive, and universally available intervention. Further studies are required to assess the clinical feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of this intervention.

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  18. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  19. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  20. Common swine models of cardiovascular disease for research and training.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo, Verónica; Sun, Fei; Maynar, Manuel; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Blanco, Virginia; Garcia-Lindo, Monica; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major health concern and therefore an important topic in biomedical research. Large animal models allow researchers to assess the safety and efficacy of new cardiovascular procedures in systems that resemble human anatomy; additionally, they can be used to emulate scenarios for training purposes. Among the many biomedical models that are described in published literature, it is important that researchers understand and select those that are best suited to achieve the aims of their research, that facilitate the humane care and management of their research animals and that best promote the high ethical standards required of animal research. In this resource the authors describe some common swine models that can be easily incorporated into regular practices of research and training at biomedical institutions. These models use both native and altered vascular anatomy of swine to carry out research protocols, such as testing biological reactions to implanted materials, surgically creating aneurysms using autologous tissue and inducing myocardial infarction through closed-chest procedures. Such models can also be used for training, where native and altered vascular anatomy allow medical professionals to learn and practice challenging techniques in anatomy that closely simulates human systems.

  1. Myocardial infarction and intramyocardial injection models in swine.

    PubMed

    McCall, Frederic C; Telukuntla, Kartik S; Karantalis, Vasileios; Suncion, Viky Y; Heldman, Alan W; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Williams, Adam R; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-07-12

    Sustainable and reproducible large animal models that closely replicate the clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI) are important for the translation of basic science research into bedside medicine. Swine are well accepted by the scientific community for cardiovascular research, and they represent an established animal model for preclinical trials for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of novel therapies. Here we present a protocol for using porcine models of MI created with a closed-chest coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion technique. This creates a model of MI encompassing the anteroapical, lateral and septal walls of the left ventricle. This model infarction can be easily adapted to suit individual study design and enables the investigation of a variety of possible interventions. This model is therefore a useful tool for translational research into the pathophysiology of ventricular remodeling and is an ideal testing platform for novel biological approaches targeting regenerative medicine. This model can be created in approximately 8-10 h.

  2. Swine as models in biomedical research and toxicology testing.

    PubMed

    Swindle, M M; Makin, A; Herron, A J; Clubb, F J; Frazier, K S

    2012-03-01

    Swine are considered to be one of the major animal species used in translational research, surgical models, and procedural training and are increasingly being used as an alternative to the dog or monkey as the choice of nonrodent species in preclinical toxicologic testing of pharmaceuticals. There are unique advantages to the use of swine in this setting given that they share with humans similar anatomic and physiologic characteristics involving the cardiovascular, urinary, integumentary, and digestive systems. However, the investigator needs to be familiar with important anatomic, histopathologic, and clinicopathologic features of the laboratory pig and minipig in order to put background lesions or xenobiotically induced toxicologic changes in their proper perspective and also needs to consider specific anatomic differences when using the pig as a surgical model. Ethical considerations, as well as the existence of significant amounts of background data, from a regulatory perspective, provide further support for the use of this species in experimental or pharmaceutical research studies. It is likely that pigs and minipigs will become an increasingly important animal model for research and pharmaceutical development applications.

  3. Acute Electrocardiographic ST Segment Elevation May Predict Hypotension in a Swine Model of Severe Cyanide Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-21

    induced shock, 30 swine were anesthetized and monitored and then intoxicated with a continuous cyanide infusion until severe hypotension (50 % of...TOXICOLOGY INVESTIGATION Acute Electrocardiographic ST Segment ElevationMay Predict Hypotension in a Swine Model of Severe Cyanide Toxicity Tylan A...Toxicology 2012 Abstract Cyanide causes severe cardiac toxicity resulting in tachycardia, hypotension, and cardiac arrest; however, the clinical diagnosis can

  4. Swine models, genomic tools and services to enhance our understanding of human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Wells, Kevin D; Bryda, Elizabeth C; Schommer, Susan; Prather, Randall S

    2017-03-22

    The pig is becoming increasingly important as a biomedical model. Given the similarities between pigs and humans, a greater understanding of the underlying biology of human health and diseases may come from the pig rather than from classical rodent models. With an increasing need for swine models, it is essential that the genomic tools, models and services be readily available to the scientific community. Many of these are available through the National Swine Resource and Research Center (NSRRC), a facility funded by the US National Institutes of Health at the University of Missouri. The goal of the NSRRC is to provide high-quality biomedical swine models to the scientific community.

  5. Transmissibility of Variant Influenza From Swine to Humans: A Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen K.; Gambhir, Manoj; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.; Ostroff, Stephen; Reed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory illness was reported among humans and swine at an agricultural fair in 2011; 3 human infections with an influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were confirmed. Using epidemiologic investigation data, we sought to estimate H3N2v transmissibility from swine to humans. Methods We developed a model of H3N2v transmission among swine and humans and fit it to data from a cohort of 100 agricultural club members reporting swine contact to estimate transmissibility. A sensitivity analysis was performed varying H3N2v prevalence in the club cohort. Using the best-fit transmission probability, we simulated the number of swine-acquired infections among all fair attendees. Results We estimated the best-fit probability of swine-to-human H3N2v transmission per minute of swine contact. Applying this probability to 14 910 people with swine contact at the fair, we estimate that there were 80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40–133) H3N2v infections among persons aged <20 years and 58 (95% CI, 29–96) H3N2v infections among person aged ≥20 years. Conclusions Using early data from investigation of a new virus with unclear transmission properties, we estimated the transmissibility of H3N2v from swine to humans and the burden of H3N2v among fair attendees. Although the risk of H3N2v virus infection is small for fair attendees with minimal swine contact, large populations attend agricultural events each year, and human cases will likely occur when infected swine are present. PMID:23794727

  6. Lymphatic Territories (Lymphosomes) in Swine: An Animal Model for Future Lymphatic Research.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ran; Suami, Hiroo

    2015-08-01

    The swine is a common preclinical large-animal model for medical research because of the resemblance of its tissue structures to those of humans. However, the lymphatic system in swine is poorly understood. The authors investigated the lymphatic system and defined territories (lymphosomes) in swine using the microinjection technique. Six swine (two male and four female 17.5- to 50-kg Sus domesticus) were used. Real-time indocyanine green fluorescence lymphography was performed in four live swine. After the animals were killed, the authors injected a radiocontrast mixture consisting of barium sulfate and hydrogen peroxide with red acrylic dye directly into lymphatic vessels in six swine carcasses. Courses of the lymphatic vessel were analyzed radiographically. The lymphatic vessels were dissected meticulously and chased until they connected to the first-tier (sentinel) lymph node. This procedure was repeated throughout the body until all the relationships between the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes were defined. The authors successfully mapped the superficial lymphatic vessels and their corresponding lymph nodes. Indocyanine green fluorescence lymphography and subsequent radiography revealed that the swine lymphatic system contained seven lymphosomes: parotid, mandibular, dorsal cervical, ventral cervical, subiliac, inguinal, and popliteal territories. Of note, no lymph nodes existed in the superficial axillary region. The swine could be a useful large-animal model for lymphatic research because of the anatomical consistency of the lymphosomes among animals and the sizable lymphatic vessels. However, swine lack the superficial axillary lymph node found in humans, suggesting that swine may not be a good model for breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  7. Mathematical modeling of influenza A virus dynamics within swine farms and the effects of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jennifer J H; Torremorell, Montserrat; Craft, Meggan E

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus infections are widespread in swine herds across the world. Influenza negatively affects swine health and production, and represents a significant threat to public health due to the risk of zoonotic infections. Swine herds can act as reservoirs for potentially pandemic influenza strains. In this study, we develop mathematical models based on experimental data, representing typical breeding and wean-to-finish swine farms. These models are used to explore and describe the dynamics of influenza infection at the farm level, which are at present not well understood. In addition, we use the models to assess the effectiveness of vaccination strategies currently employed by swine producers, testing both homologous and heterologous vaccines. An important finding is that following an influenza outbreak in a breeding herd, our model predicts a persistently high level of infectious piglets. Sensitivity analysis indicates that this finding is robust to changes in both transmission rates and farm size. Vaccination does not eliminate influenza throughout the breeding farm population. In the wean-to-finish herd, influenza infection may persist in the population only if recovered individuals become susceptible to infection again. A homologous vaccine administered to the entire wean-to-finish population after the loss of maternal antibodies eliminates influenza, but a vaccine that only induces partial protection (heterologous vaccine) has little effect on influenza infection levels. Our results have important implications for the control of influenza in swine herds, which is crucial in order to reduce both losses for swine producers and the risk to public health.

  8. Modeling Classical Swine Fever Outbreak-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole J.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak-related outcomes, such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. These scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak) outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N = 6) and non-clustered (N = 9) groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles) epidemic duration (days) was 224 (24, 343) in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251) and 210 (167, 302) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles) number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488) in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662) and 465 (295, 640) in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distributions of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on the management of swine operations and continuity of business, so that potential losses

  9. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  10. Failure models for textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the `Binary Model,` was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  11. Myocardial infarction and intramyocardial injection models in swine

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Frederic C; Telukuntla, Kartik S; Karantalis, Vasileios; Suncion, Viky Y; Heldman, Alan W; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Williams, Adam R; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable and reproducible large animal models that closely replicate the clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI) are important for the translation of basic science research into bedside medicine. Swine are well accepted by the scientific community for cardiovascular research, and they represent an established animal model for preclinical trials for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of novel therapies. Here we present a protocol for using porcine models of MI created with a closed-chest coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion technique. This creates a model of MI encompassing the anteroapical, lateral and septal walls of the left ventricle. This model infarction can be easily adapted to suit individual study design and enables the investigation of a variety of possible interventions. This model is therefore a useful tool for translational research into the pathophysiology of ventricular remodeling and is an ideal testing platform for novel biological approaches targeting regenerative medicine. This model can be created in approximately 8–10 h. PMID:22790084

  12. A Bayesian network model for assessing natural estrogen fate and transport in a swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a probabilistic Bayesian network model was developed to assess natural estrogen fate and budget and then compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to describe the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, whereas the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations demonstrated that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhance estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. A Bayesian Network Model for Assessing Estrogen Fate and Transport in a Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.; Yost, Erin; Meyer, Michael T.; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Reckhow, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    Commercial swine waste lagoons are regarded as a major reservoir of natural estrogens, which have the potential to produce adverse physiological effects on exposed aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, there remains limited understanding of the complex mechanisms of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the fate and transport of natural estrogens within an anaerobic swine lagoon. To improve lagoon management and ultimately help control the offsite transport of these compounds from swine operations, a Bayesian network model was developed to predict estrogen fate and budget and compared against data collected from a commercial swine field site. In general, the model was able to predict the estrogen fate and budget in both the slurry and sludge stores within the swine lagoon. Sensitivity analysis within the model, demonstrated that the estrogen input loading from the associated barn facility was the most important factor in controlling estrogen concentrations within the lagoon slurry storage, while the settling rate was the most significant factor in the lagoon sludge storage. The degradation reactions were shown to be minor in both stores based on prediction of average total estrogen concentrations. Management scenario evaluations showed that the best possible management options to reduce estrogen levels in the lagoon are either to adjust the estrogen input loading from swine barn facilities or to effectively enhancing estrogen bonding with suspended solids through the use of organic polymers or inorganic coagulants. PMID:24798317

  14. Assessment of coronary microcirculation in a swine animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Takarada, Shigeho; Molloi, Sabee

    2011-08-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction has important prognostic implications. Several hemodynamic indexes, such as coronary flow reserve (CFR), microvascular resistance, and zero-flow pressure (P(zf)), were used to establish the most reliable index to assess coronary microcirculation. Fifteen swine were instrumented with a flow probe, and a pressure wire was advanced into the distal left anterior descending artery. Adenosine was used to produce maximum hyperemia. Microspheres were used to create microvascular dysfunction. An occluder was used to produce stenosis. Blood flow from the probe (Q(p)), aortic pressure, distal coronary pressure, and right atrium pressure were recorded. Angiographic flow (Q(a)) was calculated using a time-density curve. Flow probe-based CFR and angiographic CFR were calculated using Q(p) and Q(a), respectively. Flow probe-based (NMR(qh)) and angiographic normalized microvascular resistance (NMR(ah)) were determined using Q(p) and Q(a), respectively, during hyperemia. P(zf) was calculated using Q(p) and distal coronary pressure. Two series of receiver operating characteristic curves were generated: normal epicardial artery model (N model) and stenosis model (S model). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for flow probe-based CFR, angiographic CFR, NMR(qh), NMR(ah), and P(zf) were 0.855, 0.836, 0.976, 0.956, and 0.855 in N model and 0.737, 0.700, 0.935, 0.889, and 0.698 in S model. Both NMR(qh) and NMR(ah) were significantly more reliable than CFR and P(zf) in detecting the microvascular deterioration. Compared with CFR and P(zf), NMR provided a more accurate assessment of microcirculation. This improved accuracy was more prevalent when stenosis existed. Moreover, NMR(ah) is potentially a less invasive method for assessing coronary microcirculation.

  15. Assessment of coronary microcirculation in a swine animal model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhang; Takarada, Shigeho

    2011-01-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction has important prognostic implications. Several hemodynamic indexes, such as coronary flow reserve (CFR), microvascular resistance, and zero-flow pressure (Pzf), were used to establish the most reliable index to assess coronary microcirculation. Fifteen swine were instrumented with a flow probe, and a pressure wire was advanced into the distal left anterior descending artery. Adenosine was used to produce maximum hyperemia. Microspheres were used to create microvascular dysfunction. An occluder was used to produce stenosis. Blood flow from the probe (Q̇p), aortic pressure, distal coronary pressure, and right atrium pressure were recorded. Angiographic flow (Q̇a) was calculated using a time-density curve. Flow probe-based CFR and angiographic CFR were calculated using Q̇p and Q̇a, respectively. Flow probe-based (NMRqh) and angiographic normalized microvascular resistance (NMRah) were determined using Q̇p and Q̇a, respectively, during hyperemia. Pzf was calculated using Q̇p and distal coronary pressure. Two series of receiver operating characteristic curves were generated: normal epicardial artery model (N model) and stenosis model (S model). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for flow probe-based CFR, angiographic CFR, NMRqh, NMRah, and Pzf were 0.855, 0.836, 0.976, 0.956, and 0.855 in N model and 0.737, 0.700, 0.935, 0.889, and 0.698 in S model. Both NMRqh and NMRah were significantly more reliable than CFR and Pzf in detecting the microvascular deterioration. Compared with CFR and Pzf, NMR provided a more accurate assessment of microcirculation. This improved accuracy was more prevalent when stenosis existed. Moreover, NMRah is potentially a less invasive method for assessing coronary microcirculation. PMID:21622826

  16. Battery failure model derived from flaw theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, I.

    1981-01-01

    A previously derived failure model for battery lifetime is discussed in terms of growth rate of the flaw, distribution of flaw sizes, and number of flaws. Equations are presented for determining the failure model for a nickel cadmium battery.

  17. Evaluation of factors important in modeling plasma concentrations of tetracycline hydrochloride administered in water in swine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Sharon E; Almond, Glen W; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2012-10-01

    To model the plasma tetracycline concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domestica) treated with medication administered in water and determine the factors that contribute to the most accurate predictions of measured plasma drug concentrations. Plasma tetracycline concentrations measured in blood samples from 3 populations of swine. Data from previous studies provided plasma tetracycline concentrations that were measured in blood samples collected from 1 swine population at 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32, 48, 56, 72, 80, 96, and 104 hours and from 2 swine populations at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours hours during administration of tetracycline hydrochloride dissolved in water. A 1-compartment pharmacostatistical model was used to analyze 5 potential covariate schemes and determine factors most important in predicting the plasma concentrations of tetracycline in swine. 2 models most accurately predicted the tetracycline plasma concentrations in the 3 populations of swine. Factors of importance were body weight or age of pig, ambient temperature, concentration of tetracycline in water, and water use per unit of time. The factors found to be of importance, combined with knowledge of the individual pharmacokinetic and chemical properties of medications currently approved for administration in water, may be useful in more prudent administration of approved medications administered to swine. Factors found to be important in pharmacostatistical models may allow prediction of plasma concentrations of tetracycline or other commonly used medications administered in water. The ability to predict in vivo concentrations of medication in a population of food animals can be combined with bacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations to decrease the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Heart Failure Using a Swine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-21

    Bates S, Goetsch SC, Gallardo TD, Garry DJ. Persistent expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abcg2, identifies cardiac SP cells in the...myocyte apoptosis and regeneration. J Clin Invest 2003;111(10):1457-1459. 194. Oh H, Bradfute SB, Gallardo TD, Nakamura T, Gaussin V, Mishina Y

  19. A simplified model for assessing the impact to groundwater of swine farms at regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabo, Marco; Viterbo, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Swine manure can be an excellent source of nutrients for crop production. Several swine farms are present in the territory of Regione Umbria and more than 200.000 of swine heads are present yearly in the whole territory while some municipalities host more than 30.000 heads over a relatively limited land. Municipality with elevated number of swine heads has registered particularly higher Nitrate concentration in groundwater that requires a management plan and intervention in order to determine the maximum allowed N loads in the specific region. Use of manure and fertilizers in agricultural field produce diffuse nitrogen (N) losses that are a major cause of excessive nitrate concentrations in ground and surface waters and have been of concern since decades. Excessive nitrate concentrations in groundwater can have toxic effects when used as drinking water and cause eutrophication in surface waters. For management and environmental planning purposes, it is necessary to assess the magnitude of diffuse N losses from agricultural fields and how they are influenced by factors such as management practices, type of fertilizers -organic or inorganic - climate and soil etc. There are several methods for assessing N leaching, they span from methods based on field test to complex models that require many input data. We use a simple index method that accounts for the type of fertilizer used - inorganic, swine or cattle manure- and hydrological and hydrogeological conditions. Hydrological conditions such as infiltration rates are estimated by a fully distributed hydrological model. Data on inorganic and organic fertilization are estimated at municipal level by using the nutrient crops needs and the statistics of swine and cattle heads within the municipality. The index method has been calibrated by using groundwater concentration as a proxy of N losses from agriculture. A time series of three years of data has been analyzed. The application of the simple index method allowed to

  20. Model for heart failure education.

    PubMed

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting.

  1. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E; Ulery, Eva S; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J; Richt, Jürgen A

    2011-02-05

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H.; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E.; Ulery, Eva S.; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. PMID:21074235

  3. Cardiac I-1c overexpression with reengineered AAV improves cardiac function in swine ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth M; Tilemann, Lisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Aguero, Jaume; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Lee, Ahyoung; Karakikes, Ioannis; Xie, Chaoqin; Akar, Fadi G; Shimada, Yuichi J; Gwathmey, Judith K; Asokan, Aravind; McPhee, Scott; Samulski, Jade; Samulski, Richard Jude; Sigg, Daniel C; Weber, Thomas; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac gene therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat advanced heart failure (HF). Advances in molecular biology and gene targeting approaches are offering further novel options for genetic manipulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to improve cardiac function in chronic HF by overexpressing constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) using a novel cardiotropic vector generated by capsid reengineering of adeno-associated virus (BNP116). One month after a large anterior myocardial infarction, 20 Yorkshire pigs randomly received intracoronary injection of either high-dose BNP116.I-1c (1.0 × 10(13) vector genomes (vg), n = 7), low-dose BNP116.I-1c (3.0 × 10(12) vg, n = 7), or saline (n = 6). Compared to baseline, mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 5.7% in the high-dose group, and by 5.2% in the low-dose group, whereas it decreased by 7% in the saline group. Additionally, preload-recruitable stroke work obtained from pressure-volume analysis demonstrated significantly higher cardiac performance in the high-dose group. Likewise, other hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume and contractility index indicated improved cardiac function after the I-1c gene transfer. Furthermore, BNP116 showed a favorable gene expression pattern for targeting the heart. In summary, I-1c overexpression using BNP116 improves cardiac function in a clinically relevant model of ischemic HF.

  4. Temperature modulation with an esophageal heat transfer device - a pediatric swine model study.

    PubMed

    Kulstad, Erik B; Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Haryu, Todd; Waller, Donald; Azarafrooz, Farshid; Courtney, Daniel Mark

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of conditions appear to benefit from control and modulation of temperature, but available techniques to control temperature often have limitations, particularly in smaller patients with high surface to mass ratios. We aimed to evaluate a new method of temperature modulation with an esophageal heat transfer device in a pediatric swine model, hypothesizing that clinically significant modulation in temperature (both increases and decreases of more than 1°C) would be possible. Three female Yorkshire swine averaging 23 kg were anesthetized with inhalational isoflurane prior to placement of the esophageal device, which was powered by a commercially available heat exchanger. Swine temperature was measured rectally and cooling and warming were performed by selecting the appropriate external heat exchanger mode. Temperature was recorded over time in order to calculate rates of temperature change. Histopathology of esophageal tissue was performed after study completion. Average swine baseline temperature was 38.3°C. Swine #1 exhibited a cooling rate of 3.5°C/hr; however, passive cooling may have contributed to this rate. External warming blankets maintained thermal equilibrium in swine #2 and #3, demonstrating maximum temperature decrease of 1.7°C/hr. Warming rates averaged 0.29°C/hr. Histopathologic analysis of esophageal tissue showed no adverse effects. An esophageal heat transfer device successfully modulated the temperature in a pediatric swine model. This approach to temperature modulation may offer a useful new modality to control temperature in conditions warranting temperature management (such as maintenance of normothermia, induction of hypothermia, fever control, or malignant hyperthermia).

  5. Swine as a model for influenza A virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) infect a variety of hosts, including humans, swine, and various avian species. The annual influenza disease burden in the human population remains significant even with current vaccine usage and much about the pathogenesis and transmission of influenza viruses in human rema...

  6. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions. PMID:27538860

  7. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions.

  8. Cardiac Ischemia Model for +Gz Using Miniature Swine and Baboons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    z were seen equally in both the control and experimental swine and in the baboons before and after stenosis, with or without propranolol . During 1...stenosis, with or without propranolol . There was a positive relationship between a normal/abnormal ECG and a normal/abnormal myocardial perfusion...inertial force , propranolol . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  9. Anisotropic Failure Modeling for HY-100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harstad, E. N.; Maudlin, P. J.; McKirgan, J. B.

    2004-07-01

    HY-100 steel is a material that behaves isotropically in the elastic and plastic region and acts anisotropically in failure. Since HY-100 is a ductile metal, a more gradual failure process is observed as opposed to the nearly instantaneous failure in brittle materials. We extend our elasto-plastic-damage constitutive model by including of a decohesion model to describe material behavior between the onset of failure and fracture. We also develop an anisotropic failure surface to account for directionality in material failure. Both the anisotropic failure and decohesion models have been implemented into a finite element code, where the effects of these models are studied in a uniaxial stress simulations, a plate impact simulations, and a quasistatic notched round bar tensile test simulations.

  10. Development of a Standard Swine Hemorrhage Model for Efficacy Assessment of Topical Hemostatic Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    that Combat Gauze (CG), a kaolin -coated surgical gauze that is currently used as the standard dressing in military, would be used as the control agent...Terrazas IB, et at. Safety evaluation of new hemostatic agents, smectite granules and kaolin -coated gauze in a vascular injury wound model in swine. J

  11. Emerging models in the U.S.A.: swine, woodchucks, and the hairless guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Balk, M W

    1987-01-01

    Swine have been used in biomedical research for many years, but have generally been limited to those locations with personnel familiar with this species and with specially designed facilities and equipment. There is currently a growing trend in the United States for more swine, both miniature and domestic to be used as research models. Commercial availability, education through workshops and symposia, and specific research applicability in the areas such as: organ transplantation, cardiovascular surgery, nutrition, diabetes, dermatology, and renal physiology have all contributed to the increased usage of swine. Additionally, increasing costs and public concern about the use of random source dogs and cats have also resulted in a refocus on swine as a laboratory animal model. The woodchuck (Marmota monax) has recently gained a role as a laboratory animal model when it was discovered that woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is closely related to hepatitis B virus in humans (HBV). Chronic infections in woodchucks with WHV have shown protein particles in their blood which are similar to the Australian antigen found on the surface of HBV. There is also immunologic response similarities by the respective host to these viruses. These findings have resulted in a number of laboratories using the woodchuck in infectious disease comparative research studies. A euthymic hairless guinea pig has been described in Canada and recently been produced on a limited basis commercially in the United States. For dermatologic studies requiring an immunocompetent animal model the hairless guinea pig may prove useful. time to have the ability to add

  12. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  13. Computational Models of Rock Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Dave A.; Spiegelman, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Practitioners in computational geodynamics, as per many other branches of applied science, typically do not analyse the underlying PDE's being solved in order to establish the existence or uniqueness of solutions. Rather, such proofs are left to the mathematicians, and all too frequently these results lag far behind (in time) the applied research being conducted, are often unintelligible to the non-specialist, are buried in journals applied scientists simply do not read, or simply have not been proven. As practitioners, we are by definition pragmatic. Thus, rather than first analysing our PDE's, we first attempt to find approximate solutions by throwing all our computational methods and machinery at the given problem and hoping for the best. Typically this approach leads to a satisfactory outcome. Usually it is only if the numerical solutions "look odd" that we start delving deeper into the math. In this presentation I summarise our findings in relation to using pressure dependent (Drucker-Prager type) flow laws in a simplified model of continental extension in which the material is assumed to be an incompressible, highly viscous fluid. Such assumptions represent the current mainstream adopted in computational studies of mantle and lithosphere deformation within our community. In short, we conclude that for the parameter range of cohesion and friction angle relevant to studying rocks, the incompressibility constraint combined with a Drucker-Prager flow law can result in problems which have no solution. This is proven by a 1D analytic model and convincingly demonstrated by 2D numerical simulations. To date, we do not have a robust "fix" for this fundamental problem. The intent of this submission is to highlight the importance of simple analytic models, highlight some of the dangers / risks of interpreting numerical solutions without understanding the properties of the PDE we solved, and lastly to stimulate discussions to develop an improved computational model of

  14. Guinea pig model for evaluating the potential public health risk of swine and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yipeng; Bi, Yuhai; Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-11-23

    The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses.

  15. Guinea Pig Model for Evaluating the Potential Public Health Risk of Swine and Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Juan; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Linqing; Xu, Qi; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Mengda; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2010-01-01

    Background The influenza viruses circulating in animals sporadically transmit to humans and pose pandemic threats. Animal models to evaluate the potential public health risk potential of these viruses are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the guinea pig as a mammalian model for the study of the replication and transmission characteristics of selected swine H1N1, H1N2, H3N2 and avian H9N2 influenza viruses, compared to those of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal human H1N1, H3N2 influenza viruses. The swine and avian influenza viruses investigated were restricted to the respiratory system of guinea pigs and shed at high titers in nasal tracts without prior adaptation, similar to human strains. None of the swine and avian influenza viruses showed transmissibility among guinea pigs; in contrast, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus transmitted from infected guinea pigs to all animals and seasonal human influenza viruses could also horizontally transmit in guinea pigs. The analysis of the receptor distribution in the guinea pig respiratory tissues by lectin histochemistry indicated that both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors widely presented in the nasal tract and the trachea, while SAα2,3-Gal receptor was the main receptor in the lung. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the guinea pig could serve as a useful mammalian model to evaluate the potential public health threat of swine and avian influenza viruses. PMID:21124850

  16. One-Health Simulation Modelling: A Case Study of Influenza Spread between Human and Swine Populations using NAADSM.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2016-02-01

    The circulation of zoonotic influenza A viruses including pH1N1 2009 and H5N1 continue to present a constant threat to animal and human populations. Recently, an H3N2 variant spread from pigs to humans and between humans in limited numbers. Accordingly, this research investigated a range of scenarios of the transmission dynamics of pH1N1 2009 virus at the swine-human interface while accounting for different percentages of swine workers initially immune. Furthermore, the feasibility of using NAADSM (North American Animal Disease Spread Model) applied as a one-health simulation model was assessed. The study population included 488 swine herds and 29, 707 households of people within a county in Ontario, Canada. Households were categorized as follows: (i) rural households with swine workers, (ii) rural households without swine workers, and (iii) urban households without swine workers. Forty-eight scenarios were investigated, based on the combination of six scenarios around the transmissibility of the virus at the interface and four vaccination coverage levels of swine workers (0-60%), all under two settings of either swine or human origin of the virus. Outcomes were assessed in terms of stochastic 'die-out' fraction, size and time to peak epidemic day, overall size and duration of the outbreaks. The modelled outcomes indicated that minimizing influenza transmissibility at the interface and targeted vaccination of swine workers had significant beneficial effects. Our results indicate that NAADSM can be used as a framework to model the spread and control of contagious zoonotic diseases among animal and human populations, under certain simplifying assumptions. Further evaluation of the model is required. In addition to these specific findings, this study serves as a benchmark that can provide useful input to a future one-health influenza modelling studies. Some pertinent information gaps were also identified. Enhanced surveillance and the collection of high

  17. ASPH modeling of Material Damage and Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, J M

    2010-04-30

    We describe our new methodology for Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) and its application to problems in modeling material failure. We find that ASPH is often crucial for properly modeling such experiments, since in most cases the strain placed on materials is non-isotropic (such as a stretching rod), and without the directional adaptability of ASPH numerical failure due to SPH nodes losing contact in the straining direction can compete with or exceed the physical process of failure.

  18. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or ‑mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  19. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or -mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios.

  20. Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, S.; Berkhout, V.; Mayer, J.; Siebenlist, D.

    2016-09-01

    Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines is an essential part of offshore wind farm simulation software as it leads to optimized decision making when specifying the necessary resources for the operation and maintenance of wind farms. In order to optimize O&M strategies, a thorough understanding of a wind turbine's failure behaviour is vital and is therefore being developed at Fraunhofer IWES. Within this article, first the failure models of existing offshore O&M tools are presented to show the state of the art and strengths and weaknesses of the respective models are briefly discussed. Then a conceptual framework for modelling different failure mechanisms of wind turbines is being presented. This framework takes into account the different wind turbine subsystems and structures as well as the failure modes of a component by applying several influencing factors representing wear and break failure mechanisms. A failure function is being set up for the rotor blade as exemplary component and simulation results have been compared to a constant failure rate and to empirical wind turbine fleet data as a reference. The comparison and the breakdown of specific failure categories demonstrate the overall plausibility of the model.

  1. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  2. Direct epicardial assist device using artificial rubber muscle in a swine model of pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kondo, Norihiro; Kowatari, Ryosuke; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices are a potent alternative or bridge therapy to heart transplants for dilated cardiomyopathy patients. However, ventricular assist devices have problems related to biocompatibility, hemocompatibility, and thromboembolic events, especially in younger patients. The present study examined the hemodynamic effects of a direct cardiac compression device using circumferential artificial rubber muscles in a young swine model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy was established in 6 pigs (6-8 weeks of rapid right ventricular pacing; average weight, 22.6 ± 2.1 kg). The device was designed using pneumatic rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, Festo). Hemodynamic parameters were monitored under baseline conditions, after the assistance, and after inducing ventricular fibrillation. Hemodynamic data were acquired using a PiCCO, multilumened thermodilution catheter in the pulmonary artery, left ventricular pressure monitoring, and epicardial echocardiography. Direct epicardial assistance resulted in a significant improvement in hemodynamic data. Cardiac output improved from 1.39 ± 0.24 L/min to 1.96 ± 0.46 (p = 0.02). Stroke volume (14.5 ± 3.2 mL versus 20.1 ± 4.3 ml, p<0.01) and ejection fraction (25.2 ± 3.6% versus 47.7 ± 7.8%, p<0.01) also improved after assistance. After inducing ventricular fibrillation, cardiac output was maintained at 1.33 ± 0.28 L/min. Use of a circumferential direct epicardial assistant device resulted in improvement in hemodynamic data in a dilated cardiomyopathy model. Although there is still a need for improvements in device components, the direct cardiac assist device may be a good alternative to recent heart failure device therapies.

  3. Endotracheal intubation in swine.

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2012-11-01

    Swine are commonly used as research models for cardiovascular surgery and disease, gastrointestinal disease, organ transplantation and intra-renal surgery. These surgical models require anesthesia and, consequently, endotracheal intubation in order to protect the airway; prevent aspiration of saliva, blood and foreign materials; and maintain positive pressure ventilation of the animal. Successful intubation is vital to the stable maintenance of swine under inhalational anesthesia. Here we discuss key features of swine anatomy that make intubation challenging, equipment necessary for successful intubation and techniques for endotracheal intubation in swine.

  4. Using a chemical equilibrium model to predict amendments required to precipitate phosphorus as struvite in liquid swine manure.

    PubMed

    Celen, Ipek; Buchanan, John R; Burns, Robert T; Robinson, R Bruce; Raman, D Raj

    2007-04-01

    Precipitation of phosphate minerals from liquid swine manure is an established means of reducing the orthophosphate (OP) concentration. This project investigated the usefulness of a chemical equilibrium model, Visual Minteq, for prescribing the amendments needed to maximize struvite precipitation from liquid swine manure and thus reduce the OP phosphorus concentration. The actual concentrations of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), OP, NH(4)(+), alkalinity and pH from a liquid swine manure system were used as inputs to the model. The model was modified to remove species with extremely low formation rates, because they would not significantly precipitate in the reaction occurring in a short retention-time process such as those envisioned for swine manure struvite-formation reactors. Using the model's output, a series of 19-L reactors were used to verify the results. Verification results demonstrated that Visual Minteq can be used to pre-determine the concentration of amendments required to maximize struvite recovery.

  5. Model degradation effects on sensor failure detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of imperfect modeling on the detection and isolation of sensor failures. For systems with non-zero set points, deterministic inputs or non-zero noise biases, the model mismatch appears as a bias on the stochastic innovation process. This bias, if left unaccounted for, would be sufficient to declare a false alarm failure in one or more sensors. A practical design procedure based upon the Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLR) form uses a finite data window sequential t-test to detect and isolate model mismatch effects and soft sensor failures. Application to an eighth order model of the QCSEE turbofan engine is discussed.

  6. Dynamic Constitutive/Failure Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    compressive failure--microfracture versus microplasticity . Actual traces observed in plate impact tests on ceramic targets are hardly ever as simple as the...observa- tions for microfracture and microplasticity . Unfortunately, each team of investigators has used slightly different experimental techniques and

  7. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J; Huang, Christene A

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  8. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation activates pyruvate oxidation in an immature swine model in vivo. Twelve male mixed-breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30–49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (group C) or pyruvate (group P) during the final 6 h of 8 h of ECMO. Over the final hour, piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, as a reference substrate for oxidation, and [13C6]-l-leucine, as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of the citric acid cycle intermediates. An increase in anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation in group P occurred compared with no change in pyruvate oxidation. Additionally, pyruvate promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient-sensitive enzymes, like AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation for fatty acid oxidation. Pyruvate also promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. In conclusion, although prolonged pyruvate supplementation did not alter pyruvate oxidation, it did elicit changes in nutrient- and energy-sensitive pathways. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of pyruvate and its downstream effect on cardiac function. PMID:25910802

  9. Constitutive modeling of the passive inflation-extension behavior of the swine colon.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavesh; Chen, Huan; Ahuja, Aashish; Krieger, Joshua F; Noblet, Jillian; Chambers, Sean; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2017-08-31

    In the present work, we propose the first structural constitutive model of the passive mechanical behavior of the swine colon that is validated against physiological inflation-extension tests, and accounts for residual strains. Sections from the spiral colon and the descending colon were considered to investigate potential regional variability. We found that the proposed constitutive model accurately captures the passive inflation-extension behavior of both regions of the swine colon (coefficient of determination R(2)=0.94±0.02). The model revealed that the circumferential muscle layer does not provide significant mechanical support under passive conditions and the circumferential load is actually carried by the submucosa layer. The stress analysis permitted by the model showed that the colon tissue can distend up to 30% radially without significant increase in the wall stresses suggesting a highly compliant behavior of the tissue. This is in-line with the requirement for the tissue to easily accommodate variable quantities of fecal matter. The analysis also showed that the descending colon is significantly more compliant than the spiral colon, which is relevant to the storage function of the descending colon. Histological analysis showed that the swine colon possesses a four-layer structure similar to the human colon, where the longitudinal muscle layer is organized into bands called taeniae, a typical feature of the human colon. The model and the estimated parameters can be used in a Finite Element framework to conduct simulations with realistic geometry of the swine colon. The resulting computational model will provide a foundation for virtual assessment of safe and effective devices for the treatment of colonic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and application of a simulation model for the thermophilic oxic process for treating swine waste.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungho; Nakano, Kazunori; Nishimura, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The thermophilic oxic process (TOP) is a composting process that enables simultaneous complete decomposition and evaporation of organic waste under high temperature conditions supported by well-balanced calorific value control. To develop the simulation model for TOP, three-dimensional relationships among decomposition rate constant, temperature (20-70 °C) and moisture content (30-70%) were determined for swine waste and cooking oil based on the oxygen consumption rate during a thermophilic oxic decomposition reaction. The decomposition rate of swine waste and cooking oil under various moisture contents was described by the Arrhenius equation. The optimal temperature and moisture content were 60 °C and 60% for swine waste and 60 °C and 50% for cooking oil, respectively. The simulation model for TOP was constructed on the basis of the carbon, heat, and moisture balance. The validation of the simulation model was examined by comparing the measured temperature in the TOP reactor to that estimated by the simulation. The simulation model was proven by comparing experimental and calculated values. The relationship between the injection calorific value and the process mechanism of TOP was interpreted by the simulation model. On the basis of their relationship during TOP, the appropriate process conditions were discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling

    PubMed Central

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m2-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10−7 µg/yr-m2-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels. PMID:21804761

  12. Use of AERMOD to Determine a Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factor for Swine Operations by Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine both optimal settings applied to the plume dispersion model, AERMOD, and a scalable emission factor for accurately determining the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the vicinity of swine concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations emit hydrogen sulfide from both housing structures and waste lagoons. With ambient measurements made at 4 stations within 1 km of large swine CAFOs in Iowa, an inverse-modeling approach applied to AERMOD was used to determine hydrogen sulfide emission rates. CAFO buildings were treated as volume sources whereas nearby lagoons were modeled as area sources. The robust highest concentration (RHC), calculated for both measured and modeled concentrations, was used as the metric for adjusting the emission rate until the ratio of the two RHC levels was unity. Utilizing this approach, an average emission flux rate of 0.57 µg/m(2)-s was determined for swine CAFO lagoons. Using the average total animal weight (kg) of each CAFO, an average emission factor of 6.06 × 10(-7) µg/yr-m(2)-kg was calculated. From studies that measured either building or lagoon emission flux rates, building fluxes, on a floor area basis, were considered equal to lagoon flux rates. The emission factor was applied to all CAFOs surrounding the original 4 sites and surrounding an additional 6 sites in Iowa, producing an average modeled-to-measured RHC ratio of 1.24. When the emission factor was applied to AERMOD to simulate the spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide around a hypothetical large swine CAFO (1M kg), concentrations 0.5 km from the CAFO were 35 ppb and dropped to 2 ppb within 6 km of the CAFO. These values compare to a level of 30 ppb that has been determined by the State of Iowa as a threshold level for ambient hydrogen sulfide levels.

  13. Animal models of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit Pal; Junemann, Anselm; Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal; Grover, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    The animal models are pivotal for understanding the characteristics of acute renal failure (ARF) and development of effective therapy for its optimal management. Since the etiology for induction of renal failure is multifold, therefore, a large number of animal models have been developed to mimic the clinical conditions of renal failure. Glycerol-induced renal failure closely mimics the rhabdomyolysis; ischemia-reperfusion-induced ARF simulate the hemodynamic changes-induced changes in renal functioning; drug-induced such as gentamicin, cisplatin, NSAID, ifosfamide-induced ARF mimics the renal failure due to clinical administration of respective drugs; uranium, potassium dichromate-induced ARF mimics the occupational hazard; S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine-induced ARF simulate contaminated water-induced renal dysfunction; sepsis-induced ARF mimics the infection-induced renal failure and radiocontrast-induced ARF mimics renal failure in patients during use of radiocontrast media at the time of cardiac catheterization. Since each animal model has been created with specific methodology, therefore, it is essential to describe the model in detail and consequently interpret the results in the context of a specific model.

  14. Physiologic Tolerance of Descending Thoracic Aortic Balloon Occlusion in a Swine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-10

    Endovascular proximal control of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms : the internal aortic clamp. J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino) 2009;50(3):381. 14. Arthurs Z...Starnes B, See C, Andersen C. Clamp Before You Cut: Proximal Control of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Endovascular Balloon Occlusion...PHYSIOLOGIC TOLERANCE OF DESCENDING THORACIC AORTIC BALLOON OCCLUSION IN A SWINE MODEL OF HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK 10 January 2013 Reporting Period: September

  15. A swine model of infarct-related reentrant ventricular tachycardia: Electroanatomic, magnetic resonance, and histopathological characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Roujol, Sébastien; Nezafat, Reza; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly; Buxton, Alfred E.; Josephson, Mark E.; Anter, Elad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human ventricular tachycardia (VT) after myocardial infarction usually occurs because of subendocardial reentrant circuits originating in scar tissue that borders surviving myocardial bundles. Several preclinical large animal models have been used to further study postinfarct reentrant VT, but with varied experimental methodologies and limited evaluation of the underlying substrate or induced arrhythmia mechanism. OBJECTIVE We aimed to develop and characterize a swine model of scar-related reentrant VT. METHODS Thirty-five Yorkshire swine underwent 180-minute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Thirty-one animals (89%) survived the 6–8-week survival period. These animals underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by electrophysiology study, detailed electroanatomic mapping, and histopathological analysis. RESULTS Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction measured using CMR imaging was 36% ± 6.6% with anteroseptal wall motion abnormality and late gadolinium enhancement across 12.5% ± 4.1% of the LV surface area. Low voltage measured using endocardial electroanatomic mapping encompassed 11.1% ± 3.5% of the LV surface area (bipolar voltage ≤1.5 mV) with anterior, anteroseptal, and anterolateral involvement. Reentrant circuits mapped were largely determined by functional rather than fix anatomical barriers, consistent with “pseudo-block” due to anisotropic conduction. Sustained monomorphic VT was induced in 28 of 31 swine (90%) (67 VTs; 2.4 ± 1.1; range 1–4) and characterized as reentry. VT circuits were subendocardial, with an arrhythmogenic substrate characterized by transmural anterior scar with varying degrees of fibrosis and myocardial fiber disarray on the septal and lateral borders. CONCLUSION This is a well-characterized swine model of scar-related subendocardial reentrant VT. This model can serve as the basis for further investigation in the physiology and therapeutics of humanlike postinfarction

  16. A surgical model for studying biliary bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in swine.

    PubMed

    Faidley, T D; Galloway, S T; Luhman, C M; Foley, M K; Beitz, D C

    1991-10-01

    Techniques were developed in young growing pigs to simultaneously collect and reinfuse bile. Silastic cannulae were designed and surgically implanted in the common bile duct and the duodenum. Direct sampling of the hepatic bile was achieved by bypassing the gallbladder. The techniques allowed for steady-state studies of hepatic function to be conducted in conscious swine in two different studies. Pigs, thus surgically modified, can serve as an appropriate model for physiologic, pharmacologic, and nutritional research that involves bile sampling.

  17. Identification of Region-Specific Myocardial Gene Expression Patterns in a Chronic Swine Model of Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Charron, Sabine; Roubertie, François; Benoist, David; Dubes, Virginie; Gilbert, Stephen H; Constantin, Marion; Vieillot, Delphine; Elbes, Delphine; Quesson, Bruno; Bordachar, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel; Bernus, Olivier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Rooryck, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is highly successful but may be complicated in adulthood by arrhythmias, sudden death, and right ventricular or biventricular dysfunction. To better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of these delayed cardiac events, a chronic animal model of postoperative TOF was studied using microarrays to perform cardiac transcriptomic studies. The experimental study included 12 piglets (7 rTOF and 5 controls) that underwent surgery at age 2 months and were further studied after 23 (+/- 1) weeks of postoperative recovery. Two distinct regions (endocardium and epicardium) from both ventricles were analyzed. Expression levels from each localization were compared in order to decipher mechanisms and signaling pathways leading to ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias in surgically repaired TOF. Several genes were confirmed to participate in ventricular remodeling and cardiac failure and some new candidate genes were described. In particular, these data pointed out FRZB as a heart failure marker. Moreover, calcium handling and contractile function genes (SLN, ACTC1, PLCD4, PLCZ), potential arrhythmia-related genes (MYO5B, KCNA5), and cytoskeleton and cellular organization-related genes (XIRP2, COL8A1, KCNA6) were among the most deregulated genes in rTOF ventricles. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on global gene expression profiling in the heart of a long-term swine model of repaired TOF.

  18. Modelling early failures in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    A major problem encountered in planning for Space Station Freedom is the amount of maintenance that will be required. To predict the failure rates of components and systems aboard Space Station Freedom, the logical approach is to use data obtained from previously flown spacecraft. In order to determine the mechanisms that are driving the failures, models can be proposed, and then checked to see if they adequately fit the observed failure data obtained from a large variety of satellites. For this particular study, failure data and truncation times were available for satellites launched between 1976 and 1984; no data past 1984 was available. The study was limited to electrical subsystems and assemblies, which were studied to determine if they followed a model resulting from a mixture of exponential distributions.

  19. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Nam, Min-Ho; Yoon, Ji Woong; Kwon, Hee-Min; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS) development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure) that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens. PMID:23762159

  20. Novel threadlike structures may be present on the large animal organ surface: evidence in Swine model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Nam, Min-Ho; Yoon, Ji Woong; Kwon, Hee-Min; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS) development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure) that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  1. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  2. Scenario tree model for animal disease freedom framed in the OIE context using the example of a generic swine model for Aujeszky's disease in commercial swine in Canada.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jette; Vallières, André

    2016-01-01

    "Freedom from animal disease" is an ambiguous concept that may have a different meaning in trade and science. For trade alone, there are different levels of freedom from OIE listed diseases. A country can: be recognized by OIE to be "officially free"; self-declare freedom, with no official recognition by the OIE; or report animal disease as absent (no occurrence) in six-monthly reports. In science, we apply scenario tree models to calculate the probability of a population being free from disease at a given prevalence to provide evidence of freedom from animal disease. Here, we link science with application by describing how a scenario tree model may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease. We combine the idea of a standardized presentation of scenario tree models for disease freedom and having a similar model for two different animal diseases to suggest that a simple generic model may help veterinary authorities to build and evaluate scenario tree models for disease freedom. Here, we aim to develop a generic scenario tree model for disease freedom that is: animal species specific, population specific, and has a simple structure. The specific objectives were: to explore the levels of freedom described in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code; to describe how scenario tree models may contribute to a country's claim of freedom from animal disease; and to present a generic swine scenario tree model for disease freedom in Canada's domestic (commercial) swine applied to Aujeszky's disease (AD). In particular, to explore how historical survey data, and data mining may affect the probability of freedom and to explore different sampling strategies. Finally, to frame the generic scenario tree model in the context of Canada's claim of freedom from AD. We found that scenario tree models are useful to support a country's claim of freedom either as "recognized officially free" or as part of a self-declaration but the models should not stand alone in a

  3. Interspecies mixed-effect pharmacokinetic modeling of penicillin G in cattle and swine.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao; Riviere, Jim E

    2014-08-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses.

  4. Interspecies Mixed-Effect Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Penicillin G in Cattle and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Tell, Lisa; Baynes, Ronald; Huang, Qingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Extralabel drug use of penicillin G in food-producing animals may cause an excess of residues in tissue which will have the potential to damage human health. Of all the antibiotics, penicillin G may have the greatest potential for producing allergic responses to the consumer of food animal products. There are, however, no population pharmacokinetic studies of penicillin G for food animals. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the time-concentration data profile of penicillin G across two species. Data were collected from previously published pharmacokinetic studies in which several formulations of penicillin G were administered to diverse populations of cattle and swine. Liver, kidney, and muscle residue data were also used in this study. Compartmental models with first-order absorption and elimination were fit to plasma and tissue concentrations using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling approach. A 3-compartment model with extra tissue compartments was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G. Typical population parameter estimates (interindividual variability) were central volumes of distribution of 3.45 liters (12%) and 3.05 liters (8.8%) and central clearance of 105 liters/h (32%) and 16.9 liters/h (14%) for cattle and swine, respectively, with peripheral clearance of 24.8 liters/h (13%) and 9.65 liters/h (23%) for cattle and 13.7 liters/h (85%) and 0.52 liters/h (40%) for swine. Body weight and age were the covariates in the final pharmacokinetic models. This study established a robust model of penicillin for a large and diverse population of food-producing animals which could be applied to other antibiotics and species in future analyses. PMID:24867969

  5. Rotating Frame Spin Lattice Relaxation in a Swine Model of Chronic, Left Ventricular Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Witschey, Walter RT; Pilla, James J; Ferrari, Giovanni; Koomalsingh, Kevin; Haris, Mohammed; Hinmon, Robin; Zsido, Gerald; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation times were quantified in a swine model of chronic, left ventricular myocardial infarction. It was found that there were low frequency relaxation mechanisms that suppress endogenous contrast at low spin lock amplitudes and in T2-weighted images. A moderate amplitude spin locking pulse could overcome these relaxation mechanisms. Relaxation dispersion data was measured over a range of RF field amplitudes and a model was formulated to include dipole-dipole relaxation modulated by molecular rotation and an apparent exchange mechanism. These techniques may find some use in the clinic for the observation of chronic, left ventricular cardiac remodeling. PMID:20677236

  6. Inactivation of Viruses and Bacteriophages as Models for Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Food Matrices.

    PubMed

    Emmoth, Eva; Rovira, Jordi; Rajkovic, Andreja; Corcuera, Elena; Wilches Pérez, Diego; Dergel, Irene; Ottoson, Jakob R; Widén, Frederik

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus has been recognised as a food-borne virus hazard in pork products, due to its zoonotic properties. This risk can be reduced by adequate treatment of the food to inactivate food-borne viruses. We used a spectrum of viruses and bacteriophages to evaluate the effect of three food treatments: high pressure processing (HPP), lactic acid (LA) and intense light pulse (ILP) treatments. On swine liver at 400 MPa for 10 min, HPP gave log10 reductions of ≥4.2, ≥5.0 and 3.4 for feline calicivirus (FCV) 2280, FCV wildtype (wt) and murine norovirus 1 (MNV 1), respectively. Escherichia coli coliphage ϕX174 displayed a lower reduction of 1.1, while Escherichia coli coliphage MS2 was unaffected. For ham at 600 MPa, the corresponding reductions were 4.1, 4.4, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.3 log10. LA treatment at 2.2 M gave log10 reductions in the viral spectrum of 0.29-2.1 for swine liver and 0.87-3.1 for ham, with ϕX174 and MNV 1, respectively, as the most stable microorganisms. The ILP treatment gave log10 reductions of 1.6-2.8 for swine liver, 0.97-2.2 for ham and 1.3-2.3 for sausage, at 15-60 J cm(-2), with MS2 as the most stable microorganism. The HPP treatment gave significantly (p < 0.05) greater virus reduction on swine liver than ham for the viruses at equivalent pressure/time combinations. For ILP treatment, reductions on swine liver were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than on ham for all microorganisms. The results presented here could be used in assessments of different strategies to protect consumers against virus contamination and in advice to food producers. Conservative model indicators for the pathogenic viruses could be suggested.

  7. Laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy in a swine model. Third place winner of the Conrad Jobst Award in the Gold Medal paper competition.

    PubMed

    Layman, T S; Burns, R P; Chandler, K E; Russell, W L; Cook, R G

    1993-01-01

    A simplified method of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using prosthetic materials was evaluated in a swine hernia model. The goals of this study were to determine 1) effectiveness of repair in a rapidly growing animal, 2) effectiveness and extent of adhesion formation of different prosthetic materials, 3) the effect of repair on testicular growth, and 4) histologic effects on the hernia site and surrounding structures. In a prospective randomized study, 30 juvenile male swine (average, 23 kg) with 35 congenital indirect inguinal hernias underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using one of three prosthetic materials: Group 1 (polytetrafluoroethylene/Gore-Tex), N = 10; Group 2 (polypropylene mesh/Marlex), N = 10; Group 3 (polypropylene mesh/Prolene), N = 10. A standardized laparoscopic herniorrhaphy technique consisting of stapling prosthetic material over the hernia defect without peritoneal dissection was employed. During the 3-month postoperative period, animals were sequentially examined for normal growth and development, normal testicular development, and signs of hernia recurrence. Clinically apparent complications related to herniorrhaphy occurred in five animals (17%) during the observation period (one with repair failure, one with testicular torsion, two with repair failure and bowel obstruction, and one with intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions). All three animals with bowel obstruction died. At 90 days after surgery all remaining animals (N = 27) were euthanized (Group 1 = 9, Group 2 = 8, Group 3 = 10). Average weight was 84 kg. Necropsy findings included no additional hernia recurrences, and one mesh erosion into the urinary bladder.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A Cellular Automaton Model of Catastrophic Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, C. A.; Klein, W.

