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Sample records for faith-based organizations fbos

  1. Beyond Morality: Assessment of the Capacity of Faith-based Organizations (FBOS) in Responding to the HIV/AIDS Challenge in Southeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Anugwom, Eze Edlyne; Anugwom, Kenechukwu

    2018-01-01

    For the world can get rid of the HIV/AIDS pandemic by 2030, there is need for more to be done especially in the case of countries in Africa. In Nigeria, such efforts have included Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) recognized as partners in the National Response Framework. However, the extent to which these FBOs contribute to efforts to control the pandemic will depend on their capacity. Therefore, this study aimed to ascertain the technical and managerial capacity of these FBOs to respond to the pandemic in Nigeria. We utilized social survey in examining the capacity of three purposively selected FBOs in the Southeast of Nigeria to respond to the pandemic. Thus, the focus group discussion and the key informant interviews were used. The data for the study was collected between Feb and Apr 2014. The study discovered a general low capacity but high willingness of the FBOs to get involved. One of the FBOs studied was better placed than others and had even established committee on the pandemic. However, in another FBO, the pandemic was still seen largely with moral lens that blame those infected rather than provide support. All the FBOs were ambivalent on the use of condoms as a prevention method. There is need for sustained capacity building for the FBOs in order to provide them with knowledge on the pandemic and help them act out the role envisaged for them in the National Response Framework in Nigeria.

  2. Engaging African American Faith-Based Organizations in Adolescent HIV Prevention.

    PubMed

    Woods-Jaeger, Briana A; Carlson, Mamie; Taggart, Tamara; Riggins, Linda; Lightfoot, Alexandra F; Jackson, Melvin R

    2015-08-01

    To reduce current HIV disparities among African American youth, it is imperative to find effective ways to extend the reach of evidence-based HIV prevention. One promising community resource to support this effort is faith-based organizations (FBOs), a credible and respected resource in the African American community. This paper describes the experiences, perceptions, and challenges that African American FBOs and faith leaders face in engaging in adolescent HIV prevention and highlights facilitators and barriers to implementing HIV prevention in African American FBOs. The findings suggest that African American FBOs and faith-based leaders are uniquely positioned to be instrumental resources in reducing African American youth HIV disparities.

  3. Immigration detention and faith-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Susanna; Bell, Holly; Busch-Armendariz, Noël

    2015-04-01

    Immigration detention is a hot contemporary issue in the United States, with over 33,000 individuals held in detention facilities daily and reports of poor conditions and human rights abuses. Building on a growing body of theory exploring the role of faith-based organizations (FBOs) in social services provision, and seeking to address a gap in the literature concerning services provided to immigrants in detention, this qualitative study explored the responses of FBOs to immigration detainees. Twenty in-depth interviews with volunteers and staff members of FBOs as well as field notes from participant observation were analyzed using thematic coding techniques. Findings suggest that FBOs are active leaders in this area of social work practice and provide significant resources to isolated and vulnerable detained immigrants in a variety of ways. Simultaneously, they face challenges surrounding access and constricted activity. The study indicates that considerable scope exists for expanding and enhancing faith-based and other social work engagement in this crucial field.

  4. Enhancing the role of faith-based organizations to improve health: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2017-09-01

    Researchers, policymakers, and community members increasingly recognize the potential to leverage faith-based organizations (FBOs) to improve health. This commentary complements Leyva and colleagues' article on whether and how members of FBOs view such a role. The commentary draws on our 13+ years operating a faith-based and community-based research organization, Faith Moves Mountains, in the Appalachian context. Issues to be addressed in the further development of faith-based health promotion include sustainability; adherence to the evidence-based operations of interventions, training, and privacy and protection protocols; and understanding the changing landscape of American public life.

  5. Teaching about Faith-Based Organizations in the Social Work Curriculum: Perspectives of Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Samta P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work…

  6. Organizational characteristics, financial performance measures, and funding sources of faith based organizations.

    PubMed

    Lampkin, Lynne; Raghavan, Kamala

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of organizational characteristics and financial performance measures of faith based organizations (FBOS) in Pennsylvania and Ohio on the decisions of the funding sources. Organizational characteristics of size, age, and type of service, and financial performance measures such as expense, liquidity, and solvency ratios were gathered from the data on IRS form 990 for 97 FBOS for the period of 1995 to 2004. The study found that the 1996 Charitable Choice provisions and the 2001 Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives have led to increased government funding for FBOS. The results showed that government funding of FBOS is affected positively by age of the FBO, and negatively by its size. For smaller FBOS, savings ratio had a negative relationship to government funding and a positive relationship to direct public support. For social service FBOS government funding was positively affected by age and negatively affected by size and debt ratio, while days-cash-on-hand had a negative impact on direct public support. All of the above relationships were statistically significant.

  7. Mass-Fatality Incident Preparedness Among Faith-Based Organizations.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Qi; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Gershon, Robyn R

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Members of faith-based organizations (FBOs) are in a unique position to provide support and services to their local communities during disasters. Because of their close community ties and well-established trust, they can play an especially critical role in helping communities heal in the aftermath of a mass-fatality incident (MFI). Faith-based organizations are considered an important disaster resource and partner under the National Response Plan (NRP) and National Response Framework; however, their level of preparedness and response capabilities with respect to MFIs has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to develop appropriate measures of preparedness for this sector; (2) to assess MFI preparedness among United States FBOs; and (3) to identify key factors associated with MFI preparedness. Problem New metrics for MFI preparedness, comprised of three domains (organizational capabilities, operational capabilities, and resource sharing partnerships), were developed and tested in a national convenience sample of FBO members. Data were collected using an online anonymous survey that was distributed through two major, national faith-based associations and social media during a 6-week period in 2014. Descriptive, bivariate, and correlational analyses were conducted. One hundred twenty-four respondents completed the online survey. More than one-half of the FBOs had responded to MFIs in the previous five years. Only 20% of respondents thought that roughly three-quarters of FBO clergy would be able to respond to MFIs, with or without hazardous contamination. A higher proportion (45%) thought that most FBO clergy would be willing to respond, but only 37% thought they would be willing if hazardous contamination was involved. Almost all respondents reported that their FBO was capable of providing emotional care and grief counseling in response to MFIs. Resource sharing partnerships were typically in place with other voluntary

  8. Faith-Based Organizations and Veteran Reintegration: Enriching the Web of Support.

    PubMed

    Werber, Laura; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rudnick, Mollie; Harrell, Margaret C; Naranjo, Diana

    2015-11-30

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are an important community-based resource for veterans as they readjust to civilian life. Through interviews with both national-level and smaller, local FBOs, the authors sought to understand better the current and potential roles for FBOs in veteran reintegration. Interviewees suggested that veterans may look to FBOs for support because they offer privacy and confidentiality, two features that may be especially critical when a potential stigma is involved. Some FBOs have also developed a reputation as safe places for veterans, providing supportive, judgment-free environments. FBOs not only help veterans with spiritual matters but address diverse areas of veteran health and wellness, including vocation, education, financial and legal stability, shelter, access to goods and services, mental health, access to health care, physical health, family, and social networks. In some cases, the support is offered to veterans directly; in other instances, the support is indirect, via training individuals to help veterans or educating the public about them. In the process of providing support, FBOs interact with varied organizations, including government entities, private nonprofits, and one another, for training, outreach, referrals, information exchange, obtaining donations, and collaboration. Yet challenges exist, including insufficient connections with chaplains working in different settings and others in the web of support, resource and capacity constraints, lack of awareness of experience with veterans, issues related to religious philosophy or orientation, and characteristics of veterans themselves. To move forward, the authors offer recommendations for policymakers, organizations that interact with FBOs, and FBOs themselves to help FBOs engage fully in the web of reintegration support.

  9. Aligning faith-based and national HIV/AIDS prevention responses? Factors influencing the HIV/AIDS prevention policy process and response of faith-based NGOs in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rosemary; Green, Andrew; Boesten, Jelke

    2014-05-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have a long tradition of providing HIV/AIDS prevention and mitigation services in Africa. The overall response of FBOs, however, has been controversial, particularly in regard to HIV/AIDS prevention and FBO's rejection of condom use and promotion, which can conflict with and negatively influence national HIV/AIDS prevention response efforts. This article reports the findings from a study that explored the factors influencing the HIV/AIDS prevention policy process within faith-based non-governmental organizations (NGOs) of different faiths. These factors were examined within three faith-based NGOs in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania-a Catholic, Anglican and Muslim organization. The research used an exploratory, qualitative case-study approach, and employed a health policy analysis framework, examining the context, actor and process factors and how they interact to form content in terms of policy and its implementation within each organization. Three key factors were found to influence faith-based NGOs' HIV/AIDS prevention response in terms of both policy and its implementation: (1) the faith structure in which the organizations are a part, (2) the presence or absence of organizational policy and (3) the professional nature of the organizations and its actors. The interaction between these factors, and how actors negotiate between them, was found to shape the organizations' HIV/AIDS prevention response. This article reports on these factors and analyses the different HIV/AIDS prevention responses found within each organization. By understanding the factors that influence faith-based NGOs' HIV/AIDS prevention policy process, the overall faith-based response to HIV/AIDS, and how it corresponds to national response efforts, is better understood. It is hoped that by doing so the government will be better able to identify how to best work with FBOs to meet national HIV/AIDS prevention targets, improving the overall role of FBOs in the fight against

  10. Obesity interventions in African American faith-based organizations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, K J; Carter-Edwards, L; Grilo, S; Shen, C; Schoenthaler, A M

    2014-10-01

    African Americans, especially women, have higher obesity rates than the general US population. Because of the importance of faith to many African Americans, faith-based organizations (FBOs) may be effective venues for delivering health messages and promoting adoption of healthy behaviours. This article systematically reviews interventions targeting weight and related behaviours in faith settings. We searched literature published through July 2012 for interventions in FBOs targeting weight loss, diet and/or physical activity (PA) in African Americans. Of 27 relevant articles identified, 12 were randomized controlled trials; seven of these reported a statistically significant change in an outcome. Four of the five quasi-experimental and single-group design studies reported a statistically significant outcome. All 10 pilot studies reported improvement in at least one outcome, but most did not have a comparison group. Overall, 70% of interventions reported success in reducing weight, 60% reported increased fruit and vegetable intake and 38% reported increased PA. These results suggest that interventions in African American FBOs can successfully improve weight and related behaviours. However, not all of the findings about the success of certain approaches were as expected. This review identifies gaps in knowledge and recommends more rigorous studies be conducted to strengthen the comparative methodology and evidence. © 2014 World Obesity.

  11. Learning for sustainability among faith-based organizations in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Joanne M; Sinclair, A John; Diduck, Alan P

    2014-08-01

    The complex and unpredictable contexts in which environmental and development work take place require an adaptable, learning approach. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a significant role in sustainability work around the world, and provide a unique setting in which to study learning. This paper explores individual learning for sustainability within two FBOs engaged in sustainability work in Kenya. Learning outcomes covered a broad range of areas, including the sustainability framework, environment/conservation, skills, community work, interpersonal engagement, and personal and faith development. These outcomes were acquired through embodied experience and activity, facilitation by the workplace, interpersonal interaction, personal reflection, and Bible study and worship. Grounded categories were compared to learning domains and processes described by Mezirow's transformative learning theory. The findings indicate that for learning in the sustainability field, instrumental learning and embodied learning processes are particularly important, and consequently they require greater attention in the theory when applied in this field.

  12. Learning for Sustainability Among Faith-Based Organizations in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Joanne M.; Sinclair, A. John; Diduck, Alan P.

    2014-08-01

    The complex and unpredictable contexts in which environmental and development work take place require an adaptable, learning approach. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a significant role in sustainability work around the world, and provide a unique setting in which to study learning. This paper explores individual learning for sustainability within two FBOs engaged in sustainability work in Kenya. Learning outcomes covered a broad range of areas, including the sustainability framework, environment/conservation, skills, community work, interpersonal engagement, and personal and faith development. These outcomes were acquired through embodied experience and activity, facilitation by the workplace, interpersonal interaction, personal reflection, and Bible study and worship. Grounded categories were compared to learning domains and processes described by Mezirow's transformative learning theory. The findings indicate that for learning in the sustainability field, instrumental learning and embodied learning processes are particularly important, and consequently they require greater attention in the theory when applied in this field.

  13. Estimating the development assistance for health provided to faith-based organizations, 1990-2013.

    PubMed

    Haakenstad, Annie; Johnson, Elizabeth; Graves, Casey; Olivier, Jill; Duff, Jean; Dieleman, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH) channeled through these organizations. Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs. In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund's contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation's contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs. Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health.

  14. Faith-based organizations and sustainable sheltering operations in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina: implications for informal network utilization.

    PubMed

    Pant, Anjali T; Kirsch, Thomas D; Subbarao, Italo R; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Vu, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a significant number of faith-based organizations (FBOs) that were not a part of the formal National Response Plan (NRP) initiated and sustained sheltering operations. The objective of this study was to examine the sheltering operations of FBOs, understand the decision-making process of FBO shelters, and identify the advantages and disadvantages of FBO shelters. Verbal interviews were conducted with FBO shelter leaders. Inclusion criteria were: (1) opening in response to the Katrina disaster; (2) operating for more than three weeks; and (3) being a FBO. Enrolled shelters were examined using descriptive data methods. The majority of shelters operating in Mississippi up to three weeks post-Katrina were FBO-managed. All of the operating FBO shelters in Mississippi that met the inclusion criteria were contacted with a response rate of 94%. Decisions were made by individuals or small groups in most shelters regarding opening, operating procedures, and closing. Most FBOs provided at least one enabling service to evacuees, and all utilized informal networks for sheltering operations. Only 25% of FBOs had disaster plans in place prior to Hurricane Katrina. Faith-based organization shelters played a significant role in the acute phase of the Katrina disaster. Formal disaster training should be initiated for these organizations. Services provided by FBOs should be standardized. Informal networks should be incorporated into national disaster planning.

  15. Health and wellness programming in faith-based organizations: a description of a nationwide sample.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Most of the U.S. population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBOs) and regularly attends services. Health and wellness activities (HWA) delivered through FBOs have great potential for reach, but the number of FBOs offering health programs and the characteristics of these programs are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to better understand rates, characteristics, and factors influencing faith-based HWA across the United States. Faith leaders (N = 844) completed an online survey assessing faith leader demographics and health, FBO demographics (e.g., denomination, size, location, diversity), and details of HWA within their FBO. Respondents were primarily White (93%), male (72%), middle-aged (53.2 ± 12.1 years), and affiliated with Methodist (42.5%) or Lutheran (20.2%) denominations. Although most faith leaders report meeting physical activity recommendations (56.5%), most were overweight/obese (77.4%), did not meet fruit and vegetable recommendations (65.9%), and had been diagnosed with 1.25 ± 1.36 chronic diseases. Respondents reported offering 4.8 ± 3 HWA within their FBO over the past 12 months. Most common HWA included clubs/teams related to physical activity (54.8%), individual-level health counseling (54%), and providing health/wellness pamphlets. Leaders cited a lack of lay leadership (48.1%) and financial resources for staff time (47.8%) as the most common barriers to HWA. An increase in interest/awareness in health topics from FBO members was the most common facilitator for HWA (66.5%). Although faith-based HWA are prevalent nationally, types of HWA and the factors influencing HWA are dependent on FBO characteristics. Future faith-based interventions should consider existing capabilities and moderating factors for HWA.

  16. Estimating the Development Assistance for Health Provided to Faith-Based Organizations, 1990–2013

    PubMed Central

    Haakenstad, Annie; Johnson, Elizabeth; Graves, Casey; Olivier, Jill; Duff, Jean; Dieleman, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH) channeled through these organizations. Material and Methods Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs. Results In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund’s contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation’s contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs. Conclusion Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health. PMID:26042731

  17. Implementing health promotion activities using community-engaged approaches in Asian American faith-based organizations in New York City and New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S C; Patel, S; Choy, C; Zanowiak, J; Rideout, C; Yi, S; Wyatt, L; Taher, M D; Garcia-Dia, M J; Kim, S S; Denholm, T K; Kavathe, R; Islam, N S

    2017-09-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) (e.g., churches, mosques, and gurdwaras) can play a vital role in health promotion. The Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health for Asian Americans (REACH FAR) Project is implementing a multi-level and evidence-based health promotion and hypertension (HTN) control program in faith-based organizations serving Asian American (AA) communities (Bangladeshi, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian) across multiple denominations (Christian, Muslim, and Sikh) in New York/New Jersey (NY/NJ). This paper presents baseline results and describes the cultural adaptation and implementation process of the REACH FAR program across diverse FBOs and religious denominations serving AA subgroups. Working with 12 FBOs, informed by implementation research and guided by a cultural adaptation framework and community-engaged approaches, REACH FAR strategies included (1) implementing healthy food policies for communal meals and (2) delivering a culturally-linguistically adapted HTN management coaching program. Using the Ecological Validity Model (EVM), the program was culturally adapted across congregation and faith settings. Baseline measures include (i) Congregant surveys assessing social norms and diet (n = 946), (ii) HTN participant program surveys (n = 725), (iii) FBO environmental strategy checklists (n = 13), and (iv) community partner in-depth interviews assessing project feasibility (n = 5). We describe the adaptation process and baseline assessments of FBOs. In year 1, we reached 3790 (nutritional strategies) and 725 (HTN program) via AA FBO sites. Most AA FBOs lack nutrition policies and present prime opportunities for evidence-based multi-level interventions. REACH FAR presents a promising health promotion implementation program that may result in significant community reach.

  18. Faith-Based Partnerships Promoting Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Michael L.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita

    2012-01-01

    Churches or, as they are now more commonly referred to in some circles, faith-based organizations (FBOs), have a rich tradition of providing not only religious but educational and social service opportunities for their congregations and local community. Social service agencies, health care agencies, and educational institutions have long realized…

  19. An Exploration of Community Relations between a Public High School District and Faith-Based Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerbower, John David

    2013-01-01

    An effective school leader explores better ways to communicate with the community stakeholder their district serves. Often, some of the strongest groups in a community are the faith-based organizations (FBOs). A qualitative, action research design was used to explore three primary questions. The study provided an example for exploring perceptions…

  20. Individual and institutional influences on faith-based health and wellness programming.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A

    2011-12-01

    The majority of the US population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBO). Health and wellness activities (HWAs) within FBOs have great potential for reach, though the factors influencing faith-based HWA are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine individual faith leader and institutional influences on HWAs offered within FBOs. A national convenience sample of faith leaders (N = 844) completed an online survey assessing individual (demographics, health, health behaviors and attitudes) and institutional influences (size, location and external support) on health and HWA within FBO. Respondents were primarily White (93%), male (72%), middle-aged and affiliated with Methodist (42.5%) or Lutheran (20.2%) religions. Respondents reported 4.8 ± 3.2 HWA within their FBO per year. Faith leader education, length of service to the FBO, physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake were positively related to HWA and body mass index was negatively related. Denomination, congregation diversity, location and size were also related to HWA. Results show a strong relationship between faith leaders' health and HWA, indicating the influence of the social environment on health promotion in FBOs. Institutional variables, though not modifiable, were significant predictors of HWA and should be considered when delivering interventions to achieve a significant impact.

  1. Faith-Based Organizations and the Affordable Care Act: Reducing Latino Mental Healthcare Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Villatoro, Alice P.; Dixon, Elizabeth; Mays, Vickie M.

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is expected to increase access to mental healthcare through provisions aimed at increasing health coverage among the nation's uninsured, including 10.2 million eligible Latino non-elderly adults. The ACA will increase health coverage by expanding Medicaid eligibility to individuals living below 138% of the federal poverty level, subsidizing the purchase of private insurance among individuals not eligible for Medicaid, and requiring employers with 50 or more employees to offer health insurance. An anticipated result of this landmark legislation is improvement in the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders in racial/ethnic minorities, particularly for Latinos, who traditionally have had less access to these services. However, these efforts alone may not sufficiently ameliorate mental healthcare disparities for Latinos. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) could play an integral role in the mental healthcare of Latinos by increasing help-seeking, providing religion-based mental health services, and delivering supportive services that address common access barriers among Latinos. Thus, in determining ways to eliminate Latino mental healthcare disparities under the ACA, examining pathways into care through the faith-based sector offers unique opportunities to address some of the cultural barriers confronted by this population. We examine how partnerships between FBOs and primary care patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) may help reduce the gap of unmet mental health needs among Latinos in this era of health reform. We also describe the challenges FBOs and PCMH providers need to overcome in order to be partners in integrated care efforts. PMID:26845492

  2. Faith-based organizations and the Affordable Care Act: Reducing Latino mental health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Alice P; Dixon, Elizabeth; Mays, Vickie M

    2016-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA; 2010) is expected to increase access to mental health care through provisions aimed at increasing health coverage among the nation's uninsured, including 10.2 million eligible Latino adults. The ACA will increase health coverage by expanding Medicaid eligibility to individuals living below 138% of the federal poverty level, subsidizing the purchase of private insurance among individuals not eligible for Medicaid, and requiring employers with 50 or more employees to offer health insurance. An anticipated result of this landmark legislation is improvement in the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders in racial/ethnic minorities, particularly for Latinos, who traditionally have had less access to these services. However, these efforts alone may not sufficiently ameliorate mental health care disparities for Latinos. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) could play an integral role in the mental health care of Latinos by increasing help seeking, providing religion-based mental health services, and delivering supportive services that address common access barriers among Latinos. Thus, in determining ways to eliminate Latino mental health care disparities under the ACA, examining pathways into care through the faith-based sector offers unique opportunities to address some of the cultural barriers confronted by this population. We examine how partnerships between FBOs and primary care patient-centered health homes may help reduce the gap of unmet mental health needs among Latinos in this era of health reform. We also describe the challenges FBOs and primary care providers need to overcome to be partners in integrated care efforts. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Vehicle of Hope: Faith-based Disaster Response.

    PubMed

    Persell, Deborah J

    2016-12-01

    In August 2005, the United States experienced one of the most catastrophic and costly disasters in its history: Hurricane Katrina. Faith-based Organizations (FBOs) made a major contribution to the response and recovery efforts. Whereas the activities and skill sets of FBOs vary, their core missions are very similar: they want to provide hope. As a concept, hope has been purported to be essential for health and well-being, is viewed as multidimensional and a life force, as well as is highly individualized. This mixed methods study used interviews of the phenomenology tradition and the Herth Hope Index. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Facilitators, challenges, and collaborative activities in faith and health partnerships to address health disparities.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle C; Hall, Sarah M; Kiser, Mimi

    2010-10-01

    Interest in partnering with faith-based organizations (FBOs) to address health disparities has grown in recent years. Yet relatively little is known about these types of partnerships. As part of an evaluation of the Institute for Faith and Public Health Collaborations, representatives of 34 faith-health teams (n = 61) completed semi-structured interviews. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded by two members of the evaluation team to identify themes. Major facilitators to faith-health collaborative work were passion and commitment, importance of FBOs in communities, favorable political climate, support from community and faith leaders, diversity of teams, and mutual trust and respect. Barriers unique to faith and health collaboration included discomfort with FBOs, distrust of either health agencies or FBOs, diversity within faith communities, different agendas, separation of church and state, and the lack of a common language. Findings suggest that faith-health partnerships face unique challenges but are capable of aligning resources to address health disparities.

  5. Health Ministry and Activities in African American Faith-Based Organizations: A Qualitative Examination of Facilitators, Barriers, and Use of Technology.

    PubMed

    Holt, Cheryl L; Graham-Phillips, Anita L; Daniel Mullins, C; Slade, Jimmie L; Savoy, Alma; Carter, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    African American faith-based organizations (FBOs) play an important role in addressing health disparities. Increasingly, churches offer health fairs, screenings, or education through health ministries. However, little is known about linking these organizations with evidence-based interventions (EBIs) developed by research. This study explored 1) factors that facilitate or impede health ministry activities, including the adoption of EBIs, and 2) opportunities to use technology to support/enhance the capacity of FBOs to sustain health-related activities. We conducted 18 key informant interviews with African American pastors and FBO leaders and six focus groups with members. A popular health ministry strategy was distribution of print materials. There was limited awareness of EBIs and how to access them. Challenges included maintaining qualified volunteers, financial resources, and technical assistance needs. Participants used technology and social media but older adults did so less often. Findings have implications for dissemination/implementation research in FBOs, in relation to the translational continuum.

  6. The role for public funding of faith-based organizations delivering behavioral health services: guideposts for monitoring and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Fredrica D

    2010-12-01

    The paper reviews policies promoting faith-based organizations' (FBO) participation in publicly-funded programs since the Charitable Choice statute was enacted during the Clinton administration and then additional faith-based initiatives were implemented by the Bush administration. The paper focuses on research findings on FBO participation in publicly-funded human service programs under these policies. It then proposes a framework for evaluation to assess the appropriateness of public funding for behavioral health services delivered by FBOs, in order to address: (1) the programmatic and systemic effects resulting from the infusion of new players from the faith community, and the consequences to the profile of services and who gets served; and (2) the content and effectiveness of faith-infused services as a basis for identifying interventions appropriate for public funding. The analysis considers classification issues, theoretical bases of measured effects of faith-infused services, and the transferability of faith-based interventions across religious and secular applications in order to satisfy constitutional issues and client choice.

  7. Availability of family planning services and quality of counseling by faith-based organizations: a three country comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Barden-O'Fallon, Janine

    2017-05-08

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have a long history of providing health services in developing countries and are important contributors to healthcare systems. Support for the wellbeing of women, children, and families is evidenced through active participation in the field of family planning (FP). However, there is little quantitative evidence on the availability or quality of FP services by FBOs. The descriptive analysis uses facility-level data collected through recent Service Provision Assessments in Malawi (2013-14), Kenya (2010), and Haiti (2012) to examine 11 indicators of FP service and method availability and nine indicators of comprehensive and quality counseling. The indicators include measures of FP service provision, method mix, method stock, the provision of accurate information, and the discussion of reproductive intentions, client's questions/concerns, prevention of sexually transmitted infections, and return visits, among others. Pearson's Chi-square test is used to assess the selected indicators by managing authority (FBO, public, and other private sector) to determine statistical equivalence. Results show that FBOs are less likely to offer FP services than other managing authorities (p < 0.05). For example, 69% of FBOs in Kenya offer FP services compared to 97% of public facilities and 83% of other private facilities. Offering long-acting or permanent methods in faith-based facilities is especially low (43% in Malawi, 29% in Kenya and 39% in Haiti). There were few statistically significant differences between the managing authorities in comprehensive and quality counseling indicators. Interestingly, Haitian FBOs often perform as well or better than public sector health facilities on counseling indicators, such as discussion of a return visit (79% of FBO providers vs. 68% of public sector providers) and discussion of client concerns/questions (52% vs. 49%, respectively). Results from this analysis indicate that there is room for improvement in

  8. Adoption of a Tai Chi Intervention, Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance, for Fall Prevention by Rural Faith-Based Organizations, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dina L; Starcher, Rachael W; Eicher, Jennifer L; Wilcox, Sara

    2016-07-14

    Translating evidence-based, community-delivered, fall-prevention exercise programs into new settings is a public health priority. Older adults (aged ≥65 y) are at high risk for falls. We conducted a community engagement project in West Virginia to evaluate the adoption of a tai chi exercise program, Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance, by rural faith-based organizations (FBOs) and exercise instructors by recruiting 20 FBOs and 20 or more exercise instructors and by obtaining input from key stakeholders (representatives of FBOs, community representatives, exercise instructors) regarding potential barriers and facilitators to program adoption. We used both multistage, purposeful random sampling and snowball sampling to recruit FBOs and exercise instructors in 7 West Virginia counties. Two forums were held with stakeholders to identify barriers and facilitators to program adoption. We calculated separate adoption rates for organizations and exercise instructors. It took up to 3 months to recruit each FBO with an adoption rate of 94%. We made 289 telephone calls, sent 193 emails and 215 letters, distributed brochures and flyers to 69 FBOs, held 118 meetings, and made 20 trips over a period of 31 days (8,933 miles traveled). Nineteen of 22 trained exercise instructors started classes, an instructor adoption rate of 86%. Key issues regarding adoption were the age requirement for participants, trust, education, and competing priorities. Although we had recruitment challenges, our adoption rates were similar to or higher than those reported in other studies, and the objectives of the community engagement project were met. Clustering the FBOs and having them located closer geographically to our location may have reduced our resource use, and using a recruitment coordinator from the local community may have enabled us to gain the trust of congregants and clergy support.

  9. Assessing Needs and Feasibility of Diabetes Self-management Coaching at Faith-Based Organizations for Indo-Guyanese Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Hosler, Akiko S; Solanki, Malini N; Savadatti, Sanghamitra

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore barriers and needs related to diabetes care and the feasibility of diabetes self-management (DSM) "coaching" at faith-based organizations (FBOs) for the Indo-Guyanese community in Schenectady, New York. Participants were recruited though flyers and mass mailings, and in-depth interviews were conducted at their homes by a team of culturally matched interviewers using a semi-structured questionnaire. Characteristics of participants were compared with existing population-based data to confirm their representativeness. Responses were transcribed, coded, and summarized, and findings are presented along with selective quotations. Key dimensions of feasibility were scored and charted for visualization. Findings revealed barriers regarding diet-related knowledge and skills, access to structured DSM education, hyperglycemia control, and environmental support for physical activity. Participants responded positively to receiving free DSM coaching at their FBOs. All participants preferred a qualified health care professional such as certified diabetes educator as their coach and wanted coaching in all aspects of DSM; however, food preparation/diet was the most frequently requested specific topic. Participants uniformly disliked contact with the coach through e-mails and text messages but liked receiving periodic telephone calls at home by the coach. Overall, DSM coaching at FBOs rated high on the key dimensions of feasibility, namely, affordability, accessibility, acceptability, cultural relevance, and safety. This study sheds light on the feasibility of an FBO-based DSM intervention for the Indo-Guyanese. It offers insights into developing culturally appropriate DSM intervention format and strategy. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Spatial Access to Faith-based Diabetes Intervention for Guyanese Adults in Schenectady, New York.

    PubMed

    Hosler, Akiko S; Michaels, Isaac H

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether travel distance would pose a barrier to participation in proposed diabetes intervention programs for Guyanese immigrants at faith-based organizations (FBOs). This study also suggests the most collectively accessible set of FBOs that could serve as intervention sites. Data were extracted from a cross-sectional health interview survey conducted in Schenectady, New York, in 2011. The shortest driving distances from homes to FBOs and to the city's only diabetes education center (DEC) were analyzed among Guyanese and non-Guyanese adults with diabetes and prediabetes (n = 238), using spatial algorithms and Geographic Information System resources. The Guyanese were more likely to belong to a FBO than the non-Guyanese (77.8% vs 61.2%). The mean driving distance to FBO was 1.19 miles (95% CI, 0.98-1.39) for the Guyanese, which was significantly shorter than that for the non-Guyanese (2.87 miles, 95% CI, 1.93-3.82). The Guyanese had uniformly shorter mean and median driving distances in all sociodemographic and health status subcategories as well. Moreover, a higher percentage of the Guyanese lived closer to FBO than to DEC compared to non-Guyanese (52.2% vs 34.7%). It was found that having diabetes intervention at the 4 most popular FBOs (2 Hindu temples and 2 Christian churches) and DEC would provide the most collectively accessible arrangement for the Guyanese. The results suggest that the short driving distance to FBO is a likely enabler that can encourage regular utilization of the faith-based intervention for the Guyanese. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. Dilemmas and tensions facing a faith-based organisation promoting HIVprevention among young people in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa; Nixon, Stephanie; Flicker, Sarah; Rubincam, Clara; Jenney, Angelique

    2010-06-01

    Faith-based organisations (FBOs) are receiving growing attention for their roles in addressing HIV and AIDS in southern Africa. These roles, however, are not without philosophical challenges. Yet, to date, most references to the successes or limitations of FBOs have remained the domain of theoretical and, often, ideological debate. In this context, discussions about the roles of faith and FBOs in responding to HIV and AIDS often evoke extreme positions-either advocating for or critiquing their involvement. In place of this there is a need for empirical evidence and analyses that shed light on both the challenges and opportunities of faith-based HIV-prevention programming. This article presents a critical sociological analysis of the complexities confronting one FBO in its effort to deliver an abstinence-focused HIV-prevention programme to school-going adolescents in a poor peri-urban area of South Africa. As one aspect of a larger mixed-methods evaluation, this analysis is based on 11 focus group discussions, variously held with parents, teachers, learners and programme facilitators, in an effort to determine how and why the participants perceived the programme to work. We present and analyse four sources of tension appearing within the data which relate to the programme's faith-based orientation: a) enthusiasm for sexual abstinence despite awareness of the structural constraints; b) a dichotomous framing of behaviours (i.e. good versus bad); c) mixed messages about condoms; and d) administering faith-based programming within secular public schools. Through this analysis we aim to identify opportunities and challenges for faith-based HIV-prevention efforts more broadly. We argue that any assessment of faith-based HIV-prevention programming ought to respect and reflect its complexity as well as the complexity of the context within which it operates.

  12. Accessing Faith-Based Organizations Using Public Transportation.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Terri; Maley, Olivia; Esnard, Ann-Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Nondriving aging adults are at risk of experiencing mobility barriers that inhibit access to important community resources for managing health and wellbeing. This multimethod study explores bus transportation experiences of older adults who live in extended stay hotels and use faith-based organizations to access resources. Interviews from 17 nondriving older adults were analyzed for perspectives about using faith-based organizations and residents' experiences navigating to faith-based organizations through available bus transportation in their communities. Residents described both favorable and unfavorable experiences when reaching out for help from faith-based organizations. Although they report reliance on faith-based organizations for a variety of resources, residents were challenged by an ineffective bus system that interfered with resource accessibility. Suggestions for improving bus transit systems and providing alternative, aging-friendly transportation options are discussed.

  13. The Role of Faith-Based Organizations in the Depression Care of African Americans and Hispanics in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Dalencour, Michelle; Wong, Eunice C; Tang, Lingqi; Dixon, Elizabeth; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Wells, Kenneth; Miranda, Jeanne

    2017-04-01

    This study examined use of depression care provided by faith-based organizations (FBOs) by African Americans and Hispanics and factors associated with the receipt of such care, including mental illness severity and use of traditional mental health services. The study used baseline data from the Community Partners in Care study, a group-randomized trial comparing a community-partnered approach with a technical-assistance approach to improving depression care in underresourced communities in Los Angeles. A sample of 947 individuals (48% African American, 27% non-U.S.-born Hispanic, 15% U.S.-born Hispanic, and 10% non-Hispanic white) were surveyed about recent visits to a religious or spiritual place and receipt of FBO depression care. Descriptive analyses compared racial-ethnic, sociodemographic, and health service use variables for three groups: those who did not attend a religious place, those who attended a religious place and did not receive FBO depression services, and those who received FBO depression services. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify predictors of receipt of FBO depression care. A larger proportion of African Americans and non-U.S.-born Hispanics received FBO faith-based depression services compared with non-Hispanic whites and with U.S.-born Hispanics. Receipt of FBO depression services was associated with younger age, lifetime diagnosis of mania, use of primary care depression services, and receipt of a mental health service from a substance abuse agency. FBO depression services were used in the community, especially by persons from racial-ethnic minority groups. Collaborative efforts between FBOs and traditional health services may increase access to depression services for African Americans and Latinos.

  14. 45 CFR 92.13 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 92.13...-Award Requirements § 92.13 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this... Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [69 FR 42592, July 16, 2004] ...

  15. 45 CFR 92.13 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 92.13...-Award Requirements § 92.13 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this... Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [69 FR 42592, July 16, 2004] ...

  16. 45 CFR 92.13 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 92.13...-Award Requirements § 92.13 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this... Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [69 FR 42592, July 16, 2004] ...

  17. 45 CFR 92.13 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 92.13...-Award Requirements § 92.13 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this... Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [69 FR 42592, July 16, 2004] ...