    2009-03-01

    We introduce a two-dimensional cellular automaton model for studying the catastrophic failure of materials under stress. Our model is similar to the Olami-Feder-Christensen earthquake model [Z. Olami et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1244 (1992)] except that after a site fails f-times, it no longer can receive stress from its neighbors. In the limit that the interaction range, R, goes to infinity, our model is equivalent to the global load sharing fiber bundle model of Pierce [F. T.Pierce, J. Text. Ind. 17, 355 (1926)] and Daniels [H. E. Daniels, Proc. Roy. Soc. London A 183, 405 (1945)]. By varying the interaction range, we observe two qualitatively different failure modes. For R 1 catastrophic failure resembles a nucleation-like event which grows symmetrically from a single initiating site and fails every site in the lattice. In contrast, for R 1 a percolating cluster of failed sites spans the system despite the many active sites that persist, even after catastrophic failure. We use the stress-fluctuation metric to study the ergodicity of our model and hence the validity of equilibrium descriptions of fracture.

  9. Screening of potential small volume resuscitation products using a severe hemorrhage sedated swine model

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W; Baer, Lisa A; Darlington, Daniel N; Dubick, Michael A; Wade, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Background Small volumes of resuscitation products to sustain survival until definitive care are desired in extreme environments due to limited resources. A severe controlled hemorrhage model in sedated, sexually mature miniature swine has been developed to evaluate these products. Valproic Acid (VPA) and Pentoxifylline (PTX) have been suggested as potential products for small volume resuscitation following hemorrhage predominately in anesthetized small animal models. We evaluated the survival time of VPA and PTX in the swine model. Methods Fifteen male miniature swine weighing 41.1 ± 2.9 kg were sedated and hemorrhaged 60% of estimated blood volume over 1 hr and treated with one of the following: 1) VPA at 400 mg/kg in a volume of 1.33 ml/kg over 2 min (n=4); 2) VPA at 300 mg/kg in a volume of 2 ml/kg over 30 min (n=3); 3) PTX at 50 mg/kg in a volume of 2 ml/kg over 2 min (n=4); 4) saline vehicle at 2 ml/kg over 2 min (n=4). Survival times were compared to non-resuscitated historic controls (n=16). Survival was determined from the end of hemorrhage/initiation of treatment. Results Median (95% CI) survival times were: Control 55.7 (17.5 - 86) min; VPA (400 mg/kg) 6 (4 - 8) min; VPA (300 mg/kg) 17.5 (12 - 24.5) min; PTX 60.8 (21 - 75) min; and vehicle 92 (15 - 180) min. No treatment increased survival time compared to controls and there were no significant differences in percent survival among groups. Conclusion In this sedated severe hemorrhage model VPA and PTX were unacceptable as small volume resuscitation products at the concentrations and delivery rates used because of early deaths. Considering that these drugs are FDA approved for other indications at lower doses the present data suggest that further investigation of mechanisms involved are warranted. PMID:22928168

  10. Modeling the biomechanics of swine mastication--an inverse dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Basafa, Ehsan; Murphy, Ryan J; Gordon, Chad R; Armand, Mehran

    2014-08-22

    A novel reconstructive alternative for patients with severe facial structural deformity is Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplantation (FJTT). To date, however, only ten surgeries have included underlying skeletal and jaw-teeth components, all yielding sub-optimal results and a need for a subsequent revision surgery, due to size mismatch and lack of precise planning. Numerous studies have proven swine to be appropriate candidates for translational studies including pre-operative planning of transplantation. An important aspect of planning FJTT is determining the optimal muscle attachment sites on the recipient's jaw, which requires a clear understanding of mastication and bite mechanics in relation to the new donated upper and/or lower jaw. A segmented CT scan coupled with data taken from literature defined a biomechanical model of mandible and jaw muscles of a swine. The model was driven using tracked motion and external force data of one cycle of chewing published earlier, and predicted the muscle activation patterns as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces and condylar motions. Two methods, polynomial and min/max optimization, were used for solving the muscle recruitment problem. Similar performances were observed between the two methods. On average, there was a mean absolute error (MAE) of <0.08 between the predicted and measured activation levels of all muscles, and an MAE of <7 N for TMJ reaction forces. Simulated activations qualitatively followed the same patterns as the reference data and there was very good agreement for simulated TMJ forces. The polynomial optimization produced a smoother output, suggesting that it is more suitable for studying such motions. Average MAE for condylar motion was 1.2mm, which reduced to 0.37 mm when the input incisor motion was scaled to reflect the possible size mismatch between the current and original swine models. Results support the hypothesis that the model can be used for planning of facial

  11. Detection and evaluation of renal biomarkers in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Su-Yan; Xing, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is increasing and strongly associated with long-term mortality. However, lack of reliable animal models and well-defined measures of renoprotection, made early diagnosis and therapy difficult. We previously successfully established the swine acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model of ischemia-reperfusion by blocking left anterior descending branch (LAD). Reperfusion was performed after 90-minute occlusion of the LAD. AMI was confirmed by ECG and left ventricular angiography (LVG). Then those 52 survived AMI reperfusion swine, including ventricular fibrillation-cardiac arrest after restoration of blood flow, were randomly divided into four groups (four/group) according to different interventions: resuscitation in room temperature, resuscitation with 500 ml saline in room temperature, resuscitation with 4°C 500 ml saline and normal control (with no intervention of resuscitation). Each group was further observed in four groups according to different time of resuscitation after ventricular arrhythmias: 1, 3, 5, 10-minute reperfusion after ventricular arrhythmias. Plasma and random urine were collected to evaluate renal function and test renal biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI). Our swine AMI model of ischemia-reperfusion provoked subclinical AKI with the elevation of the tubular damage biomarker, NGAL, IL-18 and L-FABP. Renal damage rapidly observed after hemodynamic instability, rather than observation after several hours as previously reported. The increasing rate of biological markers declined after interventions, however, its impact on the long-term prognosis remains to be further studied. These data show that elevation of tubular damage biomarkers without glomerular function loss may indicate appropriate timing for effective renoprotections like hypothermia resuscitation in type 1 CRS.

  12. Modelling the time at which overcrowding and feed interruption emerge on the swine premises under movement restrictions during a classical swine fever outbreak.

    PubMed

    Weng, H Y; Yadav, S; Olynk Widmar, N J; Croney, C; Ash, M; Cooper, M

    2017-03-01

    A stochastic risk model was developed to estimate the time elapsed before overcrowding (TOC) or feed interruption (TFI) emerged on the swine premises under movement restrictions during a classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak in Indiana, USA. Nursery (19 to 65 days of age) and grow-to-finish (40 to 165 days of age) pork production operations were modelled separately. Overcrowding was defined as the total weight of pigs on premises exceeding 100% to 115% of the maximum capacity of the premises, which was computed as the total weight of the pigs at harvest/transition age. Algorithms were developed to estimate age-specific weight of the pigs on premises and to compare the daily total weight of the pigs with the threshold weight defining overcrowding to flag the time when the total weight exceeded the threshold (i.e. when overcrowding occurred). To estimate TFI, an algorithm was constructed to model a swine producer's decision to discontinue feed supply by incorporating the assumptions that a longer estimated epidemic duration, a longer time interval between the age of pigs at the onset of the outbreak and the harvest/transition age, or a longer progression of an ongoing outbreak would increase the probability of a producer's decision to discontinue the feed supply. Adverse animal welfare conditions were modelled to emerge shortly after an interruption of feed supply. Simulations were run with 100 000 iterations each for a 365-day period. Overcrowding occurred in all simulated iterations, and feed interruption occurred in 30% of the iterations. The median (5th and 95th percentiles) TOC was 24 days (10, 43) in nursery operations and 78 days (26, 134) in grow-to-finish operations. Most feed interruptions, if they emerged, occurred within 15 days of an outbreak. The median (5th and 95th percentiles) time at which either overcrowding or feed interruption emerged was 19 days (4, 42) in nursery and 57 days (4, 130) in grow-to-finish operations. The study findings suggest that

  13. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  14. Failure diagnosis using discrete event models

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, M.; Sengupta, R.; Lafortune, S.; Teneketzis, D.; Sinnamohideen, K.

    1994-12-31

    We propose a Discrete Event Systems (DES) approach to the failure diagnosis problem. We present a methodology for modeling physical systems in a DES framework. We discuss the notion of diagnosability and present the construction procedure of the diagnoser. Finally, we illustrate our approach using a Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system.

  15. Accelerated Failure-Time Models of Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimka, Justin R.; Wang, Qilu

    2009-01-01

    This third article in a series describing survival analysis of engineering student retention and graduation introduces accelerated failure-time as an alternative to the Cox proportional hazards model to the context of student data. The new survival analysis of graduation data presented here assumes different distributions including exponential,…

  16. Modeling of microstructural effects on electromigration failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ceric, H.; Orio, R. L. de; Zisser, W.; Selberherr, S.

    2014-06-19

    Current electromigration models used for simulation and analysis of interconnect reliability lack the appropriate description of metal microstructure and consequently have a very limited predictive capability. Therefore, the main objective of our work was obtaining more sophisticated electromigration tools. The problem is addressed through a combination of different levels of atomistic modeling and already available, continuum level macroscopic models. A novel method for an ab initio calculation of the effective valence for electromigration is presented and its application on the analysis of EM behavior is demonstrated. Additionally, a simple analytical model for the early electromigration lifetime is obtained. We have shown that its application provides a reasonable estimate for the early electromigration failures including the effect of microstructure. A simulation study is also applied on electromigration failure in tin solder bumps, where it contributed the understanding of the role of tin crystal anisotropy in the degradation mechanism of solder bumps.

  17. Characterization of right ventricular remodeling and failure in a chronic pulmonary hypertension model

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Hadri, Lahouaria; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Fish, Kenneth; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Chaanine, Antoine; Torquato, Samantha; Naim, Charbel; Ibanez, Borja; Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Fuster, Valentin; Sengupta, Partho P.; Leopold, Jane A.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure is the main determinant of a poor prognosis. We aimed to characterize RV structural and functional differences during adaptive RV remodeling and progression to RV failure in a large animal model of chronic PH. Postcapillary PH was created surgically in swine (n = 21). After an 8- to 14-wk follow-up, two groups were identified based on the development of overt heart failure (HF): PH-NF (nonfailing, n = 12) and PH-HF (n = 8). In both groups, invasive hemodynamics, pressure-volume relationships, and echocardiography confirmed a significant increase in pulmonary pressures and vascular resistance consistent with PH. Histological analysis also demonstrated distal pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling in both groups. Diastolic dysfunction, defined by a steeper RV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship and longitudinal strain, was found in the absence of HF as an early marker of RV remodeling. RV contractility was increased in both groups, and RV-PA coupling was preserved in PH-NF animals but impaired in the PH-HF group. RV hypertrophy was present in PH-HF, although there was evidence of increased RV fibrosis in both PH groups. In the PH-HF group, RV sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase2a expression was decreased, and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased. Aldosterone levels were also elevated in PH-HF. Thus, in the swine pulmonary vein banding model of chronic postcapillary PH, RV remodeling occurs at the structural, histological, and molecular level. Diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis are present in adaptive RV remodeling, whereas the onset of RV failure is associated with RV-PA uncoupling, defective calcium handling, and hyperaldosteronism. PMID:25158063

  18. A Multiscale Computational Model of the Response of Swine Epidermis After Acute Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events can lead to very high skin dose for astronauts on exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth s magnetic field [1]. Assessing the detrimental effects to human skin under such adverse conditions could be predicted by conducting territorial experiments on animal models. In this study we apply a computational approach to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis [2]. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters into a multiscale tissue modeling framework, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation index comparable to unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments [3]. It is noted the basal cell doubling time is 10 to 16 days in the intact population, but drops to 13.6 hr in the regenerating populations surviving irradiation. This complex 30-fold variation is proposed to be attributed to the shortening of the G1 phase duration. We investigate this radiation induced effect by considering at the sub-cellular level the expression and signaling of TGF-beta, as it is recognized as a key regulatory factor of tissue formation and wound healing [4]. This integrated model will allow us to test the validity of various basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and should lead to a fuller understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  19. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  20. Reducing Neointima Formation in a Swine Model with IVUS and Sirolimus Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Joseph P; Dhanaliwala, Ali H; Klibanov, Alexander L; Bowles, Douglas K; Wamhoff, Brian R; Hossack, John A

    2015-11-01

    Potent therapeutic compounds with dose dependent side effects require more efficient and selective drug delivery to reduce systemic drug doses. Here, we demonstrate a new platform that combines intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and drug-loaded microbubbles to enhance and localize drug delivery, while enabling versatility of drug type and dosing. Localization and degree of delivery with IVUS and microbubbles was assessed using fluorophore-loaded microbubbles and different IVUS parameters in ex vivo swine arteries. Using a swine model of neointimal hyperplasia, reduction of neointima formation following balloon injury was evaluated when using the combination of IVUS and sirolimus-loaded microbubbles. IVUS and microbubble enhanced fluorophore delivery was greatest when applying low amplitude pulses in the ex vivo model. In the in vivo model, neointima formation was reduced by 50% after treatment with IVUS and the sirolimus-loaded microbubbles. This reduction was achieved with a sirolimus whole blood concentration comparable to a commercial drug-eluting stent (0.999 ng/mL). We anticipate this therapy will find clinical use localizing drug delivery for numerous other diseases in addition to serving as an adjunct to stents in treating atherosclerosis.

  1. Short-term Safety and Efficiency of Cryoablation for Renal Sympathetic Denervation in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Meng; Shen, Li; Wu, Yi-Zhe; Yao, Zhi-Feng; Yin, Jia-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Hui; Jia, Jian-Guo; Qiao, Ling-Juan; Liu, Peng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal sympathetic nerves are involved in the reflective activation of the sympathetic nervous system in circulatory control. Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) ameliorated treatment-resistant hypertension safely, but 10%–20% of treated patients are nonresponders to radiofrequency denervation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficiency of cryoablation for sympathetic denervation in a swine model and to explore a new way of RDN. Methods: Seven swines randomly assigned to two groups: Renal cryoablation (CR) group and control group. The control group underwent renal angiogram only. The CR group underwent renal angiogram plus bilateral renal cryoablation. Renal angiograms via femoral were performed before denervation, after denervation and prior to the sacrifice to access the diameter of renal arterial and the pressure of aorta abdominalis. Euthanasia of the swine was performed on 28-day to access norepinephrine (NE) changes of the renal cortex and the changes of renal nerves. Results: Cryoablation did not induce severe complications at any time point. There was no significant change in diameter of renal artery. CR reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) from 145.50 ± 9.95 mmHg at baseline to 119.00 ± 14.09 mmHg. There was a slight but insignificant decrease in diastolic BP. The main nerve changes at 28-day consisted of necrosis with perineurial fibrosis at the site of CR exposure in conjunction with the nerve vacuolation. Compared with the control group, renal tissue NE of CR group decreased by 89.85%. Conclusions: Percutaneous catheter-based cryoablation of the renal artery is safe. CR could effectively reduce NE storing in the renal cortex, and the efficiency could be maintained 28-day at least. PMID:25758274

  2. The emulsified perfluorocarbon Oxycyte improves spinal cord injury in a swine model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Mahon, R T; Auker, C R; Bradley, S G; Mendelson, A; Hall, A A

    2013-03-01

    A prospective, animal model for pharmacological intervention of decompression sickness (DCS), including spinal cord (SC) injury. Signs and symptoms of DCS can include joint pain, skin discoloration, cardiopulmonary congestion and SC injury; severity ranges from trivial to fatal. Non-recompressive therapy for DCS may improve time-to-treatment and therefore impact mortality and morbidity. Oxycyte at 5 cc kg(-1) provides both SC protection and statistically significant survival benefit in a swine model of DCS. The purpose of this study was to test whether a reduced dose of Oxycyte (3 cc kg(-1)) would provide similar benefit. Silver Spring, MD, USA METHODS: Male Yorkshire swine (N=50) underwent a non-linear compression profile to 200 fsw (feet of sea water), which was identical to previous work using the 5 cc kg(-1) dose of Oxycyte. After 31 min of bottom time, decompression was initiated at 30 fsw per minute until surface pressure was reached. Following decompression and the onset of DCS, intravenous Oxycyte or saline was administered with concurrent 100% O(2) for 1 h. The primary end point was DCS-induced mortality, with Tarlov score and SC histopathology as secondary end points. Oxycyte administration of 3 cc kg(-1) following surfacing produced no significant detectable survival benefit. Animals that received Oxycyte, however, had reduced SC lesion area. Further studies to determine the lowest fully efficacious dose of Oxycyte for the adjunct treatment of DCS are warranted.

  3. Characterization of Dendritic Cells Subpopulations in Skin and Afferent Lymph in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Florian; Bonneau, Michel; Pascale, Florentina; Urien, Celine; Kang, Chantal; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Bertho, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous delivery of vaccines to specific skin dendritic cells (DC) subsets is foreseen as a promising strategy to induce strong and specific types of immune responses such as tolerance, cytotoxicity or humoral immunity. Because of striking histological similarities between human and pig skin, pig is recognized as the most suitable model to study the cutaneous delivery of medicine. Therefore improving the knowledge on swine skin DC subsets would be highly valuable to the skin vaccine field. In this study, we showed that pig skin DC comprise the classical epidermal langerhans cells (LC) and dermal DC (DDC) that could be divided in 3 subsets according to their phenotypes: (1) the CD163neg/CD172aneg, (2) the CD163highCD172apos and (3) the CD163lowCD172apos DDC. These subtypes have the capacity to migrate from skin to lymph node since we detected them in pseudo-afferent lymph. Extensive phenotyping with a set of markers suggested that the CD163high DDC resemble the antibody response-inducing human skin DC/macrophages whereas the CD163negCD172low DDC share properties with the CD8+ T cell response-inducing murine skin CD103pos DC. This work, by showing similarities between human, mouse and swine skin DC, establishes pig as a model of choice for the development of transcutaneous immunisation strategies targeting DC. PMID:21298011

  4. Juvenile Swine Surgical Alveolar Cleft Model to Test Novel Autologous Stem Cell Therapies.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Montserrat; Morse, Justin C; Halevi, Alexandra E; Emodi, Omri; Pharaon, Michael R; Wood, Jeyhan S; van Aalst, John A

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of craniofacial congenital bone defects has historically relied on autologous bone grafts. Engineered bone using mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord on electrospun nanomicrofiber scaffolds offers an alternative to current treatments. This preclinical study presents the development of a juvenile swine model with a surgically created maxillary cleft defect for future testing of tissue-engineered implants for bone generation. Five-week-old pigs (n=6) underwent surgically created maxillary (alveolar) defects to determine critical-sized defect and the quality of treatment outcomes with rib, iliac crest cancellous bone, and tissue-engineered scaffolds. Pigs were sacrificed at 1 month. Computed tomography scans were obtained at days 0 and 30, at the time of euthanasia. Histological evaluation was performed on newly formed bone within the surgical defect. A 1 cm surgically created defect healed with no treatment, the 2 cm defect did not heal. A subsequently created 1.7 cm defect, physiologically similar to a congenitally occurring alveolar cleft in humans, from the central incisor to the canine, similarly did not heal. Rib graft treatment did not incorporate into adjacent normal bone; cancellous bone and the tissue-engineered graft healed the critical-sized defect. This work establishes a juvenile swine alveolar cleft model with critical-sized defect approaching 1.7 cm. Both cancellous bone and tissue engineered graft generated bridging bone formation in the surgically created alveolar cleft defect.

  5. Needle versus tube thoracostomy in a swine model of traumatic tension hemopneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, John B; McManus, John G; Kerr, S T; Pusateri, Anthony E

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic tension hemopneumothorax is fatal if not treated rapidly. However, whether prehospital decompression is better achieved by chest tube or needle thoracostomy is unknown. We conducted this study to compare the immediate results and prolonged effectiveness of two methods of treatment for traumatic tension hemopneumothorax in a swine model. Ten percent of calculated total blood volume was instilled into the hemithorax of spontaneously ventilating swine (n = 5 per group, 40 +/- 3 kg). A Veres needle and insufflator were used to induce tension hemopneumothorax. Animals were randomized to one of four groups: 1) needle thoracostomy with 14-gauge intravenous catheter; 2) needle thoracostomy with Cook catheter; 3) 32-F chest tube thoracostomy; or 4) no intervention (control). Serial chest x-rays were obtained to document mediastinal shift before and after treatment. Arterial blood gas values and physiologic data were recorded. Postoperatively, thoracoscopy was performed to detect possible pulmonary injury from the procedure and/or catheter kinking or clotting. Positive intrapleural pressure was rapidly relieved in all treated animals. Four-hour survival was 100% in the 14-gauge needle and chest tube thoracostomy groups, 60% in the Cook catheter group, and 0% in the control animals (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in survival or physiologic measurements among the treated animals (p > 0.05). In this animal model, needle thoracostomy using a 14-gauge or Cook catheter was as successful as chest tube thoracostomy for relieving tension hemopneumothorax.

  6. Unique transcriptomic signature of omental adipose tissue in Ossabaw swine: a model of childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Toedebusch, Ryan G.; Roberts, Michael D.; Wells, Kevin D.; Company, Joseph M.; Kanosky, Kayla M.; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Perfield, James W.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Booth, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on intra-abdominal adipose tissue phenotype, a complete transcriptomic analysis using deep RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on omental adipose tissue (OMAT) obtained from lean and Western diet-induced obese juvenile Ossabaw swine. Obese animals had 88% greater body mass, 49% greater body fat content, and a 60% increase in OMAT adipocyte area (all P < 0.05) compared with lean pigs. RNA-seq revealed a 37% increase in the total transcript number in the OMAT of obese pigs. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed transcripts in obese OMAT were primarily enriched in the following categories: 1) development, 2) cellular function and maintenance, and 3) connective tissue development and function, while transcripts associated with RNA posttranslational modification, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry were reduced. DAVID and Gene Ontology analyses showed that many of the classically recognized gene pathways associated with adipose tissue dysfunction in obese adults including hypoxia, inflammation, angiogenesis were not altered in OMAT in our model. The current study indicates that obesity in juvenile Ossabaw swine is characterized by increases in overall OMAT transcript number and provides novel data describing early transcriptomic alterations that occur in response to excess caloric intake in visceral adipose tissue in a pig model of childhood obesity. PMID:24642759

  7. Co-liquefaction of swine manure and crude glycerol to bio-oil: model compound studies and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhangying; Xiu, Shuangning; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Zhu, Songming

    2012-01-01

    The reaction pathways of co-liquefaction of swine manure and crude glycerol to bio-oil (ester compounds) were investigated. Swine manure was hydrothermal treated (340 °C, 27.5 MPa, 15 min) with a number of model compounds in a high pressure batch reactor under inert atmosphere. The compounds were methanol, pure glycerol, mixture of pure glycerol, pure methanol and H(2)O, and commercial fatty acids (linoleic acid). The chemical composition of the bio-oil was analyzed by GC/MS. Glycerol, methanol and water showed synergistic effects on manure liquefaction, increasing the oil yield as high as 65%. A maximum oil yield of 79.96% was obtained when linoleic acid reacted with swine manure. Based on the results, the reaction pathways were proposed. Esterification reactions occurred not only because the crude glycerol have methanol, but also because methanol can be produced from hydrothermal reactions of glycerol.

  8. Modelling the failure modes in geobag revetments.

    PubMed

    Akter, A; Crapper, M; Pender, G; Wright, G; Wong, W S

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, sand filled geotextile bags (geobags) have been used as a means of long-term riverbank revetment stabilization. However, despite their deployment in a significant number of locations, the failure modes of such structures are not well understood. Three interactions influence the geobag performance, i.e. geobag-geobag, geobag-water flow and geobag-water flow-river bank. The aim of the research reported here is to develop a detailed understanding of the failure mechanisms in a geobag revetment using a discrete element model (DEM) validated by laboratory data. The laboratory measured velocity data were used for preparing a mapped velocity field for a coupled DEM simulation of geobag revetment failure. The validated DEM model could identify well the critical bag location in varying water depths. Toe scour, one of the major instability factors in revetments, and its influence on the bottom-most layer of the bags were also reasonably represented in this DEM model. It is envisaged that the use of a DEM model will provide more details on geobag revetment performance in riverbanks.

  9. Stochastic Models for Common Failures of Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    common cause model, NUREG /CR-1401, 1980. [3] Church, J. D. and Harris, B., The estimation of reliability from stress- strength relationship...Fachband 2/1, 1980. [11] Lewis, H. W., Chairman, Risk Assessment Review Group Report to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG /CR-0400, 1978. [12...Regulatory Commission, P.R.A. Procedures Guide, NUREG / CR-2300, 1983. [18] Vesely, W. E., Estimating Common Cause Failure Probabilities in Reliability and

  10. Control of Junctional Hemorrhage in a Consensus Swine Model With Hemostatic Gauze Products Following Minimal Training.

    PubMed

    Conley, Sean P; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Henao, Jose; DeVito, Sara S; Zarow, Gregory J

    2015-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage from junctional wounds that cannot be controlled by traditional tourniquets accounts for one in five preventable battlefield exsanguination deaths. Products for treating these wounds are costly and require special training. However, chemically treated gauze products are inexpensive, potentially effective, and require only minimal training. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of three hemostatic gauze products following brief training, using a consensus swine groin injury model. After viewing a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation, without demonstration or practice, 24 U.S. Navy Corpsmen, most with little to no live tissue or hemostatic agent experience, applied one of three hemostatic agents: QuikClot Combat Gauze, Celox Trauma Gauze, or Hemcon ChitoGauze. Animals were resuscitated and monitored for 150 minutes to assess initial hemostasis, blood loss, rebleeding, and survival. Participants completed a survey before training and following testing. Products were similar in initial hemostasis, blood loss, and rebleeding. Twenty-three swine survived (96%). Ease of use and perceived efficacy of training ratings were high. Comfort level with application improved following training. Hemostatic gauze can potentially be effective for treating junctional wounds following minimal training, which has important implications for corpsmen, self-aid/buddy-aid, civilian providers, and Tactical Combat Casualty Care guidelines. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  12. Myelogenous leukemia in adult inbred MHC-defined miniature swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Cho, Patricia S; Teague, Alexander G S; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S; Hanekamp, John S; Moran, Shannon G; Wikiel, Krzysztof J; Ferguson, Kelly K; Lo, Diana P; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V; Spitzer, Thomas R; McMorrow, Isabel M; Sachs, David H; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A

    2010-06-15

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin.

  14. Miniature swine and in vitro studies as models of human iron bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.; Browder, B.; Jordan, M.; Bates, G.

    1986-03-05

    Iron bioavailability is ultimately dependent upon ligand exchange reactions between mucosal iron receptor proteins and iron binding ligands present in the digestive mass. This exchange reaction depends upon the chemistry of iron during digestion, its oxidation, reduction, polymerization, precipitation and adsorption to solid surfaces. The authors have investigated these phenomena using miniature Sinclair swine with gastric and duodenal cannula and in vitro enzymatic digestion. Cooked pinto beans have been our food model. In vitro studies demonstrate the importance of reductive iron release reactions at low pH in the presence of reductants and chelate mediated iron mobilization near neutral pH. They found the redox state of iron in the digestive mass to be closely linked to pH. The pH in the duodenum of swine ranges from 2 to 6 depending on the time of digestion, nature of additives and amount of food given. In the authors study they have utilized pinto beans in the presence of ascorbate, citrate, phosvitin, tea, and other food components. The principle difference observed in iron chemistry between the in vitro and in vivo digestion is a greater fraction of Fe/sup 2 +/ in the latter. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to monitor the presence of iron in the Fe/sup 3 +/ state and the reactivity of iron with Fe/sup 3 +/ preferring chelators.

  15. Environmental effectiveness of swine sewage management: a multicriteria AHP-based model for a reliable quick assessment.

    PubMed

    Vizzari, Marco; Modica, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Environmental issues related to swine production are still a major concern for the general public and represent a key challenge for the swine industry. The environmental impact of higher livestock concentration is particularly significant where it coincides with weaker policy standards and poor manure management. Effective tools for environmental monitoring of the swine sewage management process become essential for verifying the environmental compatibility of farming facilities and for defining suitable policies aimed at increasing swine production sustainability. This research aims at the development and application of a model for a quick assessment of the environmental effectiveness of the pig farming sewage management process. In order to define the model, multicriteria techniques, and in particular, Saaty's analytic hierarchy process, were used to develop an iterative process in which the various key factors influencing the process under investigation were analyzed. The model, named EASE (Environmental Assessment of Sewages management Effectiveness), was optimized and applied to the Lake Trasimeno basin (Umbria, Italy), an area of high natural, environmental and aesthetic value. In this context, inadequate disposal of pig sewage represents a potential source of very considerable pollution. The results have demonstrated how the multicriteria model can represent a very effective and adaptable tool also in those decision-making processes aimed at the sustainable management of livestock production.

  16. Semi-empirical process-based models for ammonia emissions from beef, swine, and poultry operations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuilling, Alyssa M.; Adams, Peter J.

    2015-11-01

    Farm-level ammonia emissions factors in the literature vary by an order of magnitude due to variations in manure management practices and meteorology, and it is essential to capture this variability in emission inventories used for atmospheric modeling. Loss of ammonia to the atmosphere is modeled here through a nitrogen mass balance with losses controlled by mass transfer resistance parameters, which vary with meteorological conditions and are tuned to match literature-reported emissions factors. Variations due to management practices are captured by having tuned parameters that are specific to each set of management practices. The resulting farm emissions models (FEMs) explain between 20% and 70% of the variability in published emissions factors and typically estimate emission factors within a factor of 2. The r2 values are: 0.53 for swine housing (0.67 for shallow-pit houses); 0.48 for swine storage; 0.29 for broiler chickens; 0.70 for layer chickens; and 0.21 for beef feedlots (0.36 for beef feedlots with more farm-specific input data). Mean fractional error was found to be 22-44% for beef feedlots, swine housing, and layer housing; fractional errors were greater for swine lagoons (90%) and broiler housing (69%). Unexplained variability and errors result from model limitations, measurement errors in reported emissions factors, and a lack of information about measurement conditions.

  17. Environmental Effectiveness of Swine Sewage Management: A Multicriteria AHP-Based Model for a Reliable Quick Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizzari, Marco; Modica, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Environmental issues related to swine production are still a major concern for the general public and represent a key challenge for the swine industry. The environmental impact of higher livestock concentration is particularly significant where it coincides with weaker policy standards and poor manure management. Effective tools for environmental monitoring of the swine sewage management process become essential for verifying the environmental compatibility of farming facilities and for defining suitable policies aimed at increasing swine production sustainability. This research aims at the development and application of a model for a quick assessment of the environmental effectiveness of the pig farming sewage management process. In order to define the model, multicriteria techniques, and in particular, Saaty's analytic hierarchy process, were used to develop an iterative process in which the various key factors influencing the process under investigation were analyzed. The model, named EASE (Environmental Assessment of Sewages management Effectiveness), was optimized and applied to the Lake Trasimeno basin (Umbria, Italy), an area of high natural, environmental and aesthetic value. In this context, inadequate disposal of pig sewage represents a potential source of very considerable pollution. The results have demonstrated how the multicriteria model can represent a very effective and adaptable tool also in those decision-making processes aimed at the sustainable management of livestock production.

  18. Analysis of air pollution from swine production by using air dispersion model and GIS in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Joachim H; Goïta, Kalifa; Desmarais, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Swine production, the second most important contributor to Quebec's agricultural revenue, faces many problems. Intensive piggeries, with up to 599 animal units, are used to raise finishing pigs for slaughter. Among the great number of gaseous species emitted to the atmospheric environment from livestock buildings and manure storage units is NH3, which is one of the most important and most offensive with respect to human health. Under appropriate meteorological and topographical conditions, gaseous contaminants can spread and cause a public nuisance--up to a 1-km radius around the farm. To mitigate these effects, the Quebec Government adopted regulations that set minimum buffer distances to be observed by any expansion of an existing or new pig farm. The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the efficiency of the current buffer distance prescriptions in Quebec in mitigating effects of air pollution from swine units and (ii) to identify potential areas for establishing pig farm operations that will not be offensive to people. The air dispersion American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) with receptors distributed at 1.6 km around each source was used first, followed by a spatial geographic information system (GIS) model. Results from the dispersion model showed that the highest hourly concentration with a 99.5% compliance frequency for a single farm was 3078.1 microg/m3 and exceeded the NH3 odor criterion hourly standard set by the Quebec Government at 183.4 microg/m3. Thus, for public safety, densely populated areas like housing developments must be located >1300 m from a pig farm. This distance is in the range of setback distances (723 to 1447 m) obtained by using abacuses defined in the L'Erable Regional County Municipality. That is why we can say the current rules established by the Quebec Government, if rigorously applied, can prevent odor nuisance, due to NH3 emission, from swine farms. In the spatial model

  19. New swine model of infected soft tissue blast injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinqing; Topaz, Morris; Xun, Wenxing; Li, Wangzhou; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Haibo; Yuan, Yanqin; Chen, Shaozong; Li, Yuejun; Li, Xueyong

    2012-10-01

    War injuries, especially blast injuries, have a high risk of infection. However, no animal models of infected war injuries have been built in large animals, which retards both the understanding and the treatment optimization of infected war injuries. Soft tissue blast injuries were created by explosion of electric detonators in white domestic pigs. The ultra structure of the tissue around the wound was determined by transmission electron microscope. To develop infection of blast injury wounds, the pigs were housed in a standard animal house which was disinfected periodically, and the wounds were left untreated for 3 days. Wound specimens were collected daily to determine the bacterial load and bacterial components. To determine whether infection induces tissue necrosis in infected soft tissue blast injury wounds, uninfected blast injury wounds were created as controls of infected wounds by surgical debridement daily, and the wound area and wound depth of both wounds were measured. The wound area and the wound depth of the soft tissue blast injury created in this study fell in the range of human moderate soft tissue war injuries, and the ultra structure of the wounds was comparable with that of human blast injury wounds. The bacterial load of uninfected wounds was under 10 colony forming unit/g during the first 3 days of injury, while that of infected wounds was over 10 colony forming unit/g after 2 days of injury. The infected soft tissue blast injury wounds contained most of the bacteria frequently isolated in battlefield wounds. In addition, infection induced evident tissue necrosis in infected blast injury wounds. The infected soft tissue blast injury wounds mimic those in human, and they can be used to address key points of treatment optimization.

  20. Dispersion modeling to compare alternative technologies for odor remediation at swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Susan S; Graham, Brevick G; Williams, C Mike

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of 18 alternative technologies for reducing odor dispersion at and beyond the boundary of swine facilities was assessed in conjunction with an initiative sponsored through agreements between the Attorney General of North Carolina and Smithfield Foods, Premium Standard Farms, and Frontline Farmers. The trajectory and spatial distribution of odor emitted at each facility were modeled at 200 and 400 m downwind from each site under two meteorological conditions (daytime and nighttime) using a Eulerian-Lagrangian model. To predict the dispersion of odor downwind, the geographical area containing the odorant sources at each facility was partitioned into 10-m2 grids on the basis of satellite photographs and architectural drawings. Relative odorant concentrations were assigned to each grid point on the basis of intensity measurements made by the trained odor panel at each facility using a 9-point rating scale. The results of the modeling indicated that odor did not extend significantly beyond 400 m downwind of any of the test sites during the daytime when the layer of air above the earth's surface is usually turbulent. However, modeling indicated that odor from all full-scale farms extended beyond 400 m onto neighboring property in the evenings when deep surface cooling through long-wave radiation to space produces a stable (nocturnal) boundary layer. The results also indicated that swine housing, independent of waste management type, plays a significant role in odor downwind, as do odor sources of moderate to moderately high intensity that emanate from a large surface area such as a lagoon. Human odor assessments were utilized for modeling rather than instrument measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or particulates less than 10 microm in diameter (PM10) because these physical measurements obtained simultaneously with human panel ratings were not found to accurately predict human odor intensity in the field.

  1. Modeling material failure with a vectorized routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, S. M.; Goodman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The computational aspects of modelling material failure in structural wood members are presented with particular reference to vector processing aspects. Wood members are considered to be highly orthotropic, inhomogeneous, and discontinuous due to the complex microstructure of wood material and the presence of natural growth characteristics such as knots, cracks and cross grain in wood members. The simulation of strength behavior of wood members is accomplished through the use of a special purpose finite element/fracture mechanics routine, program STARW (Strength Analysis Routine for Wood). Program STARW employs quadratic finite elements combined with singular crack tip elements in a finite element mesh. Vector processing techniques are employed in mesh generation, stiffness matrix formation, simultaneous equation solution, and material failure calculations. The paper addresses these techniques along with the time and effort requirements needed to convert existing finite element code to a vectorized version. Comparisons in execution time between vectorized and nonvectorized routines are provided.

  2. Inferential model estimates of ammonia dry deposition in the vicinity of a swine production facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, John; Spence, Porche'; Kimbrough, Sue; Robarge, Wayne

    This project investigates NH 3 dry deposition around a commercial swine production facility in eastern North Carolina. Passive diffusion-tube samplers were used to measure weekly integrated NH 3 concentrations at 22 locations along horizontal gradients from the barn/lagoon emissions complex (source) out to a distance of 700 m. A two-layer canopy compensation point model was used to predict bi-directional NH 3 exchange within a 500 m circular buffer surrounding the source. The model takes into account differences in soil and vegetation emission potential, as well as canopy physical characteristics, among three primary surfaces surrounding the site: forest, crops spray fertilized with swine waste, and other fertilized crops. Between June 2003 and July 2005, mean observed NH 3 concentrations ranged from 169.0 μg NH 3 m -3 at a distance of 10 m from the source to 7.1 and 13.0 μg NH 3 m -3 at 612 and 698 m in the predominant upwind and downwind directions, respectively. Median predicted dry deposition rates ranged from 145 kg NH 3-N ha -1 yr -1 at 10 m from the source to 16 kg NH 3-N ha -1 yr -1 at 500 m, which is ≈3.5× wet deposition of NH 4+-N. Assuming a steady-state emission factor of 7.0 kg NH 3 animal -1 yr -1 and a median population of 4900 animals, NH 3 dry deposition over the nearest 500 m from the barn/lagoon complex accounted for 10.4% (3567 kg NH 3) of annual emissions (34,300 kg NH 3). A model sensitivity analysis shows that predicted deposition rates are more sensitive to assumptions regarding cuticular uptake relative to soil and vegetation emission potentials.

  3. Electrocardiogram frequency change by extracorporeal blood perfusion in a swine ventricular fibrillation model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) refers to the application of extracorporeal blood circulation with oxygenation as a resuscitation tool. The objective of this study is to observe the frequency component changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG) by ECPR during prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods Six swine were prepared as a VF model. Extracorporeal blood circulation with a pulsatile blood pump and oxygenator was set up for the model. ECG signals were measured for 13 min during VF and analyzed using frequency analysis methods. The median frequency (MF), dominant frequency (DF), and amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) were calculated from a spectrogram obtained using short-time Fourier transform (STFT). Results MF decreased from 11 Hz at the start to 9 Hz at 2 min after VF and then increased to 11 Hz at 4.5 min after VF. DF started at 7 Hz and increased to 11 Hz within the first min and decreased to 9 Hz at 2 min, then increased to 12 Hz at 4.5 min after VF. Both frequency components decreased gradually from 4.5 min until 10 min after VF. After the oxygenated blood perfusion was initiated, both MF and DF increased remarkably and exceeded 12 and 14 Hz, respectively. Similarly, AMSA decreased gradually for the first 10 min, but increased remarkably and varied beyond 13 mV∙Hz after the oxygenated blood supply started. Remarkable frequency increases in ECG due to the oxygenated blood perfusion during ECPR were observed in the swine VF model. Conclusions The ECG frequency analysis during ECPR can give the resuscitation provider important information about the cardiac perfusion status and the appropriateness of the ECPR setup as well as the prediction of defibrillation success. PMID:24274395

  4. A swine model of acute thrombocytopenia with prolonged bleeding time produced by busulfan

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Kono, Shota; Ohnuki, Takahiro; Hishikawa, Shuji; Kunita, Satoshi; Hanazono, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of thrombocytopenia are indispensable for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of hemostatic agents, cryopreserved platelets, and artificial platelets, but no large animal models are available. In this study, we generated a swine model of acute thrombocytopenia with prolonged bleeding times by administering the chemotherapeutic drug busulfan. First, we tested multiple doses of busulfan (4, 6, and 8 mg/kg) in pigs, and found that 6 mg/kg of busulfan is an optimal dose for producing a safe and moderate thrombocytopenia, with a platelet count of less than 30,000/µl. The pigs administered 6 mg/kg of busulfan (n=8) reached half their initial counts at day 7, counts below 30,000/µl at day 12, and their nadirs at day 15 (on average). The minimal platelet count was 14,000/µl. With this dose of busulfan (6 mg/kg), bleeding times were significantly prolonged in addition to the decrease in platelet counts (r=−0.63, P<0.01), while there were no cases of apparent hemorrhage. White blood cell counts were maintained at over 5,000/µl, and there were no infections or other adverse events including anemia or appetite or body weight loss. All pigs were sacrificed on day 16, with subsequent examination showing a significant reduction in cellularity and colony-forming units in the bone marrow, indicating that thrombocytopenia was the result of myelosuppression. In summary, administration with 6 mg/kg of busulfan induces safe and moderate thrombocytopenia with a prolonged bleeding time in swine. PMID:27333841

  5. A wind tunnel study of air flow near model swine confinement buildings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most significant and persistent environmental concerns regarding swine production is the transport of odor constituents, trace gases, and particulates from animal production and manure storage facilities. The objectives of this study were to determine how swine housing unit orientation af...

  6. A simple approach to modeling ductile failure.

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Gerald William

    2012-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the need to predict the behavior of structures after the occurrence of an initial failure. In some cases determining the extent of failure, beyond initiation, is required, while in a few cases the initial failure is a design feature used to tailor the subsequent load paths. In either case, the ability to numerically simulate the initiation and propagation of failures is a highly desired capability. This document describes one approach to the simulation of failure initiation and propagation.

  7. Left Ventricular Compressions Improve Hemodynamics in a Swine Model of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kenton L; Castaneda, Maria G; Boudreau, Susan M; Sharon, Danny J; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that chest compressions located directly over the left ventricle (LV) would improve hemodynamics, including coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Transthoracic echocardiography (echo) was used to mark the location of the aortic root and the center of the left ventricle on animals (n = 26) which were randomized to receive chest compressions in one of the two locations. After a period of ten minutes of ventricular fibrillation, basic life support (BLS) with mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated and performed for ten minutes followed by advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) for an additional ten minutes. During BLS the area of maximal compression was verified using transesophageal echo. CPP and other hemodynamic variables were averaged every two minutes. Mean CPP was not significantly higher in the LV group during all time intervals of resuscitation; mean CPP was significantly higher in the LV group during the 12-14 minute interval of BLS and during minutes 22-30 of ACLS (p < 0.05). Aortic systolic and diastolic pressures, right atrial systolic pressures, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) were higher in the LV group during all time intervals of resuscitation (p < 0.05). Nine of the left ventricle group (69%) achieved ROSC and survived to 60 minutes compared to zero of the aortic root group (p < 0.001).  In our swine model of cardiac arrest, chest compressions over the left ventricle improved hemodynamics and resulted in a greater proportion of animals with ROSC and survival to 60 minutes.

  8. Effects of Intraluminal Irradiation with Holmium-166 for TIPS Stenosis: Experimental Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Seon; Kim, Deog Yoon; Park, Yong Koo; Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Soo Joong

    2007-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal irradiation with Holmium-166 (166Ho) for reducing the pseudointimal hyperplasia (PIH) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tract in a swine model. Materials and Methods TIPS was performed in 12 domestic pigs, after the creation of portal hypertension by intraportal injection of a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and lipiodol. Five pigs first underwent intraluminal irradiation (30 Gy) in the parenchymal tract with using a 166Ho solution-filled balloon catheter, and this was followed by the placement of a nitinol stent in the TIPS tract. For the seven control pigs, the balloon was filled with saline and contrast media mixture. Two weeks later, follow-up portography and histological analysis were performed. Results TIPS was successfully performed in all twelve pigs with achieving artificially induced portal hypertension. Portography performed two weeks after TIPS showed the patent tracts in the TIPS tracts that were irradiated with 166Ho (5/5, 100%), whereas either completely (5/6, 83.3%) or partially (1/6, 16.7%) occluded TIPS were seen in the seven pigs of the nonirradiated control group, except in one pig that experienced periprocedural death due to bleeding. Histological analysis showed a statistically significant difference for the maximal PIH (irradiated: 32.8%, nonirradiated: 76.0%, p < 0.001) between the two groups. Conclusion Intraluminal irradiation with 30 Gy of 166Ho for TIPS significantly improved the TIPS patency in a swine model of portal hypertension during a 2-week period of follow-up. PMID:17420630

  9. Effort test failure: toward a predictive model.

    PubMed

    Webb, James W; Batchelor, Jennifer; Meares, Susanne; Taylor, Alan; Marsh, Nigel V

    2012-01-01

    Predictors of effort test failure were examined in an archival sample of 555 traumatically brain-injured (TBI) adults. Logistic regression models were used to examine whether compensation-seeking, injury-related, psychological, demographic, and cultural factors predicted effort test failure (ETF). ETF was significantly associated with compensation-seeking (OR = 3.51, 95% CI [1.25, 9.79]), low education (OR:. 83 [.74, . 94]), self-reported mood disorder (OR: 5.53 [3.10, 9.85]), exaggerated displays of behavior (OR: 5.84 [2.15, 15.84]), psychotic illness (OR: 12.86 [3.21, 51.44]), being foreign-born (OR: 5.10 [2.35, 11.06]), having sustained a workplace accident (OR: 4.60 [2.40, 8.81]), and mild traumatic brain injury severity compared with very severe traumatic brain injury severity (OR: 0.37 [0.13, 0.995]). ETF was associated with a broader range of statistical predictors than has previously been identified and the relative importance of psychological and behavioral predictors of ETF was evident in the logistic regression model. Variables that might potentially extend the model of ETF are identified for future research efforts.

  10. Estimating Failure Propagation in Models of Cascading Blackouts

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Ian; Carreras, Benjamin A; Lynch, Vickie E; Nkei, Bertrand; Newman, David E

    2005-09-01

    We compare and test statistical estimates of failure propagation in data from versions of a probabilistic model of loading-dependent cascading failure and a power systems blackout model of cascading transmission line overloads. The comparisons suggest mechanisms affecting failure propagation and are an initial step towards monitoring failure propagation from practical system data. Approximations to the probabilistic model describe the forms of probability distributions of cascade sizes.

  11. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  12. Endovascular creation of aortic dissection in a swine model with technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Teruaki; Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Takahashi, Takuya; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Ueshima, Eisuke; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-05-01

    Creating an experimental model of a type B aortic dissection with a minimally invasive endovascular procedure in swine to help future evaluation of therapies for aortic dissection. Aortic dissection was created in 14 swine using endovascular procedures only. Under fluoroscopy, a modified 10F outer catheter with a 14 G stiffening inner metallic cannula was forced via the femoral artery into the aortic vessel wall to create an initial dissection. A .035-inch guidewire and a 4F straight catheter were advanced into the dissected space, and the dissection was extended in a retrograde direction using a technique including loop formation of the guidewire, which was placed carefully against the transmural penetration and extended as far as possible in the descending thoracic aorta up to the point where loop formation of the guidewire reached smoothly. An 8F introducer sheath was advanced with a Brockenbrough needle into the dissected space, and a proximal fenestration was created by puncturing the intima. If required, balloon dilatation was performed to enlarge the proximal and distal tears. Aortography and contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) were performed in addition to a detailed histologic evaluation of the dissected portion. Aortic dissection was successfully created in 11 of the 14 swine (78.6%). Among the 11 dissections, nine were located in the thoracoabdominal aorta and two in the abdominal aorta. The initial aortic diameter at the middle portion of the created dissection ranged from 7.4 to 16.8 mm (mean ± standard deviation, 10.9 ± 2.9), while after dissection, it ranged from 7.8 to 19.3 mm (12.9 ± 3.8 mm). The dissected length ranged from 4.4 to 17.7 cm (10.7 ± 4.6 cm). Aortography and CBCT revealed seven dissections (63.6%) with a smooth and patent false lumen. Histologic evaluation revealed that the outer one-third of the media was separated from the inner two-thirds. In the remaining four dissections (36.4%), imaging procedures revealed

  13. UPDATE ON SWINE DISEASE AND GENOMICS RESEARCH

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review will summarize advances in swine genomics and how it has altered approaches for swine disease and vaccination research. The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive p...

  14. Experimental testing and constitutive modeling of the mechanical properties of the swine skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Łagan, Sylwia D; Liber-Kneć, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was an estimation of the possibility of using hyperelastic material models to fit experimental data obtained in the tensile test for the swine skin tissue. The uniaxial tensile tests of samples taken from the abdomen and back of a pig was carried out. The mechanical properties of the skin such as the mean Young's modulus, the mean maximum stress and the mean maximum elongation were calculated. The experimental data have been used to identify the parameters in specific strain-energy functions given in seven constitutive models of hyperelastic materials: neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Ogden, Yeoh, Martins, Humphrey and Veronda-Westmann. An analysis of errors in fitting of theoretical and experimental data was done. Comparison of load -displacement curves for the back and abdomen regions of skin taken showed a different scope of both the mean maximum loading forces and the mean maximum elongation. Samples which have been prepared from the abdominal area had lower values of the mean maximum load compared to samples from the spine area. The reverse trend was observed during the analysis of the values of elongation. An analysis of the accuracy of model fitting to the experimental data showed that, the least accurate were the model of neo- -Hookean, model of Mooney-Rivlin for the abdominal region and model of Veronda-Westmann for the spine region. An analysis of seven hyperelastic material models showed good correlations between the experimental and the theoretical data for five models.

  15. Selective rod degeneration and partial cone inactivation characterize an iodoacetic acid model of Swine retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fernandez de Castro, Juan; Vukmanic, Eric; Zhou, Liang; Emery, Douglas; Demarco, Paul J; Kaplan, Henry J; Dean, Douglas C

    2011-10-07

    PURPOSE. Transgenic pigs carrying a mutant human rhodopsin transgene have been developed as a large animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This model displays some key features of human RP, but the time course of disease progression makes this model costly, time consuming, and difficult to study because of the size of the animals at end-stage disease. Here, the authors evaluate an iodoacetic acid (IAA) model of photoreceptor degeneration in the pig as an alternative model that shares features of the transgenic pig and human RP. METHODS. IAA blocks glycolysis, thereby inhibiting photoreceptor function. The effect of the intravenous injection of IAA on swine rod and cone photoreceptor viability and morphology was followed by histologic evaluation of different regions of the retina using hematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining. Rod and cone function was analyzed by full-field electroretinography and multifocal electroretinography. RESULTS. IAA led to specific loss of rods in a central-to-peripheral retinal gradient. Although cones were resistant, they showed shortened outer segments, loss of bipolar cell synaptic connections, and a diminished flicker ERG, hallmarks of transition to cone dysfunction in RP patients. CONCLUSIONS. IAA provides an alternative rod-dominant model of retinal damage that shares a surprising number of features with the pig transgenic model of RP and with human RP. This IAA model is cost-effective and rapid, ensuring that the size of the animals does not become prohibitive for end-stage evaluation or therapeutic intervention.

  16. Fibrinogen Concentrate Improves Survival During Limited Resuscitation of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Wang, Xu; Liles, W. Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (N=7 per group) were then randomized to receive either; 1. No fluid resuscitation (Neg Control), 2. Limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10ml/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution (HEX) given 30 minutes apart, or 3. The same fluid regimen with one dose of 120mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first HEX bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 hours with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 hours. Survival to 6 hours was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) vs. HEX (2/7, 29%), and Neg Control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan Meier LR p=0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4ml/kg/min) when compared to FBG (0.1mg/kg/min, p=0.047) and Neg Control (0.1ml/kg/min, p=0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG vs. HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25337778

  17. Calpain Inhibition Improves Collateral Dependent Perfusion in a Hypercholesterolemic Swine Model of Chronic Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabe, Ashraf A.; Potz, Brittany A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Liu, Yuhong; Feng, Jun; Abid, M. Ruhul; Abbott, Jinnette D; Senger, Donald R; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Calpain over-expression is implicated in aberrant angiogenesis. We hypothesized that calpain inhibition (CI, MDL28170) would improve collateral perfusion in a swine model with hypercholesterolemia and chronic myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results Yorkshire swine fed a high cholesterol diet for 4 weeks underwent surgical placement of an ameroid constrictor to their left circumflex coronary artery. Three weeks later, animals received either: no drug, high cholesterol control group (HCC; n= 8); low dose CI (0.12 mg/kg; LCI, n= 9); or high dose CI (0.25 mg/kg; HCI, n= 8). The heart was harvested after 5 weeks. There was a trend toward increased right to left collateral vessels on angiography with HCI. Myocardial perfusion in ischemic myocardium significantly improved with HCI at rest and with demand pacing (p = 0.016 and 0.011). Endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation was significantly improved with LCI (p = 0.001). There was a significant increase in capillary density, with LCI and HCI (p= 0.01 and 0.01), and arteriolar density with LCI (p= 0.001). CI significantly increased several proangiogenic proteins including VEGF (p= 0.02), VEGFR1 (p= 0.003), VEGFR2 (p= 0.003) and talin, a microvascular structural protein (p= 0.0002). There was a slight increase in proteins implicated in endothelial-dependent (NO Mediated) relaxation including ERK, p-ERK and iNOS with CI. Conclusions In the setting of hypercholesterolemia, CI improved perfusion, with a trend toward increased collateralization on angiography and increased capillary and arteriolar densities in ischemic myocardium. CI also improved endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation and increased expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and vasodilatation. PMID:26478238

  18. Fibrinogen concentrate improves survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in a Swine model.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Xu; Liles, Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4-mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (n = 7 per group) were then randomized to receive (i) no fluid resuscitation (neg control) or (ii) limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10 mL/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution given 30 min apart (HEX group), or (iii) the same fluid regimen with one dose of 120-mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first hydroxyethyl starch bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 h with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 h. Survival to 6 h was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) versus HEX (2/7, 29%) and neg control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan-Meier log-rank P = 0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4 mL/kg per minute) when compared with FBG (0.1 mg/kg per minute, P = 0.047) and neg control (0.1 mL/kg per minute, P = 0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG versus HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

  19. Modeled effectiveness of ventilation with contaminant control devices on indoor air quality in a swine farrowing facility.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5 °C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s(-1) (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures.

  20. Modeled Effectiveness of Ventilation with Contaminant Control Devices on Indoor Air Quality in a Swine Farrowing Facility

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5°C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s−1 (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures. PMID:24433305

  1. A Novel Method for Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in a Swine Model of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury with Associated Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    therapeutic hypothermia in a swine model of blast- induced traumatic brain injury with associated hemorrhagic shock PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...A novel method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia in a swine model of blast- induced traumatic brain injury with associated hemorrhagic shock 5b...becomes available, the investigators will add a third arm to the study consisting of blast injury plus hemorrhagic shock. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  2. Animal model of reversible, right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Stephen H; Javan, Hadi; Bowen, Megan E; Liu, Xiaoquing; Schaaf, Christin L; Briggs, Casey M; Zou, Huashan; Gomez, Arnold David; Abdullah, Osama M; Hsu, Ed W; Selzman, Craig H

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death but very little is known about right ventricular (RV) failure (RVF) and right ventricular recovery (RVR). A robust animal model of reversible, RVF does not exist, which currently limits research opportunities and clinical progress. We sought to develop an animal model of reversible, pressure-overload RVF to study RVF and RVR. Fifteen New Zealand rabbits underwent implantation of a fully implantable, adjustable, pulmonary artery band. Animals were assigned to the control, RVF, and RVR groups (n = 5 for each). For the RVF and RVR groups, the pulmonary artery bands were serially tightened to create RVF and released for RVR. Echocardiographic, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic analysis were performed. RV chamber size and wall thickness increased during RVF and regressed during RVR. RV volumes were 1023 μL ± 123 for control, 2381 μL ± 637 for RVF, and 635 μL ± 549 for RVR, and RV wall thicknesses were 0.98 mm ± 0.12 for controls (P = 0.05), 1.72 mm ± 0.60 for RVF, and 1.16 mm ± 0.03 for RVR animals (P = 0.04), respectively. Similarly, heart weight, liver weight, cardiomyocyte size, and the degree of cardiac and hepatic fibrosis increased with RVF and decreased during RVR. We report an animal model of chronic, reversible, pressure-overload RVF to study RVF and RVR. This model will be used for preclinical studies that improve our understanding of the mechanisms of RVF and that develop and test RV protective and RVR strategies to be studied later in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  4. Exploring the mechanical behavior of degrading swine neural tissue at low strain rates via the fractional Zener constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Bentil, Sarah A; Dupaix, Rebecca B

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the fractional Zener constitutive model to predict the behavior of postmortem swine brain tissue was examined in this work. Understanding tissue behavior attributed to degradation is invaluable in many fields such as the forensic sciences or cases where only cadaveric tissue is available. To understand how material properties change with postmortem age, the fractional Zener model was considered as it includes parameters to describe brain stiffness and also the parameter α, which quantifies the viscoelasticity of a material. The relationship between the viscoelasticity described by α and tissue degradation was examined by fitting the model to data collected in a previous study (Bentil, 2013). This previous study subjected swine neural tissue to in vitro unconfined compression tests using four postmortem age groups (<6h, 24h, 3 days, and 1 week). All samples were compressed to a strain level of 10% using two compressive rates: 1mm/min and 5mm/min. Statistical analysis was used as a tool to study the influence of the fractional Zener constants on factors such as tissue degradation and compressive rate. Application of the fractional Zener constitutive model to the experimental data showed that swine neural tissue becomes less stiff with increased postmortem age. The fractional Zener model was also able to capture the nonlinear viscoelastic features of the brain tissue at low strain rates. The results showed that the parameter α was better correlated with compressive rate than with postmortem age.

  5. Swine in biomedical research. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: hemodynamic characteristics of the conscious resting pig; cardiovascular and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise in swine (ILLEGIBLE) a large animal model for studies (ILLEGIBLE) effects of heparin-protamine interaction in swine - intravenous vs. intraarterial; swine as animal models in cardiovascular research; studies of coronary thrombosis in swine with von Willebrand's disease; role of plasma intermediate and low density lipoproteins in early atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic swine; swine as a model in renal physiology and nephrology; the pig as a model for studying kidney disease in man; hypertension of renal origin and the effects of Captopril in miniature pigs; porcine natural killer/killer cell system; the behavior of pig lymphocyte populations in vivo; a review of spontaneous and experimental porcine eperythrozoonosis; and Sinclair swine melanoma.

  6. Measurements and modeling of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia from swine facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep Singh

    Ammonia has recently gained importance for its increasing atmospheric concentrations and its role in the formation of aerosols. Studies have shown increasing atmospheric concentration levels of NH3 and NH 4+, especially in the regions of concentrated animal feeding operations. Atmospheric inputs of reduced nitrogen as ammonia and ammonium by dry and wet deposition may represent a substantial contribution to the acidification of semi natural ecosystems and could also affect sensitive coastal ecosystems and estuaries. The anaerobic lagoon and spray method, commonly used for waste storage and disposal in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO), is a significant source of ammonia emissions. An accurate emission model for ammonia from aqueous surfaces can help in the development of emission factors. Study of dispersion and dry deposition patterns of ammonia downwind of a hog farm will help us to understand how much ammonia gets dry deposited near the farm, and how remaining ammonia gets transported farther away. An experimental and modeling study is conducted of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one swine farm as a unit. Measurements of ammonia flux were made at 11 swine facilities in North Carolina using dynamic flow-through chamber system over the anaerobic waste treatment lagoons. Continuous measurements of ammonia flux, meteorological and lagoon parameters were made for 8-10 days at each farm during each of the warm and cold seasons. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in the chamber placed over the lagoon using a Thermo Environmental Instrument Incorporated (TECO) Model 17c chemiluminescnce ammonia analyzer. A similar ammonia analyzer was used to measure ammonia concentrations at selected locations on the farm. Barn emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. A 10 m meteorological tower was erected at each site to measure wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity

  7. Empirical model of odor emission from deep-pit swine finishing barns to derive a standardized odor emission factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauberger, Günther; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Ni, Ji-Qin; Bundy, Dwaine S.; Haymore, Barry L.; Diehl, Claude A.; Duggirala, Ravi K.; Heber, Albert J.

    2013-02-01

    Odor emission from swine housing is influenced by the herd characteristics and building environment. The following three specific factors were identified as inputs to a swine house odor emission model: indoor temperature, barn ventilation rate, and pig activity. Model input parameters were determined based on tests of four, identical, 1000-head, mechanically-ventilated swine finishing houses. Each building had two sidewall curtains, a curtain on the west end wall, five exhaust fans on the east end wall, four pit ventilation fans, and long-term manure storage beneath a fully slatted floor. Odor concentrations of 112 odor samples were determined using dynamic forced-choice olfactometry with four to six trained panelists. The emission model showed that the standard live mass specific odor emission factor was 48 OU s-1 per 500 kg live mass or animal unit (AU), and it corresponded to an indoor temperature of T0 = 20 °C, a ventilation rate of V0 = 200 m3 h-1 (55.6 × 10-3 m3 s-1) per pig (maximum capacity for summer time), and the daily mean animal activity. The rate of odor emission from a swine finishing house can be calculated based on these parameters coupled with the number of animals, the mean live mass, and the standard live mass specific odor emission factor. Using this process-based odor emission model, the odor emission estimation and therefore the input for odor dispersion models can be improved to obtain more reliable estimates of separation distance for siting future pig farms.

  8. Association of the host immune response with protection using a live attenuated African swine fever virus model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricted animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated st...

  9. Sodium Thiosulfate Versus Hydroxocobalamin in the Treatment of Acute, Severe Cyanide Induced Cardiotoxicity in a Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-22

    intoxicated by cyanide develop cardiac-ar.rest or severely low blood pressure. Currently several antidotes exist, but many have severe adverse effects...machine. They were intoxicated with cyanide (infused through the vein) until the blood pressure was low. The animals were assigned to-one of three...IUIVIJ:lt:M Sodium thiosulfate versus hydroxocoba~amin in the treatment of acute, severe cyanide induced cardiotoxicity in a swine (Sus Scrofa)model on

  10. Development of failure model for nickel cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a method for the life prediction of nickel cadmium cells is discussed. The approach described involves acquiring an understanding of the mechanisms of degradation and failure and at the same time developing nondestructive evaluation techniques for the nickel cadmium cells. The development of a statistical failure model which will describe the mechanisms of degradation and failure is outlined.

  11. The Effect of rFVIIa on Pro- and Anti-Inflamatory Cytokines in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    alpha expression and protein levels after fluid percussion injury in rats: the effect of injury severity and brain temperature. Neurosurgery ...Short Communication The effect of rFVIIa on pro- and anti-inflamatory cytokines in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in a swine model of traumatic brain...Tumor necrosis factor-ex lnterleukin-1 p lnterleukin-1 0 rfVlla TBl Twenty anesthetized immature Yorkshire swine underwent fluid percussion TBI. At

  12. Multiscale modeling of failure in composites under model parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanor, Michael J.; Oskay, Caglar; Clay, Stephen B.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript presents a multiscale stochastic failure modeling approach for fiber reinforced composites. A homogenization based reduced-order multiscale computational model is employed to predict the progressive damage accumulation and failure in the composite. Uncertainty in the composite response is modeled at the scale of the microstructure by considering the constituent material (i.e., matrix and fiber) parameters governing the evolution of damage as random variables. Through the use of the multiscale model, randomness at the constituent scale is propagated to the scale of the composite laminate. The probability distributions of the underlying material parameters are calibrated from unidirectional composite experiments using a Bayesian statistical approach. The calibrated multiscale model is exercised to predict the ultimate tensile strength of quasi-isotropic open-hole composite specimens at various loading rates. The effect of random spatial distribution of constituent material properties on the composite response is investigated.

  13. Internal vacuum-assisted closure device in the swine model of severe liver injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The authors present a novel approach to nonresectional therapy in major hepatic trauma utilizing intraabdominal perihepatic vacuum assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the porcine model of Grade V liver injury. Methods A Grade V injury was created in the right lobe of the liver in a healthy pig. A Pringle maneuver was applied (4.5 minutes total clamp time) and a vacuum assisted closure device was placed over the injured lobe and connected to suction. The device consisted of a perforated plastic bag placed over the liver, followed by a 15 cm by 15cm VAC sponge covered with a nonperforated plastic bag. The abdomen was closed temporarily. Blood loss, cardiopulmonary parameters and bladder pressures were measured over a one-hour period. The device was then removed and the animal was euthanized. Results Feasibility of device placement was demonstrated by maintenance of adequate vacuum suction pressures and seal. VAC placement presented no major technical challenges. Successful control of ongoing liver hemorrhage was achieved with the VAC. Total blood loss was 625 ml (20ml/kg). This corresponds to class II hemorrhagic shock in humans and compares favorably to previously reported estimated blood losses with similar grade liver injuries in the swine model. No post-injury cardiopulmonary compromise or elevated abdominal compartment pressures were encountered, while hepatic parenchymal perfusion was maintained. Conclusion These data demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a perihepatic negative pressure device for the treatment of hemorrhage from severe liver injury in the porcine model. PMID:23217091

  14. Single-session baseline virtual reality simulator scores predict technical performance for laparoscopic colectomy: a study in the swine model.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor E; Bertoncini, Alexandre B; Horcel, Lucas A; Nahas, Sergio C; Cecconello, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation helps reducing the learning curve of laparoscopic colectomy. Moreover, it may be used to ascertain surgeons' pretraining skills. It was aimed to establish predictive validity of specific parameters gathered during VR simulation training on sigmoid colectomy and whether simulator parameters correlate with technical performance during the same operation in a swine model. Surgeons novice to laparoscopic colectomy underwent a single VR simulation session on sigmoid colectomy. Next, all participants performed a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in the swine. Operations were recorded. Performance evaluation was conducted by 2 board-certified colorectal surgeons blinded to surgeons' simulator scores using an instrument specific to laparoscopic colectomy. For each participant, a mean score of specific skills was calculated. Linear regression analysis was used to identify simulator parameters that were best related to the score. The stepwise method was used to select parameters. The magnitude of the regression model was measured by the coefficient of determination (R(2)) value. The University of Sao Paulo Medical Center is a high-volume, public practice, university-affiliated hospital. A total of 14 first-year residents in digestive tract surgery were included. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the regression model was significant (p = 0.0001), and an association between simulation scores and specific skills was confirmed. The R(2) value was 99%. The VR simulator parameters that strongly correlated with specific skills during laparoscopic colectomy in the swine were safe use of electrosurgery/energy device and safety of medial-to-lateral dissection. A single VR simulation session for novice surgeons in the sigmoid colectomy module generates baseline scores that highly correlated with performance of specific skills during a laparoscopic colectomy in the swine. This information may be useful in an attempt to tailor VR simulator practice according

  15. Network analysis of swine shipments in Ontario, Canada, to support disease spread modelling and risk-based disease management.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    Understanding contact networks are important for modelling and managing the spread and control of communicable diseases in populations. This study characterizes the swine shipment network of a multi-site production system in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Data were extracted from a company's database listing swine shipments among 251 swine farms, including 20 sow, 69 nursery and 162 finishing farms, for the 2-year period of 2006 to 2007. Several network metrics were generated. The number of shipments per week between pairs of farms ranged from 1 to 6. The medians (and ranges) of out-degree were: sow 6 (1-21), nursery 8 (0-25), and finishing 0 (0-4), over the entire 2-year study period. Corresponding estimates for in-degree of nursery and finishing farms were 3 (0-9) and 3 (0-12) respectively. Outgoing and incoming infection chains (OIC and IIC), were also measured. The medians (ranges) of the monthly OIC and IIC were 0 (0-8) and 0 (0-6), respectively, with very similar measures observed for 2-week intervals. Nursery farms exhibited high measures of centrality. This indicates that they pose greater risks of disease spread in the network. Therefore, they should be given a high priority for disease prevention and control measures affecting all age groups alike. The network demonstrated scale-free and small-world topologies as observed in other livestock shipment studies. This heterogeneity in contacts among farm types and network topologies should be incorporated in simulation models to improve their validity. In conclusion, this study provided useful epidemiological information and parameters for the control and modelling of disease spread among swine farms, for the first time from Ontario, Canada. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Coburn, Brian J; Wagner, Bradley G; Blower, Sally

    2009-06-22

    Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1), formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0). The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1) has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918-1919 pandemic strain (mean R0 approximately 2: range 1.4 to 2.8) and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1). By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza.

  17. An Effective and Reproducible Model of Ventricular Fibrillation in Crossbred Yorkshire Swine (Sus scrofa) for Use in Physiologic Research.

    PubMed

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose C; Craig, W John; O'Sullivan, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical induction (TCEI) has been used to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF) in laboratory swine for physiologic and resuscitation research. Many studies do not describe the method of TCEI in detail, thus making replication by future investigators difficult. Here we describe a detailed method of electrically inducing VF that was used successfully in a prospective, experimental resuscitation study. Specifically, an electrical current was passed through the heart to induce VF in crossbred Yorkshire swine (n = 30); the current was generated by using two 22-gauge spinal needles, with one placed above and one below the heart, and three 9V batteries connected in series. VF developed in 28 of the 30 pigs (93%) within 10 s of beginning the procedure. In the remaining 2 swine, VF was induced successfully after medial redirection of the superior parasternal needle. The TCEI method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective. TCEI may be especially valuable to researchers with limited access to funding, sophisticated equipment, or colleagues experienced in interventional cardiology techniques. The TCEI method might be most appropriate for pharmacologic studies requiring VF, VF resulting from the R-on-T phenomenon (as in prolonged QT syndrome), and VF arising from other ectopic or reentrant causes. However, the TCEI method does not accurately model the most common cause of VF, acute coronary occlusive disease. Researchers must consider the limitations of TCEI that may affect internal and external validity of collected data, when designing experiments using this model of VF.

  18. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-07

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantification of morphologic, cytologic, and kinetic parameters of unirradiated swine skin: a histologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, J.O.; Bennett, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    This study determines multiple histologic and cell kinetic parameters of unirradiated swine skin. The prickle cell layer exists as a shell three to six cells thick. The proliferative basal layer exists as a confluent monolayer with 2031 +/- 48 cells/cm; it has delta growth fraction of 1, an average cell generation time of 12 days, a T/sub s/ of 9 hr, and a T/sub s/ + T/sub G2/ + T/sub 1/2M/ of 17 to 19 hr. The labeling index is 3.9% with a diurnal variation having a 5% peak at 1800 hr and a 2.5% nadir at 0900-1100 hr. The mitotic index varies from 1.7 to 3.2% and has no clear-cut diurnal variation. These values are similar to those available for man. These data and those published previously are utilized to define a histologic model of the irradiated epidermal cell renewal system. These measured values are compared with those derived from analysis of available time-dose isoeffect data using a single-hit multitarget and a linear-quadratic model.

  20. Early Cellular Changes in the Ascending Aorta and Myocardium in a Swine Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Feroze; Owais, Khurram; Bardia, Amit; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Liu, David; Senthilnathan, Venkatachalam; Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Sellke, Frank; Matyal, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is associated with pathological remodeling of the heart and adjacent vessels. The early biochemical and cellular changes underlying the vascular damage are not fully understood. In this study, we sought to establish the nature, extent, and initial timeline of cytochemical derangements underlying reduced ventriculo-arterial compliance in a swine model of metabolic syndrome. Methods Yorkshire swine (n = 8 per group) were fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-cholesterol (HCD) for 12 weeks. Myocardial function and blood flow was assessed before harvesting the heart. Immuno-blotting and immuno-histochemical staining were used to assess the cellular changes in the myocardium, ascending aorta and left anterior descending artery (LAD). Results There was significant increase in body mass index, blood glucose and mean arterial pressures (p = 0.002, p = 0.001 and p = 0.024 respectively) in HCD group. At the cellular level there was significant increase in anti-apoptotic factors p-Akt (p = 0.007 and p = 0.002) and Bcl-xL (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01) in the HCD aorta and myocardium, respectively. Pro-fibrotic markers TGF-β (p = 0.01), pSmad1/5 (p = 0.03) and MMP-9 (p = 0.005) were significantly increased in the HCD aorta. The levels of pro-apoptotic p38MAPK, Apaf-1 and cleaved Caspase3 were significantly increased in aorta of HCD (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 and p = 0.007 respectively). Similar changes in coronary arteries were not observed in either group. Functionally, the high cholesterol diet resulted in significant increase in ventricular end systolic pressure and–dp/dt (p = 0.05 and p = 0.007 respectively) in the HCD group. Conclusion Preclinical metabolic syndrome initiates pro-apoptosis and pro-fibrosis pathways in the heart and ascending aorta, while sparing coronary arteries at this early stage of dietary modification. PMID:26766185

  1. Catheter‐based induction of renal ischemia/reperfusion in swine: description of an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Malagrino, Pamella A.; Venturini, Gabriela; Yogi, Patrícia S.; Dariolli, Rafael; Padilha, Kallyandra; Kiers, Bianca; Gois, Tamiris C.; da Motta‐Leal‐Filho, Joaquim M.; Takimura, Celso K.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.; Carnevale, Francisco C.; Zeri, Ana C. M.; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Krieger, José E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Several techniques to induce renal ischemia have been proposed: clamp, PVA particles, and catheter‐balloon. We report the development of a controlled, single‐insult model of unilateral renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) without contralateral nephrectomy, using a suitable model, the pig. This is a balloon‐catheter‐based model using a percutaneous, interventional radiology procedure. One angioplasty balloon‐catheter was placed into the right renal artery and inflated for 120 min and reperfusion over 24 h. Serial serums were sampled from the inferior vena cava and urine was directly sampled from the bladder throughout the experiment, and both kidneys were excised after 24 h of reperfusion. Analyses of renal structure and function were performed by hematoxylin–eosin/periodic Acid‐Schiff, serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), fractional excretion of ions, and glucose, SDS‐PAGE analysis of urinary proteins, and serum neutrophil gelatinase‐associated lipocalin (NGAL). Total nitrated protein was quantified to characterize oxidative stress. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was identified in every animal, but only two animals showed levels of SCr above 150% of baseline values. As expected, I/R increased SCr and BUN. Fractional sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate excretion were modulated during ischemia. Serum‐nitrated proteins and NGAL had two profiles: decreased with ischemia and increased after reperfusion. This decline was associated with increased protein excretion during ischemia and early reperfusion. Altogether, these data show that the renal I/R model can be performed by percutaneous approach in the swine model. This is a suitable translational model to study new early renal ischemic biomarkers and pathophysiological mechanisms in renal ischemia. PMID:25263203

  2. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  3. A Mathematical Model that Simulates Control Options for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV).

    PubMed

    Barongo, Mike B; Bishop, Richard P; Fèvre, Eric M; Knobel, Darryn L; Ssematimba, Amos

    2016-01-01

    A stochastic model designed to simulate transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in a free-ranging pig population under various intervention scenarios is presented. The model was used to assess the relative impact of the timing of the implementation of different control strategies on disease-related mortality. The implementation of biosecurity measures was simulated through incorporation of a decay function on the transmission rate. The model predicts that biosecurity measures implemented within 14 days of the onset of an epidemic can avert up to 74% of pig deaths due to ASF while hypothetical vaccines that confer 70% immunity when deployed prior to day 14 of the epidemic could avert 65% of pig deaths. When the two control measures are combined, the model predicts that 91% of the pigs that would have otherwise succumbed to the disease if no intervention was implemented would be saved. However, if the combined interventions are delayed (defined as implementation from > 60 days) only 30% of ASF-related deaths would be averted. In the absence of vaccines against ASF, we recommend early implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures. Active surveillance and use of pen-side diagnostic assays, preferably linked to rapid dissemination of this data to veterinary authorities through mobile phone technology platforms are essential for rapid detection and confirmation of ASF outbreaks. This prediction, although it may seem intuitive, rationally confirms the importance of early intervention in managing ASF epidemics. The modelling approach is particularly valuable in that it determines an optimal timing for implementation of interventions in controlling ASF outbreaks.

  4. A Mathematical Model that Simulates Control Options for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV)

    PubMed Central

    Barongo, Mike B.; Bishop, Richard P; Fèvre, Eric M; Knobel, Darryn L; Ssematimba, Amos

    2016-01-01

    A stochastic model designed to simulate transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in a free-ranging pig population under various intervention scenarios is presented. The model was used to assess the relative impact of the timing of the implementation of different control strategies on disease-related mortality. The implementation of biosecurity measures was simulated through incorporation of a decay function on the transmission rate. The model predicts that biosecurity measures implemented within 14 days of the onset of an epidemic can avert up to 74% of pig deaths due to ASF while hypothetical vaccines that confer 70% immunity when deployed prior to day 14 of the epidemic could avert 65% of pig deaths. When the two control measures are combined, the model predicts that 91% of the pigs that would have otherwise succumbed to the disease if no intervention was implemented would be saved. However, if the combined interventions are delayed (defined as implementation from > 60 days) only 30% of ASF-related deaths would be averted. In the absence of vaccines against ASF, we recommend early implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures. Active surveillance and use of pen-side diagnostic assays, preferably linked to rapid dissemination of this data to veterinary authorities through mobile phone technology platforms are essential for rapid detection and confirmation of ASF outbreaks. This prediction, although it may seem intuitive, rationally confirms the importance of early intervention in managing ASF epidemics. The modelling approach is particularly valuable in that it determines an optimal timing for implementation of interventions in controlling ASF outbreaks. PMID:27391689

  5. Pulmonary deposition of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus in a Swine model due to exposure from a simulated anthrax letter incident.

    PubMed

    Duncan, E J Scott; Kournikakis, Bill; Ho, Jim; Hill, Ira

    2009-02-01

    Dry anthrax spore powder is readily disseminated as an aerosol and it is possible that passive dispersion when opening a letter containing anthrax spores may result in lethal doses to humans. The specific aim of this study was to quantify the respirable aerosol hazard associated with opening an envelope/letter contaminated with a dry spore powder of the biological pathogen anthrax in a typical office environment. An envelope containing a letter contaminated with 1.0 g of dry Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores (pathogen simulant) was opened in the presence of an unrestrained swine model. Aerosolized spores were detected in the room in seconds and peak concentrations occurred by three minutes. The swine, located approximately 1.5 m from the source, was exposed to the aerosol for 28 min following the letter opening event and then moved to a clean room for 30 min. A necropsy was completed to determine the extent of in vivo spore deposition in the lungs. The median number of viable colony forming units (CFU) measured in the combined right and left lung was 21,200: the average mass of both lungs was 283 g. In excess of 100 CFU per gram of lung tissue was found at sites within the anterior, intermediate and posterior lobes. The results of this study confirmed that opening an envelope containing spores generated an aerosol spanning the respirable particle size range of 1-10 microm, and that normal respiration of swine led to spore deposition throughout the lungs. The observed deposition of spores in the lungs of the swine is within the LD(50) range of 2,500-55,000 estimated for humans for inhaled anthrax. Thus, there would appear to be a significant health risk to those individuals exposed to anthrax spores when opening a contaminated envelope.

  6. Effects of tibial intraosseous and intravenous administration of Hextend on time of administration and hemodynamics in a hypovolemic swine model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James; Passmore, Alex; Leger, Sephra; Lannan, Johnathon; Bentley, Michael; Johnson, Don

    2016-01-01

    To determine if there were significant differences between the tibial intraosseous (TIO) and intravenous (IV) administration of Hextend relative to time and in hemodynamics in a hypovolemic model. Vivarium. Yorkshire swine; sample size was based on a power of 80 percent, α of 0.05, and a large effect size of 0.6. Swine were randomly assigned to one of three groups: TIO (n = 7), IV (n = 7), and control (n = 7). Swine were exsanguinated 30 percent of their blood volume. Hextend (500 mL) was administered either by the TIO or IV route; the control group received none. Time of administration of Hextend; systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) data were collected every 2 minutes and compared by group over 8 minutes. An independent t test determined that there was no significant difference between groups relative to time of administration (p = 0.001). A repeated analysis of variance found that there were no significant differences in SBP, DBP, MAP, HR, CO, and SV between the TIO and IV groups over 8 minutes (p > 0.05) but significant differences between both TIO and IV compared to the control group (p < 0.05). TIO is an effective and easily used method to administer Hextend for patients in hypovolemic shock. Based upon the findings of this study, the TIO route might be considered the first choice for rapid vascular access and the administration of Hextend.

  7. Short-Term Effects of Ketamine and Isoflurane on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in an Experimental Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin; Madias, Christopher; Pandian, Natesa; Link, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. General anesthesia is an essential element of experimental medical procedures. Ketamine and isoflurane are agents commonly used to induce and maintain anesthesia in animals. The cardiovascular effects of these anesthetic agents are diverse, and the response of global myocardial function is unknown. Methods. In a series of 15 swine, echocardiography measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were obtained before the animals received anesthesia (baseline), after an intramuscular injection of ketamine (postketamine) and after inhaled isoflurane (postisoflurane). Results. The mean LVEF of an unanesthetized swine was 47 ± 3%. There was a significant decrease in the mean LVEF after administration of ketamine to 41 + 6.5% (P = 0.003). The addition of inhaled isoflurane did not result in further decrease in mean LVEF (mean LVEF 38 ± 7.2%, P = 0.22). Eight of the swine had an increase in their LVEF with sympathetic stimulation. Conclusions. In our experimental model the administration of ketamine was associated with decreased LV function. The decrease may be largely secondary to a blunting of sympathetic tone. The addition of isoflurane to ketamine did not significantly change LV function. A significant number of animals had returned to preanesthesia LV function with sympathetic stimulation. PMID:22347646

  8. Assessment of Deep Partial Thickness Burn Treatment with Keratin Biomaterial Hydrogels in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Poranki, D.; Goodwin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Partial thickness burns can advance to full thickness after initial injury due to inadequate tissue perfusion and increased production of inflammatory cytokines, which has been referred to as burn wound progression. In previous work, we demonstrated that a keratin biomaterial hydrogel appeared to reduce burn wound progression. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a modified keratin hydrogel could reduce burn wound progression and speed healing. Standardized burn wounds were created in Yorkshire swine and treated within 30 minutes with keratin hydrogel (modified and unmodified), collagen hydrogel, or silver sulfadiazine (SSD). Digital images of each wound were taken for area measurements immediately prior to cleaning and dressing changes. Wound tissue was collected and assessed histologically at several time points. Wound area showed a significant difference between hydrogels and SSD groups, and rates of reepithelialization at early time points showed an increase when keratin treatment was used compared to both collagen and SSD. A linear regression model predicted a time to wound closure of approximately 25 days for keratin hydrogel while SSD treatment required 35 days. There appeared to be no measurable differences between the modified and unmodified formulations of keratin hydrogels. PMID:28025638

  9. Comparison of Two Foreign Body Retrieval Devices with Adjustable Loops in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, Andras

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to compare two similar foreign body retrieval devices, the Texan{sup TM} (TX) and the Texan LONGhorn{sup TM} (TX-LG), in a swine model. Both devices feature a {<=}30-mm adjustable loop. Capture times and total procedure times for retrieving foreign bodies from the infrarenal aorta, inferior vena cava, and stomach were compared. All attempts with both devices (TX, n = 15; TX-LG, n = 14) were successful. Foreign bodies in the vasculature were captured quickly using both devices (mean {+-} SD, 88 {+-} 106 sec for TX vs 67 {+-} 42 sec for TX-LG) with no significant difference between them. The TX-LG, however, allowed significantly better capture times than the TX in the stomach (p = 0.022), Overall, capture times for the TX-LG were significantly better than for the TX (p = 0.029). There was no significant difference between the total procedure times in any anatomic region. TX-LG performed significantly better than the TX in the stomach and therefore overall. The better torque control and maneuverability of TX-LG resulted in better performance in large anatomic spaces.

  10. The potential of antiviral agents to control classical swine fever: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Backer, Jantien A; Vrancken, Robert; Neyts, Johan; Goris, Nesya

    2013-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) represents a continuous threat to pig populations that are free of disease without vaccination. When CSF virus is introduced, the minimal control strategy imposed by the EU is often insufficient to mitigate the epidemic. Additional measures such as preemptive culling encounter ethical objections, whereas emergency vaccination leads to prolonged export restrictions. Antiviral agents, however, provide instantaneous protection without inducing an antibody response. The use of antiviral agents to contain CSF epidemics is studied with a model describing within- and between-herd virus transmission. Epidemics are simulated in a densely populated livestock area in The Netherlands, with farms of varying sizes and pig types (finishers, piglets and sows). Our results show that vaccination and/or antiviral treatment in a 2 km radius around an infected herd is more effective than preemptive culling in a 1 km radius. However, the instantaneous but temporary protection provided by antiviral treatment is slightly less effective than the delayed but long-lasting protection offered by vaccination. Therefore, the most effective control strategy is to vaccinate animals when allowed (finishers and piglets) and to treat with antiviral agents when vaccination is prohibited (sows). As independent control measure, antiviral treatment in a 1 km radius presents an elevated risk of epidemics running out of control. A 2 km control radius largely eliminates this risk.

  11. Test of a novel miniature blood pressure sensor in the coronary arteries of a swine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Sun, Kai; Zou, Xiaotian; Barringhaus, Kurt; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has proven to be very useful in diagnosis of narrowed coronary arteries. It is a technique that is used in coronary catheterization to measure blood pressure difference across a coronary artery stenosis in maximal flow. In-vivo blood pressure measurement is critical in FFR diagnosis. This paper presents a novel miniature all-optical fiber blood pressure sensor. It is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometry principle. The FP cavity was fabricated by directly wet etching the fiber tip. Then, a diaphragm with well-controlled thickness was bonded to the end face of the fiber using the thermal bonding technique. Finally, the sensor was packaged with a bio-compatible and flexible coil for animal tests. A 25-50 kg Yorkshire swine model was introduced as the animal test target. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was exposed, and beyond the takeoff of the largest diagonal branch, a 3.0 mm vascular occluder was secured. Firstly, standard invasive manometry was used to obtain the blood pressure as baseline. Next, a guiding catheter was introduced into the ostium of the left main coronary artery, and the miniature blood pressure sensor was advanced into the LAD at a point beyond the vascular occlude. The blood pressure beyond the vascular occlude was recorded. The sensor successfully recorded the blood pressure at both near-end and far-end of the vascular occluder.

  12. Assessment of Deep Partial Thickness Burn Treatment with Keratin Biomaterial Hydrogels in a Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Poranki, D; Goodwin, C; Van Dyke, M

    2016-01-01

    Partial thickness burns can advance to full thickness after initial injury due to inadequate tissue perfusion and increased production of inflammatory cytokines, which has been referred to as burn wound progression. In previous work, we demonstrated that a keratin biomaterial hydrogel appeared to reduce burn wound progression. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a modified keratin hydrogel could reduce burn wound progression and speed healing. Standardized burn wounds were created in Yorkshire swine and treated within 30 minutes with keratin hydrogel (modified and unmodified), collagen hydrogel, or silver sulfadiazine (SSD). Digital images of each wound were taken for area measurements immediately prior to cleaning and dressing changes. Wound tissue was collected and assessed histologically at several time points. Wound area showed a significant difference between hydrogels and SSD groups, and rates of reepithelialization at early time points showed an increase when keratin treatment was used compared to both collagen and SSD. A linear regression model predicted a time to wound closure of approximately 25 days for keratin hydrogel while SSD treatment required 35 days. There appeared to be no measurable differences between the modified and unmodified formulations of keratin hydrogels.

  13. Gallbladder Cryoablation: Proof of Concept in a Swine Model for a Percutaneous Alternative to Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Hugh C J; Saeed, Maythem; Surman, Andrew; Ehman, Eric C; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W; Conrad, Miles B

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of percutaneous gallbladder cryoablation (GBC) under CT guidance in a swine model with histopathologic correlation. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval was obtained for this study protocol. Five pigs underwent GBC. Under CT guidance, 3-4 cryoprobes were positioned percutaneously at the gallbladder margins. Thermocouple probes were placed percutaneously at the gallbladder fundus, neck, free wall, and gallbladder fossa. Two freeze-thaw cycles ranging from 10 to 26 min were performed. The subjects were sacrificed 5 h after cryoablation. The gallbladder and bile ducts were resected, stained, and examined microscopically. GBC was completed in all subjects. A 10-mm ablation margin was achieved beyond all gallbladder walls. Thermocouple probes reached at least -20 °C. Intra-procedural body temperature decreased to a minimum of 35 °C but recovered after the procedure. Intra- and post-procedural vital signs otherwise remained within physiologic parameters. Non-target ablation occurred in the stomach and colon of the first two subjects. Histology demonstrated complete denudation of the gallbladder epithelium, hemorrhage, and edema within the muscularis layer, and preservation of the microscopic architecture of the common bile duct in all cases. Percutaneous gallbladder cryoablation is feasible, with adequate ablation margins obtained and histologic changes demonstrating transmural necrosis. Adjacent structures included in the ablation may require conservative ablation zones, hydrodissection, or continuous saline lavage.

  14. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  15. One-Health Simulation Modelling: Assessment of Control Strategies Against the Spread of Influenza between Swine and Human Populations Using NAADSM.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; McClure, J T; Sanchez, J

    2016-04-01

    Simulation models implemented using a range of parameters offer a useful approach to identifying effective disease intervention strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of key control strategies to mitigate the simultaneous spread of influenza among and between swine and human populations. We used the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus as a case study. The study population included swine herds (488 herds) and households-of-people (29,707 households) within a county in Ontario, Canada. Households were categorized as: (i) rural households with swine workers, (ii) rural households without swine workers and (iii) urban households without swine workers. Seventy-two scenarios were investigated based on a combination of the parameters of speed of detection and control strategies, such as quarantine strategy, effectiveness of movement restriction and ring vaccination strategy, all assessed at three levels of transmissibility of the virus at the swine-human interface. Results showed that the speed of detection of the infected units combined with the quarantine strategy had the largest impact on the duration and size of outbreaks. A combination of fast to moderate speed of the detection (where infected units were detected within 5-10 days since first infection) and quarantine of the detected units alone contained the outbreak within the swine population in most of the simulated outbreaks. Ring vaccination had no added beneficial effect. In conclusion, our study suggests that the early detection (and therefore effective surveillance) and effective quarantine had the largest impact in the control of the influenza spread, consistent with earlier studies. To our knowledge, no study had previously assessed the impact of the combination of different intervention strategies involving the simultaneous spread of influenza between swine and human populations.

  16. User-Defined Material Model for Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F. Jr.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An overview of different types of composite material system architectures and a brief review of progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model (or UMAT) for use with the ABAQUS/Standard1 nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details and use of the UMAT subroutine are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented.

  17. Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R

    2017-01-01

    Swine dysentery is a severe enteric disease in pigs, which is characterized by bloody to mucoid diarrhea and associated with reduced growth performance and variable mortality. This disease is most often observed in grower-finisher pigs, wherein susceptible pigs develop a significant mucohemorrhagic typhlocolitis following infection with strongly hemolytic spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. While swine dysentery is endemic in many parts of the world, the disease had essentially disappeared in much of the United States by the mid-1990s as a result of industry consolidation and effective treatment, control, and elimination methods. However, since 2007, there has been a reported increase in laboratory diagnosis of swine dysentery in parts of North America along with the detection of novel pathogenic Brachyspira spp worldwide. Accordingly, there has been a renewed interest in swine dysentery and Brachyspira spp infections in pigs, particularly in areas where the disease was previously eliminated. This review provides an overview of knowledge on the etiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of swine dysentery, with insights into risk factors and control.

  18. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  19. A modeling framework for system restoration from cascading failures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems.

  20. A Modeling Framework for System Restoration from Cascading Failures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems. PMID:25474408

  1. Economic evaluation of alternative crossbreeding systems involving four breeds of swine. I. The simulation model.

    PubMed

    McLaren, D G; Buchanan, D S; Williams, J E

    1987-10-01

    A static, deterministic computer model, programmed in Microsoft Basic for IBM PC and Apple Macintosh computers, was developed to calculate production efficiency (cost per kg of product) for nine alternative types of crossbreeding system involving four breeds of swine. The model simulates efficiencies for four purebred and 60 alternative two-, three- and four-breed rotation, rotaterminal, backcross and static cross systems. Crossbreeding systems were defined as including all purebred, crossbred and commercial matings necessary to maintain a total of 10,000 farrowings. Driving variables for the model are mean conception rate at first service and for an 8-wk breeding season, litter size born, preweaning survival rate, postweaning average daily gain, feed-to-gain ratio and carcass backfat. Predictions are computed using breed direct genetic and maternal effects for the four breeds, plus individual, maternal and paternal specific heterosis values, input by the user. Inputs required to calculate the number of females farrowing in each sub-system include the proportion of males and females replaced each breeding cycle in purebred and crossbred populations, the proportion of male and female offspring in seedstock herds that become breeding animals, and the number of females per boar. Inputs required to calculate the efficiency of terminal production (cost-to-product ratio) for each sub-system include breeding herd feed intake, gilt development costs, feed costs and labor and overhead costs. Crossbreeding system efficiency is calculated as the weighted average of sub-system cost-to-product ratio values, weighting by the number of females farrowing in each sub-system.

  2. A Modified Heterotopic Swine Hind Limb Transplant Model for Translational Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Research

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Cooney, Damon S.; Shores, Jaimie T.; Sacks, Justin M.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Gordon, Chad; Ruben, Dawn; Schneeberger, Stefan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) such as hand and face transplants represent a viable treatment option for complex musculoskeletal trauma and devastating tissue loss. Despite favorable and highly encouraging early and intermediate functional outcomes, rejection of the highly immunogenic skin component of a VCA and potential adverse effects of chronic multi-drug immunosuppression continue to hamper widespread clinical application of VCA. Therefore, research in this novel field needs to focus on translational studies related to unique immunologic features of VCA and to develop novel immunomodulatory strategies for immunomodulation and tolerance induction following VCA without the need for long term immunosuppression. This article describes a reliable and reproducible translational large animal model of VCA that is comprised of an osteomyocutaneous flap in a MHC-defined swine heterotopic hind limb allotransplantation. Briefly, a well-vascularized skin paddle is identified in the anteromedial thigh region using near infrared laser angiography. The underlying muscles, knee joint, distal femur, and proximal tibia are harvested on a femoral vascular pedicle. This allograft can be considered both a VCA and a vascularized bone marrow transplant with its unique immune privileged features. The graft is transplanted to a subcutaneous abdominal pocket in the recipient animal with a skin component exteriorized to the dorsolateral region for immune monitoring. Three surgical teams work simultaneously in a well-coordinated manner to reduce anesthesia and ischemia times, thereby improving efficiency of this model and reducing potential confounders in experimental protocols. This model serves as the groundwork for future therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing and potentially eliminating the need for chronic multi-drug immunosuppression in VCA. PMID:24145603

  3. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  4. Consequences of pneumoperitoneum on liver ischemia during laparoscopic portal triad clamping in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Nsadi, Berthier; Gilson, Nathalie; Pire, Emilie; Cheramy, Jean-Paul; Pincemail, Joel; Scagnol, Irène; Meurisse, Michel; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Detry, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Portal triad clamping (PTC) may be required during laparoscopic liver resection to limit blood loss. The aim of this study was to test in a swine model the hypothesis that during laparoscopic PTC, increased intraperitoneal pressure may alter hepatic vein reverse circulation, inducing a more severe hepatic ischemia compared with PTC performed in laparotomy. Fifteen pigs were randomized into three groups: laparoscopy (1 h of pneumoperitoneum at 15 mmHg and 3 h of surveillance), open PTC (1 h PTC through laparotomy and 3 h of reperfusion), and laparoscopic PTC (1 h PTC with 15 mmHg pneumoperitoneum and 3 h of reperfusion). PTC was performed under mesenteric decompression using a veno-venous splenofemoral bypass. Hepatic partial oxygen tension and microcirculatory flow were continuously measured using a Clarke-type electrode and a laser Doppler flow probe, respectively. Liver consequences of PTC was assessed by right atrium serum determination of transaminases, creatinine, bilirubin, INR, and several ischemia/reperfusion parameters, drawn before PTC (T0), before unclamping (T60), and 1 (T120) and 3 h after reperfusion (T240). Histology was performed on T240 liver biopsies. Compared with open PTC, laparoscopic PTC produced a more rapid and more severe decrease in hepatic oxygen tension, indicating a more severe tissular hypoxia, and a more severe decrease in hepatic microcirculatory flow, indicating a decrease in hepatic backflow. At T240, the laparoscopic PTC livers suffered from a higher degree of hepatocellular damage, shown by higher transaminases and increased necrotic index at pathology. These results indicate that in this pig model, laparoscopic PTC induces a more severe liver ischemia, related to decreased hepatic oxygen content and decreased hepatic backflow. If confirmed by clinical studies, these results may indicate that caution is necessary when performing prolonged PTC during laparoscopic hepatic resection, particularly in cirrhotic or steatotic livers

  5. Assessment of a modified acoustic lens for electromagnetic shock wave lithotripters in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Mancini, John G; Neisius, Andreas; Smith, Nathan; Sankin, Georgy; Astroza, Gaston M; Lipkin, Michael E; Simmons, W Neal; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2013-09-01

    The acoustic lens of the Modularis electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter (Siemens, Malvern, Pennsylvania) was modified to produce a pressure waveform and focal zone more closely resembling that of the original HM3 device (Dornier Medtech, Wessling, Germany). We assessed the newly designed acoustic lens in vivo in an animal model. Stone fragmentation and tissue injury produced by the original and modified lenses of the Modularis lithotripter were evaluated in a swine model under equivalent acoustic pulse energy (about 45 mJ) at 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency. Stone fragmentation was determined by the weight percent of stone fragments less than 2 mm. To assess tissue injury, shock wave treated kidneys were perfused, dehydrated, cast in paraffin wax and sectioned. Digital images were captured every 120 μm and processed to determine functional renal volume damage. After 500 shocks, the mean ± SD stone fragmentation efficiency produced by the original and modified lenses was 48% ± 12% and 52% ± 17%, respectively (p = 0.60). However, after 2,000 shocks, the modified lens showed significantly improved stone fragmentation compared to the original lens (mean 86% ± 10% vs 72% ± 12%, p = 0.02). Tissue injury caused by the original and modified lenses was minimal at a mean of 0.57% ± 0.44% and 0.25% ± 0.25%, respectively (p = 0.27). With lens modification the Modularis lithotripter demonstrates significantly improved stone fragmentation with minimal tissue injury at a clinically relevant acoustic pulse energy. This new lens design could potentially be retrofitted to existing lithotripters, improving the effectiveness of electromagnetic lithotripters. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  7. Swine Model of Thrombotic Caval Occlusion Created by Autologous Thrombus Injection with Assistance of Intra-caval Net Knitting

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wan-Yin; Wu, Shuang; Hu, Lan-Yue; Liu, Chang-Jian; Gu, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a swine model of thrombotic inferior vena cava (IVC) occlusion (IVCO) created by autologous thrombus injection with assistance of intra-caval net knitting. Sixteen pigs were included and divided into two groups: Group A (n = 10), IVCO model created by knitting a caval net followed by autologous thrombus injection; Group B (n = 6), control model created by knitting a net and normal saline injection. Venography was performed to assess each model and the associated thrombotic occlusion. The vessels were examined histologically to analyse the pathological changes postoperatively. IVCO model was successfully created in 10 animals in Group A (100%). Immediate venography showed extensive clot burden in the IVC. Postoperative venography revealed partial caval occlusion at 7 days, and complete occlusion coupled with collateral vessels at 14 days. Histologically, Group A animals had significantly greater venous wall thickening, with CD163-positive and CD3-positive cell infiltration. Recanalization channels were observed at the margins of the thrombus. By contrast, no thrombotic occlusion of the IVC was observed in Group B. The thrombotic IVCO model can be reliably established in swine. The inflammatory reaction may contribute to the caval thrombus propagation following occlusion. PMID:26680253

  8. UM206, a selective Frizzled antagonist, attenuates adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction in swine.

    PubMed

    Uitterdijk, André; Hermans, Kevin C M; de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Matthijs Blankesteijn, W; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-02-01

    Modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 reduced infarct expansion and prevented heart failure development in mice, an effect that was accompanied by increased myofibroblast presence in the infarct, suggesting that Wnt/Frizzled signaling has a key role in cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). This study investigated the effects of modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 in a swine model of reperfused MI. For this purpose, seven swine with MI were treated with continuous infusion of UM206 for 5 weeks. Six control swine were treated with vehicle. Another eight swine were sham-operated. Cardiac function was determined by echo in awake swine. Infarct mass was estimated at baseline by heart-specific fatty acid-binding protein ELISA and at follow-up using planimetry. Components of Wnt/Frizzled signaling, myofibroblast presence, and extracellular matrix were measured at follow-up with qPCR and/or histology. Results show that UM206 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in infarct mass compared with baseline (-41±10%), whereas infarct mass remained stable in the Control-MI group (+3±17%). Progressive dilation of the left ventricle occurred in the Control-MI group between 3 and 5 weeks after MI, while adverse remodeling was halted in the UM206-treated group. mRNA expression for Frizzled-4 and the Frizzled co-receptor LRP5 was increased in UM206-treated swine as compared with Control-MI swine. Myofibroblast presence was significantly lower in infarcted tissue of the UM206-treated animals (1.53±0.43% vs 3.38±0.61%) at 5 weeks follow-up. This study demonstrates that UM206 treatment attenuates adverse remodeling in a swine model of reperfused MI, indicating that Wnt/Frizzled signaling is a promising target to improve infarct healing and limit post-MI remodeling.

  9. Hydroxocobalamin and epinephrine both improve survival in a swine model of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Pitotti, Rebecca L; Dixon, Patricia S; Valtier, Sandra; Esquivel, Luis; Bush, Anneke; Little, Charles M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether hydroxocobalamin will improve survival compared with epinephrine and saline solution controls in a model of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest. Forty-five swine (38 to 42 kg) were tracheally intubated, anesthetized, and central venous and arterial continuous cardiovascular monitoring catheters were inserted. Potassium cyanide was infused until cardiac arrest developed, defined as mean arterial pressure less than 30 mm Hg. Animals were treated with standardized mechanical chest compressions and were randomly assigned to receive one of 3 intravenous bolus therapies: hydroxocobalamin, epinephrine, or saline solution (control). All animals were monitored for 60 minutes after cardiac arrest. Additional epinephrine infusions were used in all arms of the study after return of spontaneous circulation for systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg. A sample size of 15 animals per group was determined according to a power of 80%, a survival difference of 0.5, and an α of 0.05. Repeated-measure ANOVA was used to determine statistically significant changes between groups over time. Baseline weight, time to arrest, and cyanide dose at cardiac arrest were similar in the 3 groups. Coronary perfusion pressures with chest compressions were greater than 15 mm Hg in both treatment groups indicating sufficient compression depth. Zero of 15 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0% to 25%) animals in the control group, 11 of 15 (73%; 95% CI 48% to 90%) in the hydroxocobalamin group, and 11 of 15 (73%; 95% CI 48% to 90%) in the epinephrine group survived to the conclusion of the study (P<.001). The proportion of animals with return of spontaneous circulation at 5 minutes was 4 of 15 (27%; 95% CI 10% to 52%), and that of return of spontaneous circulation at 10 minutes was 11 of 15 (73%; 95% CI 48% to 90%) in the 2 treatment groups. Additional epinephrine infusion after return of spontaneous circulation was administered for hypotension in 2 of 11 (18%; 95% CI 4% to 48

  10. Heat flux measurements and modeling of malodorous compounds above an anaerobic swine lagoon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The concentration of p-cresol and p-ethylphenol, two malodorants typical of swine waste, were measured at 0.5 m and 1.5 m above a waste treatment lagoon during two separate campaigns encompassing late winter through early spring and late spring through early summer. Concomitant collection of air te...

  11. In vivo validation of predicted and conserved T cell epitopes in a swine influenza model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection using inactivated whole-virus, subunit and alpha replicon-based vaccines do not provide broad prot...

  12. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  13. Swine dust exposure is a model for rapid induction of non-allergic neutrophil inflammation in the nasal mucosa of healthy volunteers, and the symptoms as well as the microcirculation are modified by nasal lavage.

    PubMed

    Ehnhage, Anders; Kölbeck, Karl-Gustav; Juto, Jan-Erik; Grudemo, Hans; Stjärne, Pär

    2007-12-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of non-allergic rhinitis is not clear and there is a lack of models in healthy volunteers. It has previously been shown that swine dust exposure is an excellent method for inducing inflammatory changes in the lower airways. We have shown earlier that exposure to swine dust increases the histamine sensitivity of the nasal mucosa as measured by rhinostereometry. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of swine dust exposure on nasal symptoms as well as the microcirculation. Furthermore, the effect on nasal lavage was investigated. Seventeen subjects were exposed to swine dust during a three-hour period of work in a swine house. Nasal symptoms and the nasal mucosal response to histamine before and after exposure to swine dust were evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry and nasal lavage. Exposure to swine dust increased nasal symptoms and levels of neutrophils, IL-8 and albumin. The increase in nasal symptoms and the microcirculation were modified by nasal lavage. CMBC correlated inversely with an increase in albumin (p = 0.018, R = -0.95). Swine dust exposure is a useful model for inducing nasal inflammation in healthy volunteers. Furthermore, nasal lavage modifies subjective as well as objective parameters, which should be considered when designing studies. Nasal lavage may be useful in the treatment of workers in a swine dust environment.