  18. 45 CFR 92.13 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 92.13...-Award Requirements § 92.13 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this... Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [69 FR 42592, July 16, 2004] ...

  19. Reducing Low Birth Weight among African Americans in the Midwest: A Look at How Faith-Based Organizations Are Poised to Inform and Influence Health Communication on the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)

    PubMed Central

    Lumpkins, Crystal Y.; Saint Onge, Jarron M.

    2017-01-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) rates remain the highest among African Americans despite public health efforts to address these disparities; with some of the highest racial disparities in the Midwest (Kansas). The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) perspective offers an explanation for how LBW contributes to racial health disparities among African Americans and informs a community directed health communication framework for creating sustainable programs to address these disparities. Trusted community organizations such as faith-based organizations are well situated to explain health communication gaps that may occur over the life course. These entities are underutilized in core health promotion programming targeting underserved populations and can prove essential for addressing developmental origins of LBW among African Americans. Extrapolating from focus group data collected from African American church populations as part of a social marketing health promotion project on cancer prevention, we theoretically consider how a similar communication framework and approach may apply to address LBW disparities. Stratified focus groups (n = 9) were used to discover emergent themes about disease prevention, and subsequently applied to explore how faith-based organizations (FBOs) inform strategic health care (media) advocacy and health promotion that potentially apply to address LBW among African Americans. We argue that FBOs are poised to meet health promotion and health communication needs among African American women who face social barriers in health. PMID:28165368

  20. Reducing Low Birth Weight among African Americans in the Midwest: A Look at How Faith-Based Organizations Are Poised to Inform and Influence Health Communication on the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD).

    PubMed

    Lumpkins, Crystal Y; Saint Onge, Jarron M

    2017-02-04

    Low birth weight (LBW) rates remain the highest among African Americans despite public health efforts to address these disparities; with some of the highest racial disparities in the Midwest (Kansas). The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) perspective offers an explanation for how LBW contributes to racial health disparities among African Americans and informs a community directed health communication framework for creating sustainable programs to address these disparities. Trusted community organizations such as faith-based organizations are well situated to explain health communication gaps that may occur over the life course. These entities are underutilized in core health promotion programming targeting underserved populations and can prove essential for addressing developmental origins of LBW among African Americans. Extrapolating from focus group data collected from African American church populations as part of a social marketing health promotion project on cancer prevention, we theoretically consider how a similar communication framework and approach may apply to address LBW disparities. Stratified focus groups ( n = 9) were used to discover emergent themes about disease prevention, and subsequently applied to explore how faith-based organizations (FBOs) inform strategic health care (media) advocacy and health promotion that potentially apply to address LBW among African Americans. We argue that FBOs are poised to meet health promotion and health communication needs among African American women who face social barriers in health.

  1. 28 CFR 90.3 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... WOMEN General Provisions § 90.3 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under... for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2841, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  2. 28 CFR 90.3 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... WOMEN General Provisions § 90.3 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under... for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2841, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  3. 28 CFR 90.3 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... WOMEN General Provisions § 90.3 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under... for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2841, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  4. 28 CFR 90.3 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... WOMEN General Provisions § 90.3 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under... for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2841, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  5. 28 CFR 31.404 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... Grants General Conditions and Assurances § 31.404 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds... Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2838, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  6. 28 CFR 31.404 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... Grants General Conditions and Assurances § 31.404 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds... Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2838, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  7. 28 CFR 31.404 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... Grants General Conditions and Assurances § 31.404 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds... Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2838, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  8. 28 CFR 31.404 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... Grants General Conditions and Assurances § 31.404 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds... Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2838, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  9. 28 CFR 31.404 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... Grants General Conditions and Assurances § 31.404 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds... Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No. 2703-2004, 69 FR 2838, Jan. 21, 2004] ...

  10. Influence of faith-based organisations on HIV prevention strategies in Africa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ochillo, Marylyn A; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Hind, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target sub-Saharan Africa since it is the hardest hit region worldwide. Religion and more specifically faith-based organisations can have an effect on socio-cultural factors that increase or decrease the risk of infection; and offer preventative interventions to the wider community. To understand the influence of faith-based organisations on HIV prevention in Africa. The main search engine of a British university 'mysearch' was used as this incorporates all relevant databases. Studies were also retrieved by searches within Google scholar, PubMed and reference lists of included papers were hand searched. The authors assessed the relevance of each article separately against the inclusion criteria. The data extraction form was piloted by the first author and cross-checked by the other authors. Seven studies met all inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Seven individual themes were identified. However, for the purposes of focus within this paper only two themes were focused on. Given the accessibility of faith-based organisations (FBOs) and the coverage of religion among the population, FBOs are potentially important players in HIV prevention. Therefore, more resources and support should be given to support their health promotion strategies.

  11. Role of faith-based and nongovernment organizations in the provision of obstetric services in 3 African countries.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Joshua Peter; Betrán, Ana Pilar; Widmer, Mariana; Souza, João Paulo; Gülmezoglu, Ahmet Metin; Seuc, Armando; Torloni, Maria Regina; Mengestu, Tigest Ketsela; Merialdi, Mario

    2012-12-01

    We sought to describe obstetric care capacity of nongovernment organization (NGO)-/faith-based organization (FBO)-run institutions compared to government-run institutions in 3 African countries using the World Health Organization Global Survey. We also compared delivery characteristics and outcomes. This is a descriptive analysis of the 22 NGO-/FBO-run institutions in Uganda, Kenya and Democratic Republic of Congo delivering 11,594 women, compared to 20 government-run institutions delivering 25,825 women in the same countries and period. Infrastructure, obstetric services, diagnostic facilities, and anesthesiology at NGO/FBO institutions were comparable to government institutions. Women delivering at NGO/FBO institutions had more antenatal care, antenatal complications, and cesarean delivery. NGO/FBO institutions had higher obstetrician attendance and lower rates of eclampsia, preterm birth, stillbirth, Apgar <7, and neonatal near miss. NGO/FBO institutions are comparable to government institutions in capacity to deliver obstetric care. NGO/FBOs have been found effective in providing delivery care in developing countries and should be appropriately recognized by stakeholders in their efforts to assist nations achieve international goals. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissemination of evidence-based cancer control interventions among Catholic faith-based organizations: results from the CRUZA randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer D; Torres, Maria Idalí; Tom, Laura S; Leyva, Bryan; Galeas, Ana V; Ospino, Hosffman

    2016-05-18

    The CRUZA randomized trial tested the efficacy of an organizational-level intervention to increase the capacity of Catholic faith-based organizations (FBOs) serving Latinos to implement evidence-based strategies (EBS) for cancer control. Thirty-one Catholic parishes were enrolled. Twenty were randomized to a "capacity enhancement" (CE) intervention and 11 to a "standard dissemination" (SD) condition. Each received a Program Implementation Manual and Toolkit of materials culturally adapted for FBOs with Latino audiences for five types of EBS recommended by the US Preventive Services Community Guide. CE parishes were offered a menu of capacity-building activities over a 3-month period, while SD parishes were provided a one-time consultation by an Intervention Specialist. Baseline and follow-up surveys compared the number and types of EBS offered. At baseline, only one parish had offered any cancer-related program in the prior year, yet a third (36 %) had offered some other type of health program or service. At post-intervention follow-up, all parishes offered a greater number of EBS. The only statistically significant difference between CE and SD groups was the number of parishes offering small media interventions (90 % in CE, 64 % in SD; p < 0.05). All parishes increased the number of cancer control activities offered to their members. These findings suggest that Catholic parishes may already have capacity to implement EBS if they are appropriately adapted and packaged and may only require low levels of support to carry out programming. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which program offerings continued after the period of grant funding. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01740219 .

  13. A response to Edzi (AIDS): Malawi faith-based organizations' impact on HIV prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Teri; Schell, Ellen; Rankin, Sally; Phiri, Joel; Fiedler, Rachel; Chakanza, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    African faith-based organization (FBO) leaders influence their members' HIV knowledge, beliefs, and practices, but their roles in HIV prevention and care are poorly understood. This article expands the work of Garner (2000) to test the impact of FBO influence on member risk and care behaviors, embedding it in the Theory of Planned Behavior. Qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys were collected from five FBOs (Christian and Muslim) in Malawi and analyzed using mixed methods. Contrary to Garner, we found that the level of power and influence of the FBO had no significant impact on the risk-taking behaviors of members; however, leaders' HIV knowledge predicted members' behaviors. Stigmatizing attitudes of leaders significantly decreased members' care behaviors, but FBO hierarchy tended to increase members' care behaviors. The power of local church and mosque leaders to influence behavior could be exploited more effectively by nurses by providing support, knowledge, and encouragement to churches and mosques. Copyright © 2013 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 28 CFR 90.3 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 90.3 Section 90.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN General Provisions § 90.3 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under...

  15. EXPLORING THE ROLE OF FAITH BASED ORGANIZATIONS IN ADDRESSING ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP ABUSE

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erica; Garcia, Erik Fernandez y; Freedman, Lori; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is prevalent with significant health and social consequences. Faith based organizations could play an important role in ARA prevention and intervention. Studies on the role of faith based organizations in interpersonal violence have focused on adult survivor perspectives rather than adolescents. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with faith based organization leaders, parents, and youth. Findings highlight that church leaders, parents and youth all expect that faith based organizations can play a role in educating teens about healthy relationships. Divergent perspectives about how faith based organizations should address adolescent sexuality and privacy need to be addressed. PMID:26466975

  16. 28 CFR 33.53 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Additional Requirements § 33.53 Participation by faith... standards set forth in part 38 (Equal Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No...

  17. 28 CFR 33.53 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Additional Requirements § 33.53 Participation by faith... standards set forth in part 38 (Equal Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No...

  18. 28 CFR 33.53 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Additional Requirements § 33.53 Participation by faith... standards set forth in part 38 (Equal Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No...

  19. 28 CFR 33.53 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Additional Requirements § 33.53 Participation by faith... standards set forth in part 38 (Equal Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No...

  20. 28 CFR 33.53 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Participation by faith-based... GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Additional Requirements § 33.53 Participation by faith... standards set forth in part 38 (Equal Treatment for Faith-based Organizations) of this chapter. [Order No...

  1. 22 CFR 202.10 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 202.10 Section 202.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF SUPPLIES BY VOLUNTARY NON-PROFIT RELIEF AGENCIES § 202.10 Participation by faith-based organizations. The...

  2. 22 CFR 202.10 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 202.10 Section 202.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF SUPPLIES BY VOLUNTARY NON-PROFIT RELIEF AGENCIES § 202.10 Participation by faith-based organizations. The...

  3. 22 CFR 202.10 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 202.10 Section 202.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF SUPPLIES BY VOLUNTARY NON-PROFIT RELIEF AGENCIES § 202.10 Participation by faith-based organizations. The...

  4. 22 CFR 202.10 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 202.10 Section 202.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF SUPPLIES BY VOLUNTARY NON-PROFIT RELIEF AGENCIES § 202.10 Participation by faith-based organizations. The...

  5. 22 CFR 202.10 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 202.10 Section 202.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF SUPPLIES BY VOLUNTARY NON-PROFIT RELIEF AGENCIES § 202.10 Participation by faith-based organizations. The...

  6. 45 CFR 96.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 96.18 Section 96.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS General Procedures § 96.18 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this part...

  7. 45 CFR 96.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 96.18 Section 96.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS General Procedures § 96.18 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this part...

  8. 45 CFR 96.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 96.18 Section 96.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS General Procedures § 96.18 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this part...

  9. 45 CFR 96.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 96.18 Section 96.18 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS General Procedures § 96.18 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this part...

  10. 45 CFR 96.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 96.18 Section 96.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS General Procedures § 96.18 Participation by faith-based organizations. The funds provided under this part...

  11. Exploring the Role of Faith-Based Organizations in Addressing Adolescent Relationship Abuse.

    PubMed

    Li, Erica; Freedman, Lori R; Fernandez Y Garcia, Erik; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is prevalent with significant health and social consequences. Faith-based organizations could play an important role in ARA prevention and intervention. Studies on the role of faith-based organizations in interpersonal violence have focused on adult survivor perspectives rather than adolescents. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with faith-based organization leaders, parents, and youth. Findings highlight that church leaders, parents, and youth all expect that faith-based organizations can play a role in educating teens about healthy relationships. Divergent perspectives about how faith-based organizations should address adolescent sexuality and privacy need to be addressed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. 45 CFR 74.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 74.18 Section 74.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.18 Participation by faith...

  13. 45 CFR 74.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 74.18 Section 74.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.18 Participation by faith...

  14. 45 CFR 74.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 74.18 Section 74.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.18 Participation by faith...

  15. 45 CFR 74.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 74.18 Section 74.18 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.18 Participation by faith...

  16. 45 CFR 74.18 - Participation by faith-based organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Participation by faith-based organizations. 74.18 Section 74.18 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM... NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.18 Participation by faith...

  17. Physical Activity Interventions in Faith-Based Organizations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tristão Parra, Maíra; Porfírio, Gustavo J M; Arredondo, Elva M; Atallah, Álvaro N

    2018-03-01

    To review and assess the effectiveness of physical activity interventions delivered in faith-based organizations. We searched the Cochrane Library, DoPHER, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, WHO ICTRP, and Clinicaltrials.gov databases until January 2016, without restriction of language or publication date. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials investigating physical activity interventions for adults delivered in faith-based organizations. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study methodological quality. We used relative risk and mean difference with 95% confidence interval to estimate the effect of the interventions on measures of physical activity, physical fitness, and health. The review included 18 studies. Study participants were predominantly female, and the majority of trials were conducted in the United States. Study heterogeneity did not allow us to conduct meta-analyses. Although interventions delivered in faith-based organizations increased physical activity and positively influenced measures of health and fitness in participants, the quality of the evidence was very low. Faith-based organizations are promising settings to promote physical activity, consequently addressing health disparities. However, high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed to adequately assess the effectiveness of interventions delivered in faith-based organizations.

  18. Enhancing capacity among faith-based organizations to implement evidence-based cancer control programs: a community-engaged approach.

    PubMed

    Leyva, Bryan; Allen, Jennifer D; Ospino, Hosffman; Tom, Laura S; Negrón, Rosalyn; Buesa, Richard; Torres, Maria Idalí

    2017-09-01

    Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) to promote cancer control among Latinos have proliferated in recent years, though adoption and implementation of these interventions by faith-based organizations (FBOs) is limited. Capacity building may be one strategy to promote implementation. In this qualitative study, 18 community key informants were interviewed to (a) understand existing capacity for health programming among Catholic parishes, (b) characterize parishes' resource gaps and capacity-building needs implementing cancer control EBIs, and (c) elucidate strategies for delivering capacity-building assistance to parishes to facilitate implementation of EBIs. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted. Key informants concurred about the capacity of Catholic parishes to deliver health programs, and described attributes of parishes that make them strong partners in health promotion initiatives, including a mission to address physical and mental health, outreach to marginalized groups, altruism among members, and existing engagement in health programming. However, resource gaps and capacity building needs were also identified. Specific recommendations participants made about how existing resources might be leveraged to address challenges include to: establish parish wellness committees; provide "hands-on" learning opportunities for parishioners to gain program planning skills; offer continuous, tailored, on-site technical assistance; facilitate relationships between parishes and community resources; and provide financial support for parishes. Leveraging parishes' existing resources and addressing their implementation needs may improve adoption of cancer control EBIs.

  19. Social Determinants of HIV-Related Stigma in Faith-Based Organizations.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jason D; Tate, Allan D; Gaddist, Bambi; White, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    To examine the association between social factors in faith-based settings (including religiosity and proximity to people living with HIV/AIDS) and HIV stigma. A total of 1747 congregants from primarily African American faith-based organizations of Project FAITH (Fostering AIDS Initiatives That Heal), a South Carolina statewide initiative to address HIV-related stigma, completed a survey. Female gender (P = .001), higher education (P < .001), knowing someone with HIV/AIDS (P = .01), and knowing someone who is gay (P < .001), but not religiosity, were associated with lower levels of stigma and with lower odds of stigmatizing attitudes (P < .05). Opportunities for connection with people living with HIV/AIDS tailored to the social characteristics of faith-based organizations may address HIV stigma in African American communities.

  20. Faith and HIV prevention: the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among Pentecostal Batswana teenagers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a huge interest by faith-based organizations (FBOs) in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere in HIV prevention interventions that build on the religious aspects of being. Successful partnerships between the public health services and FBOs will require a better understanding of the conceptual framing of HIV prevention by FBOS to access for prevention intervention, those concepts the churches of various denominations and their members would support or endorse. This study investigated the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among church youths in Botswana; - a country with one of the highest HIV prevalence in the world. Method Participants were 213 Pentecostal church members (67% female; age range 12 to 23 years; median age = 19 years). We engaged the participants in a mixed-method inductive process to collect data on their implicit framing of HIV prevention concepts, taking into account the centrality of religion concepts to them and the moderating influences of age, gender and sexual experience. After, we analysed the data using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to map the ways the church youths framed HIV prevention. Results The findings suggest the church youth to conceptually frame their HIV prevention from both faith-oriented and secular-oriented perspectives, while prioritizing the faith-oriented concepts based on biblical teachings and future focus. In their secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention, the church youths endorsed the importance to learn the facts about HIV and AIDS, understanding of community norms that increased risk for HIV and prevention education. However, components of secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention concepts were comparatively less was well differentiated among the youths than with faith-oriented framing, suggesting latent influences of the church knowledge environment to undervalue secular oriented concepts. Older and sexually experienced church youths in their framing

  1. Faith and HIV prevention: the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among Pentecostal Batswana teenagers.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Elias; Nkomazana, Fidelis; Muchado, Jabulani A; Togarasei, Lovemore; Bingenheimer, Jeffrey Bart

    2014-03-05

    There is a huge interest by faith-based organizations (FBOs) in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere in HIV prevention interventions that build on the religious aspects of being. Successful partnerships between the public health services and FBOs will require a better understanding of the conceptual framing of HIV prevention by FBOS to access for prevention intervention, those concepts the churches of various denominations and their members would support or endorse. This study investigated the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among church youths in Botswana;--a country with one of the highest HIV prevalence in the world. Participants were 213 Pentecostal church members (67% female; age range 12 to 23 years; median age=19 years). We engaged the participants in a mixed-method inductive process to collect data on their implicit framing of HIV prevention concepts, taking into account the centrality of religion concepts to them and the moderating influences of age, gender and sexual experience. After, we analysed the data using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to map the ways the church youths framed HIV prevention. The findings suggest the church youth to conceptually frame their HIV prevention from both faith-oriented and secular-oriented perspectives, while prioritizing the faith-oriented concepts based on biblical teachings and future focus. In their secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention, the church youths endorsed the importance to learn the facts about HIV and AIDS, understanding of community norms that increased risk for HIV and prevention education. However, components of secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention concepts were comparatively less was well differentiated among the youths than with faith-oriented framing, suggesting latent influences of the church knowledge environment to undervalue secular oriented concepts. Older and sexually experienced church youths in their framing of HIV prevention valued future

  2. Community-Based Participatory Research Approach to Evidence-Based Research: Lessons From the Pacific Islander American Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Panapasa, Sela; Jackson, James; Caldwell, Cleopatra; Heeringa, Steve; McNally, James; Williams, David; Coral, Debra; Taumoepeau, Leafa; Young, Louisa; Young, Setafano; Fa'asisila, Saia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Reports on the challenges and lessons learned from the Pacific Island American Health Study engagement with community-based organizations (CBOs) and faith-based organizations (FBOs) in Pacific Islander (PI) communities and mechanisms to facilitate the collection of robust data. Methods Academic–community partnership building was achieved with PI CBOs and FBOs. Focus group meetings were organized to plan various aspects of the study, develop questionnaire themes and protocols for survey, assist with the interviewer recruitment process, and strategize data dissemination plan. Lessons Learned The PIA-HS represents a model for overcoming challenges in data collection among small understudied populations. FBOs represent a valuable resource for community-based participatory research (CBPR) data collection and for effective interventions. Conclusion The study methodology can be replicated for other racial/ethnic groups with high levels of religiosity combined with concentrated levels of residential clustering. Expansion of the Pacific Islander American Health Study (PIA-HS) to include other PI subgroups is encouraged. PMID:22643788

  3. Exploring the relationship between stigma and help-seeking for mental illness in African-descended faith communities in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Nadia; Pizzolati, Micol; Edge, Dawn

    2017-06-01

    Stigma related to mental illness affects all ethnic groups, contributing to the production and maintenance of mental illness and restricting access to care and support. However, stigma is especially prevalent in minority communities, thus potentially increasing ethnically based disparities. Little is known of the links between stigma and help-seeking for mental illness in African-descended populations in the UK. Building on the evidence that faith-based organizations (FBOs) can aid the development of effective public health strategies, this qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with faith groups to explore the complex ways in which stigma influences help-seeking for mental illness in African-descended communities. A thematic approach to data analysis was applied to the entire data set. Twenty-six men and women who had varying levels of involvement with Christian FBOs in south London were interviewed (e.g. six faith leaders, thirteen 'active members' and seven 'regular attendees'). Key factors influencing help-seeking behaviour were as follows: beliefs about the causes of mental illness; 'silencing' of mental illness resulting from heightened levels of ideological stigma; and stigma (re)production and maintenance at community level. Individuals with a diagnosis of mental illness were likely to experience a triple jeopardy in terms of stigma. 'One-size-fits-all' approaches cannot effectively meet the needs of diverse populations. To ensure that services are more congruent with their needs, health and care organizations should enable service users, families and community members to become active creators of interventions to remove barriers to help-seeking for mental illness. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Perspectives of Community- and Faith-Based Organizations about Partnering with Local Health Departments for Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Stajura, Michael; Glik, Deborah; Eisenman, David; Prelip, Michael; Martel, Andrea; Sammartinova, Jitka

    2012-01-01

    Public health emergency planners can better perform their mission if they develop and maintain effective relationships with community- and faith-based organizations in their jurisdictions. This qualitative study presents six themes that emerged from 20 key informant interviews representing a wide range of American community- and faith-based organizations across different types of jurisdictions, organizational types, and missions. This research seeks to provide local health department public health emergency planners with tools to assess and improve their inter-organizational community relationships. The themes identified address the importance of community engagement, leadership, intergroup dynamics and communication, and resources. Community- and faith-based organizations perceive that they are underutilized or untapped resources with respect to public health emergencies and disasters. One key reason for this is that many public health departments limit their engagement with community- and faith-based organizations to a one-way “push” model for information dissemination, rather than engaging them in other ways or improving their capacity. Beyond a reprioritization of staff time, few other resources would be required. From the perspective of community- and faith-based organizations, the quality of relationships seems to matter more than discrete resources provided by such ties. PMID:22851942

  5. Staff perceptions of the benefits of religion in health and human services nonprofits: evidence from international development.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Shawn Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Some argue faith-based organizations (FBOs) provide desirable moral or spiritual components to health and human service provision, and that services are more effective due to staffs more supportive approach. However, the majority of research has been conducted in the United States, and has focused on the experiences of Christian FBOs. This article examines the benefits that FBO staff in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Lebanon, and Sri Lanka believe religious identity brings to the work of their organizations, based on interviews with more than 100 staff of Buddhist, Catholic, Druze, Orthodox Christian, Protestant Christian, Shiite Muslim, and Sunni Muslim FBOs, as well as secular NGOs. The interview data indicate that staff members from most of the religious traditions included in the study believe the faith orientation of their organization brings benefits to their service provision. However, these perceived benefits differ based on country context. Some of these benefits are similar to those often mentioned in the literature on FBOs in the United States; however, other benefits are quite different than those discussed in the US literature.

  6. Grants to Faith-Based Organizations, Fiscal Year 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The data included in this report reflects a review of 151 Federally administered programs at six Federal agencies (HHS, HUD, ED, DOL, DOJ, and USDA), and 17 program areas at USAID. It includes only those programs that utilize competitively awarded grants for which faith-based and community organizations (FBCOs) were eligible to apply and…

  7. Pre-marital HIV testing in couples from faith-based organisations: experience in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akani, C I; Erhabor, O; Babatunde, S

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among prospective couples referred from Faith-Based Organisations in Port Harcourt, Nigeria for pre-marital HIV screening. The study sought to establish the sero-prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in this peculiar study group. A total of 84 healthy heterosexual couples who required pre-marital HIV screening were tested between January 2000 and December 2003 using a Double ELISA confirmatory test of Immunocomb and Genscreen HIV I&II Kits. Amongst the 168 individuals tested, 35 (20.8%) were found positive. Seroprevalence was significantly higher among females 23 (27.4%) compared to males 12 (14.3%). Infection rate was highest in the 25-29 years group (29.7%, n=22) and lowest in those of 35-39 years (6.1 %, n=2), though this difference was not statistically significant (p-value=0.058). Infection rate was significantly higher among females (p-value=0.036); among prospective couples from Orthodox churches (p-value=0.021); couples with prolonged courtship (>6 months) (p-value=0.0001); couples with history of premarital sex (p-value=0.0001); and couples with history of cohabitation (p-value=0.0001). Our findings prompt a wake-up call for faith-based organizations (FBOs) to urgently initiate or be more receptive of measures that emphasize behavioural and social changes amongst members. Government and non-governmental organizations should organise capacity building training for religious based organizations to enable them cope with the challenges of HIV/AIDS. The outcomes of this study further underscores the value of voluntary counselling and confidential HIV testing and especially pre- and post-test counselling as the basis of pre-marital HIV testing.

  8. Implementing Charitable Choice at the State and Local Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberkern, Rachel M.

    2002-01-01

    The 1998 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) was the first federal legislation to contain a "charitable choice" provision allowing faith-based organizations (FBOs) to compete for state and federal government funds on the same basis as secular providers. For FBOs that consider pursuit of government…

  9. 24 CFR 576.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expression of its religious beliefs, provided that the religious organization does not use direct ESG funds... Faith-based activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same... the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b) Organizations that are directly funded...

  10. 24 CFR 576.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expression of its religious beliefs, provided that the religious organization does not use direct ESG funds... Faith-based activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same... the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b) Organizations that are directly funded...

  11. 24 CFR 576.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expression of its religious beliefs, provided that the religious organization does not use direct ESG funds... Faith-based activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same... the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b) Organizations that are directly funded...

  12. Religion and organ donation: the views of UK faith leaders.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurch; Brocklehurst, Anna; Pateman, Ruth; Kinsella, Suzannah; Parry, Vivienne

    2012-09-01

    This article reports the findings from the one-to-one interviews with the main UK faith and belief leaders which were commissioned by the Organ Donation Taskforce as part of its evidence gathering. Interviews were arranged with the main faith and belief organisations within the UK. Interviews covered a range of issues related to organ donation. Although some faith groups had some reservations regarding organ donation, interviews with these leaders demonstrated that none of these faith groups have reached a consensus against organ donation. The interviewees stated that the majority opinion in their faith or belief group is to permit organ donation, with some actively supporting it. Interviewees were keen to stress that there is a broad spectrum of opinion on organ transplantation within each faith and belief group and that consequently it is difficult to speak on behalf of an entire group. One complication mentioned by interviewees is that as organ transplantation is a relatively new medical procedure, there is no explicit reference to it in many original religious texts. Consequently, positions on the receipt and donation of organs are based on interpretation. It was felt that a much greater level of engagement is needed, as organ donation is currently not a priority for many faith and belief groups.

  13. Assessing and Mobilizing Faith Organizations to Implement Childhood Obesity Prevention Advocacy Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bozlak, Christine T; Kenady, James M; Becker, Adam B

    2018-01-01

    Childhood obesity remains a public health problem requiring mobilization across diverse social and political sectors. The faith-based sector can contribute to obesity prevention advocacy when existing resources are supported and leveraged. This article describes an advocacy resource assessment conducted in six Chicago faith organizations. Key administrators and congregation members were surveyed to identify organizational resources that could be mobilized for childhood obesity prevention advocacy. Survey data were analyzed using SPSS and Excel. Descriptive statistics were calculated for each organization and for all combined. Organizational resources for advocacy were identified, with varying degrees of resources within organizations. Congregation members and faith leaders expressed interest in advocacy training and activities but acknowledged competing organizational priorities. Participating organizations received a stipend to pursue recommended action items based on their assessment. Faith organizations have unique resources and human capital and can be key partners in childhood obesity prevention. Conducting an assessment prior to planning interventions and advocacy approaches can strengthen partnerships, leverage assets among partners, and ensure efforts are relevant and beneficial for faith organizations. It may also be strategic to incorporate funding in grant budgets in order to empower faith organizations to act on findings from the assessment process.

  14. An Evidence-Based Assessment of Faith-Based Programs: Do Faith-Based Programs "Work" to Reduce Recidivism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Kimberly D.; Cabage, Leann N.; Klenowski, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Faith-based organizations administer many of the prison-based programs aimed at reducing recidivism. Many of these organizations also manage treatment programs for substance abusers, at-risk juveniles, and ex-offenders. Much of the research on religiosity and delinquency indicates that the two are inversely related. Therefore, it seems plausible…

  15. The Role of Faith-Based Organizations in the Education, Support, and Services for Persons Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Teresa M

    2018-03-01

    Faith-based organizations are in a unique position to provide resilience-enhancing efforts for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS. Many persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS report having a strong faith or religious affiliation, with a large percentage attending church services on a regular basis. Faith-based organizations can use these factors to reach out to these individuals and effectively promote health, well-being, education, and support. Faith-based organizations can contribute to the reduction of stigma and isolation for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Source Materials for the Healthy Communities Toolkit: A Resource Guide for Community and Faith-Based Organizations.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Joie; Chandra, Anita; Williams, Malcolm; Davis, Lois M

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act places significant emphasis on the role of community-based health promotion initiatives; within this focus, community and faith-based organizations (CFBOs) are seen as critical partners for improving community well-being. This article describes a report that provides the content for a toolkit that will prepare community and faith-based organizations to take advantage of opportunities presented in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and engage faith and community leaders in promoting health in their communities. This includes key facts and figures about health topics, handouts for community groups, and web links for resources and other information in the following areas: healthcare reform; community health centers and development of the community health workforce; promotion of healthy families; mental health; violence and trauma; prevention of teen and unintended pregnancy and HIV/AIDS; and chronic disease prevention. The report also includes recommendations for testing the content of the toolkit with communities and considerations for its implementation.

  17. National Service: A Resource for Faith-Based and Community Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for National and Community Service, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more Americans volunteer through religious organizations than through any other type of organization and 92 percent of faith-based charities report the ability to take on additional volunteers. The Corporation for National and Community Service is dedicated to ensuring that faith-based and community organizations have the capacity, tools,…

  18. Review of the Role of Faith- and Community-Based Organizations in Providing Comprehensive Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, David J.; Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Gemmill, Alison; Boonstra, Heather; Finer, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the role of faith- and community-based organizations in providing comprehensive sexuality education for adolescents in the United States. To gather information about these organizations, a broad approach was used that included a formal literature review, systematic searches through organizational Web sites, and the convening…

  19. 75 FR 8079 - President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... fields related to the work of faith-based and neighborhood organizations in order to: Identify best... implementation and coordination of public policies relating to faith-based and other neighborhood organizations... of the Office, Environment and Climate Change, Inter-Religious Cooperation, Fatherhood and Healthy...

  20. Implementing a mental health ministry committee in faith-based organizations: the promoting emotional wellness and spirituality program.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laverne; Gorman, Robyn; Hankerson, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Social workers have successfully collaborated with African-American faith-based organizations to improve health outcomes for numerous medical conditions. However, the literature on Faith-Based Health Promotion for major depression is sparse. Thus, the authors describe a program used to implement a Mental Health Ministry Committee in African-American churches. Program goals are to educate clergy, reduce stigma, and promote treatment seeking for depression. Key lessons learned are to initially form partnerships with church staff if there is not a preexisting relationship with the lead pastor, to utilize a community-based participatory approach, and to have flexibility in program implementation.

  1. Implementing a Mental Health Ministry Committee in Faith-Based Organizations: The Promoting Emotional Wellness and Spirituality Program

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Laverne; Gorman, Robyn; Hankerson, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Social workers have successfully collaborated with African American faith-based organizations to improve health outcomes for numerous medical conditions. However, the literature on Faith-Based Health Promotion for major depression is sparse. Thus, the authors describe a program used to implement a Mental Health Ministry Committee in African American churches. Program goals are to educate clergy, reduce stigma, and promote treatment seeking for depression. Key lessons learned are to initially form partnerships with church staff if there is not a pre-existing relationship with the lead pastor, to utilize a community-based participatory approach, and to have flexibility in program implementation. PMID:24717187

  2. 24 CFR 1003.600 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not engage in any inherently religious... Requirements § 1003.600 Faith-based activities. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as... shall discriminate against an organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  3. 24 CFR 1003.600 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not engage in any inherently religious... Requirements § 1003.600 Faith-based activities. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as... shall discriminate against an organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  4. 24 CFR 1003.600 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not engage in any inherently religious... Requirements § 1003.600 Faith-based activities. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as... shall discriminate against an organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  5. 24 CFR 576.23 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) Emergency shelter grants may not be used for the... ASSISTANCE ACT Eligible Activities § 576.23 Faith-based activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or... organization's religious character or affiliation. (b) Organizations that are directly funded under the...

  6. 24 CFR 1003.600 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not engage in any inherently religious... Requirements § 1003.600 Faith-based activities. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as... shall discriminate against an organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  7. 24 CFR 1003.600 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not engage in any inherently religious... Requirements § 1003.600 Faith-based activities. (a) Religious organizations are eligible, on the same basis as... shall discriminate against an organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  8. 24 CFR 576.23 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) Emergency shelter grants may not be used for the... ASSISTANCE ACT Eligible Activities § 576.23 Faith-based activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or... organization's religious character or affiliation. (b) Organizations that are directly funded under the...

  9. 76 FR 53934 - Delegation of Authority for the Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...Through this notice, the Secretary delegates to the Director, Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, authority and responsibility for the direction of HUD's faith-based initiatives specifically relating to coordination with secular and faith-based nonprofit organizations seeking to partner with HUD, the provision of resources to those organizations, and the establishment of relationships between HUD and outside partners, practitioners, and organizations from the nonprofit and faith communities to more effectively identify and meet the needs of some of the Nation's most vulnerable citizens.

  10. Faith leaders' comfort implementing an HIV prevention curriculum in a faith setting.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Latrice C; Griffith, Derek M; Campbell, Bettina; Allen, Julie Ober; Williams, Terrinieka T; Addo, Angela Y

    2012-08-01

    YOUR Blessed Health (YBH) is a faith-based HIV prevention pilot program designed to increase faith-based organizations' capacity to address HIV/AIDS among African American congregations. Faith leaders (e.g., pastors, pastors' spouses) were trained to deliver youth and adult HIV education sessions. Perceptions of comfort with discussing 11 sexual health topics were assessed after program implementation. Twenty-nine faith leaders self-reported their comfort discussing sexual behaviors, sexual communication, and sexual abuse. Overall, faith leaders were comfortable discussing these sexual health topics; however, denominational and leadership role differences were found. These findings suggest African American faith leaders are willing to lead faith-based HIV prevention efforts, but that consideration of denominational differences and organizational roles in faith-based health promotion programs is critical.

  11. Faith-based organizing for youth: one organization's district campaign for small schools policy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Oakland Community Organizations (OCO) has worked for over ten years to improve educational opportunities in low-income neighborhoods in Oakland, California. The work of thousands of parent, teacher, youth, and community leaders has resulted in the formation of nearly fifty new small schools and more than ten charters, creating settings for individualized learning environments and the opportunity for quality choices for many of Oakland's low-income families. In this article, OCO's executive director, Ron Snyder, outlines a four-phase organizing process undertaken by OCO, based on a set of organizing principles that have sustained community-led education reform despite constant changes in the political and school district environment: the centrality of love (self-interest) as a motivator for advocacy; the importance of quality research and powerful ideas (vision) as alternatives to the status quo; application of a model that creates a common structure, language, and experience to sustain leaders; the need for institutional and network power to apply leverage; the flexibility to seize opportunity when the window is open; and faithfulness to the object of our love: our children.

  12. Faith-based initiatives in health promotion: history, challenges, and current partnerships.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Faith-based institutions and organizations represent a longstanding yet underutilized resource for health promotion and disease prevention efforts. The White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, and its affiliated office within the Department of Health and Human Services, are the highest-profile markers of federal efforts, but most faith-health partnerships are not federally funded and date back many decades. Formal partnerships between the faith-based and public health sectors encompass activities in the fields of health behavior and health education, health policy and management, epidemiology and biostatistics, and environmental health. These partnerships are instrumental for achieving both domestic and global health promotion priorities.

  13. 24 CFR 92.257 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not use direct HOME funds to... prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) HOME funds may not be used...) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other organization, to...

  14. 24 CFR 92.257 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not use direct HOME funds to... prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) HOME funds may not be used...) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other organization, to...

  15. 24 CFR 92.257 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not use direct HOME funds to... prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) HOME funds may not be used...) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other organization, to...

  16. 24 CFR 92.257 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided that it does not use direct HOME funds to... prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e) HOME funds may not be used...) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other organization, to...

  17. Guidance to Faith-Based and Community Organizations on Partnering with the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, Washington, DC.

    The guiding principle behind President George W. Bush's Faith-Based and Community Initiative is that faith-based charities should be able to compete on an equal footing for public dollars to provide public services. President Bush believes that the federal government, within the framework of U.S. Constitutional church-state guidelines, should…

  18. Between international donors and local faith communities: Intermediaries in humanitarian assistance to Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Kathryn; Smith, Jonathan D

    2018-06-12

    This paper explores the crucial part that faith-based organisations (FBOs) play in acting as intermediaries between international donors and local faith communities (LFCs) implementing humanitarian relief projects for Syrian refugees. Humanitarian responses to the mounting Syrian refugee crisis have coincided with greater collaboration between international donors and LFCs. This cooperation often is facilitated by a complex web of non-state intermediaries at the international, national, and local level. This study probes the breadth of roles of these intermediaries, drawing on primary data from case studies of two Christian intermediaries supporting Christian LFCs as they deliver aid primarily to Muslim Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon. The results of the study are connected to the wider literature on LFCs in humanitarian response, revealing how intermediaries address issues of accountability, capacity-building, impartiality, neutrality, and professionalism. The paper concludes by offering suggestions for further research on intermediaries as key actors in the localisation of humanitarian assistance. © 2018 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2018.

  19. 24 CFR 585.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided... program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e... activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other...

  20. 24 CFR 585.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided... program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e... activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other...

  1. 24 CFR 585.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided... program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e... activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other...

  2. 24 CFR 585.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided... program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e... activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other...

  3. 24 CFR 585.406 - Faith-based activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs, provided... program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion or religious belief. (e... activities. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on the same basis as any other...

  4. Role of Religion in Organ Donation-Development of the United Kingdom Faith and Organ Donation Action Plan.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, G; Neuberger, J

    2016-04-01

    At a national policy level, the United Kingdom is at the forefront of recognizing the role of faith and its impact on organ donation. This is demonstrated by the recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce, National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines on organ donation, All-Party Parliamentary Kidney Group, and National Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Taskforce Alliance. Evidence to date shows that further thought is required to ensure the active engagement of faith communities with organ donation in the UK. The "Taking Organ Transplantation to 2020" strategy was launched in July 2013 by National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) in collaboration with the Department of Health and Welsh, Scottish, and Northern Irish governments and seeks to increase the number of people, from all sections of the UK's multiethnic and multifaith population, who consent to and authorize organ donation in their life. NHSBT seeks to work in partnership with faith leaders and this culminated in a Faith and Organ Donation Summit. Faith leaders highlight that there is a need for engagement at both national and local levels concerning organ donation as well as diagnosis and definition of death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Mid-South Perspective: African American Faith-based Organizations, HIV, and Stigma.

    PubMed

    Otey, Tamara D; Miller, Wendy Renee

    2016-01-01

    Shelby County, Tennessee has the fastest growing rate of HIV infection in the state, and the majority of new infections are in African Americans. In 2011, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report stated that Memphis (the largest city in Shelby County) ranked seventh highest in new HIV infections. Little research has addressed HIV-related themes in African American culture that could hinder HIV prevention measures. Our qualitative study engaged African American, faith-based leaders in areas with high rates of HIV in meaningful conversations regarding their attitudes toward HIV and those who are infected. Although faith-based leaders felt they had a role in HIV prevention, only 4% in our study had participated in HIV prevention activities, but they were open to HIV prevention programs. We found that faith-based leaders had limited knowledge of health disparities and ongoing stigma concerning HIV, which served as a major barrier to HIV prevention. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Faith based aviation: An ethnographic study of missionary flights international

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Joseph H.

    The development of faith-based missionary aviation is a post-World War II phenomenon. The war effort demonstrated the value, utility, and global reach of aviation to remote, underdeveloped areas of the world. With the beginnings of a worldwide infrastructure for aviation, Christian aviators realized aviation could increase the range and effectiveness of their efforts to reach the world for Christ (Mellis, 2006). Although individual organizations provide statistical information and data about flight operations there is a lack of external evidence and relevant research literature confirming the scope and value of these faith based aviation organizations and operations. A qualitative, ethnographic study was conducted to document the activities of one faith-based aviation organization to gain an understanding of this little known aspect of civilian aviation. The study was conducted with Missionary Flights International (MFI) of Fort Pierce, FL which has been involved in faith-based, missionary aviation since its inception in 1964. As an aviation organization "MFI strives to offer affiliated missions the kind of efficient service and professionalism expected of an airline operation" (Missionary Flights International, 2013, p.1). MFI is a lifeline for missionaries to Haiti and the Dominican Republic, fulfilling their motto of "Standing in the Gap". MFI provides twice a week service to the island of Hispaniola and the Republic of Haiti. In this in-depth study insight and understanding was gained into the purpose of MFI, their daily routines and operations, and the challenges they face in maintaining their flight services to Haiti. This study provided documentation of the value and utility of such aviation efforts and of the individuals involved in this endeavor.

  7. Integrating Faith-Based Organizations into State-Funded Pre-K Programs: Resolving Constitutional Conflict. Pre-K Policy Brief Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Dan; Boylan, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This policy brief addresses federal and state constitutional issues that arise when faith-based organizations participate in state prekindergarten (pre-k) programs and recommends safeguards to ensure that public funding of those programs complies with constitutional principles respecting the separation of church and state and freedom of religion.…

  8. Initiating policy, systems, and environmental changes for childhood obesity prevention by engaging six faith-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Boutain, Doris M; McNees, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how to engage faith-organizations, especially churches, when using policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change approaches for prevention. This article documents the PSE changes implemented by engaging 6 faith organizations, with an estimated reach of 3500 members, for 18 months. Timeline (n = 6), focus group (n = 6), report (n = 18), and observational meeting (n = 16) and event (n = 5) summaries were analyzed using content analysis. Early changes were usually environmental changes. Mid and later changes focused on policy and systems change. Churches structured for process and outcome accountability and person-centered accountability can accomplish PSE changes.

  9. Sources of Social Capital for Malawi People Living With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Sally H.; Jong, SoSon; Matovu, Schola; Youmans, Sharon; Lindgren, Teri

    2016-01-01

    With one of the highest rates of poverty and HIV in the world, Malawi faith-based organizations (FBOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and community-based organizations (CBOs) are expected to provide tangible and emotional support to people living with HIV (PLWH). Using Lin’s social capital theoretical approach, we examine the perspective of PLWH regarding the adequacy of support responses. Forty-six rural Malawi HIV+ adults provided interviews that were recorded digitally, translated, and transcribed by Malawi research assistants. Atlas.ti was used to organize the data and to aid in the analytic process. Participants expressed disappointment in the lack of resources that could be accessed through the FBOs although their expectations may have been unrealistic. Outcomes from accessing and mobilizing the FBO network were negative in terms of stigmatization by FBO leaders and members, whereas outcomes related to CBOs and NGOs were generally positive in terms of empowerment through HIV information and attendance at support groups. PMID:28462349

  10. Professional confidence and job satisfaction: an examination of counselors' perceptions in faith-based and non-faith-based drug treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Doris C; Sung, Hung-En

    2014-08-01

    Understanding substance abuse counselors' professional confidence and job satisfaction is important since such confidence and satisfaction can affect the way counselors go about their jobs. Analyzing data derived from a random sample of 110 counselors from faith-based and non-faith-based treatment programs, this study examines counselors' professional confidence and job satisfaction in both faith-based and non-faith-based programs. The multivariate analyses indicate years of experience and being a certified counselor were the only significant predictors of professional confidence. There was no significant difference in perceived job satisfaction and confidence between counselors in faith-based and non-faith-based programs. A majority of counselors in both groups expressed a high level of satisfaction with their job. Job experience in drug counseling and prior experience as an abuser were perceived by counselors as important components to facilitate counseling skills. Policy implications are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Innovations in Compassion: The Faith-Based and Community Initiative. A Final Report to the Armies of Compassion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This Final Report prepared by the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives offers an account of President George W. Bush's Faith-Based and Community Initiative (FBCI) to the faith-based and other community organizations (FBCOs) that have joined in the battles against poverty, disease, and other social ills. The report emphasizes…

  12. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Speaker | "Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)" will be presented by Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, Chair of the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Date: 2/20/2018; Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm; Location: NCI Shady Grove Campus,

  13. Faith-based perspectives on the use of chimeric organisms for medical research.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Irvine, Rob; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to advance our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases involve the creation chimeric organisms from human neural stem cells and primate embryos--known as prenatal chimeras. The existence of potential mentally complex beings with human and non-human neural apparatus raises fundamental questions as to the ethical permissibility of chimeric research and the moral status of the creatures it creates. Even as bioethicists find fewer reasons to be troubled by most types of chimeric organisms, social attitudes towards the non-human world are often influenced by religious beliefs. In this paper scholars representing eight major religious traditions provide a brief commentary on a hypothetical case concerning the development and use of prenatal human-animal chimeric primates in medical research. These commentaries reflect the plurality and complexity within and between religious discourses of our relationships with other species. Views on the moral status and permissibility of research on neural human animal chimeras vary. The authors provide an introduction to those who seek a better understanding of how faith-based perspectives might enter into biomedical ethics and public discourse towards forms of biomedical research that involves chimeric organisms.

  14. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)

    Cancer.gov

    Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. McNeill's research is on the elimination of cancer-related health disparities in minority populations. Her research has particular emphasis on understanding the influence of social contextual determinants of cancer in minorities, with a special focus of the role of physical activity as a key preventive behavior and obesity as a major cancer determinant. Her research takes place in minority and underserved communities such as public housing developments, black churches, community-based clinics and low-income neighborhoods-communities with excess cancer death rates. She has been continuously funded, receiving grants from various funding agencies (i.e., National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, etc.), to better understand and design innovative solutions to address obesity in racial/ethnic minority communities. Dr. McNeill is PI of several community-based studies, primarily working with African American churches. One is a called Project CHURCH, an academic-faith-based partnership established to: 1) identify underlying reasons for health disparities in cancer and cancer risk factors (e.g., screening, diet) among AAs using a cohort study (N=2400), 2) engage AAs as partners in the research process, and 3) to ultimately eliminate disparities among AAs. In 2014 Dr. McNeill furthered her partnership through the Faith, Health, and Family (FHF) Collaborative. The goals of FHF are to enhance the Project CHURCH partnership to address family obesity in African Americans, strengthen the partnership by developing a larger coalition of organizations and stakeholders to address the problem, assess church and community interest in family obesity and develop an agenda to address obesity in faith settings. To date we have 50 churches as members. Dr. McNeill is also director of the Center for Community

  15. Can interfaith research partnerships develop new paradigms for condom use and HIV prevention? The implementation of conceptual events in Malawi results in a ‘spiritualised condom’

    PubMed Central

    Arratia, Maria-Ines; Makondesa, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this intervention research study was to engage senior leaders of faith-based organisations (FBOs) in Malawi in a participatory process to construct an interfaith theology of HIV/AIDS. This process was designed to enhance the capacity of faith leaders to respond more effectively to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Methods An evidence-driven combination of ethnographic and participatory action research methodologies was utilised. Conceptual events—innovative participatory action research processes—were held over the 4-year project and brought together health service providers, policy makers and a non-governmental organisation in partnership with FBOs and grassroots faith-based communities. Results Through facilitated dialogue, an interfaith theology of HIV/AIDS emerged, resulting in the proposition that a ‘spiritualised condom’ endorses a ‘theology of protecting life’. This proposition was based on the following convictions: (1) life is sacred and to be protected, (2) to kill or murder is a ‘greater sin’ than the ‘lesser sin of infidelity’, (3) protection of the innocent is a moral and religious requirement, (4) condoms have the potential to prevent the death of an innocent person and (5) condoms need to be encouraged, even in the context of marriage. Conclusions Clinicians, non-governmental organisations, health service providers and policy makers, assisted by health social scientists, can successfully partner with FBOs and their leaders to (1) modify and transform faith-based understandings of HIV risk and (2) bring about attitudinal and behaviour changes that help to address the challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. PMID:21983882

  16. The Promise and Challenge of Mentoring High-Risk Youth: Findings from the National Faith-Based Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauldry, Shawn; Hartmann, Tracey A.

    2004-01-01

    This report, the third derived from research out of the National Faith-Based Initiative (NFBI), examines how faith-based organizations designed and implemented mentoring programs for high-risk youth. Focusing on four NFBI sites (in the Bronx and Brooklyn, NY; Baton Rouge, LA; and Philadelphia, PA), the report takes up three key questions: How were…

  17. Why "Faith-Based" Is Here to Stay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Lew

    2009-01-01

    By the time he left office, President Bush's faith-based initiative had become a kind of stand-in for his entire presidency. Whenever something went wrong on Bush's watch it was tarred as yet another "faith-based" policy. As the 2008 presidential election began to take shape, with the Democrats newly in charge of both the House and the Senate and…

  18. Building a national model of public mental health preparedness and community resilience: validation of a dual-intervention, systems-based approach.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Semon, Natalie L; Thompson, Carol B; Lating, Jeffrey M; Everly, George S; Perry, Charlene J; Moore, Suzanne Straub; Mosley, Adrian M; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-12-01

    Working within a series of partnerships among an academic health center, local health departments (LHDs), and faith-based organizations (FBOs), we validated companion interventions to address community mental health planning and response challenges in public health emergency preparedness. We implemented the project within the framework of an enhanced logic model and employed a multi-cohort, pre-test/post-test design to assess the outcomes of 1-day workshops in psychological first aid (PFA) and guided preparedness planning (GPP). The workshops were delivered to urban and rural communities in eastern and midwestern regions of the United States. Intervention effectiveness was based on changes in relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) and on several behavioral indexes. Significant improvements were observed in self-reported and objectively measured KSAs across all cohorts. Additionally, GPP teams proved capable of producing quality drafts of basic community disaster plans in 1 day, and PFA trainees confirmed upon follow-up that their training proved useful in real-world trauma contexts. We documented examples of policy and practice changes at the levels of local and state health departments. Given appropriate guidance, LHDs and FBOs can implement an effective and potentially scalable model for promoting disaster mental health preparedness and community resilience, with implications for positive translational impact.

  19. Faith-based initiatives and the challenges of governance.

    PubMed

    Biebricher, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The task of this paper is to offer an analysis of the Faith-Based and Community Initiative (FBCI) established by George W. Bush and continued under the Obama administration based on a critical and decentred approach to governance (networks). The paper starts out by placing FBCI in the context of the welfare reform of 1996 arguing that both share certain basic assumptions, for example, regarding the nature of poverty, and that FBCI can be interpreted as a response to the relative failure of some aspects of the reform of 1996. In what follows, FBCI is analysed as a typical case of (welfare) state restructuring from government to governance. Emphasis is given to the way discourses and traditions such as communitarianism and public choice have shaped the formation of this new governance arrangement in the field of social service delivery in order to strive for a ‘decentring’ of FBCI by drawing attention to actors' beliefs and worldviews. Finally, I argue that it is not least because of a divergence of such views between policy-makers and faith-based organizations that the effect of FBCI remains for the time being limited.

  20. Emergence of an Israel faith-based community organization facilitating live donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Walter G; Boner, Geoffrey; Koslowsky, Meni; Lazar, Adi

    2018-06-07

    The 2014 Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Living Kidney Donations recognized live donor kidney transplantation as the best treatment for late-stage kidney disease, yielding superior graft and patient survival, improved quality of life, fewer requirements for dialysis and increased cost-effectiveness compared to deceased donor kidney transplantation. Yet in spite of the excellent results of living kidney donation, the annual number of living kidney donors is declining in many countries, including the United States. In Israel, a non-profit organization, Matnat Chaim ("Gift of Life" in Hebrew), a faith-based initiative, has emerged as a major force for arranging living donor kidney transplantation mainly by facilitating altruistic living unrelated donor transplantation. A retrospective review of the records of live kidney donations facilitated by the Matnat Chaim organization and referred to Israel transplant centers, since the organization's inception in 2009, was performed and compared to published data from the Israel Ministry of Health. Matnat Chaim has facilitated 494 live kidney donations since its founding in February 2009 until the end of 2017. Of the 124 live kidney transplants performed in 2016, 111 (90%) were shown to be altruistic and unrelated. This large number of donations was associated with a doubling of the total number of kidney transplantations, performed in Israel (data published by the Israel Ministry of Health). The success of an Israel community organization in the promotion of kidney transplantation may serve as a model for other religious and non-religious communities worldwide.

  1. Faith and Moral Development: A Case Study of a Jail Faith-Based Correctional Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, faith-based programs have provided curriculum in correctional facilities to meet the challenge of rehabilitating offenders. To attempt to identify the impact of such instruction, this qualitative case study examines the faith and moral development of the participants in one such program. Through interviews, observations, document…

  2. Contrasting faith-based and traditional substance abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Neff, James Alan; Shorkey, Clayton T; Windsor, Liliane Cambraia

    2006-01-01

    This article (a) discusses the definition of faith-based substance abuse treatment programs, (b) juxtaposes Durkheim's theory regarding religion with treatment process model to highlight key dimensions of faith-based and traditional programs, and (c) presents results from a study of seven programs to identify key program dimensions and to identify differences/similarities between program types. Focus group/Concept Mapping techniques yielded a clear "spiritual activities, beliefs, and rituals" dimension, rated as significantly more important to faith-based programs. Faith-based program staff also rated "structure and discipline" as more important and "work readiness" as less important. No differences were found for "group activities/cohesion" and "role modeling/mentoring," "safe, supportive environment," and "traditional treatment modalities." Programs showed substantial similarities with regard to core social processes of treatment such as mentoring, role modeling, and social cohesion. Implications are considered for further research on treatment engagement, retention, and other outcomes.

  3. Faith-Based Institutions as Venues for Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Maria J

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this current narrative review is to critique the scope and value of recent studies with a focus on obesity-related health promotion in faith organizations. Electronic database searches, scanning of the reference lists of identified articles, and hand searching of journals for articles written in English and published in 2013-2016 revealed 16 studies. Half of the studies involved African-Americans, in churches and with predominantly female participants. Research among other ethnic groups was more likely to be exploratory. All of the 11 studies reporting the impact of programmes on weight-related measures showed favourable outcomes. However, due to study limitations (small sample size, short duration, attrition), significant unbiased effects cannot yet be concluded for most of the interventions reviewed. Study strengths included application of theory in community engagement and detailed description of cultural tailoring. Faith organizations show promise as settings for obesity prevention among high-risk groups, particularly African-Americans. Support for progressing formative work to adequately powered, randomized controlled trials is vital. Wider involvement of diverse faith settings and targeting obesity in men and childhood would be valuable developments.

  4. The Response...: Differing Faiths in a Faith-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Stephanie; Freeman, Nancy K.

    2012-01-01

    In the May 2011 issue of "Young Children," Rabbi Meir Muller--Focus on Ethics's first guest editor--presented a situation set in a faith-based program. This column analyzes the responses provided by early childhood educators in reflecting on how best to use the Code to help a teacher follow the most ethically defensible course of action when…

  5. Talking with Students about Faith-Based Career Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kenzie; Davidson, Spencer M.; Campbell, Elizabeth L.

    2017-01-01

    For Christian college students, the journey toward vocation can be hindered by faith-based anxiety. The relationship between students and mentors in Christian higher education offers a unique, optimum space to explore these beliefs. Christians in academia have invaluable personal experience in integrating their faith and career, and have much to…

  6. In Good Faith.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Craig

    2001-01-01

    Since 1991, the number of school district/faith-based organization partnerships jumped from 3 to 40 percent, promoted by President Clinton and the federally funded 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative. Keys to success are identified, and programs, benefits, and problems in three large urban districts are profiled. (MLH)

  7. The Law and Hiring Practices in Faith-Based Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A key concern of educational leaders in faith-based schools is their ability to hire faculty members who support institutional missions. Insofar as the American legal system protects the rights of leaders in faith-based schools to hire those who share in school goals, this article is divided into three substantive sections. The first section…

  8. The Effects of a Counselor-Led, Faith-Based, School-Family-Community Partnership on Student Achievement in a High-Poverty Urban Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lynette M.; Bryan, Julia; Zalaquett, Carlos P.

    2017-01-01

    School counselors play critical roles in partnerships with faith-based organizations that provide valuable programs for students with economic challenges. This study evaluated the effects of a counselor-led, faith-based, school-family-community partnership on student reading achievement in a high-poverty elementary school. Results indicated…

  9. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in Southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M E; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health programming. Inclusive partnerships could increase

  10. Faith-Based Mental Health Interventions with African Americans: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Krystal; Aranda, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based interventions have emerged culturally sensitive way to address mental health issues among African Americans. This systematic review explores the scope and efficacy of faith-based mental health intervention outcomes among African Americans. Extracted data included the study population, setting, study design, intervention, adaptations,…

  11. Faith Is Confidence: The Implication of Psychosocial Components in Faith-Based Educational Programs on Expressive Communication Skills of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Erin M.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based programs for adult learners have environmental factors that differentiate them from non-faith based programs, but explicit empirical studies evaluating the impact of the psychosocial factors have been lacking in the literature. This study comparatively examines the achievement level of expressive communication skills as measured…

  12. Multi-Level Partnerships Support a Comprehensive Faith-Based Health Promotion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardison-Moody, Annie; Dunn, Carolyn; Hall, David; Jones, Lorelei; Newkirk, Jimmy; Thomas, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the role of multi-level partnerships in implementing Faithful Families Eating Smart and Moving More, a faith-based health promotion program that works with low-resource faith communities in North Carolina. This program incorporates a nine-lesson individual behavior change program in concert with policy and environmental…

  13. Integrating Faith-based and Community-based Participatory Research Approaches to Adapt the Korean Parent Training Program.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjung; Boutain, Doris; Kim, Sangho; Chun, Jin-Joo; Im, Hyesang

    Faith and community based inquiry approaches are rarely used to develop research interventions. The purpose of this article is to present how a research team worked with six Korean American Christian churches to revise the prototype Korean Parent Training Program (KPTP), based upon the Bright Futures Parenting Program. The collaboration was sought to better integrate and align the KPTP with Korean culture and faith. The KPTP was developed to promote positive parenting practices and decrease mental health disparities of Korean American children. Sixteen church participants completed a Delphi survey, a workshop series, Community Theaters, and focus groups. The participants suggested adding Korean traditional parenting virtues, Christian parenting principles, and revising the standardized parent training and program philosophy. Revisions made KPTP sensitive to Korean culture and faith, and promoted program acceptability. The process demonstrated the importance of working with church volunteers to develop faith-based and community-based health promotion interventions targeting Korean American faith communities. This research presents significant and meaningful implications for working with other faith communities from minority backgrounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Results of a faith-based weight loss intervention for black women.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Stolley, Melinda R; Ganschow, Pamela; Schiffer, Linda; Wells, Anita; Simon, Nolanna; Dyer, Alan

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for a variety of chronic diseases. Although weight loss may reduce these risks, weight loss programs designed for black women have yielded mixed results. Studies suggest that religion/spirituality is a prominent component of black culture. Given this, the inclusion of religion/spirituality as an active component of a weight loss program may enhance the benefits of the program. The role of religion/spirituality, however, has not been specifically tested as a mechanism that enhances the weight loss process. This paper presents the results of "Faith on the Move," a randomized pilot study of a faith-based weight loss program for black women. The goals of the study were to estimate the effects of a 12-week culturally tailored, faith-based weight loss intervention on weight loss, dietary fat consumption and physical activity. The culturally tailored, faith-based weight loss intervention was compared to a culturally tailored weight loss intervention with no active faith component. Fifty-nine overweight/obese black women were randomized to one of the two interventions. Although the results were not statistically significant, the effect size suggests that the addition of the faith component improved results. These promising preliminary results will need to be tested in an adequately powered trial.

  15. Factors associated with faith-based health counselling in the United States: implications for dissemination of evidence-based behavioural medicine.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Elizabeth A; Bopp, Melissa; Webb, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Health counselling is an evidence-based behavioural medicine approach and the most commonly reported form of faith-based health interventions. Yet, no research has explored the factors influencing the implementation of faith-based health counselling. Therefore, this study examined individual, organisational and environmental factors associated with offering/not offering faith-based health counselling programmes within faith-based organisations. A national, internet-based, opt-in, cross-sectional survey of faith leaders (N = 676) was conducted (March-December 2009) to assess faith leaders' demographic information, health status, fatalism, health-related attitudes and normative beliefs, attitudes towards health counselling, institutional and occupational information, and perceptions of parent organisation support for health and wellness interventions. Most faith leaders reported offering some type of health counselling in the past year [n = 424, 62.7%, 95% CI (59.0, 66.3)]. Results of a multivariate logistic regression showed that faith leaders reporting greater proxy efficacy (OR = 1.40, P = 0.002), greater comfort in speaking with church members about health (OR = 1.25, P = 0.005), greater perceived health (OR = 1.27, P = 0.034), and who worked at larger churches (OR ≥ 3.2, P ≤ 0.001) with greater parent organisation support (OR = 1.33, P = 0.002) had significantly higher odds of offering faith-based health counselling. Church size and parent organisation support for faith-based health interventions appear to be important factors in the presence of faith leader health counselling. The content of faith leader health counselling training should aim to increase faith leaders' confidence that church members will successfully change their health behaviours as a result of the health counselling and increase faith leaders' comfort in speaking with church members about health. Future research is needed to examine efficacious and effective dissemination methods such as

  16. Strengthening of partnerships between the public sector and faith-based groups.

    PubMed

    Duff, Jean F; Buckingham, Warren W

    2015-10-31

    The sharpening focus on global health and the growing recognition of the capacities and scope of faith-based groups for improving community health outcomes suggest an intentional and systematic approach to forging strong, sustained partnerships between public sector agencies and faith-based organisations. Drawing from both development and faith perspectives, this Series paper examines trends that could ground powerful, more sustainable partnerships and identifies new opportunities for collaboration based on respective strengths and existing models. This paper concludes with five areas of recommendations for more effective collaboration to achieve health goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pilot Trial of an Electronic Family Medical History in US Faith-Based Communities.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Patricia; Canclini, Sharon; Cauble, Denise; Raudonis, Barbara; Golden, Paulette

    2014-07-01

    In spite of the acknowledged importance of collecting family health information, methods of collecting, organizing, and storage of pedigree data are not uniformly utilized in practice, though several electronic tools have been developed for the purpose. Using electronic tools to gather health information may empower individuals to take responsibility in managing their family health history. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility and outcomes of introducing small groups to the My Family Health Portrait tool in faith-based communities using faith community nurses (FCNs). This pilot project adopted a mixed methods approach to assess the potential of an educational intervention delivered by FCNs for increasing the use of electronic technologies for organizing and storing family health histories among the general public. Treatment and control groups were recruited from four faith-based communities in north Texas using a parallel-groups quasi-experimental design. Qualitative data were gleaned from field notes made by investigators interacting with FCNs and observing their teaching. A majority of respondents believed that knowing one's health history and passing it on to family and medical personnel is important. Those receiving face-to-face instruction on the electronic tool were significantly more likely to have written down family health information than the control group who received only an informational handout (χ(2) = 5.96, P = .015). Barriers to teaching about and using the electronic tool included FCNs' lack of facility with computers in the educational context and FCN and respondent mistrust of electronic storage for family health information. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Application of a faith-based integration tool to assess mental and physical health interventions

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Donna M.; Leak, Jean; Carver, Monique E.; Smith, Selina A.

    2017-01-01

    Background To build on current research involving faith-based interventions (FBIs) for addressing mental and physical health, this study a) reviewed the extent to which relevant publications integrate faith concepts with health and b) initiated analysis of the degree of FBI integration with intervention outcomes. Methods Derived from a systematic search of articles published between 2007 and 2017, 36 studies were assessed with a Faith-Based Integration Assessment Tool (FIAT) to quantify faith-health integration. Basic statistical procedures were employed to determine the association of faith-based integration with intervention outcomes. Results The assessed studies possessed (on average) moderate, inconsistent integration because of poor use of faith measures, and moderate, inconsistent use of faith practices. Analysis procedures for determining the effect of FBI integration on intervention outcomes were inadequate for formulating practical conclusions. Conclusions Regardless of integration, interventions were associated with beneficial outcomes. To determine the link between FBI integration and intervention outcomes, additional analyses are needed. PMID:29354795

  19. Application of a faith-based integration tool to assess mental and physical health interventions.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Donna M; Leak, Jean; Carver, Monique E; Smith, Selina A

    2017-01-01

    To build on current research involving faith-based interventions (FBIs) for addressing mental and physical health, this study a) reviewed the extent to which relevant publications integrate faith concepts with health and b) initiated analysis of the degree of FBI integration with intervention outcomes. Derived from a systematic search of articles published between 2007 and 2017, 36 studies were assessed with a Faith-Based Integration Assessment Tool (FIAT) to quantify faith-health integration. Basic statistical procedures were employed to determine the association of faith-based integration with intervention outcomes. The assessed studies possessed (on average) moderate, inconsistent integration because of poor use of faith measures, and moderate, inconsistent use of faith practices. Analysis procedures for determining the effect of FBI integration on intervention outcomes were inadequate for formulating practical conclusions. Regardless of integration, interventions were associated with beneficial outcomes. To determine the link between FBI integration and intervention outcomes, additional analyses are needed.

  20. Guided preparedness planning with lay communities: enhancing capacity of rural emergency response through a systems-based partnership.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Perry, Charlene; Azur, Melissa; Taylor, Henry G; Gwon, Howard; Mosley, Adrian; Semon, Natalie; Links, Jonathan M

    2013-02-01

    Community disaster preparedness plans, particularly those with content that would mitigate the effects of psychological trauma on vulnerable rural populations, are often nonexistent or underdeveloped. The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate a model of disaster mental health preparedness planning involving a partnership among three, key stakeholders in the public health system. A one-group, post-test, quasi-experimental design was used to assess outcomes as a function of an intervention designated Guided Preparedness Planning (GPP). The setting was the eastern-, northern-, and mid-shore region of the state of Maryland. Partner participants were four local health departments (LHDs), 100 faith-based organizations (FBOs), and one academic health center (AHC)-the latter, collaborating entities of the Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System. Individual participants were 178 community residents recruited from counties of the above-referenced geographic area. Effectiveness of GPP was based on post-intervention assessments of trainee knowledge, skills, and attitudes supportive of community disaster mental health planning. Inferences about the practicability (feasibility) of the model were drawn from pre-defined criteria for partner readiness, willingness, and ability to participate in the project. Additional aims of the study were to determine if LHD leaders would be willing and able to generate post-project strategies to perpetuate project-initiated government/faith planning alliances (sustainability), and to develop portable methods and materials to enhance model application and impact in other health jurisdictions (scalability). The majority (95%) of the 178 lay citizens receiving the GPP intervention and submitting complete evaluations reported that planning-supportive objectives had been achieved. Moreover, all criteria for inferring model feasibility, sustainability, and scalability were met. Within the span of a six-month period

  1. Exploration and Description of Faith-Based Health Resources: Findings Inform Advancing Holistic Health Care.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan MacLeod

    2015-01-01

    It is important to use all holistic resource opportunities in communities, such as integrative healing centers, and mind-body-spirit approaches to health. These holistic approaches may be realized through nontraditional avenues, such as faith-based resources. This article reports on an exploratory study that describes faith-based resources supporting holistic health in a southeastern region of the United States. A working definition for "faith-based health resources" was "ecumenical and interfaith community-based, open-access health resources that include in mission for service a reference to faith." Excluded from the definition were institutional services from hospitals, focused social services from area agencies, and federally funded services.

  2. Development of a Faith-Based Stress Management Intervention in a Rural African American Community.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Keneshia; Moore, Todd; Willis, Nathaniel; Hadden, Kristie

    2015-01-01

    Faith-based mental health interventions developed and implemented using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach hold promise for reaching rural African Americans and addressing health disparities. To describe the development, challenges, and lessons learned from the Trinity Life Management, a faith-based stress management intervention in a rural African American faith community. The researchers used a CBPR approach by partnering with the African American faith community to develop a stress management intervention. Development strategies include working with key informants, focus groups, and a community advisory board (CAB). The community identified the key concepts that should be included in a stress management intervention. The faith-based "Trinity Life Management" stress management intervention was developed collaboratively by a CAB and an academic research team. The intervention includes stress management techniques that incorporate Biblical principles and information about the stress-distress-depression continuum.

  3. Faith in Action: Using Interfaith Coalitions To Support Voluntary Caregiving Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Carla; Pepper, Sarah Kathryn

    This study evaluated Generation II of the Faith in Action program (which united faith-based organizations and volunteers in providing in-home care), assessing how many original grantees still served their communities, numbers of volunteers and clients involved with the programs, services provided, and program growth since receiving surveys of…

  4. 75 FR 5331 - President's Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES President's Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the President's Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships announces the following meeting: Name: President's Advisory...

  5. 75 FR 1058 - President's Advisory Council for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES President's Advisory Council for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the President's Advisory Council for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships announces the following meeting: Name: President's Advisory...

  6. 75 FR 4822 - President's Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES President's Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the President's Advisory Council for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships announces the following meeting: Name: President's Advisory...

  7. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M. E.; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health

  8. President Bush's Faith-Based & Community Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, Washington, DC.

    Despite efforts by the federal and state governments to battle social distress, there are many people who still suffer from poverty and despair. People are calling out for help. For years, faith-based and community groups have been assisting these people and others in need. The federal government has not often been a willing partner to these…

  9. Evaluation of HeartSmarts, a Faith-Based Cardiovascular Health Education Program.

    PubMed

    Tettey, Naa-Solo; Duran, Pedro A; Andersen, Holly S; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2017-02-01

    In order to effectively address cardiovascular disease among African Americans, evidence-based health information must be disseminated within a context aligned with the values and beliefs of the population. Faith-based organizations play a critical role in meeting the religious and spiritual needs of many African Americans. Additionally, faith-based organizations can be effective in health promotion. A manual was created by incorporating biblical scriptures relating to health messages drawn from existing health manuals oriented toward African Americans. Lay health educators active in their churches participated in a 12-week training to learn the basics of cardiovascular disease and methods for delivering the program to their congregations' members. After the completion of the training, these lay health educators recruited participants from their respective churches and administered their own 12-week HeartSmarts program. Measurements of participants' systolic and diastolic blood pressure (mmHg), height (in.), weight (lbs.), and waist circumference (in.) were taken, and cardiovascular disease knowledge assessments (based on 20 open-ended questions) were administered at the start and end of the 12-week programs. Fourteen predominantly African American churches in NYC participated. Of the 221 participants, 199 completed the program. There were significant reductions in pretest and posttest total participant averages for systolic BP (4.48 mmHg, p < 0.001), diastolic BP (3.38 mmHg, p < 0.001), weight (3lbs., p = 0.001), and BMI (0.46, p = 0.001). Cardiovascular disease health assessment scores had an average increase of 12.74 correct responses (p < 0.001). The HeartSmarts program may be an effective ecumenical and cultural model for disseminating health messages and reducing cardiovascular risk among African Americans.