  14. Progression of Pro23His Retinopathy in a Miniature Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick A.; de Castro, Juan P. Fernandez; DeMarco, Paul J.; Ross, Jason W.; Njoka, Josephat; Walters, Eric; Prather, Randall S.; McCall, Maureen A.; Kaplan, Henry J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We characterize the progression of retinopathy in Filial 1 (F1) progeny of a transgenic (Tg) founder miniswine exhibiting severe Pro23His (P23H) retinopathy. Methods The F1 TgP23H miniswine progeny were created by crossing TgP23H founder miniswine 53-1 with wild type (WT) inbred miniature swine. Scotopic (rod-driven) and photopic (cone-driven) retinal functions were evaluated in F1 TgP23H and WT littermates using full field electroretinograms (ffERGs) at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of age, as well as the Tg founder miniswine at 6 years of age. Miniswine were euthanized and their retinas processed for morphologic evaluation at the light and electron microscopic level. Retinal morphology of a 36-month-old Tg miniswine also was examined. Results Wild type littermates reached mature scotopic and photopic retinal function by 3 months, while TgP23H miniswine showed abnormal scotopic ffERGs at the earliest time point, 1 month, and depressed photopic ffERGs after 2 months. Rod and cone photoreceptors (PR) exhibited morphologic abnormalities and dropout from the outer nuclear layer at 1 month, with only a monolayer of cone PR somata remaining after 2 months. The retinas showed progressive neural remodeling of the outer retina that included dendritic retraction of rod bipolar cells and glial seal formation by Müller cells. The TgP23H founder miniswine showed cone PR with relatively intact morphology exclusive to the area centralis. Conclusions The F1 Tg miniswine and the TgP23H founder miniswine exhibit similar retinopathy. Translational Relevance TgP23H miniswine are a useful large-eye model to study pathogenesis and preservation cone PRs in humans with retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:28316877

  15. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  16. A modified collagen gel dressing promotes angiogenesis in a preclinical swine model of chronic ischemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Ganesh, Kasturi; Dickerson, Jennifer; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Ghatak, Piya Das; Dixit, Sriteja; Bergdall, Valerie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2014-01-01

    We recently performed proteomic characterization of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing and reported promising effects of the gel in healing full-thickness excisional wounds. In this work, we test the translational relevance of our aforesaid findings by testing the dressing in a swine model of chronic ischemic wounds recently reported by our laboratory. Full-thickness excisional wounds were established in the center of bipedicle ischemic skin flaps on the backs of animals. Ischemia was verified by laser Doppler imaging, and MCG was applied to the test group of wounds. Seven days post wounding, macrophage recruitment to the wound was significantly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. In vitro, MCG up-regulated expression of Mrc-1 (a reparative M2 macrophage marker) and induced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and of fibroblast growth factor-basic (β-FGF). An increased expression of CCR2, an M2 macrophage marker, was noted in the macrophages from MCG treated wounds. Furthermore, analyses of wound tissues 7 days post wounding showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, von Willebrand's factor, and collagen type I expression in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. At 21 days post wounding, MCG-treated ischemic wounds displayed higher abundance of proliferating endothelial cells that formed mature vascular structures and increased blood flow to the wound. Fibroblast count was markedly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wound-edge tissue. In addition, MCG-treated wound-edge tissues displayed higher abundance of mature collagen with increased collagen type I : III deposition. Taken together, MCG helped mount a more robust inflammatory response that resolved in a timely manner, followed by an enhanced proliferative phase, angiogenic outcome, and postwound tissue remodeling. Findings of the current study warrant clinical testing of MCG in a setting of ischemic chronic wounds.

  17. Evaluation of an active vena cava filter for MR imaging in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Nils A; Immel, Erwin; Donker, Hank C W; Melzer, Andreas; Ocklenburg, Christina; Guenther, Rolf W; Buecker, Arno; Krombach, Gabriele A; Spuentrup, Elmar

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided placement of an active vena cava filter (AVCF) in a swine model, the effectiveness of the system in filtering thrombi, and the detection of thrombi with MR imaging. This study was approved by the government committee on animal investigations. An AVCF tuned to the Larmor frequency of a 1.5-T MR unit was placed in the inferior vena cava (IVC) of seven pigs under real-time MR imaging guidance. Steady-state free precession sequences with four different flip angles (90°, 40°, 25°, and 15°), T1-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences with two flip angles (90° and 15°), and black-blood proton-density-weighted sequences with a flip angle of 90° were performed before and after filter placement. In six cases, extracorporeally produced thrombi were injected through the femoral access to test filter function. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed before and after filter deployment and compared by using the signed-rank test. All AVCFs were successfully deployed. Significant differences (P < .05) in the SNR and CNR of the IVC were found before and after AVCF placement and between sequences with different flip angles. Intravenous thrombi were caught in all cases and clearly depicted with MR imaging. On black-blood proton-density-weighted images, high-signal-intensity thrombi inside the filter were clearly detectable without any overlaying artifacts. MR imaging-guided deployment and monitoring of an AVCF is feasible. The AVCF enhances the SNR and CNR, resulting in clear depiction of thrombi inside the filter without the need for contrast material. Design modifications for improved intracaval fixation and retrieval of the prototype AVCF will be required. © RSNA, 2010.

  18. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  19. Efficacy and safety of a new single-port model for appendectomy: Experimental study on swine

    PubMed Central

    Olijnyk, José Gustavo; Ferreira, Paulo Walter; Nácul, Miguel Prestes; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: With the cooperation of surgeons and the engineering division of the company Bhio supply© (Esteio-RS, Brazil), a permanent single port was developed. AIMS: An experimental study assessed the safety and efficacy of the device using a swine laparoscopic appendectomy model (right salpingo-oophorectomy). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Experimental randomised study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 pigs were randomised for the conventional laparoscopic (CL) three-trocar technique or the single Centry port (CPort) with two working channels, aided by a transparietal thread. Operative times, surgical complications, CO2 use, and pneumoperitoneal pressure were checked. Pressure and chromopertubation tests assessed the ligatures. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: For quantitative outcomes, the Fisher's exact test analysed the samples to compare the surgeons in each group, the ANOVA test for parametric data (volume and pressure) and the Student's t-test for analysis of the fascial incision length. The binaries and isolated occurrence events were described in percentages. RESULTS: For all cases, pneumoperitoneum was maintained. The CPort group, however, resulted in higher CO2 use (26.18 l; standard deviation [SD] ± 11.09) than CL group (5.69 l; SD ± 2.44) (P < 0.01). The mean pressure in CPort group (6.604 mmHg, SD ± 1.793) was comparatively lower than in CL group (7.382 mmHg, SD ± 1.833) (P = 0.363). There was no statistical difference between operative times, ligature safety or adverse surgical events between the different groups and surgeons. CONCLUSION: The surgical technique used with the single port showed no differences in safety and efficacy. Though it does require more CO2 use, its working dynamics did not lead to increased operative times. The results were similar between the two surgeons in the study, suggesting that they can be reproduced. PMID:27073304

  20. Monitoring of Liver Cell Transplantation in a Preclinical Swine Model Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf; Billecke, Nils; Zielinski, Anja; Steinz, Kirsten; Kammer, Nora N.; Morgul, Mehmet H.; Schmeisser, Sarah; Adonopoulou, Michaela K.; Morawietz, Lars; Hiebl, Bernhard; Schwartlander, Ruth; Rüdinger, Wolfgang; Hamm, Bernd; Neuhaus, Peter; Sauer, Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation (LCT) is a promising treatment approach for certain liver diseases, but clinical implementation requires methods for noninvasive follow-up. Labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles can enable the detection of cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the feasibility of monitoring transplanted liver cells by MRI in a preclinical swine model and used this approach to evaluate different routes for cell application. Liver cells were isolated from landrace piglets and labeled with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIO) in adhesion. Labeled cells (n = 10), native cells (n = 3), or pure particles (n = 4) were transplanted to minipigs via intraportal infusion into the liver, direct injection into the splenic parenchyma, or intra-arterial infusion to the spleen. Recipients were investigated by repeated 3.0 Tesla MRI and computed tomography angiography up to 8 weeks after transplantation. Labeling with MPIO, which are known to have a strong effect on the magnetic field, enabled noninvasive detection of cell aggregates by MRI. Following intraportal application, which is commonly applied for clinical LCT, MRI was able to visualize the microembolization of transplanted cells in the liver that were not detected by conventional imaging modalities. Cells directly injected into the spleen were retained, whereas cell infusions intra-arterially into the spleen led to translocation and engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver, with significantly fewer microembolisms compared to intraportal application. These findings demonstrate that MRI can be a valuable tool for noninvasive elucidation of cellular processes of LCT and—if clinically applicable MPIO are available—for monitoring of LCT under clinical conditions. Moreover, the results clarify mechanisms relevant for clinical practice of LCT, suggesting that the intra-arterial route to the spleen deserves further evaluation. PMID:27004132

  1. Application of Hyperosmotic Nanoemulsions in Wound Healing: Partial Thickness Injury Model in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Sean; Li, Jianming; Durkes, Abigail; Freeman, Lynetta

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In this work, we introduce a novel hyperosmotic nanoemulsion (HNE) topical agent for use in wound healing. These topical emulsion complexes combine a lipophilic thymol nanoemulsion with a hyperosmotic saccharide matrix. This combination has been previously shown to possess synergistic antimicrobial activity against a host of common and drug-resistant pathogens in vitro. Approach: In this study, we present additional data to assess the safety and efficacy of these emulsions in a partial thickness injury model in swine. Ten wounds sized 2 × 3.5 cm were created in 18 pigs using an electrodermatome set at a depth of 0.76 mm. The wounds were subsequently contaminated with a cocktail of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans at 5 × 107 total colony forming unit per wound. Treatments were subdivided in the control group and emulsion concentrations at 0.0%, 0.01%, 0.03%, and 0.063% thymol content. Longitudinal metrics for wound healing included rate of reepithelialization, wound bed color measurements, amount of wound exudate, wound swab culture data, and histological examination at 4, 7, and 14 days. The cosmetics of the healed wound were obtained at day 14 with three-dimensional photogrammetry. Results: Experimental results showed that HNE reduced the wound level bacteria count by ∼0.5–1 log versus controls after 24 h. The amount of pathogen reduction was weakly correlated to the concentration of the emulsion. In addition, all HNE groups maintained a moist wound environment and showed increased fibrin formation and improved hemostatic response. Innovation: No significant difference in the rate of reepithelialization or wound closure was found between treatment concentrations and control groups. HNE treatment did not demonstrate any adverse host tissue response. Conclusion: These results suggest HNE may be a candidate for reducing wound bacterial counts without compromising reepithelialization

  2. Isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Misael O; Mangual, Jan O; Ebner, Armin D; Ritter, James A

    2008-09-01

    An isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model was developed and used under physiologically relevant conditions to study implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT). A stent coil was fabricated from a ferromagnetic SS 430 wire and used to capture 100-nm diameter magnetite particles that mimicked magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). Four key cases were studied: (1) no stent and no magnet (control), (2) no magnet but with a stent, (3) no stent but with a magnet (traditional MDT), and (4) with a stent and a magnet (IA-MDT). When applied, the magnetic field was fixed at 0.125T. The performance of the system was based on the capture efficiency (CE) of the magnetite nanoparticles. The experiments done in the absence of the magnetic field showed minimal retention of any nanoparticles whether the stent was present or not. The experiments done in the presence of the magnetic field showed a statistically significant increase in the retention of the nanoparticles, with a marked difference between the traditional and IA-MDT cases. Compared to the control case, in one case there was nearly an 11-fold increase in CE for the IA-MDT case compared to only a threefold increase in CE for the traditional MDT case. This enhanced performance by the IA-MDT case was typical of all the experiments. Histology images of the cross-section of the coronary artery revealed that the nanoparticles were captured mainly in the vicinity of the stent. Overall, the IA-MDT results from this work with actual tissue were very encouraging and similar to those obtained from other non-tissue and theoretical studies; but, they did point to the need for further studies of IA-MDT.

  3. Effect of model uncertainty on failure detection - The threshold selector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emami-Naeini, Abbas; Akhter, Muhammad M.; Rock, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of all failure detection, isolation, and accomodation (DIA) algorithms is influenced by the presence of model uncertainty. A unique framework is presented to incorporate a knowledge of modeling error in the analysis and design of failure detection systems. The tools being used are very similar to those in robust control theory. A concept is introduced called the threshold selector, which is a nonlinear inequality whose solution defines the set of detectable sensor failure signals. The threshold selector represents an innovative tool for analysis and synthesis of DIA algorithms. It identifies the optimal threshold to be used in innovations-based DIA algorithms. The optimal threshold is shown to be a function of the bound on modeling errors, the noise properties, the speed of DIA filters, and the classes of reference and failure signals. The size of the smallest detectable failure is also determined. The results are applied to a multivariable turbofan jet engine example, which demonstrates improvements compared to previous studies.

  4. Effect of model uncertainty on failure detection - The threshold selector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emami-Naeini, Abbas; Akhter, Muhammad M.; Rock, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of all failure detection, isolation, and accomodation (DIA) algorithms is influenced by the presence of model uncertainty. A unique framework is presented to incorporate a knowledge of modeling error in the analysis and design of failure detection systems. The tools being used are very similar to those in robust control theory. A concept is introduced called the threshold selector, which is a nonlinear inequality whose solution defines the set of detectable sensor failure signals. The threshold selector represents an innovative tool for analysis and synthesis of DIA algorithms. It identifies the optimal threshold to be used in innovations-based DIA algorithms. The optimal threshold is shown to be a function of the bound on modeling errors, the noise properties, the speed of DIA filters, and the classes of reference and failure signals. The size of the smallest detectable failure is also determined. The results are applied to a multivariable turbofan jet engine example, which demonstrates improvements compared to previous studies.

  5. Mechanical dissociation of swine liver to produce organoid units for tissue engineering and in vitro disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Irani, Katayun; Pomerantseva, Irina; Hart, Alison R; Sundback, Cathryn A; Neville, Craig M; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    The complex intricate architecture of the liver is crucial to hepatic function. Standard protocols used for enzymatic digestion to isolate hepatocytes destroy tissue structure and result in significant loss of synthetic, metabolic, and detoxification processes. We describe a process using mechanical dissociation to generate hepatic organoids with preserved intrinsic tissue architecture from swine liver. Oxygen-supplemented perfusion culture better preserved organoid viability, morphology, serum protein synthesis, and urea production, compared with standard and oxygen-supplemented static culture. Hepatic organoids offer an alternative source for hepatic assist devices, engineered liver, disease modeling, and xenobiotic testing.

  6. Stochastic load-redistribution model for cascading failure propagation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jörg; Bernasconi, Jakob

    2010-03-01

    A class of probabilistic models for cascading failure propagation in interconnected systems is proposed. The models are able to represent important physical characteristics of realistic load-redistribution mechanisms, e.g., that the load increments after a failure depend on the load of the failing element and that they may be distributed nonuniformly among the remaining elements. In the limit of large system sizes, the models are solved analytically in terms of generalized branching processes, and the failure propagation properties of a prototype example are analyzed in detail.

  7. The Adult Göttingen Minipig as a Model for Chronic Heart Failure After Myocardial Infarction: Focus on Cardiovascular Imaging and Regenerative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Schuleri, Karl H; Boyle, Andrew J; Centola, Marco; Amado, Luciano C; Evers, Robert; Zimmet, Jeffrey M; Evers, Kristine S; Ostbye, Katherine M; Scorpio, Diana G; Hare, Joshua M; Lardo, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    Porcine models have become increasingly popular in cardiovascular research. The standard farm pig rapidly increases in body weight and size, potentially confounding serial measurements of cardiac function and morphology. We developed an adult porcine model that does not show physiologic increases in heart mass during the study period and is suitable for long-term study. We compared adult minipigs with the commonly used adolescent Yorkshire swine. Myocardial infarction was induced in adult Göttingen minipigs and adolescent Yorkshire swine by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by reperfusion. At 8 wk after infarction, the left ventricular ejection fraction was 34.1 ± 2.3% in minipigs and 30.7 ± 2.0% in Yorkshire swine. The left ventricular end-diastolic mass in Yorkshire pigs assessed by magnetic resonance imaging increased 17 ± 5 g, from 42.6 ± 4.3 g at week 1 after infarction to 52.8 ± 6.6 g at week 8, whereas it remained unchanged in minipigs. Cardiac anatomy and physiology in adult minipigs were evaluated invasively by angiography and noninvasively by Multidetector Computed Tomography and by Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T prior to myocardial infarction and during folow-up. This porcine heart failure model is reproducible, mimics the pathophysiology in patients who have experienced myocardial infarction, and is suitable for imaging studies. New heart failure therapies and devices can be tested preclinically in this adult animal model of chronic heart failure. PMID:19149414

  8. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  9. Resuscitation with lactated ringer's does not increase inflammatory response in a Swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jennifer M; Brundage, Susan I; Todd, S Rob; Zautke, Nathan A; Stefater, J A; Lam, J C; Muller, Patrick J; Malinoski, Darren; Schreiber, Martin A

    2004-09-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are widely and interchangeably used for resuscitation of trauma victims. Studies show LR to be superior to NS in the physiologic response to resuscitation. Recent in vitro studies demonstrate equivalent effects of LR and NS on leukocytes. We aimed to determine whether LR resuscitation would produce an equivalent inflammatory response compared with normal saline (NS) resuscitation in a clinically relevant swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. Thirty-two swine were randomized. Control animals (n = 6) were sacrificed following induction of anesthesia for baseline data. Sham animals (n = 6) underwent laparotomy and 2 h of anesthesia. Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock animals (n = 10/group) underwent laparotomy, grade V liver injury, and blinded resuscitation with LR or NS to maintain baseline blood pressure for 1.5 h before sacrifice. Lung was harvested, and tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were determined using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR). Sections of lung were processed and examined for neutrophils sequestered within the alveolar walls. Cytokine analysis showed no difference in IL-6 gene transcription in any group (P = 0.99). Resuscitated swine had elevated G-CSF and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but LR and NS groups were not different from each other (P= 0.96 and 0.10, respectively). Both resuscitation groups had significantly more alveolar neutrophils present than controls (P < 0.01) and shams (P < 0.05) but were not different from one another (P= 0.83). LR and NS resuscitation have equivalent effects on indices of inflammation in the lungs in our model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

  10. A Pro23His mutation alters prenatal rod photoreceptor morphology in a transgenic swine model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Scott, Patrick A; Fernandez de Castro, Juan P; Kaplan, Henry J; McCall, Maureen A

    2014-04-28

    Functional studies have detected deficits in retinal signaling in asymptomatic children from families with inherited autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whether retinal abnormalities are present earlier during gestation or shortly after birth in a subset of children with autosomal dominant RP is unknown and no appropriate animal RP model possessing visual function at birth has been available to examine this possibility. In a recently developed transgenic P23H (TgP23H) rhodopsin swine model of RP, we tracked changes in pre- and early postnatal retinal morphology, as well as early postnatal retinal function. Domestic swine inseminated with semen from a TgP23H miniswine founder produced TgP23H hybrid and wild type (Wt) littermates. Outer retinal morphology was assessed at light and electron microscopic levels between embryonic (E) and postnatal (P) day E85 to P3. Retinal function was evaluated using the full field electroretinogram at P3. Embryonic TgP23H rod photoreceptors are malformed and their rhodopsin expression pattern is abnormal. Consistent with morphological abnormalities, rod-driven function is absent at P3. In contrast, TgP23H and Wt cone photoreceptor morphology (E85-P3) and cone-driven retinal function (P3) are similar. Prenatal expression of mutant rhodopsin alters the normal morphological and functional development of rod photoreceptors in TgP23H swine embryos. Despite this significant change, cone photoreceptors are unaffected. Human infants with similarly aggressive RP might never have rod vision, although cone vision would be unaffected. Such aggressive forms of RP in preverbal children would require early intervention to delay or prevent functional blindness.

  11. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  12. Computational Failure Modeling of Lower Extremities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    bone fracture, ligament tear, and muscle rupture. While these injuries may seem well-defined through medical imaging, the process of injury and the... process of high strain rate direct axial loading that leads to bone fracture and fragmentation is investigated. 15. SUBJECT TERMS failure, lower...While these injuries may seem well-defined through medical imaging, the process of injury and the effects of vehicle system design to protection are

  13. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSCs) Improve Heart Function in Swine Myocardial Infarction Model through Paracrine Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Min; Shen, Rui; Song, Lei; Lu, Minjie; Wang, Jianguang; Zhao, Shihua; Tang, Yue; Meng, Xianmin; Li, Zongjin; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are promising for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) and large animal models should be used to better understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidences. In this study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were transplanted into swine heart ischemia model. To detect glucose metabolism in global left ventricular myocardium and regional myocardium, combined with assessment of cardiac function, positron emission tomography-computer tomography (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. To study the changes of glucose transporters and glucose metabolism-related enzymes and the signal transduction pathway, RT-PCR, Western-blot, and immunohistochemistry were carried out. Myocardium metabolic evaluation by PET-CT showed that mean signal intensity (MSI) increased in these segments at week 4 compared with that at week 1 after BM-MSCs transplantation. Moreover, MRI demonstrated significant function enhancement in BM-MSCs group. The gene expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT4), glucose metabolism-related enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k) in BM-MSCs injected areas were up-regulated at week 4 after BM-MSCs transplantation and this was confirmed by Western-blot and immunohistochemistry. In conclusions, BM-MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function in swine MI model by activation of mTOR signal transduction pathway. PMID:27321050

  14. Novel use of noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasonography for intercostal nerve neurolysis in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Gutta, Narendra B; Ezell, Paula C; Monette, Sébastien; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive thermal ablation technique. High-intensity focused ultrasound has been used in small-animal models to lesion neural tissue selectively. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of HIFU in a large-animal model for ablation of nerves similar in size to human nerves. Twelve acute magnetic resonance-guided HIFU ablation lesions were created in intercostal nerves in a swine model. In a second pig, as a control, 4 radiofrequency ablation and 4 alcohol lesions were performed on intercostal nerves under ultrasound guidance. Preprocedural and postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging was then performed to evaluate radiologically the lesion size created by HIFU. Animals were euthanized 1 hour postprocedure, and necropsy was performed to collect tissue samples for histopathologic analysis. On gross and histological examination of the intercostal nerve, acute HIFU nerve lesions showed evidence of well-demarcated, acute, focally extensive thermal necrosis. Four intercostal nerves ablated with HIFU were sent for histopathologic analysis, with 2 of 4 lesions showing pathologic damage to the intercostal nerve. Similar results were shown with radiofrequency ablation technique, whereas the intercostal nerves appeared histologically intact with alcohol ablation. High-intensity focused ultrasound may be used as a noninvasive neurolytic technique in swine. High-intensity focused ultrasound may have potential as a neuroablation technique for patients with chronic and cancer pain.

  15. Control of endemic swine flu persistence in farrow-to-finish pig farms: a stochastic metapopulation modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Cador, Charlie; Andraud, Mathieu; Willem, Lander; Rose, Nicolas

    2017-10-03

    Swine influenza viruses (swIAVs) are known to persist endemically in farrow-to-finish pig farms, leading to repeated swine flu outbreaks in successive batches of pigs at a similar age (mostly around 8 weeks of age). This persistence in European swine herds involves swIAVs from European lineages including H1avN1, H1huN2, H3N2, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus and their reassortants. The specific population dynamics of farrow-to-finish pig farms, the immune status of the animals at infection-time, the co-circulation of distinct subtypes leading to consecutive or concomitant infections have been evidenced as factors favouring swIAV persistence within herds. We developed a stochastic metapopulation model representing the co-circulation of two distinct swIAVs within a typical farrow-to-finish pig herd to evaluate the risk of reassortant viruses generation due to co-infection events. Control strategies related to herd management and/or vaccination schemes (batch-to-batch or mass vaccination of the sow herd and vaccination of growing pigs) were implemented to assess their relative efficacy regarding viral persistence. The overall probability of a co-infection event for France, possibly leading to reassortment, was evaluated to 16.8%. The export of consecutive piglets batches was identified as the most efficient measure facilitating swIAV infection fade-out. Although some vaccination schemes (batch-to-batch vaccination) had a beneficial effect in breeding sows by reducing the persistence of swIAVs within this subpopulation, none of vaccination strategies achieved swIAVs fade-out within the entire farrow-to-finish pig herd.

  16. Miniature Swine for Preclinical Modeling of Complexities of Human Disease for Translational Scientific Discovery and Accelerated Development of Therapies and Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Dominic T; Tellez, Armando; Meudt, Jennifer J; Brady, Dane A; Dillon, Krista N; Arowolo, Folagbayi K; Wicks, Joan; Rousselle, Serge D; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan

    2016-04-01

    Noncommunicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer, are the leading cause of death in the world. The cost, both monetary and time, of developing therapies to prevent, treat, or manage these diseases has become unsustainable. A contributing factor is inefficient and ineffective preclinical research, in which the animal models utilized do not replicate the complex physiology that influences disease. An ideal preclinical animal model is one that responds similarly to intrinsic and extrinsic influences, providing high translatability and concordance of preclinical findings to humans. The overwhelming genetic, anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological similarities to humans make miniature swine an ideal model for preclinical studies of human disease. Additionally, recent development of precision gene-editing tools for creation of novel genetic swine models allows the modeling of highly complex pathophysiology and comorbidities. As such, the utilization of swine models in early research allows for the evaluation of novel drug and technology efficacy while encouraging redesign and refinement before committing to clinical testing. This review highlights the appropriateness of the miniature swine for modeling complex physiologic systems, presenting it as a highly translational preclinical platform to validate efficacy and safety of therapies and devices.

  17. The retina rapidly incorporates ingested C20-D3-vitamin A in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Doina M.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Blaner, William S.; Romanov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine how the retina uses vitamin A for vision, we studied the flux of oral vitamin A into and out of the swine retina. Methods We administered labeled vitamin A to swine daily for 30 days and measured the percent of the labeled vitamin A to native unlabeled vitamin A in the retinal epithelium, neuroretina, plasma, liver, lung, and kidney. Results We show that during normal vitamin A homeostasis, the retina rapidly assimilates newly ingested dietary vitamin A, which replaces native vitamin A. Retinal vitamin A is turned over faster than previously thought. Provitamin A carotenoids do not significantly contribute to retinal vitamin A pools when consuming diets adequate in vitamin A. Conclusions Fast vitamin A turnover in the retina has direct implications for emerging therapies to prevent major forms of blindness based on controlling the concentrations of retinal vitamin A. PMID:23914132

  18. In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Model (PolyFermS) of the Swine Proximal Colon for Simultaneous Testing on the Same Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Sabine A.; Zihler Berner, Annina; Rigozzi, Eugenia; Grattepanche, Franck; Chassard, Christophe; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling provides a useful platform for a fast and reproducible assessment of treatment-related changes. Currently, pig intestinal fermentation models are mainly batch models with important inherent limitations. In this study we developed a novel in vitro continuous fermentation model, mimicking the porcine proximal colon, which we validated during 54 days of fermentation. This model, based on our recent PolyFermS design, allows comparing different treatment effects on the same microbiota. It is composed of a first-stage inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal swine microbiota and used to constantly inoculate (10% v/v) five second-stage reactors, with all reactors fed with fresh nutritive chyme medium and set to mimic the swine proximal colon. Reactor effluents were analyzed for metabolite concentrations and bacterial composition by HPLC and quantitative PCR, and microbial diversity was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing. The novel PolyFermS featured stable microbial composition, diversity and metabolite production, consistent with bacterial activity reported for swine proximal colon in vivo. The constant inoculation provided by the inoculum reactor generated reproducible microbial ecosystems in all second-stage reactors, allowing the simultaneous investigation and direct comparison of different treatments on the same porcine gut microbiota. Our data demonstrate the unique features of this novel PolyFermS design for the swine proximal colon. The model provides a tool for efficient, reproducible and cost-effective screening of environmental factors, such as dietary additives, on pig colonic fermentation. PMID:24709947

  19. [Regularity of agonal respiration after untreated cardiac arrest in a swine model].

    PubMed

    Tongying, Liu; Lixiang, Wang; Yahua, Liu; Ye, Cui; Chan, Chen; Yuanli, Jiang; Manhong, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To explore the regularity of incidence of agonal respiration (AR) and agonal respiration frequency rate (ARFR) during untreated cardiac arrest (CA) after ventricular fibrillation (VF) in a swine model. Ten healthy male domestic pigs weighing (25.0 ± 3.0) kg were employed in this experiment. VF was induced by intraventricular shock with alternating current without treatment for 8 minutes. The incidence of AR and ARFR per minute were recorded for 8 minutes. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 19.0 system software. AR occurred in all animals after VF induced CA within 8 minutes. There was 1 animal showed AR at the first minute with ARFR (0.2 ± 0.1) times/min, 4 animals showed AR at the second minute with ARFR (1.2 ± 1.0) times/min, 7 animals showed AR at the third minute with ARFR (2.7 ± 1.4) times/min, all animals showed AR at the fourth to fifth minute with ARFR (3.7 ± 1.6) times/min and (3.2 ± 1.9) times/min, 7 animals showed AR at the sixth minute with ARFR (1.3 ± 1.0) times/min, no animal showed AR at the seventh minute, and 1 animal showed AR at the eighth minute with ARFR (0.2 ± 0.1) times/min. The first and the last AR were observed at (2.02 ± 0.84) minutes and (5.21 ± 1.12) minutes respectively. Occurrence of AR reached its peak at the fourth to fifth minute, and it was absent at the seventh minute. ARFR after CA showed a crescendo-decrescendo pattern, which increased from (0.2 ± 0.1) times/min to (3.7 ± 1.6) times/min followed by a fall to (0.2 ± 0.1) times/min. AR is one of the symbolic signs after CA. AR occurred in all animals during untreated VF, and it reaches its peak at the fourth to fifth minute, with a crescendo-decrescendo pattern of ARFR. Effective identification and treatment in victim with AR timely can help to improve the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival rate.

  20. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of illness at all. How common is swine flu among pigs? H1N1 and H3N2 swine flu viruses are endemic among pig populations in the ... and winter) , but can occur year round. While H1N1 swine viruses have been ... least 1930, H3N2 influenza viruses did not begin circulating among pigs in ...

  1. Spatio-temporal modeling of the African swine fever epidemic in the Russian Federation, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Korennoy, F I; Gulenkin, V M; Malone, J B; Mores, C N; Dudnikov, S A; Stevenson, M A

    2014-10-01

    In 2007 African swine fever (ASF) entered Georgia and in the same year the disease entered the Russian Federation. From 2007 to 2012 ASF spread throughout the southern region of the Russian Federation. At the same time several cases of ASF were detected in the central and northern regions of the Russian Federation, forming a northern cluster of outbreaks in 2011. This northern cluster is of concern because of its proximity to mainland Europe. The aim of this study was to use details of recorded ASF outbreaks and human and swine population details to estimate the spatial distribution of ASF risk in the southern region of the European part of the Russian Federation. Our model of ASF risk was comprised of two components. The first was an estimate of ASF suitability scores calculated using maximum entropy methods. The second was an estimate of ASF risk as a function of Euclidean distance from index cases. An exponential distribution fitted to a frequency histogram of the Euclidean distance between consecutive ASF cases had a mean value of 156 km, a distance greater than the surveillance zone radius of 100-150 km stated in the ASF control regulations for the Russian Federation. We show that the spatial and temporal risk of ASF expansion is related to the suitability of the area of potential expansion, which is in turn a function of socio-economic and geographic variables. We propose that the methodology presented in this paper provides a useful tool to optimize surveillance for ASF in affected areas.

  2. The effects of sternal intraosseous and intravenous administration of amiodarone in a hypovolemic swine cardiac arrest model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samuel; Borgkvist, Bradley; Kist, Teara; Annelin, Jason; Johnson, Don; Long, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of amiodarone via sternal intraosseous (SIO) and intravenous (IV) routes on return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), time to ROSC, concentration maximum (Cmax), time to maximum concentration (Tmax), and mean concentrations over time in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Prospective, between subjects, randomized experimental design. TriService Research Facility. Yorkshire-cross swine (n = 28). Swine were anesthetized and placed into cardiac arrest. After 2 minutes, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated. After an additional 2 minutes, amiodarone 300 mg was administered via the tibial intraosseous TIO or the IV route. Blood samples were collected over 5 minutes. The plasma concentrations were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. ROSC, time to ROSC, Cmax, Tmax, and mean concentrations over time. A multivariate analyses of variance indicated that there were no significant differences in the SIO and IV groups in ROSC (p = 0.191), time to ROSC (p > 0.05), Tmax mean 88.1 ± 24.8 seconds versus 49.5 ± 21.8 seconds (p = 0.317), or Cmax mean 92,700 ± 161,112 ng/mL versus 64,159.8 ± 14,174.8 ng/mL (p = 0.260). A repeated analyses of variance indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups relative to concentrations over time (p > 0.05). The SIO provides rapid and reliable access to administer life-saving medications during cardiac arrest.

  3. A failure model for sealed nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.; Cizmecioglu, M.; Hong, S. D.; Gupta, A.; Moacanin, J.

    1982-01-01

    A model has been developed to describe failure in electrochemical batteries. The model is based on the concept of the existence and subsequent growth of flaws which ultimately lead to battery failure. This model provides, in a natural way, for the statistical variability of lifetime data. The model as applied to the Crane data indicates that when the effects of temperature and depth of discharge are taken into account, the observed variability in lifetime data is due almost entirely to statistical variability inherent in the battery itself.

  4. Modeling Common Cause Failures of Thrusters on ISS Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haught, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology used to model common cause failures of thrusters on the International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicles. The ISS Visiting Vehicles each have as many as 32 thrusters, whose redundancy makes them susceptible to common cause failures. The Global Alpha Model (as described in NUREG/CR-5485) can be used to represent the system common cause contribution, but NUREG/CR-5496 supplies global alpha parameters for groups only up to size six. Because of the large number of redundant thrusters on each vehicle, regression is used to determine parameter values for groups of size larger than six. An additional challenge is that Visiting Vehicle thruster failures must occur in specific combinations in order to fail the propulsion system; not all failure groups of a certain size are critical.

  5. Modeling Common Cause Failures of Thrusters on ISS Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haught, Megan; Duncan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology used to model common cause failures of thrusters on the International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicles. The ISS Visiting Vehicles each have as many as 32 thrusters, whose redundancy and similar design make them susceptible to common cause failures. The Global Alpha Model (as described in NUREG/CR-5485) can be used to represent the system common cause contribution, but NUREG/CR-5496 supplies global alpha parameters for groups only up to size six. Because of the large number of redundant thrusters on each vehicle, regression is used to determine parameter values for groups of size larger than six. An additional challenge is that Visiting Vehicle thruster failures must occur in specific combinations in order to fail the propulsion system; not all failure groups of a certain size are critical.

  6. Instrumented failure of hillslope models with soil-pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Raj H.; Konietzky, Heinz

    2011-07-01

    Soil-pipes (porous pipes inside a hillslope) are often detected in collapsed slopes indicating their influence on slope failure processes. Only limited studies can be found regarding the impacts of soil-pipes on landslide mechanisms. Hillslope models prepared in a flume are experimented with different soil-pipe configurations: a) no pipe, b) closed pipe and c) open pipe. Pore-water pressures were measured at six different locations along a slope. Discharges at the outlet of soil-pipe and groundwater seepage were also recorded. For the above mentioned pipe configurations two types of experiments were conducted: a) rainfall-induced failure and b) seepage-induced failure. Experimental results show that a closed pipe accumulates water around its lower end and continuously increases pore-water pressure till a failure. An open pipe works as a means of hillslope drainage and reduces the pore-water pressure of an entire slope. However, if open pipe is blocked, pore-water pressure close to its lower end rises rapidly, leading to immediate soil mass movement. For both seepage and rainfall-induced failure experiments, the maximum pressure before the failure was larger at a slope with an open pipe (once it is closed) than a slope with a pipe closed from the beginning or that without a soil-pipe. This indicates that the blockage of soil-pipes makes a slope more susceptible to failure. Displacement vectors show that soil movement velocity close to the surface was highest at slopes with open pipes after closure and lowest at slopes without pipes because of a higher degree of saturation and pore-water pressure at the time of failure of the former. Before a large failure, small fluctuations in pore-water pressure were also observed which can be an indicator of impending failure.

  7. Product component genealogy modeling and field-failure prediction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Caleb; Hong, Yili; Meeker, William Q.

    2016-04-13

    Many industrial products consist of multiple components that are necessary for system operation. There is an abundance of literature on modeling the lifetime of such components through competing risks models. During the life-cycle of a product, it is common for there to be incremental design changes to improve reliability, to reduce costs, or due to changes in availability of certain part numbers. These changes can affect product reliability but are often ignored in system lifetime modeling. By incorporating this information about changes in part numbers over time (information that is readily available in most production databases), better accuracy can be achieved in predicting time to failure, thus yielding more accurate field-failure predictions. This paper presents methods for estimating parameters and predictions for this generational model and a comparison with existing methods through the use of simulation. Our results indicate that the generational model has important practical advantages and outperforms the existing methods in predicting field failures.

  8. Failure analysis and modeling of a VAXcluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Dong; Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Subramani, Sujatha S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a measurement-based analysis of real error data collected from a DEC VAXcluster multicomputer system. In addition to evaluating basic system dependability characteristics such as error and failure distributions and hazard rates for both individual machines and for the VAXcluster, reward models were developed to analyze the impact of failures on the system as a whole. The results show that more than 46 percent of all failures were due to errors in shared resources. This is despite the fact that these errors have a recovery probability greater than 0.99. The hazard rate calculations show that not only errors, but also failures occur in bursts. Approximately 40 percent of all failures occur in bursts and involved multiple machines. This result indicates that correlated failures are significant. Analysis of rewards shows that software errors have the lowest reward (0.05 vs 0.74 for disk errors). The expected reward rate (reliability measure) of the VAXcluster drops to 0.5 in 18 hours for the 7-out-of-7 model and in 80 days for the 3-out-of-7 model.

  9. Preventing Phrenic Nerve Stimulation by a Patch Insulation in an Intact Swine Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Wen; Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chien-Ming; Wang, Kuo-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) could be prevented by a silastic patch over the epicardial lead. We studied the effects in preventing PNS by placing a silastic patch directly over an epicardial lead or placing a graft around the phrenic nerve (PN). Methods and Results Fourteen Lanyu swine were enrolled. A bipolar lead was placed epicardially on the left ventricle (LV) inferior to the PN. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) lead was placed into the right ventricle (RV). The maximal influential distance (MID) was measured under 3 pacing configurations to express the influential electrical field on the PN. The threshold of the LV and PN were evaluated epicardially. Then, PTFE patches of different sizes (10×10 mm, 20×20 mm and 30×30 mm) were placed between the LV lead and PN to study the rise in PN threshold in 7 swine. On the other hand, the PN were surrounded by a PTFE graft of different lengths (10 mm, 20 mm, and 30 mm) in the remaining 7 swine. LV-bipolar pacing showed the shortest MID when compared to the other 2 unipolar pacing configurations at pacing voltage of 10 V. The patch was most effective in preventing PNS during LV-bipolar pacing. PNS was prevented under all circumstances with a larger PTFE patch (30×30 mm) or long graft (30 mm). Conclusions PNS was avoided by placing a PTFE patch over the LV lead or a graft around the PN despite pacing configurations. Hence if PNS persisted during CRT implantation, a PTFE patch on the LV lead or a graft around the PN could be considered. PMID:25033271

  10. Variation in arsenic bioavailability in rice genotypes using swine model: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiqul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Duan, Luchun; Islam, M R; Kuchel, Tim; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-12-01

    An in vivo assay using swine was used to measure the absolute bioavailability (AB) of As from cooked rice of twelve genotypes commonly grown in Bangladesh. An assessment of both total As in rice and its bioavailability is crucial for estimating human exposure following dietary intake by the local community. Average As concentrations in each rice genotype ranged from 108±4μg/kg to 580±6μg/kg. Arsenic speciation shows that most of the rice genotype contains 73 to 100% inorganic As. Swine were administered with As orally and via intravenous method, i.e. injection and fed certain common Bangladeshi rice genotypes (cooked). Swine blood As levels were measured to calculate As bioavailability from rice. Pilot studies shows that for As(III) and As(V), 90.8±12.4% and 85.0±19.2% of the administered oral dose was absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract whereas organic As was poorly absorbed resulting in low bioavailability values 20.2±2.6% (MMA) to 31.2±3.4% (DMA), respectively. These studies demonstrates that rice genotypic characters influenced As bioavailability in rice grown in As-contaminated areas and the bioavailability varied between 25% and 94%. Arsenic in salt tolerant rice genotypes Binadhan-10 and BRRI dhan47 as well as brown rice genotypes Kheali Boro and Local Boro has lower bioavailability (<50%) compared to other rice genotypes. The most commonly cultivated and consumed variety (BRRI dhan28) has As bioavailability of 70%, which poses a significant risk to consumers. Calculation of maximum tolerable daily intake (MTDI) for humans due to consumption of rice based on bioavailability data was higher than those calculated based on inorganic and organic As concentration in rice genotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diet-induced swine model with obesity/leptin resistance for the study of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rovira, L; Astiz, S; Caro, A; Lopez-Bote, C; Ovilo, C; Pallares, P; Perez-Solana, M L; Sanchez-Sanchez, R; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases.

  12. Diet-Induced Swine Model with Obesity/Leptin Resistance for the Study of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rovira, L.; Astiz, S.; Caro, A.; Lopez-Bote, C.; Ovilo, C.; Pallares, P.; Perez-Solana, M. L.; Sanchez-Sanchez, R.; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the suitability of a swine breed with leptin resistance and predisposition to obesity (the Iberian pig) as model for studies on metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Thus, six Iberian sows had ad libitum access to food enriched with saturated fat (SFAD group; food consumption was estimated to be 4.5 kg/animal/day) whilst four females acted as controls and were fed with 2 kg/animal/day of a commercial maintenance diet. After three months of differential feeding, SFAD animals developed central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, and elevated blood pressure; the five parameters associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the current study characterizes the Iberian pig as a robust, amenable, and reliable translational model for studies on nutrition-associated diseases. PMID:22629144

  13. Swine production.

    PubMed

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  14. Prediction failure of a wolf landscape model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    I compared 101 wolf (Canis lupus) pack territories formed in Wisconsin during 1993-2004 to the logistic regression predictive model of Mladenoff et al. (1995, 1997, 1999). Of these, 60% were located in putative habitat suitabilities 50% remained unoccupied by known packs after 24 years of recolonization. This model was a poor predictor of wolf re-colonizing locations in Wisconsin, apparently because it failed to consider the adaptability of wolves. Such models should be used cautiously in wolf-management or restoration plans.

  15. Modeling failure of soft anisotropic materials with application to arteries.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2011-11-01

    The arterial wall is a composite where the preferred orientation of collagen fibers induces anisotropy. Though the hyperelastic theories of fiber-reinforced composites reached a high level of sophistication and showed a reasonable correspondence with the available experimental data they are short of the failure description. Following the tradition of strength of materials the failure criteria are usually separated from stress analysis. In the present work we incorporate a failure description in the hyperelastic models of soft anisotropic materials by introducing energy limiters in the strain energy functions. The limiters provide the saturation value for the strain energy which indicates the maximum energy that can be stored and dissipated by an infinitesimal material volume. By using some popular constitutive models enhanced with the energy limiters we analyze rupture of a sheet of arterial material under the plane stress state varying from the uniaxial to equal biaxial tension. We calculate the local failure criteria including the maximum principal stress, the maximum principal stretch, the von Mises stress, and the strain energy at the moment of the sheet rupture. We find that the local failure criterion in the form of the critical strain energy is the most robust among the considered ones. We also find that the tensile strength-the maximum principal stress-that is usually obtained in uniaxial tension tests might not be appropriate as a failure indicator in the cases of the developed biaxiality of the stress-strain state. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Wood-adhesive bonding failure : modeling and simulation

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of wood bonding failure when exposed to wet conditions or wet/dry cycles is not fully understood and the role of the resulting internal stresses exerted upon the wood-adhesive bondline has yet to be quantitatively determined. Unlike previous modeling this study has developed a new two-dimensional internal-stress model on the basis of the mechanics of...

  17. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  18. Adipose-derived stem cell sheet transplantation therapy in a porcine model of chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Osamu; Hagino, Ikuo; Nagaya, Noritoshi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo; Sawa, Yoshiki; Mori, Hidezo; Yagihara, Toshikatsu

    2015-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a promising resource for cell transplantation therapy for damaged heart tissue. Cell death in the graft early after transplantation represents the main cause of unsatisfactory therapeutic efficacy, but tissue-engineered cell sheets grown in temperature-responsive cell culture dishes may enable improved engraftment of transplanted cells. We investigated the therapeutic potential of this method in chronic myocardial ischemia in swine. We created a porcine model of chronic heart failure by implanting an ameroid constrictor around the main trunk of the left anterior descending artery, just distal to the circumflex branch. Simultaneously, ASCs were obtained from a piece of subcutaneous adipose tissue and expanded to form ASC sheets using temperature-responsive dishes. Four weeks after ameroid constrictor placement, triple-layered ASC sheets were transplanted onto the area of the ischemic myocardium (sheet group, n = 7). Controls (n = 7) received no sheet. Just before and 4 weeks after transplantation, left ventriculography (LVG) and coronary angiography (CAG) were performed. LVG revealed a significant improvement in the left ventricular ejection fraction of the sheet group compared with controls (47.6 ± 2.9% vs 41.4 ± 2.8%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, development of collateral vessels was only detected in the sheet group with right CAG. Histologic analysis demonstrated that engrafted ASC sheets grew to form a thickened layer that included newly formed vessels. ASC sheet transplantation therapy is an intriguing therapeutic method for ischemic heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydroxocobalamin versus sodium thiosulfate for the treatment of acute cyanide toxicity in a swine (Sus scrofa) model.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Pitotti, Rebecca L; Dixon, Patricia; Lairet, Julio R; Bush, Anneke; Tanen, David A

    2012-06-01

    We compare the efficacy of hydroxocobalamin to sodium thiosulfate to reverse the depressive effects on mean arterial pressure in a swine model of acute cyanide toxicity and gain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of the hydroxocobalamin in reversal of the toxicity. Swine were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented with central arterial and venous lines and a pulmonary artery catheter. Animals (n=36) were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: hydroxocobalamin alone (150 mg/kg), sodium thiosulfate alone (413 mg/kg), or hydroxocobalamin (150 mg/kg)+sodium thiosulfate (413 mg/kg) and monitored for 60 minutes after the start of antidotal infusion. Cyanide was infused until severe hypotension developed, defined as blood pressure 50% of baseline mean arterial pressure. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to determine statistically significant changes between groups over time. Time to hypotension (25, 28, and 33 minutes), cyanide dose at hypotension (4.7, 5.0, and 5.6 mg/kg), and mean cyanide blood levels (3.2, 3.7, and 3.8 μg/mL) and lactate levels (7, 8.2, 8.3 and mmol/L) were similar. All 12 animals in the sodium thiosulfate group died compared with 2 of 12 in the hydroxocobalamin/sodium thiosulfate group and 1 of 12 in hydroxocobalamin group. No statistically significant differences were detected between the hydroxocobalamin and hydroxocobalamin/sodium thiosulfate groups for carbon monoxide, mean arterial pressure, cyanide levels, or mortality at 60 minutes. Lactate level (2.6 versus 2.1 mmol/L), pH (7.44 versus 7.42), and bicarbonate level (25 versus 26 mEq/L) at 60 minutes were also similar between groups. Sodium thiosulfate failed to reverse cyanide-induced shock in our swine model of severe cyanide toxicity. Further, sodium thiosulfate was not found to be effective when added to hydroxocobalamin in the treatment of cyanide-induced shock. Hydroxocobalamin alone was again found to be effective for severe cyanide toxicity. Copyright © 2012. Published

  20. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cowled, Brendan D; Garner, M Graeme; Negus, Katherine; Ward, Michael P

    2012-01-16

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  1. Natural IgM Blockade Limits Infarct Expansion and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in a Swine Myocardial Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    Sihag, Smita; Haas, Michael S.; Kim, Karen M.; Guerrero, J. Luis; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Alicot, Elisabeth M.; Schuerpf, Franziska; Gottschall, James D.; Puro, Robyn J.; Madsen, Joren C.; Sachs, David H.; Newman, Walter; Carroll, Michael C.; Allan, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, treatment of acute coronary occlusion inevitably results in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Circulating natural IgM has been shown to play a significant role in mouse models of I/R injury. A highly conserved self-antigen, non-muscle myosin heavy chain II (NMHC-II), has been identified as a target of pathogenic IgM. We hypothesized that a monoclonal antibody (m21G6) directed against NMHC-II may inhibit IgM binding and reduce injury in a pre-clinical model of myocardial infarction (MI). Thus, our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous m21G6 treatment in limiting infarct expansion, troponin release, and left ventricular dysfunction in a swine MI model. Methods and Results MGH miniature swine underwent occlusion of the mid left anterior descending coronary artery for 60min, followed by 1h, 5d, or 21d reperfusion. Specificity and localization of m21G6 to injured myocardium were confirmed using fluorescently labeled m21G6. Treatment with m21G6 prior to reperfusion resulted in a 49% reduction in infarct size (p<0.005) and a 61% reduction in troponin-T levels (p<0.05) in comparison to saline controls at 5d reperfusion. Furthermore, m21G6 treated animals recovered 85.4% of their baseline left ventricular function as measured by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D TTE) in contrast to 67.1% in controls at 21d reperfusion (p<0.05). Conclusions Treatment with m21G6 significantly reduced infarct size and troponin-T release, and led to marked preservation of cardiac function in our study. Overall, these findings suggest that pathogenic IgM blockade represents a valid therapeutic strategy in mitigating myocardial I/R injury. PMID:26671971

  2. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (< 2 herds per day) in an epidemic wave along contiguous habitat for several years, before dying out (when the epidemic arrived at the end of a contiguous sub-population or at a low density wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain

  3. Effect of Erythropoietin on Postresuscitation Renal Function in a Swine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kouskouni, Evangelia; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Kaparos, Georgios; Barouxis, Dimitrios; Lelovas, Pavlos; Kotsilianou, Olympia; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Gkiokas, Georgios; Garosa, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of EPO administration on postresuscitation renal function. Methods. Twenty-four female Landrace/Large-White piglets aged 10–15 weeks with average weight of 19 ± 2 kg were randomly assigned to 2 different groups of 12 subjects each. After the end of an 8-minute ventricular fibrillation, the control group (Group C) received saline as placebo, whereas the EPO group (Group E) received EPO 5000 U/kg. The animals were resuscitated according to the 2010 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation. Results. Five animals (41.67%) from Group C and 11 animals (91.67%) from Group E achieved ROSC (p = 0.027). Eight animals (66.67%, 5 surviving and 3 nonsurviving) from Group C suffered severe kidney damage or AKI compared to animals from Group E, in which none of the swine had evidence of severe kidney damage or AKI (p = 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in all tested biochemical markers between the two groups, as well as a positive correlation of creatinine with NGAL, L-FABP, and IL-18 (summed mean values' p = 0.049, 0.01, and 0.004, resp.). Conclusions. Administration of EPO protected swine from postresuscitation acute kidney injury. PMID:27847811

  4. Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Procedure in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, Jacqueline; Davies, Roger P.

    2004-01-15

    A new method is described for guiding hepato-portalvenous puncture using a longitudinal side-view intravascular ultrasound(L-IVUS) transducer to assist in the performance of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in three Australian swine.Simultaneous L-IVUS with an AcuNav (registered) 5-10 MHz 10 Fr transducer(Acuson Corporation, Mountain View, CA, USA) and fluoroscopy guidance was used to image and monitor the hepatic to portal venous puncture,dilatation of the tract, and deployment of the TIPS stent. Flow through the shunt could be demonstrated with both L-IVUS and angiography. TIPS was successful in all swine. The time for portal vein puncture once the target portal vein was identified was reduced at each attempt. The number of portal vein puncture attempts was 2, 1, and 1. No post-procedural complication was evident. L-IVUS-guided TIPS is practical and has the potential to improve safety by permitting simultaneous ultrasound and fluoroscopic imaging of the needle and target vascular structures. This technique allows for a more streamlined approach to TIPS, decreasing the fluoroscopic time (hence,decreasing the radiation exposure to the staff and patient) and anesthetic time. In addition, there are improved safety benefits obviating the need for wedged portography, facilitating avoidance of bile duct and hepatic arterial puncture, and minimizing hepatic injury by decreasing liver capsular puncture and the attendant risks.

  5. Application of an in vivo swine model for the determination of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Albert L; Smith, Euan; Weber, John; Rees, Matthew; Rofe, Allan; Kuchel, Tim; Sansom, Lloyd; Naidu, Ravi

    2008-05-01

    Considerable information is available in the literature regarding the uptake of arsenic (As) from contaminated soil and irrigation water by vegetables. However, few studies have investigated As speciation in these crops while a dearth of information is available on As bioavailability following their consumption. In this study, the concentration and speciation of As in chard, radish, lettuce and mung beans was determined following hydroponic growth of the vegetables using As-contaminated water. In addition, As bioavailability was assessed using an in vivo swine feeding assay. While As concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 84.2mg As kg(-1) (dry weight), only inorganic As (arsenite and arsenate) was detected in the edible portions of the vegetables. When As bioavailability was assessed through monitoring blood plasma As concentrations following swine consumption of As-contaminated vegetables, between 50% and 100% of the administered As dose was absorbed and entered systemic circulation. Arsenic bioavailability decreased in the order mung beans>radish>lettuce=chard.