  10. Evolutionary conceptual analysis: faith community nursing.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to report an evolutionary concept analysis of faith community nursing (FCN). FCN is a source of healthcare delivery in the USA which has grown in comprehensiveness and complexity. With increasing healthcare cost and a focus on access and prevention, FCN has extended beyond the physical walls of the faith community building. Faith communities and healthcare organizations invest in FCN and standardized training programs exist. Using Rodgers' evolutionary analysis, the literature was examined for antecedents, attributes, and consequences of the concept. This design allows for understanding the historical and social nature of the concept and how it changes over time. A search of databases using the keywords FCN, faith community nurse, parish nursing, and parish nurse was done. The concept of FCN was explored using research and theoretical literature. A theoretical definition and model were developed with relevant implications. The search results netted a sample of 124 reports of research and theoretical articles from multiple disciplines: medicine, education, religion and philosophy, international health, and nursing. Theoretical definition: FCN is a method of healthcare delivery that is centered in a relationship between the nurse and client (client as person, family, group, or community). The relationship occurs in an iterative motion over time when the client seeks or is targeted for wholistic health care with the goal of optimal wholistic health functioning. Faith integrating is a continuous occurring attribute. Health promoting, disease managing, coordinating, empowering and accessing health care are other essential attributes. All essential attributes occur with intentionality in a faith community, home, health institution and other community settings with fluidity as part of a community, national, or global health initiative. A new theoretical definition and corresponding conceptual model of FCN provides a basis for future nursing

  11. Faith-Based Hospitals and Variation in Psychiatric Inpatient Length of Stay in California, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    Banta, Jim E; McKinney, Ogbochi

    2016-06-01

    We examined current treatment patterns at faith-based hospitals. Psychiatric discharges from all community-based hospitals in California were obtained for 2002-2011 and a Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach used to study hospital religious affiliation and length of stay (LOS). During 10 years there were 1,976,893 psychiatric inpatient discharges, of which 14.3% were from faith-based nonprofit hospitals (eighteen Catholic, seven Seventh-day Adventist, and one Jewish hospital). Modest differences in patient characteristics and shorter LOS (7.5 vs. 8.3 days) were observed between faith-based and other hospitals. Multivariable negative binomial regression found shorter LOS at faith-based nonprofit hospitals (coefficient = -0.1169, p < 0.001, Wald χ (2) = 55) and greater LOS at all nonprofits (coefficient = 1.5909, p < 0.001, Wald χ (2) = 2755) as compared to local government-controlled hospitals. Faith-based hospitals provide a substantial and consistent amount of psychiatric care in California and may have slightly lower LOS after adjusting for patient and other hospital characteristics.

  12. Tempest in a Therapeutic Community: Implementation and Evaluation Issues for Faith-Based Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Diane L.; Crow, Matthew S.; Thompson, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic community (TC) is an increasingly utilized intervention model in corrections settings. Rarely do these TCs include faith-based curriculum other than that included in Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous programs as does the faith-based TC that serves as the basis for this article. Borrowing from the successful TC model, the…

  13. Conceptual bases of Christian, faith-based substance abuse rehabilitation programs: qualitative analysis of staff interviews.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa K; Hermos, John A; Bokhour, Barbara G; Frayne, Susan M

    2004-09-01

    Faith-based substance abuse rehabilitation programs provide residential treatment for many substance abusers. To determine key governing concepts of such programs, we conducted semi-structured interviews with sample of eleven clinical and administrative staff referred to us by program directors at six, Evangelical Christian, faith-based, residential rehabilitation programs representing two large, nationwide networks. Qualitative analysis using grounded theory methods examined how spirituality is incorporated into treatment and elicited key theories of addiction and recovery. Although containing comprehensive secular components, the core activities are strongly rooted in a Christian belief system that informs their understanding of addiction and recovery and drives the treatment format. These governing conceptions, that addiction stems from attempts to fill a spiritual void through substance use and recovery through salvation and a long-term relationship with God, provide an explicit, theory-driven model upon which they base their core treatment activities. Knowledge of these core concepts and practices should be helpful to clinicians in considering referrals to faith-based recovery programs.

  14. Award-Winning Faculty at a Faith-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Jennifer; Jun, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the development of excellent teachers could contribute to the revision of current practices in faculty recruitment, evaluation, workload expectations, and reward systems. This grounded theory study examined the professional careers of nine award-winning faculty members of a faith-based institution of higher education. The data, collected…

  15. Training at a faith-based institution matters for obstetrics and gynecology residents: results from a regional survey.

    PubMed

    Guiahi, Maryam; Westhoff, Carolyn L; Summers, Sondra; Kenton, Kimberly

    2013-06-01

    Prior data suggest that opportunities in family planning training may be limited during obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) residency training, particularly at faith-based institutions with moral and ethical constraints, although this aspect of the Ob-Gyn curriculum has not been formally studied to date. We compared Ob-Gyn residents' self-rated competency and intentions to provide family planning procedures at faith-based versus those of residents at non-faith-based programs. We surveyed residents at all 20 Ob-Gyn programs in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Wisconsin from 2008 to 2009. Residents were queried about current skills and future plans to perform family planning procedures. We examined associations based on program and residents' personal characteristics and performed multivariable logistic regression analysis. A total of 232 of 340 residents (68%) from 17 programs (85%) returned surveys. Seven programs were faith-based. Residents from non-faith-based programs were more likely to be completely satisfied with family planning training (odds ratio [OR]  =  3.4, 95% confidence limit [CI], 1.9-6.2) and to report they "understand and can perform on own" most procedures. Most residents, regardless of program type, planned to provide all surveyed family planning services. Despite similar intentions to provide family planning procedures after graduation, residents at faith-based training programs were less satisfied with their family planning training and rate their ability to perform family planning services lower than residents at non-faith-based training programs.

  16. Faith healing and faith in healing.

    PubMed

    Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Sarkar and Seshadri have presented an interesting paper in this issue on the ethical approach that a physician should take when faced with requests for faith healing (1). The paper describes four approaches that the physician can take. These are rejecting the request, keeping oneself detached from the issue, endorsing the request and trying to understand the practices concerned so as to make a reasoned decision. This commentary attempts to explore the issue of faith healing further, from the point of view of clinical care. It shall discuss five important dimensions which can supplement the arguments by Sarkar and Seshadri. These are the concepts of faith, spirituality and religion and faith healing; the difference between cure and healing; patient-centred care; the various factors influencing a doctor's response to requests for faith healing; and finally, the ethical issues to be considered while making a decision. Before launching into the discussion, it should be made clear that this commentary refers mainly to those faith healing practices which are not overtly harmful, such as prayers, and wearing rings and amulets.

  17. Spirituality, Values and the School's Ethos: Factors Shaping Leadership in a Faith-Based School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striepe, Michelle; Clarke, Simon; O'Donoghue, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Studies which examine how educational leadership in faith-based schools is understood and practised are few and far between in the research literature. This is surprising given the important role faith-based schools play within the Australian school system and the controversy that has often surrounded them. Taking into consideration the gap in the…

  18. What’s God got to do with it? Engaging African American faith-based institutions in HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy; Cornwall, Alexandra; Thomas, Gladys; Waller, Pastor Alyn; Friend, Rafiyq; Broadnax, Pastor Jay; Flanigan, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Although faith-based institutions play critical leadership roles in the African American community, the faith-based response to HIV/AIDS has historically been lacking. We explore recent successful strategies of a citywide HIV/AIDS awareness and testing campaign developed in partnership with 40 African American faith-based institutions in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a city with some of the United State’s highest HIV infection rates. Drawing on important lessons from the campaign and subsequent efforts to sustain the campaign’s momentum with a citywide HIV testing, treatment and awareness program, we provide a roadmap for engaging African American faith communities in HIV prevention that include partnering with faith leaders; engaging the media to raise awareness, destigmatising HIV/AIDS and encouraging HIV testing; and conducting educational and HIV testing events at houses of worship. African American faith based institutions have a critical role to play in raising awareness about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and for reducing racial disparities in HIV infection. PMID:23379422

  19. Keeping the faith: African American faith leaders' perspectives and recommendations for reducing racial disparities in HIV/AIDS infection.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Amy; Cornwall, Alexandra; Chute, Nora; Sanders, Julia; Thomas, Gladys; James, George; Lally, Michelle; Trooskin, Stacey; Flanigan, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    In Philadelphia, 66% of new HIV infections are among African Americans and 2% of African Americans are living with HIV. The city of Philadelphia has among the largest numbers of faith institutions of any city in the country. Although faith-based institutions play an important role in the African American community, their response to the AIDS epidemic has historically been lacking. We convened 38 of Philadelphia's most influential African American faith leaders for in-depth interviews and focus groups examining the role of faith-based institutions in HIV prevention. Participants were asked to comment on barriers to engaging faith-based leaders in HIV prevention and were asked to provide normative recommendations for how African American faith institutions can enhance HIV/AIDS prevention and reduce racial disparities in HIV infection. Many faith leaders cited lack of knowledge about Philadelphia's racial disparities in HIV infection as a common reason for not previously engaging in HIV programs; others noted their congregations' existing HIV prevention and outreach programs and shared lessons learned. Barriers to engaging the faith community in HIV prevention included: concerns about tacitly endorsing extramarital sex by promoting condom use, lack of educational information appropriate for a faith-based audience, and fear of losing congregants and revenue as a result of discussing human sexuality and HIV/AIDS from the pulpit. However, many leaders expressed a moral imperative to respond to the AIDS epidemic, and believed clergy should play a greater role in HIV prevention. Many participants noted that controversy surrounding homosexuality has historically divided the faith community and prohibited an appropriate response to the epidemic; many expressed interest in balancing traditional theology with practical public health approaches to HIV prevention. Leaders suggested the faith community should: promote HIV testing, including during or after worship services and in

  20. Keeping the Faith: African American Faith Leaders’ Perspectives and Recommendations for Reducing Racial Disparities in HIV/AIDS Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy; Cornwall, Alexandra; Chute, Nora; Sanders, Julia; Thomas, Gladys; James, George; Lally, Michelle; Trooskin, Stacey; Flanigan, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    In Philadelphia, 66% of new HIV infections are among African Americans and 2% of African Americans are living with HIV. The city of Philadelphia has among the largest numbers of faith institutions of any city in the country. Although faith-based institutions play an important role in the African American community, their response to the AIDS epidemic has historically been lacking. We convened 38 of Philadelphia’s most influential African American faith leaders for in-depth interviews and focus groups examining the role of faith-based institutions in HIV prevention. Participants were asked to comment on barriers to engaging faith-based leaders in HIV prevention and were asked to provide normative recommendations for how African American faith institutions can enhance HIV/AIDS prevention and reduce racial disparities in HIV infection. Many faith leaders cited lack of knowledge about Philadelphia’s racial disparities in HIV infection as a common reason for not previously engaging in HIV programs; others noted their congregations’ existing HIV prevention and outreach programs and shared lessons learned. Barriers to engaging the faith community in HIV prevention included: concerns about tacitly endorsing extramarital sex by promoting condom use, lack of educational information appropriate for a faith-based audience, and fear of losing congregants and revenue as a result of discussing human sexuality and HIV/AIDS from the pulpit. However, many leaders expressed a moral imperative to respond to the AIDS epidemic, and believed clergy should play a greater role in HIV prevention. Many participants noted that controversy surrounding homosexuality has historically divided the faith community and prohibited an appropriate response to the epidemic; many expressed interest in balancing traditional theology with practical public health approaches to HIV prevention. Leaders suggested the faith community should: promote HIV testing, including during or after worship services

  1. Balancing Identity and Diversity in Faith-Based Nursing Education: A Case Study from Northern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tveit, Bodil; Karvinen, Ikali; Damsma-Bakker, Alica; Ylönen, Merja; Oosterhoff-Zielman, Marjanne; Fanuelsen, Olav; van Leeuwen, Réné

    2015-01-01

    The role of faith-based nursing education is contested in today's Northern European societies, which are often described as postmodern, pluralist, or secular. Although faith-based institutions played pioneering roles in the early development of nursing education, many today downplay their religious roots and have transformed themselves into modern…

  2. A faith-based community partnership to address HIV/AIDS in the southern United States: implementation, challenges, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston; Coleman, Jason D; Fairchild, Amanda; Gaddist, Bambi; White, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Though race and region are not by themselves risk factors for HIV infection, regional and racial disparities exist in the burden of HIV/AIDS in the US. Specifically, African Americans in the southern US appear to bear the brunt of this burden due to a complex set of upstream factors like structural and cultural influences that do not facilitate HIV/AIDS awareness, HIV testing, or sexual risk-reduction techniques while perpetuating HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Strategies proposed to mitigate the burden among this population have included establishing partnerships and collaborations with non-traditional entities like African American churches and other faith-based organizations. Though efforts to partner with the African American church are not necessarily novel, most of these efforts do not present a model that focuses on building the capacity of the African American church to address these upstream factors and sustain these interventions. This article will describe Project Fostering AIDS Initiatives That Heal (F.A.I.T.H), a faith-based model for successfully developing, implementing, and sustaining locally developed HIV/AIDS prevention interventions in African American churches in South Carolina. This was achieved by engaging the faith community and the provision of technical assistance, grant funding and training for project personnel. Elements of success, challenges, and lessons learned during this process will also be discussed.

  3. The internal migration between public and faith-based health providers: a cross-sectional, retrospective and multicentre study from southern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Prytherch, Helen; Baumgarten, Inge; Kisanga, Oberlin M E; Schmidt-Ehry, Bergis; Marx, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To assess the magnitude, direction and underlying dynamics of internal health worker migration between public and faith-based health providers from a hospital perspective. Two complementary tools were implemented in 10 public and six faith-based hospitals in southern Tanzania. A hospital questionnaire assessed magnitude and direction of staff migration between January 2006 and June 2009. Interviews with 42 public and 20 faith-based maternity nurses evaluated differences in staff perspectives and motives for the observed migration patterns. The predominant direction of staff movement was from the faith-based to the public sector: 69.1% (n = 105/152) of hospital staff exits and 60.6% (n = 60/99) of hospital staff gains. Nurses were the largest group among the migrating health workforce. Faith-based hospitals lost 59.3% (n = 86/145) of nurses and 90.6% (n = 77/85) of registered nurses to the public sector, whereby public hospitals reported 13.5% (n = 59/436) of nurses and 24.4% (n = 41/168) of registered nurses being former faith-based employees. Interviews revealed significantly inferior staff perspectives among faith-based respondents than their public colleagues. Main differences were identified regarding career development and training, management support, employee engagement and workload. This study revealed considerable internal health worker migration from the faith-based to the public sector. Staff retention and motivation within faith-based hospitals are not restricted to financial considerations, and salary gaps can no longer uniquely explain this movement pattern. The consequences for the catchment area of faith-based hospitals are potentially severe and erode cooperation potential between the public and private health sector.

  4. Church leaders' tobacco opinions: send materials, not money.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Bonita; Carver, Vivien; Range, Lillian; Pike, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In addition to personnel challenges,faith-based organizations (FBOs) face tangible challenges to implementing tobacco use prevention programs, such as finding materials that fit within their mission and financial backing to support the program. The present project surveyed 71 FBO leaders about these challenges with two open-ended questions that asked what would help and hinder them from delivering a tobacco prevention program, and Likert questionnaires on advocacy, efficacy, impact, policy, burnout, and morality. On what would help them deliver a tobacco prevention program, the most common answer was materials; about half of present FBO leaders gave this answer. On what would interfere, the most common answer was nothing, with about one quarter giving this answer; and, the next most common answer was not having materials with about one sixth giving this answer. The survey was brief (2 pages), and the sample size was small (71). Having the appropriate tobacco prevention materials was clearly a concern for present, mostly African American faith-based leaders, who reported that they needed materials more than they needed money, volunteers, or other forms of assistance.

  5. Church leaders' tobacco opinions: send materials, not money.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Bonita; Carver, Vivien; Range, Lillian; Pike, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In addition to personnel challenges,faith-based organizations (FBOs) face tangible challenges to implementing tobacco use prevention programs, such as finding materials that fit within their mission and financial backing to support the program. The present project surveyed 71 FBO leaders about these challenges with two open-ended questions that asked what would help and hinder them from delivering a tobacco prevention program, and Likert questionnaires on advocacy, efficacy, impact, policy, burnout, and morality. On what would help them deliver a tobacco prevention program, the most common answer was materials, about half of present FBO leaders gave this answer. On what would interfere, the most common answer was nothing, with about one quarter giving this answer; and, the next most common answer was not having materials with about one sixth giving this answer. The survey was brief (2 pages), and the sample size was small (71). Having the appropriate tobacco prevention materials was clearly a concern for present, mostly African American faith-based leaders, who reported that they needed materials more than they needed money, volunteers, or other forms of assistance.

  6. Faith Matters: Developing the Our Whole Lives Evaluation and Promotion Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of faith-based organizations implementing comprehensive sexuality education into their ministries, including a review of a study of 5,819 religious teens by Christian Community Inc., a nonprofit research and resource development organization. The study by Christian Community Inc. had a major impact in the…

  7. The birds, the bees, and the Bible: single African American mothers' perceptions of a faith-based sexuality educaton program.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Judith Bacchus

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined single mothers' ideas on the development of a faith-based sexuality program. Twenty African American single mothers with adolescent children (11 to 13 years of age) who were of the same faith and members of one church, participated in two focus groups about how a faith-based sexuality program could be designed and implemented. The findings call attention to the need for research on the design of faith-based sexuality education programs for ethnic minority families headed by single mothers.

  8. A Contextualized Approach to Faith-Based HIV Risk Reduction for African American Women.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jennifer M; Rogers, Christopher K; Bellinger, Dawn; Thompson, Keitra

    2016-07-01

    HIV/AIDS has a devastating impact on African Americans, particularly women and young adults. We sought to characterize risks, barriers, and content and delivery needs for a faith-based intervention to reduce HIV risk among African American women ages 18 to 25. In a convergent parallel mixed methods study, we conducted four focus groups (n = 38) and surveyed 71 young adult women. Data were collected across four African American churches for a total of 109 participants. We found the majority of women in this sample were engaged in behaviors that put them at risk for contracting HIV, struggled with religiously based barriers and matters of sexuality, and had a desire to incorporate their intimate relationships, parenting, and financial burdens into faith-based HIV risk-reduction interventions. Incorporating additional social context-related factors into HIV risk-reduction interventions for young African American women is critical to adapting and developing HIV interventions to reduce risk among young adult women in faith settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Faith-based aid, globalisation and the humanitarian frontline: an analysis of Western-based Muslim aid organisations.

    PubMed

    De Cordier, Bruno

    2009-10-01

    This paper focuses on the emergence and modus operandi of Muslim faith-based aid organisations from the West, particularly those from the United Kingdom. Through case studies of Islamic Relief Worldwide and Muslim Hands, it examines the actual and potential added value generated by these humanitarian players in Muslim-majority contexts at times when aid actors from or associated with the West are being perceived by some as instrumental to the political agendas of Western powers, or are being confronted with the consequences thereof. The study analyses Muslim faith-based aid organisations' transnational networks, their implementing partnerships with local faith-based non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and their security position within and their access to insecure contexts, drawing on field examples and opinion from Central Asia, Iraq and Pakistan. It thereby argues that there is ground for an expansion of the role of Muslim aid actors, because of the existence of social and political realities in the field that cannot be always effectively tackled by the dominant international development approaches.

  10. 75 FR 6033 - Public Meeting of the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: A notice was published in the Federal... has been cancelled in its entirety. We will publish a new notice when the meeting has been rescheduled. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mara Vanderslice, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood...

  11. Shared Use of Physical Activity Facilities Among North Carolina Faith Communities, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Michael B.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Stein, Anna; Kanters, Michael A.; Sherman, Danielle Marie; Rhew, Lori K.; Stallings, Willona Marie; Bowen, Sarah K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Shared use of recreational facilities is a promising strategy for increasing access to places for physical activity. Little is known about shared use in faith-based settings. This study examined shared use practices and barriers in faith communities in North Carolina. Methods Faith communities in North Carolina (n = 234) completed an online survey (October–December 2013) designed to provide information about the extent and nature of shared use of recreational facilities. We used binary logistic regression to examine differences between congregations that shared use and those that did not share use. Results Most of the faith communities (82.9%) that completed the survey indicated that they share their facilities with outside individuals and organizations. Formal agreements were more common when faith communities shared indoor spaces such as gymnasiums and classroom meeting spaces than when they shared outdoor spaces such as playgrounds or athletic fields. Faith communities in the wealthiest counties were more likely to share their spaces than were faith communities in poorer counties. Faith communities in counties with the best health rankings were more likely to share facilities than faith communities in counties that had lower health rankings. The most frequently cited reasons faith communities did not share their facilities were that they did not know how to initiate the process of sharing their facilities or that no outside groups had ever asked. Conclusion Most faith communities shared their facilities for physical activity. Research is needed on the relationship between shared use and physical activity levels, including the effect of formalizing shared-use policies. PMID:28152362

  12. Shared Use of Physical Activity Facilities Among North Carolina Faith Communities, 2013.

    PubMed

    Hardison-Moody, Annie; Edwards, Michael B; Bocarro, Jason N; Stein, Anna; Kanters, Michael A; Sherman, Danielle Marie; Rhew, Lori K; Stallings, Willona Marie; Bowen, Sarah K

    2017-02-02

    Shared use of recreational facilities is a promising strategy for increasing access to places for physical activity. Little is known about shared use in faith-based settings. This study examined shared use practices and barriers in faith communities in North Carolina. Faith communities in North Carolina (n = 234) completed an online survey (October-December 2013) designed to provide information about the extent and nature of shared use of recreational facilities. We used binary logistic regression to examine differences between congregations that shared use and those that did not share use. Most of the faith communities (82.9%) that completed the survey indicated that they share their facilities with outside individuals and organizations. Formal agreements were more common when faith communities shared indoor spaces such as gymnasiums and classroom meeting spaces than when they shared outdoor spaces such as playgrounds or athletic fields. Faith communities in the wealthiest counties were more likely to share their spaces than were faith communities in poorer counties. Faith communities in counties with the best health rankings were more likely to share facilities than faith communities in counties that had lower health rankings. The most frequently cited reasons faith communities did not share their facilities were that they did not know how to initiate the process of sharing their facilities or that no outside groups had ever asked. Most faith communities shared their facilities for physical activity. Research is needed on the relationship between shared use and physical activity levels, including the effect of formalizing shared-use policies.

  13. The impact of length of stay on recovery measures in faith-based addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Mary

    2018-03-30

    To determine the impact of length of stay among homeless men in faith-based residential addictions recovery on physical activity, depression, self-esteem, and nicotine dependence. A time series design was utilized to measure changes in the four quality measures at program entry and at 3, 6, and 9 months following admission. The sample consisted of 175 homeless residents enrolled in a faith-based residential recovery program. Paired t tests were used to determine the change in average instrument response from admission to each follow-up period. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey posthoc tests were used to assess for differences in length of stay between demographic variables. Statistically significant improvements were noted in self-esteem and depressive symptomatology at 3 and 6 months following admission and in physical activity levels at 3 months following admission. Nicotine dependence scores declined at 3 and 6 months but were not statistically significant. Time spent in this faith-based spiritual recovery program had a significant impact on depression, self-esteem, and physical activity. Recommendations for future study include conducting research to analyze the relationship between distinct program elements and quality indicators and comparing faith-based programs to other similar programs and to publicly funded secular recovery programs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Opening up their doors: perspectives on the involvement of the African American faith community in HIV prevention in four communities.

    PubMed

    Wooster, Joanna; Eshel, Ariela; Moore, Andrea; Mishra, Meenoo; Toledo, Carlos; Uhl, Gary; Aguero, Linda Wright-De

    2011-09-01

    In 1998, the U.S. government launched the Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) to address growing ethnic and racial disparities in HIV/AIDS cases. The CDC performed an evaluation of its MAI-funded programs, including an assessment of community stakeholders' perspective on the involvement of the faith community in HIV prevention. Individual interviews (N = 113) were conducted annually over 3 years in four communities. The majority of participants described a change in faith community's attitudes toward HIV and a rise in HIV-related activities conducted by faith-based organizations. Participants attributed changes to faith-based funding, acknowledgment by African American community leadership that HIV is a serious health issue, and faith leaders' desire to become more educated on HIV/AIDS. Participants reported conservative faith doctrine and stigma as barriers to faith community involvement. The findings suggest that although barriers remain, there is an increased willingness to address HIV/AIDS, and the faith community serves as a vital resource in HIV prevention.

  15. Building Nehemiah's Wall: The North Minneapolis Faith Community's Role in the Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Jeannette L; Spencer, Rachael A; Lynch, Alice O; Clark, Cari Jo

    2016-12-01

    African American women who are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) often rely on faith when exposed to IPV; however, the role of the faith community in the lives of IPV victims is less clear. This study uses a community-based approach to examine the role of the faith community in addressing IPV in heterosexual relationships in North Minneapolis where rates of poverty and IPV among African Americans are disproportionately high compared to other cities in Minnesota. Five focus group discussions (FGDs) were held with 34 lay and secular leaders of mixed genders in the North Minneapolis community. FGDs were evaluated using a grounded theory method of analysis. Discussions revealed that some faith leaders effectively identified IPV as a community issue and intervened but that many remained silent or were not well trained to address the issue safely. Faith-based solutions were identified to address IPV in the African American community and included the faith community speaking openly about IPV, developing programs for unmarried and adolescent couples, and coordinating services with secular IPV support organizations.

  16. Developing FAITHH: Methods to Develop a Faith-Based HIV Stigma-Reduction Intervention in the Rural South.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Erin L P; Sutton, Madeline Y; Cooks, Eric; Washington-Ball, Brittney; Gaul, Zaneta; Gaskins, Susan; Payne-Foster, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects Blacks/African Americans, particularly those residing in the southern United States. HIV-related stigma adversely affects strategies to successfully engage people in HIV education, prevention, and care. Interventions targeting stigma reduction are vital as additional tools to move toward improved outcomes with HIV prevention and care, consistent with national goals. Faith institutions in the South have been understudied as partners in HIV stigma-reduction efforts, and some at-risk, Black/African American communities are involved with southern faith institutions. We describe the collaborative effort with rural, southern faith leaders from various denominations to develop and pilot test Project Faith-based Anti-stigma Initiative Towards Healing HIV/AIDS (FAITHH), an HIV stigma-reduction intervention that built on strategies previously used with other nonrural, Black/African American faith communities. The eight-module intervention included educational materials, myth-busting exercises to increase accurate HIV knowledge, role-playing, activities to confront stigma, and opportunities to develop and practice delivering a sermon about HIV that included scripture-based content and guidance. Engaging faith leaders facilitated the successful tailoring of the intervention, and congregation members were willing participants in the research process in support of increased HIV awareness, prevention, and care.

  17. 24 CFR 3400.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... NMLSR § 3400.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. HUD or any organization serving as...-faith action or omission of any officer or employee of any such entity, while acting within the scope of...

  18. 24 CFR 3400.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... NMLSR § 3400.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. HUD or any organization serving as...-faith action or omission of any officer or employee of any such entity, while acting within the scope of...

  19. 24 CFR 3400.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... NMLSR § 3400.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. HUD or any organization serving as...-faith action or omission of any officer or employee of any such entity, while acting within the scope of...

  20. Institutionalizing Faith-Based Management Education in a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teehankee, Benito

    2012-01-01

    De La Salle University started in the Philippines as a Catholic school of business in 1911 through the initiative of Archbishop Harty of Manila. Its faith-based orientation gave way to a more secular one in the following decades as it adopted the more scientific and technical approaches of Western business schools. Recent changes in the…

  1. Engaging Stakeholders in Generating Solutions to Address Enrollment Decline in an Urban Faith-Based Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Monica B.

    2014-01-01

    The United States has a tradition of faith-based K-12 education that can be traced back to the 1600s. This sector of education has played a vital role in America's urban communities. Faith-based schools have a strong record of serving disadvantaged families. They provide moral grounding, community ethic, safe and structured environment, academic…

  2. Faith in Their Futures: The Youth and Congregations in Partnership Program of the Kings County (Brooklyn, NY) District Attorney's Office. National Faith-Based Initiative Field Report Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Davie, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Why would a law-and-order district attorney in one of the toughest, most crime-prone areas in the nation develop a faith-based alternative to incarceration for youthful offenders? District Attorney Charles J. Hynes credits his faith and a strong conviction that society can't prison-build its way out of the crime problem. Hynes established Youth…

  3. Controversies in faith and health care.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The poetics of mourning and faith-based intervention in maladaptive grieving processes in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Jeylan Wolyie

    2018-08-01

    The paper is an inquiry into the poetics of mourning and faith-based intervention in maladaptive grieving processes in Ethiopia. The paper discusses the ways that loss is signified and analyzes the meanings of ethnocultural and psychospiritual practices employed to deal with maladaptive grief processes and their psychological and emotional after-effects. Hermeneutics provided the methodological framework and informed the analysis. The thesis of the paper is that the poetics of mourning and faith-based social interventions are interactionally based meaning making processes. The paper indicates the limitations of the study and their implications for further inquiry.

  5. HIV/AIDS prevention, faith, and spirituality among black/African American and Latino communities in the United States: strengthening scientific faith-based efforts to shift the course of the epidemic and reduce HIV-related health disparities.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Madeline Y; Parks, Carolyn P

    2013-06-01

    Black/African American and Latino communities are disproportionately affected by the domestic HIV/AIDS epidemic. Blacks/African Americans and Latinos are also more likely to report a formal, religious, or faith affiliation when compared with non-Hispanic whites. As such, faith leaders and their institutions have been identified in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy as having a vital role to serve in reducing: (1) HIV-related health disparities and (2) the number of new HIV infections by promoting non-judgmental support for persons living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS and by serving as trusted information resources for their congregants and communities. We describe faith doctrines and faith-science partnerships that are increasing in support of faith-based HIV prevention and service delivery activities and discuss the vital role of these faith-based efforts in highly affected black/African American and Latino communities.

  6. Promoting Policy and Environmental Change in Faith-Based Organizations: Description and Findings From a Mini-Grants Program.

    PubMed

    Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob; Hermstad, April; Flemming, Shauna St Clair; Honeycutt, Sally; Carvalho, Michelle L; Cherry, Sabrina T; Davis, Tamara; Frazier, Sheritta; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C

    2017-05-01

    The Emory Prevention Research Center's Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network mini-grant program funded faith-based organizations to implement policy and environmental change to promote healthy eating and physical activity in rural South Georgia. This study describes the existing health promotion environment and its relationship to church member behavior. Cross-sectional. Data were obtained from parishioners of six churches in predominantly rural South Georgia. Participants were 319 church members with average age of 48 years, of whom 80% were female and 84% were black/African-American. Questionnaires assessed perceptions of the existing church health promotion environment relative to nutrition and physical activity, eating behavior and intention to use physical activity facilities at church, and eating and physical activity behaviors outside of church. Multiple regression and ordinal logistic regression using generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustered data. Results indicate that delivering messages via sermons and church bulletins, having healthy eating programs, and serving healthy foods are associated with participants' self-reported consumption of healthy foods at church (all p values ≤ .001). Serving more healthy food and less unhealthy food was associated with healthier eating in general but not to physical activity in general (p values ≤ .001). The church environment may play an important role in supporting healthy eating in this setting and more generally.

  7. Faith Development in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulik, Richard N.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces the faith development paradigm of James Fowler, describing six stages of faith development: intuitive-projective faith, mythic-literal faith, synthetic-conventional faith, individuating-reflective faith, conjunctive faith, and universalizing faith. Reviews one research project in which Fowler's paradigm was applied to older adults.…

  8. Assessing Intermediate Outcomes of a Faith-Based Residential Prisoner Reentry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Caterina G.; Wolff, Ashley; Correa, Vanessa; Buck, Janeen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined intermediate outcomes of a faith-based prisoner reentry program by assessing how client spirituality related to client- and program-level characteristics, investigating differences between completers and terminators, and examining how religious preference, religiosity/spirituality, religious salience, and…

  9. The FAITH Trial: Baseline Characteristics of a Church-based Trial to Improve Blood Pressure Control in Blacks.

    PubMed

    Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Lancaster, Kristie; Midberry, Sara; Nulty, Matthew; Ige, Elizabeth; Palfrey, Amy; Kumar, Niketa; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2015-08-07

    To describe the baseline characteristics of participants in the Faith-based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension (FAITH) Trial. FAITH evaluates the effectiveness of a faith-based lifestyle intervention vs health education control on blood pressure (BP) reduction among hypertensive Black adults. Participants included 373 members of 32 Black churches in New York City. Baseline data collected included participant demographic characteristics, clinical measures (eg, blood pressure), behaviors (eg, diet, physical activity), and psychosocial factors (eg, self-efficacy, depressive symptoms). Participants had a mean age of 63.4 ± 11.9 years and 76% were female. About half completed at least some college (53%), 66% had an income ≥$20,000, and 42.2% were retired or on disability. Participants had a mean systolic and diastolic BP of 152.1 ± 16.8 mm Hg and 86.2 ± 12.2 mm Hg, respectively, and a mean BMI of 32 kg/m2. Hypertension (HTN) medications were taken by 95% of participants, but most (79.1%) reported non-adherence to their regimen. Participants reported consuming 3.4 ± 2.6 servings of fruits and vegetables and received 30.9% of their energy from fat. About one-third (35.9%) reported a low activity level. Participants in the FAITH trial exhibited several adverse clinical and behavioral characteristics at baseline. Future analyses will evaluate the effectiveness of the faith-based lifestyle intervention on changes in BP and lifestyle behaviors among hypertensive Black adults.

  10. Apostolic faith church organization contexts for health and wellbeing in women and children.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Elias; Dune, Tinashe Moira; Hallfors, Denise Dion; Mapfumo, John; Mutepfa, Magen Mhaka; January, James

    2011-12-01

    The study explored contexts for health and wellbeing for women and children influenced by the structural behavior of an Apostolic faith church organization in Zimbabwe. Twenty-three purposively selected members of an African indigenous Apostolic church (males = 12; females = 11; age range 22-95 years) were informants to a focus group discussion session. They provided data on the institutional behaviors that were culturally-historically embedded in the organization's activities. Data were analyzed thematically and using cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) to foreground essential themes. The church organization provided social capital to support health and wellbeing in members. However, the culturally embedded practices to minimize decision making by women and child members potentially compromised their health and wellbeing. The findings suggest that the structural activities of the church for health and wellbeing could also have the paradoxical effect of exposing women and children to health risks from obligatory roles.

  11. Giving Christian Universities a Scarlet Letter: Examining the Canadian Association of University Teachers' Opposition to Faith-Based Hiring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008 the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) has launched investigations into five Canadian faith-based universities to determine if they violate CAUT's particular understanding of academic freedom. The source of the violation concerns the universities' faith-based hiring requirements, which CAUT maintains violates the…

  12. Hot-Spots and Holiness: Faith-Based Topics in Freshman Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Jan

    For an instructor of freshman composition at the University of Michigan at Flint, faith-based writing topics offer particular challenges and sometimes intersect in troubling ways with her own prejudices and personal history as a teacher and as a person. But if handled correctly, she believes that a teacher's interaction with students about…

  13. Faith communities and their assets for health promotion: the views from health professionals and faith leaders in Dundee, in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Donna M; Kiger, Alice; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-06-01

    Within the European Union, as well as in Canada and the United States (US), health promoters employ a number of strategies to encourage community-based health improvements. This involves the creation of innovative health promotion partnerships to support and enable people to choose and engage in healthy living practices. Compared to the US, in other Western countries, such as the United Kingdom, faith communities have largely been ignored in health promotion partnerships. This study established existing evidence about health promotion in faith communities in Scotland by examining the perceptions and attitudes concerning health promotion among faith leaders and health promotion professionals. We conducted 33 semi-structured interviews with health promotion professionals (n = 9) and representatives of Christian and non-Christian faith communities (n = 24). The majority of participants expressed an interest in the concept of health promotion in a faith community and could readily envision its application in their area of work. Both groups identified multiple physical assets, as well as social supports within faith communities that could be directed towards healthy living activities. Faith groups and church organisations may constitute potential partners and new settings to increase community capacity for health promotion. Further research and funding for demonstration projects may be particularly helpful to provide evidence of the strengths and limitations of faith-based health promotion in Scotland, which in turn could inform health promotion practice and policy.

  14. Understanding the roles of faith-based health-care providers in Africa: review of the evidence with a focus on magnitude, reach, cost, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jill; Tsimpo, Clarence; Gemignani, Regina; Shojo, Mari; Coulombe, Harold; Dimmock, Frank; Nguyen, Minh Cong; Hines, Harrison; Mills, Edward J; Dieleman, Joseph L; Haakenstad, Annie; Wodon, Quentin

    2015-10-31

    At a time when many countries might not achieve the health targets of the Millennium Development Goals and the post-2015 agenda for sustainable development is being negotiated, the contribution of faith-based health-care providers is potentially crucial. For better partnership to be achieved and for health systems to be strengthened by the alignment of faith-based health-providers with national systems and priorities, improved information is needed at all levels. Comparisons of basic factors (such as magnitude, reach to poor people, cost to patients, modes of financing, and satisfaction of patients with the services received) within faith-based health-providers and national systems show some differences. As the first report in the Series on faith-based health care, we review a broad body of published work and introduce some empirical evidence on the role of faith-based health-care providers, with a focus on Christian faith-based health providers in sub-Saharan Africa (on which the most detailed documentation has been gathered). The restricted and diverse evidence reported supports the idea that faith-based health providers continue to play a part in health provision, especially in fragile health systems, and the subsequent reports in this Series review controversies in faith-based health care and recommendations for how public and faith sectors might collaborate more effectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Finding our Place: Making the Connection Toward Faith Integration.

    PubMed

    Astle, Barbara; Gibson, Deborah

    At the onset, the unfamiliarity of faith integration for nurse educators working within a faith-based university can be challenging. Two nurse educators describe the process they took to learn and navigate faith integration, while teaching undergraduate nursing students. Over the course of one year, various approaches toward faith integration with students were implemented, leading to an authentic relational interconnectedness.

  16. Development of the Faith Activities in the Home Scale (FAITHS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Nathaniel M.; Dollahite, David C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the development of the Faith Activities In The Home Scale (FAITHS). The initial FAITHS measure was improved on and expanded by using qualitative data of two separate samples and then empirically tested on three separate samples. Study 1 comprised two samples totaling 57 highly religious families from New England and California…

  17. Attempts to avoid NEPA: Is it bad faith?

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckfield, D.J.

    1995-12-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) imposes procedural requirements on federal agencies that undertake {open_quotes}major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.{close_quotes} Determining whether a project is a major federal action, subject to NEPA, is not always an easy task. When a determination is made that a project is not subject to NEPA, opponents of the project and environmental organizations occasionally cry foul. Often there are allegations that the federal agency of the project proponent (or both) acted in bad faith to avoid NEPA. The question of whether bad faith is relevant in NEPA inquiries has beenmore » the subject litigation for many of years. In that time, courts have addressed a number of bad faith questions. A common question is whether it is appropriate for a non-federal project proponent to structure a project to maintain eligibility for federal funding, but at the last minute withdraw the project from eligibility for the sole purpose of avoiding NEPA. More difficult questions arise when the federal government allocates some federal money to the project for preliminary design work before the project is withdrawn from eligibility for additional federal construction funds. Still other questions arise with respect to whether project proponents must reimburse the federal government for funds allocated to a project before the determination is made that it will not be a federal project. This paper will trace the evolution of the courts` struggle with bad faith NEPA claims. It will then show how courts have recently begun to develop a workable and appropriate test for determining when bad faith is an issue in NEPA litigation. This issue is important for project proponents and federal agency officials so they will not unwittingly take steps others might construe as bad faith. It is important for members of environmental organizations so they may recognize and properly assert bad faith claims when

  18. Testing for Turkeys Faith-Based Community HIV Testing Initiative: An Update.

    PubMed

    DeGrezia, Mary; Baker, Dorcas; McDowell, Ingrid

    2018-06-04

    Testing for Turkeys (TFT) HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing initiative is a joint effort between Older Women Embracing Life (OWEL), Inc., a nonprofit faith-based community HIV support and advocacy organization; the Johns Hopkins University Regional Partner MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center (MAAETC); and the University of Maryland, Baltimore JACQUES Initiative (JI), and is now in its 11th year of providing HIV outreach, testing, and linkage to care. Since 2008, the annual TFT daylong community HIV testing and linkage to care initiative has been held 2 weeks before Thanksgiving at a faith-based center in Baltimore, Maryland, in a zip code where one in 26 adults and adolescents ages 13 years and older are living with HIV (Maryland Department of Health, Center for HIV Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Evaluation, 2017). TFT includes a health fair with vendors that supply an abundance of education information (handouts, videos, one-on-one counseling) and safer sex necessities, including male and female condoms, dental dams, and lube. Nutritious boxed lunches and beverages are provided to all attendees and volunteers. Everyone tested for HIV who stays to obtain their results is given a free frozen turkey as they exit. The Baltimore City Health Department is on hand with a confidential no-test list (persons in the state already known to have HIV) to diminish retesting of individuals previously diagnosed with HIV. However, linkage to care is available to everyone: newly diagnosed individuals and those previously diagnosed and currently out of care. Copyright © 2018 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Faith: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan Macleod

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports a concept analysis of faith. There are numerous scholars who consider spirituality and religiosity as they relate to health and nursing. Faith is often implied as linked to these concepts but deserves distinct exploration. In addition, as nursing practice conducted within communities of faith continues to emerge, concept clarification of faith is warranted. Qualitative analysis deliberately considered the concept of faith within the lens of Margaret Newman's health as expanding consciousness. Data sources used included a secondary analysis of stories collected within a study conducted in 2008, two specific reconstructed stories, the identification of attributes noted within these various stories and selected philosophical literature from 1950 to 2009.  A definition was identified from the analysis; faith is an evolving pattern of believing, that grounds and guides authentic living and gives meaning in the present moment of inter-relating. Four key attributes of faith were also identified as focusing on beliefs, foundational meaning for life, living authentically in accordance with beliefs, and interrelating with self, others and/or Divine. Although a seemingly universal concept, faith was defined individually. Faith appeared to be broader than spiritual practices and religious ritual and became the very foundation that enabled human beings to make sense of their world and circumstances. More work is needed to understand how faith community nursing can expand the traditional understanding of denominationally defined faith community practices and how nurses can support faith for individuals with whom they encounter within all nursing practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Qualifying Sociopolitical Consciousness: Complicating Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Faith-Based Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallavis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and faith-based schooling. The author presents a portion of a larger ethnographic research project conducted at a Catholic elementary school that serves a predominantly Latino population in urban Chicago. This work contributes to theories of culturally responsive education by…

  1. "Can One Put Faith and Work in the Same Sentence?" Faith Development and Vocation of a Female Leader in the Engineering Profession.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Claude-Hélène; Viviers, Rian

    2018-06-01

    Faith has been pointed out as a possible resource in strengthening individuals' health and well-being at work. The aim of this article is to gain in-depth knowledge of the faith development and vocation of a selected female leader in a male-dominated work context. The article contributes to research on faith development in women leaders, based on Fowler's faith development theory. This is a single case study grounded in a qualitative research design. In-depth qualitative data were gathered through observation and interviews over 18 months. Findings showed the development of faith across a women leader's life span and highlight that faith and vocation are important resources that provide strength, meaningfulness and a vision.

  2. Can Positive Faith-Based Encounters Influence Australian Young People's Drinking Behaviours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, Alison; Whitehead, Dean; Ullah, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Alcohol-related accidents and injuries occur disproportionately within young people--especially when gathering at social events. This study represents a partnership between a faith-based group of volunteers specifically trained to counsel and support young people to reduce their risk of alcohol-related harm, Adelaide City Council, and the…

  3. Teachers and Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that faith and vocation play in teaching. Faith can lead to a sense of calling that impacts the identity and integrity of the teacher, which, in turn, influences the holistic development of students. Therefore, teachers of faith who respect the limits of religious belief in public schools are essential contributors to…

  4. Critical Consciousness and the Christian Conscience: Making the Necessary Connections between Faith-Based Learning and Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heekap; Givens, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Critical pedagogy is a by product of postmodernism, which argues that reality is always subjective, and truth is identified through each person's experiences and environment. Can critical pedagogy be applied to faith-based education? The authors claim that it can. First, the theories and practices of critical pedagogy have strengthened faith-based…

  5. Faith-Based Human Services Initiatives: Considerations for Social Work Practice and Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangenberg, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    Faith-based human services initiatives present numerous challenges to professional social work. This article explores ways a theoretical integration of ecosystems and structuration perspectives may help social workers navigate complex ideological and practical implications of changing service delivery policies. The article highlights diversity…

  6. Science, Practitioners and Faith Communities: using TEK and Faith Knowledge to address climate issues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, K.

    2017-12-01

    Worldview, Lifeway and Science - Communities that are tied to the land or water for their livelihood, and for whom subsistence guides their cultural lifeway, have knowledges that inform their interactions with the environment. These frameworks, sometimes called Traditional Ecological Knowledges (TEK), are based on generations of observations made and shared within lived life-environmental systems, and are tied to practitioners' broader worldviews. Subsistence communities, including Native American tribes, are well aware of the crises caused by climate change impacts. These communities are working on ways to integrate knowledge from their ancient ways with current observations and methods from Western science to implement appropriate adaptation and resilience measures. In the delta region of south Louisiana, the communities hold worldviews that blend TEK, climate science and faith-derived concepts. It is not incongruent for the communities to intertwine conversations from complex and diverse sources, including the academy, to inform their adaptation measures and their imagined solutions. Drawing on over twenty years of work with local communities, science organizations and faith institutions of the lower bayou region of Louisiana, the presenter will address the complexity of traditional communities' work with diverse sources of knowledge to guide local decision-making and to assist outside partners to more effectively address challenges associated with climate change.

  7. An Innovative Role for Faith Community Nursing: Palliative Care Ministry.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Judy C

    Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities.

  8. Common Ground with "A Common Faith": Dewey's Idea of the "Religious"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    In "A Common Faith", Dewey rejects organized religion and belief in the supernatural, instead arguing for an authentically "religious" attitude which this interpretive essay analyzes in terms of four propositions: (1) Knowledge is unified. (2) Knowledge is democratic. (3) The pursuit of moral ideals requires moral faith. (4) The authority for…

  9. Do Faith Communities Have a Role in Addressing Childhood Obesity?

    PubMed

    Opalinski, Andra; Dyess, Susan; Grooper, Sareen

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a multifaceted phenomenon. A partnership with faith-based communities to address the issue has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural beliefs of faith community leaders regarding childhood obesity and to examine attitudes about their role in addressing the issue. A qualitative descriptive design informed by ethnographic methods and triangulation of multiple data sources was utilized to assess the cultural beliefs of faith community leaders. A purposive sample of 13 leaders (nine females, four males) from seven multicultural and multigenerational local faith communities participated in the study. No more than three participants from any one faith community were enrolled in the study. Twenty-first century lifestyle challenges, accountability of behaviors (a dichotomy that fluctuated between individual responsibility to community and/or social responsibility), and the need for intentionality emerged as themes from the data. Faith community leaders envisioned a role for faith communities in addressing childhood obesity. Findings support the ongoing development of population based health promotion programs through faith community engagement. The findings provide a foundation for nurses partnering with faith communities on health promotion programs targeting childhood obesity to address family health issues in a holistic way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A comparison on inclusive practices for children with special needs in faith-based kindergartens in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yue Sum Sharon; Zhang, Kaili Chen

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine the inclusive practices implemented in three faith-based kindergartens in Hong Kong. A questionnaire was used to collect information about school backgrounds, students' special needs, teacher training, special education services, curriculum design, school policy, parental involvement, and challenges faced by these schools when implementing their inclusive practices. The primary focus of this study was the influence of faiths on the provision of inclusive services for children with special needs. The results indicated that faiths, along with other factors, have played a significant role in contributing to the inclusive education services provided to children in these schools.

  11. Removing obstacles one patient at a time: the importance of faith based health care in the community.

    PubMed

    Fortson, Nedra S; Dennis, Ursula; Kimsey, Troy

    2012-05-01

    Samaritan Clinic, a faith-based, safety-net clinic in Albany, Georgia is an outreach ministry of Mt. Zion and Second Mt. Zion Baptist Church. Through volunteerism, Samaritan Clinic has served 3,335 patients representing 7,092 visits; this is a story of faith made possible by a grant to Samaritan Clinic from Morehouse School of Medicine.

  12. A rural Appalachian faith-placed smoking cessation intervention.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Bundy, Henry E; Baeker Bispo, Jordan A; Studts, Christina R; Shelton, Brent J; Fields, Nell

    2015-04-01

    Although health promotion programming in faith institutions is promising, most faith-based or placed health projects focus on diet, exercise, or cancer screening and many have been located in urban environments. This article addresses the notable absence of faith programming for smoking cessation among underserved rural US residents who experience tobacco-related health inequities. In this article, we describe our faith-oriented smoking cessation program in rural Appalachia, involving 590 smokers in 26 rural churches randomized to early and delayed intervention groups. We present three main themes that account for participants' positive evaluation of the program; the program's ability to leverage social connections; the program's convenience orientation; and the program's financial support for smoking cessation. We also present themes on the roles of faith and church in smoking cessation programming, including some mixed perceptions on smoking stigma and comfort in church settings; challenges in faith-placed smoking cessation recruitment; and the positive perception of such programming by church leaders. We conclude that faith-placed smoking cessation programs offer great potential, although they must be administered with great sensitivity to individual and community norms.

  13. Views of Somali women and men on the use of faith-based messages promoting breast and cervical cancer screening for Somali women: a focus-group study.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Rebekah; Mohamed, Sharif; Dirie, Wali; Ahmed, Nimo; VanKeulen, Michael; Ahmed, Huda; Raymond, Nancy; Okuyemi, Kola

    2017-03-20

    Screening rates for breast and cervical cancer for Muslim women in the United States are low, particularly for first-generation immigrants. Interpretations of the Muslim faith represent some of the barriers for breast and cervical cancer screening. Working to understand how faith influences breast and cervical screening for Somali women, and working with the community to identify and utilize faith-based assets for promoting screening, may lead to life-saving changes in screening behaviors. We partnered with an Imam to develop faith-based messages addressing the concerns of modesty and predetermination and promoting cancer testing and screening. A total of five focus groups were convened, with 34 Somali women (three groups) and 20 Somali men (two groups). Each focus group first discussed participant views of breast and cervical cancer screening in general and then viewed and discussed video clips of the Imam delivering the faith-based messages. Both Somali women and men had an overwhelmingly positive response to the faith-based messages promoting breast and cervical cancer screening. The faith-based messages appeared to reinforce the views of those who were already inclined to see screening positively, with participants describing increased confidence to engage in screening. For those who had reservations about screening, there was feedback that the faith-based messages had meaningfully influenced their views. Somali immigrant women and men found faith-based messages addressing topics of predestination and modesty and encouraging the use of screening and treatment to be both acceptable and influential. Faith can play an important role as an asset to promote breast and cervical cancer screening, and there may be substantial benefits to adding faith-based messaging to other interventions that focus on improving screening uptake. This may help to address health disparities for Somali women in this area.

  14. A Phenomenographical Study of the Enlighten Foundation Learning Program for Faith-Based Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Anne Higginbotham

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and chart the qualitatively different ways Christian faith-based women make meaning of and understand the learning intervention of The Enlighten Foundation's Learning Program. Research supports the use of an interactive, experienced-based learning program as conducive to developmental change for women.…

  15. The Evidence Base on the Effects of Policy and Practice in Faith Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettinger, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses some of the common assertions made in the public debate about the merits and disadvantages of faith schools and tests them against actual research findings. It argues that there is a growing body of evidence showing that current policy and practice in faith schools creates social division and that faith schools need to do…

  16. Differences in Mental Health for Sexual Minority Students at Faith-Based Colleges/Universities and in the General College/University Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Jamal R.

    2017-01-01

    The present study is an examination of mental health between lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning students at faith based colleges/universities (FBCU) and the general college/university population (GCUP), which includes mostly non-faith based colleges/universities (NFBCU) as well as some FBCU. Current literature on this topic is sparse.…

  17. The role of internalized homonegativity in the faith and psychological health of lesbians.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Dane R; de St Aubin, Ed; Skerven, Kim

    2017-10-02

    Among lesbians, faith-based beliefs and behaviors may be associated with negative psychological health due to the interplay between religious and sexual identities. The present study examined health outcomes, faith-based beliefs (views of God as loving and controlling), faith-based behaviors (personal spiritual practices, religious activities), and internalized homonegativity in a sample of 225 self-identified lesbians. We hypothesized that internalized homonegativity would moderate the relationship between health outcomes and faith-based beliefs and behaviors among lesbians. Generally, results indicated that some faith-based beliefs and behaviors were related to negative health outcomes among lesbians with higher levels of internalized homonegativity, but among those with lower levels of internalized homonegativity, the negative associations with health were mitigated.

  18. A Rural Appalachian Faith-Placed Smoking Cessation Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Bundy, Henry E.; Baeker Bispo, Jordan A.; Studts, Christina R.; Shelton, Brent J.; Fields, Nell

    2014-01-01

    Although health promotion programming in faith institutions is promising, most faith-based or placed health projects focus on diet, exercise, or cancer screening and many have been located in urban environments. This article addresses the notable absence of faith programming for smoking cessation among underserved rural US residents who experience tobacco-related health inequities. In this article, we describe our faith-oriented smoking cessation program in rural Appalachia, involving 590 smokers in 26 rural churches randomized to early and delayed intervention groups. We present three main themes that account for participants’ positive evaluation of the program; the program’s ability to leverage social connections; the program’s convenience orientation; and the program’s financial support for smoking cessation. We also present themes on the roles of faith and church in smoking cessation programming, including some mixed perceptions on smoking stigma and comfort in church settings; challenges in faith-placed smoking cessation recruitment; and the positive perception of such programming by church leaders. We conclude that faith-placed smoking cessation program offer great potential, although they must be administered with great sensitivity to individual and community norms. PMID:24691565

  19. Public Support for Faith-Based Correctional Programs: Should Sacred Places Serve Civic Purposes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Francis T.; Pealer, Jennifer A.; Santana, Shannon A.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Applegate, Brandon K.; Blevins, Kristie R.

    2007-01-01

    In light of President Bush's enthusiastic support and numerous initiatives, there is a growing call to fund "faith-based" social service programs, including those focused on juvenile and adult offenders. These programs are controversial because they seek to reconfigure the line separating church and state. Based on a national 2001 survey of 327…

  20. End of Life in a Haitian American, Faith-Based Community: Caring for Family and Communal Unity.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Susan Charlotte; Gordon, Shirley C

    This article presents two models resulting from a grounded theory study of the end-of-life decision-making process for Haitian Americans. Successful access to this vulnerable population was achieved through the faith-based community. The first model describes this faith-based community of Haitian Americans. The second model describes the process used by families in this community who must make end-of-life healthcare decisions. Implications for nursing practice and caring science include a need to improve the congruence between the nursing care provided at this vulnerable time and the cultural values of a population.

  1. A Systematic Review of Promising Strategies of Faith-Based Cancer Education and Lifestyle Interventions Among Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups.

    PubMed

    Hou, Su-I; Cao, Xian

    2017-09-13

    Church-based interventions have been used to reach racial/ethnic minorities. In order to develop effective programs, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review of faith-based cancer prevention studies (2005~2016) to examine characteristics and promising strategies. Combination terms "church or faith-based or religion," "intervention or program," and "cancer education or lifestyle" were used in searching the five major databases: CINAHL; ERIC; Health Technology Assessments; MEDLINE; and PsycInfo. A total of 20 studies met study criteria. CDC's Community Guide was used to analyze and review group interventions. Analyses were organized by two racial groups: African American (AA) and Latino/Hispanic American groups. Results showed most studies reviewed focused on breast cancer alone or in combination with other cancers. Studies of Latino/Hispanic groups targeted more on uninsured, Medicare, or Medicaid individuals, whereas AA studies generally did not include specific insurance criteria. The sample sizes of the AA studies were generally larger. The majority of these studies reviewed used pre-post, posttest only with control group, or quasi-experience designs. The Health Belief Model was the most commonly used theory in both groups. Community-based participatory research and empowerment/ecological frameworks were also used frequently in the Latino/Hispanic studies. Small media and group education were the top two most popular intervention strategies in both groups. Although one-on-one strategy was used in some Latino studies, neither group used reducing client out-of-pocket costs strategy. Client reminders could also be used more in both groups as well. Current review showed church-based cancer education programs were effective in changing knowledge, but not always screening utilization. Results show faith-based cancer educational interventions are promising. To maximize intervention impact, future studies might consider using stronger study designs, incorporating a

  2. Teamwork in Secular and Faith-Based Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Arnold R.

    2007-01-01

    The word "teamwork" has become a favorite of corporate leaders; however, many employees view "teamwork" as a word devoid of meaning. Part of the problem is that "teamwork" has an entirely different meaning to people at various levels in an organization, and this prevents individuals and different departments within a company from moving forward…

  3. Faith in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallstrom, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Introduces Faith Smith, president of Native American Educational Services (NAES) College in Chicago. Discusses community-based and action-oriented approaches to education followed on the central campus and satellite campuses in Montana, New Mexico, Minneapolis, and Wisconsin. Reports on the range of NAES activities and programs and portrays some…

  4. Stirring up the Mud: Using a Community-Based Participatory Approach to Address Health Disparities through a Faith-Based Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Sue A.; Ruddock, Charmaine; Golub, Maxine; Davis, Joyce; Foley, Robert; Devia, Carlos; Rosen, Rosa; Berry, Carolyn; Barretto, Brenda; Carter, Toni; Irish-Spencer, Evalina; Marchena, Maria; Purcaro, Ellenrita; Calman, Neil

    2011-01-01

    This case study provides a mid-course assessment of the Bronx Health REACH faith-based initiative four years into its implementation. The study uses qualitative methods to identify lessons learned and to reflect on the benefits and challenges of using a community-based participatory approach for the development and evaluation of a faith-based program designed to address health disparities. Key findings concern the role of pastoral leadership, the importance of providing a religious context for health promotion and health equality messages, the challenges of creating a bilingual/bi-cultural program, and the need to provide management support to the lay program coordinators. The study also identifies lessons learned about community-based evaluation and the importance of addressing community concern about the balance between evaluation and program. Finally, the study identifies the challenges that lie ahead, including issues of program institution-alization and sustainability. PMID:20168022

  5. Psychological first-aid training for paraprofessionals: a systems-based model for enhancing capacity of rural emergency responses.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Perry, Charlene; Azur, Melissa; Taylor, Henry G; Bailey, Mark; Links, Jonathan M

    2011-08-01

    Ensuring the capacity of the public health, emergency preparedness system to respond to disaster-related need for mental health services is a challenge, particularly in rural areas in which the supply of responders with relevant expertise rarely matches the surge of demand for services. This investigation established and evaluated a systems-based partnership model for recruiting, training, and promoting official recognition of community residents as paraprofessional members of the Maryland Medical Professional Volunteer Corps. The partners were leaders of local health departments (LHDs), faith-based organizations (FBOs), and an academic health center (AHC). A one-group, quasi-experimental research design, using both post-test only and pre-/post-test assessments, was used to determine the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of the overall program and of a one-day workshop in Psychological First Aid (PFA) for Paraprofessionals. The training was applied to and evaluated for 178 citizens drawn from 120 Christian parishes in four local health jurisdictions in rural Maryland. Feasibility-The model was demonstrated to be practicable, as measured by specific criteria to quantify partner readiness, willingness, and ability to collaborate and accomplish project aims. Effectiveness-The majority (93-99%) of individual participants "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that, as a result of the intervention, they understood the conceptual content of PFA and were confident about ("perceived self-efficacy") using PFA techniques with prospective disaster survivors. Impact-Following PFA training, 56 of the 178 (31.5%) participants submitted same-day applications to be paraprofessional responders in the Volunteer Corps. The formal acceptance of citizens who typically do not possess licensure in a health profession reflects a project-engendered policy change by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that it is feasible to

  6. Promoting advance directives among African Americans: a faith-based model.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Karen

    2006-02-01

    Studies show that African Americans are less likely than other ethnic groups to complete advance directives. However, what influences African Americans' decisions to complete or not complete advance directives is unclear. Using a faith-based promotion model, 102 African Americans aged 55 years or older were recruited from local churches and community-based agencies to participate in a pilot study to promote advance care planning. Focus groups were used to collect data on participants' preferences for care, desire to make personal choices, values and attitudes, beliefs about death and dying, and advance directives. A standardized interview was used in the focus groups, and the data were organized and analyzed using NUDIST 4 software (QRS Software, Victoria, Australia). Three fourths of the participants refused to complete advance directives. The following factors influenced the participants' decisions about end-of-life care and completion of an advance directive: spirituality; view of suffering, death, and dying; social support networks; barriers to utilization; and mistrust of the health care system. The dissemination of information apprises individuals of their right to self-determine about their care, but educational efforts may not produce a significant change in behavior toward completion of advance care planning. Thus, ongoing efforts are needed to improve the trust that African Americans have in medical and health care providers.

  7. Through a Freirean Lens: Professional Learning, Faith-Based Schooling and Liberatory Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John Trevitt; Armstrong, Ann Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on a broader qualitative study of professional learning in schools of the Peoples of the Book (Christians, Jews and Muslims) in post-colonial Australia, addressing the role that the growing number of Australian faith-based schools play in shaping a just and inclusive Australian society. By reviewing material in the public domain,…

  8. Conflicts of Ethos: Issues of Equity and Diversity in Faith-Based Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Gerry; Norman, James

    2010-01-01

    The recent rise in the number of faith-based schools in Britain creates some interesting issues. On the one hand it is clear that the government, and certainly former Prime Minister Tony Blair, perceives such schools as contributing not only to choice and diversity but also to the raising of educational standards. This appears to be because of an…

  9. Scientists and Faith Communities in Dialogue - Finding Common Ground to Care for our Common Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    World-wide, faith communities are a key place for education and outreach to the general adult population. The sacred responsibility to care for the earth, living sustainability and concern for the poor are nearly universal priorities across faith communities. Scientists and people of faith share in common experiences of awe and wonder and ethical roles as citizens. The majority of faith communities have statements on climate changes, environmental justice, and stewardship, and respond with education, action plans and advocacy. People of faith are increasingly seeking science expertise to better understand the science and best solutions to implement. Transformation of point of view often requires heart-felt motivation (domain of religion) as well as knowledge (science). Scientists can participate in alleviating environmental justice by providing data and education to communities. Expert testimony is a critical service. Pope Francis' environmental encyclical Laudato si, engaged diverse scientists in its writing and outreach. Francis invites our continued dialogue with people of faith and goodwill of all societal sectors and fields to achieve an integral ecology that integrates science, economics, and impacts on the poor. For scientists to be most effective in sharing expertise, and building understanding and trust in scientific findings, skill- building is needed in: communication, finding common ground, intercultural competency, working with diverse populations and religious literacy. Educational initiatives bridging scientists and faith-communities will be highlighted including within: the Ecological Society of America, American Assn for Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, faith-based & Environmental Justice networks, Nature centers, Higher Education (including Seminary) Initiatives and the Hanley Sustainability Institute, and interfaith religious organizations engaged with scientists. Bridge-building and ongoing partnerships of scientists, EJ

  10. Community-based participatory research to design a faith-enhanced diabetes prevention program: The Better Me Within randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kitzman, Heather; Dodgen, Leilani; Mamun, Abdullah; Slater, J Lee; King, George; Slater, Donna; King, Alene; Mandapati, Surendra; DeHaven, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Reducing obesity positively impacts diabetes and cardiovascular risk; however, evidence-based lifestyle programs, such as the diabetes prevention program (DPP), show reduced effectiveness in African American (AA) women. In addition to an attenuated response to lifestyle programs, AA women also demonstrate high rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. To address these disparities, enhancements to evidence-based lifestyle programs for AA women need to be developed and evaluated with culturally relevant and rigorous study designs. This study describes a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to design a novel faith-enhancement to the DPP for AA women. A long-standing CBPR partnership designed the faith-enhancement from focus group data (N=64 AA adults) integrating five components: a brief pastor led sermon, memory verse, in class or take-home faith activity, promises to remember, and scripture and prayer integrated into participant curriculum and facilitator materials. The faith components were specifically linked to weekly DPP learning objectives to strategically emphasize behavioral skills with religious principles. Using a CBPR approach, the Better Me Within trial was able to enroll 12 churches, screen 333 AA women, and randomize 221 (M age =48.8±11.2; M BMI =36.7±8.4; 52% technical or high school) after collection of objective eligibility measures. A prospective, randomized, nested by church, design will be used to evaluate the faith-enhanced DPP as compared to a standard DPP on weight, diabetes and cardiovascular risk, over a 16-week intervention and 10-month follow up. This study will provide essential data to guide enhancements to evidence-based lifestyle programs for AA women who are at high risk for chronic disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A qualitative evaluation of a faith-based breast and cervical cancer screening intervention for African American women.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Alicia K; Berrios, Nerida; Darnell, Julie S; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    This article presents a formative evaluation of a CDC Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 faith-based breast and cervical cancer early detection and prevention intervention for African American women living in urban communities. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of women (N=94) recruited from each church participating in the intervention. One focus group was conducted in each of the nine participating churches following completion of the 6-month REACH 2010 intervention. Transcribed data were coded to identify relevant themes. Key findings included (a) the acceptability of receiving cancer education within the context of a faith community, (b) the importance of pastoral input, (c) the effectiveness of personal testimonies and lay health advocates, (d) the saliency of biblical scripture in reinforcing health messages, (e) the effectiveness of multimodal learning aids, and (f) the relationship between cervical cancer and social stigma. Study findings have implications for enhancing faith-based breast and cervical cancer prevention efforts in African American communities.

  12. Gendered Realities and Women's Leadership Development: Participant Voices from Faith-Based Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafreniere, Shawna L.; Longman, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    Women who seek high-level administrative leadership positions in various sectors of higher education continue to meet a variety of barriers (Eagly & Carli, 2007). These challenges are especially evident among the 105-member Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU), an association of faith-based liberal arts institutions. Seeking to…

  13. The faithful remote preparation of general quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Deng, Yun; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This paper is to establish a theoretical framework for faithful and deterministic remote state preparation, which is related to the classical Hurwitz theorem. And then based on the new theory various schemes with different characteristics are presented. Moreover, the permutation group and the partially quantum resources have also discussed for faithful schemes.

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of a Faith-Based HIV Intervention for African American Women: Importance of Enhancing Religious Social Capital

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, LaShun R.; Braxton, Nikia D.; Er, Deja L.; Conner, Anita C.; Renfro, Tiffaney L.; Rubtsova, Anna A.; Hardin, James W.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effectiveness of P4 for Women, a faith-based HIV intervention. Methods. We used a 2-arm comparative effectiveness trial involving 134 African American women aged 18 to 34 years to compare the effectiveness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–defined evidence-based Sisters Informing Sisters about Topics on AIDS (SISTA) HIV intervention with P4 for Women, an adapted faith-based version of SISTA. Participants were recruited from a large black church in Atlanta, Georgia, and completed assessments at baseline and follow-up. Results. Both SISTA and P4 for Women had statistically significant effects on this study’s primary outcome—consistent condom use in the past 90 days—as well as other sexual behaviors. However, P4 for Women also had statistically significant effects on the number of weeks women were abstinent, on all psychosocial mediators, and most noteworthy, on all measures of religious social capital. Results were achieved by enhancing structural social capital through ministry participation, religious values and norms, linking trust and by reducing negative religious coping. High intervention attendance may indicate the feasibility of conducting faith-based HIV prevention research for African American women. Conclusions. P4 for Women enhanced abstinence and safer sex practices as well as religious social capital, and was more acceptable than SISTA. Such efforts may assist faith leaders in responding to the HIV epidemic in African American women. PMID:24134367

  15. Transformational Leadership: The Nexus between Faith and Classroom Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Bobbie Ann Adair; Pearson, Kerri; Bledsoe, Christie; Hendricks, Randy

    2017-01-01

    Transformational leadership is well documented in organizational and business literature. Classroom and faith-based applications are more recent phenomena. The authors of this mixed-methods study explored professor behaviors and characteristics perceived as transformational in students' faith and focused on transformational leadership in the…

  16. Health Profiles of Allied Health Students Enrolled in a Faith-Based University.

    PubMed

    Krpalek, Dragana; Javaherian-Dysinger, Heather; Hewitt, Liane

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the health profiles of students at a faith-based university. Data were collected using a modified version of the Health Lifestyle Enhancement Profile (HELP) and HELP-Screener. Participants were 323 undergraduate and graduate allied health students, of whom 64% were female and 36% male, with ages ranging from 19 to 51 years. Associations between variables were explored and a two-step cluster analysis was applied to the data. Results showed that 34.1% of students perceived their health as excellent and 57.2% as good. It was also detected that high ratings of health were positively correlated with high ratings of happiness. Further, students who reported frequent exercise and a healthy diet scored more favorably across all measures of health in comparison to those who reported less frequent exercise and poorer dietary habits. Descriptive analysis revealed that 46.6% of students identified having at least one health problem, with back and neck pain being the most prevalent. Less than half of the study sample reported monitoring their health regularly, avoiding unhealthy foods, avoiding sedentary activities, and engaging in community activities. Considerations for future university-based interventions to support students' health at faith-based institutions are indicated.

  17. "It's Like Backing up Science with Scripture": Lessons Learned from the Implementation of HeartSmarts, a Faith-Based Cardiovascular Disease Health Education Program.

    PubMed

    Tettey, Naa-Solo; Duran, Pedro A; Andersen, Holly S; Washington, Niajee; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2016-06-01

    African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by cardiovascular disease (CVD). Faith-based institutions provide a non-traditional route for health education targeted at African-Americans. This paper describes HeartSmarts, a faith-based CVD education program. Evidence-based literature was used to develop a curriculum, which was tailored by integrating biblical scripture representing aspects of health behaviors. Eighteen church peer-educators were recruited to participate in a 12-week training. They then disseminated the faith-based curriculum to members of their congregations. There were 199 participants of which 137 provided feedback via open-ended surveys indicating that HeartSmarts was well accepted and effective for disseminating CVD health messages while engaging spirituality.

  18. Capacity building among african american faith leaders to promote HIV prevention and vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Alio, Amina P; Lewis, Cindi A; Bunce, Catherine A; Wakefield, Steven; Thomas, Weldon G; Sanders, Edwin; Keefer, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    In light of the increasing rates of HIV infection in African Americans, it is essential that black faith leaders become more proactive in the fight against the epidemic. The study aim was to engage faith leaders in a sustainable partnership to increase community participation in preventive HIV vaccine clinical research while improving their access to and utilization of HIV/AIDS prevention services. Leadership Development Seminars were adapted for faith leaders in Rochester, NY, with topics ranging from the importance of preventive HIV vaccine research to social issues surrounding HIV/AIDs within a theological framework. Seminars were taught by field-specific experts from the black community and included the development of action plans to institute HIV preventive ministries. To assess the outcome of the Seminars, baseline and post-training surveys were administered and analyzed through paired sample t Tests and informal interviews. 19 faith leaders completed the intervention. In general, the majority of clergy felt that their understanding of HIV vaccine research and its goals had increased postintervention. A critical outcome was the subsequent formation of the Rochester Faith Collaborative by participating clergy seeking to sustain the collaborative and address the implementation of community action plans. Providing scientific HIV/AIDS knowledge within the context of clergy members' belief structure was an effective method for engaging black Church leaders in Rochester, NY. Collaborative efforts with various local institutions and community-based organizations were essential in building trust with the faith leaders, thereby building bridges for better understanding of HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, including HIV vaccine research.