  6. Effects of benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid on balloon-injured arteries in a swine model of restenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, G. Michael; Fox, Jolene; Johnson, Suzanne; Maragon, Phillipe

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated benzoporphyrin derivative verteporfin (BPD) photodynamic therapy (PDT) and dark effect on the intima (I) and media (M) hyperplasia (H) response of swine iliac arteries to balloon dilatation (Bdil) injury. Four month old Yucatan swine received bdil at 8 ATM pressure to all four iliac arteries. Pigs were randomly assigned to groups. PDT was performed with intraluminal 690 nm, cw laser (200 milliwatts and 30 joules per cm2 tissue). Six weeks later, sites were pressure fixed, and excised at autopsy. Sections from each site were evaluated for I and M thickness, injury score (1 equals normal, 4 equals worst), and smooth muscle cell (SMC) intensity and distribution. Groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Means for each parameter were determined, and group means used for statistical analysis. Conclusions: (1) Bdil produced IH and MH. (2) PDT enhanced IH. (3) 2 mg/kg BPD reduced MH and produced a favorable trend in IH and injury. (4) No differences in SMC intensity and distribution were present.

  7. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  8. Semi-parametric estimation in failure time mixture models.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J M

    1995-09-01

    A mixture model is an attractive approach for analyzing failure time data in which there are thought to be two groups of subjects, those who could eventually develop the endpoint and those who could not develop the endpoint. The proposed model is a semi-parametric generalization of the mixture model of Farewell (1982). A logistic regression model is proposed for the incidence part of the model, and a Kaplan-Meier type approach is used to estimate the latency part of the model. The estimator arises naturally out of the EM algorithm approach for fitting failure time mixture models as described by Larson and Dinse (1985). The procedure is applied to some experimental data from radiation biology and is evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation study. The simulation study suggests the semi-parametric procedure is almost as efficient as the correct fully parametric procedure for estimating the regression coefficient in the incidence, but less efficient for estimating the latency distribution.

  9. Human recombinant relaxin reduces heart injury and improves ventricular performance in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Perna, Avio-Maria; Masini, Emanuela; Nistri, Silvia; Bani Sacchi, Tatiana; Bigazzi, Mario; Bani, Daniele

    2005-05-01

    This study shows that relaxin can be effective in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. In a swine model of heart ischemia-reperfusion currently used to test cardiotropic drugs because of its similarities with human myocardial infarction, human recombinant relaxin (2.5 and 5 microg/kg body weight), given at reperfusion after a 30-min ischemia, markedly reduced the main serum markers of myocardial damage (myoglobin, CK-MB, and troponin T) and the metabolic and histopathologic parameters of myocardial inflammation and cardiomyocyte injury, resulting in overall improvement of ventricular performance (increased cardiac index) compared to the controls. These results provide a background for future clinical trials with human relaxin as adjunctive therapy to catheter-based coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  10. Association of the host immune response with protection using a live attenuated African swine fever virus model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a lethal disease of swine. Infection with attenuated strains protect against challenge but there is limited knowledge of the immune mechanisms generating that protection. ASFV Pret4 produces a fatal disease, while its derivative, lacking virulence-associated g...

  11. Non-local models for ductile failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César de Sá, José; Azinpour, Erfan; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Ductile damage can be dealt with continuous descriptions of material, resorting, for example, to continuous damage mechanic descriptions or micromechanical constitutive models. When it comes to describe material behaviour near and beyond fracture these approaches are no longer sufficient or valid and continuous/discontinuous approaches can be adopted to track fracture initiation and propagation. Apart from more pragmatic solutions like element erosion or remeshing techniques more advanced approaches based on the X-FEM concept, in particular associated with non-local formulations, may be adopted to numerically model these problems. Nevertheless, very often, for practical reasons, some important aspects are somewhat left behind, specially energetic requirements to promote the necessary transition of energy release associated with material damage and fracture energy associated to a crack creation and evolution. Phase-field methods may combine advantages of regularised continuous models by providing a similar description to non-local thermodynamical continuous damage mechanics, as well as, a "continuous" approach to numerically follow crack evolution and branching

  12. Modeling the in-plane tension failure of composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Trinh, K.V.

    1997-11-01

    This study developed a modeling method to predict the final failure load of laminated composite plates which may contain cutouts and are subjected to quasi-static in-plane tensile loads. This study focused on overcoming numerical problems often encountered in analyses that exhibit significant stable damage growth in the composite materials. To keep the computational cost at a reasonable level, the modeling method uses a quasi-static solution procedure to solve composite plate problems with quasi-static load. The numerical problems in the quasi-static analyses are nonconvergence problems caused by the discontinuous material behavior from brittle fiber failure. This study adds artificial damping to the material model to suppress the discontinuous material behavior. The artificial damping essentially changes the material behavior, and could adversely change the final failure load prediction. Thus, a selective scheme for adding the damping was developed to minimize adverse damping effects. In addition, this modeling method uses multiple analyses at different levels of artificial damping to determine damping effects on the failure load prediction. Fracture strength experimental data for small coupons with small cutouts and large panels with larger cutouts available in the literature were selected and used to verify failure predictions of the developed modeling method. Results show that, without the artificial damping treatment, progressive damage analyses reasonably predicted the fracture strength of the small coupons, but severely underpredicted the fracture strength of the large panels. With the artificial damping treatment, the analyses predicted the failure load of both the small coupons and the large panels reasonably well.

  13. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Mónica; Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals.

  14. Safety and effectiveness of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation according to the different power and target temperature in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Hee; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Yeon Suk; Lee, Don Haeng; Jeong, Seok

    2017-02-01

    Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (EB-RFA) is a new endoscopic palliation and adjunctive tool. Although EB-RFA is performed worldwide, a possibility of iatrogenic thermal injury leading to perforation or bleeding still remains. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effects of thermal and coagulation injury after in vivo EB-RFA using a new catheter with a temperature sensor in a swine model. Twelve mini pigs were divided into four groups according to power (33 mm 10 W electrode vs. 18 mm 7 W electrode) and RFA target temperature (75°C vs. 80°C). All mini pigs underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and target temperature controlled EB-RFA for 120 s. Additional cholangiogram was taken immediately after RFA, and all pigs were sacrificed after 24 h to assess the macroscopic/microscopic RFA injury. Microscopic maximal injury depth and ablation area of EB-RFA using a 33-mm 10 W RFA electrode were significantly deeper and larger than those of EB-RFA using an 18-mm 7 W electrode (median; 2.7 vs. 2.1 mm, P = 0.004, 48.9 vs. 36.2 mm(2) , P = 0.016). However, there were no significant differences in microscopic ablation parameters between two different RFA target temperatures (75°C vs. 80°C). In addition, a post-RFA cholangiogram and assessment of the resected specimen at 24 h after the RFA showed no adverse events such as perforation or bleeding. EB-RFA using a temperature controlled RFA catheter successfully ablates the bile duct wall without adverse events in a swine model. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals. PMID:25711878

  16. Resveratrol preserves myocardial function and perfusion in remote nonischemic myocardium in a swine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robich, Michael P; Chu, Louis M; Burgess, Thomas A; Feng, Jun; Han, Yuchi; Nezafat, Reza; Leber, Michael P; Laham, Roger J; Manning, Warren J; Sellke, Frank W

    2012-11-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to reverse some of the detrimental effects of metabolic syndrome (MetS). We sought to define the impact of supplemental resveratrol on normal myocardium remote from an ischemic territory in a swine model of MetS and chronic myocardial ischemia. Yorkshire swine were fed a normal diet (control), a high cholesterol diet (HCD), or a high cholesterol diet with orally supplemented resveratrol (HCD-R; 100 mg/kg/day). Four weeks after diet modification, myocardial ischemia was induced by ameroid constrictor placement. Seven weeks later, myocardial tissue from a territory remote from the ischemia was harvested. Animals in the HCD and HCD-R groups underwent functional cardiac MRI before ischemia and before sacrifice. Tissue was harvested for protein expression analysis. After 7 weeks of ischemia, regional left ventricular systolic function was significantly increased in HCD-R as compared with HCD animals. During ventricular pacing the HCD group had significantly decreased flow (p = 0.03); perfusion in the HCD-R was preserved as compared with the control. There was no difference in microvascular relaxation. Expression of metabolic proteins Sirt-1 (p = 0.002), AMPkinase (p = 0.02), and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (p = 0.002) were upregulated in the HCD-R group. Levels of protein oxidative stress were significantly increased in the HCD and HCD-R groups, as compared with the controls (p = 0.003). Activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was increased in the HCD-R group (p = 0.01). There was no difference in myocardial endothelial cell density between the groups; however, dividing endothelial cells were decreased in the HCD and HCD-R groups (p = 0.006). Resveratrol supplementation improves regional left ventricular function and preserves perfusion to myocardium remote from an area of ischemia in an animal model of metabolic syndrome and chronic myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  17. Efficacy of a Dexamethasone-Eluting Nitinol Stent on the Inhibition of Pseudointimal Hyperplasia in a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: An Experimental Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae-Seok; Park, Young-Koo; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Sang Joon; Yuk, Sun-Hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of using a dexamethasone (DM)-eluting nitinol stent to inhibit the pseudointimal hyperplasia following stent placement in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (TIPS) of a swine. Materials and Methods Fifteen stents were constructed using 0.15 mm-thick nitinol wire; they were 60 mm in length and 10 mm in diameter. The metallic stents were then classified into three types; type 1 and 2 was coated with the mixture of 12% and 20%, respectively, of DM solution and polyurethane (PU), while type 3 was a bare stent that was used for control study. In fifteen swine, each type of stent was implanted in the TIPS tract of 5 swine, and each animal was sacrificed 2 weeks after TIPS creation. The proliferation of the pseudointima was evaluated both on follow-up portogram and pathologic examination. Results One TIPS case, using the type 1 stent, and two TIPS cases, using the type 2 stent, maintained their luminal patency while the others were all occluded. On the histopathologic analysis, the mean of the maximum pseudointimal hyperplasia was expressed as the percentage of the stent radius that was patent, and these values were 51.2%, 50% and 76% for the type 1, 2, and 3 stents, respectively. Conclusion The DM-eluting stent showed a tendency to reduce the development of pseudointimal hyperplasia in the TIPS tract of a swine model with induced-portal hypertension. PMID:16374082

  18. Extending the golden hour: Partial resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta in a highly lethal swine liver injury model.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rachel M; Williams, Timothy K; Grayson, John Kevin; Lamb, Christopher M; Cannon, Jeremy W; Clement, Nathan F; Galante, Joseph M; Neff, Lucas P

    2016-03-01

    Combat-injured patients may require rapid and sustained support during transport; however, the prolonged aortic occlusion produced by conventional resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) may lead to substantial morbidity. Partial REBOA (P-REBOA) may permit longer periods of occlusion by allowing some degree of distal perfusion. However, the ability of this procedure to limit exsanguination is unclear. We evaluated the impact of P-REBOA on immediate survival and ongoing hemorrhage in a highly lethal swine liver injury model. Fifteen Yorkshire-cross swine were anesthetized, instrumented, splenectomized, and subjected to rapid 10% total blood loss followed by 30% liver amputation. Coagulopathy was created through colloid hemodilution. Randomized swine received no intervention (control), P-REBOA, or complete REBOA (C-REBOA). Central mean arterial pressure (cMAP), carotid blood flow, and blood loss were recorded. Balloons remained inflated in the P-REBOA and C-REBOA groups for 90 minutes followed by graded deflation. The study ended at 180 minutes from onset of hemorrhage or death of the animal. Survival analysis was performed, and data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance with post hoc pairwise comparisons. Mean survival times in the control, P-REBOA, and C-REBOA groups were, 25 ± 21, 86 ± 40, and 163 ± 20 minutes, respectively (p < 0.001). Blood loss was greater in the P-REBOA group than the C-REBOA or control groups, but this difference was not significant (4,722 ± 224, 3,834 ± 319, 3,818 ± 37 mL, respectively, p = 0.10). P-REBOA resulted in maintenance of near-baseline carotid blood flow and cMAP, while C-REBOA generated extreme cMAP and prolonged supraphysiologic carotid blood flow. Both experimental groups experienced profound decreases in cMAP following balloon deflation. In the setting of severe ongoing hemorrhage, P-REBOA increased survival time beyond the golden hour while maintaining cMAP and carotid flow

  19. Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of Severe Cyanide Poisoning in a Swine (Sus scrofa) Model

    PubMed Central

    Bebarta, Lt Col Vikhyat S.; Tanen, David A.; Boudreau, Susan; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A.; Vargas, Toni; Boss, Gerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective Hydroxocobalamin is a Food and Drug Administration–approved antidote for cyanide poisoning. Cobinamide is a potential antidote that contains 2 cyanide-binding sites. To our knowledge, no study has directly compared hydroxocobalamin with cobinamide in a severe, cyanide-toxic large-animal model. Our objective is to compare the time to return of spontaneous breathing in swine with acute cyanide-induced apnea treated with intravenous hydroxocobalamin, intravenous cobinamide, or saline solution (control). Methods Thirty-three swine (45 to 55 kg) were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented (continuous mean arterial pressure and cardiac output monitoring). Anesthesia was adjusted to allow spontaneous breathing with FiO2 of 21% during the experiment. Cyanide was continuously infused intravenously until apnea occurred and lasted for 1 minute (time zero). Animals were then randomly assigned to receive intravenous hydroxocobalamin (65 mg/kg), cobinamide (12.5 mg/kg), or saline solution and monitored for 60 minutes. A sample size of 11 animals per group was selected according to obtaining a power of 80%, an α of .05, and an SD of 0.17 in mean time to detect a 20% difference in time to spontaneous breathing. We assessed differences in time to death among groups, using Kaplan-Meier estimation methods, and compared serum lactate, blood pH, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation time curves with repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Baseline weights and vital signs were similar among groups. The time to apnea and cyanide dose required to achieve apnea were similar. At time zero, mean cyanide blood and lactate concentrations and reduction in mean arterial pressure from baseline were similar. In the saline solution group, 2 of 11 animals survived compared with 10 of 11 in the hydroxocobalamin and cobinamide groups (P<.001 between the 2 treated groups and the saline solution group). Time to return of spontaneous breathing

  20. Intravenous cobinamide versus hydroxocobalamin for acute treatment of severe cyanide poisoning in a swine (Sus scrofa) model.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Tanen, David A; Boudreau, Susan; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A; Vargas, Toni; Boss, Gerry R

    2014-12-01

    Hydroxocobalamin is a Food and Drug Administration-approved antidote for cyanide poisoning. Cobinamide is a potential antidote that contains 2 cyanide-binding sites. To our knowledge, no study has directly compared hydroxocobalamin with cobinamide in a severe, cyanide-toxic large-animal model. Our objective is to compare the time to return of spontaneous breathing in swine with acute cyanide-induced apnea treated with intravenous hydroxocobalamin, intravenous cobinamide, or saline solution (control). Thirty-three swine (45 to 55 kg) were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented (continuous mean arterial pressure and cardiac output monitoring). Anesthesia was adjusted to allow spontaneous breathing with FiO2 of 21% during the experiment. Cyanide was continuously infused intravenously until apnea occurred and lasted for 1 minute (time zero). Animals were then randomly assigned to receive intravenous hydroxocobalamin (65 mg/kg), cobinamide (12.5 mg/kg), or saline solution and monitored for 60 minutes. A sample size of 11 animals per group was selected according to obtaining a power of 80%, an α of .05, and an SD of 0.17 in mean time to detect a 20% difference in time to spontaneous breathing. We assessed differences in time to death among groups, using Kaplan-Meier estimation methods, and compared serum lactate, blood pH, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation time curves with repeated-measures ANOVA. Baseline weights and vital signs were similar among groups. The time to apnea and cyanide dose required to achieve apnea were similar. At time zero, mean cyanide blood and lactate concentrations and reduction in mean arterial pressure from baseline were similar. In the saline solution group, 2 of 11 animals survived compared with 10 of 11 in the hydroxocobalamin and cobinamide groups (P<.001 between the 2 treated groups and the saline solution group). Time to return of spontaneous breathing after antidote was similar between

  1. Development of Improved Dynamic Failure Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-15

    anisotropic yielding, and Bauschinger effect observed in to,- VI-3 & .... experiments of Naghdi et al.8 Bazant has recently begun formulation of a r...Plasticity," J. Appl. Mech. 25 201-209 (1958). 9. Z. P. Bazant and B. R. Oh, "Hicroplane Model for Fracture Analysis of Concrete Structures," Proceedings of...Yield Criteria and Flow Rules for Porous Ductile Media," J. Engin. Materials and Tech., Trans. of ASHE, Jan . 1977, pp. 2-15. VIII-29 e7 . . -4

  2. Modeling Failure Propagation in Large-Scale Engineering Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, Markus; Shapiro, Jonathan L.

    The simultaneous unavailability of several technical components within large-scale engineering systems can lead to high stress, rendering them prone to cascading events. In order to gain qualitative insights into the failure propagation mechanisms resulting from independent outages, we adopt a minimalistic model representing the components and their interdependencies by an undirected, unweighted network. The failure dynamics are modeled by an anticipated accelerated “wearout” process being dependent on the initial degree of a node and on the number of failed nearest neighbors. The results of the stochastic simulations imply that the influence of the network topology on the speed of the cascade highly depends on how the number of failed nearest neighbors shortens the life expectancy of a node. As a formal description of the decaying networks we propose a continuous-time mean field approximation, estimating the average failure rate of the nearest neighbors of a node based on the degree-degree distribution.

  3. Fuzzy modeling of analytical redundancy for sensor failure detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T.M.; Chou, H.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Failure detection and isolation (FDI) in dynamic systems may be accomplished by testing the consistency of the system via analytically redundant relations. The redundant relation is basically a mathematical model relating system inputs and dissimilar sensor outputs from which information is extracted and subsequently examined for the presence of failure signatures. Performance of the approach is often jeopardized by inherent modeling error and noise interference. To mitigate such effects, techniques such as Kalman filtering, auto-regression-moving-average (ARMA) modeling in conjunction with probability tests are often employed. These conventional techniques treat the stochastic nature of uncertainties in a deterministic manner to generate best-estimated model and sensor outputs by minimizing uncertainties. In this paper, the authors present a different approach by treating the effect of uncertainties with fuzzy numbers. Coefficients in redundant relations derived from first-principle physical models are considered as fuzzy parameters and on-line updated according to system behaviors. Failure detection is accomplished by examining the possibility that a sensor signal occurred in an estimated fuzzy domain. To facilitate failure isolation, individual FDI monitors are designed for each interested sensor.

  4. Spatio-temporal modeling of the African swine fever epidemic in the Russian Federation, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Korennoy, F.I.; Gulenkin, V.M.; Malone, J.B.; Mores, C.N.; Dudnikov, S.A.; Stevenson, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007 African swine fever (ASF) entered Georgia and in the same year the disease entered the Russian Federation. From 2007 to 2012 ASF spread throughout the southern region of the Russian Federation. At the same time several cases of ASF were detected in the central and northern regions of the Russian Federation, forming a northern cluster of outbreaks in 2011. This northern cluster is of concern because of its proximity to mainland Europe. The aim of this study was to use details of recorded ASF outbreaks and human and swine population details to estimate the spatial distribution of ASF risk in the southern region of the European part of the Russian Federation. Our model of ASF risk was comprised of two components. The first was an estimate of ASF suitability scores calculated using maximum entropy methods. The second was an estimate of ASF risk as a function of Euclidean distance from index cases. An exponential distribution fitted to a frequency histogram of the Euclidean distance between consecutive ASF cases had a mean value of 156 km, a distance greater than the surveillance zone radius of 100–150 km stated in the ASF control regulations for the Russian Federation. We show that the spatial and temporal risk of ASF expansion is related to the suitability of the area of potential expansion, which is in turn a function of socio-economic and geographic variables. We propose that the methodology presented in this paper provides a useful tool to optimize surveillance for ASF in affected areas. PMID:25457602

  5. Short oxygen prebreathe periods reduce or prevent severe decompression sickness in a 70-kg swine saturation model.

    PubMed

    Mahon, R T; Dainer, H M; Gibellato, M G; Soutiere, S E

    2009-04-01

    Disabled submarine (DISSUB) survivors are expected to achieve saturation with inert gas. However, rescue procedures may not accommodate staged decompression, raising the potential for severe decompression sickness (DCS). Alternatives to standard recompression therapy are needed. It has been demonstrated in humans that isobaric oxygen "prebreathing" (OPB) can accelerate decompression in a DISSUB scenario. In-70 kg swine saturated at 2.82 atm absolute (ATA), 1 h of OPB eliminated death and reduced severe DCS. We hypothesized that even shorter periods (<1 h) of OPB before no-stop decompression from saturation at 2.82 ATA could reduce the incidence of DCS in a large animal model. Catheterized Yorkshire swine (68.8 +/- 1.7 kg) in individual Plexiglas boxes within a large animal hyperbaric chamber were compressed to 2.82 ATA for 22 h. Following saturation and while still at depth, breathing gas was switched to >95% O(2) for 45 min (OPB(45)), 15 min (OPB(15)), or 5 min (OPB(05)) of OPB, or no OPB (control). The chamber was then decompressed without stops (0.91 ATA/min). Observers then entered the chamber and recorded signs of DCS for 2 h. All OPB periods significantly reduced the risk of developing type II DCS. OPB(45) eliminated severe DCS. Controls had a 2.5 times greater risk of developing type II DCS than OPB(05) (P = 0.016). OPB(45) and OPB(15) significantly reduced type I DCS compared with controls. These results support the potential of OPB as an alternative to staged decompression and that OPB could be expected to improve outcome in a DISSUB rescue scenario.

  6. Evaluation of the Role of Cisplatin-conjugated-soluble Gelatin Sponge: Feasibility Study in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Kouhei; Nakai, Motoki; Sanda, Hiroki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kanayama, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and the delivery function of cisplatin-conjugated-soluble gelatin sponge in a swine model.MethodsFifteen healthy young swine were assigned into three groups: transarterial cisplatin infusion group, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with cisplatin-conjugated 120-min soluble gelatin sponge (TACE-120) group, and TACE with cisplatin-conjugated 360-min soluble gelatin sponge (TACE-360) group. A total volume of 0.8 mL/kg cisplatin in each group and 8 mg/kg soluble gelatin sponge in TACE-120 and TACE-360 groups were injected from the left hepatic artery in small increments for 10 min. Common hepatic angiography and whole-blood sampling via the left hepatic vein were conducted to explore recanalization immediately after the procedure and again at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 min later. The area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC) of non-protein-bound platinum was compared among the three groups. Each liver was removed and cut into 10-cm-thick sections for calculating liver-damaged volume ratio.ResultsSequential angiography depicted gradual recanalization of the occluded hepatic artery and total recanalization at 120 and 360 min after embolization in the TACE-120 and TACE-360 groups, respectively. Of the three groups, AUC{sub 0-30}, AUC{sub 30-120}, and AUC{sub 120-420} were significantly highest in the transarterial cisplatin infusion group (p < 0.001), the TACE-120 group (p < 0.001), and the TACE-360 group (p < 0.001), respectively. The liver-damaged volume ratio in the TACE-360 group was small (8.20 %) but significantly higher than that in the TACE-120 group (2.67 %, p = 0.014).ConclusionCisplatin-conjugated soluble gelatin sponge functions as a cisplatin carrier and is associated with tolerable liver damage.

  7. Alcohol and the Heart: A Proteomics Analysis of Pericardium and Myocardium in a Swine Model of Myocardial Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Sadek, Ahmed A; Sabe, Ashraf A; Lassaletta, Antonio D; Sellke, Frank W

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is cardioprotective and reduces postoperative pericardial adhesions; however, the mechanism is not fully understood. Using proteomic analysis, we sought to objectively investigate the effects of daily moderate alcohol consumption in the pericardium and myocardium in a swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia. Fourteen swine underwent placement of an ameroid constrictor to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. Animals were supplemented with 90 mL of ethanol daily (ETOH) or 80 g of sucrose of equal caloric value (SUC). After 7 weeks, the ischemic myocardium and pericardium were harvested for proteomics analysis. Pericardial proteomics analysis yielded 397 proteins, of which 23 were unique to SUC and 52 were unique to ETOH. Of the 322 common proteins, 71 were statistically significant and 23 were characterized (p < 0.05). Alcohol supplementation increased structural proteins, and decreased immune protease inhibitors and coagulation proteins in the pericardium (p < 0.01). Myocardial proteomics analysis yielded 576 proteins, of which 32 were unique to SUC and 21 were unique to ETOH. Of the 523 common proteins, 85 were significant, and 32 were characterized (p < 0.05). Alcohol supplementation decreased cardiac remodeling proteins, cell death proteins and motor proteins, and increased metabolic proteins (p < 0.05). The results suggest that daily moderate alcohol consumption affects numerous pathways that contribute to cardioprotection, including cardiac remodeling, metabolism, and cell death. Our findings reveal the biosignature of myocardial and pericardial protein expression in the setting of chronic myocardial ischemia and daily moderate alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  9. A Comparison of Proximal Tibia, Proximal Humerus and Distal Femur Infusion Rates of Blood Under High Pressure Using the EX IO Intraosseous Device in the Adult Swine (Sus scrofa) Hypovolemic Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-25

    of Blood Under High Pressure Using the EZ IO Intraosseous Device on the Adult Swine (Sus scrofa) hypovolemic Model.” 4. Principal Investigator... hypovolemic period and decreased after infusion of blood. In the femur arm the serum lactate increased until the experiment ended. Histopathologic...vascular resistance in our pilot, dose-finding hemorrhagic shock swine model. The blood pressure response paralleled increasing drug dose

  10. Bayesian failure probability model sensitivity study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has developed a system-level approach for estimating the effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the connectivity of telecommunications networks. This approach incorporates a Bayesian statistical model which estimates the HEMP-induced failure probabilities of telecommunications switches and transmission facilities. The purpose of this analysis is to address the sensitivity of the Bayesian model. This is done by systematically varying two model input parameters--the number of observations, and the equipment failure rates. Throughout the study, a non-informative prior distribution is used. The sensitivity of the Bayesian model to the noninformative prior distribution is investigated from a theoretical mathematical perspective.

  11. Successes and failures in modeling heart cell electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Noble, Denis

    2011-11-01

    Mathematical models of the electrical activity of the heart using equations for protein ion channels and other transporters began with the Noble 1962 model. These models then developed over a period of about 50 years. Cell types in all regions have been modeled and now are available for download from the CellML website (www.cellml.org). Simulation is a necessary tool of analysis in attempting to understand biological complexity. We often learn as much from the failures as from the successes of mathematical models. It is the iterative interaction between experiment and simulation that is important. Copyright © 2011 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Katalan, Shahaf; Falach, Reut; Rosner, Amir; Goldvaser, Michael; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal; Dvir, Ayana; Mizrachi, Avi; Goren, Orr; Cohen, Barak; Gal, Yoav; Sapoznikov, Anita; Ehrlich, Sharon; Kronman, Chanoch

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS. PMID:28067630

  13. Development and application of a population physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for penicillin G in swine and cattle for food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E; Lin, Zhoumeng

    2017-09-01

    Penicillin G is a widely used antimicrobial in food-producing animals, and one of the most predominant drug residues in animal-derived food products. Due to reduced sensitivity of bacteria to penicillin, extralabel use of penicillin G is common, which may lead to violative residues in edible tissues and cause adverse reactions in consumers. This study aimed to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict drug residues in edible tissues and estimate extended withdrawal intervals for penicillin G in swine and cattle. A flow-limited PBPK model was developed with data from Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank using Berkeley Madonna. The model predicted observed drug concentrations in edible tissues, including liver, muscle, and kidney for penicillin G both in swine and cattle well, including data not used in model calibration. For extralabel use (5× and 10× label dose) of penicillin G, Monte Carlo sampling technique was applied to predict times needed for tissue concentrations to fall below established tolerances for the 99th percentile of the population. This model provides a useful tool to predict tissue residues of penicillin G in swine and cattle to aid food safety assessment, and also provide a framework for extrapolation to other food animal species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  15. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  16. Translational value of animal models of kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Izquierdo, Maria C; Martin-Cleary, Catalina; Garcia-Bermejo, Laura; Moreno, Juan A; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Draibe, Juliana; Cruzado, Josep M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M; Soler, Maria J; Sanz, Ana B

    2015-07-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with decreased renal function and increased mortality risk, while the therapeutic armamentarium is unsatisfactory. The availability of adequate animal models may speed up the discovery of biomarkers for disease staging and therapy individualization as well as design and testing of novel therapeutic strategies. Some longstanding animal models have failed to result in therapeutic advances in the clinical setting, such as kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and diabetic nephropathy models. In this regard, most models for diabetic nephropathy are unsatisfactory in that they do not evolve to renal failure. Satisfactory models for additional nephropathies are needed. These include anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, IgA nephropathy, anti-phospholipase-A2-receptor (PLA2R) membranous nephropathy and Fabry nephropathy. However, recent novel models hold promise for clinical translation. Thus, the AKI to CKD translation has been modeled, in some cases with toxins of interest for human CKD such as aristolochic acid. Genetically modified mice provide models for Alport syndrome evolving to renal failure that have resulted in clinical recommendations, polycystic kidney disease models that have provided clues for the development of tolvaptan, that was recently approved for the human disease in Japan; and animal models also contributed to target C5 with eculizumab in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Some ongoing trials explore novel concepts derived from models, such TWEAK targeting as tissue protection for lupus nephritis. We now review animal models reproducing diverse, genetic and acquired, causes of AKI and CKD evolving to kidney failure and discuss the contribution to clinical translation and prospects for the future.

  17. On rate-state and Coulomb failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.; Blanpied, M.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the predictions of Coulomb failure stress and rate-state frictional models. We study the change in failure time (clock advance) Δt due to stress step perturbations (i.e., coseismic static stress increases) added to "background" stressing at a constant rate (i.e., tectonic loading) at time t0. The predictability of Δt implies a predictable change in seismicity rate r(t)/r0, testable using earthquake catalogs, where r0 is the constant rate resulting from tectonic stressing. Models of r(t)/r0, consistent with general properties of aftershock sequences, must predict an Omori law seismicity decay rate, a sequence duration that is less than a few percent of the mainshock cycle time and a return directly to the background rate. A Coulomb model requires that a fault remains locked during loading, that failure occur instantaneously, and that Δt is independent of t0. These characteristics imply an instantaneous infinite seismicity rate increase of zero duration. Numerical calculations of r(t)/r0 for different state evolution laws show that aftershocks occur on faults extremely close to failure at the mainshock origin time, that these faults must be "Coulomb-like," and that the slip evolution law can be precluded. Real aftershock population characteristics also may constrain rate-state constitutive parameters; a may be lower than laboratory values, the stiffness may be high, and/or normal stress may be lower than lithostatic. We also compare Coulomb and rate-state models theoretically. Rate-state model fault behavior becomes more Coulomb-like as constitutive parameter a decreases relative to parameter b. This is because the slip initially decelerates, representing an initial healing of fault contacts. The deceleration is more pronounced for smaller a, more closely simulating a locked fault. Even when the rate-state Δt has Coulomb characteristics, its magnitude may differ by some constant dependent on b. In this case, a rate-state model behaves like a modified

  18. A predictive model for failure properties of thermoset resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruthers, James M.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1989-01-01

    A predictive model for the three-dimensional failure behavior of engineering polymers has been developed in a recent NASA-sponsored research program. This model acknowledges the underlying molecular deformation mechanisms and thus accounts for the effects of different chemical compositions, crosslink density, functionality of the curing agent, etc., on the complete nonlinear stress-strain response including yield. The material parameters required by the model can be determined from test-tube quantities of a new resin in only a few days. Thus, we can obtain a first-order prediction of the applicability of a new resin for an advanced aerospace application without synthesizing the large quantities of material needed for failure testing. This technology will effect order-of-magnitude reductions in the time and expense required to develop new engineering polymers.

  19. Product component genealogy modeling and field-failure prediction

    DOE PAGES

    King, Caleb; Hong, Yili; Meeker, William Q.

    2016-04-13

    Many industrial products consist of multiple components that are necessary for system operation. There is an abundance of literature on modeling the lifetime of such components through competing risks models. During the life-cycle of a product, it is common for there to be incremental design changes to improve reliability, to reduce costs, or due to changes in availability of certain part numbers. These changes can affect product reliability but are often ignored in system lifetime modeling. By incorporating this information about changes in part numbers over time (information that is readily available in most production databases), better accuracy can bemore » achieved in predicting time to failure, thus yielding more accurate field-failure predictions. This paper presents methods for estimating parameters and predictions for this generational model and a comparison with existing methods through the use of simulation. Our results indicate that the generational model has important practical advantages and outperforms the existing methods in predicting field failures.« less

  20. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  1. The Effect of Hypotensive Resuscitation and Fluid Type on Mortality, Bleeding, Coagulation, & Dysfunctional Inflammation in a Swine Grade V Liver Injury Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    defined by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Scaling System. This model has been described in several prior studies...fasted for 16 hours prior to surgery , except for water ad libitum. We pre-anesthatized the swine with an intramuscular injection of 8mg/kg Telazol...through measurement of jaw laxity, hemodynamic fluxuations, and response to painful stimuli at the nasal septum and forefoot . All efforts were made to

  2. A statistical model of carbon/carbon composite failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1991-01-01

    A failure model which considers the stochastic nature of the damage accumulation process is essential to assess reliability and to accurately scale the results from standard test specimens to composite structures. A superior filamentary composite for high temperature applications is composed of carbon fibers in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites are the strongest known material at very high temperatures. Since there appears to be a significant randomness in C-C material strength which cannot be controlled or detected with current technology, a better model of the material failure based upon statistical principles should be used. Simple applications of the model based upon the limited data provide encouraging results that indicate that better design of test specimens would provide a substantially higher prediction for the design strength of C-C composites. An A-basis strength for the C-C tensile rings from a first stage D-5 billets was estimated. A statistical failure model was developed for these rings which indicates that this strength may be very conservative for larger C-C parts. The analysis may be improved by use of a heterogeneous/noncontinuum finite element approach on the minimechanical level.

  3. 3D coronary motion tracking in swine models with MR tracking catheters.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Dumoulin, Charles L; Darrow, Robert D; Klein, Eric; Kiruluta, Andrew J M; Hayase, Motoya

    2009-01-01

    To develop MR-tracked catheters to delineate the three-dimensional motion of coronary arteries at high spatial and temporal resolution. Catheters with three tracking microcoils were placed into nine swine. During breath-holds, electrocardiographic (ECG)-synchronized 3D motion was measured at varying vessel depths. 3D motion was measured in American Heart Association left anterior descending (LAD) segments 6-7, left circumflex (LCX) segments 11-15, and right coronary artery (RCA) segments 2-3, at 60-115 beats/min heart rates. Similar-length cardiac cycles were averaged. Intercoil cross-correlation identified early systolic phase (ES) and determined segment motion delay. Translational and rotational motion, as a function of cardiac phase, is shown, with directionality and amplitude varying along the vessel length. Rotation (peak-to-peak solid-angle RCA approximately 0.10, LAD approximately 0.06, LCX approximately 0.18 radian) occurs primarily during fast translational motion and increases distally. LCX displacement increases with heart rate by 18%. Phantom simulations of motion effects on high-resolution images, using RCA results, show artifacts due to translation and rotation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking catheters quantify motion at 20 fps and 1 mm(3) resolution at multiple vessel depths, exceeding that available with other techniques. Imaging artifacts due to rotation are demonstrated. Motion-tracking catheters may provide physiological information during interventions and improve imaging spatial resolution.

  4. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Eamon B; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-03-07

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread.

  5. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Eamon B.; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread. PMID:26947420

  6. Microwave ablation with multiple simultaneously powered small-gauge triaxial antennas: results from an in vivo swine liver model.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; Laeseke, Paul F; Sampson, Lisa A; Frey, Tina M; van der Weide, Daniel W; Lee, Fred T

    2007-07-01

    To prospectively investigate the ability of a single generator to power multiple small-diameter antennas and create large zones of ablation in an in vivo swine liver model. Thirteen female domestic swine (mean weight, 70 kg) were used for the study as approved by the animal care and use committee. A single generator was used to simultaneously power three triaxial antennas at 55 W per antenna for 10 minutes in three groups: a control group where antennas were spaced to eliminate ablation zone overlap (n=6; 18 individual zones of ablation) and experimental groups where antennas were spaced 2.5 cm (n=7) or 3.0 cm (n=5) apart. Animals were euthanized after ablation, and ablation zones were sectioned and measured. A mixed linear model was used to test for differences in size and circularity among groups. Mean (+/-standard deviation) cross-sectional areas of multiple-antenna zones of ablation at 2.5- and 3.0-cm spacing (26.6 cm(2) +/- 9.7 and 32.2 cm(2) +/- 8.1, respectively) were significantly larger than individual ablation zones created with single antennas (6.76 cm(2) +/- 2.8, P<.001) and were 31% (2.5-cm spacing group: multiple antenna mean area, 26.6 cm(2); 3 x single antenna mean area, 20.28 cm(2)) to 59% (3.0-cm spacing group: multiple antenna mean area, 32.2 cm(2); 3 x single antenna mean area, 20.28 cm(2)) larger than 3 times the mean area of the single-antenna zones. Zones of ablation were found to be very circular, and vessels as large as 1.1 cm were completely coagulated with multiple antennas. A single generator may effectively deliver microwave power to multiple antennas. Large volumes of tissue may be ablated and large vessels coagulated with multiple-antenna ablation in the same time as single-antenna ablation. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  7. Reciprocating compressor valve failure -- Digital modelling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Motriuk, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Many problems in reciprocating compressors are caused by valve failures. Usually, valve failures are diagnosed early, and the worn out parts are replaced. This requires, however, unscheduled compressor shutdowns which increase the cost of operation and possibly breach gas delivery contracts. Thus, it is essential to design valves adequate for the particular compressors and flow conditions. In this paper, it is determined that the cause of an unusually large number of valve failures at one of the NOVA Gas Transmission Limited (NGTL) compressor stations was an inadequate valve design. It is shown that the type of valve presently used is unacceptable and should be replaced. Due to economic restrictions, however, the existing valves are modified rather than replaced. The method used to re-design the compressor valves includes two steps: field measurements and computer digital modelling. The modelling incorporates: (1) acoustic simulation of the system, (2) compressor valve dynamic simulation, and (3) simultaneous simulation of fluid solid interactions between the compressor valves, compressor cylinders and pipework. The results obtained by using models of (2) and (3) are compared.

  8. Utilization of laser Doppler flowmetry and tissue spectrophotometry for burn depth assessment using a miniature swine model.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Oliver; Held, Manuel; Schiefer, Jennifer; Werner, Ole; Medved, Fabian; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Jaminet, Patrick; Rothenberger, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the diagnosis of burn depth is primarily based on a visual assessment and can be dependent on the surgeons' experience. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of laser Doppler flowmeter combined with a tissue spectrophotometer to discriminate burn depth in a miniature swine burn model. Burn injuries of varying depth, including superficial-partial, deep-partial, and full thickness, were created in seven Göttingen minipigs using an aluminium bar (100 °C), which was applied to the abdominal skin for periods of 1, 3, 6, 12, 30, and 60 seconds with gravity alone. The depth of injury was evaluated histologically using hematoxylin and eosin staining. All burns were assessed 3 hours after injury using a device that combines a laser light and a white light to determine blood flow, hemoglobin oxygenation, and relative amount of hemoglobin. The blood flow (41 vs. 124 arbitrary units [AU]) and relative amount of hemoglobin (32 vs. 52 AU) were significantly lower in full thickness compared with superficial-partial thickness burns. However, no significant differences in hemoglobin oxygenation were observed between these depths of burns (61 vs. 60%). These results show the ability of laser Doppler flowmeter and tissue spectrophotometer in combination to discriminate between various depths of injury in the minipig model, suggesting that this device may offer a valuable tool for burn depth assessment influencing burn management.

  9. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald Murray; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-09-01

    Despite human laboratory and field studies that have demonstrated a reasonable safety profile for TASER brand conducted electrical weapons (CEW), the results of some swine studies and arrest related deaths temporal to the use of the CEWs continue to raise questions regarding cardiac safety. TASER International, Inc., has released a new CEW, the TASER X2, touted to have a better safety profile than its long-standing predecessor, the TASER X26. We have developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs and used it to compare the TASER X2 and the TASER X26. This safety model was also used to assess the relative safety of an experimental probe design as compared to the standard steel probe. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 has an improved safety margin over the TASER X26. The new probe design also has promise for enhanced cardiac safety, although may have some disadvantages when compared to the existing design which would make field use impractical.

  10. Approach to failure in a discrete element model of the compressive failure of porous rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, F.; Varga, I.; Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how a porous rock sample approaches failure under uniaxial compression. Computer simulations are carried out in the framework of a discrete element model (DEM) which takes into account both the microstructure of the material and the dynamics of local fracturing, revealing much more detail and observation bandwidth in then granular mechanics than possible during standard laboratory tests. The synthetic sample is generated by sedimentation of randomly-sized spherical particles with a log-normal size distribution inside a cylindrical container. The cohesive interaction of particles is represented by beam elements that break when overstressed. The breaking rule takes into account both stretching and shear of particle contacts. When particles not connected by a beam come into contact their interaction is described by the Hertz contact law. The time evolution of the system is generated by molecular dynamics simulations in three dimensions. Computer simulations showed that under strain controlled uniaxial loading of the system micro-cracks initially nucleate in an uncorrelated way all over the sample. As loading proceeds localization occurs, i.e. the damage concentrates into a narrow damage band. Inside the damage band the material is crushed, into a poorly sorted mixture of fine powder and larger fragments with a power-law mass distribution, as observed in fault wear products (gouge) in natural and laboratory faults. Dynamic bursts of radiated energy, analogous to acoustic emissions observed in laboratory experiments, are identified as correlated trails of local fracture emerging as the consequence of stress redistribution. Characteristic quantities of burst such as size/rupture area, released elastic energy, and duration proved to have power law probability-size distributions over a broad range. The energy and duration of bursts have power law dependence on the rupture area created. As the system approaches macroscopic failure consecutive bursts become

  11. Effect of Whole-abdominal Irradiation on Penetration Depth of Doxorubicin in Normal Tissue After Pressurized Intraperitoneal Aerosol Chemotherapy (PIPAC) in a Post-mortem Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Khosrawipour, Veria; Khosrawipour, Tanja; Hedayat-Pour, Yousef; Diaz-Carballo, David; Bellendorf, Alexander; Böse-Ribeiro, Hugo; Mücke, Ralph; Mohanaraja, Nirushika; Adamietz, Irenäus Anton; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2017-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of whole-abdominal irradiation on local penetration of doxorubicin into the peritoneum and the abdominal organs in a post-mortem swine model. Doxorubicin was aerosolized into the abdominal cavity of swine at a pressure of 12 mmHg CO2 at room temperature (25°). One swine was subjected to pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) using Micropump(©) without irradiation; the second one received 2 Gy and the third one 7 Gy whole-abdominal irradiation, 15 min prior to PIPAC application. Samples of the peritoneal surface were extracted at different positions from within the abdominal cavity. In-tissue doxorubicin penetration was measured using fluorescence microscopy on frozen thin sections. The depth of penetration of doxorubicin was found to be wide-ranging, between 17 μm on the surface of the stomach and 348 μm in the small intestine. The penetration depth into the small intestine was 348 μm, 312 μm and 265 μm for PIPAC alone, PIPAC with 2 Gy irradiation and PIPAC with 7 Gy irradiation, respectively (p<0.05). The penetration into the liver was 64 μm, 55 μm and 40 μm, respectively (p=0.05). Irradiation was not found to increase the depth of doxorubicin penetration into normal tissue in the post-mortem swine model. A reduction of doxorubicin penetration was observed after application of higher irradiation doses. Further studies are warranted to determine if irradiation can be used safely as chemopotentiating agent for patients with peritoneal metastases treated with PIPAC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the effects of sternal and tibial intraosseous administered resuscitative drugs on return of spontaneous circulation in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Mara; Martinez, Andre; Long, Audrey; Johnson, Michelle; Blouin, Dawn; Johnson, Arthur D; Burgert, James M

    2016-01-01

    Compare vasopressin, amiodarone, and epinephrine administration by sternal intraosseous (SIO), tibial intraosseous (TIO), and intravenous (IV) routes in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Prospective, randomized, between subjects, experimental design. Laboratory. Male Yorkshire-cross swine (N = 35), seven per group. Swine were randomized to SIO, TIO, IV, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with defibrillation, or CPR-only groups. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced under general anesthesia. Mechanical CPR began 2 minutes postarrest. Vasopressin (40 U) was administered to the SIO, TIO, and IV groups 4 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was performed and amiodarone (300 mg) was administered 6 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was repeated, and epinephrine (1 mg) was administered 10 minutes postarrest. Defibrillation was repeated every 2 minutes and epinephrine repeated every 4 minutes until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or 26 postarrest minutes elapsed. Rate of ROSC, time to ROSC, and odds of ROSC. There were no significant differences in rate of ROSC between the SIO and TIO (p = 0.22) or IV groups (p = 1.0). Time to ROSC was five times less in the SIO group than the TIO group (p = 0.003) but not compared to IV (p = 0.125). Time to ROSC in the IV group was significantly less than the TIO group (p = 0.04). Odds of ROSC for the SIO group were five times higher compared to the TIO group but same as IV. Odds of ROSC in the IV group were higher than the TIO group. There was a statistically significant delay in the time to ROSC and a clinically significant difference in odds of ROSC when resuscitative drugs, including lipophilic amiodarone, were administered by the TIO route compared to the SIO and IV routes in a swine model of sudden cardiac arrest. Further investigations are warranted to isolate the mechanism behind these findings.

  13. The efficacy of a novel saline/bipolar radiofrequency energy instrument for arresting ongoing solid and non-solid organ hemorrhage in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Ball, Chad G; Campbell, Andre; Grondin, Sean C; Dixon, Elijah

    2016-12-01

    Ongoing hemorrhage is often life threatening and can be challenging to stop in critically injured patients. Traditional techniques for addressing this issue include high voltage cautery (Bovie), topical hemostatic application, and the delivery of ignited argon gas. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel energy device for arresting ongoing bleeding from both solid and non-solid organs within a swine model. A novel instrument utilizing bipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy which acts to ignite/boil dripping saline from a small hand piece was employed to arrest ongoing hemorrhage from an escalating series of injuries in large male swine. Liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, inferior vena cava and abdominal wall targets were evaluated and digitally recorded. Methodology was descriptive. Four large male swine received escalating injuries to their liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, inferior vena cava and abdominal wall. Injury patterns included a variety of surface decapsulation, superficial lacerations, deep lacerations, "through and through" missiles and complete transections. Application of the bipolar/RF instrument to sites of ongoing hemorrhage was successful in 97% of all scenarios. Depth of tissue penetration via microscopic evaluation ranged from 1.1mm to 3.0mm depending on the target organ composition. No air leaks were observed following application to the bleeding lung. Surgeon reported 'ease of use' score was high (4.8/5). This energy technology is successful in arresting ongoing hemorrhage from varying intensities of traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen, kidney, abdominal wall, lung and heart in the swine model. Additional testing is required before advocating its use on any thoracic organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracoronary artery transplantation of cardiomyoblast-like cells from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improve left ventricular dysfunction and survival in a swine model of chronic myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Hanayuki; Saga, Ayami; Soeda, Mayumi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Daimon, Takashi; Ichinose, Akihiro; Matsuyama, Akifumi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We administered human CLCs in a swine model of MI via intracoronary artery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histological studies demonstrated engraftment of hCLCs into the scarred myocardium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Echocardiography showed rescue of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted swine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of hCLCs is an effective therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. -- Abstract: Transplantation of human cardiomyoblast-like cells (hCLCs) from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improved left ventricular function and survival of rats with myocardial infarction. Here we examined the effect of intracoronary artery transplantation of human CLCs in a swine model of chronic heart failure. Twenty-four pigs underwent balloon-occlusion of the first diagonal branch followed by reperfusion, with a second balloon-occlusion of the left ascending coronary artery 1 week later followed by reperfusion. Four weeks after the second occlusion/reperfusion, 17 of the 18 surviving animals with severe chronic MI (ejection fraction <35% by echocardiography) were immunosuppressed then randomly assigned to receive either intracoronary artery transplantation of hCLCs hADMPCs or placebo lactic Ringer's solution with heparin. Intracoronary artery transplantation was followed by the distribution of DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardial milieu. Echocardiography at post-transplant days 4 and 8 weeks showed rescue and maintenance of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted group, but not in the control animals, indicating myocardial functional recovery by hCLCs intracoronary transplantation. At 8 week post-transplantation, 7 of 8 hCLCs transplanted animals were still alive compared with only 1 of the 5 control (p = 0.0147). Histological studies at week 12 post-transplantation demonstrated engraftment of the pre DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardium and their expression of

  15. Efficacy of Reductive Ventricular Osmotherapy in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Odland, Rick M.; Venugopal, Sandya; Borgos, John; Coppes, Valerie; McKinney, Alexander M.; Rockswold, Gaylan; Shi, Jian; Panter, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of osmotic gradients in the development of cerebral edema and the effectiveness of osmotherapy are well recognized. A modification of ventriculostomy catheters described in this paper provides a method of osmotherapy that is not currently available. The Reductive Ventricular Osmotherapy (RVOT) catheter removes free water from ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by incorporating hollow fibers that remove water vapor, thereby providing osmotherapy without increasing osmotic load. Objective To increase osmolarity in the ventricular CSF through use of RVOT in vivo. Methods Twelve Yorkshire swine with contusional injury were randomized to external ventricular drainage (EVD) or RVOT for 12 hours. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. Serum, CSF, and brain ultrafiltrate were analyzed. Histology was compared using Fluor-Jade B and H & E. Results With RVOT, CSF osmolality increased from 292 ± 2.7 to 345 ± 8.0 mosmol/kg (mean ± SE, p=0.0006), and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the injury region increased from 0.735 ±0 .047 to 1.135 ± .063 (p=0.004) over 24 hours. With EVD controls, CSF osmolarity and ADC were not significantly changed. Histologically, all RVOT pigs showed no evidence of neuronal degeneration (Grade 1/4) compared to moderate degeneration (Grade 2.6 +.4/4) seen in EVD treated animals (p=0.02). The difference in intracranial pressure (ICP) by area under the curve approached significance at p = .065 by Mann Whitney test. Conclusion RVOT can increase CSF osmolarity in vivo after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). In anticipated clinical use, only a slight increase in CSF osmolarity may be required to reduce cerebral edema. PMID:21826032

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Swine Hemi-Facial Allotransplantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Shigeru; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Chun-Ting; Tsai, Chia-Chun; Chen, Chao-Long

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated whether the infusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), combined with transient immunosuppressant treatment, could suppress allograft rejection and modulate T-cell regulation in a swine orthotopic hemi-facial composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) model. Methodology/Principal Findings Outbred miniature swine underwent hemi-facial allotransplantation (day 0). Group-I (n = 5) consisted of untreated control animals. Group-II (n = 3) animals received MSCs alone (given on days −1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21). Group-III (n = 3) animals received CsA (days 0 to +28). Group-IV (n = 5) animals received CsA (days 0 to +28) and MSCs (days −1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21). The transplanted face tissue was observed daily for signs of rejection. Biopsies of donor tissues and recipient blood sample were obtained at specified predetermined times (per 2 weeks post-transplant) or at the time of clinically evident rejection. Our results indicated that the MSC-CsA group had significantly prolonged allograft survival compared to the other groups (P<0.001). Histological examination of the MSC-CsA group displayed the lowest degree of rejection in alloskin and lymphoid gland tissues. TNF-α expression in circulating blood revealed significant suppression in the MSC and MSC-CsA treatment groups, as compared to that in controls. IHC staining showed CD45 and IL-6 expression were significantly decreased in MSC-CsA treatment groups compared to controls. The number of CD4+/CD25+ regulatory T-cells and IL-10 expressions in the circulating blood significantly increased in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. IHC staining of alloskin tissue biopsies revealed a significant increase in the numbers of foxp3+T-cells and TGF-β1 positive cells in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. Conclusions These results demonstrate that MSCs significantly prolong hemifacial CTA survival. Our data indicate the MSCs

  17. Early Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Augmentation with Phenylephrine after Traumatic Brain Injury may be Neuroprotective in a Pediatric Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Stuart H.; Smith, Colin; Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Frangos, Suzanne G.; Ralston, Jill; Helfaer, Mark A; Margulies, Susan S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) less than 40 mm Hg following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with increased mortality independent of age, and current guidelines recommend maintaining CPP between 40–60 mm Hg. Although adult TBI studies have observed an increased risk of complications associated with targeting a CPP > 70, we hypothesize that targeting a CPP of 70 mm Hg with the use of phenylephrine early after injury in the immature brain will be neuroprotective. Design Animals were randomly assigned to injury with CPP = 70 mm Hg (CPP70) or CPP = 40 mm Hg (CPP40). Diffuse TBI was produced by a single rapid rotation of the head in the axial plane. Cerebral microdialysis, brain tissue oxygen, intracranial pressure, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured 30 min – 6 h post-injury. One hour after injury, CPP was manipulated with the vasoconstrictor phenylephrine. Animals were euthanized 6 h post-TBI, brains fixed, and stained to assess regions of cell injury and axonal dysfunction. Setting University center. Subject 21 four week-old female swine. Measurements and Main Results Augmentation of CPP to 70 mm Hg resulted in no change in axonal dysfunction, but significantly smaller cell injury volumes at 6 hours post injury compared to CPP40 (1.1% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.05). Microdialysis lactate/pyruvate ratios were improved at CPP70 compared to CPP40. CBF was higher in the CPP70 group but did not reach statistical significance. Phenylephrine was well tolerated and there were no observed increases in serum lactate or intracranial pressure in either group. Conclusions Targeting a CPP of 70 mm Hg resulted in a greater reduction in metabolic crisis and cell injury volumes compared to a CPP of 40 mm Hg in an immature swine model. Early aggressive CPP augmentation to a CPP of 70 mm Hg in pediatric TBI before severe intracranial hypertension has the potential to be neuroprotective, and further investigations are needed. PMID:22809910

  18. Understanding African Swine Fever infection dynamics in Sardinia using a spatially explicit transmission model in domestic pig farms.