  19. Medical negligence based on bad faith, breach of contract, or mental anguish.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, B J

    1980-01-01

    Financial recovery owing to breach of contract is restricted to the pecuniary amount lost because of failure to perform on the stipulated contract. With the acquisition of newer knowledge, attorneys are now utilizing the weapon of contractual failure as applied to medical negligence. The impetus to this new weapon for the plaintiff has accrued because of the favorable verdicts rendered from positive decisions based upon bad faith.

  20. Responses to the global HIV and AIDS pandemic: a study of the role of faith-based organisations in Lesotho.

    PubMed

    Olowu, Dejo

    2015-01-01

    This article attempts to establish the key contribution by people of faith to the global HIV pandemic response, using Lesotho as a case study. Particular focus is paid to the work of selected religious organisations in Lesotho in this context, assessing their capacities to coordinate an effective HIV and AIDS action at the grassroots levels through education, health care, development, and social service activities. Empirical evaluations and findings regarding the level and quality of faith-based engagement in this field establish the basic premise of this article, namely, that faith-based organisations are contributing energy, expertise, and experience in order to achieve the commitment of the global commitment to advance universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, and support. Although the article is particularly focused on the Lesotho context, its tremendous implications for simulated studies and approaches across Sub-Saharan Africa are accentuated.

  1. 42 CFR 93.210 - Good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Good faith. 93.210 Section 93.210 Public Health... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.210 Good faith. Good faith as applied to a complainant or witness, means having a... allegation or cooperation with a research misconduct proceeding is not in good faith if made with knowing or...

  2. 42 CFR 93.210 - Good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Good faith. 93.210 Section 93.210 Public Health... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.210 Good faith. Good faith as applied to a complainant or witness, means having a... allegation or cooperation with a research misconduct proceeding is not in good faith if made with knowing or...

  3. 42 CFR 93.210 - Good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Good faith. 93.210 Section 93.210 Public Health... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.210 Good faith. Good faith as applied to a complainant or witness, means having a... allegation or cooperation with a research misconduct proceeding is not in good faith if made with knowing or...

  4. Graduate Student Preferences for Practicing Faith in Online Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacapsin, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to gain a better understanding of the expectations graduate students hold regarding the amount of and types of faith-related activities utilized in online coursework. Two groups of participants surveyed were enrolled at two different, faith-based institutions in Pennsylvania, United States; one a Catholic…

  5. An Exploration of the Use of Branding to Shape Institutional Image in the Marketing Activities of Faith-Based Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Modern higher education includes student-consumers who shop for educational opportunities and institutions that actively market themselves. This study examined the marketing of faith-based institutions to determine how faith-related missions are reflected in the printed recruitment materials, Web sites, and admissions portals of the 112 member…

  6. R. A. Fisher: a faith fit for eugenics.

    PubMed

    Moore, James

    2007-03-01

    In discussions of 'religion-and-science', faith is usually emphasized more than works, scientists' beliefs more than their deeds. By reversing the priority, a lingering puzzle in the life of Ronald Aylmer Fisher (1890-1962), statistician, eugenicist and founder of the neo-Darwinian synthesis, can be solved. Scholars have struggled to find coherence in Fisher's simultaneous commitment to Darwinism, Anglican Christianity and eugenics. The problem is addressed by asking what practical mode of faith or faithful mode of practice lent unity to his life? Families, it is argued, with their myriad practical, emotional and intellectual challenges, rendered a mathematically-based eugenic Darwinian Christianity not just possible for Fisher, but vital.

  7. Study design, intervention, and baseline characteristics of a group randomized trial involving a faith-based healthy eating and physical activity intervention (Walk by Faith) to reduce weight and cancer risk among overweight and obese Appalachian adults.

    PubMed

    Baltic, Ryan D; Weier, Rory C; Katz, Mira L; Kennedy, Stephenie K; Lengerich, Eugene J; Lesko, Samuel M; Reese, David; Roberto, Karen A; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Young, Gregory S; Dignan, Mark B; Paskett, Electra D

    2015-09-01

    Increased prevalence of overweight and obesity among Appalachian residents may contribute to increased cancer rates in this region. This manuscript describes the design, components, and participant baseline characteristics of a faith-based study to decrease overweight and obesity among Appalachian residents. A group randomized study design was used to assign 13 churches to an intervention to reduce overweight and obesity (Walk by Faith) and 15 churches to a cancer screening intervention (Ribbons of Faith). Church members with a body mass index (BMI) ?25 were recruited from these churches in Appalachian counties in five states to participate in the study. A standard protocol was used to measure participant characteristics at baseline. The same protocol will be followed to obtain measurements after completion of the active intervention phase (12months) and the sustainability phase (24months). Primary outcome is change in BMI from baseline to 12months. Secondary outcomes include changes in blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio, and fruit and vegetable consumption, as well as intervention sustainability. Church members (n=664) from 28 churches enrolled in the study. At baseline 64.3% of the participants were obese (BMI?30), less than half (41.6%) reported regular exercise, and 85.5% reported consuming less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Church members recruited to participate in a faith-based study across the Appalachian region reported high rates of unhealthy behaviors. We have demonstrated the feasibility of developing and recruiting participants to a faith-based intervention aimed at improving diet and increasing exercise among underserved populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 75 FR 71317 - Fundamental Principles and Policymaking Criteria for Partnerships With Faith-Based and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Part IV The President Executive Order 13559--Fundamental Principles and Policymaking Criteria for... Fundamental Principles and Policymaking Criteria for Partnerships With Faith-Based and Other Neighborhood... the following: ``Sec. 2. Fundamental Principles. In formulating and implementing policies that have...

  9. Donating in good faith or getting into trouble Religion and organ donation revisited.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Mike; Ahmed, Aimun; Woywodt, Alexander

    2012-10-24

    There is worldwide shortage of organs for solid-organ transplantation. Many obstacles to deceased and live donation have been described and addressed, such as lack of understanding of the medical process, the issue of the definition of brain death, public awareness of the need for transplants, and many others. However, it is clear that the striking differences in deceased and live donation rates between different countries are only partly explained by these factors and many cultural and social reasons have been invoked to explain these observations. We believe that one obstacle to both deceased and live donation that is less well appreciated is that of religious concerns. Looking at the major faiths and religions worldwide, it is reassuring to see that most of them encourage donation. However, there is also scepticism amongst some of them, often relating to the concept of brain death and/or the processes surrounding death itself. It is worthwhile for transplant teams to be broadly aware of the issues and also to be mindful of resources for counselling. We believe that increased awareness of these issues within the transplant community will enable us to discuss these openly with patients, if they so wish.

  10. Donating in good faith or getting into trouble Religion and organ donation revisited

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Mike; Ahmed, Aimun; Woywodt, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    There is worldwide shortage of organs for solid-organ transplantation. Many obstacles to deceased and live donation have been described and addressed, such as lack of understanding of the medical process, the issue of the definition of brain death, public awareness of the need for transplants, and many others. However, it is clear that the striking differences in deceased and live donation rates between different countries are only partly explained by these factors and many cultural and social reasons have been invoked to explain these observations. We believe that one obstacle to both deceased and live donation that is less well appreciated is that of religious concerns. Looking at the major faiths and religions worldwide, it is reassuring to see that most of them encourage donation. However, there is also scepticism amongst some of them, often relating to the concept of brain death and/or the processes surrounding death itself. It is worthwhile for transplant teams to be broadly aware of the issues and also to be mindful of resources for counselling. We believe that increased awareness of these issues within the transplant community will enable us to discuss these openly with patients, if they so wish. PMID:24175198

  11. Psychological Changes among Muslim Students Participating in a Faith-Based School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicaise, Virginie; Kahan, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Some religions espouse doctrines that (in)directly impact physical activity (PA) behavior. Yet limited PA interventions have been tailored to religious minorities. Thus, a formative study was conducted to examine the effect of a faith-based pedometer program (Virtual Umra) on psychological correlates of PA behavior and their contribution…

  12. Have a little faith: measuring the impact of illness on positive and negative aspects of faith.

    PubMed

    Salsman, John M; Garcia, Sofia F; Lai, Jin-Shei; Cella, David

    2012-12-01

    The importance of faith and its associations with health are well documented. As part of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, items tapping positive and negative impact of illness (PII and NII) were developed across four content domains: Coping/Stress Response, Self-Concept, Social Connection/Isolation, and Meaning and Spirituality. Faith items were included within the concept of meaning and spirituality. This measurement model was tested on a heterogeneous group of 509 cancer survivors. To evaluate dimensionality, we applied two bi-factor models, specifying a general factor (PII or NII) and four local factors: Coping/Stress Response, Self-Concept, Social Connection/Isolation, and Meaning and Spirituality. Bi-factor analysis supported sufficient unidimensionality within PII and NII item sets. The unidimensionality of both PII and NII item sets was enhanced by extraction of the faith items from the rest of the questions. Of the 10 faith items, nine demonstrated higher local than general factor loadings (range for local factor loadings = 0.402 to 0.876), suggesting utility as a separate but related 'faith' factor. The same was true for only two of the remaining 63 items across the PII and NII item sets. Although conceptually and to a degree empirically related to Meaning and Spirituality, Faith appears to be a distinct subdomain of PII and NII, better handled by distinct assessment. A 10-item measure of the impact of illness upon faith (II-Faith) was therefore assembled. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Factors Affecting Utilization of Information Output of Computer-Based Modeling Procedures in Local Government Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komsky, Susan

    Fiscal Impact Budgeting Systems (FIBS) are sophisticated computer based modeling procedures used in local government organizations, whose results, however, are often overlooked or ignored by decision makers. A study attempted to discover the reasons for this situation by focusing on four factors: potential usefulness, faith in computers,…

  14. Is HIV/AIDS a consequence or divine judgment? Implications for faith-based social services. A Nigerian faith-based university's study.

    PubMed

    Olaore, Israel B; Olaore, Augusta Y

    2014-01-01

    A contemporary reading of Romans 1:27 was disguised as a saying by Paul Benjamin, AD 58 and administered to 275 randomly selected members of a private Christian university community in south western Nigeria in West Africa. Participants were asked to respond to a two-item questionnaire on their perception of the cause of HIV/AIDS either as a judgment from God or consequence of individual lifestyle choices. The apparent consensus drifted in the direction of God as the culprit handing down his judgment to perpetrators of evil who engage in the homosexual lifestyle. The goal of this paper was to examine the implications of a judgmental stance on addressing the psychosocial needs of Persons Living with HIV/AIDS in religious environments. It also explores how service providers in faith-based environments can work around the Judgment versus Consequence tussle in providing non-discriminatory services to persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

  15. Religious faith in coping with terminal cancer: what is the nursing experience?

    PubMed

    Granero-Molina, J; Díaz Cortés, M M; Márquez Membrive, J; Castro-Sánchez, A M; López Entrambasaguas, O M; Fernández-Sola, C

    2014-05-01

    This qualitative study describes nurses' reports on the role played by religious faith in the care of patients with terminal cancer. Using Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics and C. Roy's adaptation model as a base, in-depth interviews were carried out with 23 nurses who had cared for patients with terminal cancer for at least 6 months. Three main themes emerged when a Gadamerian-based hermeneutic research method was applied: faith facilitates the coping process in cases of terminal cancer, faith hinders the coping process in cases of terminal cancer and terminal illness impacts faith. The lack of univocal results indicates that the role of faith in coping with death is essentially practical, individualised and changeable. The nurse-patient relationship can help to determine the spiritual needs of cancer patients at the end of life. This source of knowledge held by the nurse, together with the rest of the multidisciplinary team, can help to improve end-of-life care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Challenges Faced by a Faith-Based School in a Rural, Predominantly Secular Setting: Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evangelinou-Yiannakis, Angela

    2016-01-01

    A new, independent Catholic school in rural Australia has had to face significant challenges in relation to its distinct Catholic ethos and curriculum. The challenges have included resistance from parents of the School with regard to the weekly time allocation for Religious Education, the nature of the faith-based curriculum, and the way in which…

  17. Spiritual interventions and the impact of a faith community nursing program.

    PubMed

    Shores, Cynthia Ingram

    2014-04-01

    Faith community nursing had its formal beginnings in the Midwestern United States in 1984 when six nurses received financial support from a local hospital to work in churches. Over time, the churches assumed increasing responsibility for the nurses' salaries. The success of this initiative was associated with the understanding that faith communities are dedicated to keeping people well. The number of programs increased over the past 30 years and now there are thousands of faith community nurses serving populations around the world. Research for this specialty practice has not experienced comparable growth, and is needed to further develop faith community nursing science. This study, based on the Roy Adaptation Model, used a qualitative design to identify spiritual nursing interventions that faith community nurses use in their practice, and to examine the spiritual impact of a faith community nursing program. Data were collected from faith community members, clergy representatives, and faith community nurses with a researcher-developed demographic tool and a six-item open-ended questionnaire that were both mailed to participants (N = 112; n = 52; response rate = 46%) and analyzed through content analysis. A variety of spiritual nursing interventions were identified. Themes related to the spiritual impact included the physical, mental, and spiritual health connection, caring, hope, spiritual support and benefits, and religious concepts.

  18. A Spatial Faithful Cooperative System Based on Mixed Presence Groupware Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiangyu; Wang, Rui

    Traditional groupware platforms are found restrained and cumbersome for supporting geographically dispersed design collaboration. This paper starts with two groupware models, which are Single Display Groupware and Mixed Presence Groupware, and then discusses some of the limitations and argues how these limitations could possibly impair efficient communication among remote designers. Next, it suggests that the support for spatial faithfulness and Tangible User Interface (TUI) could help fill the gap between Face-to-Face (F2F) collaboration and computer-mediated remote collaboration. A spatial faithful groupware with TUI support is then developed to illustrate this concept.

  19. Student Athlete Persistence Patterns: An Analysis of Retention Factors at a Small, Faith-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Charlie D.

    2011-01-01

    The persistence patterns of student athletes continues to gain interest among the higher education community, particularly among private, faith-based institutions belonging to the NAIA who continue to rely on student athlete recruitment to optimize overall enrollment patterns. Unfortunately, few studies exist in the literature surrounding student…

  20. 12 CFR 220.6 - Good faith account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith account. 220.6 Section 220.6 Banks... BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.6 Good faith account. In a good faith account, a creditor...) Securities entitled to good faith margin—(1) Permissible transactions. A creditor may effect and finance...

  1. 12 CFR 220.6 - Good faith account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith account. 220.6 Section 220.6 Banks... BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.6 Good faith account. In a good faith account, a creditor...) Securities entitled to good faith margin—(1) Permissible transactions. A creditor may effect and finance...

  2. 12 CFR 220.6 - Good faith account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith account. 220.6 Section 220.6 Banks... (CONTINUED) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.6 Good faith account. In a good faith account...: (a) Securities entitled to good faith margin—(1) Permissible transactions. A creditor may effect and...

  3. 12 CFR 220.6 - Good faith account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith account. 220.6 Section 220.6 Banks... (CONTINUED) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.6 Good faith account. In a good faith account...: (a) Securities entitled to good faith margin—(1) Permissible transactions. A creditor may effect and...

  4. Catholic Education: From and for Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groome, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Catholic education arises from the deep structures and earliest traditions of Christian faith. Its commitments throughout the centuries have been to educate both "from" and "for" faith. It educates from a faith perspective by drawing upon the universal values of Catholicism to provide a distinctive philosophy, perhaps even more…

  5. Faith Moves Mountains-Mountains Move Faith: Two Opposite Epidemiological Forces in Research on Religion and Health.

    PubMed

    Hvidt, N C; Hvidtjørn, D; Christensen, K; Nielsen, J B; Søndergaard, J

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests opposite epidemiological forces in religion and health: (1). Faith seems to move mountains in the sense that religion is associated with positive health outcomes. (2). Mountains of bad health seem to move faith. We reflected on these forces in a population of 3000 young Danish twins in which all religiosity measures were associated with severe disease. We believe the reason for this novel finding is that the sample presents as a particularly secular population-based study and that the second epidemiological force has gained the upper hand in this sample. We suggest that all cross-sectional research on religion and health should be interpreted in light of such opposite epidemiological forces potentially diluting each other.

  6. The convergence of American and Nigerian religious conservatism in a biopolitical shaping of Nigeria's HIV/AIDS prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Jappah, Jlateh V

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria has the largest number of HIV/AIDS cases in West Africa, with 3.3 million people estimated to be living with the disease. The country remains a fragile democratic state and has allocated insufficient resources to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS among its citizens. The preponderance of President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) dollars, expert knowledge, conservative ideology and activities has shaped the direction of HIV/AIDS sexual-transmission prevention programmes in Nigeria. PEPFAR channels significant resources through Nigerian faith-based organisations (FBOs), and considers these organisations integral for HIV prevention strategies. In many instances, HIV/AIDS prevention programmes managed by FBOs reflect their ideologies of morality and sexuality. There is a convergence of religious ideology concerning morality and HIV infectivity between American and Nigerian conservatives; this produces a fertile ground for the influence and expansion of the conservative activities of PEPFAR in Nigeria. The paper highlights this nexus and draws attention to the biopolitical underpinning of PEPFAR in shaping Nigeria's HIV prevention programmes. The paper further notes both positive and negative effects of PEPFAR activities and attempts by the Obama administration to redirect PEPFAR to a more holistic approach in order to optimise outcomes.

  7. 78 FR 18594 - Notice of Cancelation for Call of the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... scheduled to convene on April 2, 2013 has been cancelled. Please contact Ben O'Dell for any additional...: March 21, 2013. Ben O'Dell, Associate Director for Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships...

  8. Is HIV/AIDS a consequence or divine judgment? Implications for faith-based social services. A Nigerian faith-based university's study

    PubMed Central

    Olaore, Israel B.; Olaore, Augusta Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A contemporary reading of Romans 1:27 was disguised as a saying by Paul Benjamin, AD 58 and administered to 275 randomly selected members of a private Christian university community in south western Nigeria in West Africa. Participants were asked to respond to a two-item questionnaire on their perception of the cause of HIV/AIDS either as a judgment from God or consequence of individual lifestyle choices. The apparent consensus drifted in the direction of God as the culprit handing down his judgment to perpetrators of evil who engage in the homosexual lifestyle. The goal of this paper was to examine the implications of a judgmental stance on addressing the psychosocial needs of Persons Living with HIV/AIDS in religious environments. It also explores how service providers in faith-based environments can work around the Judgment versus Consequence tussle in providing non-discriminatory services to persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. PMID:24820240

  9. Faith and End of Life in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Robert L.; Black, Helen K.; Doyle, Patrick J.; Moss, Miriam; Moss, Sidney Z.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of religious belief in the experiences of dying and death in a Catholic nursing home. The home appeals to residents and their families due to the active religious presence. Thus, religion is a salient element of the “local culture” which exists in this long-term care setting. The preeminence of faith within the organization and the personal religious convictions of staff, residents, and families may drive how death and dying are discussed and experienced in this setting, as well as the meanings that are attached to them. This paper examines the relationship between faith and the experience and meaning of death in this nursing home. We present themes that emerged from open-ended interviews with residents, family members, and staff, gathered between 1996 and 2004. The data indicate that people select the home due to their Catholic faith and the home's religious tone. Themes also show that belief in God and an afterlife helps shape the experience of dying and death for our informants. Our paper does not compare ease of dying with other nursing homes or within other belief systems. PMID:21629755

  10. Recruiting and Surveying Catholic Parishes for Cancer Control Initiatives: Lessons Learned From the CRUZA Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Laura S.; Leyva, Bryan; Rustan, Sarah; Ospino, Hosffman; Negron, Rosalyn; Torres, Maria Idalí; Galeas, Ana V.

    2017-01-01

    Background We describe activities undertaken to conduct organizational surveys among faith-based organizations (FBOs) in Massachusetts (MA) as part of a larger study designed to promote parish-based cancer control programs for Latinos. Methods Catholic parishes located in MA that provided Spanish-language mass were eligible for study participation. Parishes were identified through diocesan records and online directories. Prior to parish recruitment, we implemented a variety of activities to gain support from Catholic leaders at the Diocesan level. We then recruited individual parishes to complete a four-part organizational survey, which assessed: (A) parish leadership; (B) financial resources; (C) involvement in Hispanic ministry; and (D) health and social service offerings. Our goal was to administer each survey component to a parish representatives who could best provide an organizational perspective on the content of each component (e.g., A=pastors; B= Business Managers; C=Hispanic Ministry Leaders; and D= Parish Nurse or Health Ministry leader. Here, we present descriptive statistics on recruitment and survey administration processes. Results Seventy-five percent of eligible parishes responded to the survey and of these, 92% completed all four components. Completed four-part surveys required an average of 16.6 contact attempts. There were an average of 2.1 respondents per site. Pastoral staff were the most frequent respondents (79%), but also required the most contact attempts (M = 9.3, range = 1 to 27). While most interviews were completed by phone (71%), one-quarter were completed during in-person site visits. Conclusions We achieved a high survey completion rate among organizational representatives. Our lessons learned may inform efforts to engage and survey FBOs for public health efforts. PMID:25878192

  11. Exploring the Struggle of Balancing Academics, Religion, and Mission at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Learty Letroy

    2014-01-01

    Leaders at faith-based institutions struggle to provide equitable attention to academics, religious heritage, and the secular mission of the institution; as a result, leaders find themselves mitigating conflict that arises from this imbalance (Brackney, 2004; Ecklund, Park, & Veliz, 2008; Witek, 2009). The purposes of this study were: (a) to…

  12. Faculty in Faith-Based Institutions: Participation in Decision-Making and Its Impact on Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metheny, Glen A.; West, G. Bud; Winston, Bruce E.; Wood, J. Andy

    2015-01-01

    This study examined full-time faculty in Christian, faith-based colleges and universities and investigated the type of impact their participation in the decision-making process had on job satisfaction. Previous studies have examined relationships among faculty at state universities and community colleges, yet little research has been examined in…

  13. Music Educator Vacancies in Faith-Based K-12 Schools in the United States: 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hash, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and summarize characteristics of music educator vacancies in faith-based K-12 schools in the United States for the 2013-2014 academic year. Data extracted from placement notices and supplemental sources included demographic information, job responsibilities, and employment requirements for 153 listings in…

  14. Study design, intervention, and baseline characteristics of a group randomized trial involving a faith-based healthy eating and physical activity intervention (Walk by Faith) to reduce weight and cancer risk among overweight and obese Appalachian adults☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Baltic, Ryan D.; Weier, Rory C.; Katz, Mira L.; Kennedy, Stephenie K.; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Lesko, Samuel M.; Reese, David; Roberto, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Young, Gregory S.; Dignan, Mark B.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Increased prevalence of overweight and obesity among Appalachian residents may contribute to increased cancer rates in this region. This manuscript describes the design, components, and participant baseline characteristics of a faith-based study to decrease overweight and obesity among Appalachian residents. Methods A group randomized study design was used to assign 13 churches to an intervention to reduce overweight and obesity (Walk by Faith) and 15 churches to a cancer screening intervention (Ribbons of Faith). Church members with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 were recruited from these churches in Appalachian counties in five states to participate in the study. A standard protocol was used to measure participant characteristics at baseline. The same protocol will be followed to obtain measurements after completion of the active intervention phase (12 months) and the sustainability phase (24 months). Primary outcome is change in BMI from baseline to 12 months. Secondary outcomes include changes in blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio, and fruit and vegetable consumption, as well as intervention sustainability. Results Church members (n = 664) from 28 churches enrolled in the study. At baseline 64.3% of the participants were obese (BMI ≥30), less than half (41.6%) reported regular exercise, and 85.5% reported consuming less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Conclusions Church members recruited to participate in a faith-based study across the Appalachian region reported high rates of unhealthy behaviors. We have demonstrated the feasibility of developing and recruiting participants to a faith-based intervention aimed at improving diet and increasing exercise among underserved populations. PMID:26115879

  15. Measuring Communities of Faith: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R. David

    2013-01-01

    Numerous references are made in the literature to communities of faith, yet there have been relatively few efforts to measure them empirically. The purpose of this study is to address this gap in the literature by estimating a higher-order confirmatory factor model that consists of two tiers. Seven dimensions of church-based social support make up the first tier: emotional support received from rank-and-file church members, emotional support given to fellow church members, tangible support received from rank-and-file church members, tangible support given to fellow congregants, spiritual support received from fellow church members, emotional support received from a pastor, and tangible support received from a pastor. It is hypothesized that these first-order constructs are driven by a higher-order latent variable that denotes a community of faith. Data from a nationwide survey reveal that, for the sample taken as a whole, emotional support represents the way in which a community of faith is most likely to be manifest while tangible support is a less critical component. Moreover, the results indicate that a community of faith is more likely to reside in support exchanged among rank-and-file church members than support received from a pastor. PMID:24039556

  16. Bridging Faith, Languages and Learning in London: A Faith Teacher Reflects upon Pedagogy in Religious Instruction Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytra, Vally; Gregory, Eve; Ilankuberan, Arani

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examine a faith teacher's reflections on faith literacy teaching and learning and how they shaped his pedagogy in the context of Hindu/Saiva religious instruction classes for students of Sri Lankan Tamil heritage. The data are part of a larger multi-site three-year team ethnography of children's faith literacy learning in…

  17. Islam, brain death, and transplantation: culture, faith, and jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Richard; AlGhamdi, Hanan Mesfer Saad; Peters, Linda

    2012-01-01

    A significant gap exists between availability of organs for transplant and patients with end-stage organ failure for whom organ transplantation is the last treatment option. Reasons for this mismatch include inadequate approach to potential donor families and donor loss as a result of refractory cardiopulmonary instability during and after brainstem herniation. Other reasons include inadequate cultural competence and sensitivity when communicating with potential donor families. Clinicians may not have an understanding of the cultural and religious perspectives of Muslim families of critically ill patients who may be approached about brain death and organ donation. This review analyzes Islamic cultural and religious perspectives on organ donation, transplantation, and brain death, including faith-based directives from Islamic religious authorities, definitions of death in Islam, and communication strategies when discussing brain death and organ donation with Muslim families. Optimal family care and communication are highlighted using case studies and backgrounds illustrating barriers and approaches with Muslim families in the United States and in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that can improve cultural competence and family care as well as increase organ availability within the Muslim population and beyond.

  18. Faith and Fundraising: The Role of Institutional Religious Identity in Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    How important is the faith associated with an educational institution in raising funds? Do development professionals at faith-based institutions use strategies different from their secular school colleagues? Are there particular challenges to raising money from donors who may already have philanthropic ties to churches or synagogues? Fundraisers…

  19. A rural African American faith community's solutions to depression disparities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Keneshia; Haynes, Tiffany; Kim Yeary, Karen Hye-Cheon; Greer-Williams, Nancy; Hartwig, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how a rural African American faith community would address depression within their congregations and the community as a whole. A qualitative, interpretive descriptive methodology was used. The sample included 24 participants representing pastors, parishioners interested in health, and African American men who had experienced symptoms of depression in a community in the Arkansas Delta. The primary data sources for this qualitative research study were focus groups. Participants identified three key players in the rural African American faith community who can combat depression: the Church, the Pastor/Clergy, and the Layperson. The roles of each were identified and recommendations for each to address depression disparities in rural African Americans. The recommendations can be used to develop faith-based interventions for depression targeting the African American faith community. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Faith in science in global perspective: Implications for transhumanism.

    PubMed

    Evans, John H

    2014-10-01

    While citizens can know scientific facts, they also have faith in science - with faith defined as a firm belief for which there is no proof. Using national public opinion surveys from twelve nations from 1993 to 2010, I examine three different types of faith in science that citizens could hold. I examine temporal changes in levels of faith in science as well as the social determinants of each type of faith. I focus on the implications of these levels of faith for the transhumanist movement, which is particularly dependent on faith in science. I find that two of three types of faith in science are on the rise across the West, and that the social determinants of these types of faith suggest particular challenges for the transhumanist movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Making a difference: initiating and maintaining a faith-based free health clinic.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Linda L

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary of the challenges, struggles, and barriers that a group of churches encountered in developing a faith-based free health clinic. From the inception, this clinic has existed for the uninsured whose total household income aligns with the 2009 Fedral Poverty Guidelines. A voluntary interview with the executive director of The Good Samaritan Clinic revealed the experiential evolvement of this free health clinic. Numerous examples are shared that depict how this clinic has made a difference in the lives of many people.

  2. Faith-Based Solutions: What Are the Legal Issues? Hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session (June 6, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document presents witness testimonies addressing faith-based charities that offer critically needed social services through publicly funded and professionally managed programs. Specifically, the hearing discusses the possibility of extensive expansion of government involvement in faith-based charities, and some of the legal and policy…

  3. Religious Beliefs and Cancer Screening Behaviors among Catholic Latinos: Implications for Faith-based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Leyva, Bryan; Torres, María Idalí; Ospino, Hosffman; Tom, Laura; Rustan, Sarah; Bartholomew, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Although most U.S. Latinos identify as Catholic, few studies have focused on the influence of this religious tradition on health beliefs among this population. This study explores the role of Catholic religious teachings, practices, and ministry on cancer screening knowledge, attitudes and behaviors among Latinos. Eight focus groups were conducted with 67 Catholic Latino parishioners in Massachusetts. Qualitative analysis provided evidence of strong reliance on faith, God, and parish leaders for health concerns. Parishes were described as vital sources of health and social support, playing a central role in the community's health. Participants emphasized that their religious beliefs promote positive health behaviors and health care utilization, including the use of cancer screening services. In addition, they expressed willingness to participate in cancer education programs located at their parishes and provided practical recommendations for implementing health programs in parishes. Implications for culturally appropriate health communication and faith-based interventions are discussed. PMID:24858865

  4. Psychological first aid training for the faith community: a model curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Lating, Jeffrey M; Everly, George S; Mosley, Adrian M; Teague, Paula J; Links, Jonathan M; Kaminsky, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally faith communities have served important roles in helping survivors cope in the aftermath of public health disasters. However, the provision of optimally effective crisis intervention services for persons experiencing acute or prolonged emotional trauma following such incidents requires specialized knowledge, skills, and abilities. Supported by a federally-funded grant, several academic health centers and faith-based organizations collaborated to develop a training program in Psychological First Aid (PFA) and disaster ministry for members of the clergy serving urban minorities and Latino immigrants in Baltimore, Maryland. This article describes the one-day training curriculum composed of four content modules: Stress Reactions of Mind-Body-Spirit, Psychological First Aid and Crisis Intervention, Pastoral Care and Disaster Ministry, and Practical Resources and Self Care for the Spiritual Caregiver Detailed descriptions of each module are provided, including its purpose; rationale and background literature; learning objectives; topics and sub-topics; and educational methods, materials and resources. The strengths, weaknesses, and future applications of the training template are discussed from the vantage points of participants' subjective reactions to the training.

  5. Faith-Based Media Literacy Education: A Look at the Past with an Eye toward the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iaquinto, Stephanie; Keeler, John

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses several fundamental questions about faith-based media literacy education in the United States, including how the assumptions, motivations, goals, and pedagogy of those Christians who are operating within a media literacy framework come together to create a unique approach to teaching media literacy. After briefly reviewing…

  6. Faith and reason and physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Christopher

    1998-08-01

    Aquinas's conception of the relationship of faith and reason calls into question the arguments and some of the conclusions advanced in contributions to the debate on physician-assisted suicide by David Thomasma and H. Tristram Engelhardt. An understanding of the nature of theology as based on revelation calls into question Thomasma's theological argument in favor of physician-assisted suicide based on the example of Christ and the martyrs. On the other hand, unaided reason calls into question his assumptions about the nature of death as in some cases a good for the human person. Finally, if Aquinas is right about the relationship of faith and reason, Engelhardt's sharp contrast between "Christian" and "secular" approaches to physician-assisted suicide needs reconsideration, although his conclusions about physician-assisted suicide would find support.

  7. Science instruction in the context of Christian faith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Brock Cameron

    One of the issues faced in higher education involves the development of scientifically literate undergraduate students (NRC, 1996). Developing science literacy needs to take into account the various aspects of resistance students have toward science because of their personal faith. There is a need to know more about the effective strategies that science faculty in a Christian, faith-based institution use to assist their undergraduate students in dealing with the apparent conflict between science and faith. The purpose of this study was to analyze how these faculty members develop scientifically literate students. Through descriptive qualitative analysis, interview and questionnaire data were analyzed to discover science faculty perceptions of student tension with faith and science and to elicit faculty use of conceptual change teaching strategies. It was discovered that faculty participants perceive that their students experience such a tension. Students generally view the two as conflicting or independent of each other. Also, it was found that the conceptual change strategies were used to some extent by all participants. The data revealed three themes: time, talk, and trust. Conceptual change is accomplished over time through a learning environment rich with instruction and experimentation. These strategies allow for increasing science literacy through self-reflection and conversations. Trust is built through faculty modeling of the process of science and its integration with personal faith. Increasing science literacy in the college population has potential for social change by producing adults capable of making more informed political and ethical decisions.

  8. A generalized resistance resource: faith. A nursing view.

    PubMed

    Encarnação, Paula; Oliveira, Clara C; Martins, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Based on Aaron Antonovsky's salutogenic model, the authors of this article aim to analyze the term Faith as a Generalized Resistance Resource (GRR) of people's health and to delve the relevance of this construct to clinical practice in Nursing. The authors consider that, in order for nurses to intervene in the promotion of faith so as to bring health benefits to people, a solid educational training in this subject area is required by nursing students. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 12 CFR 1081.108 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1081.108 Section 1081... PROCEEDINGS General Rules § 1081.108 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of...

  10. 12 CFR 1081.108 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1081.108 Section 1081... PROCEEDINGS General Rules § 1081.108 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of...

  11. 12 CFR 1209.13 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1209.13 Section 1209... PROCEDURE Rules of Practice and Procedure § 1209.13 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every... warranted by existing law or a good faith, non-frivolous argument for the extension, modification, or...

  12. 12 CFR 1209.13 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1209.13 Section 1209... PROCEDURE Rules of Practice and Procedure § 1209.13 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every... warranted by existing law or a good faith, non-frivolous argument for the extension, modification, or...

  13. 12 CFR 1081.108 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1081.108 Section 1081... PROCEEDINGS General Rules § 1081.108 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of...

  14. 12 CFR 1209.13 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1209.13 Section 1209... PROCEDURE Rules of Practice and Procedure § 1209.13 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every... warranted by existing law or a good faith, non-frivolous argument for the extension, modification, or...

  15. Differentiation and Diversification in Higher Education: The Case of Private, Faith-Based Higher Education in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The central proposition of this article is that Manitoba's faith-based higher education institutions have become more accepted by, and more closely integrated into, the mainstream post-secondary system in the province. Drawing on theoretical work explaining change in higher education systems, the article examines legislative and policy actions by…

  16. Characteristics of Part-Time Online Instructors: A Comparison of For-Profit to Nonprofit Faith-Based Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcher, Keith O.

    2017-01-01

    As the for-profit business model and a reliance on adjunct faculty continues to grow among faith-based institutions, little research exists on the differences in the characteristics of part-time online faculty in for-profit versus nonprofit environments that could provide guidance to administrators. This study utilized a descriptive,…

  17. Managerial Strategies to Plan, Promote, and Manage Adult Degree Completion Programs in Faith-Based Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoggatt, Deborah K.

    2014-01-01

    College and universities underwent tremendous shifts in the latter part of the 20th century caused in part by the shrinking pool of college ready 18 year-olds. Concerned about diminishing enrollments and lost revenue from traditionally-aged students, administrators at faith-based, tuition-driven universities instituted adult degree completion…

  18. 77 FR 68780 - Meeting Notice for the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... event. Please RSVP to Ben O'Dell at [email protected] . Status: Open to the public, limited only by...: Please contact Ben O'Dell for any additional information about the President's Advisory Council meeting...: November 9, 2012. Ben O'Dell, Designated Federal Officer and Associate Director, HHS Center for Faith-based...

  19. Taking a Leap of Faith: Redefining Teaching and Learning in Higher Education through Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jean S.; Blackwell, Sue; Drake, Jennifer; Moran, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines two aspects of teaching with a project-based learning (PBL) model in higher education settings: faculty definitions of PBL and faculty PBL practices, as evidenced by their self-described successes and challenges in implementation. Faculty participants took "a leap of faith" in their teaching practices to redefine what…

  20. 78 FR 17210 - Meeting Notice for the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Partnerships announces the following three conference calls: Name: President's Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships Council Conference Calls. Time and Date: Monday, April 2nd, 2013 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. (EDT). Place: All meetings announced herein will be held by conference call. The call...

  1. 77 FR 60123 - Meeting Notice for the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Partnerships announces the following three conference calls: Name: President's Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships Council Conference Calls Time and Date: Thursday, October 18th 4 p.m.-5...) Place: All meetings announced herein will be held by conference call. The call-in line is: 1-866-823...

  2. 38 CFR 61.64 - Religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... religion or religious belief. (f) If a state or local government voluntarily contributes its own funds to... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Religious organizations... § 61.64 Religious organizations. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on...

  3. 38 CFR 61.64 - Religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... religion or religious belief. (f) If a state or local government voluntarily contributes its own funds to... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Religious organizations... § 61.64 Religious organizations. (a) Organizations that are religious or faith-based are eligible, on...

  4. The Crossroads of Science and Faith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benecchi, Susan D.; Kober, Gladys; Gossard, Paula

    2015-11-01

    We have recently completed a 4-year project to produce a textbook for students that uniquely addresses the needs of the Christian homeschool community. It is also relevant for students of other faith and non-faith backgrounds. Two elements are at work: parents want their kids to become mature adults adhering to the faith of their upbringing, and students are challenged when they don't understand how to rationally discuss their beliefs in relation to many current scientific discoveries. To add to the polarization, a few scientists have spread an atheistic naturalistic worldview together with their teaching of science as if it was part of science itself. As a result many parents avoid materials they consider controversial and students later come to believe they must choose between science and their faith. The key to bridging this gap are professional astronomers who hold to a Christian worldview and who can speak both languages, understanding the complexities of both communities. The role of science educators is to teach science, not to impose worldviews. Science is well received by Christians when it is presented not as a threat to faith, but rather as a complementary way to understand God, leading to a more integrated view of reality. Our textbook boasts four hallmarks, providing students with: 1) An understanding of the relationship between faith and science with the goal of helping students to identify and integrate their own worldview. 2) Scientifically reviewed and accurate astronomical information. 3) Examples of scientists who have wrestled with science/faith issues and come to a coherent relationship between the two. And 4) exercises for the students to interact with the material in both faith and scientific areas. We hope this will be a resource to help parents who hold tightly to particular ideologies to be less closed to current scientific discovery and more excited about how new discoveries can bolster and enable their faith. We will present an overview

  5. 12 CFR 19.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 19.7 Section 19.7... PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 19.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement... warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing...

  6. 12 CFR 509.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 509.7 Section 509.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  7. 12 CFR 747.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 747.7 Section 747.7... of Practice and Procedure § 747.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or...

  8. 12 CFR 109.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 109.7 Section 109.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 109.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  9. 12 CFR 509.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 509.7 Section 509.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  10. 12 CFR 509.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Good faith certification. 509.7 Section 509.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  11. 12 CFR 19.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 19.7 Section 19.7... PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 19.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement... warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing...

  12. 12 CFR 509.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Good faith certification. 509.7 Section 509.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  13. 12 CFR 19.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 19.7 Section 19.7... PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 19.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement... warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing...

  14. 12 CFR 747.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 747.7 Section 747.7... of Practice and Procedure § 747.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or...

  15. 12 CFR 109.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 109.7 Section 109.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 109.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  16. 12 CFR 747.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 747.7 Section 747.7... of Practice and Procedure § 747.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or...

  17. 12 CFR 19.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 19.7 Section 19.7... PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 19.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement... warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing...

  18. 12 CFR 747.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 747.7 Section 747.7... of Practice and Procedure § 747.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or...

  19. 12 CFR 109.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 109.7 Section 109.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 109.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  20. 12 CFR 747.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 747.7 Section 747.7... of Practice and Procedure § 747.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or... good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or...

  1. 12 CFR 19.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 19.7 Section 19.7... PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 19.7 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement... warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing...

  2. 12 CFR 509.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 509.7 Section 509.7... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  3. Faithful teleportation with arbitrary pure or mixed resource states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-Jing; Li, Zong-Guo; Fei, Shao-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Xi; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2011-05-01

    We study faithful teleportation systematically with arbitrary entangled states as resources. The necessary conditions of mixed states to complete perfect teleportation are proved. Based on these results, the necessary and sufficient conditions of faithful teleportation of an unknown state |phirang in { C}^d with an entangled resource ρ in { C}^m \\otimes { C}^d and { C}^d \\otimes { C}^n are derived. It is shown that for ρ in { C}^m \\otimes { C}^d, ρ must be a maximally entangled state, while for ρ in { C}^d \\otimes { C}^n, ρ must be a pure maximally entangled state. Moreover, we show that the sender's measurements must be all projectors of maximally entangled pure states. The relations between the entanglement of the formation of the resource states and faithful teleportation are also discussed.

  4. Traveling with faith: the creation of women's immigrant aid associations in nineteenth and twentieth-century France.

    PubMed

    Machen, Emily

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the efforts of French Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish women to morally, spiritually, and physically protect immigrant and migrant women and girls in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Women of faith worried about the dangers posed by the white slave trade, and they feared the loss of spiritual consciousness among women living far from their families and their places of worship. In response to these concerns, they developed numerous faith-based international organizations aimed at protecting vulnerable working-class immigrants. Upper-class women's work in immigrant aid societies allowed them to take on much greater social and religious leadership roles than they had in the past. Likewise, the intricate, international networks that these women developed contributed to the building of international cooperation throughout Europe.

  5. 12 CFR 308.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 308.7 Section 308.7... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 308.7 Good faith certification. (a... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  6. 12 CFR 263.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 263.7 Section 263.7... (CONTINUED) RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 263.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  7. 12 CFR 263.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 263.7 Section 263.7... RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 263.7 Good faith certification... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  8. 12 CFR 263.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 263.7 Section 263.7... (CONTINUED) RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 263.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  9. 12 CFR 308.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 308.7 Section 308.7... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 308.7 Good faith certification. (a... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  10. 12 CFR 263.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 263.7 Section 263.7... (CONTINUED) RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 263.7 Good faith... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  11. 12 CFR 308.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 308.7 Section 308.7... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 308.7 Good faith certification. (a... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  12. 12 CFR 308.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 308.7 Section 308.7... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 308.7 Good faith certification. (a... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  13. 12 CFR 308.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 308.7 Section 308.7... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 308.7 Good faith certification. (a... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  14. 12 CFR 263.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 263.7 Section 263.7... RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 263.7 Good faith certification... in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or...

  15. Preserving a Critical National Asset: "America's Disadvantaged Students and the Crisis in Faith-Based Urban Schools"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    On April 24, 2008, President George W. Bush convened an array of education and community stakeholders in Washington, D.C. to address the quickening disappearance of faith-based schools in America's cities. The disappearance of these schools, which have played a fundamental role in the American story of religious freedom and tolerance, community…

  16. 78 FR 6109 - Meeting Notice for the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Partnerships announces the following three conference calls: Name: President's Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships Council Conference Calls Time and Date: Wednesday, February 13th, 4:00 p..., 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. (e.s.t.) Place: All meetings announced herein will be held by conference call...

  17. Explorations into the Synergy Between Faith, Health, and Health-Care Among Black Baptists.

    PubMed

    Maclin, Sandy D

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health disparities are documented by race/ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, and geographic demographics. Since federal health record keeping began, regardless of other demographic factors, Black people continue to record statistical significant disparities. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) domain of mind-body medicine provides a method and language to assess the metaphysical constructs of faith, spirituality and religion and their influence on health and healthcare practices. Explorations into the synergy between faith, health and healthcare among a convenient sample of Black Baptist conventioneers provides an opportunity to better understand if and how faith can be used to enhance the health and wellbeing of Black people. In 2005 a convenience sample of 2,500 Black persons among 10,000 Joint Baptist conventioneers participated in the study; 1,827 completed and returned an 80 item questionnaire. 500 surveys were lost due to computer malfunctions. Survey results covered: demographic, health/safety, health care, and faith/religion/health. 58.6% of respondents were women; 61% were married. Most (66.2%) reported good health and few were told by their physician they had a chronic disease. 33.5% never talk to their pastor about health problems or (42.7%) physician visits. Mental health responses: (98.7%) get along well with others; (93.6%) were satisfied with life; (92.8%) feel good about themselves; and (97.6%) were in good spirits most times. Many were in social organizations (40.6%). 96.1% felt religion was very important in their life; 91% thought religion affects physical/mental health; and 89.1% believed faith affects mental/physical health. 95.7% believe faith can change a health crisis. Most described religion and faith differently. The Black Church has history in social justice connected to community health. Responses to religion/faith affirm the interconnectedness of the synergy between faith-health. Empowered by religious fervor to interpret

  18. 29 CFR 570.141 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Good faith defense. 570.141 Section 570.141 Labor... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Enforcement § 570.141 Good faith defense. A... ships or delivers for shipment in commerce goods which he acquired in good faith in reliance on written...

  19. 29 CFR 570.141 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Good faith defense. 570.141 Section 570.141 Labor... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Enforcement § 570.141 Good faith defense. A... ships or delivers for shipment in commerce goods which he acquired in good faith in reliance on written...

  20. 12 CFR 390.36 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith certification. 390.36 Section 390.36... Proceedings § 390.36 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record... filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith...

  1. 12 CFR 1780.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1780.7 Section 1780.7... DEVELOPMENT RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules § 1780.7 Good faith... record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith, nonfrivolous argument...

  2. 12 CFR 390.36 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith certification. 390.36 Section 390.36... Proceedings § 390.36 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record... filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith...

  3. 12 CFR 1024.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith estimate. 1024.7 Section 1024.7... (REGULATION X) Mortgage Settlement and Escrow Accounts § 1024.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1..., 2014. For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 1024.7 Good faith...

  4. 29 CFR 570.141 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Good faith defense. 570.141 Section 570.141 Labor... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Enforcement § 570.141 Good faith defense. A... ships or delivers for shipment in commerce goods which he acquired in good faith in reliance on written...

  5. 12 CFR 390.36 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith certification. 390.36 Section 390.36... Proceedings § 390.36 Good faith certification. (a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record... filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith...

  6. 29 CFR 570.141 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Good faith defense. 570.141 Section 570.141 Labor... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Enforcement § 570.141 Good faith defense. A... ships or delivers for shipment in commerce goods which he acquired in good faith in reliance on written...

  7. 12 CFR 908.23 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith certification. 908.23 Section 908.23... OPERATIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE IN HEARINGS ON THE RECORD General Rules § 908.23 Good faith... filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith...

  8. 12 CFR 908.23 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 908.23 Section 908.23... OPERATIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE IN HEARINGS ON THE RECORD General Rules § 908.23 Good faith... filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith...

  9. 12 CFR 1780.7 - Good faith certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith certification. 1780.7 Section 1780.7... DEVELOPMENT RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules § 1780.7 Good faith... record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith, nonfrivolous argument...

  10. A rights-based proposal for managing faith-based values and expectations of migrants at end-of-life illustrated by an empirical study involving South Asians in the UK.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Jo; Samanta, Ash; Madhloom, Omar

    2018-06-08

    International migration is an important issue for many high-income countries and is accompanied by opportunities as well as challenges. South Asians are the largest minority ethnic group in the United Kingdom, and this diaspora is reflective of the growing diversity of British society. An empirical study was performed to ascertain the faith-based values, beliefs, views and attitudes of participants in relation to their perception of issues pertaining to end-of-life care. Empirical observations from this study, as well as the extant knowledge-base from the literature, are used to support and contextualise our reflections against a socio-legal backdrop. We argue for accommodation of faith-based values of migrants at end-of-life within normative structures of receiving countries. We posit the ethically relevant principles of inclusiveness, integration and embedment, for an innovative bioethical framework as a vehicle for accommodating faith-based values and needs of migrants at end-of-life. These tenets work conjunctively, as well as individually, in respect of individual care, enabling processes and procedures, and ultimately for formulating policy and strategy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Participatory public health systems research: value of community involvement in a study series in mental health emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Marum, Felicity; Semon, Natalie; Mosley, Adrian; Gwon, Howard; Perry, Charlene; Moore, Suzanne Straub; Links, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have arisen over recent years about the absence of empirically derived evidence on which to base policy and practice in the public health system, in general, and to meet the challenge of public health emergency preparedness, in particular. Related issues include the challenge of disaster-caused, behavioral health surge, and the frequent exclusion of populations from studies that the research is meant to aid. To characterize the contributions of nonacademic collaborators to a series of projects validating a set of interventions to enhance capacity and competency of public mental health preparedness planning and response. Urban, suburban, and rural communities of the state of Maryland and rural communities of the state of Iowa. Study partners and participants (both of this project and the studies examined) were representatives of academic health centers (AHCs), local health departments (LHDs), and faith-based organizations (FBOs) and their communities. A multiple-project, case study analysis was conducted, that is, four research projects implemented by the authors from 2005 through 2011 to determine the types and impact of contributions made by nonacademic collaborators to those projects. The analysis involved reviewing research records, conceptualizing contributions (and providing examples) for government, faith, and (nonacademic) institutional collaborators. Ten areas were identified where partners made valuable contributions to the study series; these "value-areas" were as follows: 1) leadership and management of the projects; 2) formulation and refinement of research topics, aims, etc; 3) recruitment and retention of participants; 4) design and enhancement of interventions; 5) delivery of interventions; 6) collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; 7) dissemination of findings; 8) ensuring sustainability of faith/government preparedness planning relationships; 9) optimizing scalability and portability of the model; and 10) facilitating

  12. Non-faith-based arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P; Travaline, John M; Mitchell, Louise A; Ely, E Wesley

    2016-08-01

    This article is a complement to "A Template for Non-Religious-Based Discussions Against Euthanasia" by Melissa Harintho, Nathaniel Bloodworth, and E. Wesley Ely which appeared in the February 2015 Linacre Quarterly . Herein we build upon Daniel Sulmasy's opening and closing arguments from the 2014 Intelligence Squared debate on legalizing assisted suicide, supplemented by other non-faith-based arguments and thoughts, providing four nontheistic arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: (1) "it offends me"; (2) slippery slope; (3) "pain can be alleviated"; (4) physician integrity and patient trust. Lay Summary: Presented here are four non-religious, reasonable arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: (1) "it offends me," suicide devalues human life; (2) slippery slope, the limits on euthanasia gradually erode; (3) "pain can be alleviated," palliative care and modern therapeutics more and more adequately manage pain; (4) physician integrity and patient trust, participating in suicide violates the integrity of the physician and undermines the trust patients place in physicians to heal and not to harm.

  13. Experiences of faith group members using new reproductive and genetic technologies: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Scully, Jackie Leach; Banks, Sarah; Song, Robert; Haq, Jackie

    2017-04-01

    This paper explores the experiences of members of faith groups deciding whether or not to use new reproductive or genetic technologies (NRGTs). It is based on 16 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with people with direct experience of NRGTs. Participants identified as members of Christian or Muslim faith traditions and had been faced with deciding whether or not to make use of novel forms of fertility treatment or genetic testing. The findings show that members of faith groups may experience specific barriers of access, and distinctive ethical difficulties, when considering the use of different forms of NRGTs. Both Christian and Muslim interviewees reported difficulties in obtaining information on the official faith teaching, or found that their faith group had not yet crafted an official position. Participants' needs for information, and the opportunity to discuss the faith implications of their clinical choices, were not being met in either the clinic or the faith setting. This paper concludes that clinics should indicate more clearly their acknowledgement of patients' faith concerns. Appropriate training is needed for both healthcare professionals and chaplains, while faith groups should be encouraged to engage with healthcare providers to ensure that guidance is available to their members.

  14. The links between protected areas, faiths, and sacred natural sites.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Nigel; Higgins-Zogib, Liza; Mansourian, Stephanie

    2009-06-01

    Most people follow and are influenced by some kind of spiritual faith. We examined two ways in which religious faiths can in turn influence biodiversity conservation in protected areas. First, biodiversity conservation is influenced through the direct and often effective protection afforded to wild species in sacred natural sites and in seminatural habitats around religious buildings. Sacred natural sites are almost certainly the world's oldest form of habitat protection. Although some sacred natural sites exist inside official protected areas, many thousands more form a largely unrecognized "shadow" conservation network in many countries throughout the world, which can be more stringently protected than state-run reserves. Second, faiths have a profound impact on attitudes to protection of the natural world through their philosophy, teachings, investment choices, approaches to land they control, and religious-based management systems. We considered the interactions between faiths and protected areas with respect to all 11 mainstream faiths and to a number of local belief systems. The close links between faiths and habitat protection offer major conservation opportunities, but also pose challenges. Bringing a sacred natural site into a national protected-area system can increase protection for the site, but may compromise some of its spiritual values or even its conservation values. Most protected-area managers are not trained to manage natural sites for religious purposes, but many sacred natural sites are under threat from cultural changes and habitat degradation. Decisions about whether or not to make a sacred natural site an "official" protected area therefore need to be made on a case-by-case basis. Such sites can play an important role in conservation inside and outside official protected areas. More information about the conservation value of sacred lands is needed as is more informed experience in integrating these into wider conservation strategies. In

  15. The convergence of American and Nigerian religious conservatism in a biopolitical shaping of Nigeria's HIV/AIDS prevention programmes

    PubMed Central

    Jappah, Jlateh V.

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria has the largest number of HIV/AIDS cases in West Africa, with 3.3 million people estimated to be living with the disease. The country remains a fragile democratic state and has allocated insufficient resources to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS among its citizens. The preponderance of President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) dollars, expert knowledge, conservative ideology and activities has shaped the direction of HIV/AIDS sexual-transmission prevention programmes in Nigeria. PEPFAR channels significant resources through Nigerian faith-based organisations (FBOs), and considers these organisations integral for HIV prevention strategies. In many instances, HIV/AIDS prevention programmes managed by FBOs reflect their ideologies of morality and sexuality. There is a convergence of religious ideology concerning morality and HIV infectivity between American and Nigerian conservatives; this produces a fertile ground for the influence and expansion of the conservative activities of PEPFAR in Nigeria. The paper highlights this nexus and draws attention to the biopolitical underpinning of PEPFAR in shaping Nigeria's HIV prevention programmes. The paper further notes both positive and negative effects of PEPFAR activities and attempts by the Obama administration to redirect PEPFAR to a more holistic approach in order to optimise outcomes. PMID:23391163

  16. Explorations into the Synergy Between Faith, Health, and Health-Care Among Black Baptists

    PubMed Central

    Maclin, Sandy D.

    2013-01-01

    Background U.S. health disparities are documented by race/ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, and geographic demographics. Since federal health record keeping began, regardless of other demographic factors, Black people continue to record statistical significant disparities. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) domain of mind-body medicine provides a method and language to assess the metaphysical constructs of faith, spirituality and religion and their influence on health and healthcare practices. Explorations into the synergy between faith, health and healthcare among a convenient sample of Black Baptist conventioneers provides an opportunity to better understand if and how faith can be used to enhance the health and wellbeing of Black people. Methodology In 2005 a convenience sample of 2,500 Black persons among 10,000 Joint Baptist conventioneers participated in the study; 1,827 completed and returned an 80 item questionnaire. 500 surveys were lost due to computer malfunctions. Survey results covered: demographic, health/safety, health care, and faith/religion/health. Results 58.6% of respondents were women; 61% were married. Most (66.2%) reported good health and few were told by their physician they had a chronic disease. 33.5% never talk to their pastor about health problems or (42.7%) physician visits. Mental health responses: (98.7%) get along well with others; (93.6%) were satisfied with life; (92.8%) feel good about themselves; and (97.6%) were in good spirits most times. Many were in social organizations (40.6%). 96.1% felt religion was very important in their life; 91% thought religion affects physical/mental health; and 89.1% believed faith affects mental/physical health. 95.7% believe faith can change a health crisis. Most described religion and faith differently. Discussion The Black Church has history in social justice connected to community health. Responses to religion/faith affirm the interconnectedness of the synergy between faith

  17. 7 CFR 1980.308 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Full faith and credit. 1980.308 Section 1980.308...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Rural Housing Loans § 1980.308 Full faith and credit. The loan note guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States...

  18. 7 CFR 1980.308 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1980.308 Section 1980.308...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Rural Housing Loans § 1980.308 Full faith and credit. The loan note guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States...

  19. A Qualitative Evaluation of a Faith-Based Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention for African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Alicia K.; Berrios, Nerida; Darnell, Julie S.; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a formative evaluation of a CDC Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 faith-based breast and cervical cancer early detection and prevention intervention for African American women living in urban communities. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of women (N = 94) recruited from each church…

  20. 7 CFR 3575.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3575.3 Section 3575.3... AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is not...

  1. 7 CFR 1779.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Full faith and credit. 1779.3 Section 1779.3... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United...

  2. 7 CFR 3575.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3575.3 Section 3575.3... AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is not...

  3. 7 CFR 3575.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3575.3 Section 3575.3... AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is not...

  4. 7 CFR 1779.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1779.3 Section 1779.3... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United...

  5. 7 CFR 3555.108 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3555.108 Section 3555.108... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL HOUSING PROGRAM (Eff. 9-1-14) Loan Requirements § 3555.108 Full faith and credit. (a) General. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit...

  6. 7 CFR 1779.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1779.3 Section 1779.3... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United...

  7. 7 CFR 3575.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3575.3 Section 3575.3... AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is not...

  8. 7 CFR 762.103 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 762.103 Section 762.103... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.103 Full faith and credit. (a) Fraud and misrepresentation. The loan guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United...

  9. 7 CFR 1779.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1779.3 Section 1779.3... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United...

  10. 7 CFR 3575.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 3575.3 Section 3575.3... AGRICULTURE GENERAL Community Programs Guaranteed Loans § 3575.3 Full faith and credit. The Loan Note Guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is not...

  11. Using a Faith Development Model in College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanard, Rebecca Powell; Painter, Linda C.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of faith on counseling outcomes has been a topic of interest in recent years, however many counselors are not familiar with faith development theory and little practical information on how to integrate that theory into practice is available. This article reviews Fowler's (1981) theory of faith development and offers concrete suggestions…

  12. Can faith-based correctional programs work? An outcome evaluation of the innerchange freedom initiative in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Duwe, Grant; King, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of the InnerChange Freedom Initiative (InnerChange), a faith-based prisoner reentry program, by examining recidivism outcomes among 732 offenders released from Minnesota prisons between 2003 and 2009. Results from the Cox regression analyses revealed that participating in InnerChange significantly reduced reoffending (rearrest, reconviction, and new offense reincarceration), although it did not have a significant impact on reincarceration for a technical violation revocation. The findings further suggest that the beneficial recidivism outcomes for InnerChange participants may have been due, in part, to the continuum of mentoring support some offenders received in the institution and the community. The results imply that faith-based correctional programs can reduce recidivism, but only if they apply evidence-based practices that focus on providing a behavioral intervention within a therapeutic community, addressing the criminogenic needs of participants and delivering a continuum of care from the institution to the community. Given that InnerChange relies heavily on volunteers and program costs are privately funded, the program exacts no additional costs to the State of Minnesota. Yet, because InnerChange lowers recidivism, which includes reduced reincarceration and victimization costs, the program may be especially advantageous from a cost-benefit perspective.

  13. Christian Youth Work: Teaching Faith, Filling Churches or Response to Social Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the purposes of Christian youth work. It responds to Collins-Mayo et al.'s contention that youth work is an ineffective medium for faith transmission and building faith communities and to their affirmation of the church's role in this. The analysis is based on research with young people aged between early teens and early 20s,…

  14. 7 CFR 1738.31 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1738.31 Section 1738.31... AGRICULTURE RURAL BROADBAND ACCESS LOANS AND LOAN GUARANTEES Types of Loans § 1738.31 Full faith and credit. Loan guarantees made under this part are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. ...

  15. 7 CFR 763.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 763.3 Section 763.3 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS LAND CONTRACT GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 763.3 Full faith and credit. (a) The land contract guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. The Agency...

  16. 7 CFR 1738.31 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1738.31 Section 1738.31... AGRICULTURE RURAL BROADBAND ACCESS LOANS AND LOAN GUARANTEES Types of Loans § 1738.31 Full faith and credit. Loan guarantees made under this part are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. ...

  17. 7 CFR 763.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 763.3 Section 763.3 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS LAND CONTRACT GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 763.3 Full faith and credit. (a) The land contract guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. The Agency...

  18. 7 CFR 763.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 763.3 Section 763.3 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS LAND CONTRACT GUARANTEE PROGRAM (Eff. 1-3-12) § 763.3 Full faith and credit. (a) The land contract guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States...

  19. The Transmission of Faith to Young Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale-Benson, Janice

    In the study of faith in young black children, understanding must flow from an analysis of the development of faith in Afro-American culture. To understand faith in Afro-American culture, the roots of Afro-American culture in general, and religious aspects of that culture in particular, must be analyzed. Such an analysis must begin with…

  20. Is it just religious practice? Exploring patients' reasons for choosing a faith-based primary health clinic over their local public sector primary health clinic.

    PubMed

    Porter, James D; Bresick, Graham

    2017-06-29

    Person-centred, re-engineered primary health care (PHC) is a national and global priority. Faith-based health care is a significant provider of PHC in sub-Saharan Africa, but there is limited published data on the reasons for patient choice of faith-based health care, particularly in South Africa. The primary objective was to determine and explore the reasons for patient choice of a faith-based primary care clinic over their local public sector primary care clinic, and secondarily to determine to what extent these reasons were influenced by demography. The study was conducted at Jubilee Health Centre (JHC), a faith-based primary care clinic attached to Jubilee Community Church in Cape Town, South Africa. Focus groups, using the nominal group technique, were conducted with JHC patients and used to generate ranked reasons for attending the clinic. These were collated into the top 15 reasons and incorporated into a quantitative questionnaire which was administered to adult patients attending JHC. A total of 164 patients were surveyed (a response rate of 92.4%) of which 68.3% were female and 57.9% from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Of patients surveyed, 98.2% chose to attend JHC because 'the staff treat me with respect', 96.3% because 'the staff are friendly' and 96.3% because 'the staff take time to listen to me'. The reason 'it is a Christian clinic' was chosen by 70.1% of patients. 'The staff speak my home language' was given as a reason by 61.1% of DRC patients and 37.1% of South African patients. 'The clinic is close to me' was chosen by 66.6% of Muslims and 40.8% of Christians. Patients chose to attend JHC (a faith-based primary care clinic) because of the quality of care received. They emphasised the staff-patient relationship and patient-centredness rather than the clinic's religious practices (prayer with patients). These findings may be important in informing efforts to improve public sector primary care.

  1. Prototyping Faithful Execution in a Java virtual machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, Thomas David; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-09-01

    This report presents the implementation of a stateless scheme for Faithful Execution, the design for which is presented in a companion report, ''Principles of Faithful Execution in the Implementation of Trusted Objects'' (SAND 2003-2328). We added a simple cryptographic capability to an already simplified class loader and its associated Java Virtual Machine (JVM) to provide a byte-level implementation of Faithful Execution. The extended class loader and JVM we refer to collectively as the Sandia Faithfully Executing Java architecture (or JavaFE for short). This prototype is intended to enable exploration of more sophisticated techniques which we intend to implement in hardware.

  2. Non-faith-based arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Travaline, John M.; Mitchell, Louise A.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    This article is a complement to “A Template for Non-Religious-Based Discussions Against Euthanasia” by Melissa Harintho, Nathaniel Bloodworth, and E. Wesley Ely which appeared in the February 2015 Linacre Quarterly. Herein we build upon Daniel Sulmasy's opening and closing arguments from the 2014 Intelligence Squared debate on legalizing assisted suicide, supplemented by other non-faith-based arguments and thoughts, providing four nontheistic arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: (1) “it offends me”; (2) slippery slope; (3) “pain can be alleviated”; (4) physician integrity and patient trust. Lay Summary: Presented here are four non-religious, reasonable arguments against physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: (1) “it offends me,” suicide devalues human life; (2) slippery slope, the limits on euthanasia gradually erode; (3) “pain can be alleviated,” palliative care and modern therapeutics more and more adequately manage pain; (4) physician integrity and patient trust, participating in suicide violates the integrity of the physician and undermines the trust patients place in physicians to heal and not to harm. PMID:27833206

  3. Selective and faithful imitation at 12 and 15 months.

    PubMed

    Hilbrink, Elma E; Sakkalou, Elena; Ellis-Davies, Kate; Fowler, Nia C; Gattis, Merideth

    2013-11-01

    Research on imitation in infancy has primarily focused on what and when infants imitate. More recently, however, the question why infants imitate has received renewed attention, partly motivated by the finding that infants sometimes selectively imitate the actions of others and sometimes faithfully imitate, or overimitate, the actions of others. The present study evaluates the hypothesis that this varying imitative behavior is related to infants' social traits. To do so, we assessed faithful and selective imitation longitudinally at 12 and 15 months, and extraversion at 15 months. At both ages, selective imitation was dependent on the causal structure of the act. From 12 to 15 months, selective imitation decreased while faithful imitation increased. Furthermore, infants high in extraversion were more faithful imitators than infants low in extraversion. These results demonstrate that the onset of faithful imitation is earlier than previously thought, but later than the onset of selective imitation. The observed relation between extraversion and faithful imitation supports the hypothesis that faithful imitation is driven by the social motivations of the infant. We call this relation the King Louie Effect: like the orangutan King Louie in The Jungle Book, infants imitate faithfully due to a growing interest in the interpersonal nature of interactions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cultivating Student Learning across Faith Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Marion; Shady, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Educators face the important challenge of preparing students to live constructively in a religiously diverse world. At some institutions, a reluctance to allow issues of faith into the classroom creates an obstacle to cultivating the skills students need to understand, process, and engage a religiously pluralistic society. At faith-based…

  5. 18 CFR 2.20 - Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities. 2.20 Section 2.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES...

  6. 18 CFR 2.20 - Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities. 2.20 Section 2.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES...

  7. 18 CFR 2.20 - Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Good faith requests for transmission services and good faith responses by transmitting utilities. 2.20 Section 2.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES...

  8. 7 CFR 1980.308 - Full faith and credit and indemnification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit and indemnification. 1980.308... Full faith and credit and indemnification. (a) Full faith and credit. The loan note guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is incontestable...

  9. 7 CFR 1980.308 - Full faith and credit and indemnification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit and indemnification. 1980.308... Full faith and credit and indemnification. (a) Full faith and credit. The loan note guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is incontestable...

  10. 7 CFR 1980.308 - Full faith and credit and indemnification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit and indemnification. 1980.308... Full faith and credit and indemnification. (a) Full faith and credit. The loan note guarantee constitutes an obligation supported by the full faith and credit of the United States and is incontestable...

  11. A Christian faith-based recovery theory: understanding God as sponsor.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2012-12-01

    This article reports the development of a substantive theory to explain an evangelical Christian-based process of recovery from addiction. Faith-based, 12-step, mutual aid programs can improve drug abstinence by offering: (a) an intervention option alone and/or in conjunction with secular programs and (b) an opportunity for religious involvement. Although literature on religion, spirituality, and addiction is voluminous, traditional 12-step programs fail to explain the mechanism that underpins the process of Christian-based recovery (CR). This pilot study used grounded theory to explore and describe the essence of recovery of 10 former crack cocaine-addicted persons voluntarily enrolled in a CR program. Data were collected from in-depth interviews during 4 months of 2008. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim, and the constant comparative method was used to analyze data resulting in the basic social process theory, understanding God as sponsor. The theory was determined through writing theoretical memos that generated key elements that allow persons to recover: acknowledging God-centered crises, communicating with God, and planning for the future. Findings from this preliminary study identifies important factors that can help persons in recovery to sustain sobriety and program administrators to benefit from theory that guides the development of evidence-based addiction interventions.

  12. Low Prevalence of Substandard and Falsified Antimalarial and Antibiotic Medicines in Public and Faith-Based Health Facilities of Southern Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Khuluza, Felix; Kigera, Stephen; Heide, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Substandard and falsified antimalarial and antibiotic medicines represent a serious problem for public health, especially in low- and middle-income countries. However, information on the prevalence of poor-quality medicines is limited. In the present study, samples of six antimalarial and six antibiotic medicines were collected from 31 health facilities and drug outlets in southern Malawi. Random sampling was used in the selection of health facilities. For sample collection, an overt approach was used in licensed facilities, and a mystery shopper approach in nonlicensed outlets. One hundred and fifty-five samples were analyzed by visual and physical examination and by rapid prescreening tests, that is, disintegration testing and thin-layer chromatography using the GPHF-Minilab. Fifty-six of the samples were analyzed according to pharmacopeial monographs in a World Health Organization-prequalified quality control laboratory. Seven out-of-specification medicines were identified. One sample was classified as falsified, lacking the declared active ingredients, and containing other active ingredients instead. Three samples were classified as substandard with extreme deviations from the pharmacopeial standards, and three further samples as substandard with nonextreme deviations. Of the substandard medicines, three failed in dissolution testing, two in the assay for the content of the active pharmaceutical ingredient, and one failed in both dissolution testing and assay. Six of the seven out-of-specification medicines were from private facilities. Only one out-of-specification medicine was found within the samples from public and faith-based health facilities. Although the observed presence of substandard and falsified medicines in Malawi requires action, their low prevalence in public and faith-based health facilities is encouraging. PMID:28219993

  13. Faith Maturity and Mental Well-Being: A Longitudinal Study of Indian American Followers of a Guru Tradition.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Samta P

    2018-05-05

    This article is based on a longitudinal study of Indian Americans devoted to a guru tradition, aiming to explore how faith contributes to their mental well-being. Respondent sample size at phase 1 (2003-2004) was 1872 and at phase 2 (2013-2014) was 1764. Two scales were used to measure faith maturity and well-being. Results showed that phase 2 well-being scores of the devotees were higher, influenced by faith maturity and engagement regularity, thereby corroborating the faith-religiosity-well-being link, further reinforced by the structural equation model. Faith emerges as critical variable in working with this cohort and planning interventions towards promoting their well-being.

  14. Face to Faith: Teaching Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The Tony Blair Faith Foundation has created a program that enables students to learn directly with, from, and about one another's culture, religion and beliefs. Face to Faith is a state-of-the-art educational program that addresses cross-cultural and inter-religious understanding in the context of study about global issues. The program uses…

  15. Looking Forward from "A Common Faith"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2009-01-01

    "A Common Faith," according to this author, is arguably one of John Dewey's least effective books. In it, he tries to persuade readers that the best of two epistemologically different worlds can be reconciled in a common faith--one that employs the methods of science with a generously religious attitude. Possibly most people today believe this…

  16. Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE): A Focus on Climate Change-related Dialogs with Faith-Based Groups as a form of Network Building in the Southeast United States - Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, F. J.; McNeal, K. S.; Hammerman, J.; Christiansen, J.