    PubMed

    Mur, L; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Fernández-Carrión, E; Jurado, C; Rolesu, S; Feliziani, F; Laddomada, A; Martínez-López, B

    2017-03-13

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) has been endemic in Sardinia since 1978, resulting in severe losses for local pig producers and creating important problems for the island's veterinary authorities. This study used a spatially explicit stochastic transmission model followed by two regression models to investigate the dynamics of ASFV spread amongst domestic pig farms, to identify geographic areas at highest risk and determine the role of different susceptible pig populations (registered domestic pigs, non-registered domestic pigs [brado] and wild boar) in ASF occurrence. We simulated transmission within and between farms using an adapted version of the previously described model known as Be-FAST. Results from the model revealed a generally low diffusion of ASF in Sardinia, with only 24% of the simulations resulting in disease spread, and for each simulated outbreak on average only four farms and 66 pigs were affected. Overall, local spread (indirect transmission between farms within a 2 km radius through fomites) was the most common route of transmission, being responsible for 98.6% of secondary cases. The risk of ASF occurrence for each domestic pig farm was estimated from the spread model results and integrated in two regression models together with available data for brado and wild boar populations. There was a significant association between the density of all three populations (domestic pigs, brado, and wild boar) and ASF occurrence in Sardinia. The most significant risk factors were the high densities of brado (OR = 2.2) and wild boar (OR = 2.1). The results of both analyses demonstrated that ASF epidemiology and infection dynamics in Sardinia create a complex and multifactorial disease situation, where all susceptible populations play an important role. To stop ASF transmission in Sardinia, three main factors (improving biosecurity on domestic pig farms, eliminating brado practices and better management of wild boars) need to be addressed.

  19. Case–Cohort Analysis with Accelerated Failure Time Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lan; Cai, Jianwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary In a case–cohort design, covariates are assembled only for a subcohort that is randomly selected from the entire cohort and any additional cases outside the subcohort. This design is appealing for large cohort studies of rare disease, especially when the exposures of interest are expensive to ascertain for all the subjects. We propose statistical methods for analyzing the case–cohort data with a semiparametric accelerated failure time model that interprets the covariates effects as to accelerate or decelerate the time to failure. Asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are developed. The finite sample properties of case–cohort estimator and its relative efficiency to full cohort estimator are assessed via simulation studies. A real example from a study of cardiovascular disease is provided to illustrate the estimating procedure. PMID:18537948

  20. Modeling hydrogen sulfide emissions across the gas-liquid interface of an anaerobic swine waste treatment storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica; Aneja, Viney P.; Overton, John H.

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" smell and is considered a toxic manure gas. In the southeastern United States, anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are widely used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Hydrogen sulfide is produced as manure decomposes anaerobically, resulting from the mineralization of organic sulfur compounds as well as the reduction of oxidized inorganic sulfur compounds by sulfur-reducing bacteria. The process of H 2S emissions from anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are investigated utilizing a two-film model with three different modeling approaches: Coupled Mass Transfer with Chemical Reactions Model with the assumption (1) pH remains constant in the liquid film (MTCR Model I) and (2) pH may change throughout the liquid film due to diffusion processes that occur within the film (MTCR Model II); and (3) a Mass Transfer Model which neglects chemical reactions (MTNCR Model) in the gas and liquid films. Results of model predictions are consistent with previous works, which show that flux is largely dependent on the physicochemical lagoon properties including sulfide concentration, pH, and lagoon temperature. Air temperature and low wind velocities (e.g., <3.25 m s -1) have negligible impact on flux. Results also indicate that flux values decrease with increased film thickness. The flux was primarily influenced by variations in the liquid film thickness, signifying that the H 2S flux is driven by liquid-phase parameters. Model results were compared with H 2S flux measurements made at a swine waste treatment storage lagoon in North Carolina using a dynamic emission flux chamber system in order to evaluate model accuracy in calculating lagoon H 2S emissions. The MTCR Model II predicted the highest increase in emission rates as aqueous sulfide concentration was increased. The MTNCR Model showed the highest dependence on pH. All three models

  1. An approach to model monitoring and surveillance data of wildlife diseases-exemplified by Classical Swine Fever in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, N; Liebscher, V; Staubach, C; Ziller, M

    2013-11-01

    The analysis of epidemiological field data from monitoring and surveillance systems (MOSSs) in wild animals is of great importance in order to evaluate the performance of such systems. By parameter estimation from MOSS data, conclusions about disease dynamics in the observed population can be drawn. To strengthen the analysis, the implementation of a maximum likelihood estimation is the main aim of our work. The new approach presented here is based on an underlying simple SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) model for a disease scenario in a wildlife population. The three corresponding classes are assumed to govern the intensities (number of animals in the classes) of non-homogeneous Poisson processes. A sampling rate was defined which describes the process of data collection (for MOSSs). Further, the performance of the diagnostics was implemented in the model by a diagnostic matrix containing misclassification rates. Both descriptions of these MOSS parts were included in the Poisson process approach. For simulation studies, the combined model demonstrates its ability to validly estimate epidemiological parameters, such as the basic reproduction rate R0. These parameters will help the evaluation of existing disease control systems. They will also enable comparison with other simulation models. The model has been tested with data from a Classical Swine Fever (CSF) outbreak in wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa L.) from a region of Germany (1999-2002). The results show that the hunting strategy as a sole control tool is insufficient to decrease the threshold for susceptible animals to eradicate the disease, since the estimated R0 confirms an ongoing epidemic of CSF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a Fatal Noncompressible Truncal Hemorrhage Model with Combined Hepatic and Portal Venous Injury in Normothermic Normovolemic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Yanala, Ujwal R.; Johanning, Jason M.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34–36 kg) underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1) central stellate injury (N = 6); 2) excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6); or 3) hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10). The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms. PMID:25251401

  3. The Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA protects against an experimental infection in the swine model of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima R; Routh, Patty A; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Smith, Valerie A; Koch, Gary G; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2014-06-24

    Adherence of pathogens to cellular targets is required to initiate most infections. Defining strategies that interfere with adhesion is therefore important for the development of preventative measures against infectious diseases. As an adhesin to host extracellular matrix proteins and human keratinocytes, the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA, a proven virulence factor of the Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi, is a potential target for vaccine development. A recombinant form of the N-terminal passenger domain of DsrA from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP, termed rNT-DsrAI, was tested as a vaccine immunogen in the experimental swine model of H. ducreyi infection. Viable homologous H. ducreyi was not recovered from any animal receiving four doses of rNT-DsrAI administered with Freund's adjuvant at two-week intervals. Control pigs receiving adjuvant only were all infected. All animals receiving the rNT-DsrAI vaccine developed antibody endpoint titers between 3.5 and 5 logs. All rNT-DsrAI antisera bound the surface of the two H. ducreyi strains used to challenge immunized pigs. Purified anti-rNT-DsrAI IgG partially blocked binding of fibrinogen at the surface of viable H. ducreyi. Overall, immunization with the passenger domain of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA accelerated clearance of H. ducreyi in experimental lesions, possibly by interfering with fibrinogen binding.

  4. Preclinical Safety Evaluation of Allogeneic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Therapy in a Swine Model of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Iborra-Egea, Oriol; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Martí, Mercè; Iglesias-García, Olalla; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Roura, Santiago; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Raya, Ángel; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2017-08-18

    The combination of biomatrices and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derivatives to aid repair and myocardial scar formation may soon become a reality for cardiac regenerative medicine. However, the tumor risk associated with residual undifferentiated cells remains an important safety concern of iPSC-based therapies. This concern is not satisfactorily addressed in xenotransplantation, which requires immune suppression of the transplanted animal. In this study, we assessed the safety of transplanting undifferentiated iPSCs in an allogeneic setting. Given that swine are commonly used as large animal models in cardiac medicine, we used porcine iPSCs (p-iPSCs) in conjunction with bioengineered constructs that support recovery after acute myocardial infarction. Histopathology analyses found no evidence of p-iPSCs or p-iPSC-derived cells within the host myocardium or biomatrices after 30 and 90 days of follow-up. Consistent with the disappearance of the implanted cells, we could not observe functional benefit of these treatments in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac output, ventricular volumes, or necrosis. We therefore conclude that residual undifferentiated iPSCs should pose no safety concern when used on immune-competent recipients in an allogeneic setting, at least in the context of cardiac regenerative medicine.

  5. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten; Christensen, Hanne; Toft, Nils; Boklund, Anette

    2016-12-25

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning, it is important to explore strategies that can effectively control an epidemic of ASF. In this study, the epidemiological and economic effects of strategies to control the spread of ASF between domestic swine herds were examined using a published model (DTU-DADS-ASF). The control strategies were the basic EU and national strategy (Basic), the basic strategy plus pre-emptive depopulation of neighboring swine herds, and intensive surveillance of herds in the control zones, including testing live or dead animals. Virus spread via wild boar was not modelled. Under the basic control strategy, the median epidemic duration was predicted to be 21days (5th and 95th percentiles; 1-55days), the median number of infected herds was predicted to be 3 herds (1-8), and the total costs were predicted to be €326 million (€256-€442 million). Adding pre-emptive depopulation or intensive surveillance by testing live animals resulted in marginal improvements to the control of the epidemics. However, adding testing of dead animals in the protection and surveillance zones was predicted to be the optimal control scenario for an ASF epidemic in industrialized swine populations without contact to wild boar. This optimal scenario reduced the epidemic duration to 9days (1-38) and the total costs to €294 million (€257-€392 million). Export losses were the driving force of the total costs of the epidemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Swine in biomedical research. V. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the effect of dietary fiber on growing pigs; preparation of a cerebral perfusion model in the pig - anatomic considerations; a review of the utilization of lactose, glucose, sucrose, and cornstarch by neonatal piglets reared artificially; histology of piglet liver, swine hematology; use of swine as a model of musculoskeletal growth in animals; boar and human sperm as cellular models for membrane phospholipiid biosynthesis and degradation; a stereotaxic atlas of the developing swine (Sus Scrofa) forebrain; the effect of ethanol on liver mitochondrial Ca++-uptake; control of feed intake in pigs; the pig as a model of abberations associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; whey and cholesterol in swine; vitamin and mineral nutrition and malnutrition; cadmium absorption, distribution and excretion in young and adult minature swine; a piglet model for infant total parenteral nutrition studies; swine in perinatal research; the endocrine pancreas of the fetal pig; cardiovascular physiology of the pig fetus; and the effect of sow's milk versus formula on the superior mesenteric blood flow of newborn piglets.

  7. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  8. Validation of the health ABC heart failure model for incident heart failure risk prediction: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Psaty, Bruce M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki; Smith, Andrew L; Smith, Nicholas L; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Wilson, Peter W F; Newman, Anne B; Harris, Tamara B; Butler, Javed

    2010-07-01

    The recently developed and internally validated Health ABC HF model uses 9 routinely available clinical variables to determine incident heart failure risk. In this study, we sought to externally validate the Health ABC HF model. Observed 5-year incidence of heart failure, defined as first hospitalization for new-onset heart failure, was compared with 5-year risk estimates derived from the Health ABC HF model among participants without heart failure at baseline in the Cardiovascular Health Study. During follow-up, 400 of 5335 (7.5%) participants developed heart failure over 5 years versus 364 (6.8%) predicted by the Health ABC HF model (predicted-to-observed ratio, 0.90). Observed versus predicted 5-year heart failure probabilities were 3.2% versus 2.8%, 9.0% versus 7.0%, 15.9% versus 13.7%, and 24.6% versus 30.8% for the <5%, 5% to 10%, 10% to 20%, and >20% 5-year risk categories, respectively. The Hosmer-Lemeshow chi(2) was 14.72 (degrees of freedom, 10; P=0.14), and the C index was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.76). Calibration and discrimination demonstrated adequate performance across sex and race overall; however, risk was underestimated in white men, especially in the 5% to 10% risk category. Model performance was optimal when participants with normal left ventricular function at baseline were assessed separately. Performance was consistent across age groups. Analyses with death as a competing risk yielded similar results. The Health ABC HF model adequately predicted 5-year heart failure risk in a large community-based study, providing support for the external validity of the model. This tool may be used to identify individuals to whom to target heart failure prevention efforts.

  9. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Single-Fraction Partial-Volume Irradiation: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation in swine. Methods and Materials: A 5-cm-long cervical segment was irradiated in 38-47-week-old Yucatan minipigs using a dedicated, image-guided radiosurgery linear accelerator. The radiation was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter that was positioned lateral to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. The dose was prescribed to the 90% isodose line. A total of 26 pigs were stratified into eight dose groups of 12-47 Gy. The mean maximum spinal cord dose was 16.9 {+-} 0.1, 18.9 {+-} 0.1, 21.0 {+-} 0.1, 23.0 {+-} 0.2, and 25.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy in the 16-, 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-Gy dose groups, respectively. The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 43% {+-} 3%, 48% {+-} 4%, 51% {+-} 2%, 57% {+-} 2%, and 59% {+-} 4%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait during a 1-year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a median effective dose for the maximum dose point of 20.0 Gy (95% confidence interval, 18.3-21.7). Excellent agreement was observed between the occurrence of neurologic change and the presence of histologic change. All the minipigs with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of the gray matter. The histologic findings were unremarkable in the minipigs with normal neurologic status. Conclusions: Our results have indicated that for a dose distribution with a steep lateral gradient, the pigs had a lower median effective dose for paralysis than has been observed in rats and more closely resembles that for rats, mice, and guinea pigs receiving uniform spinal cord irradiation.

  10. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Reirradiation With Single-Fraction Radiosurgery: A Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Sayre, James W.; McBride, William H.; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine swine spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation 1 year after receiving uniform irradiation to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Methods and Materials: A 10-cm length of spinal cord (C3-T1) was uniformly irradiated to 30 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions and reirradiated 1 year later with a single radiosurgery dose centered within the previously irradiated segment. Radiosurgery was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5 cm in length and 2 cm in diameter, which was positioned laterally to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50%, and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central, and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. Twenty-three pigs were stratified into six dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 14.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 2), 17.1 {+-} 0.3 Gy (n = 3), 19.0 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 21.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (n = 5), 23.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy (n = 5), and 25.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (n = 3). The mean percentage of spinal cord volumes receiving {>=}10 Gy for the same groups were 34% {+-} 1%, 40% {+-} 1%, 46% {+-} 3%, 52% {+-} 1%, 56 {+-} 3%, and 57% {+-} 1%. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit as determined by a change in gait during a 1- year follow-up period. Results: A steep dose-response curve was observed with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED{sub 50}) for the maximum point dose of 19.7 Gy (95% confidence interval, 17.4-21.4). With two exceptions, histology was unremarkable in animals with normal neurologic status, while all animals with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side, with relative sparing of gray matter. Histologic comparison with a companion study of de novo irradiated animals revealed that retreatment responders had more extensive tissue damage, including infarction of gray matter, only at prescription doses >20 Gy. Conclusion: Pigs receiving spinal radiosurgery 1 year after

  11. Spinal Cord Tolerance to Reirradiation with Single-Fraction Radiosurgery: A Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Medin, Paul M; Foster, Ryan D; van Kogel, Albert J; Sayre, James W; McBride, William H; Solberg, Timothy D

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to determine the spinal cord tolerance of swine to single-fraction, partial-volume irradiation one year after uniform irradiation to 30Gy in 10 fractions. Materials/ Methods A 10cm length of spinal cord (C3-T1) was uniformly irradiated to 30Gy in ten consecutive fractions and reirradiated one year later with a single radiosurgery dose centered within the previously irradiated segment. Radiosurgery was delivered to a cylindrical volume approximately 5cm in length and 2cm in diameter that was positioned lateral to the cervical spinal cord resulting in a dose distribution with the 90%, 50% and 10% isodose lines traversing the ipsilateral, central and contralateral spinal cord, respectively. Twenty-three pigs were stratified into six dose groups with mean maximum spinal cord doses of 14.9±0.1 (n=2), 17.1±0.3 (n=3), 19.0±0.1 (n=5), 21.2±0.1 (n=5), 23.4±0.2 (n=5), and 25.4±0.4 (n=3)Gy. The mean percentage spinal cord volumes receiving >=10Gy for the same groups were 34%±1, 40%±1, 46%±3, 52%±1, 56±3, and 57%±1. The study endpoint was motor neurologic deficit determined by a change in gait during a one year follow-up period. Results A steep dose-response curve was observed with an ED50(95% CI) for the maximum point dose of 19.7Gy (17.4-21.4). With two exceptions, histology was unremarkable in animals with normal neurologic status while all animals with motor deficits showed some degree of demyelination and focal white matter necrosis on the irradiated side with relative sparing of the gray matter. Histologic comparison with a companion study of de novo irradiated animals revealed retreatment responders have more extensive tissue damage, including infarction of the gray matter, only at prescription doses >20Gy. Conclusion Pigs receiving spinal radiosurgery one year following 30Gy in 10 fractions are not at significantly higher risk of developing motor deficits than pigs that have received radiosurgery alone. PMID:22197239

  12. Conceptual modeling of coincident failures in multiversion software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlewood, Bev; Miller, Douglas R.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work by Eckhardt and Lee (1985) shows that independently developed program versions fail dependently (specifically, simultaneous failure of several is greater than would be the case under true independence). The present authors show there is a precise duality between input choice and program choice in this model and consider a generalization in which different versions can be developed using diverse methodologies. The use of diverse methodologies is shown to decrease the probability of the simultaneous failure of several versions. Indeed, it is theoretically possible to obtain versions which exhibit better than independent failure behavior. The authors try to formalize the notion of methodological diversity by considering the sequence of decision outcomes that constitute a methodology. They show that diversity of decision implies likely diversity of behavior for the different verions developed under such forced diversity. For certain one-out-of-n systems the authors obtain an optimal method for allocating diversity between versions. For two-out-of-three systems there seem to be no simple optimality results which do not depend on constraints which cannot be verified in practice.

  13. ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH PROBABILISTIC FAILURE MODELING OF DIGITAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,T.L.; MARTINEZ-GURIDI,G.; LEHNER,J.; OVERLAND,D.

    2004-09-19

    The current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process of instrumentation and control (I&C) systems is based on deterministic requirements, e.g., single failure criteria, and defense in depth and diversity. Probabilistic considerations can be used as supplements to the deterministic process. The National Research Council has recommended development of methods for estimating failure probabilities of digital systems, including commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment, for use in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). NRC staff has developed informal qualitative and quantitative requirements for PRA modeling of digital systems. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed a review of the-state-of-the-art of the methods and tools that can potentially be used to model digital systems. The objectives of this paper are to summarize the review, discuss the issues associated with probabilistic modeling of digital systems, and identify potential areas of research that would enhance the state of the art toward a satisfactory modeling method that could be integrated with a typical probabilistic risk assessment.

  14. A mixture Weibull proportional hazard model for mechanical system failure prediction utilising lifetime and monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Hua, Cheng; Xu, Guanghua

    2014-02-01

    As mechanical systems increase in complexity, it is becoming more and more common to observe multiple failure modes. The system failure can be regarded as the result of interaction and competition between different failure modes. It is therefore necessary to combine multiple failure modes when analysing the failure of an overall system. In this paper, a mixture Weibull proportional hazard model (MWPHM) is proposed to predict the failure of a mechanical system with multiple failure modes. The mixed model parameters are estimated by combining historical lifetime and monitoring data of all failure modes. In addition, the system failure probability density is obtained by proportionally mixing the failure probability density of multiple failure modes. Monitoring data are input into the MWPHM to estimate the system reliability and predict the system failure time. A simulated sample set is used to verify the ability of the MWPHM to model multiple failure modes. Finally, the MWPHM and the traditional Weibull proportional hazard model (WPHM) are applied to a high-pressure water descaling pump, which has two failure modes: sealing ring wear and thrust bearing damage. Results show that the MWPHM is greatly superior in system failure prediction to the WPHM.

  15. Peridynamic Modeling of Fracture and Failure of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-02

    failure loads approach the measured values. 4.3.2.1 Laminated plate with a center hole The quasi-isotropic AS4/3501-6 carbon/ epoxy composite ...both the failure progression and residual strength of monolithic and composite laminates. Predicting damage and residual strengths of composite ...demonstrated by predicting failure loads and final failure peridynamics, composites , progressive failure 42 Erdogan Madenci 52-250-1399

  16. Failure Behavior and Constitutive Model of Weakly Consolidated Soft Rock

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-ming; Zhao, Zeng-hui; Wang, Yong-ji; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Mining areas in western China are mainly located in soft rock strata with poor bearing capacity. In order to make the deformation failure mechanism and strength behavior of weakly consolidated soft mudstone and coal rock hosted in Ili No. 4 mine of Xinjiang area clear, some uniaxial and triaxial compression tests were carried out according to the samples of rocks gathered in the studied area, respectively. Meanwhile, a damage constitutive model which considered the initial damage was established by introducing a damage variable and a correction coefficient. A linearization process method was introduced according to the characteristics of the fitting curve and experimental data. The results showed that samples under different moisture contents and confining pressures presented completely different failure mechanism. The given model could accurately describe the elastic and plastic yield characteristics as well as the strain softening behavior of collected samples at postpeak stage. Moreover, the model could precisely reflect the relationship between the elastic modulus and confining pressure at prepeak stage. PMID:24489511

  17. Mathematical modeling of flooding due to river bank failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Carniello, Luca; Defina, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Modeling of flooding events resulting from bank overflooding and levee breaching is of relevant social and environmental interest. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic models integrating the shallow water equations turn out to be very effective tools for the purpose at hand. Many of the available models also use 1D channel elements, fully coupled to the 2D model, to simulate the flow of small channels dissecting the urban and rural areas, and 1D elements, referred to as 1D-links, to efficiently model the flow over levees, road and rail embankments, bunds, the flow through control gates, either free or submerged, and the operation of other hydraulic structures. In this work we propose a physically-based 1D-link to model breach formation and evolution in fluvial levees, and levee failure due to either piping or overtopping. The proposed 1D-link is then embedded in a 1D-2D hydrodynamic model, thus accounting for critical feedbacks between breach formation and changes in the hydrodynamic flow field. The breach model also includes the possibility of simulating breach closure, an important feature particularly in the view of hydraulic risk assessment and management of the emergency. The model is applied to five different case studies and the results of the numerical simulations compare favorably with field observations displaying a good agreement in terms of urban and rural flooded areas, water levels within the channel, final breach widths, and water volumes flowed through the breach.

  18. Modelling progressive autonomic failure in MSA: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Stemberger, Sylvia; Wenning, Gregor K

    2011-05-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal late-onset α-synucleinopathy that presents with features of ataxia, Parkinsonism, and pyramidal dysfunction in any combination. Over the last decade, efforts have been made to develop preclinical MSA testbeds for novel interventional strategies. The main focus has been on murine analogues of MSA-linked motor features and their underlying brainstem, cerebellar and basal ganglia pathology. Although progressive autonomic failure (AF) is a prominent clinical feature of patients with MSA, reflecting a disruption of both central and peripheral autonomic networks controlling cardiovascular, respiratory, urogenital, gastrointestinal and sudomotor functions, attempts of modelling this aspect of the human disease have been limited. However, emerging evidence suggests that AF-like features may occur in transgenic MSA models reflecting α-synucleinopathy lesions in distributed autonomic networks. Further research is needed to fully characterize both autonomic and motor features in optimized preclinical MSA models.

  19. A Model for Assessment of Failure of LWR Fuel during an RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenfeng; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a model for Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) failure of LWR fuel during an RIA. The model uses the J-integral as a driving parameter to characterize the failure potential during PCMI. The model is implemented in the FRAPTRAN code and is validated by CABRI and NSRR simulated RIA test data. Simulation of PWR and BWR conditions are conducted by FRAPTRAN to evaluate the fuel failure potential using this model. Model validation and simulation results are compared with the strain-based failure model of PNNL and the SED/CSED model of EPRI. Our fracture mechanics model has good capability to differentiate failure from non-failure cases. The results reveal significant effects of power pulse width: a wider pulse width generally increases the threshold for fuel failure. However, this effect is less obvious for highly corroded cladding. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds for treatment of anaerobically digested swine slurry: Experimental optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kizito, Simon; Wu, Shubiao; Wandera, Simon Mdondo; Guo, Luchen; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of influent concentration, flow rate, and adsorbent bed depth on ammonium adsorption from anaerobically digested swine slurry using three types of biochar made from corncobs (MCB), hardwood (WB), and mixed sawdust pellets (MSB). WB performed better than the other two biochar types with a maximum sorption capacity of 67-114mg/g due to its superior surface area and larger pore volume. Ammonium adsorption kinetics and dynamics depended on the influent NH4(+)-N concentration, applied inflow flow rate, and the depth of the fixed bed. Maximum sorption capacities under influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 500mg/L, were identified to be 114.2mg/g, 108.9mg/g, and 24.7mg/g at inflow rate of 15mL/min for WB, MCB, and MSB, respectively. The data shows that using deeper beds and applying lower flow rates could be a better strategy to increase ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds. Moreover, three kinetic models (Thomas, Adams-Bohart (BDST), and Yoon-Nelson) were applied to the experimental data to predict breakthrough curves and determine characteristic adsorption parameters for process design. The applied models fitted data in the order: Thomas (R(2)=0.971)>BDST (R(2)=0.960)>Yoon-Nelson (R(2)=0.940). It was concluded that ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds could be an effective method for routine cyclic treatment of slurry. However, further effluent polishing is required to meet discharge requirements.

  1. The Influence of Hypovolemia and Fluid Resuscitation During Hemorrhagic Shock on Apneic Oxygen Desaturation After Preoxygenation in a Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Tadayoshi; Morita, Koji; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-12-01

    Patients experiencing major bleeding often require both aggressive fluid resuscitation and rapid sequence tracheal intubation. The influence of hemorrhage-induced hypovolemia, and/or subsequent fluid resuscitation, on the time until critical oxygen desaturation is not well described. We studied the time to oxygen desaturation in a pig model of hemorrhage shock and colloid resuscitation. After anesthetic induction with isoflurane, 9 swine (mean ± SD = 25.3 ± 0.6 kg) were studied with the use of a stepwise hemorrhage and fluid resuscitation model with 4 sequential stages: 600 mL hemorrhage, 600 mL hydroxyethyl starch infusion, a further 600 mL hemorrhage, and a second 600 mL hydroxyethyl starch infusion. At each stage, after 5 minutes of mechanical ventilation with 100% oxygen, we induced apnea and measured the time to oxygen desaturation (oxygen saturation [SpO2] <70%). Hemodynamic and blood gas variables were recorded, and the cerebral and peripheral tissue oxygenation indices were recorded by near-infrared spectroscopy. The times ± SD to SpO2 <70% at each stage were 136 ± 41 (baseline), 147 ± 41 (hemorrhage), 131 ± 38 (resuscitation), 147 ± 38 (repeat hemorrhage), and 134 ± 36 seconds (repeat resuscitation). The mean differences in times before and after hemorrhage were 11.2 (6.5 to 16.0, P = 0.0052) and 16.0 (11.0 to 21.0, P < 0.0001), respectively. PaO2 before and after apneic desaturation (at SpO2 < 70%) was not different between stages. On the basis of tissue oxygenation index findings, hypovolemia decreased oxygen consumption, and fluid resuscitation recovered this parameter. In patients with acute hemorrhagic shock, a hypovolemic state increases the duration of apnea until critical oxygen desaturation. Clinicians should thus consider the relationship between fluid resuscitation and time to desaturation when performing tracheal intubation in such patients.

  2. Enalapril protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) protect against local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study was designed to explore whether ACEIs exert cardioprotective effects in a swine model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-operated group, saline treatment group and enalapril treatment group. Thirty minutes after drug infusion, the animals in the saline and enalapril groups were subjected to ventricular fibrillation (8 min) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min). Cardiac function was monitored, and myocardial tissue and blood were collected for analysis. Enalapril pre-treatment did not improve cardiac function or the 6-h survival rate after CA and resuscitation; however, this intervention ameliorated myocardial ultrastructural damage, reduced the level of plasma cardiac troponin I and decreased myocardial apoptosis. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1–7) levels were enhanced in the model of CA and resuscitation. Enalapril reduced the plasma Ang II level at 4 and 6 h after the return of spontaneous circulation whereas enalapril did not affect the plasma Ang-(1–7) level. Enalapril pre-treatment decreased the myocardial mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Enalapril treatment also reduced the myocardial ACE/ACE2 ratio, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Enalapril pre-treatment did not affect the upregulation of ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and MAS after CA and resuscitation. Taken together, these findings suggest that enalapril protects against ischemic injury through the attenuation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis after CA and resuscitation in pigs. These results suggest the potential therapeutic value of ACEIs in patients with CA. PMID:27633002

  3. Technique Development for a Polytrauma Model to Study Partial Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (P-REBOA) in Swine (Sus scrofa)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    widely in literature, limiting comparisons. Methods: Yorkshire-cross swine were anesthetized, instrumented, and splenectomized. A simple liver...applicable injury in swine . Use of the tourniquet allowed for consistent liver injury and precise control over hemorrhage.

  4. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  5. Utilization of MRI for Cerebral White Matter Injury in a Hypobaric Swine Model-Validation of Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-23

    resonance imaging (MRI) and associated with cognitive impairment. Similar findings occur in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We are developing a swine MRI...matter change, observable on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and associated with cognitive impairment. Similar findings occur in traumatic brain...subcortical white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with nonhypoxic hypobaric occupational exposure in U-2

  6. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  7. Transmission parameters estimated for Salmonella typhimurium in swine using susceptible-infectious-resistant models and a Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transmission models can aid understanding of disease dynamics and are useful in testing the efficiency of control measures. The aim of this study was to formulate an appropriate stochastic Susceptible-Infectious-Resistant/Carrier (SIR) model for Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs and thus estimate the transmission parameters between states. Results The transmission parameters were estimated using data from a longitudinal study of three Danish farrow-to-finish pig herds known to be infected. A Bayesian model framework was proposed, which comprised Binomial components for the transition from susceptible to infectious and from infectious to carrier; and a Poisson component for carrier to infectious. Cohort random effects were incorporated into these models to allow for unobserved cohort-specific variables as well as unobserved sources of transmission, thus enabling a more realistic estimation of the transmission parameters. In the case of the transition from susceptible to infectious, the cohort random effects were also time varying. The number of infectious pigs not detected by the parallel testing was treated as unknown, and the probability of non-detection was estimated using information about the sensitivity and specificity of the bacteriological and serological tests. The estimate of the transmission rate from susceptible to infectious was 0.33 [0.06, 1.52], from infectious to carrier was 0.18 [0.14, 0.23] and from carrier to infectious was 0.01 [0.0001, 0.04]. The estimate for the basic reproduction ration (R 0 ) was 1.91 [0.78, 5.24]. The probability of non-detection was estimated to be 0.18 [0.12, 0.25]. Conclusions The proposed framework for stochastic SIR models was successfully implemented to estimate transmission rate parameters for Salmonella Typhimurium in swine field data. R 0 was 1.91, implying that there was dissemination of the infection within pigs of the same cohort. There was significant temporal-cohort variability, especially at the

  8. Failure in laboratory fault models in triaxial tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    A model of a fault in the Earth is a sand-filled saw cut in a granite cylinder subjected to a triaxial test. The saw cut is inclined at an angle a to the cylinder axis, and the sand filling is intended to represent gouge. The triaxial test subjects the granite cylinder to a constant confining pressure and increasing axial stress to maintain a constant rate of shortening of the cylinder. The required axial stress increases at a decreasing rate to a maximum, beyond which a roughly constant axial stress is sufficient to maintain the constant rate of shortening: Such triaxial tests were run for saw cuts inclined at angles ?? of 20??, 25??, 30??, 35??, 40??, 45??, and 50?? to the cylinder axis, and the apparent coefficient of friction ??a (ratio of the shear stress to the normal stress, both stresses resolved onto the saw cut) at failure was determined. Subject to the assumption that the observed failure involves slip on Coulomb shears (orientation unspecified), the orientation of the principal compression axis within the gouge can be calculated as a function of ??a for a given value of the coefficient of internal friction ??i. The rotation of the principal stress axes within the gouge in a triaxial test can then be followed as the shear strain across the gouge layer increases. For ??i ??? 0.8, an appropriate value for highly sheared sand, the observed values ??a imply that the principal-axis of compression within the gouge rotates so as to approach being parallel to the cylinder axis for all saw cut angles (20?? < ?? < 50??). In the limiting state (principal compression axis parallel to cylinder axis) the stress state in the gouge layer would be the same as that in the granite cylinder, and the failure criterion would be independent of the saw cut angle.

  9. Differential Effects Of Octanoate And Heptanoate On Myocardial Metabolism During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation In An Infant Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Oddnumbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant betaoxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Methods: Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-hour ECMO were received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA) or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol/kg body wt/min as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5 per group). The 13-Carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 minutes before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]/[ADP] ratio compared with other http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpen Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition For Peer Review groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC as well as heptanoate. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in fractional protein synthesis rate. Conclusion: Octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate, while preserving protein synthesis.

  10. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26–45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt−1·min−1 as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate, and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate. PMID:26232235

  11. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M.; Harding, John C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research. PMID:24082397

  12. A Modified Collagen Gel Dressing Promotes Angiogenesis in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model of Chronic Ischemic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Ganesh, Kasturi; Dickerson, Jennifer; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Ghatak, Piya Das; Dixit, Sriteja; Bergdall, Valerie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    We recently performed proteomic characterization of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing and reported promising effects of the gel in healing full-thickness excisional wounds. In this work, we test the translational relevance of our aforesaid findings by testing the dressing in a swine model of chronic ischemic wounds recently reported by our laboratory. Full thickness excisional wounds were established in the center of bi- pedicle ischemic skin flaps on the backs of animals. Ischemia was verified by Laser Doppler imaging and MCG was applied to the test group of wounds. Seven days post- wounding, macrophage recruitment to the wound was significantly higher in MCG- treated ischemic wounds. In vitro, MCG up-regulated expression of Mrc-1 (a reparative M2 macrophage marker) and induced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and of β-FGF. An increased expression of CCR2, a M2 macrophage marker, was noted in the macrophages from MCG treated wounds. Furthermore, analyses of wound tissues 7 days post wounding showed up-regulation of TGF-β, VEGF, vWF, and collagen type I expression in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. At 21 days post-wounding, MCG-treated ischemic wounds displayed higher abundance of proliferating endothelial cells that formed mature vascular structures and increased blood flow to the wound. Fibroblast count was markedly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wound-edge tissue. In addition, MCG-treated wound-edge tissues displayed higher abundance of mature collagen with increased collagen type I:III deposition. Taken together, MCG helped mount a more robust inflammatory response which resolved in a timely manner, followed by an enhanced proliferative phase, angiogenic outcome and post-wound tissue remodeling. Findings of the current study warrant clinical testing of MCG in a setting of ischemic chronic wounds. PMID:25224310

  13. Snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs as a model for swine infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyun; Haines, Deborah M; Harding, John C S

    2013-04-01

    The current study tested the benefit of commercially available spray-dried bovine colostrum (The Saskatoon Colostrum Company, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) in raising snatch-farrowed, porcine-colostrum-deprived (SF-pCD) pigs. In experiment 1, 12 SF-pCD pigs received a liquid diet composed mainly of bovine colostrum from birth to day 10; 6 remained on the same liquid diet (COL), and the other 6 were fed a diet composed mainly of milk replacer (RPL) until weaning. In experiment 2, 12 SF-pCD pigs were fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning; after weaning, 6 were fed a starter diet containing 20% (w/w) bovine colostrum powder (STARTER-COL), and the other 6 were fed a starter diet without any bovine colostrum (STARTER-CTRL) until termination (day 42 or day 49). In experiment 1 the COL pigs had significantly fewer fever-days than did the RPL pigs. In experiment 2 diarrhea, typhlocolitis, and pancreatic degeneration developed in 4 of the STARTER-COL pigs after weaning. In both experiments all the pigs fed mainly bovine colostrum before weaning survived until termination. All pigs tested free of swine influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine parvovirus. In experiment 2 all the pigs tested free of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), but some in both groups tested positive for Torque teno virus genogroups 1 and 2. In conclusion, with the use of snatch-farrowing and bovine colostrum, pigs can be raised in the absence of porcine maternal antibodies with 100% survival and freedom from most porcine pathogens of biologic relevance. This model is potentially suitable for animal disease research.

  14. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Olson, Aaron K; Isern, Nancy G; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1) as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon ((13)C)-labeled substrates ([2-(13)C]lactate, [5,6,7-(13)C3]heptanoate, and [U-(13)C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the (13)C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Intracoronary Delivery of Human Mesenchymal/Stromal Stem Cells: Insights from Coronary Microcirculation Invasive Assessment in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fiarresga, António; Mata, Márcia F.; Cavaco-Gonçalves, Sandra; Selas, Mafalda; Simões, Irina N.; Oliveira, Eunice; Carrapiço, Belmira; Cardim, Nuno; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; da Silva, Cláudia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have unique properties favorable to their use in clinical practice and have been studied for cardiac repair. However, these cells are larger than coronary microvessels and there is controversy about the risk of embolization and microinfarctions, which could jeopardize the safety and efficacy of intracoronary route for their delivery. The index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) is an invasive method for quantitatively assessing the coronary microcirculation status. Objectives To examine heart microcirculation after intracoronary injection of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with the index of microcirculatory resistance. Methods Healthy swine were randomized to receive by intracoronary route either 30x106 MSC or the same solution with no cells (1% human albumin/PBS) (placebo). Blinded operators took coronary pressure and flow measurements, prior to intracoronary infusion and at 5 and 30 minutes post-delivery. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) and the IMR were compared between groups. Results CFR and IMR were done with a variance within the 3 transit time measurements of 6% at rest and 11% at maximal hyperemia. After intracoronary infusion there were no significant differences in CFR. The IMR was significantly higher in MSC-injected animals (at 30 minutes, 14.2U vs. 8.8U, p = 0.02) and intragroup analysis showed a significant increase of 112% from baseline to 30 minutes after cell infusion, although no electrocardiographic changes or clinical deterioration were noted. Conclusion Overall, this study provides definitive evidence of microcirculatory disruption upon intracoronary administration of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, in a large animal model closely resembling human cardiac physiology, function and anatomy. PMID:26479722

  16. Improved bleeding scores using Gelfoam(®) Powder with incremental concentrations of bovine thrombin in a swine liver lesion model.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Silva, Elif; Bartrom, Jolee; Young, Kelli; Bass, Eric J; Potter, David; Bieber, Trevor

    2016-10-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used intra-operatively to prevent uncontrolled bleeding. Gelfoam(®) Powder contains a hemostatic agent prepared from purified pork skin gelatin, the efficacy of which is increased when combined with thrombin. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of thrombin on resultant hemostasis is not known. This study sought to evaluate the ability of various concentrations of thrombin in combination with Gelfoam Powder to control bleeding using a swine liver lesion model. Ten pigs underwent a midline laparotomy. Circular lesions were created in the left medial, right medial, and left lateral lobes; six lesions per lobe. Gelfoam Powder was hydrated with Thrombin-JMI(®) diluted to 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL. Each concentration was applied to two lesion sites per lobe. Bleeding scores were measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 min using a 6-point system; comparison of bleeding scores was performed using ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey test. The bleeding scores with thrombin concentrations at 770 IU/mL were significantly lower than at 250 and 375 IU/mL at all four time points. The percentage of biopsies with a clinically acceptable bleeding score rose from 37.9, 46.6, and 71.2 % at 3 min to 55.2, 69.0, and 88.1 % at 12 min in the 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL thrombin groups, respectively. The study showed that the hemostatic response to thrombin was dose-related: using higher concentrations of thrombin with Gelfoam Powder yielded improved hemostasis, as determined by lower bleeding scores.

  17. Experimental formation of dentin-like structure in the root canal implant model using cryopreserved swine dental pulp progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kodonas, Kostas; Gogos, Christos; Papadimitriou, Serafim; Kouzi-Koliakou, Kokona; Tziafas, Dimitrios

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to present histological and immunohistochemical evidence showing the regenerative capacity of swine dental pulp stem cells (S-DPSCs) seeded on organic or synthetic scaffolds and implanted as hybrid root implants in the jaw bone of minipigs. Immature permanent incisor teeth and unerupted premolars at the early root-forming stage were extracted from three 7-month-old minipigs, and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells were isolated from dental pulp. Cells were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. A year later, new permanent incisor and premolar teeth were extracted; pulp tissue was removed; and pieces of root canals of the extracted teeth, containing collagen or Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds seeded with the autologous cryopreserved DPSCs, were implanted into the fresh post-extraction socket of the mini pig jaw. The resulting constructs were harvested after 6 and 10 weeks and evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Six weeks postoperatively, the central canal space of the root implants showed degrading scaffold material. New extracellular matrix had been deposited in a polar predentin-like pattern on the canal dentinal walls by cuboidal nonpolarized cells. Ten weeks postoperatively, newly formed organic matrix had been consistently deposited on the canal walls. The presence of a continuous layer of polarized cells showing typical columnar morphology adjacent to the newly deposited organic matrix was evident. The interactions of S-DPSCs with the dentin matrix of roots implanted in the jawbone of minipigs constitute a model to study in vivo organization and differentiation potential of DPSCs. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rodent heart failure models do not reflect the human circulating microRNA signature in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vegter, Eline L; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Silljé, Herman H W; Meems, Laura M G; van der Pol, Atze; van der Velde, A Rogier; Berezikov, Eugene; Voors, Adriaan A; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a set of plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) that are downregulated in patients with heart failure in comparison with control subjects. To better understand their meaning and function, we sought to validate these circulating miRNAs in 3 different well-established rat and mouse heart failure models, and correlated the miRNAs to parameters of cardiac function. The previously identified let-7i-5p, miR-16-5p, miR-18a-5p, miR-26b-5p, miR-27a-3p, miR-30e-5p, miR-199a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-423-3p, miR-423-5p and miR-652-3p were measured by means of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in plasma samples of 8 homozygous TGR(mREN2)27 (Ren2) transgenic rats and 8 (control) Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 mice with angiotensin II-induced heart failure (AngII) and 6 control mice, and 8 mice with ischemic heart failure and 6 controls. Circulating miRNA levels were compared between the heart failure animals and healthy controls. Ren2 rats, AngII mice and mice with ischemic heart failure showed clear signs of heart failure, exemplified by increased left ventricular and lung weights, elevated end-diastolic left ventricular pressures, increased expression of cardiac stress markers and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. All miRNAs were detectable in plasma from rats and mice. No significant differences were observed between the circulating miRNAs in heart failure animals when compared to the healthy controls (all P>0.05) and no robust associations with cardiac function could be found. The previous observation that miRNAs circulate in lower levels in human patients with heart failure could not be validated in well-established rat and mouse heart failure models. These results question the translation of data on human circulating miRNA levels to experimental models, and vice versa the validity of experimental miRNA data for human heart failure.

  19. 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus elicits similar clinical course but differential host transcriptional response in mouse, macaque, and swine infection models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus emerged in swine and quickly became a major global health threat. In mouse, non human primate, and swine infection models, the pH1N1 virus efficiently replicates in the lung and induces pro-inflammatory host responses; however, whether similar or different cellular pathways were impacted by pH1N1 virus across independent infection models remains to be further defined. To address this we have performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of acute phase responses to a single pH1N1 influenza virus, A/California/04/2009 (CA04), in the lung of mice, macaques and swine. Results Despite similarities in the clinical course, we observed differences in inflammatory molecules elicited, and the kinetics of their gene expression changes across all three species. We found genes associated with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) signaling pathway known to control pro-inflammatory and metabolic processes that were differentially regulated during infection in each species, though the heterodimeric RXR partner, pathway associated signaling molecules, and gene expression patterns varied among the three species. Conclusions By comparing transcriptional changes in the context of clinical and virological measures, we identified differences in the host transcriptional response to pH1N1 virus across independent models of acute infection. Antiviral resistance and the emergence of new influenza viruses have placed more focus on developing drugs that target the immune system. Underlying overt clinical disease are molecular events that suggest therapeutic targets identified in one host may not be appropriate in another. PMID:23153050

  20. Analysis of failure rate data with compound models

    SciTech Connect

    Shultis, J.K.; Eckhoff, N.D.; Johnson, D.E.; Milliken, G.A.; Drayer, D.D.; Gallup, D.R.; Buranapan, W.

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning the distinction of failure data by the likelihood ratio test; detection of outliers in failure data; and properties of prior estimation techniques in Bayesian analyses.

  1. An Integrated Approach to Modeling and Mitigating SOFC Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A.; Haynes, C.; Qu, J.

    2005-01-27

    The objective of this project is to develop first-order failure criteria to be used for the initial design, material selection and optimization against thermomechanical failure of the PEN structure in high temperature SOFCs.

  2. An introductory characterization of a combat-casualty-care relevant swine model of closed head injury resulting from exposure to explosive blast.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Richard A; Ling, Geoffrey; Tong, Lawrence; Januszkiewicz, Adolph; Agoston, Dennis; Delanerolle, Nihal; Kim, Young; Ritzel, Dave; Bell, Randy; Ecklund, James; Armonda, Rocco; Bandak, Faris; Parks, Steven

    2009-06-01

    Explosive blast has been extensively used as a tactical weapon in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and more recently in Operation Enduring Freedom(OEF). The polytraumatic nature of blast injuries is evidence of their effectiveness,and brain injury is a frequent and debilitating form of this trauma. In-theater clinical observations of brain-injured casualties have shown that edema, intracranial hemorrhage, and vasospasm are the most salient pathophysiological characteristics of blast injury to the brain. Unfortunately, little is known about exactly how an explosion produces these sequelae as well as others that are less well documented. Consequently, the principal objective of the current report is to present a swine model of explosive blast injury to the brain. This model was developed during Phase I of the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) PREVENT (Preventing Violent Explosive Neurotrauma) blast research program. A second objective is to present data that illustrate the capabilities of this model to study the proximal biomechanical causes and the resulting pathophysiological, biochemical,neuropathological, and neurological consequences of explosive blast injury to the swine brain. In the concluding section of this article, the advantages and limitations of the model are considered, explosive and air-overpressure models are compared, and the physical properties of an explosion are identified that potentially contributed to the in-theater closed head injuries resulting from explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

  3. Modelling the transmission dynamics and control of the novel 2009 swine influenza (H1N1) pandemic.

    PubMed

    Sharomi, O; Podder, C N; Gumel, A B; Mahmud, S M; Rubinstein, E

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents a deterministic compartmental model for the transmission dynamics of swine influenza (H1N1) pandemic in a population in the presence of an imperfect vaccine and use of drug therapy for confirmed cases. Rigorous analysis of the model, which stratifies the infected population in terms of their risk of developing severe illness, reveals that it exhibits a vaccine-induced backward bifurcation when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. The epidemiological consequence of this result is that the effective control of H1N1, when the reproduction number is less than unity, in the population would then be dependent on the initial sizes of the subpopulations of the model. For the case where the vaccine is perfect, it is shown that having the reproduction number less than unity is necessary and sufficient for effective control of H1N1 in the population (in such a case, the associated disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable). The model has a unique endemic equilibrium when the reproduction number exceeds unity. Numerical simulations of the model, using data relevant to the province of Manitoba, Canada, show that it reasonably mimics the observed H1N1 pandemic data for Manitoba during the first (Spring) wave of the pandemic. Further, it is shown that the timely implementation of a mass vaccination program together with the size of the Manitoban population that have preexisting infection-acquired immunity (from the first wave) are crucial to the magnitude of the expected burden of disease associated with the second wave of the H1N1 pandemic. With an estimated vaccine efficacy of approximately 80%, it is projected that at least 60% of Manitobans need to be vaccinated in order for the effective control or elimination of the H1N1 pandemic in the province to be feasible. Finally, it is shown that the burden of the second wave of H1N1 is expected to be at least three times that of the first wave, and that the second wave would last

  4. Swine immune system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  5. Predictive influence in the accelerated failure time model.

    PubMed

    Bedrick, Edward J; Exuzides, Alex; Johnson, Wesley O; Thurmond, Mark C

    2002-09-01

    We develop case deletion diagnostics for prediction of future observations in the accelerated failure time model. We view prediction to be an important inferential goal in a survival analysis and thus it is important to identify whether particular observations may be influencing the quality of predictions. We use the Kullback-Leibler divergence as a measure of the discrepancy between the estimated probability distributions for the full and the case-deleted samples. In particular, we focus on the effect of case deletion on estimated survival curves but where we regard the survival curve estimate as a vehicle for prediction. We also develop a diagnostic for assessing the effect of case deletion on inferences for the median time to failure. The estimated median can be used with both predictive and estimative purposes in mind. We also discuss the relationship between our suggested measures and the corresponding Cook distance measure, which was designed with the goal of assessing estimative influence. Several applications of the proposed diagnostics are presented.

  6. Stage Separation Failure: Model Based Diagnostics and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kulikov, Igor; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Hanson, John; Hill, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Safety of the next-generation space flight vehicles requires development of an in-flight Failure Detection and Prognostic (FD&P) system. Development of such system is challenging task that involves analysis of many hard hitting engineering problems across the board. In this paper we report progress in the development of FD&P for the re-contact fault between upper stage nozzle and the inter-stage caused by the first stage and upper stage separation failure. A high-fidelity models and analytical estimations are applied to analyze the following sequence of events: (i) structural dynamics of the nozzle extension during the impact; (ii) structural stability of the deformed nozzle in the presence of the pressure and temperature loads induced by the hot gas flow during engine start up; and (iii) the fault induced thrust changes in the steady burning regime. The diagnostic is based on the measurements of the impact torque. The prognostic is based on the analysis of the correlation between the actuator signal and fault-induced changes in the nozzle structural stability and thrust.

  7. Heartbeat Model for Component Failure in Simulation of Plant Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Youngblood; R. R. Nourgaliev; D. L. Kelly; C. L. Smith; T-N. Dinh

    2011-03-01

    As part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), tools and methodology for risk-informed characterization of safety margin are being developed for use in supporting decision-making on plant life extension after the first license renewal. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize realistic probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system behavior. This way of thinking about margin comports with work done in the last 10 years. However, current capabilities to model in this way are limited: it is currently possible, but difficult, to validly simulate enough time histories to support quantification in realistic problems, and the treatment of environmental influences on reliability is relatively artificial in many existing applications. The INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability (widely referred to as “R7”) that will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin. In this paper, we show how to implement cumulative damage (“heartbeat”) models for component reliability that lend themselves naturally to being included as part of the phenomenology simulation. Implementation of this modeling approach relies on the way in which the phenomenology simulation implements its dynamic time step management. Within this approach, component failures influence the phenomenology, and the phenomenology influences the component failures.

  8. Omnibus risk assessment via accelerated failure time kernel machine modeling.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-12-01

    Integrating genomic information with traditional clinical risk factors to improve the prediction of disease outcomes could profoundly change the practice of medicine. However, the large number of potential markers and possible complexity of the relationship between markers and disease make it difficult to construct accurate risk prediction models. Standard approaches for identifying important markers often rely on marginal associations or linearity assumptions and may not capture non-linear or interactive effects. In recent years, much work has been done to group genes into pathways and networks. Integrating such biological knowledge into statistical learning could potentially improve model interpretability and reliability. One effective approach is to employ a kernel machine (KM) framework, which can capture nonlinear effects if nonlinear kernels are used (Scholkopf and Smola, 2002; Liu et al., 2007, 2008). For survival outcomes, KM regression modeling and testing procedures have been derived under a proportional hazards (PH) assumption (Li and Luan, 2003; Cai, Tonini, and Lin, 2011). In this article, we derive testing and prediction methods for KM regression under the accelerated failure time (AFT) model, a useful alternative to the PH model. We approximate the null distribution of our test statistic using resampling procedures. When multiple kernels are of potential interest, it may be unclear in advance which kernel to use for testing and estimation. We propose a robust Omnibus Test that combines information across kernels, and an approach for selecting the best kernel for estimation. The methods are illustrated with an application in breast cancer. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  9. A Macaca mulatta model of fulminant hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Xia, Jie; Guo, Gang; Huang, Zi-Xing; Lu, Qiang; Li, Li; Li, Hong-Xia; Shi, Yu-Jun; Bu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish an appropriate primate model of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS: We have, for the first time, established a large animal model of FHF in Macaca mulatta by intraperitoneal infusion of amatoxin and endotoxin. Clinical features, biochemical indexes, histopathology and iconography were examined to dynamically investigate the progress and outcome of the animal model. RESULTS: Our results showed that the enzymes and serum bilirubin were markedly increased and the enzyme-bilirubin segregation emerged 36 h after toxin administration. Coagulation activity was significantly decreased. Gradually deteriorated parenchymal abnormality was detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography at 48 h. The liver biopsy showed marked hepatocyte steatosis and massive parenchymal necrosis at 36 h and 49 h, respectively. The autopsy showed typical yellow atrophy of the liver. Hepatic encephalopathy of the models was also confirmed by hepatic coma, MRI and pathological changes of cerebral edema. The lethal effects of the extrahepatic organ dysfunction were ruled out by their biochemical indices, imaging and histopathology. CONCLUSION: We have established an appropriate large primate model of FHF, which is closely similar to clinic cases, and can be used for investigation of the mechanism of FHF and for evaluation of potential medical therapies. PMID:22346249

  10. Stochastic spatio-temporal modelling of African swine fever spread in the European Union during the high risk period.