    2013-05-01

    The Climate Literacy Partnership in the Southeast (CLiPSE, http://CLiPSE-project.org), funded through the National Science Foundation Climate Change Education Partnership program, is dedicated to improving climate literacy in the Southeastern United States (SE US). By promoting science-based formal and informal educational resources, CLiPSE works through a diverse network of key partner organizations in the SE US to conduct effective public dialogues that address diverse audiences and support learning about climate, climate change, and its impact on human and environmental systems. The CLiPSE project successfully created partnerships with more than fifty key stakeholders, including agriculture, education, leisure, and religious organizations, along with culturally diverse communities. This presentation will explain the CLiPSE model for reaching key publics who hold traditional ideologies typically perceived as incompatible with climate change science. We will discuss the results of our interactions with the leaders of our partnering organizations, their knowledge, perceptions, needs, and input in crafting effective messages for their audiences, through addressing both learners' affective and cognitive domains. For the informal education sector, CLiPSE utilized several open discussion and learning forums aimed to promote critical thinking and civil conversation about climate change. Focusing on Faith-based audiences, a key demographic, in the Southeast US, CLiPSE also conducted an online, moderated, author-attended book study, discussing the thoughts and ideas contained in the work, "Green Like God," by Jonathan Merritt. We will share the questions we faced as we focused on and learned about faith-based audiences, such as: What are the barriers and opportunities?; How do we break out of the assumptions that we have to find the common ground?; How do the audiences understand the issues?; How do we understand the issues?; What common language can we find?; What

  17. Conjunctive Faith: A Critique and Analysis from an Evangelical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Fowler regards those who practice radical monotheism as valuers of an inclusive, global community, practicing a type of universal faith that eclipses...Stages of Faith, 20. * 24 think. ,23 Niebuhr’s second type of faith relationship, which Fowler endorses, is henotheism. Niebuhr clothes henotheism...could sus- tain. In doing so, I failed to take seriously enough certain indications, which faith development categories actually make quite clear

  18. Faith, Phonics and Identity: Reading in Faith Complementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosowsky, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of UK school children spend considerable time during a lengthy period of their youth learning to read, or decode, a 'religious classical', the liturgical language connected to their faith. Drawing on recent theories of reading, identity and literacy practices, this paper briefly describes and seeks to share tentative thoughts about some…

  19. "Faith 7" - Prayer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-01-01

    S63-08512 (1963) --- Prayer, written in calligraphy, of astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) mission, read during the 17th orbit of Earth in the "Faith 7". Photo credit: NASA

  20. Addressing unmet mental health and substance abuse needs: a partnered planning effort between grassroots community agencies, faith-based organizations, service providers, and academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eunice C; Chung, Bowen; Stover, Gabriel; Stockdale, Susan; Jones, Felica; Litt, Paula; Klap, Ruth S; Patel, Kavita; Wells, Kenneth B

    2011-01-01

    To conduct a process evaluation of the Restoration Center Los Angeles, a community-academic partnered planning effort aimed at holistically addressing the unmet mental health and substance abuse needs of the Los Angeles African American community. Semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions on key domains of partnership effectiveness were conducted with a random stratified sample of participants varying by level of involvement. Eleven partners representing grassroots community agencies, faith-based organizations, service providers, and academic institutions. Common themes identified by an evaluation consultant and partners relating to partnership effectiveness, perceived benefits and costs, and future expectations. Findings underscore the importance of considering the potential issues that may arise with the increasing diversity of partners and perspectives. Many of the challenges and facilitating factors that arise within academic-community partnerships were similarly experienced between the diverse set of community partners. Challenges that affected partnership development between community-to-community partners included differences in expectations regarding the final goal of the project, trust-building, and the distribution of funds. Despite such challenges, partners were able to jointly develop a final set of recommendations for the creation of restoration centers, which was viewed as a major accomplishment. Limited guidance exists on how to navigate differences that arise between community members who have shared identities on some dimensions (eg, African American ethnicity, Los Angeles residence) but divergent identities on other dimensions (eg, formal church affiliation). With increasing diversity of community representation, careful attention needs to be dedicated to not only the development of academic-community partnerships but also community-community partnerships.

  1. 47 CFR 76.65 - Good faith and exclusive retransmission consent complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Good faith and exclusive retransmission consent... § 76.65 Good faith and exclusive retransmission consent complaints. (a) Duty to negotiate in good faith. Television broadcast stations and multichannel video programming distributors shall negotiate in good faith...

  2. Faith 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    In a nation founded with religious freedom as a central tenet, understanding the roots of one's own faith and discussing it in a non-defensive or unoffensive way can be trying for many. Yet, it is the goal of an emerging interfaith cooperation movement around academia, one that draws upon and expands the ideals and energy of past college…

  3. A community-based randomized trial of a faith-placed intervention to reduce cervical cancer burden in Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Studts, Christina R; Tarasenko, Yelena N; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Shelton, Brent J; Hatcher-Keller, Jennifer; Dignan, Mark B

    2012-06-01

    Faith Moves Mountains assessed the effectiveness of a faith-placed lay health advisor (LHA) intervention to increase Papanicolaou (Pap) test use among middle-aged and older women in a region disproportionately affected by cervical cancer and low screening rates (regionally, only 68% screened in prior 3 years). This community-based RCT was conducted in four Appalachian Kentucky counties (December 2005-June 2008). Women aged 40-64 and overdue for screening were recruited from churches and individually randomized to treatment (n=176) or wait-list control (n=169). The intervention provided LHA home visits and newsletters addressing barriers to screening. Self-reported Pap test receipt was the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that treatment group participants (17.6% screened) had over twice the odds of wait-list controls (11.2% screened) of reporting Pap test receipt post-intervention, OR=2.56, 95% CI: 1.03-6.38, p=0.04. Independent of group, recently screened participants (last Pap >1 but <5 years ago) had significantly higher odds of obtaining screening during the study than rarely or never screened participants (last Pap ≥5 years ago), OR=2.50, 95% CI: 1.48-4.25, p=0.001. The intervention was associated with increased cervical cancer screening. The faith-placed LHA addressing barriers comprises a novel approach to reducing cervical cancer disparities among Appalachian women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A community-based randomized trial of a faith-placed intervention to reduce cervical cancer burden in Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Studts, Christina R.; Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Shelton, Brent J.; Hatcher-Keller, Jennifer; Dignan, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Faith Moves Mountains assessed the effectiveness of a faith-placed lay health advisor (LHA) intervention to increase Papanicolaou (Pap) test use among middle-aged and older women in a region disproportionately affected by cervical cancer and low screening rates (regionally, only 68% screened in prior 3 years). Method This community-based RCT was conducted in four Appalachian Kentucky counties (December 2005 – June 2008). Women aged 40–64 and overdue for screening were recruited from churches and individually randomized to treatment (n=176) or wait-list control (n=169). The intervention provided LHA home visits and newsletters addressing barriers to screening. Self-reported Pap test receipt was the primary outcome. Results Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that treatment group participants (17.6% screened) had over twice the odds of wait-list controls (11.2% screened) of reporting Pap test receipt post-intervention, OR=2.56, 95%CI: 1.03–6.38, p=0.04. Independent of group, recently screened participants (last Pap >1 but <5 years ago) had significantly higher odds of obtaining screening during the study than rarely or never screened participants (last Pap ≥5 years ago), OR=2.50, 95%CI: 1.48–4.25, p=0.001. Conclusions The intervention was associated with increased cervical cancer screening. The faith-placed LHA addressing barriers comprises a novel approach to reducing cervical cancer disparities among Appalachian women. PMID:22498022

  5. An insight into frequency and predictors leading psychiatric patients to visit faith healers: A hospital-based cross-sectional survey, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khoso, Aneeta; Soomro, Rafiq Ahmed; Quraishy, Ayesha Muquim; Khan, Hammad Ali; Ismail, Saba; Nazaz, Mehrunnisa; Younus, Sana; Zainab, Saima

    2018-05-01

    Psychiatric illnesses have recently escalated in numbers, with patients resorting to various forms of healthcare providers, including faith healers. This delays early psychiatric treatment, resulting in further mental health deterioration of the patient. Various factors impact the mode of treatment preferred by psychiatric patients. To determine the frequency of psychiatric patients visiting faith healers, presenting at the outpatient department of Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, and to explore the predictors that direct them toward visiting faith healers. This cross-sectional survey was conducted using a semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire, employing a total of 219 male and female psychiatric patients. Patients were recruited through non-random consecutive sampling technique. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. About 32% of the patients had visited a faith healer in their lifetime. Frequency of current visitors declined; the most frequent reason being stated was no relief from their treatment. Students, patients of upper middle class and those coming for initial visit to a psychiatrist were more likely to visit a faith healer. Patients who knew of someone previously visiting a faith healer were less likely to have visited a faith healer. This study highlights the importance of a multisectoral approach to dealing with psychiatric patients to help in bridging the treatment gap in mental health.

  6. How Female Professionals Successfully Process and Negotiate Involuntary Job Loss at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Debra Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Using a constructivist grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2006), this qualitative study examined how eight female senior-level professionals employed at faith-based colleges and universities processed and navigated the experience of involuntary job loss and successfully transitioned to another position. The theoretical framework of psychological…

  7. Novel Reporter for Faithful Monitoring of ERK2 Dynamics in Living Cells and Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Sipieter, François; Cappe, Benjamin; Gonzalez Pisfil, Mariano; Spriet, Corentin; Bodart, Jean-François; Cailliau-Maggio, Katia; Vandenabeele, Peter; Héliot, Laurent; Riquet, Franck B.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling of ERK1/2 phosphorylation from subcellular localization is essential towards the understanding of molecular mechanisms that control ERK1/2-mediated cell-fate decision. ERK1/2 non-catalytic functions and discoveries of new specific anchors responsible of the subcellular compartmentalization of ERK1/2 signaling pathway have been proposed as regulation mechanisms for which dynamic monitoring of ERK1/2 localization is necessary. However, studying the spatiotemporal features of ERK2, for instance, in different cellular processes in living cells and tissues requires a tool that can faithfully report on its subcellular distribution. We developed a novel molecular tool, ERK2-LOC, based on the T2A-mediated coexpression of strictly equimolar levels of eGFP-ERK2 and MEK1, to faithfully visualize ERK2 localization patterns. MEK1 and eGFP-ERK2 were expressed reliably and functionally both in vitro and in single living cells. We then assessed the subcellular distribution and mobility of ERK2-LOC using fluorescence microscopy in non-stimulated conditions and after activation/inhibition of the MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Finally, we used our coexpression system in Xenopus laevis embryos during the early stages of development. This is the first report on MEK1/ERK2 T2A-mediated coexpression in living embryos, and we show that there is a strong correlation between the spatiotemporal subcellular distribution of ERK2-LOC and the phosphorylation patterns of ERK1/2. Our approach can be used to study the spatiotemporal localization of ERK2 and its dynamics in a variety of processes in living cells and embryonic tissues. PMID:26517832

  8. Teacher-Board Relations in Connecticut: A Summary of the Law Regarding Scope of Negotiations, Good Faith Bargaining, and Unfair Labor Practices. Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    This document is a discussion draft intended to lead to the formulation of a set of guidelines by the state board of education concerning three areas of teacher negotiations: scope, good faith bargaining, and prohibited practices. It has been prepared in the form of an organized data base that focuses on summarizing the present state of the law…

  9. Faith Tribes as Powerful Communities of Adolescents in Highly Differentiated Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijnen, Harmen; Barnard, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    This article describes how communal aspects of faith find their way back into the lives of adolescents. The communal aspects of faith within individualized societies need more attention. It seems that with the current emphasis on individual faith, the intrinsic power of communal aspects of faith has been lost. This study shows that informal…

  10. Forum: Teaching with, against, and to Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones Medine, Carolyn M.; Penner, Todd; Lehman, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    These three articles deal with the issue of faith in the classroom--whether one should teach "to," "for," or "against" faith. While their institutional settings and experiences are different, the authors all contend that more serious reflection needs to be given to the matter of how religious commitment plays out in…

  11. 12 CFR 1024.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith estimate. 1024.7 Section 1024.7 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT (REGULATION X) § 1024.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1) Except as otherwise provided in...

  12. 12 CFR 1024.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith estimate. 1024.7 Section 1024.7 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT (REGULATION X) § 1024.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1) Except as otherwise provided in...

  13. 24 CFR 3500.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Good faith estimate. 3500.7 Section 3500.7 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT § 3500.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1...

  14. 24 CFR 3500.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Good faith estimate. 3500.7 Section 3500.7 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT § 3500.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1...

  15. 24 CFR 3500.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Good faith estimate. 3500.7 Section 3500.7 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT § 3500.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1...

  16. 24 CFR 3500.7 - Good faith estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Good faith estimate. 3500.7 Section 3500.7 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT § 3500.7 Good faith estimate. (a) Lender to provide. (1...

  17. 34 CFR 75.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services without... prospective beneficiary in the provision of program services on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f... against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b...

  18. 34 CFR 75.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services without... prospective beneficiary in the provision of program services on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f... against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b...

  19. 34 CFR 75.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services without... prospective beneficiary in the provision of program services on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f... against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b...

  20. 34 CFR 75.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services without... prospective beneficiary in the provision of program services on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f... against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b...

  1. 34 CFR 75.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services without... prospective beneficiary in the provision of program services on the basis of religion or religious belief. (f... against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or affiliation. (b...

  2. In God We Trust: Qualitative Findings on Finances, Family, and Faith from a Diverse Sample of U.S. Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Loren D.; Dollahite, David C.; Baumgartner, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Employing qualitative interviews with a diverse national sample of 184 religious families (N = 445 individuals), we present an in-depth look at how participants (a) view and frame their faith-based financial giving, (b) how they contribute to and receive from their faith communities, and (c) how the blending of faith and finances influences their…

  3. 34 CFR 76.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a subgrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., development, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services... of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or subgrantee contributes its own funds in excess of... discriminate for or against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  4. 34 CFR 76.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a subgrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., development, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services... of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or subgrantee contributes its own funds in excess of... discriminate for or against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  5. 34 CFR 76.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a subgrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., development, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services... of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or subgrantee contributes its own funds in excess of... discriminate for or against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  6. 34 CFR 76.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a subgrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., development, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services... of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or subgrantee contributes its own funds in excess of... discriminate for or against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  7. 34 CFR 76.52 - Eligibility of faith-based organizations for a subgrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., development, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs; (iii) Use its facilities to provide services... of religion or religious belief. (f) If a State or subgrantee contributes its own funds in excess of... discriminate for or against a private organization on the basis of the organization's religious character or...

  8. Faith and Secularisation in Religious Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, James

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at the contemporary rationale for faith-based universities. There has certainly been a new openness to issues in religion within higher education more generally. Religious influence and involvement in higher education continues to be extensive and manifests itself through the presence of believing Christians, Jews and Muslims in…

  9. 29 CFR 570.128 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Good faith defense. 570.128 Section 570.128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Enforcement § 570.128 Good faith defense. Link...

  10. Social Selection and Religiously Selective Faith Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettinger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent research looking at the socio-economic profile of pupils at faith schools and the contribution religiously selective admission arrangements make. It finds that selection by faith leads to greater social segregation and is open to manipulation. It urges that such selection should end, making the state-funded school…

  11. Building Better Relationships for Better Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gecan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As the co-director of the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), a network founded by Saul Alinsky in 1940 that partners with faith and community-based organizations to improve local leadership and citizen-led action, the author has witnessed how power organizing can work. In the first few months of 2013, the author had been privileged to be part of a…

  12. The WORD (Wholeness, Oneness, Righteousness, Deliverance): design of a randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of an evidence-based weight loss and maintenance intervention translated for a faith-based, rural, African American population using a community-based participatory approach.

    PubMed

    Yeary, Karen Hye-cheon Kim; Cornell, Carol E; Prewitt, Elaine; Bursac, Zoran; Tilford, J Mick; Turner, Jerome; Eddings, Kenya; Love, ShaRhonda; Whittington, Emily; Harris, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The positive effects of weight loss on obesity-related risk factors diminish unless weight loss is maintained. Yet little work has focused on the translation of evidence-based weight loss interventions with the aim of sustaining weight loss in underserved populations. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong faith-based social infrastructure characteristic of rural African American communities is a promising way to sustain weight loss in African Americans, who bear a disproportionate burden of the obesity epidemic. Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, The WORD aims to change dietary and physical activity behaviors to produce and maintain weight loss in rural, African American adults of faith. The WORD is a randomized controlled trial with 450 participants nested within 30 churches. All churches will receive a 16-session core weight loss intervention. Half of the churches will be randomized to receive an additional 12-session maintenance component. The WORD is a cultural adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program, whereby small groups will be led by trained church members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. A detailed cost-effectiveness and process evaluation will be included. The WORD aims to sustain weight loss in rural African Americans. The utilization of a CBPR approach and the engagement of the faith-based social infrastructure of African American communities will maximize the intervention's sustainability. Unique aspects of this trial include the focus on weight loss maintenance and the use of a faith-based CBPR approach in translating evidence-based obesity interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Circumventing 'free care' and 'shouting louder': using a health systems approach to study eye health system sustainability in government and mission facilities of north-west Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jennifer J; Gilbert, Alice; Choy, Michelle; Blanchet, Karl

    2016-09-09

    Little is known about the contributions of faith-based organisations (FBOs) to health systems in Africa. In the specialist area of eye health, international and domestic Christian FBOs have been important contributors as service providers and donors, but they are also commonly critiqued as having developed eye health systems parallel to government structures which are unsustainable. In this study, we use a health systems approach (quarterly interviews, a participatory sustainability analysis exercise and a social network analysis) to describe the strategies used by eye care practitioners in four hospitals of north-west Tanzania to navigate the government, church mission and donor rules that govern eye services delivery there. Practitioners in this region felt eye care was systemically neglected by government and therefore was 'all under the NGOs', but support from international donors was also precarious. Practitioners therefore adopted four main strategies to improve the sustainability of their services: (1) maintain 'sustainability funds' to retain financial autonomy over income; (2) avoid granting government user fee exemptions to elderly patients who are the majority of service users; (3) expand or contract outreach services as financial circumstances change; and (4) access peer support for problem-solving and advocacy. Mission-based eye teams had greater freedom to increase their income from user fees by not implementing government policies for 'free care'. Teams in all hospitals, however, found similar strategies to manage their programmes even when their management structures were unique, suggesting the importance of informal rules shared through a peer network in governing eye care in this pluralistic health system. Health systems research can generate new evidence on the social dynamics that cross public and private sectors within a local health system. In this area of Tanzania, Christian FBOs' investments are important, not only in terms of the population

  14. The Faith Development of Selected Adult Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Margaret

    Theories and studies of adult development are largely confined to adult male career development and ignore a moral or faith dimension of adult development. To determine the faith and moral dimension of adult couples, three hypotheses were examined, i.e.,: (1) religion is a significant dimension in their consciousness; (2) the family is integrally…

  15. 10 CFR 609.14 - Full faith and credit and incontestability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit and incontestability. 609.14 Section 609.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTEES FOR PROJECTS THAT EMPLOY INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 609.14 Full faith and credit and incontestability. The full faith...

  16. 10 CFR 609.14 - Full faith and credit and incontestability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit and incontestability. 609.14 Section 609.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTEES FOR PROJECTS THAT EMPLOY INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 609.14 Full faith and credit and incontestability. The full faith...

  17. 10 CFR 609.14 - Full faith and credit and incontestability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Full faith and credit and incontestability. 609.14 Section 609.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTEES FOR PROJECTS THAT EMPLOY INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 609.14 Full faith and credit and incontestability. The full faith...

  18. Faith and Sexual Orientation Identity Development in Gay College Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily; Glassmann, Danny; Garrett, J. Matthew; Badaszewski, Philip; Jones, Ginny; Pierre, Darren; Fresk, Kara; Young, Dallin; Correll-Hughes, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of gay-identified college men related to their faith and sexual orientation identity development. The findings suggest that for gay-identified college men, faith and sexual orientation identity development includes examination of one's faith and sexual orientation identity, important relationships, and a desire…

  19. 10 CFR 609.14 - Full faith and credit and incontestability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full faith and credit and incontestability. 609.14 Section 609.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTEES FOR PROJECTS THAT EMPLOY INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 609.14 Full faith and credit and incontestability. The full faith...

  20. 10 CFR 609.14 - Full faith and credit and incontestability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit and incontestability. 609.14 Section 609.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTEES FOR PROJECTS THAT EMPLOY INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 609.14 Full faith and credit and incontestability. The full faith...

  1. Men's Sexual Faithfulness Judgments May Contain a Kernel of Truth.

    PubMed

    Leivers, Samantha; Simmons, Leigh W; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms enabling men to identify women likely to engage in extra-pair copulations (EPCs) would be advantageous in avoiding cuckoldry. Men's judgments of female sexual faithfulness often show high consensus, but accuracy appears poor. We examined whether accuracy of these judgments made to images of women could be improved through i) employing a forced choice task, in which men were asked to select the more faithful of two women and/or ii) providing men with full person images. In Experiment 1, men rated 34 women, for whom we had self-reported EPC behavior, on faithfulness, trustworthiness or attractiveness from either face or full person photographs. They then completed a forced choice task, selecting the more faithful of two woman from 17 pairs of images, each containing one woman who had reported no EPCs and one who had reported two or more EPCs. Men were unable to rate faithfulness with any accuracy, replicating previous findings. However, when asked to choose the more faithful of two women, they performed significantly above chance, although the ability to judge faithfulness at above-chance levels did not generalize to all pairs of women. Although there was no significant difference in accuracy for face and full person image pairs, only judgments from faces were significantly above chance. In Experiment 2, we showed that this accuracy for faces was repeatable in a new sample of men. We also showed that individual variation in accuracy was unrelated to variation in preferences for faithfulness in a long-term partner. Overall, these results show that men's judgments of faithfulness made from faces of unfamiliar women may contain a kernel of truth.

  2. How Female Professionals Successfully Process and Negotiate Involuntary Job Loss at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Debra Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Using a constructivist grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2006), this qualitative study examined how 8 female senior-level professionals employed at faith-based colleges and universities processed and navigated the experience of involuntary job loss and successfully transitioned to another position. The purpose of this research was to contribute…

  3. 32 CFR 720.32 - Certificates of full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certificates of full faith and credit. 720.32... Official Records § 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy... full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy...

  4. 32 CFR 720.32 - Certificates of full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certificates of full faith and credit. 720.32... Official Records § 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy... full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy...

  5. 32 CFR 720.32 - Certificates of full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certificates of full faith and credit. 720.32... Official Records § 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy... full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy...

  6. 32 CFR 720.32 - Certificates of full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certificates of full faith and credit. 720.32... Official Records § 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy... full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy...

  7. 32 CFR 720.32 - Certificates of full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certificates of full faith and credit. 720.32... Official Records § 720.32 Certificates of full faith and credit. The Judge Advocate General, the Deputy... full faith and credit certifying the signatures and authority of officers of the Department of the Navy...

  8. Faith Informing Competitive Youth Athletes in Christian Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoven, Matt

    2016-01-01

    How do students use religious faith to inform their actions in competitive sport? This qualitative study critically reflects on this question based upon the thinking processes and experiences of 15-year-old participants in sports and, in turn, produces a basic conceptual framework toward the question at hand. Overall, students reported a complex,…

  9. Clergy's Views of the Relationship between Science and Religious Faith and the Implications for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Daniel L.; Dawkins, Karen R.; Penick, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Since many teachers and students recognize other kinds of knowledge (faith) based on other ways of knowing, consideration of these realities is appropriate for the science education community. Understanding the multitude of ways that clergy view relationships between science and faith (i.e. alternative ways of knowing) would assist in…

  10. The Relationship of High School Type to Persistence and Grade Point Average of First-Year Students at Faith-Based Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litscher, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01

    Based on previous research, there are several student characteristics that have been identified to affect academic success of first-year students in college. However, there are few studies that examine if the type of high school (public, private faith-based, private secular, or homeschool) from which a student graduates affects grade point average…

  11. Frequency of Faith and Spirituality Discussion in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, David; White, Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Faith and spirituality are important in the lives of many individuals, and therefore, many patients. This study was performed to determine whether faith and spirituality are active part of the healthcare field and patients' receipt of these sometimes delicate topics. The nuances of the concepts of faith, spirituality, and religion and their implications in the healthcare setting are discussed. Benefits and detriments of faith and spirituality are reviewed in terms of how they relate to the health of the patient and to the healthcare field. With the focus of healthcare shifting to holistic care, this conversation may be more necessary than ever in practice, yet it seems many providers are not discussing these matters with patients. The study analyzes whether healthcare providers are discussing these topics with patients and how the discussion is received or would be received by patients. Findings demonstrate the infrequency of the discussion regardless of the fact that the majority of patients consider themselves faithful or spiritual. This study was approved by the Clarkson University Institutional Review Board on June 18, 2104.

  12. [The meaning of medical intervention and religious faith for the elderly cancer patient].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Lefèvre, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the meaning medical intervention and religious faith have for the elderly patient with cancer. A descriptive and qualitative investigation was developed between January 9 and March 28, 2001 in the Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual--Francisco Morato de Oliveira/IAMSPE (Hospital for State Public Servants). The studied sample was not randomized and consisted of 20 elderly men and women with cancer. The data were collected in semi-structured interviews and organized and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse method, applying three methodological illustrations: the Central Idea, Key Expressions and the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD). The main central ideas of the discourse material were: 1. Nothing to complain about. I think it is very good and they are on the right track; 2. No. For now, I'm doing everything the doctors say; 3. I've already participated, but not currently; 4. I don't participate in religious activity; 5. Invigoration, hope and balance. Religious faith is everything! 6. It remains the same; however, it changed the way to be. The CSD shows that the adopted medical intervention gave the elderly renewed hope and that religious faith is a key instrument for facing the disease.

  13. The development of a scale to identify college and university science professors' science-faith paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundrick, David Ray

    The relationship between science and religion in American higher education changed significantly over the past two centuries as empiricism and naturalism became the philosophical underpinnings of the university. This philosophical shift contributed significantly to the secularization of the academy, the context in which philosophers of science during the last half-century have theorized a variety of theoretical patterns for relating science and religion. Evidence suggests that science professors operationalize various science-faith paradigms, but no instrument prior to this research had ever been created to measure the constructs. The purpose of this research was to develop a scale, with at least adequate psychometric properties (good validity and initial reliability), able to identify and discriminate among these various science-faith paradigms (in the Western Christian tradition) in practice among college and university science professors in the United States. The researcher conducted a Web-based electronic survey of a stratified random sample of science professors representing a variety of higher education institution types, science disciplines, and religious affiliation. Principal Components Analysis of the survey data produced five factors predicted by the researcher. These factors correspond to five science-faith paradigms: Conflict---Science over Religion; Conflict---Religion over Science; Compartmentalism; Complementarism; and Concordism. Analysis of items loading on each factor produced a 50-item Science-Faith Paradigm Scale (SFPS) that consists of five sub-scales, each having characteristics of good content validity, construct validity, and initial reliability (Cronbach's alpha ranging from .87 to .95). Preliminary exploratory analysis of differences in SFPS sub-scale scores based on demographic variables indicates that the SFPS is capable of discriminating among groups. This research validates the existence of five science-faith paradigms in practice in

  14. 7 CFR 762.103 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 762.103 Section 762.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.103 Full faith and credit. (a) Fraud and...

  15. 7 CFR 762.103 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 762.103 Section 762.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.103 Full faith and credit. (a) Fraud and...

  16. 7 CFR 1779.3 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 1779.3 Section 1779.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.3 Full faith and credit. The...

  17. 7 CFR 762.103 - Full faith and credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full faith and credit. 762.103 Section 762.103 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.103 Full faith and credit. (a) Fraud and...

  18. Topological Aspects of the FAITH Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, Murray; Long, Kurtis

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the following issues (1) What is relationship between surface pressure extrema and singular points? (2) Does every singular point in a pattern of skin friction lines occur at a surface pressure extremum? (and/or vice versa?) (3) Can this relationship be generalized to all geometries? (4) FAITH Project (5) Ongoing effort at NASA Ames Experimental AeroPhysics Branch (6) Multi-parameter wind tunnel investigation of flow around obstacle (7) Acquire data for CFD validation, optimization and (8) Relationship between FAITH and topology projects

  19. How can mental health and faith-based practitioners work together? A case study of collaborative mental health in Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Shields, Laura; Chauhan, Ajay; Bakre, Ravindra; Hamlai, Milesh; Lynch, Durwin; Bunders, Joske

    2016-06-01

    Despite the knowledge that people with mental illness often seek care from multiple healing systems, there is limited collaboration between these systems. Greater collaboration with existing community resources could narrow the treatment gap and reduce fragmentation by encouraging more integrated care. This paper explores the origins, use, and outcomes of a collaborative programme between faith-based and allopathic mental health practitioners in India. We conducted 16 interviews with key stakeholders and examined demographic and clinical characteristics of the user population. Consistent with previous research, we found that collaboration is challenging and requires trust, rapport-building, and open dialogue. The collaboration reached a sizeable population, was reviewed favourably by key stakeholders-particularly on health improvement and livelihood restoration-and perhaps most importantly, views the client holistically, allowing for both belief systems to play a shared role in care and recovery. Results support the idea that, despite differing practices, collaboration between faith-based and allopathic mental health practitioners can be achieved and can benefit clients with otherwise limited access to mental health care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Never Mind the Evidence: Blair's Obsession with Faith Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Derek

    2007-01-01

    In this article the author describes how the Blair governments have sought to increase the number of schools controlled by churches and other religious groups despite a mass of evidence about the dangers of faith-based education and in the face of widespread professional, political and public concerns. (Contains 4 notes.)

  1. 29 CFR 790.15 - “Good faith.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR... OF 1947 ON THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 Defense of Good Faith Reliance on Administrative..., were in good faith. The legislative history of the Portal Act makes it clear that the employer's “good...

  2. 29 CFR 790.15 - “Good faith.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR... OF 1947 ON THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 Defense of Good Faith Reliance on Administrative..., were in good faith. The legislative history of the Portal Act makes it clear that the employer's “good...

  3. 8 CFR 274a.4 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Good faith defense. 274a.4 Section 274a.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS Employer Requirements § 274a.4 Good faith defense. An employer or a recruiter or referrer for a...

  4. 8 CFR 274a.4 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good faith defense. 274a.4 Section 274a.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS Employer Requirements § 274a.4 Good faith defense. An employer or a recruiter or referrer for a...

  5. 8 CFR 274a.4 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Good faith defense. 274a.4 Section 274a.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS Employer Requirements § 274a.4 Good faith defense. An employer or a recruiter or referrer for a...

  6. 8 CFR 274a.4 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good faith defense. 274a.4 Section 274a.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS Employer Requirements § 274a.4 Good faith defense. An employer or a recruiter or referrer for a...

  7. 8 CFR 274a.4 - Good faith defense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good faith defense. 274a.4 Section 274a.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS Employer Requirements § 274a.4 Good faith defense. An employer or a recruiter or referrer for a...

  8. Social Environmental Correlates of Health Behaviors in a Faith-Based Policy and Environmental Change Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hermstad, April; Honeycutt, Sally; Flemming, Shauna StClair; Carvalho, Michelle L; Hodge, Tarccara; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C; Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob

    2018-03-01

    Diet and physical activity are behavioral risk factors for many chronic diseases, which are among the most common health conditions in the United States. Yet most Americans fall short of meeting established dietary and physical activity guidelines. Faith-based organizations as settings for health promotion interventions can affect members at multiple levels of the social ecological model. The present study investigated whether change in the church social environment was associated with healthier behavior at church and in general at 1-year follow-up. Six churches received mini-grants and technical assistance for 1 year to support policy and environmental changes for healthy eating (HE) and physical activity (PA). Socioenvironmental (social support and social norms) and behavioral (HE and PA at church and in general) outcomes were derived from baseline and 1-year follow-up church member surveys ( n = 258). Three of six churches demonstrated significant improvements in all three socioenvironmental aspects of HE. Two of five churches exhibited significant socioenvironmental improvements for PA at follow-up. Church social environmental changes were related to health behaviors at church and in general ( p < .05). Change in social support for HE, social support for PA, and social norms for PA were each associated with three church-based and general behavioral outcomes. Social norms for healthy eating were related to two general behavior outcomes and social norms for unhealthy eating to one general behavioral outcome. Study findings demonstrate that socioenvironmental characteristics are essential to multilevel interventions and merit consideration in designing policy and environmental change interventions.

  9. 16 CFR 301.48a - Guaranties not received in good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guaranties not received in good faith. 301.48a Section 301.48a Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF... received in good faith. A guaranty shall not be deemed to have been received in good faith within the...

  10. 12 CFR 1008.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... for Administration of the NMLSR § 1008.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. The... action or proceeding for monetary damages by reason of the good-faith action or omission of any officer...

  11. 16 CFR 301.48a - Guaranties not received in good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Guaranties not received in good faith. 301.48a Section 301.48a Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF... received in good faith. A guaranty shall not be deemed to have been received in good faith within the...

  12. 12 CFR 1008.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... for Administration of the NMLSR § 1008.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. The... action or proceeding for monetary damages by reason of the good-faith action or omission of any officer...

  13. 16 CFR 301.48a - Guaranties not received in good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guaranties not received in good faith. 301.48a Section 301.48a Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF... received in good faith. A guaranty shall not be deemed to have been received in good faith within the...

  14. 12 CFR 1008.309 - Absence of liability for good-faith administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Absence of liability for good-faith... for Administration of the NMLSR § 1008.309 Absence of liability for good-faith administration. The... action or proceeding for monetary damages by reason of the good-faith action or omission of any officer...

  15. 16 CFR 301.48a - Guaranties not received in good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Guaranties not received in good faith. 301.48a Section 301.48a Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF... received in good faith. A guaranty shall not be deemed to have been received in good faith within the...

  16. 24 CFR 100.308 - Good faith defense against civil money damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Good faith defense against civil... Good faith defense against civil money damages. (a) A person shall not be held personally liable for... under this subpart. (b)(1) A person claiming the good faith belief defense must have actual knowledge...

  17. 24 CFR 100.308 - Good faith defense against civil money damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Good faith defense against civil... Good faith defense against civil money damages. (a) A person shall not be held personally liable for... under this subpart. (b)(1) A person claiming the good faith belief defense must have actual knowledge...

  18. 16 CFR 301.48a - Guaranties not received in good faith.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guaranties not received in good faith. 301... received in good faith. A guaranty shall not be deemed to have been received in good faith within the... required label, required invoice and advertisement relating to the fur product or fur so guaranteed; (b) If...

  19. Faith-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable intake among Koreans in the USA: a feasibility pilot.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Suzanne C; Obayashi, Saori

    2017-02-01

    In the USA, adults of Korean descent tend to eat fewer vegetables than adults in South Korea. The present pilot study examined the feasibility of developing and implementing a faith-based intervention to improve knowledge, attitudes and intake of fruit and vegetables (F&V) for Koreans in the USA. Feasibility pilot using a cluster-randomized intervention trial design. The multicomponent intervention included motivational interviewing sessions by telephone and church-based group activities. Eleven of the largest Korean churches in Southern California. Adults (n 71) from the eleven Korean churches. Feasibility was demonstrated for the study procedures, including recruitment of churches and individual participants. Allocating time throughout the study for church collaboration and having a study church coordinator to coordinate multiple churches were crucial. Participants' attendance at church activities (89 %) and participation by pastors and fellow churchgoers exceeded expectations. Participants' use of intervention materials was high (94 % or above) and satisfaction with coaching sessions was also high (75 % or above). Having a centralized coach trained in motivational interviewing, instead of one at each church, proved practical. Pilot results are promising for F&V knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. The intervention group improved knowledge and intake of the recommended amounts of F&V, above that of the control group. This pilot suggests that Koreans in the USA can be reached through their church and that a faith-based intervention study can be implemented to increase F&V intake. Preliminary results for the intervention appear promising but further research is needed to properly evaluate its efficacy.

  20. Faith-Placed Parenting Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Megan E.; Rhoades, Brittany L.; Small, Meg; Coatsworth, J. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration with religious institutions is recommended as a frontier for prevention science. Little is known about the effectiveness of programs currently disseminated by churches. This pilot program investigated potential advantages and disadvantages of university collaborations in faith settings, by implementing the Staying Connected with Your…