    PubMed

    Nigsch, Annette; Costard, Solenne; Jones, Bryony A; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable viral pig disease with high mortality and serious socio-economic consequences. Since ASF emerged in Georgia in 2007 the disease has spread to several neighbouring countries and cases have been detected in areas bordering the European Union (EU). It is uncertain how fast the virus would be able to spread within the unrestricted European trading area if it were introduced into the EU. This project therefore aimed to develop a model for the spread of ASF within and between the 27 Member States (MS) of the EU during the high risk period (HRP) and to identify MS during that period would most likely contribute to ASF spread ("super-spreaders") or MS that would most likely receive cases from other MS ("super-receivers"). A stochastic spatio-temporal state-transition model using simulated individual farm records was developed to assess silent ASF virus spread during different predefined HRPs of 10-60 days duration. Infection was seeded into farms of different pig production types in each of the 27 MS. Direct pig-to-pig transmission and indirect transmission routes (pig transport lorries and professional contacts) were considered the main pathways during the early stages of an epidemic. The model was parameterised using data collated from EUROSTAT, TRACES, a questionnaire sent to MS, and the scientific literature. Model outputs showed that virus circulation was generally limited to 1-2 infected premises per outbreak (95% IQR: 1-4; maximum: 10) with large breeder farms as index case resulting in most infected premises. Seven MS caused between-MS spread due to intra-Community trade during the first 10 days after seeding infection. For a HRP of 60 days from virus introduction, movements of infected pigs will originate at least once from 16 MS, with 6 MS spreading ASF in more than 10% of iterations. Two thirds of all intra-Community spread was linked to six trade links only. Denmark, the Netherlands, Lithuania and Latvia were identified

  11. Draft genome sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22....

  12. A Comparison of the Effects of Intraosseous and Intravenous 5% Albumin on Infusion Time and Hemodynamic Measures in a Swine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Muir, Stacy L; Sheppard, Lance B; Maika-Wilson, Anne; Burgert, James M; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Johnson, Arthur D; Coyner, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Introduction Obtaining intravenous (IV) access in patients in hemorrhagic shock is often difficult and prolonged. Failed IV attempts delay life-saving treatment. Intraosseous (IO) access may often be obtained faster than IV access. Albumin (5%) is an option for prehospital volume expansion because of the absence of interference with coagulation and platelet function. Hypothesis/Problem There are limited data comparing the performance of IO and IV administered 5% albumin. The aims of this study were to compare the effects of tibial IO (TIO) and IV administration of 500 mL of 5% albumin on infusion time and hemodynamic measurements of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) in a swine model of hemorrhagic shock. Sixteen male swine were divided into two groups: TIO and IV. All subjects were anesthetized and a Class III hemorrhage was achieved by exsanguination of 31% of estimated blood volume (EBV) from a femoral artery catheter. Following exsanguination, 500 mL of 5% albumin was administered under pressurized infusion (300 mmHg) by the TIO or IV route and infusion time was recorded. Hemodynamic measurements of HR, MAP, CO, and SV were collected before and after exsanguination and every 20 seconds for 180 seconds during 5% albumin infusion. An independent t-test determined that IV 5% albumin infusion was significantly faster compared to IO (P=.01). Mean infusion time for TIO was seven minutes 35 seconds (SD=two minutes 44 seconds) compared to four minutes 32 seconds (SD=one minute 08 seconds) in the IV group. Multivariate Analysis of Variance was performed on hemodynamic data collected during the 5% albumin infusion. Analyses indicated there were no significant differences between the TIO and IV groups relative to MAP, CO, HR, or SV (P>.05). While significantly longer to infuse 5% albumin by the TIO route, the longer TIO infusion time may be negated as IO devices can be placed more quickly compared to repeated IV

  13. Evaluation of a Multi-Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding the response of the structural adhesives used in the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle, an extensive effort has been conducted to characterize in detail the failure properties of these adhesives. This effort involved the development of a failure model that includes the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature, and time. An understanding of the effects of these parameters on the failure of the adhesive is crucial to the understanding and prediction of the safety of the RSRM nozzle. This paper documents the use of this newly developed multi-axial, temperature, and time (MATT) dependent failure model for modeling failure for the adhesives TIGA 321, EA913NA, and EA946. The development of the mathematical failure model using constant load rate normal and shear test data is presented. Verification of the accuracy of the failure model is shown through comparisons between predictions and measured creep and multi-axial failure data. The verification indicates that the failure model performs well for a wide range of conditions (loading, temperature, and time) for the three adhesives. The failure criterion is shown to be accurate through the glass transition for the adhesive EA946. Though this failure model has been developed and evaluated with adhesives, the concepts are applicable for other isotropic materials.

  14. A novel spatial and stochastic model to evaluate the within- and between-farm transmission of classical swine fever virus. I. General concepts and description of the model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, B; Ivorra, B; Ramos, A M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2011-01-27

    A new stochastic and spatial model was developed to evaluate the potential spread of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) within- and between-farms, and considering the specific farm-to-farm contact network. Within-farm transmission was simulated using a modified SI model. Between-farm transmission was assumed to occur by direct contacts (i.e. animal movement) and indirect contacts (i.e. local spread, vehicle and person contacts) and considering the spatial location of farms. Control measures dictated by the European legislation (i.e. depopulation of infected farms, movement restriction, zoning, surveillance, contact tracing) were also implemented into the model. Model experimentation was performed using real data from Segovia, one of the provinces with highest density of pigs in Spain, and results were presented using the mean, 95% probability intervals [95% PI] and risk maps. The estimated mean [95% PI] number of infected, quarantined and depopulated farms were 3 [1,17], 23 [0,76] and 115 [0,318], respectively. The duration of the epidemic was 63 [26,177] days and the most important way of transmission was associated with local spread (61.4% of the infections). Results were consistent with the spread of previous CSFV introductions into the study region. The model and results presented here may be useful for the decision making process and for the improvement of the prevention and control programmes for CSFV.

  15. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2017-02-22

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB.

  16. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K.; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB. PMID:28225040

  17. Failure Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) Analyzer Model SP-1000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) subcontractor Wiltech contacted the NASA Electrical Lab (NE-L) and requested a failure analysis of a Solvent Purity Meter; model SP-IOOO produced by the VerTis Instrument Company. The meter, used to measure the contaminate in a solvent to determine the relative contamination on spacecraft flight hardware and ground servicing equipment, had been inoperable and in storage for an unknown amount of time. NE-L was asked to troubleshoot the unit and make a determination on what may be required to make the unit operational. Through the use of general troubleshooting processes and the review of a unit in service at the time of analysis, the unit was found to be repairable but would need the replacement of multiple components.

  18. Modeling cascading failures in the North American power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, R.; Crucitti, P.; Albert, R.; Latora, V.

    2005-07-01

    The North American power grid is one of the most complex technological networks, and its interconnectivity allows both for long-distance power transmission and for the propagation of disturbances. We model the power grid using its actual topology and plausible assumptions about the load and overload of transmission substations. Our results indicate that the loss of a single substation can result in up to 25% loss of transmission efficiency by triggering an overload cascade in the network. The actual transmission loss depends on the overload tolerance of the network and the connectivity of the failed substation. We systematically study the damage inflicted by the loss of single nodes, and find three universal behaviors, suggesting that 40% of the transmission substations lead to cascading failures when disrupted. While the loss of a single node can inflict substantial damage, subsequent removals have only incremental effects, in agreement with the topological resilience to less than 1% node loss.

  19. Accelerated failure time model under general biased sampling scheme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jane Paik; Sit, Tony; Ying, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Right-censored time-to-event data are sometimes observed from a (sub)cohort of patients whose survival times can be subject to outcome-dependent sampling schemes. In this paper, we propose a unified estimation method for semiparametric accelerated failure time models under general biased estimating schemes. The proposed estimator of the regression covariates is developed upon a bias-offsetting weighting scheme and is proved to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed. Large sample properties for the estimator are also derived. Using rank-based monotone estimating functions for the regression parameters, we find that the estimating equations can be easily solved via convex optimization. The methods are confirmed through simulations and illustrated by application to real datasets on various sampling schemes including length-bias sampling, the case-cohort design and its variants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Computational modeling of progressive failure and damage in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya

    Current and future aerospace systems utilize an ever-increasing amount of fiber reinforced composite laminates in various mission critical structural components making it imperative to understand their damage tolerance capacity under a multitude of loading envelopes. Their comparatively low strength under predominantly axial compressive loading severely limits the design loads of such structures. In the current work, a mechanism based lamina level computational methodology is developed for progressive failure analysis (PFA) of composite laminates beyond initial failure. A combination of analytical and micromechanical studies are used to identify the underlying mechanism of failure under predominantly compressive loading. Under such loading, the class of carbon fiber reinforced laminates considered in this thesis fails by fiber kinking. Results from an analytical study dispel the notion of a fixed compressive strength and show that it is a function of the in-situ geometric and material properties and stress state. These observations and finite element based micromechanical studies have identified the in-situ fiber rotation in the presence of initial fiber misalignment and the degradation of the in-situ shear modulus due to microcracking as the two main drivers of the kinking failure mechanism. A previously developed thermodynamics based lamina constitutive model is utilized to develop a PFA methodology for laminated composites. Laminae are assumed to be damaged by microcraking that is manifested in the degradation of the shear modulus and the transverse modulus. The amount of irrecoverable energy, expressed as a thermodynamic state variable S, provides a measure of the damage state inside a lamina. Lamina level coupon tests are used to obtain relations between S and the degrading moduli. These relations in conjunction with the lamina elastic constants and the geometric information such as the lamina thickness and the lamina lay-up are used as the PFA inputs. Damage

  1. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  2. Passive immunization with a polyclonal antiserum to the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi confers protection against a homologous challenge in the experimental swine model of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima; Routh, Patty A; Cholon, Deborah M; Hobbs, Marcia M; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Elkins, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has an obligate requirement for heme. Heme is acquired by H. ducreyi from its human host via TonB-dependent transporters expressed at its bacterial surface. Of 3 TonB-dependent transporters encoded in the genome of H. ducreyi, only the hemoglobin receptor, HgbA, is required to establish infection during the early stages of the experimental human model of chancroid. Active immunization with a native preparation of HgbA (nHgbA) confers complete protection in the experimental swine model of chancroid, using either Freund's or monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvants. To determine if transfer of anti-nHgbA serum is sufficient to confer protection, a passive immunization experiment using pooled nHgbA antiserum was conducted in the experimental swine model of chancroid. Pigs receiving this pooled nHgbA antiserum were protected from a homologous, but not a heterologous, challenge. Passively transferred polyclonal antibodies elicited to nHgbA bound the surface of H. ducreyi and partially blocked hemoglobin binding by nHgbA, but were not bactericidal. Taken together, these data suggest that the humoral immune response to the HgbA vaccine is protective against an H. ducreyi infection, possibly by preventing acquisition of the essential nutrient heme.

  3. Ureteral Obstruction Swine Model through Laparoscopy and Single Port for Training on Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Güemes Martín-Portugués, Idoia; Hernández-Hurtado, Laura; Usón-Casaús, Jesús; Sánchez-Hurtado, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2013-01-01

    This study aims firstly to assess the most adequate surgical approach for the creation of an ureteropelvic juntion obstruction (UPJO) animal model, and secondly to validate this model for laparoscopic pyeloplasty training among urologists. Thirty six Large White pigs (28.29±5.48 Kg) were used. The left ureteropelvic junction was occluded by means of an endoclip. According to the surgical approach for model creation, pigs were randomized into: laparoscopic conventional surgery (LAP) or single port surgery (LSP). Each group was further divided into transperitoneal (+T) or retroperitoneal (+R) approach. Time needed for access, surgical field preparation, wound closure, and total surgical times were registered. Social behavior, tenderness to the touch and wound inflammation were evaluated in the early postoperative period. After ten days, all animals underwent an Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty carried out by 9 urologists, who subsequently assessed the model by means of a subjective validation questionnaire. Total operative time was significantly greater in LSP+R (p=0.001). Tenderness to the touch was significantly increased in both retroperitoneal approaches, (p=0.0001). Surgeons rated the UPJO porcine model for training on laparoscopic pyeloplasty with high or very high scores, all above 4 on a 1-5 point Likert scale. Our UPJO animal model is useful for laparoscopic pyeloplasty training. The model created by retroperitoneal single port approach presented the best score in the subjective evaluation, whereas, as a whole, transabdominal laparoscopic approach was preferred. PMID:23801892

  4. Numerical investigations of rib fracture failure models in different dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Jikuang; Miller, Karol; Li, Guibing; Joldes, Grand R; Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rib fracture is one of the most common thoracic injuries in vehicle traffic accidents that can result in fatalities associated with seriously injured internal organs. A failure model is critical when modelling rib fracture to predict such injuries. Different rib failure models have been proposed in prediction of thorax injuries. However, the biofidelity of the fracture failure models when varying the loading conditions and the effects of a rib fracture failure model on prediction of thoracic injuries have been studied only to a limited extent. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three rib failure models on prediction of thoracic injuries using a previously validated finite element model of the human thorax. The performance and biofidelity of each rib failure model were first evaluated by modelling rib responses to different loading conditions in two experimental configurations: (1) the three-point bending on the specimen taken from rib and (2) the anterior-posterior dynamic loading to an entire bony part of the rib. Furthermore, the simulation of the rib failure behaviour in the frontal impact to an entire thorax was conducted at varying velocities and the effects of the failure models were analysed with respect to the severity of rib cage damages. Simulation results demonstrated that the responses of the thorax model are similar to the general trends of the rib fracture responses reported in the experimental literature. However, they also indicated that the accuracy of the rib fracture prediction using a given failure model varies for different loading conditions.

  5. Is Embolization of the Pancreas Safe? Pancreatic Histological Changes after Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Takahashi, Takuya; Izaki, Kenta; Uotani, Kensuke; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in a swine model in terms of histological changes in the pancreas. Methods: Three groups of two female swine (58-64 kg) per group underwent TAE of the dorsal pancreatic artery, under anesthesia, with 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. Blood parameters were evaluated at days 1, 4, and 10 after TAE, after which the animals were sacrificed and pancreatic tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results: All of the animals were asymptomatic and survived for 10 days. Cone beam computed tomographic angiography revealed occlusion of the dorsal pancreatic artery and no enhancement in the embolized area. The white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level were elevated slightly on day 1 after TAE (mean {+-} SD: 252.7 {+-} 27.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2}/{mu}l and 0.15 {+-} 0.07 mg/l, respectively), but they normalized or remained near the upper normal limit thereafter. The serum amylase and lipase levels also were elevated on day 1 (8831.7 {+-} 2169.2 U/l and 130 {+-} 53.4 U/l, respectively) but normalized thereafter. Histologically, necrosis and fibrosis were noted only in the embolized segment, and necrosis and acute inflammatory reactions were absent in the nonembolized segment. The border between both segments was well defined. Lymphocytic infiltration and foreign body reaction were noted around the embolized vessels. Conclusions: Selective TAE with NBCA in the pancreas caused localized ischemic necrosis without clinically significant pancreatitis; therefore, this procedure is tolerable in swine.

  6. Agent autonomy approach to probabilistic physics-of-failure modeling of complex dynamic systems with interacting failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromek, Katherine Emily

    A novel computational and inference framework of the physics-of-failure (PoF) reliability modeling for complex dynamic systems has been established in this research. The PoF-based reliability models are used to perform a real time simulation of system failure processes, so that the system level reliability modeling would constitute inferences from checking the status of component level reliability at any given time. The "agent autonomy" concept is applied as a solution method for the system-level probabilistic PoF-based (i.e. PPoF-based) modeling. This concept originated from artificial intelligence (AI) as a leading intelligent computational inference in modeling of multi agents systems (MAS). The concept of agent autonomy in the context of reliability modeling was first proposed by M. Azarkhail [1], where a fundamentally new idea of system representation by autonomous intelligent agents for the purpose of reliability modeling was introduced. Contribution of the current work lies in the further development of the agent anatomy concept, particularly the refined agent classification within the scope of the PoF-based system reliability modeling, new approaches to the learning and the autonomy properties of the intelligent agents, and modeling interacting failure mechanisms within the dynamic engineering system. The autonomous property of intelligent agents is defined as agent's ability to self-activate, deactivate or completely redefine their role in the analysis. This property of agents and the ability to model interacting failure mechanisms of the system elements makes the agent autonomy fundamentally different from all existing methods of probabilistic PoF-based reliability modeling. 1. Azarkhail, M., "Agent Autonomy Approach to Physics-Based Reliability Modeling of Structures and Mechanical Systems", PhD thesis, University of Maryland, College Park, 2007.

  7. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald M; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Laudenbach, Andrew P; Reardon, Robert F; Miner, James R

    2014-09-01

    Arrest-related deaths proximate to the use of a conducted electrical weapon (CEW) continue to generate controversy despite a better understanding of the multi-factorial nature of many of these deaths. With the rapid adoption of this technology by law enforcement, and the proliferation of companies entering the marketplace, it is important to have a method to assess the relative safety of these weapons. We had previously developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs. In this study, we use this model to compare the TASER X2 and the Karbon Arms MPID. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 may have an improved cardiac safety margin over the Karbon Arms MPID as determined by a smaller area of cardiac pacing on the anterior chest in our model. This model seems to offer a reproducible means of comparing the cardiac effects of CEWs.

  8. Electromyographic study of differential sensitivity to succinylcholine of the diaphragm, laryngeal and somatic muscles: a swine model.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Cheng; Wang, Hsun-Mo; Kuo, Yi-Wei; Shieh, Chia-Fang; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Wu, Che-Wei; Tsai, Cheng-Jing

    2010-12-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) might diminish the electromyography signal of the vocalis muscles during intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The aim of this study was to compare differential sensitivity of different muscles to succinylcholine in a swine model, and to realize the influence of NMBAs on neuromonitoring. Six male Duroc-Landrace piglets were anesthetized with thiamylal and underwent tracheal intubation without the use of an NMBA. The left recurrent laryngeal nerve, the spinal accessory nerve, the right phrenic nerve and the brachial plexus were stimulated. Evoked potentials (electromyography signal) of four muscle groups were elicited from needle electrodes before and after intravenous succinylcholine bolus (1.0 mg/kg). Recorded muscles included the vocalis muscles, trapezius muscle, diaphragm and triceps brachii muscles. The onset time and 80% recovery of control response were recorded and analyzed. The testing was repeated after 30 minutes. The onset time of neuromuscular blocking for the vocalis muscles, trapezius muscle, diaphragm and triceps brachii muscle was 36.3 ± 6.3 seconds, 38.8 ± 14.9 seconds, 52.5 ± 9.7 seconds and 45.0 ± 8.2 seconds during the first test; and 49.3 ± 10.8 seconds, 40.0 ± 12.2 seconds, 47.5 ± 11.9 seconds and 41.3 ± 10.1 seconds during the second test. The 80% recovery of the control response for each muscle was 18.3 ± 2.7 minutes, 16.5±6.9 minutes, 8.1±2.5 minutes and 14.8±2.9 minutes during the first test; and 21.5±3.8 minutes, 12.5 ± 4.3 minutes, 10.5 ± 3.1 minutes and 16.4 ± 4.2 minutes during the second test. The sensitivity of the muscles to succinylcholine, ranked in order, was: the vocalis muscles, the triceps brachii muscle, the trapezius muscle and the diaphragm. We demonstrated a useful and reliable animal model to investigate the effects of NMBAs on intraoperative neuromonitoring. Extrapolation of these data to humans should be done with caution.

  9. Interleukin-6 infusion blunts proinflammatory cytokine production without causing systematic toxicity in a swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Brundage, Susan I; Zautke, N A; Holcomb, J B; Spain, D A; Lam, J C; Mastrangelo, M A; Macaitis, J M; Tweardy, D J

    2004-11-01

    Serum elevations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) correlate with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and mortality in critically injured trauma patients. Data from rodent models of controlled hemorrhage suggest that recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6) infusion protects tissue at risk for ischemia-reperfusion injury. Exogenous rIL-6 administered during shock appears to abrogate inflammation, providing a protective rather than a deleterious influence. In an examination of this paradox, the current study aimed to determine whether rIL-6 decreases inflammation in a clinically relevant large animal model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, (UHS), and to investigate the mechanism of protection. Swine were randomized to four groups (8 animals in each): (1) sacrifice, (2) sham (splenectomy followed by hemodilution and cooling to 33 degrees C), (3) rIL-6 infusion (sham plus UHS using grade 5 liver injury with packing and resuscitation plus blinded infusion of rIL-6 [10 mcg/kg]), and (4) placebo (UHS plus blinded vehicle). After 4 hours, blood was sampled, estimated blood loss determined, animals sacrificed, and lung harvested for RNA isolation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. Serum levels of IL-6 and TNFalpha were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). As compared with placebo, IL-6 infusion in UHS did not increase estimated blood loss or white blood cell counts, nor decrease hematocrit or platelet levels. As compared with the sham condition, lung G-CSF mRNA production in UHS plus placebo increased eightfold (*p < 0.05). In contrast, rIL-6 infusion plus UHS blunted G-CSF mRNA levels, which were not significantly higher than sham levels (p = 0.1). Infusion of rIL-6 did not significantly affect endogenous production of either lung IL-6 or mRNA. As determined by ELISA, rIL-6 infusion did not increase final

  10. Fulminant liver failure model with hepatic encephalopathy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Chen, Feng; Baine, Ann-Marie T.; Gardner, Lindsay B.; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To develop a reliable murine model for fulminant liver failure (FLF). Material and Methods We treated three groups of male C57BL/6 mice:as controls, with azoxymethane (AOM), and with galactosamine (Gal) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Effects of body temperature (BT) control on survival, in all three groups were investigated. Using BT control, survival, histopathological findings and biochemical/coagulation profiles were compared between the experimental groups. Effects of hydration on international normalized ratios of prothrombin time (PT-INR) were also checked. Dose-dependent survival curves were made for both experimental groups. Neurological behaviors were assessed using a coma scale. Results No unexpected BT effects were seen in the control group. The AOM group, but not the Gal+TNFα group, showed significant differences in survival curves between those with and without BT care. Histopathological assessment showed consistent FLF findings in both experimental groups with BT care. Between the experimental groups, there were significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase levels and PT-INR; and significant differences in PT-INRs between sufficiently- and insufficiently-hydrated groups. There were significant differences between FLF models, in the duration of each coma stage, with significant differences in stages 1 and 3 as percentages of the diseased state (stages 1-4). The two FLF models with BT care showed different survival curves in the dose-dependent survival study. Conclusion Azoxymethane can provide a good FLF model, but requires a specialized environment and careful BT control. Other FLF models may also be useful, depending on research purpose. Thoughtful attention to caregiving and close observation are indispensable for successful FLF models. PMID:24713795

  11. A Dynamic Approach to Modeling Dependence Between Human Failure Events

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-09-01

    In practice, most HRA methods use direct dependence from THERP—the notion that error be- gets error, and one human failure event (HFE) may increase the likelihood of subsequent HFEs. In this paper, we approach dependence from a simulation perspective in which the effects of human errors are dynamically modeled. There are three key concepts that play into this modeling: (1) Errors are driven by performance shaping factors (PSFs). In this context, the error propagation is not a result of the presence of an HFE yielding overall increases in subsequent HFEs. Rather, it is shared PSFs that cause dependence. (2) PSFs have qualities of lag and latency. These two qualities are not currently considered in HRA methods that use PSFs. Yet, to model the effects of PSFs, it is not simply a matter of identifying the discrete effects of a particular PSF on performance. The effects of PSFs must be considered temporally, as the PSFs will have a range of effects across the event sequence. (3) Finally, there is the concept of error spilling. When PSFs are activated, they not only have temporal effects but also lateral effects on other PSFs, leading to emergent errors. This paper presents the framework for tying together these dynamic dependence concepts.

  12. Phase field modeling of the defect evolution and failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuesong

    The plastic recovery processes in ultrafine and nano grained metals and the yield criteria and failure mechanisms in polymer matrix composite are the two major topics in this work. In the first part of the work, a phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is introduced, which tracks the evolution of the dislocations in ultrafine and nano grained metals and takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, obstacles and the applied resolved shear stress on a single slip plane. Two phenomena, the reverse plastic strain during cyclic loading and plastic strain recovery upon unloading, are studied. One major finding of our simulations is that these two plastic recovery processes are related to the formation of dislocation structures during loading, and additional grain size inhomogeneity will increase the amount of plastic strain recovered. In the second part of the work, a phase field damage model (PFDM) is presented to study the onset of yielding and crack propagation in polymer matrix composite. The effect of two damage parameters, the fracture toughness Gc and crack length scale parameter l0, are first investigated. The former is shown to determine the energy needed during crack propagation and the latter is observed to control the crack nucleation process. Moreover, two asymmetric damage models are compared regarding their yield surfaces and it is found that the model of Miehe et al. leads to a linear pressure modified von Mises relation. Next, the PFDM reveals that the yield criterion in amorphous polymers should be described in terms of local stress and strains fields and cannot be extended directly from applied stress field values. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the same damage model can be used to study the failure under shear yielding and crazing conditions. And if local defects in the samples such as voids are included explicitly in the simulations, the PFDM is able to explain the breakdown of the pressure modified von Mises

  13. Improved Patency of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: The Efficacy of Cilostazol for the Prevention of Pseudointimal Hyperplasia in Swine TIPS Models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Woo Cha, In Ho; Kim, Chul Hwan; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee; Hong, Suk Joo; Lee, In Sik

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of oral administration of cilostazol to inhibit pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models. Methods. Successful TIPS creation was carried out in 11 of 12 healthy young pigs (20-25 kg). In the treatment group (n = 6), both cilostazol and aspirin were administered daily, from the first day of TIPS creation. The control group (n = 5) was administered only aspirin. The animals were followed-up for 2 weeks and then killed. The specimen (including portal vein, hepatic parenchymal tract, hepatic vein, and inferior vena cava) and stents were carefully bisected in a longitudinal fashion. The control group was compared with the treatment group by means of a gross and histologic evaluation of the degree of pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in the shunt. Results. At the gross evaluation, the control group showed considerably more pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia than the treatment group. Using microscopic evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the mean maximum pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia thickness between the control group (2.97 {+-} 0.33 mm) and treatment group (0.73 {+-} 0.27 mm). Conclusion. Oral administration of cilostazol may have been effective in reducing pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models.

  14. improved patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: the efficacy of cilostazol for the prevention of pseudointimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Woo; Cha, In Ho; Kim, Chul Hwan; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee; Hong, Suk Joo; Lee, In Sik

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of oral administration of cilostazol to inhibit pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models. Successful TIPS creation was carried out in 11 of 12 healthy young pigs (20-25 kg). In the treatment group (n = 6), both cilostazol and aspirin were administered daily, from the first day of TIPS creation. The control group (n = 5) was administered only aspirin. The animals were followed-up for 2 weeks and then killed. The specimen (including portal vein, hepatic parenchymal tract, hepatic vein, and inferior vena cava) and stents were carefully bisected in a longitudinal fashion. The control group was compared with the treatment group by means of a gross and histologic evaluation of the degree of pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in the shunt. At the gross evaluation, the control group showed considerably more pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia than the treatment group. Using microscopic evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the mean maximum pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia thickness between the control group (2.97 +/- 0.33 mm) and treatment group (0.73 +/- 0.27 mm). Oral administration of cilostazol may have been effective in reducing pseudointimal/intimal hyperplasia in swine TIPS models.

  15. TAK-242 treatment ameliorates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting TLR4 signaling pathway in a swine model of Maastricht-category-III cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zigong; Jiao, Baoping; Liu, Tingting; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Hao; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to test the effects of TAK-242 on liver transplant viability in a model of swine Maastricht-category-III cardiac death. A swine DCD Maastricht-III model of cardiac death was established, and TAK-242 was administered prior to the induction of cardiac death. The protein and mRNA level of TLR4 signaling pathway molecules and cytokines that are important in mediating immune and inflammatory responses were assessed at different time points following the induction of cardiac death. After induction of cardiac death, both the mRNA and protein levels of key molecules (TLR4, TRAF6, NF-ϰB, ICAM-1, MCP-1 and MPO), TNF-α and IL-6 increased significantly. Infusion of TAK-242 1h before induction of cardiac death blocked the increase of immune and inflammatory response molecules. However, the increase of TLR4 level was not affected by infusion of TAK-242. Histology study showed that infusion of TAK-242 protect liver tissue from damage during cardiac death. These results indicates that TLR4 signaling pathway may contribute to ischemia/reperfusion injury in the liver grafts, and blocking TLR4 pathway with TAk-242 may reduce TLR4-mediated tissue damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  17. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  18. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  19. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  20. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  1. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  2. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  3. How influential is the duration of contrast material bolus injection in perfusion CT? evaluation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja M; Meyer, Henning; Boehnert, Markus; Hoppel, Bernice; Paul, Narinder Singh; Rogalla, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of the duration of contrast material bolus injection on perfusion values in a swine model by using the maximum slope method. This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Twenty pigs (weight range, 63-77 kg) underwent dynamic volume computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys during suspended respiration. Before the CT examination, a miniature cuff-shaped ultrasonographic flow probe encircling the right renal artery was surgically implanted in each pig to obtain true perfusion values. Two sequential perfusion CT series were performed in 30 seconds, each comprising 30 volumes with identical parameters (100 kV, 200 mAs, 0.5 sec rotation time). The duration of contrast material bolus (0.5 mL/kg of body weight) was 3.8 seconds in the first series (short bolus series) and 11.5 seconds in the second series (long bolus series), and the injection flow rate was adapted accordingly. In each pig, cortical kidney volume was determined by using the volume with the highest cortical enhancement. CT perfusion values were calculated for both series by using the maximum slope method and were statistically compared and correlated with the true perfusion values from the flow probe by using linear regression analysis. Mean true perfusion and CT perfusion values (in minutes(-1)) for the short bolus series were 1.95 and 2.03, respectively (P = .22), and for the long bolus series, they were 2.02 and 1.92, respectively (P = .12). CT perfusion showed very good correlation with true perfusion in both the short (slope, 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.11) and long (slope, 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.04) series. On the basis of the regression analysis, CT perfusion values in the short bolus series were overestimated by 1% and those in the long bolus series were underestimated by 8%. Duration of contrast material bolus injection does not influence CT perfusion values substantially. The longer, clinically preferred intravenous injection

  4. Myocardial Drug Distribution Generated from Local Epicardial Application: Potential Impact of Cardiac Capillary Perfusion in a Swine Model Using Epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Wei, Abraham E.; Wakim, Matthew G.; Murray, Michael R.; Tsukada, Hisashi; Gerogiannis, Iraklis S.; Groothuis, Adam; Lovich, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies in small mammals have shown that local epicardial application of inotropic compounds drives myocardial contractility without systemic side effects. Myocardial capillary blood flow, however, may be more significant in larger species than in small animals. We hypothesized that bulk perfusion in capillary beds of the large mammalian heart enhances drug distribution after local release, but also clears more drug from the tissue target than in small animals. Epicardial (EC) drug releasing systems were used to apply epinephrine to the anterior surface of the left heart of swine in either point-sourced or distributed configurations. Following local application or intravenous (IV) infusion at the same dose rates, hemodynamic responses, epinephrine levels in the coronary sinus and systemic circulation, and drug deposition across the ventricular wall, around the circumference and down the axis, were measured. EC delivery via point-source release generated transmural epinephrine gradients directly beneath the site of application extending into the middle third of the myocardial thickness. Gradients in drug deposition were also observed down the length of the heart and around the circumference toward the lateral wall, but not the interventricular septum. These gradients extended further than might be predicted from simple diffusion. The circumferential distribution following local epinephrine delivery from a distributed source to the entire anterior wall drove drug toward the inferior wall, further than with point-source release, but again, not to the septum. This augmented drug distribution away from the release source, down the axis of the left ventricle, and selectively towards the left heart follows the direction of capillary perfusion away from the anterior descending and circumflex arteries, suggesting a role for the coronary circulation in determining local drug deposition and clearance. The dominant role of the coronary vasculature is further suggested by

  5. Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Luchun; Palanisami, Thavamani; Liu, Yanju; Dong, Zhaomin; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Kuchel, Tim; Semple, Kirk T; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    Oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was studied in a swine model using eight spiked soil samples after incubation for 50 and/or 90 days. Silica sand was used as a reference material and the relative bioavailability (RB) of B[a]P in soils was calculated as the quotient of the area under the plasma B[a]P curve (AUC) for soil and AUC for the silica sand. Significantly reduced RB was observed in all study soils after 90 days ageing, ranging from 22.1±0.4% to 62.7±10.1%, except for one very sandy soil (sand content 87.6%) where RB was unchanged (108.1±8.0%). Apart from this, bioavailability decreased during ageing with the decrease (from day 50 to day 90) being only significant for a clayey soil containing expandable clay minerals. Statistical analyses of B[a]P RB at day 90 (eight soils) and soil properties showed no direct correlation between RB and specific soil properties such as total organic carbon (TOC) and clay content which were commonly linked to organic contaminant sequestration. However, strongly significant relationships (p<0.001) were found between RB and the fine particle associated carbon (FPAC) defined as (Silt+Clay)/TOC, and between RB and the soil mesopore (<6nm; p<0.001) fraction, after two samples with high pH and high EC being excluded from the analyses. The bioaccessibility estimated by four in vitro extraction methods: dichloromethane/acetone sonication (DCM/Ace), butanol vortex (BuOH), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin extraction (HPCD) and Milli Q water leaching methods at different sampling time (1 day, 50 days and 90 days after spiking) also showed a decreasing trend. Significant correlations were found between B[a]P RB and DCM/Ace (R(2)=0.67, p<0.05) extractable fraction and BuOH (R(2)=0.75, p<0.01) extractable fraction.

  6. Coronary microemboli effects in preexisting acute infarcts in a swine model: cardiac MR imaging indices, injury biomarkers, and histopathologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Hetts, Steven W; Do, Loi; Wilson, Mark W

    2013-07-01

    To use cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging indices, injury biomarkers, and microscopy for quantifying the effects of defined microemboli volume and sizes on viability, left ventricular (LV) function, and perfusion in preexisting acute myocardial infarcts in a swine model. Institutional approval was obtained to perform x-ray fluoroscopy and 90-minute left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion (single ischemic insult) in 16 pigs and coronary embolization in eight of the 16 pigs (32 mm(3), 40-120 μm microemboli) (double ischemic insults). Another eight pigs served as controls. Cardiac MR imaging results (viability, function, and perfusion), injury biomarkers (creatine-kinase-MB and troponin I), and histopathologic evaluations were quantified. Analysis of variance was performed, and a P value less than .02 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Delayed contrast material-enhanced MR imaging allowed simultaneous visualization of hyperenhanced large infarcts, hypoenhanced microvascular obstruction (MVO) zones, and moderately enhanced patchy microinfarcts in border zones, which represent different degrees of contraction and perfusion in the respective regions, in pigs subjected to double ischemic insults. The increase in myocardial damage was smaller in pigs with double insults (15.7% ± 1.1% of total LV mass) than in those with a single insult (12.4% ± 1.2%, P < .02), but the reduction in LV ejection fraction was disproportional (32% ± 0.6% and 38% ± 1%, P < .02, respectively). Delayed contrast-enhanced imaging can allow quantification of the MVO zone but can result in underestimation of the extent of myocardial damage compared with microscopy in animals subjected to double insults (18.2 ± 1.6, P < .02). A significant increase in cardiac injury biomarkers was observed at 18-24 hours in both cohorts. The additional effect of microemboli on troponin I was demonstrated at 68-72 hours (3.2 ng/mL ± 0.85 [3.20 μg/L ± 0.85] vs 1

  7. The Effect of REBOA, Partial Aortic Occlusion and Aggressive Blood Transfusion on Traumatic Brain Injury in a Swine Polytrauma Model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Austin; Williams, Timothy K; Ferencz, Sarah-Ashley E; Davidson, Anders J; Russo, Rachel M; O'Brien, William T; Galante, Joseph M; Grayson, J Kevin; Neff, Lucas P

    2017-04-27

    Despite clinical reports of poor outcomes, the degree to which REBOA exacerbates traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not known. We hypothesized that combined effects of increased proximal mean arterial pressure (pMAP), carotid blood flow (Qcarotid), and intracranial pressure (ICP) from REBOA would lead to TBI progression compared to partial aortic occlusion (PAO) or no intervention. 21 swine underwent a standardized TBI via computer Controlled cortical impact followed by 25% total blood volume rapid hemorrhage. After 30 minutes of hypotension, animals were randomized to 60 minutes of continued hypotension (Control), REBOA, or PAO. REBOA and PAO animals were then weaned from occlusion. All animals were resuscitated with shed blood via a rapid blood infuser. Physiologic parameters were recorded continuously and brain computed tomography obtained at specified intervals. There were no differences in baseline physiology or during the initial 30 minutes of hypotension. During the 60-minute intervention period, REBOA resulted in higher maximal pMAP (REBOA 105.3±8.8; PAO 92.7±9.2; Control 48.9±7.7, p=0.02) and higher Qcarotid (REBOA 673.1±57.9; PAO 464.2±53.0; Control 170.3±29.4, p<0.01). Increases in ICP were greatest during blood resuscitation, with Control animals demonstrating the largest peak ICP (Control 12.8±1.2; REBOA 5.1±0.6; PAO 9.4±1.1, p<0.01). There were no differences in the percentage of animals with hemorrhage progression on CT (Control 14.3%, 95%CI 3.6-57.9; REBOA 28.6%, 95%CI 3.7-71.0; and PAO 28.6%, 95%CI 3.7-71.0). In an animal model of TBI and shock, REBOA increased carotid flow and pMAP, but did not exacerbate TBI progression. PAO resulted in physiology closer to baseline with smaller increases in ICP and pMAP. Rapid blood resuscitation, not REBOA, resulted in the largest increase in ICP after intervention, which occurred in Control animals. Continued studies of the cerebral hemodynamics of aortic occlusion and blood transfusion are required to

  8. Comparison of 10 Hemostatic Dressings in a Groin Puncture Model in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    compression (about 175 mm Hg), and at 15 minutes, 500 mL resuscitation fluid (Hextand) was infused during a 30-minute period. The animals were monitored...fascia tissue. Lidocaine (Henry Schein, Inc) (1% to 2%) was spread on the artery to maximize dilation of the vessel. Any proximal side branches from the...the dressing and natural physiologic compensation after one 500-mL bolus infusion at 15 minutes without additional fluid. In our model, MAP decreased

  9. Evaluation of the Gamma-H2AX Assay for Radiation Biodosimetry in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Maeda, Daisuke; Whitnall, Mark H.; Bonner, William M.; Redon, Christophe E.

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of large animal models to study both the extent and the health risk of ionizing radiation exposure in humans. One promising candidate for such a model is the minipig. Here, we evaluate the minipig for its potential in γ-H2AX-based biodosimetry after exposure to ionizing radiation using both Cs137 and Co60 sources. γ-H2AX foci were enumerated in blood lymphocytes and normal fibroblasts of human and porcine origin after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation. DNA double-strand break repair kinetics in minipig blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts, based on the γ-H2AX assay, were similar to those observed in their human counterparts. To substantiate the similarity observed between the human and minipig we show that minipig fibroblast radiosensitivity was similar to that observed with human fibroblasts. Finally, a strong γ-H2AX induction was observed in blood lymphocytes following minipig total body irradiation. Significant responses were detected 3 days after 1.8 Gy and 1 week after 3.8 and 5 Gy with residual γ-H2AX foci proportional to the initial radiation doses. These findings show that the Gottingen minipig provides a useful in vivo model for validation of γ-H2AX biodosimetry for dose assessment in humans. PMID:23880859

  10. Evaluation of the gamma-H2AX assay for radiation biodosimetry in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Maria; Maeda, Daisuke; Whitnall, Mark H; Bonner, William M; Redon, Christophe E

    2013-07-08

    There is a paucity of large animal models to study both the extent and the health risk of ionizing radiation exposure in humans. One promising candidate for such a model is the minipig. Here, we evaluate the minipig for its potential in γ-H2AX-based biodosimetry after exposure to ionizing radiation using both Cs137 and Co60 sources. γ-H2AX foci were enumerated in blood lymphocytes and normal fibroblasts of human and porcine origin after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation. DNA double-strand break repair kinetics in minipig blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts, based on the γ-H2AX assay, were similar to those observed in their human counterparts. To substantiate the similarity observed between the human and minipig we show that minipig fibroblast radiosensitivity was similar to that observed with human fibroblasts. Finally, a strong γ-H2AX induction was observed in blood lymphocytes following minipig total body irradiation. Significant responses were detected 3 days after 1.8 Gy and 1 week after 3.8 and 5 Gy with residual γ-H2AX foci proportional to the initial radiation doses. These findings show that the Gottingen minipig provides a useful in vivo model for validation of γ-H2AX biodosimetry for dose assessment in humans.

  11. The effects of proximal and distal routes of intraosseous epinephrine administration on short-term resuscitative outcome measures in an adult swine model of ventricular fibrillation: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Froehle, Jacob; Morris, Todd; Althuisius, Ben; Richards, Jennifer; Castano, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown if the anatomical distance of intraosseous (i.o.) epinephrine injection from the heart affects resuscitative outcome. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the anatomical distance of i.o. epinephrine injection and measures of resuscitative outcome in an adult swine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Thirty-two Yorkshire-cross swine (60-80 kg) were randomly assigned to four groups: humeral i.o. (HIO), tibial i.o. (TIO), i.v. with defibrillation and epinephrine, and i.v. control: with defibrillation but no epinephrine. Ventricular fibrillation was induced. Swine remained in VF for 4 minutes prior to mechanical chest compressions. After 6 minutes in VF, swine were defibrillated and epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg) administered by group assignment. Defibrillation was repeated every 2 minutes. Epinephrine was repeated every 4 minutes. Interventions continued until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or 26 post-arrest minutes elapsed. Swine achieving ROSC were observed for 30 minutes post-ROSC. There were no significant differences between the HIO, TIO, and i.v. groups relative to the occurrence of ROSC (P > .05 in all cases), 30-minute post-ROSC survival (P > .05 in all cases), and time to ROSC (P = .43). There were significant differences between the HIO, TIO, and i.v. groups compared to the control group relative to the occurrence of ROSC (P = .02, .01, and .007 respectively), and 30 minute post-ROSC survival (P = .05, .03, and .007, respectively). The anatomical distance of i.o. epinephrine injection from the heart did not affect short-term measures of resuscitative outcome in an adult swine model of VF including the occurrence of ROSC, 30 minute post-ROSC survival, and time to ROSC. Rapidly administered epinephrine, irrespective of route of administration, increased the chance ROSC and survival to 30 minutes post-ROSC would occur in this study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. DISTRIBUTED CONTAINER FAILURE MODELS FOR THE DUST-MS COMPUTER CODE.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.; DE LEMOS,F.

    2001-02-24

    Improvements to the DUST-MS computer code have been made that permit simulation of distributed container failure rates. The new models permit instant failure of all containers within a computational volume, uniform failure of these containers over time, or a normal distribution in container failures. Incorporation of a distributed failure model requires wasteform releases to be calculated using a convolution integral. In addition, the models permit a unique time of emplacement for each modeled container and allow a fraction of the containers to fail at emplacement. Implementation of these models, verification testing, and an example problem comparing releases from a wasteform with a two-species decay chain as a function of failure distribution are presented in the paper.

  13. Technical note: A model to estimate individual feed intake of swine in group feeding.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, M D; Kim, B G

    2007-04-01

    In most animal growth experiments, groups of animals are housed within a pen. Occasionally, an individual animal shows a very different growth rate than its pen mates or dies during the experiment. When this happens, if pen feed intake (PFI) cannot be reestimated for the calculation of ADFI and feed efficiency, an observation will be lost from the data set. Therefore, we propose a model to estimate individual feed intake (IFI) of pigs in group feeding, with subsequent validation of the model using group feeding simulation studies. In the proposed model, the feed intake (FI) of each affected pen is partitioned into FI for maintenance (FI(m)) and FI for growth (FI(g)) for each animal within that pen. First, individual pig FI(m) for the period is calculated using the 1998 National Research Council estimation of ME for maintenance. Then, FI(m) for all pigs in the pen is summed. The difference between the summed FI(m) and the total PFI is that which supported growth in the pen. Next, FI(g) is calculated by apportioning the remaining feed equally to each unit of gain within the pen. Finally, the estimated IFI for the pig being removed from the pen is the sum of FI(m) and FI(g) for that pig; this FI estimate is subtracted from the original PFI to leave the new PFI for the remaining pigs. The validity of the estimated IFI is dependent on the accuracy of the maintenance energy equation and the energy analysis of the feedstuffs. In simulation studies, we compared the accuracy of the proposed method with 2 other methods. In simulation study 1, the proposed model showed better accuracy than at least one of the other methods during all tested periods (P < 0.001). In simulation study 2, the greater accuracy of the proposed method compared with 2 other methods was demonstrated again. Because calculation of IFI is relatively cumbersome, we developed a feed intake correction spreadsheet (FICS), an Excel spreadsheet containing macros for FI correction. All of the calculation

  14. Life Prediction and Classification of Failure Modes in Solid State Luminaires Using Bayesian Probabilistic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Sakalaukus, Peter

    2014-05-27

    A new method has been developed for assessment of the onset of degradation in solid state luminaires to classify failure mechanisms by using metrics beyond lumen degradation that are currently used for identification of failure. Luminous Flux output, Correlated Color Temperature Data on Philips LED Lamps has been gathered under 85°C/85%RH till lamp failure. The acquired data has been used in conjunction with Bayesian Probabilistic Models to identify luminaires with onset of degradation much prior to failure through identification of decision boundaries between lamps with accrued damage and lamps beyond the failure threshold in the feature space. In addition luminaires with different failure modes have been classified separately from healthy pristine luminaires. It is expected that, the new test technique will allow the development of failure distributions without testing till L70 life for the manifestation of failure.

  15. A zipper network model of the failure mechanics of extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Michael C; Jesudason, Rajiv; Majumdar, Arnab; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Stone, Phillip J; Nugent, Matthew A; Suki, Béla

    2009-01-27

    Mechanical failure of soft tissues is characteristic of life-threatening diseases, including capillary stress failure, pulmonary emphysema, and vessel wall aneurysms. Failure occurs when mechanical forces are sufficiently high to rupture the enzymatically weakened extracellular matrix (ECM). Elastin, an important structural ECM protein, is known to stretch beyond 200% strain before failing. However, ECM constructs and native vessel walls composed primarily of elastin and proteoglycans (PGs) have been found to fail at much lower strains. In this study, we hypothesized that PGs significantly contribute to tissue failure. To test this, we developed a zipper network model (ZNM), in which springs representing elastin are organized into long wavy fibers in a zipper-like formation and placed within a network of springs mimicking PGs. Elastin and PG springs possessed distinct mechanical and failure properties. Simulations using the ZNM showed that the failure of PGs alone reduces the global failure strain of the ECM well below that of elastin, and hence, digestion of elastin does not influence the failure strain. Network analysis suggested that whereas PGs drive the failure process and define the failure strain, elastin determines the peak and failure stresses. Predictions of the ZNM were experimentally confirmed by measuring the failure properties of engineered elastin-rich ECM constructs before and after digestion with trypsin, which cleaves the core protein of PGs without affecting elastin. This study reveals a role for PGs in the failure properties of engineered and native ECM with implications for the design of engineered tissues.

  16. Cartographical analysis of African swine fever outbreaks in the territory of the Russian Federation and computer modeling of the basic reproduction ratio.

    PubMed

    Gulenkin, V M; Korennoy, F I; Karaulov, A K; Dudnikov, S A

    2011-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF), have been introduced into the Russian Federation from Transcaucasia countries, has spread widely across the territory of the southern region of Russia since 2008. In this work we present an analysis of the spatial and temporal spread of the disease, determine risk factors by means of GIS tools and model the dynamics of the epidemic process both within infected premises (farms) and at the between-farm level to estimate the basic reproduction ratio R(0). The analysis allowed us to make a conclusion about the anthropogenic nature of the risk factors for disease spread. The major significant risk factors identified were: density of the road network, density of domestic swine population and density of water bodies in the study area. The basic reproduction ratio was estimated to range from 2 to 3 at the between-farm level and from 8 to 11 within the infected farms. These initial studies of the ASF epidemic provide information on which to based control and prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects choline as a biomarker in a swine obstructive chronic pancreatitis model at an early stage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gaofeng; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Chao; Shao, Chengwei; Hao, Jun; Zheng, Jianming; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-03-04

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory and fibrotic disease of the pancreas which encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes ranging from mild to life-threatening complications. Metabolomics has increasingly been applied to identify biomarkers for disease diagnosis with particular interest in diseases at an early stage. In this study, we tested a swine obstructive CP model by subtotal ligation of the main pancreatic duct, and the metabolic profiles of the Bama miniature swine pancreas were investigated using high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS (1)H MRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA). Increases in lactate and choline for mild CP and decreases in glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine were observed from normal pancreas to mild, moderate and severe CP. PCA results showed visual separations among the groups. The increase of choline at an early stage of CP and the decrease of glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine reveal the pathogenesis of CP at a molecular level. The MRS results presented here demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiles in discriminating a normal pancreas from different stages of CP, which may be used to achieve CP early diagnosis and timely intervention to prevent irreversible destruction of the pancreas.

  18. Feasibility of MRI and selection of adequate region of interest for longitudinal studies of growth and fatness in swine models of obesity.

    PubMed

    Barbero, A; Garcia-Real, I; Astiz, S; Ayuso, M; Lopez-Bote, C J; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2014-09-01

    To determine the feasibility of MRI for imaging subcutaneous and visceral adiposity in longitudinal studies in obese swine models (Iberian pig). To establish the anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) and measurement points (MPs) adequate for their evaluation through analyses on the inter-individual variability and over-time reproducibility and through the assessment of their reliability and validity by comparison with in vivo and ex vivo zoometric data. Five male and five female pigs were used from four (live weight around 48 kg and back-fat depth around 18 mm) to eight months old (live weight 134 kg and back-fat depth around 48 mm). MRI was carried out with a Panorama 0.23T scanner (Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands), using a body/spine XL coil. The ROIs of election for visualization of subcutaneous data are located from the cranial margin of left diaphragmatic crura to the lumbar vertebrae L3. Visceral adiposity may be equally evaluated from the vertebrae L1 to L3. MRI allows the evaluation of subcutaneous and visceral fatness in a single acquisition, which improves animal welfare and time- and cost-efficiency and provides an accurate, consistent and repeatable procedure for sequential studies of adiposity in obese swine. Copyright © 2014 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A robust Bayesian approach to modeling epistemic uncertainty in common-cause failure models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias C. M. Troffaes; Gero Walter; Dana Kelly

    2014-05-01

    In a standard Bayesian approach to the alpha-factor model for common-cause failure, a precise Dirichlet prior distribution models epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. This Dirichlet prior is then updated with observed data to obtain a posterior distribution, which forms the basis for further inferences. In this paper, we adapt the imprecise Dirichlet model of Walley to represent epistemic uncertainty in the alpha-factors. In this approach, epistemic uncertainty is expressed more cautiously via lower and upper expectations for each alpha-factor, along with a learning parameter which determines how quickly the model learns from observed data. For this application, we focus on elicitation of the learning parameter, and find that values in the range of 1 to 10 seem reasonable. The approach is compared with Kelly and Atwood's minimally informative Dirichlet prior for the alpha-factor model, which incorporated precise mean values for the alpha-factors, but which was otherwise quite diffuse. Next, we explore the use of a set of Gamma priors to model epistemic uncertainty in the marginal failure rate, expressed via a lower and upper expectation for this rate, again along with a learning parameter. As zero counts are generally less of an issue here, we find that the choice of this learning parameter is less crucial. Finally, we demonstrate how both epistemic uncertainty models can be combined to arrive at lower and upper expectations for all common-cause failure rates. Thereby, we effectively provide a full sensitivity analysis of common-cause failure rates, properly reflecting epistemic uncertainty of the analyst on all levels of the common-cause failure model.

  20. Induced hypothermia does not impair coagulation system in a swine multiple trauma model.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Hildebrand, Frank; Flohé, Sascha; Frink, Michael; Witte, Ingo; Weuster, Matthias; Fröhlich, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Keibl, Claudia; Mommsen, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Accidental hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy represent the lethal triad in severely injured patients. Therapeutic hypothermia however is commonly used in transplantations, cardiac and neurosurgical surgery, or after cardiac arrest. However, the effects of therapeutic hypothermia on the coagulation system following multiple trauma need to be elucidated. In a porcine model of multiple trauma including blunt chest injury, liver laceration, and hemorrhagic shock followed by fluid resuscitation, the influence of therapeutic hypothermia on coagulation was evaluated. A total of 40 pigs were randomly assigned to sham (only anesthesia) or trauma groups receiving either hypothermia or normothermia. Each group consisted of 10 pigs. Analyzed parameters were cell count (red blood cells, platelets), pH, prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen concentration, and analysis with ROTEM and Multiplate. Trauma and consecutive fluid resuscitation resulted in impaired coagulation parameters (cell count, pH, PT, fibrinogen, ROTEM, and platelet function). During hypothermia, coagulation parameters measured at 37°C, such as PT, fibrinogen, thrombelastometry measurements, and platelet function, showed no significant differences between normothermic and hypothermic animals in both trauma groups. Additional analyses of thrombelastometry at 34°C during hypothermia showed significant differences for clotting time and clot formation time but not for maximum clot firmness. We were not able to detect macroscopic or petechial bleeding in both trauma groups. Based on the results of the present study we suggest that mild hypothermia can be safely performed after stabilization following major trauma. Mild hypothermia has effects on the coagulation system but does not aggravate trauma-induced coagulopathy in our model. Before hypothermic treatment can be performed in the clinical setting, additional experiments with prolonged and deeper hypothermia to exclude detrimental effects are required.

  1. Adequacy indices for dialysis in acute renal failure: kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Debowska, Malgorzata; Lindholm, Bengt; Waniewski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    Many aspects of the management of renal replacement therapy in acute renal failure (ARF), including the appropriate assessment of dialysis adequacy, remain unresolved, because ARF patients often are not in a metabolic steady state. The aim of this study was to evaluate a system of adequacy indices for dialysis in ARF patients using urea and creatinine kinetic modeling. Kinetic modeling was performed for two different fictitious patients (A and B) with characteristics described by the average parameters for two patient groups and for two blood purification treatments: sustained low efficiency daily dialysis (SLEDD) in Patient A and continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) in Patient B, based on data from a clinical report. Urea and creatinine generation rates were estimated according to the clinical data on the solute concentrations in blood. Then, using estimated generation rates, two hypothetical treatments were simulated, CVVH in Patient A and SLEDD in Patient B. KT/V, fractional solute removal (FSR) and equivalent renal clearance (EKR) were calculated according to the definitions developed for metabolically unstable patients. CVVH appeared as being more effective than SLEDD because KT/V, FSR, and EKR were higher for CVVH than SLEDD in Patients A and B. Creatinine KT/V, FSR, and EKR were lower and well correlated to the respective indices for urea. Urea and creatinine generation rates were overestimated more than twice in Patient A and by 30-40% in Patient B if calculated assuming the metabolically stable state than if estimated by kinetic modeling. Adequacy indices and solute generation rates for ARF patients should be estimated using the definition for unsteady metabolic state. EKR and FSR were higher for urea and creatinine with CVVH than with SLEDD, because of higher K.T and minimized compartmental effects for CVVH.

  2. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  3. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  4. Use of subatmospheric pressure to prevent progression of partial-thickness burns in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Morykwas, M J; David, L R; Schneider, A M; Whang, C; Jennings, D A; Canty, C; Parker, D; White, W L; Argenta, L C

    1999-01-01

    The poorly understood, complex series of events that follows thermal injury frequently results in progressive loss of tissue. The concept of reversing this distinctive series of events has focused on the zone of stasis. Tissues in the zone of stasis that surround burn injuries usually die over a period of 48 to 72 hours postinjury, resulting in a more severe injury. Application of a controlled subatmospheric pressure (125 mm Hg) in an artificially closed space to partial-thickness burns in pigs significantly decreased the maximum depth of cellular death under the burn when the pressure was applied within 12 hours after burn creation (depth of control burns = 0.885 +/- 0.115 mm; subatmospheric pressure treated burns (0-hour delay) = 0.095 +/- 0.025 mm). A decrease in the depth of cell death was noted when subatmospheric pressure was applied for as little as 6 hours. In summary, the application of the negative pressure to partial-thickness burn injuries prevented progression of the wound to a deeper injury in this experimental pig model. A 12-hour working window exists between injury and treatment with reduced pressure, with an application time of as little as 6 hours for successful prevention of injury progression. This technique may represent a new, inexpensive, 'low tech' method for the treatment of partial-thickness burn injuries.

  5. Determination of efficacy of new hemostatic dressings in a model of extremity arterial hemorrhage in swine.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Scherer, Michael R; Estep, J Scot; Dubick, Michael A; Holcomb, John B

    2009-09-01

    The HemCon (HC) bandage and QuickClot have been used over the past 6 years for treating external compressible hemorrhage in combat casualties. Previously, we tested three new hemostatic agents in granular/powder forms that were superior to these products. In this study, four new dressings (preselected) that are more suitable for battlefield application were evaluated. The efficacy and acute safety of the dressings were tested in our standard arterial hemorrhage model. Anesthetized pigs (n = 38, 37 kg) were instrumented, and arterial blood was collected for hematological and coagulation assays. After splenectomy, the right femoral artery was isolated, injured (6 mm arteriotomy), and unrestricted bleeding allowed for 45 seconds. A hemostatic dressing (HC RTS [n = 6], Celox-D [CXb, n = 6], TraumaStat [TS, n = 10], Combat Gauze [CG, n = 10], or placebo gauze [PG, n = 6]) was then applied over the wound randomly and compressed for 2 minutes. Fluid resuscitation was administered and titrated to maintain a mean arterial pressure of 65 mm Hg. Animals were observed for 180 minutes or until death. Computed tomography angiography was performed on survivors and tissues were collected for histology. No differences were found in baseline blood measures, pretreatment blood loss or fluid infusion among groups. HCs and CXb testing discontinued after six unsuccessful tests, and the data were excluded. Stable hemostasis was achieved in two PG, two TS, and eight CG pigs in remaining groups resulting in stabilized mean arterial pressure and significantly different survival rates (20-80%, p = 0.03). CG secured hemostasis for 134.6 minutes +/- 22.2 minutes, which was significantly longer than TS (35.7 +/- 22.0 minutes, p < 0.05) but not different from PG (57.9 +/- 36.2 minutes). The average survival time of CG-treated animals (167.3 +/- 5.9 minutes) was also significantly longer (p < 0.05) than that of TS- (90.0 +/- 15.3 minutes) or PG-treated (121 +/- 19.3 minutes) pigs. Posttreatment

  6. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration and Modeling of Enrofloxacin in Swine for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyi; Hao, Haihong; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Chen, Dongmei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dose regimens of enrofloxacin to reduce the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli (E.coli) using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach. The single dose (2.5 mg/kg body weight) of enrofloxacin was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the healthy pigs. Using cannulation, the pharmacokinetic properties, including peak concentration (C max), time to reach C max (T max), and area under the curve (AUC), were determined in plasma and ileum content. The C max, T max, and AUC in the plasma were 1.09 ± 0.11 μg/mL, 1.27 ± 0.35 h, and 12.70 ± 2.72 μg·h/mL, respectively. While in ileum content, the C max, T max, and AUC were 7.07 ± 0.26 μg/mL, 5.54 ± 0.42 h, and 136.18 ± 12.50 μg·h/mL, respectively. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 918 E. coli isolates, an E. coli O101/K99 strain (enrofloxacin MIC = 0.25 μg/mL) was selected for pharmacodynamic studies. The in vitro minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), mutant prevention concentration (MPC), and ex vivo time-killing curves for enrofloxacin in ileum content were established against the selected E. coli O101/K99 strain. Integrating the in vivo pharmacokinetic data and ex vivo pharmacodynamic data, a sigmoid E max (Hill) equation was established to provide values for ileum content of AUC24h/MIC producing, bactericidal activity (52.65 h), and virtual eradication of bacteria (78.06 h). A dosage regimen of 1.96 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days should be sufficient in the treatment of E. coli.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of 5-aminolaevulinic acid for endovascular photodynamic therapy in a swine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael P.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.; McEwan, Jean R.

    1998-07-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are known to be important in restenosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown experimentally to deplete the VSMC population in small animal studies. We aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 5- aminolaevulinic acid (5-ALA) and to see if endovascular PDT was feasible in a large animal model. Large White pigs (15 - 20 Kg) were photosensitized with 5-ALA at a concentration of 60 and 120 mg/Kg. Arterial biopsies were taken at intervals between 30 mins and 24 hours and snap frozen in liquid nitrogen. Frozen sections were analyzed using a CCD camera and PpIX activity assessed by computing pixel counts for intima, media and adventitia at each time point. Based on the above results 8 pigs were treated with PDT at 1.5, 2.5 or 6 hours following 5-ALA administration. Iliac segments were then illuminated with 50 J/cm2, 635 nm wavelength light via a 4 mm transparent PTA balloon. Animals were culled at 3 days and the above segments pressure perfused in situ with 4% formyl saline, before being excised and fixed. Fluorescence peaked in the adventitia at 1.5 hours, was minimal at 2.5 hours and peaked in the media at 6 hours post 5-ALA. Of the second series of 8 pigs, all animals survived to culling and all treated arteries remained patent. Histological sections stained with H&E were examined and medial VSMC's counted in 4 individual high power fields per section. The mean VSMC count per HPF for PDT treated segments was 16, 51 and 12 at 1.5, 2.5 and 6 hours respectively. VSMC counts in ALA alone controls and light alone controls were 115 and 103 respectively (p less than 0.0001). Endovascular delivery of light to 5-ALA sensitized animals is therefore feasible and was not associated with any complications.

  8. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure affects fertilization outcome in swine animal model.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, N; Tettamanti, E; Russo, V; Martelli, A; Turriani, M; Mattoli, M; Barboni, B

    2010-06-01

    Modern society continuously exposes the population to electromagnetic radiation, the effects of which on human health, in particular reproduction, are still unknown. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of acute (1h) exposure of boar spermatozoa to a 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early fertility outcome. The effect of intensities ranging from 0 to 2 mT on morpho-functional integrity of capacitated spermatozoa was examined in vitro. The oviducts containing or without spermatozoa were then exposed to the minimum in vivo, TD(50,) and maximum intensities determined in vitro, 4h before ovulation. The effects of ELF-EMF on spermatozoa in terms of early embryo development were evaluated after 12h and 6 days. It was found that in vitro ELF-EMF > 0.5 mT induced a progressive acrosome damage, thus compromising the ability of spermatozoa to undergo acrosomal reaction after zona pellucida stimulation and reducing the in vitro fertilization outcome. These effects became evident at 0.75 mT and reached the plateau at 1 mT. Under in vivo conditions, the ELF-EMF intensity of 1 mT was able to compromise sperm function, significantly reducing the fertilization rate. In addition, the exposure of oviducts to fields > or = 0.75 mT in the absence of spermatozoa was able to negatively affect early embryo development. In fact, it was found to cause a slowdown in the embryo cleavage. In conclusion, it was demonstrated how and at which intensities ELF-EMF negatively affect early fertility outcome in a highly predictive animal model.

  9. Antithrombin III in animal models of sepsis and organ failure.

    PubMed

    Dickneite, G

    1998-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT III) is the physiological inhibitor of thrombin and other serine proteases of the clotting cascade. In the development of sepsis, septic shock and organ failure, the plasma levels of AT III decrease considerably, suggesting the concept of a substitution therapy with the inhibitor. A decrease of AT III plasma levels might also be associated with other pathological disorders like trauma, burns, pancreatitis or preclampsia. Activation of coagulation and consumption of AT III is the consequence of a generalized inflammation called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). The clotting cascade is also frequently activated after organ transplantation, especially if organs are grafted between different species (xenotransplantation). During the past years AT III has been investigated in numerous corresponding disease models in different animal species which will be reviewed here. The bulk of evidence suggests, that AT III substitution reduces morbidity and mortality in the diseased animals. While gaining more experience with AT III, the concept of substitution therapy to maximal baseline plasma levels (100%) appears to become insufficient. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies now suggests to adjust the AT III plasma levels to about 200%, i.e., doubling the normal value. During the last few years several authors proposed that AT III might not only be an anti-thrombotic agent, but to have in addition an anti-inflammatory effect.

  10. Intuitionistic fuzzy-based model for failure detection.

    PubMed

    Aikhuele, Daniel O; Turan, Faiz B M

    2016-01-01

    In identifying to-be-improved product component(s), the customer/user requirements which are mainly considered, and achieved through customer surveys using the quality function deployment (QFD) tool, often fail to guarantee or cover aspects of the product reliability. Even when they do, there are always many misunderstandings. To improve the product reliability and quality during product redesigning phase and to create that novel product(s) for the customers, the failure information of the existing product, and its component(s) should ordinarily be analyzed and converted to appropriate design knowledge for the design engineer. In this paper, a new intuitionistic fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making method has been proposed. The new approach which is based on an intuitionistic fuzzy TOPSIS model uses an exponential-related function for the computation of the separation measures from the intuitionistic fuzzy positive ideal solution (IFPIS) and intuitionistic fuzzy negative ideal solution (IFNIS) of alternatives. The proposed method has been applied to two practical case studies, and the result from the different cases has been compared with some similar computational approaches in the literature.

  11. The dynamic model of failures in a liquid propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisnyakov, V. F.; Pron', L. V.; Serebryanskij, V. N.

    1993-10-01

    A mathematical model of failures in a liquid propellant rocket engine is developed which includes dynamic equations for every component of the powerplant. These equations describe the operation of a given component in the transient mode and allow the simulation of different types of failures, such as leaks and obstructions in hydraulic and gas mains, breakdowns of impellers and bearings, cavitation in pumps, spring failure, and turbine shroud burnout. Model predictions are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Biotin in swine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, E T

    1985-01-01

    For many years, it was believed that supplemental biotin was not needed in swine diets because of the wide distribution of biotin in feedstuffs used in the formulation of swine diets, and because of the known synthesis of biotin by the animal's intestinal microflora. However, interest in biotin nutrition for swine was rekindled in the mid-1970s when several field reports indicated a biotin deficiency in swine that was responsive to biotin supplementation in many cases. Results from university research are accumulating, especially from long-term sow studies (three to four parities), which suggest that supplemental biotin will improve litter size, conception rate, weaning-to-estrus interval, toe lesions, and haircoat condition. Milk biotin concentration and plasma biotin concentration of sows and piglets were also elevated when supplemental biotin was fed. Using presently available feedstuffs and under modern swine production conditions, a marginal biotin deficiency is possible. Swine producers experiencing poor reproductive performance in their sow herds, associated with excessive loss of hair and severe foot lesions, should evaluate the biotin content of their sow diet and consider supplemental biotin.

  13. Development of predisposition, injury, response, organ failure model for predicting acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Suman; Jain, Priyanka; Kumar, Guresh; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Moreau, Richard; Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Abbas, Zaigham; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bihari, Chhagan; Butt, Amna Subhan; Chan, Albert; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar; Chowdhury, Ashok; Dhiman, RadhaKrishan; Dokmeci, Abdul Kadir; Ghazinyan, Hasmik; Hamid, Saeed Sadiq; Kim, Dong Joon; Komolmit, Piyawat; Lau, George K; Lee, Guan Huei; Lesmana, Laurentius A; Jamwal, Kapil; Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Mathur, Rajendra Prasad; Nayak, Suman Lata; Ning, Qin; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Alcantara-Payawal, Diana; Rastogi, Archana; Rahman, Salimur; Rela, Mohamed; Saraswat, Vivek A; Shah, Samir; Shiha, Gamal; Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Kapil; Tan, Soek Siam; Chandel, Shivendra Singh; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Wani, Zeeshan A; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yokosuka, Osamu; Duseja, Ajay; Jafri, Wasim; Devarbhavi, Harshad; Eapen, C E; Goel, Ashish; Sood, Ajit; Ji, Jia; Duan, Z; Chen, Y

    2017-10-01

    There is limited data on predictors of acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure. We developed a PIRO model (Predisposition, Injury, Response, Organ failure) for predicting acute kidney injury in a multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients. Data of 2360 patients from APASL-ACLF Research Consortium (AARC) was analysed. Multivariate logistic regression model (PIRO score) was developed from a derivation cohort (n=1363) which was validated in another prospective multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients (n=997). Factors significant for P component were serum creatinine[(≥2 mg/dL)OR 4.52, 95% CI (3.67-5.30)], bilirubin [(<12 mg/dL,OR 1) vs (12-30 mg/dL,OR 1.45, 95% 1.1-2.63) vs (≥30 mg/dL,OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2)], serum potassium [(<3 mmol/LOR-1) vs (3-4.9 mmol/L,OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.05-1.97) vs (≥5 mmol/L,OR 4.34, 95% CI 1.67-11.3)] and blood urea (OR 3.73, 95% CI 2.5-5.5); for I component nephrotoxic medications (OR-9.86, 95% CI 3.2-30.8); for R component,Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome,(OR-2.14, 95% CI 1.4-3.3); for O component, Circulatory failure (OR-3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5). The PIRO score predicted acute kidney injury with C-index of 0.95 and 0.96 in the derivation and validation cohort. The increasing PIRO score was also associated with mortality (P<.001) in both the derivation and validation cohorts. The PIRO model identifies and stratifies acute on chronic liver failure patients at risk of developing acute kidney injury. It reliably predicts mortality in these patients, underscoring the prognostic significance of acute kidney injury in patients with acute on chronic liver failure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System Failure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino Prieto, Omar Ariosto; Colmenares Guillen, Luis Enrique

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System is presented. This architecture is a legacy of the Detection System for Real-Time Physical Variables which is undergoing a patent process in Mexico. The methodologies for this design are the Structured Analysis for Real Time (SA- RT) [8], and the software is carried out by LACATRE (Langage d'aide à la Conception d'Application multitâche Temps Réel) [9,10] Real Time formal language. The system failures model is analyzed and the proposal is based on the formal language for the design of critical systems and Risk Assessment; AltaRica. This formal architecture uses satellites as input sensors and it was adapted from the original model which is a design pattern for physical variation detection in Real Time. The original design, whose task is to monitor events such as natural disasters and health related applications, or actual sickness monitoring and prevention, as the Real Time Diabetes Monitoring System, among others. Some related work has been presented on the Mexican Space Agency (AEM) Creation and Consultation Forums (2010-2011), and throughout the International Mexican Aerospace Science and Technology Society (SOMECYTA) international congress held in San Luis Potosí, México (2012). This Architecture will allow a Real Time Fire Satellite Monitoring, which will reduce the damage and danger caused by fires which consumes the forests and tropical forests of Mexico. This new proposal, permits having a new system that impacts on disaster prevention, by combining national and international technologies and cooperation for the benefit of humankind.

  15. Evaluation of Control Strategies for Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Swine Breeding Herds Using a Discrete Event Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Andréia Gonçalves; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Greer, Amy; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a discrete event agent-based stochastic model to explore the likelihood of the occurrence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) outbreaks in swine herds with different PRRS control measures in place. The control measures evaluated included vaccination with a modified-live attenuated vaccine and live-virus inoculation of gilts, and both were compared to a baseline scenario where no control measures were in place. A typical North American 1,000-sow farrow-to-wean swine herd was used as a model, with production and disease parameters estimated from the literature and expert opinion. The model constructed herein was not only able to capture individual animal heterogeneity in immunity to and shedding of the PRRS virus, but also the dynamic animal flow and contact structure typical in such herds under field conditions. The model outcomes included maximum number of females infected per simulation, and time at which that happened and the incidence of infected weaned piglets during the first year of challenge-virus introduction. Results showed that the baseline scenario produced a larger percentage of simulations resulting in outbreaks compared to the control scenarios, and interestingly some of the outbreaks occurred over long periods after virus introduction. The live-virus inoculation scenario showed promising results, with fewer simulations resulting in outbreaks than the other scenarios, but the negative impacts of maintaining a PRRS-positive population should be considered. Finally, under the assumptions of the current model, neither of the control strategies prevented the infection from spreading to the piglet population, which highlights the importance of maintaining internal biosecurity practices at the farrowing room level. PMID:27875546

  16. Efficacy of coaxial ventilation with a novel endotracheal catheter equipped with a functional cuff: A swine model study.

    PubMed

    Oto, Jun; Su, Zhenbo; Duggan, Michael; Wang, Jingwen; King, David R; Kacmarek, Robert M; Jiang, Yandong

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an endotracheal catheter with a functional cuff (ECFC) that inflates during inspiration and deflates during expiration. This catheter, together with a regular ICU ventilator, can provide coaxial ventilation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of ventilation in adult human-sized swine using an ECFC and a regular ICU ventilator. A prospective animal study. Experimental, Trauma Transplant Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Eight adult Yorkshire swine, weighing 45 to 50  kg, were studied. To create the ECFC, a 5  cm long latex cuff was placed over the distal side ports of either a 14 or 19-Fr gauge endotracheal catheter and a 1  cm long piece of plastic tube was inserted into the tip of the endotracheal catheter to create an internal resistance. The ECFC was placed into the trachea and the proximal end of the ECFC was connected to an ICU ventilator in pressure-control mode, with peak pressures set at either 25, 50 or 70  cmH2O. Tidal volume was calculated using plethysmography. During pressure control ventilation with the 14-Fr gauge ECFC at set inspiratory pressures of 25, 50 and 75  cmH2O, the tidal volumes generated were 209 ± 36, 309 ± 61 and 367 ± 85  ml, respectively, and with the 19-Fr gauge ECFC these were 277 ± 51, 442 ± 91 and 538 ± 123  ml, respectively. No complications were observed. An ECFC combined with a regular pressure-controlled ICU ventilator can produce adequate tidal volumes in adult human-sized swine. Our results establish the feasibility of ventilation with this new alternative technique. The safety and advantages of such a technique remain to be determined in humans.

  17. Intraosseous versus intravenous infusion of hydroxocobalamin for the treatment of acute severe cyanide toxicity in a Swine model.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Pitotti, Rebecca L; Boudreau, Susan; Tanen, David A

    2014-11-01

    Easily administrated cyanide antidotes are needed for first responders, military troops, and emergency department staff after cyanide exposure in mass casualty incidents or due to smoke inhalation during fires involving many victims. Hydroxocobalamin has proven to be an effective antidote, but cannot be given intramuscularly because the volume of diluent needed is too large. Thus, intraosseous (IO) infusion may be an alternative, as it is simple and has been recommended for the administration of other resuscitation drugs. The primary objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of IO delivery of hydroxocobalamin to intravenous (IV) injection for the management of acute cyanide toxicity in a well-described porcine model. Twenty-four swine (45 to 55 kg) were anesthetized, intubated, and instrumented with continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output monitoring. Cyanide was continuously infused until severe hypotension (50% of baseline MAP), followed by IO or IV hydroxocobalamin treatment. Animals were randomly assigned to receive IV (150 mg/kg) or IO (150 mg/kg) hydroxocobalamin and monitored for 60 minutes after start of antidotal infusion. The primary outcome measure was the change in MAP after antidotal treatment from onset of hypotension (time zero) to 60 minutes. A sample size of 12 animals per group was determined by group size analysis based on power of 80% to detect a one standard deviation of the mean MAP between the groups with an alpha of 0.05. Whole blood cyanide, lactate, pH, nitrotyrosine (nitric oxide marker) levels, cerebral and renal near infrared spectrometry (NIRS) oxygenation, and inflammatory markers were also measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine statistically significant changes between groups over time. At baseline and at the point of hypotension, physiologic parameters were similar between groups. At the conclusion of the study, 10 out of 12 animals in the IV group and 10 out of 12 in IO

  18. Anisotropic Tensile Failure Model of Rapid Prototyping Parts - Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Hoon; Baek, Changil; Lee, Sunyoung; Ahn, In Shup

    Stratasys' Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is a typical Rapid Prototyping (RP) process that can fabricate prototypes out of plastic materials, and the parts made from FDM were often used as load-carrying elements. Because FDM deposits materials in about 300 μm thin filament with designated orientation, parts made from FDM show anisotropic material behaviors. This paper proposes an analytic model to predict the tensile strength of FDM parts. Applying the Classical Lamination Theory and Tsai-Wu failure criterion, which were developed for laminated composite materials, a computer code was implemented to predict the failure of the FDM parts. The tensile strengths predicted by the analytic model were compared with those of the experimental data. The data and predicted values agreed reasonably well to prove the validity of the model.

  19. Bayesian accelerated failure time model for space-time dependency in a geographically augmented survival model

    PubMed Central

    Onicescu, Georgiana; Lawson, Andrew; Zhang, Jiajia; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Wallace, Kristin; Eberth, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the spatially explicit survival model for small area cancer data by allowing dependency between space and time and using accelerated failure time models. Spatial dependency is modeled directly in the definition of the survival, density, and hazard functions. The models are developed in the context of county level aggregated data. Two cases are considered: the first assumes that the spatial and temporal distributions are independent; the second allows for dependency between the spatial and temporal components. We apply the models to prostate cancer data from the Louisiana SEER cancer registry. PMID:26220537

  20. Semiparametric modeling and estimation of the terminal behavior of recurrent marker processes before failure events.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwun Chuen Gary; Wang, Mei-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent event processes with marker measurements are mostly and largely studied with forward time models starting from an initial event. Interestingly, the processes could exhibit important terminal behavior during a time period before occurrence of the failure event. A natural and direct way to study recurrent events prior to a failure event is to align the processes using the failure event as the time origin and to examine the terminal behavior by a backward time model. This paper studies regression models for backward recurrent marker processes by counting time backward from the failure event. A three-level semiparametric regression model is proposed for jointly modeling the time to a failure event, the backward recurrent event process, and the marker observed at the time of each backward recurrent event. The first level is a proportional hazards model for the failure time, the second level is a proportional rate model for the recurrent events occurring before the failure event, and the third level is a proportional mean model for the marker given the occurrence of a recurrent event backward in time. By jointly modeling the three components, estimating equations can be constructed for marked counting processes to estimate the target parameters in the three-level regression models. Large sample properties of the proposed estimators are studied and established. The proposed models and methods are illustrated by a community-based AIDS clinical trial to examine the terminal behavior of frequencies and severities of opportunistic infections among HIV infected individuals in the last six months of life.

  1. A Leasing Model to Deal with Partial Failures in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Boix, Elisa; van Cutsem, Tom; Vallejos, Jorge; de Meuter, Wolfgang; D'Hondt, Theo

    In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) many partial failures are the result of temporary network partitions due to the intermittent connectivity of mobile devices. Some of these failures will be permanent and require application-level failure handling. However, it is impossible to distinguish a permanent from a transient failure. Leasing provides a solution to this problem based on the temporal restriction of resources. But to date no leasing model has been designed specifically for MANETs. In this paper, we identify three characteristics required for a leasing model to be usable in a MANET, discuss the issues with existing leasing models and then propose the leased object references model, which integrates leasing with remote object references. In addition, we describe an implementation of the model in the programming language AmbientTalk. Leased object references provide an extensible framework that allows programmers to express their own leasing patterns and enables both lease holders (clients) and lease grantors (services) to deal with permanent failures.

  2. Implementation of a Tabulated Failure Model Into a Generalized Composite Material Model Suitable for Use in Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; Dubois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Khaled, Bilal; Shyamsunder, Loukham; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased use in the aerospace and automotive communities. The aerospace community has identified several key capabilities which are currently lacking in the available material models in commercial transient dynamic finite element codes. To attempt to improve the predictive capability of composite impact simulations, a next generation material model is being developed for incorporation within the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material model, which incorporates plasticity, damage and failure, utilizes experimentally based tabulated input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage and the initiation of failure as opposed to specifying discrete input parameters such as modulus and strength. The plasticity portion of the orthotropic, three-dimensional, macroscopic composite constitutive model is based on an extension of the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a generalized yield function with a non-associative flow rule. For the damage model, a strain equivalent formulation is used to allow for the uncoupling of the deformation and damage analyses. For the failure model, a tabulated approach is utilized in which a stress or strain based invariant is defined as a function of the location of the current stress state in stress space to define the initiation of failure. Failure surfaces can be defined with any arbitrary shape, unlike traditional failure models where the mathematical functions used to define the failure surface impose a specific shape on the failure surface. In the current paper, the complete development of the failure model is described and the generation of a tabulated failure surface for a representative composite material is discussed.

  3. Swine flu vaccine: present status.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-11-01

    In early 2009, "swine flu", a new infectious disease, emerged in Mexico and further spread around the world. It is currently accepted as the most problematic infection at present. To control this new infection, the swine flu vaccine is the hope. The reasons that we need the swine flu vaccine will be discussed. Also, the present status, current attempts and problems of swine flu vaccine development will be presented in this commentary.

  4. Multiscale Model Predicts Tissue-Level Failure From Collagen Fiber-Level Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Mohammad F.; Sander, Edward A.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive tissue-level forces communicated to the microstructure and extracellular matrix of soft tissues can lead to damage and failure through poorly understood physical processes that are multiscale in nature. In this work, we propose a multiscale mechanical model for the failure of collagenous soft tissues that incorporates spatial heterogeneity in the microstructure and links the failure of discrete collagen fibers to the material response of the tissue. The model, which is based on experimental failure data derived from different collagen gel geometries, was able to predict the mechanical response and failure of type I collagen gels, and it demonstrated that a fiber-based rule (at the micrometer scale) for discrete failure can strongly shape the macroscale failure response of the gel (at the millimeter scale). The model may be a useful tool in predicting the macroscale failure conditions for soft tissues and engineered tissue analogs. In addition, the multiscale model provides a framework for the study of failure in complex fiber-based mechanical systems in general. PMID:22938372

  5. Numerical simulation of failure behavior of granular debris flows based on flume model tests.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Ye-xun; Jia, Min-cai; Li, Cui-na

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the failure behaviors of debris flows were studied by flume model tests with artificial rainfall and numerical simulations (PFC(3D)). Model tests revealed that grain sizes distribution had profound effects on failure mode, and the failure in slope of medium sand started with cracks at crest and took the form of retrogressive toe sliding failure. With the increase of fine particles in soil, the failure mode of the slopes changed to fluidized flow. The discrete element method PFC(3D) can overcome the hypothesis of the traditional continuous medium mechanic and consider the simple characteristics of particle. Thus, a numerical simulations model considering liquid-solid coupled method has been developed to simulate the debris flow. Comparing the experimental results, the numerical simulation result indicated that the failure mode of the failure of medium sand slope was retrogressive toe sliding, and the failure of fine sand slope was fluidized sliding. The simulation result is consistent with the model test and theoretical analysis, and grain sizes distribution caused different failure behavior of granular debris flows. This research should be a guide to explore the theory of debris flow and to improve the prevention and reduction of debris flow.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Failure Behavior of Granular Debris Flows Based on Flume Model Tests

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Ye-xun; Jia, Min-cai; Li, Cui-na

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the failure behaviors of debris flows were studied by flume model tests with artificial rainfall and numerical simulations (PFC3D). Model tests revealed that grain sizes distribution had profound effects on failure mode, and the failure in slope of medium sand started with cracks at crest and took the form of retrogressive toe sliding failure. With the increase of fine particles in soil, the failure mode of the slopes changed to fluidized flow. The discrete element method PFC3D can overcome the hypothesis of the traditional continuous medium mechanic and consider the simple characteristics of particle. Thus, a numerical simulations model considering liquid-solid coupled method has been developed to simulate the debris flow. Comparing the experimental results, the numerical simulation result indicated that the failure mode of the failure of medium sand slope was retrogressive toe sliding, and the failure of fine sand slope was fluidized sliding. The simulation result is consistent with the model test and theoretical analysis, and grain sizes distribution caused different failure behavior of granular debris flows. This research should be a guide to explore the theory of debris flow and to improve the prevention and reduction of debris flow. PMID:23766700

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Is Involved in Myocardial Injury in a Miniature Swine Model of Coronary Artery Stenosis Exposed to Acceleration-Associated Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Chai, Meng; Liu, Chaozhong; Sun, Jinjin; Huang, Congchun; Yu, Xinya; Tian, Yi; Luo, Huilan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of myocardial injury in a minimally-invasive miniature swine model with different levels of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) and exposed to maximal tolerated +Gz. Proximal left anterior descending branch was ligated in 20 swine. Five swine underwent a sham operation. A trapezoid acceleration curve was used for +Gz stress. Pathological changes of myocardial tissue were detected by H&E staining. Apoptotic cardiomyocytes were detected by TUNEL. GRP78 and CHOP were investigated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. CAS models were successful in 18 animals.Compared with the sham-operated group (+8.00±0.71 Gz), the maximal tolerated +Gz values of the moderate stenosis (+6.00±0.89 Gz, P<0.05) and severe stenosis groups (+5.20±0.84 Gz, P<0.05) were decreased.Compared with sham animals (12.16±1.25%), after exposure to maximum +Gz, apoptotic cells of the moderate (43.53±8.42%, P<0.05) and severe stenosis group (60.50±9.35%, P<0.05) were increased, MDA content was increased (1.89 and 4.91 folds, respectively, P<0.05), and SOD activity was reduced (-13.66% and -21.71%, respectively). After exposure to maximum +Gz, GRP78 protein expression was low in the sham-operated (0.29±0.05) and mild stenosis groups (0.35±0.04), while expression was high in the moderate (0.72±0.04, P<0.05) and severe stenosis groups (0.65±0.07, P<0.05). CHOP protein expression was not observed in the sham-operated group, while expression was high in the moderate and severe stenosis groups. These results indicated that Under maximum exposure to +Gz stress, different levels of CAS led to different levels of myocardial injury. Endoplasmic reticulum response is involved in the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes after +Gz stress. PMID:26167928

  8. Multifunctional photopolymerized semiinterpenetrating network (sIPN) system containing bupivacaine and silver sulfadiazine is an effective donor site treatment in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Lee D; Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have shown in a cross-comparison study that multifunctional photopolymerized semiinterpenetrating network (sIPN) system is an effective donor site treatment in a swine model. The advantages of sIPN include spray-on application, in situ photopolymerization, and ability to cover large contoured areas. sIPN has also been shown to be an effective delivery vehicle for keratinocyte growth factor, dexamethasone, bupivacaine, and silver sulfadiazine in vitro. Our aim for this study was to show that these products delivered to the wound bed with sIPN would not change the wound healing characteristics compared with the control site through qualitative clinical evaluation and to compare the rate and quality of donor site healing through histologic evaluation. Eight Yucatan swine of 40 lbs each were randomly divided into four groups of two pigs before surgery. Each animal had 5.6% TBSA of skin harvested from two different dorsal regions, with one at 22/1000th-inch and the other at 30/1000th-inch setting on the dermatome. Each test site on each animal was then sequentially dressed with 50 cm(2) of Xeroform gauze, sIPN, sIPN loaded with 0.5% bupivacaine, or sIPN loaded with 1% silver sulfadiazine. sIPN with or without soluble drugs were applied as liquid, then photopolymerized in situ to form an elastic covering. Each of the test areas was separated by 50 cm(2) of autograft, which was used to divide the test areas. Wound assessment and killing occurred at days 7, 9, 14, and 21. A full-thickness biopsy was taken from each of the study areas for histological analysis. By 14 days, all areas showed complete epidermal coverage histologically. The 30/1000th-inch site revealed a thicker, more irregular dermis compared with the 22/1000th-site. Evaluation of the day-21 sites revealed equal thinning and flattening of the new epidermis. No site showed full restoration of the rete ridges. No signs of infection were seen in clinical or histological evaluations of any treatment

  9. Collateral Ventilation Quantification Using Xenon-Enhanced Dynamic Dual-Energy CT: Differences between Canine and Swine Models of Bronchial Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Ah; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Materials and Methods Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. Results A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 ± 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 ± 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 ± 1.8% vs. -5.4 ± 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Conclusion Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction. PMID:25995696

  10. Maternally Derived Immunity Extends Swine Influenza A Virus Persistence within Farrow-to-Finish Pig Farms: Insights from a Stochastic Event-Driven Metapopulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Cador, Charlie; Rose, Nicolas; Willem, Lander; Andraud, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Swine Influenza A Viruses (swIAVs) have been shown to persist in farrow-to-finish pig herds with repeated outbreaks in successive batches, increasing the risk for respiratory disorders in affected animals and being a threat for public health. Although the general routes of swIAV transmission (i.e. direct contact and exposure to aerosols) were clearly identified, the transmission process between batches is still not fully understood. Maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) were stressed as a possible factor favoring within-herd swIAV persistence. However, the relationship between MDAs and the global spread among the different subpopulations in the herds is still lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to understand the mechanisms induced by MDAs in relation with swIAV spread and persistence in farrow-to-finish pig herds. A metapopulation model has been developed representing the population dynamics considering two subpopulations—breeding sows and growing pigs—managed according to batch-rearing system. This model was coupled with a swIAV-specific epidemiological model, accounting for partial passive immunity protection in neonatal piglets and an immunity boost in re-infected animals. Airborne transmission was included by a between-room transmission rate related to the current prevalence of shedding pigs. Maternally derived partial immunity in piglets was found to extend the duration of the epidemics within their batch, allowing for efficient between-batch transmission and resulting in longer swIAV persistence at the herd level. These results should be taken into account in the design of control programmes for the spread and persistence of swIAV in swine herds. PMID:27662592

  11. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi collagen binding outer membrane protein NcaA is required for virulence in swine and human challenge models of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Robert A; Cole, Leah E; Janowicz, Diane M; Toffer, Kristen L; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Orndorff, Paul E; Spinola, Stanley M; Kawula, Thomas H

    2006-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection.

  12. Failure of sewage pumps: statistical modelling and impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Korving, H; Geise, M; Clemens, F

    2006-01-01

    Sewage pumping stations are directly responsible for affecting performance, i.e. failing pumps may result in combined sewer overflows or flooding. However, failures of sewage pumps are not yet incorporated in sewer assessments due to lack of knowledge and data. This paper presents the analysis of pump failure data provided by two sewer management authorities in The Netherlands. Pump failures have been studied accounting for the nature of the failures, the operation and maintenance procedures of the management authority, the ageing of the pumps and the changes in the environment of pumps. The analysis shows that sewage pumps fail relatively often due to the composition of sewage and the discontinuous operation of the pumps. The interarrival time and the duration of failures are highly variable and independent of the pump type and the specific function of the pump. The results also indicate that the serviceability of sewer systems is significantly affected by failing pumps. As a consequence, part of the environmental damage due to CSOs (combined sewer overflows) can be avoided by improving maintenance of pumping stations.

  13. Use on non-conjugate prior distributions in compound failure models. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Shultis, J.K.; Johnson, D.E.; Milliken, G.A.; Eckhoff, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    Several theoretical and computational techniques are presented for compound failure models in which the failure rate or failure probability for a class of components is considered to be a random variable. Both the failure-on-demand and failure-rate situation are considered. Ten different prior families are presented for describing the variation or uncertainty of the failure parameter. Methods considered for estimating values for the prior parameters from a given set of failure data are (1) matching data moments to those of the prior distribution, (2) matching data moments to those of the compound marginal distribution, and (3) the marginal maximum likelihood method. Numerical methods for computing the parameter estimators for all ten prior families are presented, as well as methods for obtaining estimates of the variances and covariance of the parameter estimators, it is shown that various confidence, probability, and tolerance intervals can be evaluated. Finally, to test the resulting failure models against the given failure data, generalized chi-squage and Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests are proposed together with a test to eliminate outliers from the failure data. Computer codes based on the results presented here have been prepared and are presented in a companion report (NUREG/CR-2375).

  14. A systems approach to the policy-level risk assessment of exotic animal diseases: network model and application to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Delgado, João; Pollard, Simon; Snary, Emma; Black, Edgar; Prpich, George; Longhurst, Phil

    2013-08-01

    Exotic animal diseases (EADs) are characterized by their capacity to spread global distances, causing impacts on animal health and welfare with significant economic consequences. We offer a critique of current import risk analysis approaches employed in the EAD field, focusing on their capacity to assess complex systems at a policy level. To address the shortcomings identified, we propose a novel method providing a systematic analysis of the likelihood of a disease incursion, developed by reference to the multibarrier system employed for the United Kingdom. We apply the network model to a policy-level risk assessment of classical swine fever (CSF), a notifiable animal disease caused by the CSF virus. In doing so, we document and discuss a sequence of analyses that describe system vulnerabilities and reveal the critical control points (CCPs) for intervention, reducing the likelihood of U.K. pig herds being exposed to the CSF virus. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Anti-remodeling and anti-fibrotic effects of the neuregulin-1β glial growth factor 2 in a large animal model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Cristi L; Kasasbeh, Ehab; Murphy, Abigail; Ryzhov, Sergey; Lenihan, Sean; Ahmad, Farhaan A; Williams, Philip; Nunnally, Amy; Adcock, Jamie; Song, Yanna; Harrell, Frank E; Tran, Truc-Linh; Parry, Tom J; Iaci, Jen; Ganguly, Anindita; Feoktistov, Igor; Stephenson, Matthew K; Caggiano, Anthony O; Sawyer, Douglas B; Cleator, John H

    2014-10-23

    Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) is a growth factor critical for cardiac development and repair with therapeutic potential for heart failure. We previously showed that the glial growth factor 2 (GGF2) isoform of NRG-1β improves cardiac function in rodents after myocardial infarction (MI), but its efficacy in a large animal model of cardiac injury has not been examined. We therefore sought to examine the effects of GGF2 on ventricular remodeling, cardiac function, and global transcription in post-MI swine, as well as potential mechanisms for anti-remodeling effects. MI was induced in anesthetized swine (n=23) by intracoronary balloon occlusion. At 1 week post-MI, survivors (n=13) received GGF2 treatment (intravenous, biweekly for 4 weeks; n=8) or were untreated (n=5). At 5 weeks post-MI, fractional shortening was higher (32.8% versus 25.3%, P=0.019), and left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic dimension lower (4.5 versus 5.3 cm, P=0.003) in GGF2-treated animals. Treatment altered expression of 528 genes, as measured by microarrays, including collagens, basal lamina components, and matricellular proteins. GGF2-treated pigs exhibited improvements in LV cardiomyocyte mitochondria and intercalated disk structures and showed less fibrosis, altered matrix structure, and fewer myofibroblasts (myoFbs), based on trichrome staining, electron microscopy, and immunostaining. In vitro experiments with isolated murine and rat cardiac fibroblasts demonstrate that NRG-1β reduces myoFbs, and suppresses TGFβ-induced phospho-SMAD3 as well as αSMA expression. These results suggest that GGF2/NRG-1β prevents adverse remodeling after injury in part via anti-fibrotic effects in the heart. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Finite element modelling of woven composite failure modes at the mesoscopic scale: deterministic versus stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roirand, Q.; Missoum-Benziane, D.; Thionnet, A.; Laiarinandrasana, L.

    2017-09-01

    Textile composites are composed of 3D complex architecture. To assess the durability of such engineering structures, the failure mechanisms must be highlighted. Examinations of the degradation have been carried out thanks to tomography. The present work addresses a numerical damage model dedicated to the simulation of the crack initiation and propagation at the scale of the warp yarns. For the 3D woven composites under study, loadings in tension and combined tension and bending were considered. Based on an erosion procedure of broken elements, the failure mechanisms have been modelled on 3D periodic cells by finite element calculations. The breakage of one element was determined using a failure criterion at the mesoscopic scale based on the yarn stress at failure. The results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for the two kinds of macroscopic loadings. The deterministic approach assumed a homogeneously distributed stress at failure all over the integration points in the meshes of woven composites. A stochastic approach was applied to a simple representative elementary periodic cell. The distribution of the Weibull stress at failure was assigned to the integration points using a Monte Carlo simulation. It was shown that this stochastic approach allowed more realistic failure simulations avoiding the idealised symmetry due to the deterministic modelling. In particular, the stochastic simulations performed have shown several variations of the stress as well as strain at failure and the failure modes of the yarn.

  17. Finite element modelling of woven composite failure modes at the mesoscopic scale: deterministic versus stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roirand, Q.; Missoum-Benziane, D.; Thionnet, A.; Laiarinandrasana, L.

    2017-01-01

    Textile composites are composed of 3D complex architecture. To assess the durability of such engineering structures, the failure mechanisms must be highlighted. Examinations of the degradation have been carried out thanks to tomography. The present work addresses a numerical damage model dedicated to the simulation of the crack initiation and propagation at the scale of the warp yarns. For the 3D woven composites under study, loadings in tension and combined tension and bending were considered. Based on an erosion procedure of broken elements, the failure mechanisms have been modelled on 3D periodic cells by finite element calculations. The breakage of one element was determined using a failure criterion at the mesoscopic scale based on the yarn stress at failure. The results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for the two kinds of macroscopic loadings. The deterministic approach assumed a homogeneously distributed stress at failure all over the integration points in the meshes of woven composites. A stochastic approach was applied to a simple representative elementary periodic cell. The distribution of the Weibull stress at failure was assigned to the integration points using a Monte Carlo simulation. It was shown that this stochastic approach allowed more realistic failure simulations avoiding the idealised symmetry due to the deterministic modelling. In particular, the stochastic simulations performed have shown several variations of the stress as well as strain at failure and the failure modes of the yarn.

  18. Exclusion of a patient assessment interval and extension of the CPR interval both mitigate post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yun-Te; Tang, Wanchun; Russell, James K; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2008-02-01

    Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), particularly as guided by automated external defibrillators, have been implicated in poor survival from cardiac arrest. Interruptions of CPR may be reduced by eliminating repetition of shocks between periods of CPR, elimination of the interval for patient assessment before CPR, and extension of the periods of CPR. The effects of exclusion of a 30s post-shock assessment interval prior to CPR and use of a longer interval (180s versus 90s) of CPR on resuscitation and post-resuscitation function were assessed in a factorial design using an established swine model of cardiac arrest. Repetitive shocks were excluded. Ventricular fibrillation was induced ischemically and maintained untreated for 5min. All subjects were resuscitated, 95% survived 3 days, and 97% of survivors had full neurological recovery. Exclusion of the assessment interval reduced the delay to first return of spontaneous circulation by 33.1s (P=0.004) and the delay to sustained resuscitation by 99.2s (P=0.004), reduced post-resuscitation ECG ST elevation by 0.12mV (P=0.03), and alleviated transient post-resuscitation ejection fraction reduction (P<0.0001). Extension of the CPR interval reduced transient post-resuscitation fractional area change impairment (P=0.003). Exclusion of an interval for assessment of airway, breathing and signs of circulation mitigates post-resuscitation dysfunction in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Extension of the period of CPR independently provides measurable, though less comprehensive, mitigation as well.

  19. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation.

  20. A comparison of proximal tibia, distal femur, and proximal humerus infusion rates using the EZ-IO intraosseous device on the adult swine (Sus scrofa) model.

    PubMed

    Lairet, Julio; Bebarta, Vikhyat; Lairet, Kimberly; Kacprowicz, Robert; Lawler, Christopher; Pitotti, Rebecca; Bush, Anneke; King, James

    2013-01-01

    We sought to compare the flow rates of the proximal tibia, the distal femur, and the proximal humerus using high pressure (greater than 300 mmHg) through an intraosseous (IO) infusion needle in an adult swine model. We performed a prospective interventional study in 11 swine. After placement of central vein and arterial lines, blood was removed via the central line until the animal's mean arterial pressure decreased 25% from the recorded baseline. We inserted a 25-mm IO needle into the proximal tibia and 45-mm needles into the distal femur and proximal humerus. All extremities were utilized in each study animal. We infused normal saline at each site for 10 minutes with a pressure bag inflated to the highest achievable pressure (greater than 300 mmHg) as measured at the infusion site with a calibrated portable inline pressure gauge. We measured the volume of normal saline remaining and we calculated infusion rates for each site. We then compared infusion flow rates between the three locations. Statistical analysis and comparison of the infusion rates of all three study arms were as performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The average weight of the swine was 71 kg (range 64-84 kg). Successful placement of the IO needle was confirmed at all three sites. The mean infusion flow rate was 213 mL/min (standard deviation [SD] 53.2 mL/min) for the proximal humerus, 138 mL/min (SD 65.3 mL/min) for the distal femur, and 103 mL/min (SD 48.1 mL/min) for the proximal tibia (p < 0.001). The flow rate through the proximal humerus was statistically greater than that for the proximal tibia and the distal femur (p < 0.001). The flow rates through the proximal tibia and distal femur were similar. The humerus is a suitable alternative site for IO placement, with a potential for higher flow rates than the proximal tibia and distal femur when resuscitating a patient.

  1. Implementation of a PETN failure model using ARIA's general chemistry framework

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a PETN thermal decomposition model that accurately predicts thermal ignition and detonator failure [1]. This model was originally developed for CALORE [2] and required several complex user subroutines. Recently, a simplified version of the PETN decomposition model was implemented into ARIA [3] using a general chemistry framework without need for user subroutines. Detonator failure was also predicted with this new model using ENCORE. The model was simplified by 1) basing the model on moles rather than mass, 2) simplifying the thermal conductivity model, and 3) implementing ARIA’s new phase change model. This memo briefly describes the model, implementation, and validation.

  2. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of cardiac stem/progenitor cell biodistribution and retention after intracoronary and intramyocardial delivery in a swine model of chronic ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Pelacho, Beatriz; García-Velloso, María José; Gavira, Juán José; Abizanda, Gloria; Palacios, Itziar; Rodriguez-Borlado, Luis; Álvarez, Virginia; Prieto, Elena; Ecay, Margarita; Larequi, Eduardo; Peñuelas, Iván; Prósper, Felipe

    2017-03-13

    The safety and efficacy of cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CSC) have been demonstrated in previous preclinical and clinical assays for heart failure. However, their optimal delivery route to the ischemic heart has not yet been assessed. This study was designed to determine by a non-invasive imaging technique (PET/CT) the biodistribution and acute retention of allogeneic pig CSC implanted by two different delivery routes, intracoronary (IC) and intramyocardial (IM), in a swine preclinical model of chronic ischemia-reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion was induced in six Goettingen hybrid minipigs by 90 min coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Thirty days later, animals were allocated to receive IC (n = 3) or NOGA(®)-guided IM injection (n = 3) of 50 million of (18)F-FDG/GFP-labeled allogeneic pig CSC. Acute retention was quantified by PET/CT 4 h after injection and cell engraftment assessed by immunohistochemical quantification of GFP(+) cells three days post-injection. Biodistribution of (18)F-FDG-labeled CSC was clearly visualized by PET/CT imaging and quantified. No statistical differences in acute cell retention (percentage of injected dose, %ID) were found in the heart when cells were administered by NOGA(®)-guided IM (13.4 ± 3.4%ID) or IC injections (17.4 ± 4.1%ID). Interestingly, engrafted CSC were histologically detected only after IM injection. PET/CT imaging of (18)F-FDG-labeled CSC allows quantifying biodistribution and acute retention of implanted cells in a clinically relevant pig model of chronic myocardial infarction. Similar levels of acute retention are achieved when cells are IM or IC administered. However, acute cell retention does not correlate with cell engraftment, which is improved by IM injection.

  3. Environmental enhancement of swine lagoons through influent treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Confined swine production generates large volumes of wastewater typically stored and treated in anaerobic lagoons. Failure of these lagoons during tropical storms in North Carolina along with major public environmental concerns led to a permanent state moratorium of construction of new anaerobic lag...

  4. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Aujesky’s Disease or pseudorabies, is one of the oldest recognized swine diseases. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus that can induce respiratory disease, reproductive failure, and affect the central nervous system. PRV vaccines, in conjunction with serologi...

  5. Model-Biased, Data-Driven Adaptive Failure Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, Todd K.

    2004-01-01

    This final report, which contains a research summary and a viewgraph presentation, addresses clustering and data simulation techniques for failure prediction. The researchers applied their techniques to both helicopter gearbox anomaly detection and segmentation of Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite imagery.

  6. Common Cause Failure Modeling in Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFs are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused for example by system environments, manufacturing, transportation, storage, maintenance, and assembly. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, they can be reduced, but are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and dependent CCF. Because common cause failure data is limited in the aerospace industry, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Team at Bastion Technology Inc. is estimating CCF risk using generic data collected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Consequently, common cause risk estimates based on this database, when applied to other industry applications, are highly uncertain. Therefore, it is important to account for a range of values for independent and CCF risk and to communicate the uncertainty to decision makers. There is an existing methodology for reducing CCF risk during design, which includes a checklist of 40+ factors grouped into eight categories. Using this checklist, an approach to produce a beta factor estimate is being investigated that quantitatively relates these factors. In this example, the checklist will be tailored to space launch vehicles, a quantitative approach will be described, and an example of the method will be presented.

  7. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  8. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure</