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Sample records for falciparum m17 aminopeptidase

  1. Modelling of human leucyl aminopeptidases for in silico off target binding analysis of potential Plasmodium falciparum leucine aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Shakti; Raj, Utkarsh; Chaudhary, Meenakshi; Nain, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in the world. Emergence of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium strains makes it crucial to identify new classes of compounds for anti-malarial therapy. Novel anti-malarial compounds from natural sources (Gomphostema niveum) as well as synthetic chemicals (5-aminolevulinic acid) have been reported in recent patents. Plasmodium falciparum leucyl aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) is a validated target for antimalarial drug development. However, known aminopeptidase inhibitors beset with the problem of non-specificity. Therefore, 3D structural models of PfA-M17 human homologs, Leucine aminopeptidase3 (hLAP3) and probable leucine aminopeptidase (hNPEPL1) were predicted for molecular docking based screening of potential inhibitors for their off target activity. Comparison of IC50 and docking scores of highly active hLAP3 inhibitors shows good correlation (r(2)≈ 0.8). Further, docking analysis with potential PfA-M17 inhibitor Compound-X (identified through virtual screening) shows much higher binding affinity towards PfA-M17 (docking score -11.44) than hLAP3 (docking score -4.26) and hNPEPL1 (docking score -5.08). This lead compound, Compound-X can act as a scaffold for further increasing PfA-M17 binding affinity and hLAP3 and hNPEPL1 3D structure models will be useful for screening of PfA-M17 specific inhibitors.

  2. Screening the Medicines for Malaria Venture "Malaria Box" against the Plasmodium falciparum aminopeptidases, M1, M17 and M18.

    PubMed

    Paiardini, Alessandro; Bamert, Rebecca S; Kannan-Sivaraman, Komagal; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Mistry, Shailesh N; Scammells, Peter J; McGowan, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that remains a global health burden. The ability of the parasite to rapidly develop resistance to therapeutics drives an urgent need for the delivery of new drugs. The Medicines for Malaria Venture have compounds known for their antimalarial activity, but not necessarily the molecular targets. In this study, we assess the ability of the "MMV 400" compounds to inhibit the activity of three metalloaminopeptidases from Plasmodium falciparum, PfA-M1, PfA-M17 and PfM18 AAP. We have developed a multiplex assay system to allow rapid primary screening of compounds against all three metalloaminopeptidases, followed by detailed analysis of promising compounds. Our results show that there were no PfM18AAP inhibitors, whereas two moderate inhibitors of the neutral aminopeptidases PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 were identified. Further investigation through structure-activity relationship studies and molecular docking suggest that these compounds are competitive inhibitors with novel binding mechanisms, acting through either non-classical zinc coordination or independently of zinc binding altogether. Although it is unlikely that inhibition of PfA-M1 and/or PfA-M17 is the primary mechanism responsible for the antiplasmodial activity reported for these compounds, their detailed characterization, as presented in this work, pave the way for their further optimization as a novel class of dual PfA-M1/PfA-M17 inhibitors utilising non-classical zinc binding groups.

  3. Potent dual inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum M1 and M17 aminopeptidases through optimization of S1 pocket interactions.

    PubMed

    Drinkwater, Nyssa; Vinh, Natalie B; Mistry, Shailesh N; Bamert, Rebecca S; Ruggeri, Chiara; Holleran, John P; Loganathan, Sasdekumar; Paiardini, Alessandro; Charman, Susan A; Powell, Andrew K; Avery, Vicky M; McGowan, Sheena; Scammells, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Malaria remains a global health problem, and though international efforts for treatment and eradication have made some headway, the emergence of drug-resistant parasites threatens this progress. Antimalarial therapeutics acting via novel mechanisms are urgently required. Plasmodium falciparum M1 and M17 are neutral aminopeptidases which are essential for parasite growth and development. Previous work in our group has identified inhibitors capable of dual inhibition of PfA-M1 and PfA-M17, and revealed further regions within the protease S1 pockets that could be exploited in the development of ligands with improved inhibitory activity. Herein, we report the structure-based design and synthesis of novel hydroxamic acid analogues that are capable of potent inhibition of both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17. Furthermore, the developed compounds potently inhibit Pf growth in culture, including the multi-drug resistant strain Dd2. The ongoing development of dual PfA-M1/PfA-M17 inhibitors continues to be an attractive strategy for the design of novel antimalarial therapeutics.

  4. Identification and Validation of a Potent Dual Inhibitor of the P. falciparum M1 and M17 Aminopeptidases Using Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Chiara; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Sivaraman, Komagal Kannan; Bamert, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 metalloaminopeptidases are validated drug targets for the discovery of antimalarial agents. In order to identify dual inhibitors of both proteins, we developed a hierarchical virtual screening approach, followed by in vitro evaluation of the highest scoring hits. Starting from the ZINC database of purchasable compounds, sequential 3D-pharmacophore and molecular docking steps were applied to filter the virtual ‘hits’. At the end of virtual screening, 12 compounds were chosen and tested against the in vitro aminopeptidase activity of both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17. Two molecules showed significant inhibitory activity (low micromolar/nanomolar range) against both proteins. Finally, the crystal structure of the most potent compound in complex with both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 was solved, revealing the binding mode and validating our computational approach. PMID:26406322

  5. Identification and Validation of a Potent Dual Inhibitor of the P. falciparum M1 and M17 Aminopeptidases Using Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Chiara; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Sivaraman, Komagal Kannan; Bamert, Rebecca S; McGowan, Sheena; Paiardini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 metalloaminopeptidases are validated drug targets for the discovery of antimalarial agents. In order to identify dual inhibitors of both proteins, we developed a hierarchical virtual screening approach, followed by in vitro evaluation of the highest scoring hits. Starting from the ZINC database of purchasable compounds, sequential 3D-pharmacophore and molecular docking steps were applied to filter the virtual 'hits'. At the end of virtual screening, 12 compounds were chosen and tested against the in vitro aminopeptidase activity of both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17. Two molecules showed significant inhibitory activity (low micromolar/nanomolar range) against both proteins. Finally, the crystal structure of the most potent compound in complex with both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 was solved, revealing the binding mode and validating our computational approach. PMID:26406322

  6. Identification and Validation of a Potent Dual Inhibitor of the P. falciparum M1 and M17 Aminopeptidases Using Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Chiara; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Sivaraman, Komagal Kannan; Bamert, Rebecca S; McGowan, Sheena; Paiardini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 metalloaminopeptidases are validated drug targets for the discovery of antimalarial agents. In order to identify dual inhibitors of both proteins, we developed a hierarchical virtual screening approach, followed by in vitro evaluation of the highest scoring hits. Starting from the ZINC database of purchasable compounds, sequential 3D-pharmacophore and molecular docking steps were applied to filter the virtual 'hits'. At the end of virtual screening, 12 compounds were chosen and tested against the in vitro aminopeptidase activity of both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17. Two molecules showed significant inhibitory activity (low micromolar/nanomolar range) against both proteins. Finally, the crystal structure of the most potent compound in complex with both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17 was solved, revealing the binding mode and validating our computational approach.

  7. Characterization of the Plasmodium falciparum M17 leucyl aminopeptidase. A protease involved in amino acid regulation with potential for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Stack, Colin M; Lowther, Jonathan; Cunningham, Eithne; Donnelly, Sheila; Gardiner, Donald L; Trenholme, Katharine R; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Teuscher, Franka; Grembecka, Jolanta; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Pawel; Lua, Linda; Bell, Angus; Dalton, John P

    2007-01-19

    Amino acids generated from the catabolism of hemoglobin by intra-erythrocytic malaria parasites are not only essential for protein synthesis but also function in maintaining an osmotically stable environment, and creating a gradient by which amino acids that are rare or not present in hemoglobin are drawn into the parasite from host serum. We have proposed that a Plasmodium falciparum M17 leucyl aminopeptidase (PfLAP) generates and regulates the internal pool of free amino acids and therefore represents a target for novel antimalarial drugs. This enzyme has been expressed in insect cells as a functional 320-kDa homo-hexamer that is optimally active at neutral or alkaline pH, is dependent on metal ions for activity, and exhibits a substrate preference for N-terminally exposed hydrophobic amino acids, particularly leucine. PfLAP is produced by all stages in the intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle of malaria but was most highly expressed by trophozoites, a stage at which hemoglobin degradation and parasite protein synthesis are elevated. The enzyme was located by immunohistochemical methods and by transfecting malaria cells with a PfLAP-green fluorescent protein construct, to the cytosolic compartment of the cell at all developmental stages, including segregated merozoites. Amino acid dipeptide analogs, such as bestatin and its derivatives, are potent inhibitors of the protease and also block the growth of P. falciparum malaria parasites in culture. This study provides a biochemical basis for the antimalarial activity of aminopeptidase inhibitors. Availability of functionally active recombinant PfLAP, coupled with a simple enzymatic readout, will aid medicinal chemistry and/or high throughput approaches for the future design/discovery of new antimalarial drugs. PMID:17107951

  8. Structural basis for substrate specificity of Helicobacter pylori M17 aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Modak, Joyanta K; Rut, Wioletta; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Pike, Robert N; Drag, Marcin; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-02-01

    The M17 aminopeptidase from the carcinogenic gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori (HpM17AP) is an important housekeeping enzyme involved in catabolism of endogenous and exogenous peptides. It is implicated in H. pylori defence against the human innate immune response and in the mechanism of metronidazole resistance. Bestatin inhibits HpM17AP and suppresses H. pylori growth. To address the structural basis of catalysis and inhibition of this enzyme, we have established its specificity towards the N-terminal amino acid of peptide substrates and determined the crystal structures of HpM17AP and its complex with bestatin. The position of the D-phenylalanine moiety of the inhibitor with respect to the active-site metal ions, bicarbonate ion and with respect to other M17 aminopeptidases suggested that this residue binds to the S1 subsite of HpM17AP. In contrast to most characterized M17 aminopeptidases, HpM17AP displays preference for L-Arg over L-Leu residues in peptide substrates. Compared to very similar homologues from other bacteria, a distinguishing feature of HpM17AP is a hydrophilic pocket at the end of the S1 subsite that is likely to accommodate the charged head group of the L-Arg residue of the substrate. The pocket is flanked by a sodium ion (not present in M17 aminopeptidases that show preference for L-Leu) and its coordinating water molecules. In addition, the structure suggests that variable loops at the entrance to, and in the middle of, the substrate-binding channel are important determinants of substrate specificity of M17 aminopeptidases.

  9. Structural basis for substrate specificity of Helicobacter pylori M17 aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Modak, Joyanta K; Rut, Wioletta; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Pike, Robert N; Drag, Marcin; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-02-01

    The M17 aminopeptidase from the carcinogenic gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori (HpM17AP) is an important housekeeping enzyme involved in catabolism of endogenous and exogenous peptides. It is implicated in H. pylori defence against the human innate immune response and in the mechanism of metronidazole resistance. Bestatin inhibits HpM17AP and suppresses H. pylori growth. To address the structural basis of catalysis and inhibition of this enzyme, we have established its specificity towards the N-terminal amino acid of peptide substrates and determined the crystal structures of HpM17AP and its complex with bestatin. The position of the D-phenylalanine moiety of the inhibitor with respect to the active-site metal ions, bicarbonate ion and with respect to other M17 aminopeptidases suggested that this residue binds to the S1 subsite of HpM17AP. In contrast to most characterized M17 aminopeptidases, HpM17AP displays preference for L-Arg over L-Leu residues in peptide substrates. Compared to very similar homologues from other bacteria, a distinguishing feature of HpM17AP is a hydrophilic pocket at the end of the S1 subsite that is likely to accommodate the charged head group of the L-Arg residue of the substrate. The pocket is flanked by a sodium ion (not present in M17 aminopeptidases that show preference for L-Leu) and its coordinating water molecules. In addition, the structure suggests that variable loops at the entrance to, and in the middle of, the substrate-binding channel are important determinants of substrate specificity of M17 aminopeptidases. PMID:26616008

  10. Essential Role for an M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase in Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Ran; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Song, Su-Min; Joo, So-Young; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2015-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions such as starvation, low temperatures, and exposure to biocides. During encystation, a massive turnover of intracellular components occurs, and a large number of organelles and proteins are degraded by proteases. Previous studies with specific protease inhibitors have shown that cysteine and serine proteases are involved in encystation of Acanthamoeba, but little is known about the role of metalloproteases in this process. Here, we have biochemically characterized an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AcLAP) and analyzed its functional involvement in encystation of the parasite. Recombinant AcLAP shared biochemical properties such as optimal pH, requirement of divalent metal ions for activity, substrate specificity for Leu, and inhibition profile by aminopeptidase inhibitors and metal chelators with other characterized M17 family LAPs. AcLAP was highly expressed at a late stage of encystation and mainly localized in the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Knockdown of AcLAP using small interfering RNA induced a decrease of LAP activity during encystation, a reduction of mature cyst formation, and the formation of abnormal cyst walls. In summary, these results indicate that AcLAP is a typical M17 family enzyme that plays an essential role during encystation of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26075721

  11. The major leucyl aminopeptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi (LAPTc) assembles into a homohexamer and belongs to the M17 family of metallopeptidases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pathogens depend on peptidase activities to accomplish many physiological processes, including interaction with their hosts, highlighting parasitic peptidases as potential drug targets. In this study, a major leucyl aminopeptidolytic activity was identified in Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Results The enzyme was isolated from epimastigote forms of the parasite by a two-step chromatographic procedure and associated with a single 330-kDa homohexameric protein as determined by sedimentation velocity and light scattering experiments. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified the enzyme as the predicted T. cruzi aminopeptidase EAN97960. Molecular and enzymatic analysis indicated that this leucyl aminopeptidase of T. cruzi (LAPTc) belongs to the peptidase family M17 or leucyl aminopeptidase family. LAPTc has a strong dependence on neutral pH, is mesophilic and retains its oligomeric form up to 80°C. Conversely, its recombinant form is thermophilic and requires alkaline pH. Conclusions LAPTc is a 330-kDa homohexameric metalloaminopeptidase expressed by all T. cruzi forms and mediates the major parasite leucyl aminopeptidolytic activity. Since biosynthetic pathways for essential amino acids, including leucine, are lacking in T. cruzi, LAPTc could have a function in nutritional supply. PMID:21861921

  12. A Plasmodium falciparum S33 proline aminopeptidase is associated with changes in erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fabio L; Dixon, Matthew W A; Stack, Colin M; Teuscher, Franka; Taran, Elena; Jones, Malcolm K; Lovas, Erica; Tilley, Leann; Brown, Christopher L; Trenholme, Katharine R; Dalton, John P; Gardiner, Donald L; Skinner-Adams, Tina S

    2016-10-01

    Infection with the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One of the striking features of this parasite is its ability to remodel and decrease the deformability of host red blood cells, a process that contributes to disease. To further understand the virulence of Pf we investigated the biochemistry and function of a putative Pf S33 proline aminopeptidase (PfPAP). Unlike other P. falciparum aminopeptidases, PfPAP contains a predicted protein export element that is non-syntenic with other human infecting Plasmodium species. Characterization of PfPAP demonstrated that it is exported into the host red blood cell and that it is a prolyl aminopeptidase with a preference for N-terminal proline substrates. In addition genetic deletion of this exopeptidase was shown to lead to an increase in the deformability of parasite-infected red cells and in reduced adherence to the endothelial cell receptor CD36 under flow conditions. Our studies suggest that PfPAP plays a role in the rigidification and adhesion of infected red blood cells to endothelial surface receptors, a role that may make this protein a novel target for anti-disease interventions strategies.

  13. A Plasmodium falciparum S33 proline aminopeptidase is associated with changes in erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fabio L; Dixon, Matthew W A; Stack, Colin M; Teuscher, Franka; Taran, Elena; Jones, Malcolm K; Lovas, Erica; Tilley, Leann; Brown, Christopher L; Trenholme, Katharine R; Dalton, John P; Gardiner, Donald L; Skinner-Adams, Tina S

    2016-10-01

    Infection with the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. One of the striking features of this parasite is its ability to remodel and decrease the deformability of host red blood cells, a process that contributes to disease. To further understand the virulence of Pf we investigated the biochemistry and function of a putative Pf S33 proline aminopeptidase (PfPAP). Unlike other P. falciparum aminopeptidases, PfPAP contains a predicted protein export element that is non-syntenic with other human infecting Plasmodium species. Characterization of PfPAP demonstrated that it is exported into the host red blood cell and that it is a prolyl aminopeptidase with a preference for N-terminal proline substrates. In addition genetic deletion of this exopeptidase was shown to lead to an increase in the deformability of parasite-infected red cells and in reduced adherence to the endothelial cell receptor CD36 under flow conditions. Our studies suggest that PfPAP plays a role in the rigidification and adhesion of infected red blood cells to endothelial surface receptors, a role that may make this protein a novel target for anti-disease interventions strategies. PMID:27373432

  14. Structural basis for the inhibition of the essential Plasmodium falciparum M1 neutral aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Lowther, Jonathan; Stack, Colin M; Golding, Sarah J; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Trenholme, Katharine R; Teuscher, Franka; Donnelly, Sheila M; Grembecka, Jolanta; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Pawel; Degori, Ross; Buckle, Ashley M; Gardiner, Donald L; Whisstock, James C; Dalton, John P

    2009-02-24

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites are responsible for the major global disease malaria, which results in >2 million deaths each year. With the rise of drug-resistant malarial parasites, novel drug targets and lead compounds are urgently required for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we address this important problem by targeting the malarial neutral aminopeptidases that are involved in the terminal stages of hemoglobin digestion and essential for the provision of amino acids used for parasite growth and development within the erythrocyte. We characterize the structure and substrate specificity of one such aminopeptidase, PfA-M1, a validated drug target. The X-ray crystal structure of PfA-M1 alone and in complex with the generic inhibitor, bestatin, and a phosphinate dipeptide analogue with potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity, hPheP[CH(2)]Phe, reveals features within the protease active site that are critical to its function as an aminopeptidase and can be exploited for drug development. These results set the groundwork for the development of antimalarial therapeutics that target the neutral aminopeptidases of the parasite.

  15. Modeling of human M1 aminopeptidases for in silico screening of potential Plasmodium falciparum alanine aminopeptidase (PfA-M1) specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Shakti; Rai, Sneha; Chaudhary, Meenakshi; Nain, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum alanine M1-aminopeptidase (PfA-M1) is a validated target for anti-malarial drug development. Presence of significant similarity between PfA-M1 and human M1-aminopeptidases, particularly within regions of enzyme active site leads to problem of non-specificity and off-target binding for known aminopeptidase inhibitors. Molecular docking based in silico screening approach for off-target binding has high potential but requires 3D-structure of all human M1-aminopeptidaes. Therefore, in the present study 3D structural models of seven human M1-aminopeptidases were developed. The robustness of docking parameters and quality of predicted human M1-aminopeptidases structural models was evaluated by stereochemical analysis and docking of their respective known inhibitors. The docking scores were in agreement with the inhibitory concentrations elucidated in enzyme assays of respective inhibitor enzyme combinations (r2≈0.70). Further docking analysis of fifteen potential PfA-M1 inhibitors (virtual screening identified) showed that three compounds had less docking affinity for human M1-aminopeptidases as compared to PfA-M1. These three identified potential lead compounds can be validated with enzyme assays and used as a scaffold for designing of new compounds with increased specificity towards PfA-M1.

  16. Identification of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum M18 Aspartyl Aminopeptidase (PfM18AAP) of Human Malaria via High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Timothy; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P; Da Silva, Fabio L; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Gardiner, Donald L; Trenholme, Katharine R; Brown, Christopher L; Ghosh, Partha; Porubsky, Patrick; Wang, Jenna L; Whipple, David A; Schoenen, Frank J; Hodder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The target of this study, the PfM18 aspartyl aminopeptidase (PfM18AAP), is the only AAP present in the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PfM18AAP is a metallo-exopeptidase that exclusively cleaves N-terminal acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate. It is expressed in parasite cytoplasm and may function in concert with other aminopeptidases in protein degradation, of, for example, hemoglobin. Previous antisense knockdown experiments identified a lethal phenotype associated with PfM18AAP suggesting that it is a valid target for new anti-malaria therapies. To identify inhibitors of PfM18AAP function, a fluorescence enzymatic assay was developed using recombinant PfM18AAP enzyme and a fluorogenic peptide substrate (H-Glu-NHMec). This was screened against the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) collection of ~292,000 compounds (the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR)). A Cathepsin L1 (CTSL1) enzyme-based assay was developed and used as a counterscreen to identify compounds with nonspecific activity. Enzymology and phenotypic assays were used to determine mechanism of action and efficacy of selective and potent compounds identified from HTS. Two structurally related compounds, CID 6852389 and CID 23724194, yield micromolar potency and are inactive in CTSL1 titration experiments (IC50 >59.6 μM). As measured by Ki assay, both compounds demonstrate micromolar non-competitive inhibition in the PfM18AAP enzyme assay. Both CID 6852389 and CID 23724194 demonstrate potency in malaria growth assays (IC50 4 μM and 1.3 μM, respectively). PMID:24619116

  17. Aminopeptidases of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, E P; Starnes, W L; Behal, F J

    1975-01-01

    Three enzymes with L- and one enzyme with D-aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11; alpha-aminoacyl peptide hydrolase) activity have been separated from each other and partially purified from Bacillus subtilis 168 W.T., distinguished with respect to their molecular weights and catalytic properties, and studied in relation to the physiology of this bacterium. One L-aminopeptidase, designated aminopeptidase I, has a molecular weight of 210,000 +/- 20,000, is produced early in growth, and hydrolyzes L-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide most rapidly. Another, designated aminopeptidase II, molecular weight 67,000 +/- 10,000, is also produced early in growth and hydrolyzes L-lysyl-beta-naphthylamide most rapidly. A third, aminopeptidase III, molecular weight 228,000 +/- 20,000, is produced predominantly in early stationary phase and most efficiently utilizes L-alpha-aspartyl-beta-naphthylamide as substrate. The synthesis of aminopeptidase III in early stationary phase suggests that selective catabolism of peptides occurs at this time, perhaps related to the cessation of growth or the onset of early sporulation-associated events. A D-aminopeptidase which hydrolyzes the carboxyl-blocked dipeptide D-alanyl-D-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide (as well as D-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide and D-alanyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine) has also been identified, separated from aminopeptidase II, and purified 170-fold. D-Aminopeptidase, molecular weight 220,000 +/- 20,000, is localized predominantly in the cell wall and periplasm of the organism. This evidence and the variation of the activity during the growth cycle suggest an important function in cell wall or peptide antibiotic metabolism. PMID:240808

  18. Knockout of leucine aminopeptidase in Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2015-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases of the M17 peptidase family represent ideal drug targets for therapies directed against the pathogens Plasmodium, Babesia and Trypanosoma. Previously, we characterised Toxoplasma gondii leucine aminopeptidase and demonstrated its role in regulating the levels of free amino acids. In this study, we evaluated the potential of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase as a drug target in T. gondii by a knockout method. Existing knockout methods for T. gondii have many drawbacks; therefore, we developed a new technique that takes advantage of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We first chose a Cas9 target site in the gene encoding T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase and then constructed a knockout vector containing Cas9 and the single guide RNA. After transfection, single tachyzoites were cloned in 96-well plates by limiting dilution. Two transfected strains derived from a single clone were cultured in Vero cells, and then subjected to expression analysis by western blotting. The phenotypic analysis revealed that knockout of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase resulted in inhibition of attachment/invasion and replication; both the growth and attachment/invasion capacity of knockout parasites were restored by complementation with a synonymously substituted allele of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase. Mouse experiments demonstrated that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout somewhat reduced the pathogenicity of T. gondii. An enzymatic activity assay showed that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout reduced the processing of a leucine aminopeptidase-specific substrate in T. gondii. The absence of leucine aminopeptidase activity could be slightly compensated for in T. gondii. Overall, T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout influenced the growth of T. gondii, but did not completely block parasite development, virulence or enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that leucine aminopeptidase would be useful only as an adjunctive drug target in T. gondii.

  19. An irradiated jet in M 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Pasquali, A.; Alves de Oliveira, C.

    2013-04-01

    Context. M 17 is one of the best studied giant HII regions in our galactic neighborhood. It should also provide a suitable environment for the class of fully ionized jets externally irradiated by the presence of nearby hot stars. However, no such jets have been observed thus far in M 17. Aims: We report on a visible imaging survey of the M 17 nebula with the goal of identifying likely shock-excited nebulosities. Methods: We imaged M 17 through narrow-band filters centered on the most intense visible lines of [OIII], Hα+[NII], [SII], and Hβ. We obtained follow-up spectroscopy of the only jet-like structure identified in the images. We also used published X-ray observations of M 17 obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, as well as infrared data obtained with the Very Large Telescope and with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to look for evidence of a jet-driving source. Results: We have detected what appears to be the first jet identified in M 17 visible HII region. The jet is composed of a set of knots, two of which have significant radial velocities with respect to the HII region, and a distant arc-like bright nebulosity that may represent an early episode of intense mass loss by the jet-driving source. The follow-up spectra of the structures composing the jet, including the arc, support this interpretation by revealing intense forbidden lines of [NII] and [SII] due to enhanced collisional excitation in shocks. The presence of a X-ray source, most likely a young stellar object, at a position where the jet launching source should be expected to lie reinforces the interpretation. We identify a tentative near-infrared counterpart of the X-ray source, although it is offset by 1".9 from the nominal position of the X-ray source, which is almost three times the radius of its positional uncertainty. The very weak [OI] emission in the spectra of the jet knots and the arc suggests that they are nearly fully ionized, in agreement with the environment in which the jet is

  20. THE SUBMILLIMETER POLARIZATION SPECTRUM OF M17

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Lingzhen; Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Bennett, Charles L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles; Chuss, David T.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2013-08-10

    We present 450 {mu}m polarimetric observations of the M17 molecular cloud obtained with the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Across the observed region, the magnetic field orientation is consistent with previous submillimeter and far-infrared polarization measurements. Our observations are centered on a region of the molecular cloud that has been compressed by stellar winds from a cluster of OB stars. We have compared these new data with previous 350 {mu}m polarimetry and find an anti-correlation between the 450 and 350 {mu}m polarization magnitude ratio and the ratio of 21 cm to 450 {mu}m intensity. The polarization ratio is lower near the east end of the studied region where the cloud is exposed to stellar winds and radiation. At the west end of the region, the polarization ratio is higher. We interpret the varying polarization spectrum as evidence supporting the radiative alignment torque model for grain alignment, implying higher alignment efficiency in the region that is exposed to a higher anisotropic radiation field.

  1. Census of cytosolic aminopeptidase activity reveals two novel cytosolic aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Nadja; Schatz, Mark; Dengjel, Jörn; Tenzer, Stefan; Schild, Hansjörg

    2012-11-01

    Activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells is crucial for the adaptive immune response against viral infections and the control of malignant transformed cells. Together with activation of costimulatory molecules like CD3 and CD28, CD8(+) T cells need activation of their unique T cell receptor via recognition of foreign peptide epitopes in combination with major histocompatibility complexes class I on the cell surface of professional antigen-presenting cells. Presentation of pathogen-associated proteins is the result of a complex proteolytic process. It starts with the breakdown of proteins by a cytosolic endopeptidase, the proteasome, and is continued by subsequent N-terminal trimming events in the cytosol and/or the endoplasmic reticulum. Analysis of the proteolytic aminopeptidase activity in the former cellular compartment showed that the cytosol harbors a multitude of aminopeptidases that have singular specificities, but on the other hand also show redundancy in the trimming of N-terminal residues. The observed pattern of the overall trimming in the cytosol is reflected by the activity of the four identified aminopeptidases, and the administration of protease inhibitors made it possible to assign specificity of cleaving of proteinogenic amino acids to one or more identified aminopeptidase. The only exception was the cleavage of aspartic acid, which is performed by one yet unidentified enzyme.

  2. The peculiar radio source M17 JVLA 35

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, L. F.; Carrasco-González, C.; Montes, G.; Tapia, M.

    2014-07-01

    M17 JVLA 35 is a radio source detected in projection against the M17 H II region. In recent observations, its spectrum between 4.96 and 8.46 GHz was found to be positive and very steep, with α ≥ 2.9 ± 0.6 (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup α}). Here we present Very Large Array observations made in the 18.5 to 36.5 GHz region that indicate a spectral turnover at ∼13 GHz and a negative spectral index (α ≅ –2.0) at higher frequencies. The spectrum is consistent with that of an extragalactic high frequency peaker (HFP). However, M17 JVLA 35 has an angular size of ∼0.''5 at 8.46 GHz, while HFPs have extremely compact, milliarcsecond dimensions. We discuss other possible models for the spectrum of the source and do not find them feasible. Finally, we propose that M17 JVLA 35 is indeed an HFP but that its angular size becomes broadened by plasma scattering as its radiation travels across M17. If our interpretation is correct, accurate measurements of the angular size of M17 JVLA 35 across the centimeter range should reveal the expected ν{sup –2} dependence.

  3. THE EXTENDED ENVIRONMENT OF M17: A STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Povich, Matthew S.; Churchwell, Ed; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Bieging, John H.; Kang, Miju; Kulesa, Craig A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Brogan, Crystal L.; Cohen, Martin; Indebetouw, Remy; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2009-05-10

    M17 is one of the youngest and most massive nearby star-formation regions in the Galaxy. It features a bright H II region erupting as a blister from the side of a giant molecular cloud (GMC). Combining photometry from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) with complementary infrared (IR) surveys, we identify candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) throughout a 1.{sup 0}5 x 1{sup 0} field that includes the M17 complex. The long sightline through the Galaxy behind M17 creates significant contamination in our YSO sample from unassociated sources with similar IR colors. Removing contaminants, we produce a highly reliable catalog of 96 candidate YSOs with a high probability of association with the M17 complex. We fit model spectral energy distributions to these sources and constrain their physical properties. Extrapolating the mass function of 62 intermediate-mass YSOs (M {sub *} > 3 M {sub sun}), we estimate that >1000 stars are in the process of forming in the extended outer regions of M17. The remaining 34 candidate YSOs are found in a 0.17 deg{sup 2} field containing the well-studied M17 H II region and photodissociation region (PDR), where bright diffuse mid-IR emission drastically reduces the sensitivity of the GLIMPSE point-source detections. By inspecting IR survey images from IRAS and GLIMPSE, we find that M17 lies on the rim of a large shell structure {approx}0.{sup 0}5 in diameter ({approx}20 pc at 2.1 kpc). We present maps of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (J = 2 {yields} 1) emission observed with the Heinrich Hertz Telescope. The CO emission shows that the shell is a coherent, kinematic structure associated with M17, centered at v = 19 km s{sup -1}. The shell is an extended bubble outlining the PDR of a faint, diffuse H II region several Myr old. We identify a group of candidate ionizing stars within the bubble. YSOs in our catalog are concentrated around the bubble rim, providing evidence that massive star formation has

  4. The Extended Environment of M17: A Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Churchwell, Ed; Bieging, John H.; Kang, Miju; Whitney, Barbara A.; Brogan, Crystal L.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Cohen, Martin; Babler, Brian L.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Meade, Marilyn R.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2009-05-01

    M17 is one of the youngest and most massive nearby star-formation regions in the Galaxy. It features a bright H II region erupting as a blister from the side of a giant molecular cloud (GMC). Combining photometry from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) with complementary infrared (IR) surveys, we identify candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) throughout a 1fdg5 × 1° field that includes the M17 complex. The long sightline through the Galaxy behind M17 creates significant contamination in our YSO sample from unassociated sources with similar IR colors. Removing contaminants, we produce a highly reliable catalog of 96 candidate YSOs with a high probability of association with the M17 complex. We fit model spectral energy distributions to these sources and constrain their physical properties. Extrapolating the mass function of 62 intermediate-mass YSOs (M sstarf > 3 M sun), we estimate that >1000 stars are in the process of forming in the extended outer regions of M17. The remaining 34 candidate YSOs are found in a 0.17 deg2 field containing the well-studied M17 H II region and photodissociation region (PDR), where bright diffuse mid-IR emission drastically reduces the sensitivity of the GLIMPSE point-source detections. By inspecting IR survey images from IRAS and GLIMPSE, we find that M17 lies on the rim of a large shell structure ~0fdg5 in diameter (~20 pc at 2.1 kpc). We present maps of 12CO and 13CO (J = 2 → 1) emission observed with the Heinrich Hertz Telescope. The CO emission shows that the shell is a coherent, kinematic structure associated with M17, centered at v = 19 km s-1. The shell is an extended bubble outlining the PDR of a faint, diffuse H II region several Myr old. We identify a group of candidate ionizing stars within the bubble. YSOs in our catalog are concentrated around the bubble rim, providing evidence that massive star formation has been triggered by the expansion of the bubble. The formation of

  5. Plasmodium dipeptidyl aminopeptidases as malaria transmission-blocking drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Deu, Edgar; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Ashburne, Michael J; Ali, Omar; Suri, Amreena; Kortagere, Sandhya; Bogyo, Matthew; Williamson, Kim C

    2013-10-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum and P. berghei genomes each contain three dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (dpap) homologs. dpap1 and -3 are critical for asexual growth, but the role of dpap2, the gametocyte-specific homolog, has not been tested. If DPAPs are essential for transmission as well as asexual growth, then a DPAP inhibitor could be used for treatment and to block transmission. To directly analyze the role of DPAP2, a dpap2-minus P. berghei (Pbdpap2Δ) line was generated. The Pbdpap2Δ parasites grew normally, differentiated into gametocytes, and generated sporozoites that were infectious to mice when fed to a mosquito. However, Pbdpap1 transcription was >2-fold upregulated in the Pbdpap2Δ clonal lines, possibly compensating for the loss of Pbdpap2. The role of DPAP1 and -3 in the dpap2Δ parasites was then evaluated using a DPAP inhibitor, ML4118S. When ML4118S was added to the Pbdpap2Δ parasites just before a mosquito membrane feed, mosquito infectivity was not affected. To assess longer exposures to ML4118S and further evaluate the role of DPAPs during gametocyte development in a parasite that causes human malaria, the dpap2 deletion was repeated in P. falciparum. Viable P. falciparum dpap2 (Pfdpap2)-minus parasites were obtained that produced morphologically normal gametocytes. Both wild-type and Pfdpap2-negative parasites were sensitive to ML4118S, indicating that, unlike many antimalarials, ML4118S has activity against parasites at both the asexual and sexual stages and that DPAP1 and -3 may be targets for a dual-stage drug that can treat patients and block malaria transmission.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases: biochemistry, physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2013-09-01

    The human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP) 1 and 2 proteins were initially identified as homologues of human placental leucine aminopeptidase/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase. They are categorized as a unique class of proteases based on their subcellular localization on the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum. ERAPs play an important role in the N-terminal processing of the antigenic precursors that are presented on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. ERAPs are also implicated in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological phenomena and pathogenic conditions. In this review, the current knowledge on ERAPs is summarized.

  7. [Endocellular aminopeptidase from Astasia longa].

    PubMed

    Rudenskaia, Iu A; Aseev, V V; Rudensaia, G N

    2008-01-01

    A new aminopeptidase was isolated from the biomass of the flagellate Astasia longa by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, gel filtration, and affinity chromatography on Arginine-Silochrome in 41% yield and with purification degree 490. The enzyme is irreversible inhibited by mercury chloride, EDTA, o-phenanthroline and, partially, bestatin and zinc chloride. It has an optimum pH 8.5 toward the hydrolysis of a synthetic chromogenic substrate Ala-pNA. The enzyme molecular mass is 45 kDa, isoelectric point 5.5, and temperature optimum 45 degrees C. The enzyme most effectively hydrolyzes p-nitroanilides of alanine, arginine, and leucine; it is classified as metalloaminopeptidase. PMID:18672681

  8. Positioning of aminopeptidase inhibitors in next generation cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Sarina M; Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2014-04-01

    Aminopeptidases represent a class of (zinc) metalloenzymes that catalyze the cleavage of amino acids nearby the N-terminus of polypeptides, resulting in hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Aminopeptidases operate downstream of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and are implicated in the final step of intracellular protein degradation either by trimming proteasome-generated peptides for antigen presentation or full hydrolysis into free amino acids for recycling in renewed protein synthesis. This review focuses on the function and subcellular location of five key aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1/2) and their association with different diseases, in particular cancer and their current position as target for therapeutic intervention by aminopeptidase inhibitors. Historically, bestatin was the first prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor that entered the clinic 35 years ago and is still used for the treatment of lung cancer. More recently, new generation aminopeptidase inhibitors became available, including the aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug tosedostat, which is currently tested in phase II clinical trials for acute myeloid leukemia. Beyond bestatin and tosedostat, medicinal chemistry has emerged with additional series of potential aminopeptidases inhibitors which are still in an early phase of (pre)clinical investigations. The expanded knowledge of the unique mechanism of action of aminopeptidases has revived interest in aminopeptidase inhibitors for drug combination regimens in anti-cancer treatment. In this context, this review will discuss relevant features and mechanisms of action of aminopeptidases and will also elaborate on factors contributing to aminopeptidase inhibitor efficacy and/or loss of efficacy due to drug resistance-related phenomena. Together, a growing body of data point to aminopeptidase inhibitors as attractive tools for

  9. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 metalloprotease of the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella, participates in parasite development.

    PubMed

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Silvestre, Anne; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs.

  10. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 Metalloprotease of the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella, Participates in Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B.; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs. PMID:24839124

  11. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Saveanu, Loredana; Stratikos, Efstratios; Vourloumis, Dionisios

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases, ERAP1 and ERAP2, as well as Insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) play key roles in antigen processing, and have recently emerged as biologically important targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural and substrate-selectivity data for these enzymes, we have rationally designed a new series of inhibitors that display low micromolar activity. The selectivity profile for these three highly homologous aminopeptidases provides a promising avenue for modulating intracellular antigen processing.

  12. Aminothiols: synthesis and effect on chicken brain aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, B; Hui, K S; Hui, M; Lajtha, A

    1988-10-01

    An amino acid derivative, leucinethiol, was reported to be a strong inhibitor of aminopeptidase activity. In order to obtain selective inhibitors of various brain aminopeptidases, we tested the inhibition by amino acid analogs of brain aminopeptidase activity. In particular, we synthesized the trifluoroacetyl derivatives of phenylalaninol, tyrosinol, and leucinol; leucinethiol; and phenylalaninethiol and measured their effect on soluble puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase S1 and SII purified in our laboratory. Two of the compounds, L-bis (1-thio-2-amino-4-methylpentane) dihydrochloride (TAMP) and L-bis (1-thio-2-amino-3-phenylpropane) dihydrochloride (TAPP), caused significant inhibition. PMID:3205972

  13. Aminopeptidase activity from germinated jojoba cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R; Storey, R

    1985-11-01

    One major and two minor aminopeptidase activities from germinated jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) cotyledon extracts were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatofocusing. None of the activities were inhibited by 1,10 phenanthroline.The major aminopeptidase, purified 260-fold, showed a pH optimum of 6.9 with leucine-p-nitroanilide as substrate, a molecular weight estimated at 14,200 by electrophoretic analysis, and an isoelectric point of 4.5 according to the chromatofocusing pattern. Activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, slightly stimulated by 1,10 phenanthroline and 2-mercaptoethanol, and not influenced by Mg(2+) or diethyl pyrocarbonate. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by the presence of cysteine in the assay. Leucine-p-nitroanilide and leucine-beta-naphthylamide were the most rapidly hydrolyzed of 11 carboxy-terminal end blocked synthetic substrates tested. No activity on endopeptidase or carboxypeptidase specific substrates was detected. The major aminopeptidase showed activity on a saline soluble, jojoba seed protein preparation and we suggest a possible physiological role for the enzyme in the concerted degradation of globulin reserve proteins during cotyledon senescence.

  14. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla-Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  15. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  16. A novel mammalian high-molecular-weight aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Erbeznik, H; Hersh, L B

    1997-08-01

    Studies with the human lymphoma U937 cell line revealed the presence of two soluble aminopeptidase activities. Using specific antisera one of these was identified as the puromycin-specific aminopeptidase, while the other appeared to be a novel approximately 200-kDa activity. The kinetic properties of this high-molecular-weight aminopeptidase, referred to as Ap200, were similar to those of the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, but showed quantitative differences. Ap200 is relatively insensitive to inhibition by both puromycin, K(i) = 27 microM, and bestatin, K(i) = 1.6 microM. Among the synthetic beta-naphthylamides, Ap200 is more specific for alanine-beta-naphthylamide compared to the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase. Similarly, this enzyme cleaves a more limited number of physiological peptides exhibiting a preference for the enkephalins. Ammonium sulfate, but not sodium chloride at the same ionic strength, was able to dissociate the high-molecular-weight aminopeptidase to a approximately 100-kDa active form. The high-molecular-weight aminopeptidase is found as a low abundant protein in a number of tissues including intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, spleen, and testes, but could not be detected in adrenal, heart, or brain. Thus, it has a tissue distribution which differs from the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase.

  17. Purification and characterization of an immunogenic aminopeptidase of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Rodriguez, Araceli; Ramirez-Zavala, Bernardo; Contreras, Andrea; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lopez-Merino, Ahide

    2003-09-01

    An immunogenic aminopeptidase was purified from Brucella melitensis strain VTRM1. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate fractionation and three chromatographic steps. This procedure resulted in a yield of 29% and a 144-fold increase in specific activity. The aminopeptidase appeared to be a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 96 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.8. Its activity was optimal at pH 7.0 at 40 degrees C. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, 1,10-phenathroline, and divalent cations (Zn(2+) and Hg(2+)), suggesting that this protein was a metalloaminopeptidase. The enzyme showed preference for alanine at the N termini of aminoacyl derivatives. The K(m) values for L-alanine-p-nitroanilide (Ala-pNA) and Lys-pNA were 0.35 and 0.18 mM, respectively. The N-terminal sequence of aminopeptidase was used for a homologous search in the genomes of B. melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330. The analysis revealed an exact match of the probe sequence (36 bp) with an open reading frame of 2,652 bp encoding a protein predicted to be alanyl aminopeptidase (aminopeptidase N). Collectively, these data suggest designation of the B. melitensis enzyme as an aminopeptidase N. The aminopeptidase was recognized by sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis, suggesting that the enzyme may have important diagnostic implications. PMID:12933870

  18. Characterization of aspartyl aminopeptidase from Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Cheng, Ziying; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidases have emerged as new promising drug targets for the development of novel anti-parasitic drugs. An aspartyl aminopeptidase-like gene has been identified in the Toxoplasma gondii genome (TgAAP), although its function remains unknown. In this study, we characterized TgAAP and performed functional analysis of the gene product. Firstly, we expressed a functional recombinant TgAAP (rTgAAP) protein in Escherichia coli, and found that it required metal ions for activity and showed a substrate preference for N-terminal acidic amino acids Glu and Asp. Then, we evaluated the function and drug target potential of TgAAP using the CRISPR/Cas9 knockout system. Western blotting demonstrated the deletion of TgAAP in the knockout strain. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that TgAAP was localized in the cytoplasm of the wild-type parasite, but was not expressed in the knockout strain. Phenotype analysis revealed that TgAAP knockout inhibited the attachment/invasion, replication, and substrate-specific activity in T. gondii. Finally, the activity of drug CID 23724194, previously described as targeting Plasmodium and malarial parasite AAP, was tested against rTgAAP and the parasite. Overall, TgAAP knockout affected the growth of T. gondii but did not completely abolish parasite replication and growth. Therefore, TgAAP may comprise a useful adjunct drug target of T. gondii. PMID:27678060

  19. New aminopeptidase from "microbial dark matter" archaeon.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Karolina; Steen, Andrew D; Chhor, Gekleng; Endres, Michael; Webber, Austen T; Bird, Jordan; Lloyd, Karen G; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Marine sediments host a large population of diverse, heterotrophic, uncultured microorganisms with unknown physiologies that control carbon flow through organic matter decomposition. Recently, single-cell genomics uncovered new key players in these processes, such as the miscellaneous crenarchaeotal group. These widespread archaea encode putative intra- and extracellular proteases for the degradation of detrital proteins present in sediments. Here, we show that one of these enzymes is a self-compartmentalizing tetrameric aminopeptidase with a preference for cysteine and hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the hydrolyzed peptide. The ability to perform detailed characterizations of enzymes from native subsurface microorganisms, without requiring that those organisms first be grown in pure culture, holds great promise for understanding key carbon transformations in the environment as well as identifying new enzymes for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Aminopeptidase, Plastidial Alanine-Aminopeptidase, from the Cotyledons of Etiolated Sugar Beet Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Amrani, A. E.; Suire, C.; Camara, B.; Gaudillere, J. P.; Couee, I.

    1995-09-01

    During prolonged dark growth of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) seedlings, etioplasts, rapidly after the proplastid-etioplast transition, undergo a degenerative process characterized by ultrastructural modifications, protein loss, and the decrease of carotenoid and chlorophyll accumulation upon illumination. Two plastidial aminopeptidase activities were identified as early markers of this degenerative process (A. El Amrani, I. Couee, J.-P. Carde, J.-P. Gaudillere, P. Raymond [1994] Plant Physiology 106: 1555-1565). The present study focuses on one of these markers and describes the purification to homogeneity and characterization of plastidial alanine-aminopeptidase. This novel aminopeptidase was found to be a metallo-type naphthylamidase particularly active with alanyl, arginyl, and leucyl substrates. Its plastidial location was confirmed by immunofluorescence with polyclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme. Its physico-chemical and enzymic properties are discussed with respect to other higher plant aminopeptidases and to its potential functions during prolonged dark growth.

  1. Methionine enkephalin is hydrolyzed by aminopeptidase N on CD4+ and CD8+ spleen T cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, B C; Thiele, D L; Hersh, L B; Cottam, G L

    1994-05-15

    Exogenous methionine enkephalin incubated with CD4+ or CD8+ T cells purified from murine spleen is metabolized primarily, if not exclusively, by aminopeptidase N (aminopeptidase M, EC 3.4.11.2), a membrane-anchored ectopeptidase. The enzyme activity is identified by its substrate specificity, sensitivity to inhibition by amastatin, and immunoreactivity with antibody to rat kidney aminopeptidase N. Activation of CD4+ T cells results in a small increase per cell in aminopeptidase N activity.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation...

  6. Adipocyte aminopeptidases in obesity and fasting.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-11-01

    This study checked the existence of a diverse array of aminopeptidase (AP) enzymes in high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal and plasma membrane (MF) fractions from adipocytes of control, monosodium glutamate obese and food deprived rats. Gene expression was detected for ArgAP, AspAP, MetAP, and two AlaAP (APM and PSA). APM and PSA had the highest catalytic efficiency, whereas AspAP the highest affinity. Subcellular distribution of AP activities depended on metabolic status. Comparing catalytic levels, AspAP in HDM, LDM and MF was absent in obese and control under food deprivation; PSA in LDM was 3.5-times higher in obese than in normally fed control and control and obese under food deprivation; MetAP in MF was 4.5-times higher in obese than in food deprived obese. Data show new AP enzymes genetically expressed in subcellular compartments of adipocytes, three of them with altered catalytic levels that respond to whole-body energetic demands.

  7. Advances in Bacterial Methionine Aminopeptidase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Helgren, Travis R; Wangtrakuldee, Phumvadee; Staker, Bart L; Hagen, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-terminal methionine from newly synthesized peptides and proteins. These MetAP enzymes are present in bacteria, and knockout experiments have shown that MetAP activity is essential for cell life, suggesting that MetAPs are good antibacterial drug targets. MetAP enzymes are also present in the human host and selectivity is essential. There have been significant structural biology efforts and over 65 protein crystal structures of bacterial MetAPs are deposited into the PDB. This review highlights the available crystallographic data for bacterial MetAPs. Structural comparison of bacterial MetAPs with human MetAPs highlights differences that can lead to selectivity. In addition, this review includes the chemical diversity of molecules that bind and inhibit the bacterial MetAP enzymes. Analysis of the structural biology and chemical space of known bacterial MetAP inhibitors leads to a greater understanding of this antibacterial target and the likely development of potential antibacterial agents.

  8. Structure and function of the methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Lowther, W T; Matthews, B W

    2000-03-01

    The removal of the N-terminal methionine from proteins and peptides is dependent upon a novel class of proteases typified by the dinuclear metalloenzyme methionine aminopeptidase from Escherichia coli (eMetAP). Substantial progress has recently been made in determining the structures of several members of this family. The identification of human MetAP as the target of putative anti-cancer drugs reiterates the importance of this family of enzymes. Determination of the modes of binding to E. coli MetAP of a substrate-like bestatin-based inhibitor, as well as phosphorus-containing transition-state analogs and reaction products has led to a rationalization of the substrate specificity and suggested the presumed catalytic mechanism. The conservation of key active site residues and ligand interactions between the MetAPs and other enzyme of the same fold suggest that avoidance of cross-reactivity may be an important consideration in the design of inhibitors directed toward a single member of the family. PMID:10708856

  9. The characteristics, functions and inhibitors of three aminopeptidases belonging to the m1 family.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yepeng; Ma, Chunhua; Wang, Yan; Fang, Hao; Xu, Wenfang

    2012-08-01

    Various aminopeptidases belong to the M1 aminopeptidase family. They are all zinc dependent enzymes playing important roles in several biological processes such as regulation of blood pressure under both physiological and pathological conditions, and the angiogenesis and metastasis of tumor, etc. They all have the highly conserved HEXXH(X)18E zinc-binding and GAMEN motifs essential for enzyme activities. In this review, the current situation regarding the biochemical characteristics, biological functions and inhibitors of three important members of these enzymes, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B are summarized.

  10. Redox regulation of methionine aminopeptidase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joyce; Wong, Jason W H; Hogg, Philip J

    2014-05-23

    Protein translation is initiated with methionine in eukaryotes, and the majority of proteins have their N-terminal methionine removed by methionine aminopeptidases (MetAP1 and MetAP2) prior to action. Methionine removal can be important for protein function, localization, or stability. No mechanism of regulation of MetAP activity has been identified. MetAP2, but not MetAP1, contains a single Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide bond that has an -RHStaple configuration and links two β-loop structures, which are hallmarks of allosteric disulfide bonds. From analysis of crystal structures and using mass spectrometry and activity assays, we found that the disulfide bond exists in oxidized and reduced states in the recombinant enzyme. The disulfide has a standard redox potential of -261 mV and is efficiently reduced by the protein reductant, thioredoxin, with a rate constant of 16,180 m(-1) s(-1). The MetAP2 disulfide bond also exists in oxidized and reduced states in glioblastoma tumor cells, and stressing the cells by oxygen or glucose deprivation results in more oxidized enzyme. The Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide is at the rim of the active site and is only three residues distant from the catalytic His(231), which suggested that cleavage of the bond would influence substrate hydrolysis. Indeed, oxidized and reduced isoforms have different catalytic efficiencies for hydrolysis of MetAP2 peptide substrates. These findings indicate that MetAP2 is post-translationally regulated by an allosteric disulfide bond, which controls substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency.

  11. Pyridinylpyrimidines selectively inhibit human methionine aminopeptidase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengtao; Yang, Xinye; Zhang, Feiran; Gabelli, Sandra B; Wang, Renxiao; Zhang, Yihua; Bhat, Shridhar; Chen, Xiaochun; Furlani, Manuel; Amzel, L Mario; Liu, Jun O; Ma, Dawei

    2013-05-01

    Cellular protein synthesis is initiated with methionine in eukaryotes with few exceptions. Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) which catalyze the process of N-terminal methionine excision are essential for all organisms. In mammals, type 2 MetAP (MetAP2) is known to be important for angiogenesis, while type 1 MetAP (MetAP1) has been shown to play a pivotal role in cell proliferation. Our previous high-throughput screening of a commercial compound library uncovered a novel class of inhibitors for both human MetAP1 (HsMetAP1) and human MetAP2 (HsMetAP2). This class of inhibitors contains a pyridinylpyrimidine core. To understand the structure-activity relationship (SAR) and to search for analogues of 2 with greater potency and higher HsMetAP1-selectivity, a total of 58 analogues were acquired through either commercial source or by in-house synthesis and their inhibitory activities against HsMetAP1 and HsMetAP2 were determined. Through this systematic medicinal chemistry analysis, we have identified (1) 5-chloro-6-methyl-2-pyridin-2-ylpyrimidine as the minimum element for the inhibition of HsMetAP1; (2) 5'-chloro as the favored substituent on the pyridine ring for the enhanced potency against HsMetAP1; and (3) long C4 side chains as the essentials for higher HsMetAP1-selectivity. At the end of our SAR campaign, 25b, 25c, 26d and 30a-30c are among the most selective and potent inhibitors of purified HsMetAP1 reported to date. In addition, we also performed crystallographic analysis of one representative inhibitor (26d) in complex with N-terminally truncated HsMetAP1.

  12. Serum cystine aminopeptidase and leucine aminopeptidase activity in women with benign and malignant uterine and ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Blum, M; Sirota, P

    1977-09-01

    The serum enzymatic activities of cystine aminopeptidase and leucine aminopeptidase were measured in a group of 113 patients of whom 90 had benign uterine or ovarian tumors, and 23 had cancer of the endometrium or ovary. Thirty healthy nonpregnant women and 260 women at different stages of normal pregnancy served as control groups. The presence of pregnancy-specific enzymes in women with uterine or ovarian tumors showed once again that similar processes occur during pregnancy and malignancy. When ovarian or uterine malignancy is suspected on clinical examination, determination of the activities of these enzymes in serum may be of diagnostic value.

  13. Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, John A.; Udeinya, Iroka J.; Leech, James H.; Hay, Robert J.; Aikawa, Masamichi; Barnwell, John; Green, Ira; Miller, Louis H.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites and schizonts are not seen in the peripheral circulation because they attach to venular endothelium via knoblike structures on the infected erythrocyte membrane. We have recently shown that erythrocytes containing P. falciparum trophozoites and schizonts likewise attach to cultured human venous endothelial cells via knobs. In search of a more practical target cell for large scale binding studies designed to characterize and isolate the knob ligand, we tested various normal cells and continuous cell lines for their ability to bind P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Of the 18 cell types tested, binding of infected erythrocytes was observed to a human amelanotic melanoma cell line and amnion epithelial cells as well as to human aortic and umbilical vein endothelial cells. 96-100% of amelanotic melanoma cells bound 17±4 (±1 SEM) infected erythrocytes per positive cell, whereas fewer endothelial cells (4-59%) and amnion epithelial cells (8-19%) were capable of binding 12±5 and 4±1 infected erythrocytes per positive cell, respectively. Further studies designed to compare the mechanism of binding to the amelanotic melanoma cell line and endothelial cells showed the following results. First, that adhesion of infected erythrocytes to these two cell types was parasite stage-specific in that only erythrocytes containing late ring forms, trophozoites, and schizonts bound. Erythrocytes containing early ring forms, which do not attach to venular endothelium in vivo, did not bind to either cell type. Second, erythrocytes infected with trophozoites and schizonts of P. vivax or a knobless strain of P. falciparum, both of which continue to circulate in vivo, did not bind to either target cell type. Third, transmission electron microscopy showed that infected erythrocytes attached to the amelanotic melanoma cells via knobs. We conclude that cultured human endothelial cells and an amelanotic melanoma cell line share

  14. Prospective evaluation of aminopeptidase activities in plasma and peripheral organs of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zambotti-Villela, L; Yamasaki, S C; Villarroel, J S; Alponti, R F; Silveira, P F

    2008-06-01

    The cleavage of peptides by aminopeptidase enzyme types could be among the mechanisms related to certain disruptions on mediator and modulatory functions in diabetes mellitus. In order to examine this hypothesis, we measured representative aminopeptidase activities in tissues of peripheral organs of control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats. None of the examined aminopeptidase activities differed between diabetics and controls in plasma, ileum, stomach or lung. Soluble and membrane-associated alanyl, and membrane-associated cystyl aminopeptidase activities were higher in the kidney of diabetics. Decreased activity was observed in soluble and membrane-associated aspartyl and soluble dipeptidyl-peptidase IV, while increased activity was observed in soluble alanyl, arginyl, and cystyl aminopeptidases in the pancreas of diabetics. In the jejunum, soluble cystyl aminopeptidase increased in diabetics. Soluble arginyl and type-1-pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase and membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activities increased in the liver of diabetics. Membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV and alanyl aminopeptidase activities in the spleen were higher in diabetics than in controls. Membrane-associated alanyl aminopeptidase activity also increased in the heart of diabetics. All these changes in streptozotocin-treated rats were avoided by the administration of insulin. Our comparative analysis of a diverse array of aminopeptidase activities supported the proposal that the regulation of peptide cleavage by these enzyme types is associated with the effects of streptozotocin-diabetes mellitus on peripheral organs.

  15. Prospective evaluation of aminopeptidase activities in plasma and peripheral organs of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zambotti-Villela, L; Yamasaki, S C; Villarroel, J S; Alponti, R F; Silveira, P F

    2008-06-01

    The cleavage of peptides by aminopeptidase enzyme types could be among the mechanisms related to certain disruptions on mediator and modulatory functions in diabetes mellitus. In order to examine this hypothesis, we measured representative aminopeptidase activities in tissues of peripheral organs of control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats. None of the examined aminopeptidase activities differed between diabetics and controls in plasma, ileum, stomach or lung. Soluble and membrane-associated alanyl, and membrane-associated cystyl aminopeptidase activities were higher in the kidney of diabetics. Decreased activity was observed in soluble and membrane-associated aspartyl and soluble dipeptidyl-peptidase IV, while increased activity was observed in soluble alanyl, arginyl, and cystyl aminopeptidases in the pancreas of diabetics. In the jejunum, soluble cystyl aminopeptidase increased in diabetics. Soluble arginyl and type-1-pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase and membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activities increased in the liver of diabetics. Membrane-associated dipeptidyl-peptidase IV and alanyl aminopeptidase activities in the spleen were higher in diabetics than in controls. Membrane-associated alanyl aminopeptidase activity also increased in the heart of diabetics. All these changes in streptozotocin-treated rats were avoided by the administration of insulin. Our comparative analysis of a diverse array of aminopeptidase activities supported the proposal that the regulation of peptide cleavage by these enzyme types is associated with the effects of streptozotocin-diabetes mellitus on peripheral organs. PMID:18591879

  16. Circulating aminopeptidase activities in men and women with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Agesta Ortega, R; Arias de Saavedra-Alías, J M; Liébana-Cañada, A; Sánchez-Muñoz, B; Martínez-Martos, J M; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2013-01-01

    Essential hypertension is one of the major contributors to premature morbidity and mortality due to the incresased risk for coronary heart disease, stroke, renal disease, peripheral vascular disease and vascular dementia for both men and women. However, its basic causes remain unknown. In the present work we studied the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes related to renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) (aminopeptidase A, APA; aminopeptidase N, APN; aminopeptidase B, APB; and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, IRAP); with oxytocin regulation (oxytocinase); with the metabolism of GnRH and TRH (pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase, Pcp); and with enkephalins metabolism (enkephalindegrading activity, EDA), to elucidate their role in the mechanisms responsible of essential hypertension and to discuss the possible gender differences. Serum samples of 53 individuals with essential hypertension and 60 healthy volunteers were collected and used to assay enzyme activities, gonad hormones testosterone and estradiol, TSH and free thyroxin (fT4). Differences were observed in APA, APN, Pcp and EDA specific activities, and in serum gonad hormone levels between hypertensive and control groups. Only Pcp activity showed gender differences. Regarding the RAS, APA is reduced while APN is increased, suggesting increased levels of angiotensin II and a facilitation of the conversion of angiotensin III in angiotensin IV. Thus, the changes in several RAS-regulating specific activities and other enzyme activities involved in the neuroendocrine modulation of gonad and stress-related functions are related to essential hypertension with minor gender differences. Therefore, aminopeptidases constitute new elements for the knowledge of the causes of essential hypertension and an alternative as therapeutic targets against the illness.

  17. Puromycin-Sensitive Aminopeptidase: An Antiviral Prodrug Activating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Tehler, Ulrika; Nelson, Cara H.; Peterson, Larryn W.; Provoda, Chester J.; Hilfinger, John M.; Lee, Kyung-Dall; McKenna, Charles E.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Cidofovir (HPMPC) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, currently used to treat AIDS-related human cytomegalovirus retinitis. Cidofovir has recognized therapeutic potential for orthopox virus infections, although its use is hampered by its inherent low oral bioavailability. Val-Ser-cyclic HPMPC (Val-Ser-cHPMPC) is a promising peptide prodrug which has previously been shown by us to improve the permeability and bioavailability of the parent compound in rodent models (Eriksson et al. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 2008 vol 5 598-609). Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was partially purified from Caco-2 cell homogenates and identified as a prodrug activating enzyme for Val-Ser-cHPMPC. The prodrug activation process initially involves an enzymatic step where the l-Valine residue is removed by puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, a step that is bestatin-sensitive. Subsequent chemical hydrolysis results in the generation of cHPMPC. A recombinant puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was generated and its substrate specificity investigated. The kcat for Val-pNA was significantly lower than that for Ala-pNA, suggesting that some amino acids are preferred over others. Furthermore, the three-fold higher kcat for Val-Ser-cHPMPC as compared to Val-pNA suggests that the leaving group may play an important role in determining hydrolytic activity. In addition to its ability to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, these observations strongly suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase is an important enzyme for activating Val-Ser-cHPMPC in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase makes an attractive target for future prodrug design. PMID:19969024

  18. Genetic associations and functional characterization of M1 aminopeptidases and immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, N; Brown, M A

    2014-12-01

    Endosplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) and puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (NPEPPS) are key zinc metallopeptidases that belong to the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidase family. NPEPPS catalyzes the processing of proteosome-derived peptide repertoire followed by trimming of antigenic peptides by ERAP1 and ERAP2 for presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules. A series of genome-wide association studies have demonstrated associations of these aminopeptidases with a range of immune-mediated diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, Behçet's disease, inflammatory bowel disease and type I diabetes, and significantly, genetic interaction between some aminopeptidases and HLA Class I loci with which these diseases are strongly associated. In this review, we highlight the current state of understanding of the genetic associations of this class of genes, their functional role in disease, and potential as therapeutic targets.

  19. Purification and some properties of an aminopeptidase from the seeds of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Arima, K; Uchikoba, T; Shimada, M; Yonezawa, H; Kaneda, K

    2000-05-01

    An aminopeptidase (HSA) with a molecular mass of 78 kDa was purified from hemp (Cannabis sativa) seeds. The activity was inhibited by monoiodeacetic acid, p-chloromercuri-phenylsulfonic acid, and Zn2+ ion. The specificity of HSA was similar to that of a leucyl aminopeptidase [EC 3.4.11.1] from mammalian cytosol. However, other enzyme properties were different from these of leucyl aminopeptidase.

  20. [Leucine and alanine aminopeptidase activity in the organs of cattle, sheep and swine].

    PubMed

    Goranov, Kh

    1982-01-01

    Studied was the activity of leucine-aminopeptidase and alanine-aminopeptidase in fresh tissue homogenates of liver, spleen, kidney, heart, pancreas, femoral muscle, stomach (rumen), small intestine, and lung taken from 8 cattle, sheep, and pigs. Both enzymes showed ubiquity. Leucine-aminopeptidase exhibited highest activity in the spleen of pigs and the kidney of sheep and cattle. The kidneys of all investigated animal species showed 10 to 15 times higher alanine-aminopeptidase activity than the remaining organs. This pointed to the relative ubiquity of the enzyme with special reference to kidneys.

  1. Excitation conditions and energetics of the dense gas in M17 SW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Beaupuits, J. P.; Güsten, R.; Spaans, M.; Ossenkopf, V.; Menten, K. M.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Stutzki, J.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Guevara, C.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical and energetic conditions created by radiative feedback are probed with observations of multiple molecular transitions toward M17 SW. Extensive maps, including the 12CO J = 16 → 15, J = 12 → 11, and J = 11 → 10 lines, as well as the HCN J = 8 → 7 and HCO+ J = 9 → 8 transitions, were obtained with the dual band receiver GREAT on board the SOFIA airborne telescope, and with the ground based APEX and IRAM 30 m telescopes. These data provide extensive line spectral energy distributions (LSEDs) of the CO, HCN and HCO+ molecules (and their isotopologues). The excitation conditions of the three species are estimated simultaneously using the same density and temperature in a two-phase non-LTE radiative transfer model of the LSEDs.

  2. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  3. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  4. Astrometry and expanding bubble of a deeply embedded young stellar object in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Baba, Tatsuya; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Shizugami, Makoto; Burns, Ross A.; Honma, Mareki; Ubachukwu, Augustine A.; Chukwude, Augustine E.; Alhassan, Jibrin A.

    2016-08-01

    We measured the trigonometric parallax of the H2O maser source in the M17 cluster-forming region to be 0.491 ± 0.041 mas, corresponding to a distance of 2.04^{+0.16}_{-0.17} kpc with 8 per cent accuracy. This result is consistent with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) previous parallax measurement of 12.2 GHz CH3OH masers in M17-UC1. We performed the first measurement of the relative proper motions of the H2O maser feature 2, and its morphology traces an expanding arcuate shell with a mean motion of ˜ 19.4 km s-1. The redshifted maser component also shows expanding motion. Fitting a uniformly expanding spherical flow model, we estimate the most probable position and motion of the driving source and we propose that the motion of the masers traces an expanding bubble from a central source, with a dynamical time-scale of ˜ 12.5 yr. This is the first evidence that the maser 2 cluster is driven internally. There is no known counterpart Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) or radio source around this H2O maser. However, the Spitzer point source catalogue has a source that is spatially coincident with the position of the H2O masers. This was detected only in the Spitzer 4.5- and 5.8-μm bands (with magnitudes 9.97 ± 0.12 and 7.82 ± 0.10 mag, respectively). The non-detection at other wavelengths could indicate that the source is still at a very early formative stage, and/or very deeply embedded and obscured in its formative environment.

  5. Porcine spleen cathepsin H hydrolyzes oligopeptides solely by aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Dehdarani, A H; Tang, J

    1988-08-01

    Cathepsin H purified from porcine spleens was studied for its specificity against various peptide and denatured protein substrates. The enzyme degraded all peptide substrates exclusively by an aminopeptidase activity. The enzyme preferentially released NH2-terminal amino acid residues with large hydrophobic (Phe, Trp, Leu, and Tyr) or basic (Arg and Lys) side chains. Amino acids containing small or polar side chains were not released. Peptides with a proline in the NH2-terminal or penultimate positions were not hydrolyzed either. Large polypeptides such as reduced and carboxymethylated soybean trypsin inhibitor and aldolase were not degraded. These results indicate that cathepsin H is an exopeptidase but not an endopeptidase. We propose that the biological role of this enzyme is the degradation of tissue proteins in lysosomes by its aminopeptidase activity.

  6. Structural basis for the inhibition of M1 family aminopeptidases by the natural product actinonin: Crystal structure in complex with E. coli aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Roopa Jones; Reddi, Ravikumar; Gumpena, Rajesh; Marapaka, Anil Kumar; Arya, Tarun; Sankoju, Priyanka; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Actinonin is a pseudotripeptide that displays a high affinity towards metalloproteases including peptide deformylases (PDFs) and M1 family aminopeptidases. PDF and M1 family aminopeptidases belong to thermolysin-metzincin superfamily. One of the major differences in terms of substrate binding pockets between these families is presence (in M1 aminopeptidases) or absence (in PDFs) of an S1 substrate pocket. The binding mode of actinonin to PDFs has been established previously; however, it is not clear how the actinonin, without a P1 residue, would bind to the M1 aminopeptidases. Here we describe the crystal structure of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase N (ePepN), a model protein of the M1 family aminopeptidases in complex with actinonin. For comparison we have also determined the structure of ePepN in complex with a well-known tetrapeptide inhibitor, amastatin. From the comparison of the actinonin and amastatin ePepN complexes, it is clear that the P1 residue is not critical as long as strong metal chelating head groups, like hydroxamic acid or α-hydroxy ketone, are present. Results from this study will be useful for the design of selective and efficient hydroxamate inhibitors against M1 family aminopeptidases.

  7. Structural basis for the inhibition of M1 family aminopeptidases by the natural product actinonin: Crystal structure in complex with E. coli aminopeptidase N

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Roopa Jones; Reddi, Ravikumar; Gumpena, Rajesh; Marapaka, Anil Kumar; Arya, Tarun; Sankoju, Priyanka; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Actinonin is a pseudotripeptide that displays a high affinity towards metalloproteases including peptide deformylases (PDFs) and M1 family aminopeptidases. PDF and M1 family aminopeptidases belong to thermolysin-metzincin superfamily. One of the major differences in terms of substrate binding pockets between these families is presence (in M1 aminopeptidases) or absence (in PDFs) of an S1 substrate pocket. The binding mode of actinonin to PDFs has been established previously; however, it is not clear how the actinonin, without a P1 residue, would bind to the M1 aminopeptidases. Here we describe the crystal structure of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase N (ePepN), a model protein of the M1 family aminopeptidases in complex with actinonin. For comparison we have also determined the structure of ePepN in complex with a well-known tetrapeptide inhibitor, amastatin. From the comparison of the actinonin and amastatin ePepN complexes, it is clear that the P1 residue is not critical as long as strong metal chelating head groups, like hydroxamic acid or α-hydroxy ketone, are present. Results from this study will be useful for the design of selective and efficient hydroxamate inhibitors against M1 family aminopeptidases. PMID:25644575

  8. Tryptophan aminopeptidase activity of several indole prenyltransferases from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Anika; Li, Shu-Ming

    2008-07-21

    Recently, five indole prenyltransferases from Aspergillus fumigatus have been proven biochemically to be responsible for prenylations of diverse substrates. In this study, we show peptidase activities of 7-DMATS, FgaPT1, CdpNPT, and FtmPT1, with preference for linear peptides containing a tryptophanyl moiety at the N terminus. Testing of 31 peptides revealed that these enzymes shared similar substrate specificity and accepted H-L-Trp-L-Ala-OH and H-L-Trp-Gly-OH as best substrates for aminopeptidase activity. By using H-L-Trp-Gly-OH as substrate, Km values at 350, 380, 300, and 420 microM and enzymatic rate constants kcat/Km at 0.51, 0.24, 0.53, and 0.14 mM(-1)s(-1) were determined for 7-DMATS, FgaPT1, CdpNPT, and FtmPT1, respectively. In contrast to prenyltransferase activities, the aminopeptidase activities were strongly or completely inhibited by EDTA. Mn2+ increased the aminopeptidase activities of FtmPT1 and CdpNPT up to 4- and 6-fold, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the catalytic promiscuity of prenyltransferases.

  9. The M1 family of vertebrate aminopeptidases: role of evolutionarily conserved tyrosines in the enzymatic mechanism of aminopeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Cadel, Sandrine; Darmon, Cécile; Pernier, Julien; Hervé, Guy; Foulon, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Aminopeptidase B (Ap-B), a member of the M1 family of Zn(2+)-aminopeptidases, removes basic residues at the NH2-terminus of peptides and is involved in the in vivo proteolytic processing of miniglucagon and cholecystokinin-8. M1 enzymes hydrolyze numerous different peptides and are implicated in many physiological functions. As these enzymes have similar catalytic mechanisms, their respective substrate specificity and/or catalytic efficiency must be based on subtle structural differences at or near the catalytic site. This leads to the hypothesis that each primary structure contains a consensus structural template, strictly necessary for aminopeptidase activity, and a specific amino acid environment localized in or outside the catalytic pocket that finely tunes the substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of each enzyme. A multiple sequence alignment of M1 peptidases from vertebrates allowed to identify conserved tyrosine amino acids, which are members of this catalytic backbone. In the present work, site-directed mutagenesis and 3D molecular modeling of Ap-B were used to specify the role of four fully (Y281, Y229, Y414, and Y441) and one partially (Y409) conserved residues. Tyrosine to phenylalanine mutations allowed confirming the influence of the hydroxyl groups on the enzyme activity. These groups are implicated in the reaction mechanism (Y414), in substrate specificity and/or catalytic efficiency (Y409), in stabilization of essential amino acids of the active site (Y229, Y409) and potentially in the maintenance of its structural integrity (Y281, Y441). The importance of hydrogen bonds is verified by the Y229H substitution, which preserves the enzyme activity. These data provide new insights into the catalytic mechanism of Ap-B in the M1 family of aminopeptidases.

  10. Structural analysis of Anopheles midgut aminopeptidase N reveals a novel malaria transmission-blocking vaccine B-cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sarah C.; Armistead, Jennifer S.; Mathias, Derrick K.; Sandeu, Maurice M.; Tao, Dingyin; Borhani-Dizaji, Nahid; Tarimo, Brian B.; Morlais, Isabelle; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Borg, Natalie A.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (mTBVs) target midgut-surface antigens of the Plasmodium parasite's obligate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. The alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is the leading mTBV immunogen; however AnAPN1's role in Plasmodium infection of the mosquito and how anti-AnAPN1 antibodies functionally block parasite transmission remains elusive. Here we present the 2.65 Å crystal structure of AnAPN1 and the immunoreactivity and transmission-blocking profile of three AnAPN1 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), including mAb 4H5B7, which effectively block transmission of natural strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Utilizing the AnAPN1 structure we map the conformation-dependent 4H5B7 neo-epitope to a previously uncharacterized region on domain 1, and further demonstrate that non-human primate neo-epitope-specific IgG also block parasite transmission. We discuss the prospect of a novel biological function of AnAPN1 as a receptor for Plasmodium in the mosquito midgut and the implications for redesigning the AnAPN1 mTBV. PMID:26075520

  11. Induction of GADD45α protects M17 neuroblastoma cells against MPP*.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zeng, Qing-Gan; Zeng, Yan; Man, Rong-Yong; Lu, Bing-Xun; Luo, Yi-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45α (GADD45α) is an important member of the family of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (GADD) proteins. The expression patterns and possible roles of GADD45α in Parkinson's disease (PD) are so far less understood. In this study, we found that 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) treatment up-regulates the expression of GADD45α in both a time-dependent manner and a dose-dependent manner in human dopamine neuroblastoma M17 cells. The up-regulation of GADD45α was abolished by pretreatment with the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 but not the p38 specific inhibitor SB203580. Further study revealed that c-Jun silencing abolished the effects of MPP+ on the expression of GADD45α. Important, ChIP studies verified the ability of c-Jun to bind to the GADD45 promoter. In addition, we found that inhibition of GADD45α by small RNA interference exacerbates the impaired cell viability, LDH release, and apoptosis induced by MPP+. Correspondingly, silence of GADD45 exacerbated Caspase-3 activation induced by MPP+. These data suggested a neuroprotective effect of GADD45α against MPP+ neurotoxicity. PMID:25469469

  12. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1985 Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived...

  13. Use of arginine aminopeptidase activity in characterization of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, H J; Neill, S D; Reid, L R

    1982-01-01

    The aminopeptidase activity of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas was investigated with 20 aminoacyl beta-naphthylamide substrates. High levels of arginyl-beta-naphthylamide hydrolysis were demonstrated in 6 of 11 species when extracts of concentrated washed organisms were used. Relatively low arginine aminopeptidase activity was demonstrated with similar extracts from 22 species not utilizing arginine. The high level of arginine aminopeptidase activity could also be demonstrated with unwashed, unconcentrated samples of the same 6 species and also with Mycoplasma arthritidis. The procedure for preparing the extract of M. arthritidis appeared to remove the arginine aminopeptidase activity which was demonstrated to be present in the untreated culture. Fluorogenic and chromogenic tests were developed whereby this distinctive arginine aminopeptidase activity could be demonstrated within 4 h with the use of small volumes of broth culture (10 microliter) or single colonies, thus providing a rapid test for early characterization of some Mycoplasma species. PMID:6764773

  14. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Tannus, Maria Claudia; Kaper, Lex

    2015-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Formation timescales are short, the corresponding accretion rates very high, and the forming stars are hidden from view due to vast amounts of interstellar extinction. On top of that, massive stars are rare, are located at relatively large distances, and play a major role in shaping the interstellar medium due to their strong UV radiation fields and stellar winds. Although massive stars show most spectral features in the UV and optical range, so far only for a handful of massive Young Stellar Objects (mYSOs) optical and near-infrared spectra have been obtained. For some of these their pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature has now been firmly established (e.g. Ochsendorf et al. 2011, Ellerbroek et al. 2013). The objective of our project is to determine the physical properties of mYSOs, to search for signatures remnant of their formation process and to better understand the feedback on their environment.To this aim the optical to near-infrared (300-2500 nm) spectra of six candidate mYSOs (Hanson et al. 1997), deeply embedded in the massive star forming region M17, have been obtained with X-Shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. These mYSO candidates have been identified based on their infrared excess and spectral features (double-peaked emission lines, CO band-head emission) indicating the presence of a disk. In most cases, we detect a photospheric spectrum allowing us to measure the physical properties of the mYSO and to confirm its PMS nature. We also uncover many emission features, including forbidden lines, providing information on the (active) formation process of these young (massive) stars.

  15. Elevated Aminopeptidase P Attenuates Cerebral Arterial Responses to Bradykinin in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Sharma, Amit; Rarick, Kevin R; Roman, Richard J; Harder, David R; Imig, John D

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral arterial myogenic and autoregulatory responses are impaired in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH) rats. Cerebral autoregulatory responses are restored in the congenic rat strain in which a segment of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway (BN) rat was transferred into the FHH genetic background (FHH.1BN). The impact of this region on cerebral arterial dilator responses remains unknown. Aminopeptidase is a gene that was transferred into the FHH genetic background to generate the FHH.1BN rats and is responsible for degradation of the vasodilator bradykinin. Thus, we hypothesized that FHH rats will have increased aminopeptidase P levels with impaired cerebral arterial responses to bradykinin compared to BN and FHH.1BN rats. We demonstrated higher cerebral arterial expression of aminopeptidase P in FHH compared to BN rats. Accordingly, we demonstrated markedly impaired cerebral arterial dilation to bradykinin in FHH compared to BN rats. Interestingly, aminopeptidase P expression was lower in FHH.1BN compared to FHH rats. Decreased aminopeptidase P levels in FHH.1BN rats were associated with increased cerebral arterial bradykinin-induced dilator responses. Aminopeptidase P inhibition by apstatin improved cerebral arterial bradykinin dilator responses in FHH rats to a level similar to FHH.1BN rats. Unlike bradykinin, cerebral arterial responses to acetylcholine were similar between FHH and FHH.1BN groups. These findings indicate decreased bradykinin bioavailability contributes to impaired cerebral arterial dilation in FHH rats. Overall, these data indicate an important role of aminopeptidase P in the impaired cerebral arterial function in FHH rat.

  16. Functional characterization of X-prolyl aminopeptidase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfa; Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Song, Mingxin

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a recombinant aminopeptidase P (rTgAPP) from Toxoplasma gondii was expressed in Escherichia coli to evaluate its enzyme parameters. The rTgAPP showed strong activity against a synthetic substrate for aminopeptidase P at pH 8·0 with a K m value of 0·255 µ m and a k cat value of 35·6 s-1. The overall catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) of the rTgAPP was 139·6 × 105 M-1 s-1. The activity of rTgAPP was enhanced by the addition of divalent cations and inhibited by bestatin. Deletion of TgAPP gene in the parasite through a CRISPR/Cas9 system resulted in inhibition of growth indicating the importance of TgAPP. Thus our findings reveal that TgAPP is an active enzyme in T. gondii and provide an insight into the function of TgAPP. PMID:27220680

  17. New aminopeptidase from “microbial dark matter” archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Steen, Andrew D.; Chhor, Gekleng; Endres, Michael; Webber, Austen T.; Bird, Jordan; Lloyd, Karen G.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments host a large population of diverse, heterotrophic, uncultured microorganisms with unknown physiologies that control carbon flow through organic matter decomposition. Recently, single-cell genomics uncovered new key players in these processes, such as the miscellaneous crenarchaeotal group. These widespread archaea encode putative intra- and extracellular proteases for the degradation of detrital proteins present in sediments. Here, we show that one of these enzymes is a self-compartmentalizing tetrameric aminopeptidase with a preference for cysteine and hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the hydrolyzed peptide. The ability to perform detailed characterizations of enzymes from native subsurface microorganisms, without requiring that those organisms first be grown in pure culture, holds great promise for understanding key carbon transformations in the environment as well as identifying new enzymes for biomedical and biotechnological applications.—Michalska, K., Steen, A. D., Chhor, G., Endres, M., Webber, A. T., Bird, J., Lloyd, K. G., Joachimiak, A. New aminopeptidase from “microbial dark matter” archaeon. PMID:26062601

  18. New role for leucyl aminopeptidase in glutathione turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cappiello, Mario; Lazzarotti, Alessandra; Buono, Francesca; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Amodeo, Pietro; Méndez, Blanca L; Pelosi, Paolo; Del Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    A manganese-dependent cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens. The characterization of the purified enzyme (molecular mass of the native protein, molecular mass of the subunit and extensive primary structure analysis) allowed the unequivocal attribution of the cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity, which is usually associated with alanyl aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.2) or membrane-bound dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), to LAP (leucyl aminopeptidase; EC 3.4.11.1). Analysis of the pH dependence of Cys-Gly hydrolysis catalysed by LAP, supported by a molecular modelling approach to the enzyme-substrate conformation, gave insights into the ability of the enzyme to recognize Cys-Gly as a substrate. Due to the effectiveness of LAP in hydrolysing Cys-Gly (K(m)=0.57 mM, kcat=6.0x10(3) min(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C) with respect to other dipeptide substrates, a new role for this enzyme in glutathione turnover is proposed. PMID:14583094

  19. Submillimeter and far infrared line observations of M17 SW: A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Stacey, G. J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, d. T.; Lugten, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far infrared spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are discussed. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. As a consequence, far ultraviolet radiation from the central OB stellar cluster can penetrate into the dense molecular cloud to a depth of several pc, thus creating bright and extended (CII) emission from the photodissociated surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clumps or sheets. The extended (CII) emission throughout the molecular cloud SW of the M17 complex has a level 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. This suggests that the molecular cloud as a whole is penetrated by ultraviolet radiation and has a clumpy or filamentary structure. The number of B stars expected to be embedded in the M17 molecular cloud probably can provide the UV radiation necessary for the extended (CII) emission. Alternatively, the UV radiation could be external, if the interstellar radiation in the vicinity of M17 is higher than in the solar neighborhood.

  20. A model to assess lactic acid bacteria aminopeptidase activities in Parmigiano Reggiano cheese during ripening.

    PubMed

    Gatti, M; De Dea Lindner, J; Gardini, F; Mucchetti, G; Bevacqua, D; Fornasari, M E; Neviani, E

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate in which phases of ripening of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese lactic acid bacteria aminopeptidases present in cheese extract could be involved in release of free amino acids and to better understand the behavior of these enzymes in physical-chemical conditions that are far from their optimum. In particular, we evaluated 6 different substrates to reproduce broad-specificity aminopeptidase N, broad-specificity aminopeptidase C, glutamyl aminopeptidase A, peptidase with high specificity for leucine and alanine, proline iminopeptidase, and X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activities releasing different N-terminal amino acids. The effects of pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature on the enzyme activities of amino acid beta-naphthylamide (betaNA)-substrates were determined by modulating the variables in 19 different runs of an experimental design, which allowed the building of mathematical models able to assess the effect on aminopeptidases activities over a range of values, obtained with bibliographic data, covering different environmental conditions in different zones of the cheese wheel at different aging times. The aminopeptidases tested in this work were present in cell-free Parmigiano Reggiano cheese extract after a 17-mo ripening and were active when tested in model system. The modeling approach shows that to highlight the individual and interactive effects of chemical-physical variables on enzyme activities, it is helpful to determine the true potential of an amino-peptidase in cheese. Our results evidenced that the 6 different lactic acid bacteria peptidases participate in cheese proteolysis and are induced or inhibited by the cheese production parameters that, in turn, depend on the cheese dimension. Generally, temperature and pH exerted the more relevant effects on the enzymatic activities, and in many cases, a relevant interactive effect of these variables was observed. Increasing salt concentration slowed down broad

  1. Influence of chronic ethanol intake on mouse synaptosomal aspartyl aminopeptidase and aminopeptidase A: relationship with oxidative stress indicators.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) and aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP) not only act as neuromodulators in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system, but also release N-terminal acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate). The hyperexcitability of amino acid neurotransmitters is responsible for several neurodegenerative processes affecting the central nervous system. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of chronic ethanol intake, a well known neurotoxic compound, on APA and ASAP activity under resting and K(+)-stimulated conditions at the synapse level. APA and ASAP activity were determined against glutamate- and aspartate-β-naphthylamide respectively in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and in their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The neurotoxic effects were analyzed by determining free radical generation, peroxidation of membrane lipids and the oxidation of synaptosomal proteins. In addition, the bioenergetic behavior of synaptosomes was analyzed under different experimental protocols. We obtained several modifications in oxidative stress parameters and a preferential inhibitor effect of chronic ethanol intake on APA and ASAP activities. Although previous in vitro studies failed to show signs of neurodegeneration, these in vivo modifications in oxidative stress parameters do not seem to be related to changes in APA and ASAP, invalidating the idea that an excess of free acidic amino acids released by APA and ASAP induces neurodegeneration.

  2. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Petter, Michaela; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes most malaria-associated morbidity and mortality in humans with over 500,000 deaths annually. The disease symptoms are associated with repeated cycles of invasion and asexual multiplication inside red blood cells of the parasite. Partial, non-sterile immunity to P. falciparum malaria develops only after repeated infections and continuous exposure. The successful evasion of the human immune system relies on the large repertoire of antigenically diverse parasite proteins displayed on the red blood cell surface and on the merozoite membrane where they are exposed to the human immune system. Expression switching of these polymorphic proteins between asexual parasite generations provides an efficient mechanism to adapt to the changing environment in the host and to maintain chronic infection. This chapter discusses antigenic diversity and variation in the malaria parasite and our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that direct the expression of these proteins. PMID:26537377

  3. Development of bestatin-based activity-based probes for metallo-aminopeptidases

    PubMed Central

    Harbut, Michael B.; Velmourougane, Geetha; Reiss, Gilana; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Greenbaum, Doron C.

    2009-01-01

    A novel set of activity-based probes (ABPs) for functionally profiling metallo-aminopeptidases was synthesized based on the bestatin inhibitor scaffold, the first synthesis of bestatin analogues using solid-phase techniques. These ABPs were shown to label metallo-aminopeptidases, using both a biotin and a fluorophore reporter, in an activity-dependent manner. This probe class was also shown to be amenable to ‘click’ chemistry labeling for possible use in live cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the ABPs are able to label an aminopeptidase in a complex proteome. Thus, these bestatin-based probes should have wide utility to functionally profile aminopeptidases in many biological systems. PMID:18823778

  4. Activity profiling of aminopeptidases in cell lysates using a fluorogenic substrate library.

    PubMed

    Byzia, Anna; Szeffler, Agata; Kalinowski, Leszek; Drag, Marcin

    2016-03-01

    Aminopeptidases are exopeptidases that process peptide bonds at the N-terminus of protein substrates, and they are involved in controlling several metabolic pathways. Due to their involvement in diseases such as cancer or rheumatoid arthritis, their presence can also be used as a predictive biomarker. Here, we used a library of fluorogenic substrates containing natural and unnatural amino acids to reliably measure the aminopeptidase N (APN) activity in cell lysates obtained from human, pig and rat kidneys. We compared our results to the substrate specificity profile of isolated APN. Our data strongly support the observation that fluorogenic substrates can be successfully used to identify aminopeptidases and to measure their activity in cell lysates. Moreover, in contrast to assays using single substrates, which can result in overlapping specificity due to cleavage by several aminopeptidases, our library fingerprint can provide information about single enzymes.

  5. Biliary aminopeptidase-N and the cholesterol crystallisation defect in cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Núñez, L; Amigo, L; Mingrone, G; Rigotti, A; Puglielli, L; Raddatz, A; Pimentel, F; Greco, A V; González, S; Garrido, J

    1995-09-01

    Several biliary proteins have cholesterol crystallisation promoting activity. One of these glycoproteins is aminopeptidase-N, a canalicular ectoenzyme. This study attempted to localise aminopeptidase-N along the biliary tree, to assess its concentration in a series of 98 patients subjected to abdominal surgery, 40 of them without gall stones, and to correlate its concentration with cholesterol crystal formation time of gall bladder bile. Aminopeptidase-N was isolated from purified native biliary vesicles. A specific polyclonal rabbit anti-aminopeptidase-N antibody was prepared for quantitative immunoblotting and for immunolocalisation. Tissue was obtained from liver biopsy specimens and from gall bladders removed at surgery because of gall stone disease. Aminopeptidase-N was immunolocalised to the apical membranes of hepatocytes and to the apical pole of ductular and gall bladder mucosal cells. The nucleation time of gall bladder bile was mean (SD) 4 (3) days in the gall stone group, compared with 21 (18) days in the control group (p < 0.001). Total absolute biliary protein and aminopeptidase-N concentrations were similar in both the control and gall stone patients. There was a reciprocal significant correlation, however, between the nucleation time and the relative aminopeptidase-N concentration (r = -0.35, p < 0.01) only in the gall stone group of patients. This study shows that this apical transmembrane ectoenzyme with cholesterol crystallisation promoting activity is present along the biliary tree and the hepatocyte. These findings support the concept that high concentrations or qualitative changes of biliary aminopeptidase-N contribute to cholesterol gall stone formation. PMID:7590442

  6. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS.

  8. Original method for the histochemical demonstration of tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I.

    PubMed

    Dikov, A; Dimitrova, M; Ivanov, I; Krieg, R; Halbhub, K J

    2000-11-01

    The original histochemical method for the visualization of tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I (TPP I, EC 3.4.14.9) is developed. The method is based on the new synthetic substrates Gly-L-Pro-L-Met(or L-Ala)-5-chloro-1-anthraquinonyl hydrazide (Gly-Pro-Met[Ala]-CAH). The final reaction product is represented as tripeptidyl-5-chloro-1 anthraquinonyl hydrazides (TPP-CAH). Upon the enzyme action the practically in aqueous media insoluble brown-reddish dye 5-chloro-1-anthraquinonyl hydrazine (CAH) is released, which reacts simultaneously with aromatic aldehydes as e.g. 4-anisaldehyde (p-AA) or 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (p-NBA), resulting in microcrystalline or amorphous deeply colored hydrazones. The last compounds mark accurately the locations of enzymatic activity. The biochemically suggested lysosomal localization of this collagen-degrading exopeptidase is thus confirmed on tissue sections. More information about the distribution of TPP I in different rat organs is presented as well.

  9. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Substrate-dependent nitric oxide synthesis by secreted endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we examined the role of aminopeptidases with reference to endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis employing murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ and LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages derived from ERAP1 knockout mouse. When NO synthesis was measured in the presence of peptides having N-terminal Arg, comparative NO synthesis was seen with that measured in the presence of Arg. In the presence of an aminopeptidase inhibitor amastatin, NO synthesis in activated RAW264.7 cells was significantly decreased. These results suggest that aminopeptidases are involved in the NO synthesis in activated RAW264.7 cells. Subsequently, significant reduction of NO synthesis was observed in ERAP1 knockdown cells compared with wild-type cells. This reduction was rescued by exogenously added ERAP1. Furthermore, when peritoneal macrophages prepared from ERAP1 knockout mouse were employed, reduction of NO synthesis in knockout mouse macrophages was also attributable to ERAP1. In the presence of amastatin, further reduction was observed in knockout mouse-derived macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that several aminopeptidases play important roles in the maximum synthesis of NO in activated macrophages in a substrate peptide-dependent manner and ERAP1 is one of the aminopeptidases involved in the NO synthesis.

  11. Aminopeptidase N gene expression and abundance in caprine mammary gland is influenced by circulating plasma peptide.

    PubMed

    Mabjeesh, S J; Gal-Garber, O; Milgram, J; Feuermann, Y; Cohen-Zinder, M; Shamay, A

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the localization and the effect of circulating peptides on the expression of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) in caprine mammary gland. Four lactating goats in mid to late lactation were used in a crossover design and were subjected to 2 dietary treatments. Abomasal infusion of casein hydrolysate was used to increase the concentration of peptide-bound amino acid in the circulation. Samples of mammary gland tissue from each goat were taken by biopsy at the end of each treatment period to measure gene and protein expression of aminopeptidase N in the tissue. There were no measurable effects on feed intake and milk production for any of the treatments. Western blot analysis showed that aminopeptidase N is located on the basolateral side of parenchymal cells and not on the apical membranes. Abomasal infusion of casein hydrolysate caused a marked change in the profile of arterial blood free amino acids and peptide-bound amino acids smaller than 1500 Da. Abundance of aminopeptidase N mRNA and protein increased by 51 and 58%, respectively, in casein hydrolysate-infused goats compared with the control treatment. It was concluded that aminopeptidase N is one candidate actively involved in the mammary gland to support protein synthesis and milk production. In accordance with the nutritional conditions in the current experiment, it is suggested that aminopeptidase N expression is partly controlled by the metabolic requirements of the gland and postabsorptive forms of amino acids in the circulation. PMID:15905436

  12. Tissue-specific interactions between nuclear proteins and the aminopeptidase N promoter.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Laustsen, L; Kärnström, U; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    1991-09-25

    Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is a metallopeptidase found in many tissues. Aminopeptidase N activity is high in the small intestinal mucosa, moderate in the liver, and low in the spleen. Using DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from these tissues, three cis elements (DF, LF-B1, UF) were identified in the aminopeptidase N promoter. The DF region (-53 to -30) interacts with the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor Sp1. The LF-B1 region (-85 to -58) interacts with the liver transcription factor LF-B1 (HNF-1) which was detected as well in nuclei from small intestinal mucosa. The UF region (-112 to -90) interacts with nuclear factors which seem to be expressed differentially in the liver and the small intestine. Transfection of promoter deletions into HepG2 cells showed that the LF-B1 region is necessary for high expression of the aminopeptidase N gene in liver cells. LF-B1 could not be detected in spleen nuclei. In accordance with this, RNA analysis demonstrated that the aminopeptidase N promoter operating in the small intestine and in the liver is inactive in the spleen. In this tissue initiation of transcription from the aminopeptidase N gene occurs from an upstream promoter.

  13. Enumeration of starter cultures during yogurt production using Petrifilm AC plates associated with acidified MRS and M17 broths.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marília M; Freitas, Rosangela; Nero, Luís A; Carvalho, Antônio F

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of Petrifilm AC (3M Microbiology, St. Paul, MN, USA) associated with the broths M17 and de Mann-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) at pH 5.4 was evaluated to enumerate Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during the yogurt production. Commercial and reference strains of these microorganisms were experimentally inoculated in nonfat milk and incubated at 42 degrees C for 4 h for yogurt production. At the moment of inoculation and after incubation, aliquots were collected, submitted to dilution using the broths M17 and MRS at pH 5.4, and plated for Strep. salivarius and Lb. bulgaricus enumeration according ISO 9232 and at Petrifilm AC plates, respectively. M17 plates were incubated at 42 degrees C, and MRS plates were incubated at 35 degrees C under anaerobiosis. After 48 h, the formed colonies were enumerated and the counts were compared by correlation and analysis of variance (P<0.05). In addition, colonies were randomly selected from all plates and characterized according to Gram staining and morphology. The obtained results indicated that Petrifilm AC plates associated to M17 and MRS at pH 5.4 can be considered as a suitable alternative for Strep. salivarius and Lb. bulgaricus enumeration during yogurt production, with slight interferences due to the acidity of MRS at the moment of inoculation, and due to the acidity of yogurt at the end of fermentation process. It was also observed that the MRS at pH 5.4 was not sufficiently selective for Lb. delbrueckii enumeration, despite it is indicated by the official protocol from ISO 9232.

  14. Pulling the Trigger on Star Formation: Expanded CO (J = 2 → 1) Maps of M17 and Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Natalie; Bieging, J. H.; Povich, M. S.; Rudolph, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    M17, also known as the Omega Nebula, is a well-known region of star formation characterized by a prominent HII region, photodissociation region and extensive giant molecular cloud (GMC). We have mapped the molecular cloud region surrounding M17 in 12CO and 13CO (J = 2 → 1) emission lines with the Heinrich Hertz Telescope. The three dimensional data cubes reveal the full extended shell structure of the molecular gas associated with the HII region, concentrated between v = 15 to 25 km/s. Utilizing a catalog of young stellar objects (YSOs) compiled from both Spitzer GLIMPSE and complementary near infrared data, we can see their distribution within and around the GMC. We find a concentration of YSOs in the northern rim of the molecular cloud; however, star formation is not observed in the newly mapped region farther north. We also observe unassociated structures near M17 at higher velocities, including one shell-like structure that is also characterized by a concentration of YSOs around its rim. We propose that the shell structure may have been produced by an older HII region. The blown out shells may have triggered the star formation in the isolated regions we now observe.

  15. Rapid Circumstellar Disk Evolution and an Accelerating Star Formation Rate in the Infrared Dark Cloud M17 SWex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Broos, Patrick S.; Orbin, Wesley T.; King, Robert R.; Naylor, Tim; Whitney, Barbara A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a catalog of 840 X-ray sources and first results from a 100 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging study of the filamentary infrared (IR) dark cloud G014.225-00.506, which forms the central regions of a larger cloud complex known as the M17 southwest extension (M17 SWex). In addition to the rich population of protostars and young stellar objects with dusty circumstellar disks revealed by archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we discover a population of X-ray-emitting, intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars that lack IR excess emission from circumstellar disks. We model the IR spectral energy distributions of this source population to measure its mass function and place new constraints on the destruction timescales for the inner dust disk for 2-8 M ⊙ stars. We also place a lower limit on the star formation rate (SFR) and find that it is quite high (\\dot{M}≥slant 0.007 M ⊙ yr-1), equivalent to several Orion Nebula Clusters in G14.225-0.506 alone, and likely accelerating. The cloud complex has not produced a population of massive, O-type stars commensurate with its SFR. This absence of very massive (≳20 M ⊙) stars suggests that either (1) M17 SWex is an example of a distributed mode of star formation that will produce a large OB association dominated by intermediate-mass stars but relatively few massive clusters, or (2) the massive cores are still in the process of accreting sufficient mass to form massive clusters hosting O stars.

  16. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  17. Characterisation of the aminopeptidase from non-germinated winter rape (Brassica napus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Kania, Joanna; Gillner, Danuta M

    2016-09-15

    Rapeseed plays a crucial role in food and fuel industry. Since aminopeptidases take part in many physiological processes in all organisms, it is important to learn their role and characteristics in economically relevant plants. Extracts of non-germinated winter rape seeds were screened for aminopeptidase activity. Substrate specificity, the influence of pH and temperature, as well as effect of protease inhibitors and chosen metal ions on the aminopeptidase activity were determined. The approximate molecular weight estimated by NATIVE-PAGE and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis was ∼60 kDa. The partially purified enzyme as well as the aminopeptidases present in crude extract cleaved preferentially Phe-pNA. The activity profiles toward several substrates were also determined. Maximum activity was observed at pH 6.5 and temperature of 40 °C for Phe-pNA as a substrate. Two visible picks in the pH profile toward Phe-pNA, together with other results (IEF) suggest the presence of more than one aminopeptidase, having similar molecular mass. Much lower activity and broad pH profiles were observed for Leu- and Ala-pNA as substrates.

  18. Collaboration within the M1 aminopeptidase family promotes reproductive success in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Mark J; Flick, Katelyn; Trzepacz, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Mutations of the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (Psa) orthologs of flies, mice, and plants result in meiotic errors and reduced embryonic viability. Genetic lesions of the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of Psa, pam-1, similarly result in dramatic reductions of worm fecundity. The gonads of animals harboring mutant pam-1 alleles display expanded populations of pachytene germinal nuclei and delayed nucleolar disassembly in the developing oocytes, phenotypes that ultimately hinder embryonic viability and overall brood sizes. PAM-1 is a member of the M1 aminopeptidase family and shares a high amount of homology with its M1 paralogs. Comparative analysis of the M1 aminopeptidase family reveals that only nine (including PAM-1) of the 17 annotated M1 aminopeptidases are predicted to be catalytically active. Interestingly, we demonstrate that three of these active M1 paralogs have roles independent of PAM-1 in promoting gametogenesis and fecundity. Simultaneous inhibition of pam-1 and M1 paralogs produces synergistic decreases in overall brood sizes and embryonic viability, exacerbates the germinal phenotypes of pachytene extension and delayed nucleolar disassembly, and unmasks previously hidden phenotypes. Our data suggests that the interdependent functions of multiple M1 aminopeptidases are necessary for reproductive success in C. elegans and lend further credence to the redundant composition of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme family.

  19. Characterisation of the aminopeptidase from non-germinated winter rape (Brassica napus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Kania, Joanna; Gillner, Danuta M

    2016-09-15

    Rapeseed plays a crucial role in food and fuel industry. Since aminopeptidases take part in many physiological processes in all organisms, it is important to learn their role and characteristics in economically relevant plants. Extracts of non-germinated winter rape seeds were screened for aminopeptidase activity. Substrate specificity, the influence of pH and temperature, as well as effect of protease inhibitors and chosen metal ions on the aminopeptidase activity were determined. The approximate molecular weight estimated by NATIVE-PAGE and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis was ∼60 kDa. The partially purified enzyme as well as the aminopeptidases present in crude extract cleaved preferentially Phe-pNA. The activity profiles toward several substrates were also determined. Maximum activity was observed at pH 6.5 and temperature of 40 °C for Phe-pNA as a substrate. Two visible picks in the pH profile toward Phe-pNA, together with other results (IEF) suggest the presence of more than one aminopeptidase, having similar molecular mass. Much lower activity and broad pH profiles were observed for Leu- and Ala-pNA as substrates. PMID:27080895

  20. Aminopeptidase-like activities in Caenorhabditis elegans and the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Masler, E P; Kovaleva, E S; Sardanelli, S

    2001-09-01

    Aminopeptidase-like activities in crude whole body extracts of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the plant parasitic soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines were examined. General characteristics including pH optima, heat lability, and inactivation of enzyme by organic solvent were the same for the two species. All developmental stages of H. glycines exhibited activity. In older females, activity was present primarily in the eggs. Affinity for the substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide was the same regardless of the stage examined, and was similar for the two species (m for C. elegans and m for H. glycines). Nearly all (>95%) of C. elegans aminopeptidase-like activity was present in the soluble fraction of the extract, while H. glycines activity was distributed between the soluble and membrane fractions. Specific activities of the soluble enzymes were highest in C. elegans and H. glycines juveniles. The C. elegans enzyme was susceptible to a number of aminopeptidase inhibitors, particularly to amastatin and leuhistin, each of which inhibited aminopeptidase-like activity more than 90% at 90 microm. In H. glycines, aminopeptidase-like activity was inhibited 39% by amastatin at 900 microm. The apparent molecular weight of the soluble C. elegans enzyme is 70-80 kDa. Some activity in H. glycines is present in the 70-80 kDa range, but most activity (80-90%) is associated with a very high molecular weight (>240 kDa) component.

  1. Novel chromogenic aminopeptidase substrates for the detection and identification of clinically important microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Marie; James, Arthur L; Orenga, Sylvain; Perry, John D; Rasul, Ari K; Robinson, Shaun N; Stanforth, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A series of amino acid derivatives 8-10, 42 and 43 have been prepared as chromogenic enzyme substrates in order to detect aminopeptidase activity in clinically important Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Enzymatic hydrolysis liberates the amino acid moiety and either a 4-aminophenol or a 4-dialkylaminoaniline derivative which undergoes oxidative coupling with 1-naphthol or a substituted 1-naphthol giving an indophenol dye. Substrates and 1-naphthols were incorporated into an agar-based culture medium and this allowed growth of intensely coloured bacterial colonies based on hydrolysis by specific enzymes. Red/pink coloured colonies were produced by the substrates 8-10 and blue coloured colonies were formed by the substrates 42 and 43. The L-alanyl aminopeptidase substrates 8 targeted L-alanyl aminopeptidase activity and gave coloured colonies with a range of Gram-negative bacteria. Substrates 9 targeted β-alanyl aminopeptidase activity and generated coloured colonies with selected Gram-negative species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three substrates for L-pyroglutamyl acid aminopeptidase (10a, 10c and 43) were hydrolysed by enterococci and Streptococcus pyogenes to generate coloured colonies. Two yeasts were also included in the study, but they did not produce coloured colonies with any of the substrates examined.

  2. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera Midgut Digestive Physiology after Ingestion of Pigeon Pea Inducible Leucine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Lomate, Purushottam R.; Jadhav, Bhakti R.; Giri, Ashok P.; Hivrale, Vandana K.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory. PMID:24098675

  3. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Jadhav, Bhakti R; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  4. Interstellar Weather Vanes: GLIMPSE Mid-Infrared Stellar Wind Bow Shocks in M17 and RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Babler, Brian L.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Meade, Marilyn R.; Churchwell, Ed

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of six infrared stellar wind bow shocks in the Galactic massive star formation regions M17 and RCW 49 from Spitzer GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire) images. The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly resolves the arc-shaped emission produced by the bow shocks. We combine Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS observations to obtain the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the bow shocks and their individual driving stars. We use the stellar SEDs to estimate the spectral types of the three newly identified O stars in RCW 49 and one previously undiscovered O star in M17. One of the bow shocks in RCW 49 reveals the presence of a large-scale flow of gas escaping the H II region at a few 102 km s-1. Radiation transfer modeling of the steep rise in the SED of this bow shock toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that the emission is coming principally from dust heated by the star driving the shock. The other five bow shocks occur where the stellar winds of O stars sweep up dust in the expanding H II regions.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMINOPEPTIDASE IN THE FREE-LIVING NEMATODE PANAGRELLUS REDIVIVUS: SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION AND POSSIBLE ROLE IN NEUROPEPTIDE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase was detected in homogenates of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus with the aminoacyl substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide (Ala-4-NA). Subcellular distribution of the enzyme was unequal, with approximately 80 percent of total aminopeptidase in the soluble fraction and the rem...

  6. Partial purification and characterization of an aminopeptidase from Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Barfield, R C

    2005-12-01

    Our previous investigation demonstrated the expression in Eimeria tenella sporulated oocysts of an aminopeptidase (AP) with strong homology to AP N. To further understand the role of proteases during development, we investigated the molecular and biochemical properties of E. tenella AP. Greater than 95% AP activity was present in a soluble extract during sporulation of oocysts with highest activity in fully sporulated oocysts. The AP activity was inhibited by the AP inhibitors bestatin and 1,6-phenanthroline, but not by serine protease inhibitors. The AP had specificity for synthetic endopeptidase substrates that contain arginine, alanine, or glycine at the N terminus. Partial purification of the enzyme yielded a major protein band with an Mr of about 106 kDa and an isoelectric point (Ip) of 5.1. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the gene for AP is expressed during sporulation, but expression is absent or greatly reduced in the sporozoites and merozoites. On the basis of the deduced gene structure, the predicted Mr is 110 kDa with a pI of 5.59. Database search indicates that the E. tenella AP shares significant homology with the AP from Apicomplexan taxa: Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Cryptosporidium hominis. Together, these results confirm the presence of a cytosolic AP related to AP N, which is expressed and active during sporulation of E. tenella oocysts. PMID:16539006

  7. Molecular structure of leucine aminopeptidase at 2. 7- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, S.K. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); David, P.R.; Lipscomb, W.N. ); Taylor, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme has been refined at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, and the current crystallographic R factor is 0.169 for a model that includes the two zinc ions and all 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 {angstrom} and maximal thickness of 90 {angstrom}. The monomers are crystallographically equivalent and each is folded into two unequal {alpha}/{beta} domains connected by an {alpha}-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 x 55 x 55 {angstrom}{sup 3}. The secondary structural composition is 40% {alpha}-helix and 19% {beta}-strand. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys-250 and Arg-336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 {angstrom} and thickness 10 {angstrom}. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the twofold symmetry axes.

  8. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Methionine Aminopeptidases by Bengamide Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing-Ping; Yuan, Xiu-Hua; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Wen-Long; Wan, Baojie; Franzblau, Scott G.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang

    2012-05-29

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) carries out an essential function of protein N-terminal processing in many bacteria and is a promising target for the development of novel antitubercular agents. Natural bengamides potently inhibit the proliferation of mammalian cells by targeting MetAP enzymes, and the X-ray crystal structure of human type 2 MetAP in complex with a bengamide derivative reveals the key interactions at the active site. By preserving the interactions with the conserved residues inside the binding pocket while exploring the differences between bacterial and human MetAPs around the binding pocket, seven bengamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of MtMetAP1a and MtMetAP1c in different metalloforms, inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in replicating and non-replicating states, and inhibition of human K562 cell growth. Potent inhibition of MtMetAP1a and MtMetAP1c and modest growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis were observed for some of these derivatives. Crystal structures of MtMetAP1c in complex with two of the derivatives provided valuable structural information for improvement of these inhibitors for potency and selectivity.

  9. Characterization and subcellular localization of aminopeptidases in senescing barley leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, S. S.; Choe, H. T.; Rausser, S.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Four aminopeptidases (APs) were separated using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cell-free extracts and the stromal fractions of isolated chloroplasts prepared from primary barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var Numar) leaves. Activities were identified using a series of aminoacyl-beta-naphthylamide derivatives as substrates. AP1, 2, and 3 were found in the stromal fraction of isolated chloroplasts with respective molecular masses of 66.7, 56.5, and 54.6 kilodaltons. AP4 was found only in the cytoplasmic fraction. No AP activity was found in vacuoles of these leaves. It was found that 50% of the L-Leu-beta-naphthylamide and 25% of the L-Arg-beta-naphthylamide activities were localized in the chloroplasts. Several AP activities were associated with the membranes of the thylakoid fraction of isolated chloroplasts. AP1, 2, and 4 reacted against a broad range of substrates, whereas AP3 hydrolyzed only L-Arg-beta-naphthylamide. Only AP2 hydrolyzed L-Val-beta-naphthylamide. Since AP2 and AP3 were the only ones reacting against Val-beta-naphthylamide and Arg-beta-naphthylamide, respectively, several protease inhibitors were tested against these substrates using a stromal fraction from isolated chloroplasts as the source of the two APs. Both APs were sensitive to both metallo and sulfhydryl type inhibitors. Although AP activity decreased as leaves senesced, no new APs appeared on gels during senescence and none disappeared.

  10. Spontaneous rupture of spleen in falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, C; Basu, Arup; Kulkarni, A R; Choudhury, R K

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of spleen is an extremely rare complication of falciparum malaria. We report a 3 1/2-year-old girl with splenic rupture who was managed successfully with splenectomy and antimalarials.

  11. An Aminopeptidase in the Drosophila Testicular Niche Acts in Germline Stem Cell Maintenance and Spermatogonial Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cindy; Gandhi, Shiv; Biniossek, Martin L; Feng, Lijuan; Schilling, Oliver; Urban, Siniša; Chen, Xin

    2015-10-13

    Extrinsic cues from the niche are known to regulate adult stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation. Here, we report that an aminopeptidase Slamdance (Sda) acts in the Drosophila testicular niche to maintain germline stem cells (GSCs) and regulate progenitor germ cell dedifferentiation. Mutations in sda lead to dramatic testicular niche deterioration and stem cell loss. Recombinant Sda has specific aminopeptidase activity in vitro, and the in vivo function of Sda requires an intact aminopeptidase domain. Sda is required for accumulation of mature DE-cadherin, and overexpression of DE-cadherin rescues most sda mutant phenotypes, suggesting that DE-cadherin is an important target of Sda. Finally, Sda is both necessary and sufficient to promote dedifferentiation during aging and recovery from genetically manipulated depletion of GSCs. Together, our results suggest that a niche factor promotes both stem cell maintenance and progenitor cell dedifferentiation.

  12. An Aminopeptidase in the Drosophila Testicular Niche Acts in Germline Stem Cell Maintenance and Spermatogonial Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cindy; Gandhi, Shiv; Biniossek, Martin L; Feng, Lijuan; Schilling, Oliver; Urban, Siniša; Chen, Xin

    2015-10-13

    Extrinsic cues from the niche are known to regulate adult stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation. Here, we report that an aminopeptidase Slamdance (Sda) acts in the Drosophila testicular niche to maintain germline stem cells (GSCs) and regulate progenitor germ cell dedifferentiation. Mutations in sda lead to dramatic testicular niche deterioration and stem cell loss. Recombinant Sda has specific aminopeptidase activity in vitro, and the in vivo function of Sda requires an intact aminopeptidase domain. Sda is required for accumulation of mature DE-cadherin, and overexpression of DE-cadherin rescues most sda mutant phenotypes, suggesting that DE-cadherin is an important target of Sda. Finally, Sda is both necessary and sufficient to promote dedifferentiation during aging and recovery from genetically manipulated depletion of GSCs. Together, our results suggest that a niche factor promotes both stem cell maintenance and progenitor cell dedifferentiation. PMID:26440886

  13. An immunohistochemical study of endopeptidase-24.11 and aminopeptidase N in lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Bowes, M A; Kenny, A J

    1987-02-01

    Two cell surface peptidases, endopeptidase-24.11 and aminopeptidase N, thought to be involved in metabolizing regulatory peptides, have been immunohistochemically mapped in pig lymphoid organs using specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. In tonsil, spleen, thymus and Peyer's patches, the endopeptidase-24.11 immunoreactivity exhibited a reticular pattern similar to that previously observed in lymph nodes, where this enzyme is much more abundant. Apart from this location in reticular cells, the only structures seen to express endopeptidase-24.11 were Hassall's corpuscles in the thymus, confirming their reticular cell origin. Aminopeptidase N exhibited a cellular distribution quite distinct from that of the endopeptidase. It was associated with cells scattered throughout the lymphoid organs studied, consistent with its localization in macrophages. In lymph nodes, some fibroblasts buried in trabeculae also stained for aminopeptidase, but this was not observed in spleen and thymus.

  14. Thiolation of polycarbophil enhances its inhibition of intestinal brush border membrane bound aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Zarti, H; Walker, G F

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates (PCP-Cys) as an oral excipient to protect leucine enkephalin (leu-enkp) from enzymatic degradation by the intestinal mucosa. Cysteine was covalently linked to polycarbophil by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDAC). Inhibitory activity was tested towards isolated aminopeptidase N and excised intact pig intestinal mucosa, with native mucus. Aminopeptidase N activity was assayed spectrophotometrically using L-leucine p-nitroanilide (leu-pNA) as a synthetic substrate and against the model peptide drug leu-enkp, by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Free cysteine at 6.3 and 63 microM (pH 6) significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited aminopeptidase N activity, and PCP-Cys (0.25% w/v, pH 6) had a significantly (p < 0.05) greater inhibitory effect than PCP on the aminopeptidase N activity towards both substrates. PCP-Cys completely protected leu-enkp against aminopeptidase N activity over a 2-h incubation period, whereas 83 +/- 4 and 60 +/- 7% remained stable in the presence of PCP and buffer only, respectively. Leu-enkp in the absence and presence of PCP (0.25% w/v) at pH 6 was completely digested by the intact intestinal mucosa at the 60- and 90-min incubation time points, respectively, whereas in the presence of PCP-Cys (0.25% w/v, pH 6) 11 +/- 3.5% of leu-enkp remained at the 120-min time point. Thiolation of PCP increased the stability of leu-enkp against the enzymatic degradation by aminopeptidase N and the intact intestinal mucosa, identifying a promising new excipient for peroral delivery of peptides.

  15. Detectability of Plasmodium falciparum clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In areas of high transmission people often harbour multiple clones of Plasmodium falciparum, but even PCR-based diagnostic methods can only detect a fraction (the detectability, q) of all clones present in a host. Accurate measurements of detectability are desirable since it affects estimates of multiplicity of infection, prevalence, and frequency of breakthrough infections in clinical drug trials. Detectability can be estimated by typing repeated samples from the same host but it has been unclear what should be the time interval between the samples and how the data should be analysed. Methods A longitudinal molecular study was conducted in the Kassena-Nankana district in northern Ghana. From each of the 80 participants, four finger prick samples were collected over a period of 8 days, and tested for presence of different Merozoite Surface Protein (msp) 2 genotypes. Implications for estimating q were derived from these data by comparing the fit of statistical models of serial dependence and over-dispersion. Results The distribution of the frequencies of detection for msp2 genotypes was close to binomial if the time span between consecutive blood samples was at least 7 days. For shorter intervals the probabilities of detection were positively correlated, i.e. the shorter the interval between two blood collections, the more likely the diagnostic results matched for a particular genotype. Estimates of q were rather insensitive to the statistical model fitted. Conclusions A simple algorithm based on analysing blood samples collected 7 days apart is justified for generating robust estimates of detectability. The finding of positive correlation of detection probabilities for short time intervals argues against imperfect detection being directly linked to the 48-hour periodicity of P. falciparum. The results suggest that the detectability of a given parasite clone changes over time, at an unknown rate, but fast enough to regard blood samples taken one week

  16. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  17. Catalysis and Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Methionine Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing-Ping; Chai, Sergio C.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang

    2010-09-07

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) carries out an important cotranslational N-terminal methionine excision of nascent proteins and represents a potential target to develop antibacterial and antitubercular drugs. We cloned one of the two MetAPs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c from the mapB gene) and purified it to homogeneity as an apoenzyme. Its activity required a divalent metal ion, and Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), and Fe(II) were among activators of the enzyme. Co(II) and Fe(II) had the tightest binding, while Ni(II) was the most efficient cofactor for the catalysis. MtMetAP1c was also functional in E. coli cells because a plasmid-expressed MtMetAP1c complemented the essential function of MetAP in E. coli and supported the cell growth. A set of potent MtMetAP1c inhibitors were identified, and they showed high selectivity toward the Fe(II)-form, the Mn(II)-form, or the Co(II) and Ni(II) forms of the enzyme, respectively. These metalloform selective inhibitors were used to assign the metalloform of the cellular MtMetAP1c. The fact that only the Fe(II)-form selective inhibitors inhibited the cellular MtMetAP1c activity and inhibited the MtMetAP1c-complemented cell growth suggests that Fe(II) is the native metal used by MtMetAP1c in an E. coli cellular environment. Finally, X-ray structures of MtMetAP1c in complex with three metalloform-selective inhibitors were analyzed, which showed different binding modes and different interactions with metal ions and active site residues.

  18. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum.

  19. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  20. Characterization and cDNA cloning of aminopeptidase A from the venom of Gloydius blomhoffi brevicaudus.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuko; Murayama, Nobuhiro; Fujita, Yoshiaki; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2007-06-15

    The aminopeptidase activities of snake venoms from Gloydius blomhoffi brevicaudus, Gloydius halys blomhoffii, Trimeresurus flavoviridis, Bothrops jararaca and Crotalus atrox were investigated. Aminopeptidase A (APA), aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities were present in all snake venoms. The strongest APA activity was found in venom from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus. The susceptibility to metallopeptidase inhibitors and the pH optimum of the partially purified enzyme from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom were similar to those of known APAs from mammals. A G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom gland cDNA library was screened to isolate cDNA clones using probes based on highly conserved amino acid sequences in known APAs. Molecular cloning of APA from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom predicted that it was a type II integral membrane protein containing 958 amino acid residues with 17 potential N-linked glycosylation sites. It possessed a His-Glu-Xaa-Xaa-His-(Xaa)(18)-Glu zinc binding motif that allowed the classification of this protein as a member of the M1 family of zinc-metallopeptidases, or gluzincins. The deduced amino acid sequence shows approximately 60% sequence identity to mammalian APA sequences. This is the first study to report the primary structure of APA from a reptile. PMID:17383704

  1. Studies on the tissue distribution of the puromycin-sensitive enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    McLellan, S; Dyer, S H; Rodriguez, G; Hersh, L B

    1988-11-01

    An antiserum generated to the soluble form of the rat brain puromycin-sensitive enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase was used to determine the tissue distribution of the soluble and membrane-associated forms of this enzyme. All tissues examined contained significant levels of the soluble enzyme form, with this enzyme accounting for greater than 90% of the arylamidase activity in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Native gel electrophoresis coupled with activity staining as well as inhibition studies were used to confirm the presence of this enzyme in various tissues. Serum was found not to contain this particular aminopeptidase. In contrast to the results obtained with the soluble enzyme form, brain was the only tissue found to contain the membrane-associated enzyme form. Although all tissues contained membrane-associated aminopeptidase activity only the brain enzyme could be maintained in solution in the absence of detergent. In addition, the brain membrane-associated enzyme could be distinguished from the membrane-associated aminopeptidase activity in other tissues on the basis of its sensitivity to inhibition by puromycin.

  2. Optical effects of the operation of the onboard engine of the Progress M-17M spacecraft at thermospheric heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Khakhinov, V. V.; Beletskii, A. B.; Lebedev, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of optical observations in the active space experiment "Radar-Progress" on April 17, 2013, after switching on the approach-correction engine of the Progress M-17M cargo spacecraft at thermospheric heights (412 km), are presented in this paper. During engine operation, a region of enhanced emission intensity has been recorded. It was presumably related to the scatter of twilight solar emission at the engine exhausts in the cargo spacecraft orbit and, probably to the occurrence of an additional emission in the atomic oxygen line [OI] 630 nm. The maximum observed dimensions of the emission region were ~350 and ~250 km along the orbit and across it, respectively. The velocity of the expansion of the emission region at the first moments after the initiation of engine operation was ~7 and ~3.5 km/s along the orbit and across it, respectively. The maximum intensity of the disturbed region is estimated to be a value equivalent to ~40-60 R within the spectral band of 2 nm. No optical manifestation, which would exceed the natural variations in brightness of the night airglow and which would be related to possible large-scale modification of the ionosphere, was detected in the natural emission lines [O] 557.7 and 630.0 nm in a zone remote from the place of injection of engine exhausts.

  3. In silico screening of novel inhibitors of M17 Leucine Amino Peptidase (LAP) of Plasmodium vivax as therapeutic candidate.

    PubMed

    Rout, Subhashree; Mahapatra, Rajani Kanta

    2016-08-01

    M17 LAP (Leucine Amino Peptidase) plays an important role in the hydrolysis of amino acids essential for growth and development of Plasmodium vivax (Pv), the pathogen causing malaria. In this paper a homology model of PvLAP was generated using MODELLER v9.15. From different in-silico methods such as structure based, ligand based and de novo drug designing a total of 90 compounds were selected for docking studies. A final list of 10 compounds was prepared. The study reported the identification of 2-[(3-azaniumyl-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoyl) amino]-4-methylpentanoate as the best inhibitor in terms of docking score and pharmacophoric features. The reliability of the binding mode of the inhibitor is confirmed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study with GROMACS software for a simulation time of 20ns in water environment. Finally, in silico ADMET analysis of the inhibitors using MedChem Designer v3 evaluated the drug likeness of the best hits to be considered for industrial pharmaceutical research.

  4. Submillimeter and far-infrared line observations of M17 SW - A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Stacey, G. J.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1988-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far-IR spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are reported. Strong forbidden C II 158 micron and CO J = 7 - 6 line emission arises in an H II region/molecular cloud interface of several pc thickness. Weaker forbidden C II emission appears to be extended over 15 pc throughout the molecular cloud. CO J = 14 - 13 and forbidden O I 145 micron spectra indicate high temperatures and densities for both molecular and atomic gas in the interface. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. The extended forbidden C II emission throughout the molecular cloud has a level around 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. The high gas temperature of molecular material in the UV-illuminated interface region suggests that CO self-shielding and heating of CO by photoelectrons are important.

  5. Mammary renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in rats with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    del Pilar Carrera, Maria; Ramírez-Expósito, Maria Jesus; Mayas, Maria Dolores; García, Maria Jesus; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Angiotensin II in particular and/or the local renin-angiotensin system in general could have an important role in epithelial tissue growth and modelling; therefore, it is possible that it may be involved in breast cancer. In this sense, previous works of our group showed a predominating role of angiotensin II in tumoral tissue obtained from women with breast cancer. However, although classically angiotensin II has been considered the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system cascade, several of its catabolism products such as angiotensin III and angiotensin IV also possess biological functions. These peptides are formed through the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the aminopeptidase type, also called angiotensinases. The aim of this work was to analyse several specific angiotensinase activities involved in the renin-angiotensin system cascade in mammary tissue from control rats and from rats with mammary tumours induced by N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU), which may reflect the functional status of their target peptides under the specific conditions brought about by the tumoural process. The results show that soluble and membrane-bound specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activities and membrane-bound glutamyl aminopeptidase activity increased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated animals and soluble aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B activities significantly decreased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated rats. These changes support the existence of a local mammary renin-angiotensin system and that this system and its putative functions in breast tissue could be altered by the tumour process, in which we suggest a predominant role of angiotensin III. All described data about the renin-angiotensin system in mammary tissue support the idea that it must be involved in normal breast tissue functions, and its disruption could be involved in one or more steps of the carcinogenesis process.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of cytosol and membrane alanyl-aminopeptidase in human T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Alicja; Tadje, Janine; Arndt, Marco; Wolke, Carmen; Kähne, Thilo; Bartsch, Jaqueline; Faust, Jürgen; Neubert, Klaus; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2003-04-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors strongly affect the proliferation and function of immune cells in man and animals and are promising agents for the pharmacological treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Membrane alanyl-aminopeptidase (mAAP) has been considered as the major target of these anti-inflammatory aminopeptidase inhibitors. Recent evidence also points to a role of the cytosol alanyl-aminopeptidase (cAAP) in the immune response. In this study we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the mRNA expression of both cAAP and mAAP in resting and activated peripheral T cells and also in CD4+, CD8+, Th1, Th2 and Treg (CD4+ CD25+) subpopulations. Both mAAP and cAAP mRNAs were expressed in all cell types investigated, and in response to activation their expression appeared to be upregulated in CD8+ cells, but downregulated in Treg cells. In CD4+ cells, mAAP and cAAP mRNAs were affected in opposite ways in response to activation. The cAAP-specific inhibitor, PAQ-22, did not affect either cAAP or mAAP expression in activated CD4+ or CD8+ cells, whereas in activated Treg cells it markedly upregulated the mRNA levels of both aminopeptidases. The non-discriminatory inhibitor, phebestin, significantly increased the amount of mAAP and cAAP mRNA in CD4+ and that of cAAP in Treg cells.

  7. Analysis of the Catecholaminergic Phenotype in Human SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Roberta; Civiero, Laura; Ferrari, Vanni; Codolo, Gaia; Greggio, Elisa; Bubacco, Luigi; Beltramini, Mariano; Bisaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Human cell lines are often used to investigate cellular pathways relevant for physiological or pathological processes or to evaluate cell toxicity or protection induced by different compounds, including potential drugs. In this study, we analyzed and compared the differentiating activities of three agents (retinoic acid, staurosporine and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) on the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 cell lines; the first cell line is largely used in the field of neuroscience, while the second is still poorly characterized. After evaluating their effects in terms of cell proliferation and morphology, we investigated their catecholaminergic properties by assessing the expression profiles of the major genes involved in catecholamine synthesis and storage and the cellular concentrations of the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline. Our results demonstrate that the two cell lines possess similar abilities to differentiate and acquire a neuron-like morphology. The most evident effects in SH-SY5Y cells were observed in the presence of staurosporine, while in BE(2)-M17 cells, retinoic acid induced the strongest effects. Undifferentiated SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 cells are characterized by the production of both NA and DA, but their levels are considerably higher in BE(2)-M17 cells. Moreover, the NAergic phenotype appears to be more pronounced in SH-SY5Y cells, while BE(2)-M17 cells have a more prominent DAergic phenotype. Finally, the catecholamine concentration strongly increases upon differentiation induced by staurosporine in both cell lines. In conclusion, in this work the catecholaminergic phenotype of the human BE(2)-M17 cell line upon differentiation was characterized for the first time. Our data suggest that SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 represent two alternative cell models for the neuroscience field.

  8. Aminopeptidases A, B, and N and dipeptidase D are the four cysteinylglycinases of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Kamatani, S; Kim, E S; Kumagai, H

    2001-02-01

    Aminopeptidases A, B, and N and dipeptidase D, with broad substrate specificity, are the four cysteinylglycinases of Escherichia coli K-12, and there is no peptidase specific for the cleavage of cysteinylglycine.

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Activity Assays of Seeds from Balanites aegyptiaca: Compounds of the Extract Show Growth Inhibition and Activity against Plasmodial Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Peter; Deininger, Susanne; Specht, Sabine; Maniako, Rudeka; Haubrich, Stefanie; Pommerening, Tanja; Lin, Paul Kong Thoo; Hoerauf, Achim; Kaiser, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Balanites aegyptiaca (Balanitaceae) is a widely grown desert plant with multiuse potential. In the present paper, a crude extract from B. aegyptiaca seeds equivalent to a ratio of 1 : 2000 seeds to the extract was screened for antiplasmodial activity. The determined IC50 value for the chloroquine-susceptible Plasmodium falciparum NF54 strain was 68.26 μg/μL ± 3.5. Analysis of the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 6-phenyl-2(H)-1,2,4-triazin-5-one oxime, an inhibitor of the parasitic M18 Aspartyl Aminopeptidase as one of the compounds which is responsible for the in vitro antiplasmodial activity. The crude plant extract had a Ki of 2.35 μg/μL and showed a dose-dependent response. After depletion of the compound, a significantly lower inhibition was determined with a Ki of 4.8 μg/μL. Moreover, two phenolic compounds, that is, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-phenol and 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol, with determined IC50 values of 50.29 μM ± 3 and 47.82 μM ± 2.5, respectively, were detected. These compounds may contribute to the in vitro antimalarial activity due to their antioxidative properties. In an in vivo experiment, treatment of BALB/c mice with the aqueous Balanite extract did not lead to eradication of the parasites, although a reduced parasitemia at day 12 p.i. was observed. PMID:21687598

  10. The metabolism of neuropeptides. Phase separation of synaptic membrane preparations with Triton X-114 reveals the presence of aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Matsas, R; Stephenson, S L; Hryszko, J; Kenny, A J; Turner, A J

    1985-10-15

    The property of solutions of Triton X-114 to separate into detergent-rich and detergent-poor phases at 30 degrees C has been exploited to investigate the identities of the aminopeptidases in synaptic membrane preparations from pig striatum. When titrated with an antiserum to aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), synaptic membranes solubilized with Triton X-100 revealed that this enzyme apparently comprises no more than 5% of the activity releasing tyrosine from [Leu]enkephalin. When assayed in the presence of puromycin, this proportion increased to 20%. Three integral membrane proteins were fractionated by phase separation in Triton X-114. Aminopeptidase activity, endopeptidase-24.11 and peptidyl dipeptidase A partitioned predominantly into the detergent-rich phase when kidney microvillar membranes were so treated. However, only 5.5% of synaptic membrane aminopeptidase activity partitioned into this phase, although the other peptidases behaved predictably. About half of the aminopeptidase activity in the detergent-rich phase could now be titrated with the antiserum, showing that aminopeptidase N is an integral membrane protein of this preparation. Three aminopeptidase inhibitors were investigated for their ability to discriminate between the different activities revealed by these experiments. Although amastatin was the most potent (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M) it failed to discriminate between pure kidney aminopeptidase N, the total activity of solubilized synaptic membranes and that in the Triton X-114-rich phase. Bestatin was slightly more potent for total activity (IC50 = 6.3 X 10(-6) M) than for the other two forms (IC50 = 1.6 X 10(-5) M). Puromycin was a weak inhibitor, but was more selective. The activity of solubilized membranes was more sensitive (IC50 = 1.6 X 10(-5) M) than that of the pure enzyme or the Triton X-114-rich phase (IC50 = 4 X 10(-4) M). We suggest that the puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase activity that predominates in crude synaptic membrane preparations

  11. The complement of family M1 aminopeptidases of Haemonchus contortus--Biotechnological implications.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Hall, Ross S; Hu, Min; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Although substantial research has been focused on the 'hidden antigen' H11 of Haemonchus contortus as a vaccine against haemonchosis in small ruminants, little is know about this and related aminopeptidases. In the present article, we reviewed genomic and transcriptomic data sets to define, for the first time, the complement of aminopeptidases (designated Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-13) of the family M1 with homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterised by zinc-binding (HEXXH) and exo-peptidase (GAMEN) motifs. The three previously published H11 isoforms (accession nos. X94187, FJ481146 and AJ249941) had most sequence similarity to Hc-AP-2 and Hc-AP-8, whereas unpublished isoforms (accession nos. AJ249942 and AJ311316) were both most similar to Hc-AP-3. The aminopeptidases characterised here had homologues in C. elegans. Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 were most similar in amino acid sequence (28-41%) to C. elegans T07F10.1; Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 to C. elegans PAM-1 (isoform b) (53-54% similar); Hc-AP-11 and Hc-AP-12 to C. elegans AC3.5 and Y67D8C.9 (26% and 50% similar, respectively); and Hc-AP-13 to C. elegans C42C1.11 and ZC416.6 (50-58% similar). Comparative analysis suggested that Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 play roles in digestion, metabolite excretion, neuropeptide processing and/or osmotic regulation, with Hc-AP-4 and Hc-AP-7 having male-specific functional roles. The analysis also indicated that Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 might be involved in the degradation of cyclin (B3) and required to complete meiosis. Hc-AP-11 represents a leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase, predicted to have metallopeptidase and zinc ion binding activity, whereas Hc-AP-12 likely encodes an aminopeptidase Q homologue also with these activities and a possible role in gonad function. Finally, Hc-AP-13 is predicted to encode an aminopeptidase AP-1 homologue of C. elegans with hydrolase activity, suggested to operate, possibly synergistically with a PEPT-1 ortholog, as an oligopeptide transporter in the gut for protein uptake

  12. Highly functionalized tetrahydropyridines are cytotoxic and selective inhibitors of human puromycin sensitive aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Aeluri, Raghunath; Ganji, Roopa Jones; Marapaka, Anil Kumar; Pillalamarri, Vijaykumar; Alla, Manjula; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Efficient one-pot five-component synthetic protocols for highly functionalized tetrahydropyridines (THPs) and their biological evaluation have been illustrated. Synthesis of novel functionalized tetrahydropyridines containing differential substitutions at 2,6-positions has been achieved via a modified MCR. Cytotoxic studies of 23 synthesized compounds have been carried out against three different cell lines, namely A-549, HeLa and HepG2, wherein some compounds have displayed appreciable cytotoxicity. Further, investigation of enzyme inhibition by the synthesized THPs has been carried out against four members of M1 family aminopeptidases. Several compounds have selectively inhibited only one member of this enzyme family i.e., human puromycin sensitive aminopeptidase (hPSA). Among the compounds; 4b, 9b, 9e and 10a demonstrated best inhibition against hPSA.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of aminopeptidase N from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Onohara, Yuko; Nakajima, Yoshitaka Ito, Kiyoshi; Xu, Yue; Nakashima, Kanako; Ito, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2006-07-01

    E. coli aminopeptidase N has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 2.0 Å resolution. A recombinant form of aminopeptidase N (molecular weight 99 kDa) from Escherichia coli was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.5, c = 171.0 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a V{sub M} value of 3.62 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation from a rotating-anode X-ray generator.

  14. Regulating adaptive immune responses using small molecule modulators of aminopeptidases that process antigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Stratikos, Efstratios

    2014-12-01

    Antigenic peptide processing by intracellular aminopeptidases has emerged recently as an important pathway that regulates adaptive immune responses. Pathogens and cancer can manipulate the activity of key enzymes of this pathway to promote immune evasion. Furthermore, the activity of these enzymes is naturally variable due to polymorphic variation, contributing to predisposition to disease, most notably autoimmunity. Here, we review recent findings that suggest that the pharmacological regulation of the activity of these aminopeptidases constitutes a valid approach for regulating human immune responses. We furthermore review the state of the art in chemical tools for inhibiting these enzymes and how these tools can be useful for the development of innovative therapeutic approaches for a variety of diseases including cancer, viral infections and autoimmunity.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi Xu, Yue; Yamada, Nozomi; Onohara, Yuko; Ito, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2005-12-01

    P. gingivalis prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. A recombinant form of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using potassium sodium tartrate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149.4, c = 159.7 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one subunit of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with a V{sub M} value of 3.14 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the BL5 station of the Photon Factory.

  16. Crystal structure of human insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with specificity for cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Stefan J; Ascher, David B; Hancock, Nancy C; Holien, Jessica K; Michell, Belinda J; Chai, Siew Yeen; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP or oxytocinase) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase that cleaves neuroactive peptides in the brain and produces memory enhancing effects when inhibited. We have determined the crystal structure of human IRAP revealing a closed, four domain arrangement with a large, mostly buried cavity abutting the active site. The structure reveals that the GAMEN exopeptidase loop adopts a very different conformation from other aminopeptidases, thus explaining IRAP's unique specificity for cyclic peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin. Computational docking of a series of IRAP-specific cognitive enhancers into the crystal structure provides a molecular basis for their structure-activity relationships and demonstrates that the structure will be a powerful tool in the development of new classes of cognitive enhancers for treating a variety of memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  17. OF4949, new inhibitors of aminopeptidase B. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sano, S; Ikai, K; Kuroda, H; Nakamura, T; Obayashi, A; Ezure, Y; Enomoto, H

    1986-12-01

    New aminopeptidase B inhibitors that we named OF4949-I, II, III and IV were isolated from the culture broth of a fungus, Penicillium rugulosum OF4949. The molecular formula of I was C23H26N4O8 and that of II, C22H24O8, judging from elemental analysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The concentrations of I, II, III and IV required for 50% inhibition of aminopeptidase, using Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells as the source of the enzyme, were 0.0054, 0.0048, 3.4 and 1.7 micrograms/ml, respectively. Components I and II augmented delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice to sheep red blood cells. PMID:3818441

  18. Different enzymatic oscillations in vivo caused by the stereoisomers of an aminopeptidase inhibitor, bestatin.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Wada, T; Yamamoto, K; Kojima, F; Nagai, M; Harada, S; Umezawa, H

    1984-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the enzymatic oscillations induced in three major organs, spleen, kidney, and liver, of mice by the active and inactive forms of an aminopeptidase inhibitor, bestatin. Although bestatin caused sine curve-type oscillations of enzymatic activities in spleen and kidney, its isomer, possessing no enzyme-inhibiting actions and no biological actions, did not show any typical enzymatic changes. Such typical oscillations were not elicited by either one of those two agents in liver, in spite of the apparent difference in the type of oscillations induced by them in this organ. These observations were taken to indicate that the enzymatic oscillations in vivo caused by bestatin are closely related to its aminopeptidase-inhibiting actions seen in vitro and that the immunomodifying actions of this agent are based on its effects on enzymes sensitive to it, possibly involving immunoresponsive cells.

  19. Purification and amino acid sequence of aminopeptidase P from pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Vergas Romero, C; Neudorfer, I; Mann, K; Schäfer, W

    1995-04-01

    Aminopeptidase P from kidney cortex was purified in high yield (recovery greater than or equal to 20%) by a series of column chromatographic steps after solubilization of the membrane-bound glycoprotein with n-butanol. A coupled enzymic assay, using Gly-Pro-Pro-NH-Nap as substrate and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV as auxilliary enzyme, was used to monitor the purification. The purification procedure yielded two forms of aminopeptidase P differing in their carbohydrate composition (glycoforms). Both enzyme preparations were homogeneous as assessed by SDS/PAGE silver staining, and isoelectric focusing. Both forms possessed the same substrate specificity, catalysed the same reaction, and consisted of identical protein chains. The amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry consisted of 623 amino acids. Six N-glycosylation sites, all contained in the N-terminal half of the protein, were characterized. PMID:7744038

  20. Bioluminogenic Imaging of AminopeptidaseN In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenxiao; Chen, Laizhong; Li, Jing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a process that converts biochemical energy to visible light. Bioluminescence-based imaging technology has been widely applicable in the imaging of process envisioned in life sciences. As one of the most popular bioluminescence system, the firefly luciferin-luciferase system is exceptionally suitable for deep tissue imaging in living animals owing to its long wavelength emission light. Herein, we report the experimental detail of bioluminogenic imaging of aminopeptidase N activity both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27424897

  1. Catechol oxidase activity of di-Cu2+-substituted aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Ming, Li-June

    2005-11-30

    Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase exhibits activities toward the hydrolyses of peptides and bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (40 billion fold) and catechol oxidation reported herein with catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) only about 10 times smaller than that of gypsywort catechol oxidase. The multifunctionality of this enzyme suggests that it is a unique system for further exploration of protein structure and function and a template for design of enzymes of diverse activities. PMID:16305209

  2. Urinary Aminopeptidase Activities as Early and Predictive Biomarkers of Renal Dysfunction in Cisplatin-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Andrés; Vargas, Félix; Montoro-Molina, Sebastián; O'Valle, Francisco; Rodríguez-Martínez, María Dolores; Osuna, Antonio; Prieto, Isabel; Ramírez, Manuel; Wangensteen, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the fluorimetric determination of alanyl- (Ala), glutamyl- (Glu), leucyl-cystinyl- (Cys) and aspartyl-aminopeptidase (AspAp) urinary enzymatic activities as early and predictive biomarkers of renal dysfunction in cisplatin-treated rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 8 each group) received a single subcutaneous injection of either saline or cisplatin 3.5 or 7 mg/kg, and urine samples were taken at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 14 days after treatment. In urine samples we determined Ala, Glu, Cys and AspAp activities, proteinuria, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), albumin, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). Plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance and renal morphological variables were measured at the end of the experiment. CysAp, NAG and albumin were increased 48 hours after treatment in the cisplatin 3.5 mg/kg treated group. At 24 hours, all urinary aminopeptidase activities and albuminuria were significantly increased in the cisplatin 7 mg/kg treated group. Aminopeptidase urinary activities correlated (p<0.011; r2>0.259) with plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance and/or kidney weight/body weight ratio at the end of the experiment and they could be considered as predictive biomarkers of renal injury severity. ROC-AUC analysis was made to study their sensitivity and specificity to distinguish between treated and untreated rats at day 1. All aminopeptidase activities showed an AUC>0.633. We conclude that Ala, Cys, Glu and AspAp enzymatic activities are early and predictive urinary biomarkers of the renal dysfunction induced by cisplatin. These determinations can be very useful in the prognostic and diagnostic of renal dysfunction in preclinical research and clinical practice. PMID:22792302

  3. Purification and Functional Characterisation of Rhiminopeptidase A, a Novel Aminopeptidase from the Venom of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Wagstaff, Simon C.; Watson, Kimberley A.; Harrison, Robert A.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Hutchinson, E. Gail

    2010-01-01

    Background Snake bite is a major neglected public health issue within poor communities living in the rural areas of several countries throughout the world. An estimated 2.5 million people are bitten by snakes each year and the cost and lack of efficacy of current anti-venom therapy, together with the lack of detailed knowledge about toxic components of venom and their modes of action, and the unavailability of treatments in rural areas mean that annually there are around 125,000 deaths worldwide. In order to develop cheaper and more effective therapeutics, the toxic components of snake venom and their modes of action need to be clearly understood. One particularly poorly understood component of snake venom is aminopeptidases. These are exo-metalloproteases, which, in mammals, are involved in important physiological functions such as the maintenance of blood pressure and brain function. Although aminopeptidase activities have been reported in some snake venoms, no detailed analysis of any individual snake venom aminopeptidases has been performed so far. As is the case for mammals, snake venom aminopeptidases may also play important roles in altering the physiological functions of victims during envenomation. In order to further understand this important group of snake venom enzymes we have isolated, functionally characterised and analysed the sequence-structure relationships of an aminopeptidase from the venom of the large, highly venomous West African gaboon viper, Bitis gabonica rhinoceros. Methodology and Principal Findings The venom of B. g. rhinoceros was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography and fractions with aminopeptidase activities were isolated. Fractions with aminopeptidase activities showed a pure protein with a molecular weight of 150 kDa on SDS-PAGE. In the absence of calcium, this purified protein had broad aminopeptidase activities against acidic, basic and neutral amino acids but in the presence of calcium, it had only acidic aminopeptidase

  4. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae.

  5. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Dimerization of aminopeptidase N and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.M. )

    1990-01-09

    The pig intestinal brush border enzymes aminopeptidase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase are present in the microvilla membrane as homodimers. Dimethyl adipimidate was used to cross-link the two ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled brush border enzymes from cultured mucosal explants. For aminopeptidase N, dimerization did not begin until 5-10 min after synthesis, and maximal dimerization by cross-linking of the transient form of the enzyme required 1 h, whereas the mature form of aminopeptidase N cross-linked with unchanged efficiency from 45 min to 3 h of labeling. Formation of dimers of this enzyme therefore occurs prior to the Golgi-associated processing, and the slow rate of dimerization may be the rate-limiting step in the transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. For lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, the posttranslational processing includes a proteolytic cleavage of its high molecular weight precursor. Since only the mature form and not the precursor of this enzyme could be cross-linked, formation of tightly associated dimers only takes place after transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Dimerization of the two brush border enzymes therefore seems to occur in different organelles of the enterocyte.

  6. Age-dependent changes in extracellular proteins, aminopeptidase and proteinase activities in Frankia isolate BR.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Benoist, P; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1991-12-01

    To investigate protein secretion by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia isolate BR, we designed a rapid DEAE adsorption, salt elution and Biogel P6DG desalination method to concentrate protein from the growth medium. Secreted proteins reached a maximum concentration (5.6 gm l-1) in the medium at growth arrest. Analysis by SDS-PAGE detected up to 63 extracellular polypeptides when Frankia cells were grown under stirred conditions in BAP medium supplemented with phosphatidylcholine and MES buffer and 65 proteins in stirred BAP media alone. The pattern of extracellular polypeptides changed during growth. Several extracellular proteolytic activities were detected and compared with intracellular ones. The substrate specificity of the extracellular and intracellular aminopeptidase activities were the same. Also, the electrophoretic migration patterns of secreted and intracellular aminopeptidases could not be distinguished. Secretion of the proline-specific aminopeptidase FAP proteinase (PF) were secreted: 10 had the same electrophoretic mobility as their intracellular counterparts after SDS-gelatine-PAGE while five (PF - 39.5, PF - 38.5, PF - 36.5, PF - 25.5 and PF - 20.5 kDa) had a different electrophoretic mobility and, therefore, appeared to be exclusively extracellular. At least seven extracellular proteinases appeared to increase coordinately in activity shortly before growth arrest.

  7. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  8. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Veronica M.; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  9. The paradoxical population genetics of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K; Nielsen, Kaare M; Barry, Alyssa E; Day, Karen P; Wirth, Dyann F; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2002-06-01

    Among the leading causes of death in African children is cerebral malaria caused by the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. Endemic forms of this disease are thought to have originated in central Africa 5000-10000 years ago, coincident with the innovation of slash-and-burn agriculture and the diversification of the Anopheles gambiae complex of mosquito vectors. Population genetic studies of P. falciparum have yielded conflicting results. Some evidence suggests that today's population includes multiple ancient lineages pre-dating human speciation. Other evidence suggests that today's population derives from only one, or a small number, of these ancient lineages. Resolution of this issue is important for the evaluation of the long-term efficacy of drug and immunological control strategies. PMID:12036741

  10. Plasma glutamine levels and falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Cowan, G; Planche, T; Agbenyega, T; Bedu-Addo, G; Owusu-Ofori, A; Adebe-Appiah, J; Agranoff, D; Woodrow, C; Castell, L; Elford, B; Krishna, S

    1999-01-01

    Glutamine deficiency is associated with increased rates of sepsis and mortality, which can be prevented by glutamine supplementation. Changes in glutamine concentration were examined in Ghanaian children with acute falciparum malaria and control cases. The mean (SD) plasma glutamine concentration was lower in patients with acute malaria (401 (82) mumol/L, n = 50) than in control patients (623 (67) mumol/L, n = 7; P < 0.001). Plasma glutamine concentrations all rose in convalescence. The mean (SD) increase in plasma glutamine was 202 (123) mumol/L (n = 18; P < 0.001) compared with acute infection. We conclude that acute falciparum malaria is associated with large decreases in plasma glutamine and these falls may increase susceptibility to sepsis and dyserythropoeisis.

  11. Acute renal failure due to falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Habte, B

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-two patients with severe falciparum malaria are described. Twenty-four (33.3%) were complicated by acute renal failure. Comparing patients with renal failure and those without, statistically significant differences occurred regarding presence of cerebral malaria (83% vs 46%), jaundice (92% vs 33%), and death (54% vs 17%). A significantly higher number of patients with renal failure were nonimmune visitors to malaria endemic regions. Renal failure was oliguric in 45% of cases. Dialysis was indicated in 38%, 29% died in early renal failure, and 33% recovered spontaneously. It is concluded that falciparum malaria is frequently complicated by cerebral malaria and renal failure. As nonimmune individuals are prone to develop serious complications, malaria prophylaxis and vigorous treatment of cases is mandatory. PMID:2236718

  12. The paradoxical population genetics of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K; Nielsen, Kaare M; Barry, Alyssa E; Day, Karen P; Wirth, Dyann F; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2002-06-01

    Among the leading causes of death in African children is cerebral malaria caused by the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. Endemic forms of this disease are thought to have originated in central Africa 5000-10000 years ago, coincident with the innovation of slash-and-burn agriculture and the diversification of the Anopheles gambiae complex of mosquito vectors. Population genetic studies of P. falciparum have yielded conflicting results. Some evidence suggests that today's population includes multiple ancient lineages pre-dating human speciation. Other evidence suggests that today's population derives from only one, or a small number, of these ancient lineages. Resolution of this issue is important for the evaluation of the long-term efficacy of drug and immunological control strategies.

  13. Combinatorial multicomponent access to natural-products-inspired peptidomimetics: discovery of selective inhibitors of microbial metallo-aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Yanira; Pérez-Labrada, Karell; González-Bacerio, Jorge; Valdés, Gilberto; de los Chávez, María Á; Osuna, Joel; Charli, Jean-Louis; Pascual, Isel; Rivera, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The development of selective inhibitors of microbial metallo-aminopeptidases is an important goal in the pursuit of antimicrobials for therapeutic applications. Herein, we disclose a combinatorial approach relying on two Ugi reactions for the generation of peptidomimetics inspired by natural metallo-aminopeptidase inhibitors. The library was screened for inhibitory activity against the neutral metallo-aminopeptidase of Escherichia coli (ePepN) and the porcine kidney cortex metallo-aminopeptidase (pAPN), which was used as a model of the M1-aminopeptidases of mammals. Six compounds showed typical dose-response inhibition profiles toward recombinant ePepN, with two of them being very potent and highly selective for ePepN over pAPN. Another compound showed moderate ePepN inhibition but total selectivity for this bacterial enzyme over its mammalian orthologue at concentrations of physiological relevance. This strategy proved to be useful for the identification of lead compounds for further optimization and development.

  14. Recombinantly expressed isoenzymic aminopeptidases from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) midgut display differential interaction with closely related Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, R; Agrawal, Neema; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Sivakumar, S; Ahmad, Suhail; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2003-01-01

    Several investigators have independently identified membrane-associated aminopeptidases in the midgut of insect larvae as the initial interacting ligand to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis. Though several isoenzymes of aminopeptidases have been identified from the midgut of an insect and their corresponding cDNA cloned, only one of the isoform has been expressed heterologously and studied for its binding to Cry toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression of two aminopeptidases N from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) (HaAPNs). The full-length cDNA of H. armigera APN1 (haapn1) is 3205 bp in size and encodes a 1000-amino-acid protein, while H. armigera APN2 (haapn2) is 3116 bp in size and corresponds to a 1012-amino-acid protein. Structurally these proteins show sequence similarity to other insect aminopeptidases and possess characteristic aminopeptidase motifs. Both the genes have been expressed in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) cells using a baculovirus expression vector. The expressed aminopeptidases are membrane-associated, catalytically active and glycosylated. Ligand-blot analysis of both these aminopeptidases with bioactive Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac proteins displayed differential interaction. All the three toxins bound to HaAPN1, whereas only Cry1Ac interacted with HaAPN2. This is the first report demonstrating differential Cry-toxin-binding abilities of two different aminopeptidases from a susceptible insect. PMID:12441000

  15. Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of defined antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Ramirez, E; Er-Hsiang, L; Lambert, P H

    1980-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum detect stage-specific, species-specific and common antigenic determinants of Plasmodia. These antibodies provide new tools for purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum antigens in relation to future procedures for immunoprophylaxis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6160002

  16. Crystal Structure of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase with Bound Substrate Analogue Provides Insight on Antigenic Epitope Precursor Recognition and Processing.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Harlos, Karl; Zhao, Yuguang; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-09-15

    Aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides influence immunodominance and adaptive cytotoxic immune responses. The mechanisms that allow these enzymes to efficiently process a vast number of different long peptide substrates are poorly understood. In this work, we report the structure of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, an enzyme that prepares antigenic epitopes for cross-presentation in dendritic cells, in complex with an antigenic peptide precursor analog. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase is found in a semiclosed conformation with an extended internal cavity with limited access to the solvent. The N-terminal moiety of the peptide is located at the active site, positioned optimally for catalysis, whereas the C-terminal moiety of the peptide is stabilized along the extended internal cavity lodged between domains II and IV. Hydrophobic interactions and shape complementarity enhance peptide affinity beyond the catalytic site and support a limited selectivity model for antigenic peptide selection that may underlie the generation of complex immunopeptidomes.

  17. Substrate specificity screening of oat (Avena sativa) seeds aminopeptidase demonstrate unusually broad tolerance in S1 pocket.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Anna D; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Drag, Marcin

    2012-05-01

    Aminopeptidases are proteolytic enzymes that remove one amino acid at a time from N-terminus of peptidic substrates. In plants, inhibitors of aminopeptidases can find potential applications in agriculture as herbicides. In this report we have used a library of fluorogenic derivatives of natural and unnatural amino acids for substrate specificity profiling of oat (Avena sativa) aminopeptidase. Interestingly, we have found that this enzyme recognizes effectively among the natural amino acids basic residues like Arg and Lys, hydrophobic Phe, Leu and Met, but also to some extent acidic residues Asp and Glu. In the case of unnatural amino acids hydrophobic residues (hPhe and hCha) and basic hArg were preferentially recognized.

  18. PDR MODEL MAPPING OF OBSCURED H{sub 2} EMISSION AND THE LINE-OF-SIGHT STRUCTURE OF M17-SW

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffer, Y.; Wolfire, M. G.

    2013-09-01

    We observed H{sub 2} line emission with Spitzer-IRS toward M17-SW and modeled the data with our photon-dominated region (PDR) code. Derived gas density values of up to few times 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} indicate that H{sub 2} emission originates in high-density clumps. We discover that the PDR code can be utilized to map the amount of intervening extinction obscuring the H{sub 2} emission layers, and thus we obtain the radial profile of A{sub V} relative to the central ionizing cluster NGC 6618. The extinction has a positive radial gradient, varying between 15-47 mag over the projected distance of 0.9-2.5 pc from the primary ionizer, CEN 1. These high extinction values are in good agreement with previous studies of A{sub V} toward stellar targets in M17-SW. The ratio of data to PDR model values is used to infer the global line-of-sight structure of the PDR surface, which is revealed to resemble a concave surface relative to NGC 6618. Such a configuration confirms that this PDR can be described as a bowl-shaped boundary of the central H II region in M17. The derived structure and physical conditions are important for interpreting the fine-structure and rotational line emission from the PDR.

  19. cDNAs of aminopeptidase-like protein genes from Plodia interpunctella strains with different susceptibilities to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y C; Kramer, K J; Oppert, B; Dowdy, A K

    2000-03-01

    Aminopeptidase N has been reported to be a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A toxin-binding protein in several lepidopteran insects. cDNAs of aminopeptidase-like proteins from both Bt-susceptible RC688s and Bt-resistant HD198r strains of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were cloned and sequenced. They contain 3345 and 3358 nucleotides, respectively, and each has a 3048 bp open reading frame that encodes 1016 amino acids. Putative protein sequences include 10 potential glycosylation sites and a zinc metal binding site motif of HEXXH, which is typical of the active site of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequences are most similar to an aminopeptidase from Heliothis virescens with 62% sequence identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran aminopeptidases from Plutella xylostella, Manduca sexta, Bombyx mori with sequence identities of 51-52%. Four nucleotide differences were observed in the open reading frames that translated into two amino acid differences in the putative protein sequences. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed an aminopeptidase gene coding difference between RC688s and HD198r strains of P. interpunctella in the PCR amplification of a specific allele (PASA) using preferential primers designed from a single base substitution. The gene mutation for Asp185-->Glu185 was also confirmed in two additional Bt-resistant P. interpunctella strains. This mutation is located within a region homologous to the conserved Cry1Aa toxin binding regions from Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella. The aminopeptidase-like mRNA expression levels in the Bt-resistant strain were slightly higher than those in the Bt-susceptible strain. The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession numbers AF034483 for susceptible strain RC688s and AF034484 for resistant strain HD198r).

  20. A novel aminopeptidase in the fat body of the moth Achaea janata as a receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins and its comparison with midgut aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Meur, Gargi; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins bind to cell-surface receptors which represent a family of aminopeptidases [APN (aminopeptidase N)] present on the brush border membrane of insect midgut cells of susceptible insects leading to pore formation and death of the insect. We report here for the first time the presence of a novel APN in the fat body of the moth Achaea janata. Northern blotting detected at least one APN-specific transcript in the fat body, whereas two transcripts of different sizes were detected in the midgut. We have cloned two full-length APN cDNAs of 3015 bp and 2850 bp from fat body and midgut respectively, which encode proteins of 1004 and 950 amino acids. These two APNs share only 33% amino acid sequence identity, but both display the typical APN features, such as the N-terminal signal peptide, several putative glycosylation sites, C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor signal, the APN-specific zinc-binding/gluzincin motif HEXXHX18E and gluzincin motif GAMENWG. The fat body APN manifested a variation in its expression with respect to tissue and developmental stage. In spite of the abundance of the APN transcript in the fat body, fairly low APN activity was detected in this tissue. The fat-body- and midgut-specific APNs showed differential interaction with various Cry1A toxins. Besides, the level of toxicity of different Cry subtypes varied enormously with mode/site of delivery, such as intrahaemocoelic injections and feeding bioassays. These data indicate that the fat body might be a potential alternative Cry toxin target site in the moth. PMID:17402938

  1. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Translational evidence in vitro that aminopeptidase N is synthesized as a Mr-115000 polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, E M; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1982-01-01

    A crude RNA fraction, prepared from pig small intestine, was found to be more efficient than a fraction enriched in polyadenylated RNA in directing translation of polypeptides with Mr greater than 100000 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. Aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) synthesized in vitro was immunopurified from the translation mixture and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. It was found to have an apparent Mr of 115000 regardless of whether the translation was performed in the absence or presence of proteinase inhibitors. This result contradicts the possibility of aminopeptidase N being synthesized as a large single-chain precursor polypeptide. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6180737

  2. Structural Basis for Antigenic Peptide Recognition and Processing by Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidase 2.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Giastas, Petros; Mathioudakis, Nikolas; Mavridis, Irene M; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-10-23

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) aminopeptidases process antigenic peptide precursors to generate epitopes for presentation by MHC class I molecules and help shape the antigenic peptide repertoire and cytotoxic T-cell responses. To perform this function, ER aminopeptidases have to recognize and process a vast variety of peptide sequences. To understand how these enzymes recognize substrates, we determined crystal structures of ER aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) in complex with a substrate analogue and a peptidic product to 2.5 and 2.7 Å, respectively, and compared them to the apo-form structure determined to 3.0 Å. The peptides were found within the internal cavity of the enzyme with no direct access to the outside solvent. The substrate analogue extends away from the catalytic center toward the distal end of the internal cavity, making interactions with several shallow pockets along the path. A similar configuration was evident for the peptidic product, although decreasing electron density toward its C terminus indicated progressive disorder. Enzymatic analysis confirmed that visualized interactions can either positively or negatively impact in vitro trimming rates. Opportunistic side-chain interactions and lack of deep specificity pockets support a limited-selectivity model for antigenic peptide processing by ERAP2. In contrast to proposed models for the homologous ERAP1, no specific recognition of the peptide C terminus by ERAP2 was evident, consistent with functional differences in length selection and self-activation between these two enzymes. Our results suggest that ERAP2 selects substrates by sequestering them in its internal cavity and allowing opportunistic interactions to determine trimming rates, thus combining substrate permissiveness with sequence bias.

  3. Ethanol modifies differently aspartyl- and glutamyl-aminopeptidase activities in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Ramírez, Manuel; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2002-01-15

    Aminopeptidase A activity (aspartyl aminopeptidase (AspAP) and glutamyl aminopeptidase (GluAP) exerts angiotensinase activity due to its relation to the metabolism of angiotensins in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This activity may also modify the free amino acid pool through the release of N-terminal acidic amino acids. Ethanol (EtOH) exerts profound effects on the brain, inducing important neurological damages. Our purpose is to study the influence of EtOH on AspAP and GluAP activities on basal and K(+)-stimulated conditions, at the synapse level. We used mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. We evaluate the possible contribution of these enzymatic activities on brain blood pressure regulation through RAS and/or the free acidic amino acid pool. The results obtained are correlated with several parameters of oxidative stress, such as free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. Under basal conditions, in synaptosomes, EtOH inhibits AspAP and GluAP activities independently of Ca(2+). In the supernatant, however, EtOH differently modulates the two enzyme activities under the various concentrations. Under K(+)-stimulated conditions, EtOH inhibits the K(+)-stimulated increase on AspAP and GluAP differently depending on the presence or absence of Ca(2+) and the concentration of EtOH used. These results invalidate the idea that excess free acidic amino acids could be released by AspAP and GluAP to induce neurodegeneration. The changes in AspAP and GluAP activities as a consequence of EtOH administration and their role in the brain RAS are discussed.

  4. A bedside dipstick method to detect Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ira; Deshmukh, C T

    2004-11-01

    We conducted this study to determine efficacy of Parasight-F (an HRP-II antigen dipstick method to detect P. Falciparum) in children. A total of 30 children were enrolled in the age group of 2 months to 12 years whose peripheral smear showed asexual forms of Plasmodium falciparum. All patients were tested for presence of HRP-II antigen of Plasmodium falciparum in their blood by the Parasight-F dipstick test by either an EDTA sample or a finger prick blood sample. The sensitivity of Parasight-F was 83.3 % However, the sensitivity of Parasight-F to detect Plasmodium Falciparum in case of mixed Plasmodium (Vivax + Falciparum) infection was only 25 %. Also, all patients less than 6 months of age had a negative Parasight-F test. Parasitic index, prior treatment with antimalarials or severity of Falciparum malaria have no effect on the sensitivity of Parasight-F test. We conclude that Parasight-F is an effective tool for diagnosis of Plasmoduim falciparum malaria in children. PMID:15591666

  5. Exploring ligand dissociation pathways from aminopeptidase N using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Tu, GuoGang; Lai, XiaoPing; Kuang, BinHai; Li, ShaoHua

    2016-10-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is a zinc-dependent ectopeptidase involved in cell proliferation, secretion, invasion, and angiogenesis, and is widely recognized as an important cancer target. However, the mechanisms whereby ligands leave the active site of APN remain unknown. Investigating ligand dissociation processes is quite difficult, both in classical simulation methods and in experimental approaches. In this study, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulation was used to investigate the potential dissociation pathways of ligand from APN. The results revealed three pathways (channels A, B and C) for ligand release. Channel A, which matches the hypothetical channel region, was the most preferred region for bestatin to dissociate from the enzyme, and is probably the major channel for the inner bound ligand. In addition, two alternative channels (channels B and C) were shown to be possible pathways for ligand egression. Meanwhile, we identified key residues controlling the dynamic features of APN channels. Identification of the dissociation routes will provide further mechanistic insights into APN, which will benefit the development of more promising APN inhibitors. Graphical Abstract The release pathways of bestatin inside active site of aminopeptidase N were simulated using RAMD simulation. PMID:27624165

  6. Expression and biochemical characterization of a type I methionine aminopeptidase of Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Ju, Jung-Won; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Ju, Hye-Lim; Lee, Jinyoung; Lee, Kon Ho; Lee, Won-Ja; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2015-04-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs), ubiquitous enzymes that play an important role in nascent protein maturation, have been recognized as attractive targets for the development of drugs against pathogenic protozoa including Plasmodium spp. Here, we characterized partial biochemical properties of a type I MetAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvMetAP1). PvMetAP1 had the typical amino acid residues essential for metal binding and substrate binding sites, which are well conserved in the type I MetAP family enzymes. Recombinant PvMetAP1 showed activity in a broad range of neutral pHs, with optimum activity at pH 7.5. PvMetAP1 was stable under neutral and alkaline pHs, but was relatively unstable under acidic conditions. PvMetAP1 activity was highly increased in the presence of Mn(2+), and was effectively inhibited by a metal chelator, EDTA. Fumagillin and aminopeptidase inhibitors, amastatin and bestatin, also showed an inhibitory effect on PvMetAP1. The enzyme had a highly specific hydrolytic activity for N-terminal methionine. These results collectively suggest that PvMetAP1 belongs to the family of type I MetAPs and may play a pivotal role for the maintenance of P. vivax physiology by mediating protein maturation and processing of the parasite.

  7. A thermo-stable lysine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Isolation, purification, characterization, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Tao; Zhou, Nan Di; Zhou, Zhe Min; Gao, Xin Xing; Tian, Ya Ping

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NJ-814, isolated from garden soil, produced an extracellular aminopeptidase that was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purity was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and the Mr value of the enzyme was estimated to be 55 kDa. The purified enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C. It exhibits high thermo-stability. Half of the activity can remain after incubation at 80 °C for 119 min. It is stable within pH range of 7.5-10.5. It is strongly activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Zn(2+) , and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The specificity of the enzyme was investigated. Within several aminoacyl-p-nitroanilines (AA-pNA), Lys-pNA is proven to be the optimal substrate. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) of the enzyme for Lys-pNA and Leu-pNA were 2.32 and 9.41 mM, respectively. Peptide map fingerprinting shows that the sequence of the enzyme is highly similar to aminopeptidase Y from P. aeruginosa 18A. It can be speculated that this enzyme is a Zn(2+) -dependent enzyme and contains two zinc ions in its active site.

  8. Evolutionary analysis of the mammalian M1 aminopeptidases reveals conserved exon structure and gene death.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Karen Beasley; Smith, Shannon A; Davis, Anthony C; Trivette, Andrew; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2014-11-15

    The members of the M1 aminopeptidase family share conserved domains, yet show functional divergence within the family as a whole. In order to better understand this family, this study analyzed the mammalian members in depth at exon, gene, and protein levels. The twelve human members, eleven rat members, and eleven mouse members were first analyzed in multiple alignments to visualize both reported and unreported conserved domains. Phylogenetic trees were then generated for humans, rats, mice, and all mammals to determine how closely related the homologs were and to gain insight to the divergence in the family members. This produced three groups with similarity within the family. Next, a synteny study was completed to determine the present locations of the genes and changes that had occurred. It became apparent that gene death likely resulted in the lack of one member in mouse and rat. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the exon structure revealed that nine members of the human family and eight in mouse, are highly conserved within the exon structure. Taken together, these results indicate that the M1 aminopeptidase family is a divergent family with three subgroups and that genetic evidence mirrors categorization of the family by enzymatic function.

  9. Unveiling aminopeptidase P from Streptomyces lavendulae: molecular cloning, expression and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Arya S; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2014-02-01

    Presence of proline residues in the second position of the N-terminus in peptides restricts the usage of many aminopeptidases; however, aminopeptidase P (APP) is capable of removing this blockage. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequences of APP from Streptomyces lavendulae, app gene was cloned in pET28a(+) and over expressed as a His-tagged protein with a molecular weight of ≈60 kDa in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Nucleotide sequencing revealed a 1467 bp open reading frame encoding 488 amino acids (NCBI Accession No: GenBank: KC292272.1). The substrate specificity of the recombinant APP was analyzed by the hydrolysis of the Xaa-Pro bond in Gly-Pro dipeptide and bradykinin. K(m) and V(max) of the enzyme were found to be 0.4697 mmol l⁻¹ and 0.6396 μmol min⁻¹, respectively. APP activity was enhanced in the presence of metal ions such as Co²⁺, Mn²⁺, Mg²⁺ and Cu²⁺ ions and was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, PMSF and DTT. The atomic absorption studies revealed the presence of Mn²⁺ in the protein as a co-factor. This substrate specific metalloenzyme was found to be a tetramer and optimally active at pH 8 and 37 °C.

  10. The Aminopeptidase CD13 Induces Homotypic Aggregation in Neutrophils and Impairs Collagen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, Christine A.; Parfrey, Helen; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Luo, Ding; Nash, Gerard B.; Murphy, Gillian; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (CD13) is a widely expressed cell surface metallopeptidase involved in the migration of cancer and endothelial cells. Apart from our demonstration that CD13 modulates the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in neutrophils, no other function for CD13 has been ascribed in this cell. We hypothesized that CD13 may be involved in neutrophil migration and/or homotypic aggregation. Using purified human blood neutrophils we confirmed the expression of CD13 on neutrophils and its up-regulation by pro-inflammatory agonists. However, using the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibody WM-15 and the aminopeptidase enzymatic inhibitor bestatin we were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD13 in neutrophil polarisation or chemotaxis. In contrast, IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration in type I collagen gels was significantly impaired by the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies WM-15 and MY7. Notably, these antibodies also induced significant homotypic aggregation of neutrophils, which was dependent on CD13 cross-linking and was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 inhibition. Live imaging demonstrated that in WM-15-treated neutrophils, where homotypic aggregation was evident, the number of cells entering IL-8 impregnated collagen I gels was significantly reduced. These data reveal a novel role for CD13 in inducing homotypic aggregation in neutrophils, which results in a transmigration deficiency; this mechanism may be relevant to neutrophil micro-aggregation in vivo. PMID:27467268

  11. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae aminopeptidase 1, the major cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Nobuo N.; Fujioka, Yuko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Aminopeptidase 1, a cargo protein in the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, was expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. The vacuole hydrolase aminopeptidase 1 (Ape1) is a cargo protein transported to the vacuole by the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ape1 is processed into mature Ape1 (mApe1). mApe1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 120.6, b = 219.5, c = 133.1 Å, β = 116.5°. Form II belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 141.2, c = 349.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 2.5 Å for form I and 1.83 Å for form II. Self-rotation functions and the volume-to-weight ratio values suggest that forms I and II contain 12 and four mApe1 molecules per asymmetric unit, respectively, and that mApe1 exists as a tetrahedral dodecamer in both crystal forms.

  12. Purification and characterization of aminopeptidase (pumAPE) from Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Flores, Yuridia; Noriega-Reyes, Yamilet; Ramírez-Zavala, Bernardo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2004-05-15

    The aminopeptidase pumAPE was purified from the haploid fungus Ustilago maydis FB1 strain. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate fractionation and three chromatographic steps, which included anion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and gel filtration chromatography, resulting in a 23% recovery. The molecular mass of the dimeric enzyme was estimated to be 110 kDa and 58 kDa by gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Enzymatic activity was optimal at pH 7.0 and at 35 degrees C toward Lys-pNA and the pI was determined to be 5.1. The enzyme was inhibited by EDTA-Na2, 1,10- phenanthroline, bestantin, PMSF and several divalent cations (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Zn2+). The aminopeptidase showed a preference for lysine and arginine in the N-position. The K(m) value was 54.4 microM and the Vmax value was 408 micromolmin(-1)mg(-1) for Lys-pNA.

  13. Organ distribution of aminopeptidase A and dipeptidyl peptidase IV in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, S; Dijkman, H B; Van Son, J P; Koene, R A; Assmann, K J

    1996-05-01

    The hydrolases aminopeptidase A and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, both present in the kidney on the brush borders of the proximal tubule epithelial cells and podocytes, are involved in the induction of experimental membranous glomerulonephritis in the mouse. However, little is known about their (co)distribution in other tissues and their function in health and disease. A detailed insight into the localization of these two enzymes is a prerequisite to elucidation of their function. Therefore, we investigated the presence and co-distribution of aminopeptidase A and dipeptidyl peptidase IV by immunohistology with two different rat monoclonal antibodies, the specificity of which was determined by an immunodepletion technique. In addition, the molecular weight of the hydrolases; was analyzed by SDS-PAGE after isolation by solid-phase immunoprecipitation from glomeruli, renal brush borders, and thymus. Both hydrolases showed different molecular weights in renal corpuscle, renal brush borders, and thymic cells. A widespread organ distribution of the two hydrolases was observed, with co-localization in kidney, liver, small intestine, thymus, brain, spleen, and lymph nodes, either on the same cells or on different cells in the same organ. This distribution and partial co-localization suggests that the two hydrolases, acting either alone or in concert, have a role in many diverse biological processes.

  14. Action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase activities in spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, H; Motegi, A; Iwabuchi, M; Takahashi, K; Horinishi, H; Umezawa, H

    1987-11-01

    The action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase (APase) activity was studied in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Ubenimex strongly inhibited hydrolyzing activities against arginine-beta-naphtylamide (Arg-NA), Lys-NA and Pro-NA in both cells. Inhibition of hydrolysis of Leu-NA, Met-NA and Ala-NA was relatively small or not observed. When both cells were incubated in HANKS' solution, hydrolyzing activities against Arg-NA, Lys-NA and Pro-NA were released to the medium, while Leu-NA and Met-NA-hydrolyzing activities were mostly bound. In addition, the Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activity in the spleen cells was kinetically studied. The Arg-NA and Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activities in four fractions prepared from the homogenate of spleen cells were also studied kinetically. From these studies it was suggested that ubenimex inhibits aminopeptidase B and a Pro-NA-hydrolyzing enzyme more effectively than Leu-APase in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

  15. Endopeptidase activity of cathepsin C, dipeptidyl aminopeptidase I, from bovine spleen.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, M; Yamada, H; Ohmori, T; Yanai, M; Imoto, T

    1993-04-01

    By employing various synthetic substrates, as well as soluble denatured protein substrate (TAP-lysozyme) and its derivatives, endopeptidase activity of cathepsin C, dipeptidyl aminopeptidase I [EC 3.4.14.1], from bovine spleen was investigated. Cathepsin C efficiently degraded Z-Phe-Arg-MCA, Pro-Phe-Arg-MCA, and Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA. This endopeptidase activity required sulfhydryl reagents and halide ions, as in the case of the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (DAP) activity. We confirmed that this endopeptidase activity is due to cathepsin C itself based on the results on gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatographies, comparative studies of the inhibitory effects of leupeptin and E-64 on this activity and those of cathepsins B and L, and further the competitive inhibitions by mutual substrates for the DAP and endopeptidase activities of cathepsin C. We also found that cathepsin C endopeptidase activity towards TAP-lysozyme and its N-alpha-acetylated tryptic peptides showed marked dependence on sulfhydryl reagents and chloride ion. Thus, we concluded that cathepsin C has endopeptidase activity as well as DAP activity. The binding energy between the enzyme and the amino acid side chains of the substrate may be as important for the endopeptidase activity as is the electrostatic interaction between the enzyme and the free alpha-amino group of the substrate for the DAP activity.

  16. Effects of exogenous fatty acids and cholesterol on aminopeptidase activities in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Mayas, M D; Ramírez, M; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2002-12-01

    Several studies have addressed the interaction between fatty acids and lipids with central nervous system peptides. Because aminopeptidases (AP) are involved in the regulation of neuropeptides, this work studies several AP expressed in cultured astroglia, after exogenous addition of oleic and linoleic fatty acids and cholesterol to the culture medium. Alanyl-AP, arginyl-AP, cystyl-AP, leucyl-AP, tyrosyl-AP and pyroglutamyl-AP activities were analysed in whole cells using the corresponding aminoacyl-beta-naphthylamides as substrates. Oleic acid inhibits alanyl-AP, cystyl-AP and leucyl-AP activities, whereas linoleic acid inhibits alanyl-AP, arginyl-AP and tyrosyl-AP activities. Neither oleic acid nor linoleic acid modifies pyroglutamyl-AP activity. In contrast, cholesterol increases arginyl-AP, cystyl-AP, leucyl-AP, tyrosyl-AP and pyroglutamyl-AP activities, although it does not modify alanyl-AP activity. The changes reported here suggest that oleic and linoleic fatty acids and cholesterol can modulate peptide activities via their degradation route involving aminopeptidases; each of them being differentially regulated.

  17. Potent macrocyclic inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) by olefin ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Hanna; Demaegdt, Heidi; Johnsson, Anders; Vauquelin, Georges; Lindeberg, Gunnar; Hallberg, Mathias; Erdelyi, Mate; Karlen, Anders; Hallberg, Anders

    2011-06-01

    Macrocyclic analogues of angiotensin IV (Ang IV, Val(1)-Tyr(2)-Ile(3)-His(4)-Pro(5)-Phe(6)) targeting the insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated biologically. Replacement of His(4)-Pro(5)-Phe(6) by a 2-(aminomethyl)phenylacetic acid (AMPAA) moiety and of Val(1) and Ile(3) by amino acids bearing olefinic side chains followed by macrocyclization provided potent IRAP inhibitors. The impact of the ring size and the type (saturated versus unsaturated), configuration, and position of the carbon-carbon bridge was assessed. The ring size generally affects the potency more than the carbon-carbon bond characteristics. Replacing Tyr(2) by β(3)hTyr or Phe is accepted, while N-methylation of Tyr(2) is deleterious for activity. Removal of the carboxyl group in the C-terminal slightly reduced the potency. Inhibitors 7 (K(i) = 4.1 nM) and 19 (K(i) = 1.8 nM), both encompassing 14-membered ring systems connected to AMPAA, are 10-fold more potent than Ang IV and are also more selective over aminopeptidase N (AP-N). Both compounds displayed high stability against proteolysis by metallopeptidases.

  18. View of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide by means of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagitova, A.; Yaminsky, I.; Meshkov, G.

    2016-08-01

    Visualization of the structure of biological objects plays a key role in medicine, biotechnology, nanotechnology and IT-technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a promising method of studying of objects’ morphology and structure. In this work, AFM was used to determine the size and shape of the bacterial strains of Escherichia coli M-17 and visualization its interaction with the nanoparticles of zinc oxide. The suspension of E.coli bacteria was applied to natural mica and studied by contact mode using the FemtoScan multifunctional scanning probe microscope.

  19. Induction of gene amplification in Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocytic in vitro cultures of Honduras I strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been stressed stepwise with increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a folate antagonist. This selection has produced a strain that is 450 times more resistant to the drug than the original culture. Uptake of sublethal doses of radiolabeled MTX by infected red blood cells was 6-36 times greater in the resistant cultures than in the nonresistant controls. DNA isolated from all of the parasites was probed by hybridization with /sup 35/S-labeled DNA derived from a clone of the yeast thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. This showed 50 to 100 times more increased hybridization of the TS probe to the DNA from the resistant parasites is direct evidence of gene amplification because DHFR and TS are actually one and the same bifunctional enzyme in P. falciparum. Hence, the evidence presented indicates that induced resistance of the malaria parasite to MTX in this case is due to overproduction of DHFR resulting from amplification of the DHFR-TS gene.

  20. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Renin angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in serum of pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; del Pilar Carrera-González, María; Dueñas, Basilio; Mayas, María Dolores; García, María Jesús; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2011-10-01

    Angiotensin peptides regulate vascular tone and natriohydric balance through the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and are related with the angiogenesis which plays an important role in the metastatic pathway. Estrogen influences the aminopeptidases (APs) involved in the metabolism of bioactive peptides of RAS through several pathways. We analyze RAS-regulating AP activities in serum of pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer to evaluate the putative value of these activities as biological markers of the development of breast cancer. We observed an increase in aminopeptidase N (APN) and aminopeptidase B (APB) activities in women with breast cancer; however, a decrease in aspartyl-aminopeptidase (AspAP) activity in premenopausal women. These results suggest a slow metabolism of angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin III (Ang III) in premenopausal women and a rapid metabolism of Ang III to angiotensin IV (Ang IV) in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer. An imbalance in the signals activated by Ang II may produce abnormal vascular growth with different response between pre- and postmenopausal women depending on the hormonal profile and the development of the disease.

  2. MHJ_0125 is an M42 glutamyl aminopeptidase that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark W.; Buchtmann, Kyle A.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; To, Joyce; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; Woolley, Lauren K.; Labbate, Maurizio; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial aminopeptidases play important roles in pathogenesis by providing a source of amino acids from exogenous proteins, destroying host immunological effector peptides and executing posttranslational modification of bacterial and host proteins. We show that MHJ_0125 from the swine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae represents a new member of the M42 class of bacterial aminopeptidases. Despite lacking a recognizable signal sequence, MHJ_0125 is detectable on the cell surface by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS/MS of (i) biotinylated surface proteins captured by avidin chromatography and (ii) peptides released by mild trypsin shaving. Furthermore, surface-associated glutamyl aminopeptidase activity was detected by incubation of live M. hyopneumoniae cells with the diagnostic substrate H-Glu-AMC. MHJ_0125 moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin, binding to both heparin and plasminogen. Native proteomics and comparative modelling studies suggest MHJ_0125 forms a dodecameric, homopolymeric structure and provide insight into the positions of key residues that are predicted to interact with heparin and plasminogen. MHJ_0125 is the first aminopeptidase shown to both bind plasminogen and facilitate its activation by tissue plasminogen activator. Plasmin cleaves host extracellular matrix proteins and activates matrix metalloproteases, generating peptide substrates for MHJ_0125 and a source of amino acids for growth of M. hyopneumoniae. This unique interaction represents a new paradigm in microbial pathogenesis. PMID:23594879

  3. Cholesterol crystallization-promoting activity of aminopeptidase-N isolated from the vesicular carrier of biliary lipids.

    PubMed

    Núñez, L; Amigo, L; Rigotti, A; Puglielli, L; Mingrone, G; Greco, A V; Nervi, F

    1993-08-23

    Different hydrophobic glycoproteins are associated to native biliary vesicles, which are the major carrier of biliary cholesterol. Some of these proteins promote cholesterol crystallization, a key step in cholesterol gallstone formation. This study was specifically conducted to identify the 130 kDa biliary vesicle-associated glycoprotein and to determine its in vitro effect on the cholesterol crystal formation time. The 130 kDa vesicular glycoprotein was identified as aminopeptidase-N by amino acid sequencing and specific enzymatic assay. Polyclonal antibodies raised against aminopeptidase-N allowed us to determine its concentration in human hepatic bile, which varied from 17.3 to 57.6 micrograms/ml. Aminopeptidase-N showed a concentration-dependent cholesterol crystallization activity when it was added to supersaturated model bile at a concentration range usually found in native bile. Because of this promoting effect on in vitro cholesterol crystal formation, we suggest that biliary aminopeptidase-N may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease.

  4. Virulence and transmission success of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Rhian E.; Tiwari, Bela; Piper, Karen P.; Baruch, Dror I.; Day, Karen P.

    1999-01-01

    Virulence of Plasmodium falciparum is associated with the expression of variant surface antigens designated PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) that are encoded by a family of var genes. Data presented show that the transmission stages of P. falciparum also express PfEMP1 variants. Virulence in this host–parasite system can be considered a variable outcome of optimizing the production of sexual transmission stages from the population of disease-inducing asexual stages. Immunity to PfEMP1 will contribute to the regulation of this trade-off by controlling the parasite population with potential to produce mature transmission stages. PMID:10200302

  5. Falciparum malaria-induced hypoglycaemia in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, O.; Tsur, A.; Rahav, G.

    1992-01-01

    We report a patient with diabetes mellitus who suffered severe falciparum malaria complicated by profound and persistent hypoglycaemia. The hypoglycaemia evolved before therapy with quinine was begun and resolved with eradication of the parasitaemia. The patient reverted to her baseline hyperglycaemia despite continuation of quinine. This case illustrates the critical role of falciparum malaria in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated hypoglycaemia, rather than quinine-mediated mechanisms. Anticipation of hypoglycaemia in falciparum malaria and its vigorous treatment may improve the poor prognosis associated with this complication. PMID:1409194

  6. Immune activation during cerebellar dysfunction following Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    de Silva, H J; Hoang, P; Dalton, H; de Silva, N R; Jewell, D P; Peiris, J B

    1992-01-01

    Evidence for immune activation was investigated in 12 patients with a rare syndrome of self-limiting, delayed onset cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria which occurred 18-26 d previously. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 6 and interleukin 2 were all significantly higher in serum samples of patients during cerebellar ataxia than in recovery sera and in the sera of 8 patients who did not develop delayed cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria. Cytokine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were also significantly higher in ataxic patients than in controls. These findings suggest that immunological mechanisms may play a role in delayed cerebellar dysfunction following falciparum malaria.

  7. Severe Plasmodium falciparum infection mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Helmi; Ismail, Muhammad Dzafir; Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Atiya, Nadia; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela

    2014-08-30

    This case report describes a case of presumed acute myocardial infarction in a returned traveler who was later diagnosed to have severe malaria. Emergency coronary angiography was normal and subsequent peripheral blood film was positive for Plasmodium falciparum.

  8. Characterization of a 225 kilodalton rhoptry protein of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Roger, N; Dubremetz, J F; Delplace, P; Fortier, B; Tronchin, G; Vernes, A

    1988-01-15

    A monoclonal antibody (24C6 4F12) raised against Plasmodium falciparum culture supernatant antigens gave a multiple dot picture on schizonts when assayed by immunofluorescence on P. falciparum erythrocytic stages. The corresponding antigen was localized in the peduncle of rhoptries by immunoelectronmicroscopy. On Western blots of P. falciparum schizonts, a major antigen of 225 kDa and a minor one of 240 kDa were recognized by this McAb. Pulse chase analysis of [35S]methionine biosynthetic labeling of P. falciparum culture demonstrated that the 240 kDa molecule was the precursor of the 225 kDa and that its processing occurred between 0 and 4 h after synthesis. Biosynthesis of the 240-225 kDa antigen occurred only during schizogony. PMID:3278223

  9. Hemoglobinopathies: Slicing the Gordian Knot of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steve M.; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits—including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia—are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a “natural experiment” to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the “Gordian knot” of host and parasite

  10. Molecular identification and characterization of leucine aminopeptidase 2, an excretory-secretory product of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuanhuan; Sun, Jiufeng; Li, Xuerong; Wang, Lexun; Hu, Xuchu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Lv, Xiaoli; Liang, Chi; Li, Wenfang; Huang, Yan; Li, Ran; Wu, Zhongdao; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2012-10-01

    Aminopeptidases serve vital roles in metabolism of hormones, neurotransmission, turnover of proteins and immunological regulations. Leucine aminopeptidases catalyze the hydrolysis of amino-acid residues from the N-terminus of proteins and peptides. In the present study, leucine aminopeptidase 2 (LAP2) gene of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) was isolated and identified from an adult cDNA library of C. sinensis. Recombinant CsLAP2 was expressed and purified in Escherichia coli BL21. The open reading frame of LAP2 contains 1,560 bp equivalent to 519 amino acids, a similarity analysis showed a relatively low homology with Homo sapiens (19.0 %), Trypanosoma cruzi (18.0 %), Mus musculus (19.3 %), and relatively high homology with Schistosoma mansoni (65.6 %). The optimum condition of rCsLAP2 enzyme activity was investigated using a fluorescent substrate of Leu-MCA at 37 °C and pH 7.5. The K (m) and V (max) values of rCsLAP2 were 18.2 μM and 10.7 μM/min, respectively. CsLAP2 gene expression can be detected at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria and egg of C. sinensis using real-time PCR, no difference was observed at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria and egg. However, CsLAP2 showed a higher expression level at the stage of excysted metacercaria than the adult worm (3.90-fold), metacercaria (4.60-fold) and egg (4.59-fold). Histochemistry analysis showed that CsLAP2 was located at the tegument and excretory vesicle of metacercaria, and the tegument and intestine of adult worm. The immune response specific to rCsLAP2 was characterized by a mixed response patterns of Th1 and Th2, indicating a compounded humoral and cellular immune response. The combined results from the present study indicate that CsLAP2 was an important antigen exposed to host immune system, and probably implicated as potential role in interaction with host cells in clonorchiasis.

  11. The Dynamics of Natural Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Ingrid; Maire, Martin; Bretscher, Michael T.; Falk, Nicole; Tiaden, André; Sama, Wilson; Beck, Hans-Peter; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Smith, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural immunity to Plasmodium falciparum has been widely studied, but its effects on parasite dynamics are poorly understood. Acquisition and clearance rates of untreated infections are key elements of the dynamics of malaria, but estimating these parameters is challenging because of frequent super-infection and imperfect detectability of parasites. Consequently, information on effects of host immune status or age on infection dynamics is fragmentary. Methods An age-stratified cohort of 347 individuals from Northern Ghana was sampled six times at 2 month intervals. High-throughput capillary electrophoresis was used to genotype the msp-2 locus of all P. falciparum infections detected by PCR. Force of infection (FOI) and duration were estimated for each age group using an immigration-death model that allows for imperfect detection of circulating parasites. Results Allowing for imperfect detection substantially increased estimates of FOI and duration. Effects of naturally acquired immunity on the FOI and duration would be reflected in age dependence in these indices, but in our cohort data FOI tended to increase with age in children. Persistence of individual parasite clones was characteristic of all age-groups. Duration peaked in 5–9 year old children (average duration 319 days, 95% confidence interval 318;320). Conclusions The main age-dependence is on parasite densities, with only small age-variations in the FOI and persistence of infections. This supports the hypothesis that acquired immunity controls transmission mainly by limiting blood-stage parasite densities rather than changing rates of acquisition or clearance of infections. PMID:23029082

  12. High-level expression and characterization of the Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. BSP1 YwaD aminopeptidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Li, Zhezhe; Li, Chunhua; Yu, Xianhong; Wang, Fei; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yaping; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Aminopeptidases are widely used for creating protein hydrolysates and peptide sequencing. The ywaD gene from a new Bacillus isolate, named Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. BSP1, was cloned into the yeast expression vector pHBM905A and expressed and secreted by Pichia pastoris strain GS115. The deduced amino acid sequence of the aminopeptidase encoded by the ywaD gene shared up to 98% identity with aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016. The yield (3.81 g/l) and specific activity (788 U/mg) of recombinant YwaD in high-density fermentation were extremely high. And 829.83 mg of the purified enzyme (4089.72 U/mg) were harvested. YwaD was glycosylated, and its activity decreased after deglycosylation, which was similar to that of the aminopeptidase from B. subtilis strain zj016. YwaD was most active toward l-arginine-4-nitroanilide. Moreover, it exhibited high resistance to carbamide, which was not true for aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016, which could simplify the purification of YwaD. Moreover, the expression and parts of characterization of the aminopeptidase from B. subtilis strain 168 in Pichia pastoris were added as supplementary material. The sequence and other characteristics of YwaD were compared with those of aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016, and they will provide a solid foundation for further research on the influence of amino acid mutations on the function of aminopeptidases.

  13. Porcine aminopeptidase N binds to F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Wang, Yiting; Zhu, Congrui; Zou, Yajie; Yang, Ying; Liu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-09

    F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains cause diarrheal disease in neonatal and post-weaned piglets. Several different host receptors for F4 fimbriae have been described, with porcine aminopeptidase N (APN) reported most recently. The FaeG subunit is essential for the binding of the three F4 variants to host cells. Here we show in both yeast two-hybrid and pulldown assays that APN binds directly to FaeG, the major subunit of F4 fimbriae, from three serotypes of F4(+) ETEC. Modulating APN gene expression in IPEC-J2 cells affected ETEC adherence. Antibodies raised against APN or F4 fimbriae both reduced ETEC adherence. Thus, APN mediates the attachment of F4(+) E. coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. Structure-based elucidation of the regulatory mechanism for aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ta, Hai Minh; Bae, Sangsu; Han, Seungsu; Song, Jihyuck; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2013-09-01

    The specificity of proteases for the residues in and length of substrates is key to understanding their regulatory mechanism, but little is known about length selectivity. Crystal structure analyses of the bacterial aminopeptidase PepS, combined with functional and single-molecule FRET assays, have elucidated a molecular basis for length selectivity. PepS exists in open and closed conformations. Substrates can access the binding hole in the open conformation, but catalytic competency is only achieved in the closed conformation by formation of the S1 binding pocket and proximal movement of Glu343, a general base, to the cleavage site. Hence, peptides longer than the depth of the binding hole block the transition from the open to the closed conformation, and thus length selection is a prerequisite for catalytic activation. A triple-sieve interlock mechanism is proposed featuring the coupling of length selectivity with residue specificity and active-site positioning.

  15. Structural Basis For Antigenic Peptide Precursor Processing by the Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase ERAP1

    SciTech Connect

    T Nguyen; S Chang; I Evnouchidou; I York; C Zikos; K Rock; A Goldberg; E Stratikos; L Stern

    2011-12-31

    ERAP1 trims antigen precursors to fit into MHC class I proteins. To fulfill this function, ERAP1 has unique substrate preferences, trimming long peptides but sparing shorter ones. To identify the structural basis for ERAP1's unusual properties, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of human ERAP1 bound to bestatin. The structure reveals an open conformation with a large interior compartment. An extended groove originating from the enzyme's catalytic center can accommodate long peptides and has features that explain ERAP1's broad specificity for antigenic peptide precursors. Structural and biochemical analyses suggest a mechanism for ERAP1's length-dependent trimming activity, whereby binding of long rather than short substrates induces a conformational change with reorientation of a key catalytic residue toward the active site. ERAP1's unique structural elements suggest how a generic aminopeptidase structure has been adapted for the specialized function of trimming antigenic precursors.

  16. In Vitro Radiosensitization of Esophageal Cancer Cells with the Aminopeptidase Inhibitor CHR-2797.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Biasoli, Deborah; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B; Mukherjee, Somnath; Hammond, Ester M

    2015-09-01

    With the increased incidence of esophageal cancer, chemoradiotherapy continues to play an important role in the management of this disease. Developing potent radiosensitizers is therefore critical for improving outcomes. The use of drugs that have already undergone clinical testing is an appealing approach once the side effects and tolerated doses are established. Here, we demonstrate that the aminopeptidase inhibitor, CHR-2797/tosedostat, increases the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cell lines (FLO-1 and OE21) in vitro in both normoxic and physiologically relevant low oxygen conditions. To our knowledge, the effective combination of CHR-2797 with radiation exposure has not been reported previously in any cancer cell type. The mechanism of increased radiosensitivity was not dependent on the induction of DNA damage or DNA repair kinetics. Our data support the need for further preclinical testing of CHR-2797 in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  17. Synthesis and biodistribution studies of technetium-99m-labeled aminopeptidase N inhibitor conjugates.

    PubMed

    Pathuri, Gopal; Hedrick, Andria F; Disch, Bryan C; Ihnat, Michael A; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Gali, Hariprasad

    2012-07-15

    Probestin is a potent aminopeptidase N (APN) inhibitor. Four probestin conjugates containing a tripeptide chelator (N(3)S) and a PEG(2) linker were synthesized and radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The number of -COOH groups on the chelator was altered to increase the excretion of the radiotracer from blood stream via the renal-urinary pathway and to decrease its hepatobiliary uptake. Biodistribution of the radiolabeled conjugates was evaluated in healthy CF-1™ mice at 1h post-injection. The results revealed that the Tc-99m labeled probestin conjugate preferentially (>85% injected dose) excreted via the renal route when an aspartic acid residue was added to the linker (conjugate 4). These results suggest that the pharmacokinetic properties of probestin-based APN-targeted agents could be optimized by adding an appropriate amino acid residue in between the linker and the payload.

  18. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, K; Nakanishi, K; Kadotani, T; Imamura, M; Koizumi, N; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-12-17

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N (APN) was analyzed, to better understand the molecular mechanism of susceptibility to the toxin and the development of resistance in insects. APN was digested with lysylendopeptidase and the ability of the resulting fragments to bind to Cry1Aa and 1Ac toxins was examined. The binding abilities of the two toxins to these fragments were different. The Cry1Aa toxin bound to the fragment containing 40-Asp to 313-Lys, suggesting that the Cry1Aa toxin-binding site is located in the region between 40-Asp and 313-Lys, while Cry1Ac toxin bound exclusively to mature APN. Next, recombinant APN of various lengths was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and its ability to bind to Cry1Aa toxin was examined. The results localized the Cry1Aa toxin binding to the region between 135-Ile and 198-Pro. PMID:10606725

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of aminopeptidase N from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Onohara, Yuko; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi; Xu, Yue; Nakashima, Kanako; Ito, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    A recombinant form of aminopeptidase N (molecular weight 99 kDa) from Escherichia coli was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.5, c = 171.0 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a V M value of 3.62 Å3 Da−1. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation from a rotating-anode X-ray generator. PMID:16820698

  20. Structural and biochemical characterization of a novel aminopeptidase from human intestine.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Bařinka, Cyril; Svoboda, Michal; Navrátil, Václav; Souček, Radko; Hubálek, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šácha, Pavel; Lubkowski, Jacek; Konvalinka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    N-acetylated α-linked acidic dipeptidase-like protein (NAALADase L), encoded by the NAALADL1 gene, is a close homolog of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, a metallopeptidase that has been intensively studied as a target for imaging and therapy of solid malignancies and neuropathologies. However, neither the physiological functions nor structural features of NAALADase L are known at present. Here, we report a thorough characterization of the protein product of the human NAALADL1 gene, including heterologous overexpression and purification, structural and biochemical characterization, and analysis of its expression profile. By solving the NAALADase L x-ray structure, we provide the first experimental evidence that it is a zinc-dependent metallopeptidase with a catalytic mechanism similar to that of glutamate carboxypeptidase II yet distinct substrate specificity. A proteome-based assay revealed that the NAALADL1 gene product possesses previously unrecognized aminopeptidase activity but no carboxy- or endopeptidase activity. These findings were corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis and identification of bestatin as a potent inhibitor of the enzyme. Analysis of NAALADL1 gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels revealed the small intestine as the major site of protein expression and points toward extensive alternative splicing of the NAALADL1 gene transcript. Taken together, our data imply that the NAALADL1 gene product's primary physiological function is associated with the final stages of protein/peptide digestion and absorption in the human digestive system. Based on these results, we suggest a new name for this enzyme: human ileal aminopeptidase (HILAP). PMID:25752612

  1. Structure-based approach to alter the substrate specificity of Bacillus subtilis aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinxing; Cui, Wenjing; Ding, Ning; Liu, Zhongmei; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Zhemin

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidases can selectively catalyze the cleavage of the N-terminal amino acid residues from peptides and proteins. Bacillus subtilis aminopeptidase (BSAP) is most active toward p-nitroanilides (pNAs) derivatives of Leu, Arg, and Lys. The BSAP with broad substrate specificity is expected to improve its application. Based on an analysis of the predicted structure of BSAP, four residues (Leu 370, Asn 385, Ile 387, and Val 396) located in the substrate binding region were selected for saturation mutagenesis. The hydrolytic activity toward different aminoacyl-pNAs of each mutant BSAP in the culture supernatant was measured. Although the mutations resulted in a decrease of hydrolytic activity toward Leu-pNA, N385L BSAP exhibited higher hydrolytic activities toward Lys-pNA (2.2-fold) and Ile-pNA (9.1-fold) than wild-type BSAP. Three mutant enzymes (I387A, I387C and I387S BSAPs) specially hydrolyzed Phe-pNA, which was undetectable in wild-type BSAP. Among these mutant BSAPs, N385L and I387A BSAPs were selected for further characterized and used for protein hydrolysis application. Both of N385L and I387A BSAPs showed higher hydrolysis efficiency than the wild-type BASP and a combination of the wild-type and N385L and I387A BSAPs exhibited the highest hydrolysis efficiency for protein hydrolysis. This study will greatly facilitate studies aimed on change the substrate specificity and our results obtained here should be useful for BSAP application in food industry.

  2. Metal promiscuity and metal-dependent substrate preferences of Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Aline; Klein, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases play a major role in posttranslational protein processing and are therefore promising targets for the discovery of novel therapeutical agents. We here describe the heterologous expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase, type 1 (TbMetAP1). We investigated the dependency of TbMetAP1 activity on pH and metal cofactor (type and concentration) using in particular the substrates Met-Gly-Met-Met and Met-AMC along with related compounds, and determined kinetic values (Km, vmax, kcat). The optimal pH for TbMetAP1 activity is between 7.0 and 8.0. Surprisingly, the two substrates have different cofactor requirements: Both substrates are processed by the cobalt-activated TbMetAP1, but only the Met-Gly-Met-Met substrate is processed with nearly identical catalytical properties by the zinc-activated enzyme. Depending on the substrate, various other metal ions (iron(II), manganese, nickel) were also accepted as cofactors. Two aspects of this work are relevant for the biochemistry of MetAPs and further drug discovery efforts: 1. Zinc, and not cobalt ions are probably the physiological cofactor of TbMetAP1 and possibly other MetAPs. 2. In MetAP assays for compound screening, the combination of the Met-AMC substrate with cobalt, manganese or iron ions may not represent the physiological reality, thereby leading to results that can not be extrapolated towards a phenotypic effect.

  3. Aspartyl Aminopeptidase Is Imported from the Cytoplasm to the Vacuole by Selective Autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Yuga, Masaki; Gomi, Katsuya; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Shintani, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a catabolic process by which cytosolic components are sequestered by double membrane vesicles called autophagosomes and sorted to the lysosomes/vacuoles to be degraded. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has adapted this mechanism for constitutive transport of the specific vacuolar hydrolases aminopeptidase I (Ape1) and α-mannosidase (Ams1); this process is called the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway. The precursor form of Ape1 self-assembles into an aggregate-like structure in the cytosol that is then recognized by Atg19 in a propeptide-dependent manner. The interaction between Atg19 and autophagosome-forming machineries allows selective packaging of the Ape1-Atg19 complex by the autophagosome-like Cvt vesicle. Ams1 also forms oligomers and utilizes the Ape1 transport system by interacting with Atg19. Although the mechanism of selective transport of the Cvt cargoes has been well studied, it is unclear whether proteins other than Ape1 and Ams1 are transported via the Cvt pathway. We describe here that aspartyl aminopeptidase (Yhr113w/Ape4) is the third Cvt cargo, which is similar in primary structure and subunit organization to Ape1. Ape4 has no propeptide, and it does not self-assemble into aggregates. However, it binds to Atg19 in a site distinct from the Ape1- and Ams1-binding sites, allowing it to “piggyback” on the Ape1 transport system. In growing conditions, a small portion of Ape4 localizes in the vacuole, but its vacuolar transport is accelerated by nutrient starvation, and it stably resides in the vacuole lumen. We propose that the cytosolic Ape4 is redistributed to the vacuole when yeast cells need more active vacuolar degradation. PMID:21343297

  4. Aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 inhibitor, Ubenimex, enhances radiation sensitivity in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hirohisa; Shibata, Kiyosumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Mikio; Nawa, Akihiro; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy can be used to treat all stages of cervical cancer. For improving local control via radiotherapy, it is important to use additional antitumor agents. Aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13, a 150-kDa metalloproteinase, is a multifunctional cell surface aminopeptidase with ubiquitous expression. Recent studies have suggested that APN/CD13 plays an important role in tumor progression in several human malignancies. Methods We investigated whether the suppression of APN/CD13 using Ubenimex, an inhibitor of APN/CD13 activity, may affect tumor radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Cell surface APN/CD13 activity in HeLa cells was calculated using alanine-p-nitroanilido as a substrate. For colony formation assays, single-dose radiation and/or Ubenimex were administered to each dish of HeLa cells, and these dishes were cultured for 14 days. Molecular changes of apoptosis were determined by Western blot. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V PI staining (flow cytometry analysis) and the Tunel method. Moreover, we investigated the effect of combining Ubenimex and low-dose radiation on tumor growth using nude mice. Results We demonstrated that Ubenimex enhanced the effectiveness of radiotherapy, acting as a radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. In colony formation assays, a significant decline in clonogenic survival was observed in Ubenimex-treated cells. Mice treated with a combination of radiation and Ubenimex showed a significant prolongation of the tumor-doubling time compared with the control, Ubenimex, or radiation-alone groups. We also showed that ubenimex enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Although further studies are needed, this report suggests that Ubeniemx acts as a radiosensitizer in cervical cancer treatment, and that the inhibition of APN/CD13 activity may represent a new approach for improving the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. PMID:18366676

  5. Structure-based approach to alter the substrate specificity of Bacillus subtilis aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxing; Cui, Wenjing; Ding, Ning; Liu, Zhongmei; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Zhemin

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidases can selectively catalyze the cleavage of the N-terminal amino acid residues from peptides and proteins. Bacillus subtilis aminopeptidase (BSAP) is most active toward p-nitroanilides (pNAs) derivatives of Leu, Arg, and Lys. The BSAP with broad substrate specificity is expected to improve its application. Based on an analysis of the predicted structure of BSAP, four residues (Leu 370, Asn 385, Ile 387, and Val 396) located in the substrate binding region were selected for saturation mutagenesis. The hydrolytic activity toward different aminoacyl-pNAs of each mutant BSAP in the culture supernatant was measured. Although the mutations resulted in a decrease of hydrolytic activity toward Leu-pNA, N385L BSAP exhibited higher hydrolytic activities toward Lys-pNA (2.2-fold) and Ile-pNA (9.1-fold) than wild-type BSAP. Three mutant enzymes (I387A, I387C and I387S BSAPs) specially hydrolyzed Phe-pNA, which was undetectable in wild-type BSAP. Among these mutant BSAPs, N385L and I387A BSAPs were selected for further characterized and used for protein hydrolysis application. Both of N385L and I387A BSAPs showed higher hydrolysis efficiency than the wild-type BASP and a combination of the wild-type and N385L and I387A BSAPs exhibited the highest hydrolysis efficiency for protein hydrolysis. This study will greatly facilitate studies aimed on change the substrate specificity and our results obtained here should be useful for BSAP application in food industry. PMID:23787698

  6. RNA interference targeting leucine aminopeptidase blocks hatching of Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Gabriel; Morales, Maria E; Alrefaei, Yousef N; Cancela, Martín; Castillo, Estela; Dalton, John P; Tort, José F; Brindley, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Schistosoma mansoni leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is thought to play a central role in hatching of the miracidium from the schistosome egg. We identified two discrete LAPs genes in the S. mansoni genome, and their orthologs in S. japonicum. The similarities in sequence and exon/intron structure of the two genes, LAP1 and LAP2, suggest that they arose by gene duplication and that this occurred before separation of the mansoni and japonicum lineages. The SmLAP1 and SmLAP2 genes have different expression patterns in diverse stages of the cycle; whereas both are equally expressed in the blood dwelling stages (schistosomules and adult), SmLAP2 expression was higher in free living larval (miracidia) and in parasitic intra-snail (sporocysts) stages. We investigated the role of each enzyme in hatching of schistosome eggs and the early stages of schistosome development by RNA interference (RNAi). Using RNAi, we observed marked and specific reduction of mRNAs, along with a loss of exopeptidase activity in soluble parasite extracts against the diagnostic substrate l-leucine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin hydroxide. Strikingly, knockdown of either SmLAP1 or SmLAP2, or both together, was accompanied by >or=80% inhibition of hatching of schistosome eggs showing that both enzymes are important to the escape of miracidia from the egg. The methods employed here refine the utility of RNAi for functional genomics studies in helminth parasites and confirm these can be used to identify potential drug targets, in this case schistosome aminopeptidases. PMID:19463860

  7. Structural and biochemical characterization of a novel aminopeptidase from human intestine.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Bařinka, Cyril; Svoboda, Michal; Navrátil, Václav; Souček, Radko; Hubálek, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šácha, Pavel; Lubkowski, Jacek; Konvalinka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    N-acetylated α-linked acidic dipeptidase-like protein (NAALADase L), encoded by the NAALADL1 gene, is a close homolog of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, a metallopeptidase that has been intensively studied as a target for imaging and therapy of solid malignancies and neuropathologies. However, neither the physiological functions nor structural features of NAALADase L are known at present. Here, we report a thorough characterization of the protein product of the human NAALADL1 gene, including heterologous overexpression and purification, structural and biochemical characterization, and analysis of its expression profile. By solving the NAALADase L x-ray structure, we provide the first experimental evidence that it is a zinc-dependent metallopeptidase with a catalytic mechanism similar to that of glutamate carboxypeptidase II yet distinct substrate specificity. A proteome-based assay revealed that the NAALADL1 gene product possesses previously unrecognized aminopeptidase activity but no carboxy- or endopeptidase activity. These findings were corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis and identification of bestatin as a potent inhibitor of the enzyme. Analysis of NAALADL1 gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels revealed the small intestine as the major site of protein expression and points toward extensive alternative splicing of the NAALADL1 gene transcript. Taken together, our data imply that the NAALADL1 gene product's primary physiological function is associated with the final stages of protein/peptide digestion and absorption in the human digestive system. Based on these results, we suggest a new name for this enzyme: human ileal aminopeptidase (HILAP).

  8. Optimized expression of prolyl aminopeptidase in Pichia pastoris and its characteristics after glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhou, Nandi; Tian, Yaping

    2016-11-01

    Prolyl aminopeptidases are specific exopeptidases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the N-terminus proline residue of peptides and proteins. In the present study, the prolyl aminopeptidase gene (pap) from Aspergillus oryzae JN-412 was optimized through the codon usage of Pichia pastoris. Both the native and optimized pap genes were inserted into the expression vector pPIC9 K and were successfully expressed in P. pastoris. Additionally, the activity of the intracellular enzyme expressed by the recombinant optimized pap gene reached 61.26 U mL(-1), an activity that is 2.1-fold higher than that of the native gene. The recombinant enzyme was purified by one-step elution through Ni-affinity chromatography. The optimal temperature and pH of the purified PAP were 60 °C and 7.5, respectively. Additionally, the recombinant PAP was recovered at a yield greater than 65 % at an extremely broad range of pH values from 6 to 10 after treatment at 50 °C for 6 h. The molecular weight of the recombinant PAP decreased from 50 kDa to 48 kDa after treatment with a deglycosylation enzyme, indicating that the recombinant PAP was completely glycosylated. The glycosylated PAP exhibited high thermo-stability. Half of the activity remained after incubation at 50 °C for 50 h, whereas the remaining activity of PAP expressed in E. coli was only 10 % after incubation at 50 °C for 1 h. PAP could be activated by the appropriate salt concentration and exhibited salt tolerance against NaCl at a concentration up to 5 mol L(-1). PMID:27628336

  9. Roles of the Peptide Transport Systems and Aminopeptidase PepA in Peptide Assimilation by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ki, Mi Ran; Lee, Ji Hyun; Yun, Soon Kyu; Choi, Kyung Min; Hwang, Se Young

    2015-10-01

    Peptide assimilation in Helicobacter pylori necessitates a coordinated working of the peptide transport systems (PepTs) and aminopeptidase (PepA). We found that H. pylori hydrolyzes two detector peptides, L-phenylalanyl-L-3-thiaphenylalanine (PSP) and L-phenylalanyl-L-2- sulfanilylglycine (PSG), primarily before intake and excludes their antibacterial effects, whereas Escherichia coli readily transports them with resultant growth inhibition. PSP assimilation by H. pylori was inhibited by aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin, but not by dialanine or cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, contrary to that of E. coli. RT- and qRT-PCR analyses showed that H. pylori may express first the PepTs (e.g., DppA and DppB) and then PepA. In addition, western blot analysis of PepA suggested that the bacterium secretes PepA in response to specific inducers.

  10. Non-empirical analysis of the nature of the inhibitor active-site interactions in leucine aminopeptidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; K ȩdzierski, P.; Sokalski, W. A.

    1999-11-01

    Non-empirical analysis of the physical nature of the intermolecular interactions between several leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors and various constituents of the enzyme active site has been performed using a direct version of the hybrid variation-perturbation decomposition of SCF and MP2 interaction energies. The interaction energy terms obtained at different theory levels have been correlated with experimentally measured activities of the inhibitors, indicating that the more advanced the quantum-chemical method and, the larger the active-site model, the better is the correlation between calculated and measured binding energies. The electrostatic multipole term constitutes the dominant contribution in the total interaction energy, whereas Zn 2+488 and Lys +262 enzyme residues play the crucial role in the binding of these inhibitors by leucine aminopeptidase.

  11. Identification of a Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11Ba toxin-binding aminopeptidase from the mosquito, Anopheles quadrimaculatus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohd Amir F; Valaitis, Algimantas P; Dean, Donald H

    2006-01-01

    Background Aminopeptidase N (APN) type proteins isolated from several species of lepidopteran insects have been implicated as Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin-binding proteins (receptors) for Cry toxins. We examined brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins from the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus to determine if APNs from this organism would bind mosquitocidal Cry toxins that are active to it. Results A 100-kDa protein with APN activity (APNAnq 100) was isolated from the brush border membrane of Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Native state binding analysis by surface plasmon resonance shows that APNAnq 100 forms tight binding to a mosquitocidal Bt toxin, Cry11Ba, but not to Cry2Aa, Cry4Ba or Cry11Aa. Conclusion An aminopeptidase from Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes is a specific binding protein for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11Ba. PMID:16716213

  12. Binding, degradation and pressor activity of angiotensins II and III after aminopeptidase inhibition with amastatin and bestatin

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, R.H.; Sullivan, M.J.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1987-09-01

    In the metabolism of angiotensin peptides by tissue angiotensinases, aminopeptidases A, B, M and leucine aminopeptidase have been identified as being particularly effective. Because the inhibitory actions of amastatin (AM) and bestatin (BE) are relatively specific for these aminopeptidases, we have examined the effects of these inhibitors on the binding, degradation and pressor activity of angiotensin II (AII) and angiotensin III (AIII). Within 30 min at 37 degrees C, significant metabolism of /sup 125/I-AII and /sup 125/I-AIII by homogenates of a block of tissue containing hypothalamus, thalamus, septum and anteroventral third ventricle regions of the brain was observed. A majority of /sup 125/I-AIII metabolism was due to soluble peptidases, whereas that of /sup 125/I-AII primarily resulted from membrane-bound peptidases. AM, BE and reduced incubation temperatures significantly decreased the metabolism of /sup 125/I-AII and /sup 125/I-AIII. After appropriate adjustments to reflect the proportion of intact radioligand bound, temperature- or inhibitor-induced decreases in metabolism were matched by corresponding increases in specific binding. Heat-treated bovine serum albumin, as a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, had no effect on either the metabolism or binding of the ligands used. In accordance with their actions in vitro, i.c.v. administration of AM and BE prolonged the pressor activity of subsequently applied AII and AIII. Unexpectedly, the amplitude of the pressor response to AIII was increased by BE, whereas that to AII was decreased by AM. The results of this study indicate that the metabolism of AII and AIII by aminopeptidases is relatively specific and acts to modulate the actions of these peptides.

  13. The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1: purification and characterization of a proteinase, a dipeptidase, and an aminopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, M; Smacchi, E; Corsetti, A

    1996-01-01

    A cell envelope 57-kDa proteinase, a cytoplasmic 65-kDa dipeptidase, and a 75-kDa aminopeptidase were purified from Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1 sourdough lactic acid bacterium by sequential fast protein liquid chromatography steps. All of the enzymes are monomers. The proteinase was most active at pH 7.0 and 40 degrees C, while aminopeptidase and dipeptidase had optima at pH 7.5 and 30 to 35 degrees C. Relatively high activities were observed at the pH and temperature of the sourdough fermentation. The proteinase is a serine enzyme. Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of digest of alpha s1- and beta-caseins showed differences in the pattern of peptides released by the purified proteinase and those produced by crude preparations of the cell envelope proteinases of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus B397 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis SK11. Reversed-phase fast protein liquid chromatography of gliadin digests showed a more-complex peptide pattern produced by the proteinase of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1. The dipeptidase is a metalloenzyme with high affinity for dipeptides containing hydrophobic amino acids but had no activity on tripeptides or larger peptides. The aminopeptidase was also inhibited by metal-chelating agents, and showed a broad N-terminal hydrolytic activity including di- and tripeptides. Km values of 0.70 and 0.44 mM were determined for the dipeptidase on Leu-Leu and the aminopeptidase on Leu-p-nitroanilide, respectively. PMID:8795211

  14. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  15. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Egan, J E; Houghten, R A; Sadoff, J C; Hoffman, S L

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of malaria sporozoites protect against malaria in rodents. Although there is interest in developing human vaccines that induce CTL against the Plasmodium falciparum CS protein, humans have never been shown to produce CTL against any Plasmodium species protein or other parasite protein. We report that when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three of four volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites were stimulated in vitro with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the P. falciparum CS protein or a peptide including only amino acids 368-390 of the P. falciparum CS protein [CS-(368-390)], the PBMC lysed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells transfected with the P. falciparum CS protein gene or incubated with CS-(368-390) tricosapeptide. Activity was antigen specific, genetically restricted, and dependent on CD8+ T cells. In one volunteer, seven peptides reflecting amino acids 311-400 were tested, and, as in B10.BR mice, CTL activity was only associated with the CS-(368-390) peptide. Development of an assay for studying human CTL against the CS and other malaria proteins and a method for constructing target cells by direct gene transfection provide a foundation for studying the role of CTL in protection against malaria. PMID:1707538

  16. p161, a murine membrane protein expressed on mast cells and some macrophages, is mouse CD13/aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Kinzer, C A; Paul, W E

    1996-09-15

    pl6l is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on mast cells and on activated macrophages but on few if any other cells of hematopoietic lineages. Its lack of expression on basophils makes it useful to distinguish mast cells from basophils and aids in the analysis of mast cells and their precursors. p161 was purified from the mast cell line CFTL-12 by affinity chromatography and subjected to limited proteolysis. The sequences of the resultant peptides indicated that p161 is homologous with rat and human CD13/aminopeptidase N. Using oligonucleotide primers derived from rat CD13 cDNA, a mouse cDNA was obtained. Its deduced amino acid sequence displays 87% identity with rat CD13 and 76 % identity with human CD13. Expression of the mouse cDNA in M12 cells, which are p161 negative, renders these cells positive for staining with the monoclonal anti-p161 Ab, K-1. Furthermore, a mAb raised against partially purified mouse intestinal aminopeptidase N specifically blocked the binding of K-1 to both CFTL-12 cells and the transfected M12 cells. These results strongly indicate that mouse p161 is CD13/aminopeptidase N. Northern blot analysis shows that p161 mRNA is most abundantly expressed in the intestinal tract and kidney and is present in liver, lymph node, spleen, and brain.

  17. Aminopeptidase T of M29 Family Acts as A Novel Intracellular Virulence Factor for Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changyong; Wang, Xiaowen; Dong, Zhimei; Shao, Chunyan; Yang, Yongchun; Fang, Weihuan; Fang, Chun; Wang, Hang; Yang, Menghua; Jiang, Lingli; Zhou, Xiangyang; Song, Houhui

    2015-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes employs a number of virulence determinants including metalloproteases to infect hosts. Here for the first time, we identified an M29 family aminopeptidase T (encoded by lmo1603) from L. monocytogenes that possesses a typical feature to catalyze the cleavage of amino acids from peptide substrates, with a preference for arginine. The purified recombinant Lmo1603 was activated by Fe3+, Zn2+ and Mn2+, but strongly stimulated by Co2+, indicating that Lmo1603 is a cobalt-dependent aminopeptidase. Single mutation at any of the Glu216, Glu281, His308, Tyr315, His327, and Asp329 completely abolished the enzymatic activity of Lmo1603. More importantly, we showed that Lmo1603 was mainly involved in Listeria infection, but not required for growth in rich laboratory medium and minimal defined medium. Disruption of Lmo1603 resulted in almost complete attenuation of Listeria virulence in a mouse infection model. In addition, we demonstrated that Lmo1603 was mainly localized in the bacterial cytosol and required for invasion and survival inside human epithelial cells and murine macrophages. We conclude that Lmo1603 encodes a functional aminopeptidase T of M29 family, which acts as a novel intracellular virulence factor essential in the successful establishment of L. monocytogenes infections in a mouse model. PMID:26610705

  18. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris of X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from basidiomycete Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Ibarra, J Antonio; Chávez-Camarillo, Griselda; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-03-01

    Dipeptidyl aminopeptidases are enzymes involved in the posttranslational control of bioactive peptides. Here we identified the gene dapUm in Ustilago maydis by homology with other fungal dipeptidyl aminopeptidases. Analysis of the dapUm-deduced amino acid sequence indicated that it encodes for membrane-type serine protease with a characteristic prolyl oligopeptidase catalytic motif triad: Ser, Asp, His. In order to overexpress the DapUm, the gene encoding for it was cloned and transformed into Pichia. Using this system, we observed a ∼ 125-kDa recombinant protein with an optimal enzymatic activity at pH 6.0 and at 40 °C for the Ala-Pro-p-nitroanilide substrate and an experimental pH of 6.9. U. maydis DapUm was specifically inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Pefabloc, confirming the presence of a serine residue in the active site. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on the cloning and expression of a DPP IV dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from a basidiomycete organism. Moreover, the use of recombinant DapUm will allow us to further study and characterize this enzyme, in addition to testing chemical compounds for pharmaceutical purposes.

  19. Aminopeptidase T of M29 Family Acts as A Novel Intracellular Virulence Factor for Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Changyong; Wang, Xiaowen; Dong, Zhimei; Shao, Chunyan; Yang, Yongchun; Fang, Weihuan; Fang, Chun; Wang, Hang; Yang, Menghua; Jiang, Lingli; Zhou, Xiangyang; Song, Houhui

    2015-11-27

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes employs a number of virulence determinants including metalloproteases to infect hosts. Here for the first time, we identified an M29 family aminopeptidase T (encoded by lmo1603) from L. monocytogenes that possesses a typical feature to catalyze the cleavage of amino acids from peptide substrates, with a preference for arginine. The purified recombinant Lmo1603 was activated by Fe(3+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+), but strongly stimulated by Co(2+), indicating that Lmo1603 is a cobalt-dependent aminopeptidase. Single mutation at any of the Glu216, Glu281, His308, Tyr315, His327, and Asp329 completely abolished the enzymatic activity of Lmo1603. More importantly, we showed that Lmo1603 was mainly involved in Listeria infection, but not required for growth in rich laboratory medium and minimal defined medium. Disruption of Lmo1603 resulted in almost complete attenuation of Listeria virulence in a mouse infection model. In addition, we demonstrated that Lmo1603 was mainly localized in the bacterial cytosol and required for invasion and survival inside human epithelial cells and murine macrophages. We conclude that Lmo1603 encodes a functional aminopeptidase T of M29 family, which acts as a novel intracellular virulence factor essential in the successful establishment of L. monocytogenes infections in a mouse model.

  20. Serum protein concentrations in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Graninger, W; Thalhammer, F; Hollenstein, U; Zotter, G M; Kremsner, P G

    1992-12-01

    In patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infection cytokine-mediated serum protein levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), coeruloplasmin (COE), beta 2-microglobulin (B2M), alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), haptoglobin (HPT), prealbumin (PRE), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin (ALB) and transferrin (TRF) were measured in an endemic area of the Amazonian rain forest. Semi-immune (SI) and nonimmune (NI) patients were investigated. In both patient groups the serum concentrations of CRP, COE and B2M were elevated on admission. In addition AAG and AAT concentrations were increased in NI patients compared to control subjects. Significantly lower serum concentrations of HPT, PRE, RBP, ALB and TRF were seen in both patient groups during the acute phase of the disease, and were more pronounced in NI patients. After a 28-day follow-up, AAT and B2M were normal in SI patients but HPT, AAT and B2M were still significantly altered in NI patients.

  1. Risk factors for UK Plasmodium falciparum cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing proportion of malaria cases diagnosed in UK residents with a history of travel to malaria endemic areas are due to Plasmodium falciparum. Methods In order to identify travellers at most risk of acquiring malaria a proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of acquiring malaria stratified by purpose of travel and age whilst adjusting for entomological inoculation rate (EIR) and duration of stay in endemic countries. Results Travellers visiting friends and relatives and business travellers were found to have significantly higher hazard of acquiring malaria (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) relative to that of holiday makers 7.4, 95% CI 6.4–8.5, p < 0. 0001 and HR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9-3.8, p < 0. 0001, respectively). All age-groups were at lower risk than children aged 0–15 years. Conclusions These estimates of the increased risk for business travellers and those visiting friends and relatives should be used to inform programmes to improve awareness of the risks of malaria when travelling. PMID:25091803

  2. Detection of SUMOylation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Katherine H; Matunis, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein modification by small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) regulates many cellular processes, including transcription, protein quality control, cell division, and oxidative stress. SUMOylation is therefore essential for normal cell function and represents a potentially valuable target for the development of inhibitors of pathogenic eukaryotic organisms, including the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). The specific and essential functions of SUMOylation in Pf, however, remain largely uncharacterized. The further development of antimalarial drugs targeting SUMOylation would benefit significantly from a more detailed understanding of its functions and regulation during the parasite life cycle. The recent development of antibodies specific for Pf SUMO provides a valuable tool to study the functions and regulation of SUMOylation. In preliminary studies, we have used immunoblot analysis to demonstrate that SUMOylation levels vary significantly in parasites during different stages of the red blood cell cycle and also in response to oxidative stress. Owing to the dynamic nature of SUMOylation and to the robust activity of SUMO isopeptidases, analysis of SUMOylation in cultured Pf parasites requires a number of precautions during parasite purification and lysis. Here, we outline methods for preserving SUMO conjugates during isolation of Pf parasites from human red blood cell cultures, and for their detection by immunoblot analysis using PfSUMO-specific antibodies. PMID:27631812

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Secretome in Erythrocyte and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rani; Sharma, Drista; Bhatt, Tarun K.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for the development of novel anti-malarial therapies. PMID:26925057

  4. Atomic far-IR fine-structure line mapping of L1630, M17, and W3: Comparison of (O I) and (C II) distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. E.; Jaffe, Dan T.; Zhou, Shudong

    1995-01-01

    We mapped the distribution of atomic far-IR line emission from (O I) and (C II) over parsec scales in the Galactic star-forming regions L1630, M17, and W3 using the MPE Far-Infrared Fabry-Perot Imaging spectrometer (FIFI) on board the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The lines mapped include (O I) 63 microns, (O I) 146 microns, and (C II) 158 microns. Comparison of the intensities and ratios of these lines with models of photodissociation regions (e.g., Tielens & Hollenbach 1985, ApJ, 344, 770) allows us to derive temperatures and densities of the primarily neutral atomic gas layers lying on the surfaces of UV-illuminated molecular gas. In general, the (C II) line arises ubiquitously throughout the molecular clouds while the (O I) lines are mainly confined to warm, dense gas (T is greater than 100 K, n is greater than 10(exp 4)/cu cm) near the sites of O and B stars. The distribution of (C II) in the star-forming clouds implies that the (C II) emission arises on the surfaces of molecular clumps throughout the clouds, rather than only at the boundary layer between molecular gas and H II regions.

  5. Multiple independent introductions of Plasmodium falciparum in South America

    PubMed Central

    Yalcindag, Erhan; Elguero, Eric; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Akiana, Jean; Anderson, Timothy J.; Aubouy, Agnes; Balloux, François; Besnard, Patrick; Bogreau, Hervé; Carnevale, Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Fontenille, Didier; Gamboa, Dionicia; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Mire, Jacques; Leroy, Eric; Maestre, Amanda; Mayxay, Mayfong; Ménard, Didier; Musset, Lise; Newton, Paul N.; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Noya, Oscar; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rogier, Christophe; Veron, Vincent; Wide, Albina; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Carme, Bernard; Legrand, Eric; Chevillon, Christine; Ayala, Francisco J.; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Plasmodium falciparum in South America is controversial. Some studies suggest a recent introduction during the European colonizations and the transatlantic slave trade. Other evidence—archeological and genetic—suggests a much older origin. We collected and analyzed P. falciparum isolates from different regions of the world, encompassing the distribution range of the parasite, including populations from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and South America. Analyses of microsatellite and SNP polymorphisms show that the populations of P. falciparum in South America are subdivided in two main genetic clusters (northern and southern). Phylogenetic analyses, as well as Approximate Bayesian Computation methods suggest independent introductions of the two clusters from African sources. Our estimates of divergence time between the South American populations and their likely sources favor a likely introduction from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade. PMID:22203975

  6. [Research Progress on Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-long; Pan, Wei-qing

    2015-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) is a novel and effective antimalarial drug discovered in China. As recommended by the World Health Organization, the ART-based combination therapies (ACTs) have become the first-line drugs for the treatment of falciparum malaria. ART and its derivatives have contributed greatly to the effective control of malaria globally, leading to yearly decrease of malaria morbidity and mortality. However, there have recently been several reports on the resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to ART in Southeast Asia. This is deemed a serious threat to the global malaria control programs. In this paper, we reviewed recent research progress on ART resistance to P. falciparum, including new tools for resistance measurement, resistance-associated molecular markers, and the origin and spread of the ART-resistant parasite strains.

  7. [Research Progress on Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-long; Pan, Wei-qing

    2015-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) is a novel and effective antimalarial drug discovered in China. As recommended by the World Health Organization, the ART-based combination therapies (ACTs) have become the first-line drugs for the treatment of falciparum malaria. ART and its derivatives have contributed greatly to the effective control of malaria globally, leading to yearly decrease of malaria morbidity and mortality. However, there have recently been several reports on the resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to ART in Southeast Asia. This is deemed a serious threat to the global malaria control programs. In this paper, we reviewed recent research progress on ART resistance to P. falciparum, including new tools for resistance measurement, resistance-associated molecular markers, and the origin and spread of the ART-resistant parasite strains. PMID:27089770

  8. Localization of apical sushi protein in Plasmodium falciparum merozoites.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anand; Singh, Shailja; Dhawan, Shikha; Mahmood Alam, M; Mohmmed, Asif; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2010-11-01

    Plasmodium falciparum belongs to the Apicomplexan group of parasites and is characterised by presence of specialized secretory organelles at the apical end. These apical organelles, referred to as microneme and rhoptries, contain proteins that play important roles during host cell invasion by mediating specific functions such as initial attachment, apical reorientation and junction formation. Recently, a protein referred to as P. falciparum apical sushi protein (PfASP), which is expressed at late schizont stage, was localized to micronemes of P. falciparum merozoites. In the present study, we have used indirect immunofluorescence assays and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that PfASP is localized in the neck of rhoptries and not in micronemes as previously described.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

    PubMed

    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. PMID:18703053

  10. Further Improvements of the P. falciparum Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Meija, Pedro; Swetman, Claire; Gleeson, James; Pérignon, Jean-Louis; Druilhe, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been shown previously that it is possible to obtain growth of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes grafted in mice lacking adaptive immune responses by controlling, to a certain extent, innate defences with liposomes containing clodronate (clo-lip). However, the reproducibility of those models is limited, with only a proportion of animals supporting longstanding parasitemia, due to strong inflammation induced by P. falciparum. Optimisation of the model is much needed for the study of new anti-malarial drugs, drug combinations, and candidate vaccines. Materials/Methods We investigated the possibility of improving previous models by employing the intravenous route (IV) for delivery of both human erythrocytes (huRBC) and P. falciparum, instead of the intraperitoneal route (IP), by testing various immunosuppressive drugs that might help to control innate mouse defences, and by exploring the potential benefits of using immunodeficient mice with additional genetic defects, such as those with IL-2Rγ deficiency (NSG mice). Results We demonstrate here the role of aging, of inosine and of the IL-2 receptor γ mutation in controlling P. falciparum induced inflammation. IV delivery of huRBC and P. falciparum in clo-lip treated NSG mice led to successful infection in 100% of inoculated mice, rapid rise of parasitemia to high levels (up to 40%), long-lasting parasitemia, and consistent results from mouse-to-mouse. Characteristics were closer to human infection than in previous models, with evidence of synchronisation, partial sequestration, and receptivity to various P. falciparum strains without preliminary adaptation. However, results show that a major IL-12p70 inflammatory response remains prevalent. Conclusion The combination of the NSG mouse, clodronate loaded liposomes, and IV delivery of huRBC has produced a reliable and more relevant model that better meets the needs of Malaria research. PMID:21483851

  11. Intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum biosynthesize vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, Rodrigo A C; Angeli, Cláudia B; Peres, Valnice J; Kimura, Emilia A; Katzin, Alejandro M

    2011-12-15

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate and shikimate pathways were found to be active in Plasmodium falciparum and both can result in vitamin E biosynthesis in plants and algae. This study biochemically confirmed vitamin E biosynthesis in the malaria parasite, which can be inhibited by usnic acid. Furthermore, we found evidence pointing to a role of this vitamin in infected erythrocytes. These findings not only contribute to current understanding of P. falciparum biology but also reveal a pathway that could serve as a chemotherapeutic target.

  12. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, D; Reddy, G R; Dame, J B; Almira, E C; Laipis, P J; Ferl, R J; Yang, T P; Rowe, T C; Schuster, S M

    1994-07-01

    An initiative was undertaken to sequence all genes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in an effort to gain a better understanding at the molecular level of the parasite that inflicts much suffering in the developing world. 550 random complimentary DNA clones were partially sequenced from the intraerythrocytic form of the parasite as one of the approaches to analyze the transcribed sequences of its genome. The sequences, after editing, generated 389 expressed sequence tag sites and over 105 kb of DNA sequences. About 32% of these clones showed significant homology with other genes in the database. These clones represent 340 new Plasmodium falciparum expressed sequence tags.

  13. Effects of alpha1-adrenergic receptor blockade by doxazosin on renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase and vasopressin-degrading activities in male and female rat thalamus.

    PubMed

    de la Chica-Rodríguez, S; Cortés-Denia, P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2007-11-01

    The thalamus has connections with central autonomic centers involved in cardiovascular control and is enervated by noradrenergic fibers. The excitability of thalamic neurons is due to a reduction of ionic currents mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. The brain renin- angiotensin system (RAS) and the peptide hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) are also involved in the central control of blood pressure, and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. It has been extensively reported that aminopeptidase A (APA), aminopeptidase B (APB), aminopeptidase N (APN), and vasopressin-degrading cystyl aminopeptidase activity (AVP-DA) play an important role in the regulation of the activity of angiotensins and AVP. We have analyzed the effect of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blockade by doxazosin on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase activities and AVP-DA in soluble and membrane-bound fractions of male and female rat thalamus. Our results show that alpha(1)-adrenoceptors blockade by doxazosin does not modify the RAS through its degrading peptidases at thalamic level either in male or female rats. However, alpha(1)-adrenoceptors blockade shows gender differences in AVP-DA, increasing in males but not in females, supporting an increased capacity of males against females to degrade AVP and, therefore, to regulate cardiovascular homeostasis, under this pharmacological manipulation.

  14. Plasma renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in early stage Alzheimer's disease and show gender differences but are not related to apolipoprotein E genotype.

    PubMed

    Puertas, María Del Carmen; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Cobo, Manuela; Lorite, Pedro; Sandalio, Rosa María; Palomeque, Teresa; Torres, María Isabel; Carrera-González, María Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in blood pressure and components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), resulting in changes that can lead or contribute to cognitive decline. Aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP), aminopeptidase A (APA), aminopeptidase N (APN) and aminopeptidase B (APB) catabolise circulating angiotensins, whereas insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) has been described as the AT4 receptor. We have found in AD patients a significant decrease of APA activity in men but not in women, and of APN, APB and IRAP in both genders, when compared with control subjects. No changes were found in ASAP activity. Also, APN, APB and IRAP but not APA correlated with the Mini-Mental test, but no relationship with APOE genotype was found. We conclude that several components of the RAS are modified in AD patients, with gender differences. Furthermore, ROC analysis indicates that APN, APB and IRAP activities could be useful non-invasive biomarkers of AD from the earliest stages.

  15. A cross strain Plasmodium falciparum microarray optimized for the transcriptome analysis of Plasmodium falciparum patient derived isolates.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Rao, Sudha Narayana; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sirohi, Paramendra; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Malarial parasite P. falciparum, an apicomplexan protozoan has a 23.3 MB nuclear genome and encodes ~ 5600 transcripts. The genetic diversity of the parasite within and across geographical zones is a challenge to gene expression studies which are essential for understanding of disease process, outcome and developing markers for diagnostics and prognostics. Here, we describe the strategy involved in designing a custom P. falciparum 15K array using the Agilent platform and Genotypic's Right Design methodology to study the transcriptome of Indian field isolates for which genome sequence information is limited. The array contains probes representing genome sequences of two distinct geographical isolates (i.e. 3D7 and HB3) and sub-telomeric var gene sequences of a third isolate (IT4) known to adhere in culture condition. Probes in the array have been selected based on their efficiency to detect transcripts through a 244K array experimentation. Array performance for the 15K array, was evaluated and validated using RNA materials from P. falciparum clinical isolates. A large percentage (91%) of the represented transcripts was detected from Indian P. falciparum patient isolates. Replicated probes and multiple probes representing the same gene showed perfect correlation between them suggesting good probe performance. Additional transcripts could be detected due to inclusion of unique probes representing HB3 strain transcripts. Variant surface antigen (VSA) transcripts were detected by optimized probes representing the VSA genes of three geographically distinct strains. The 15K cross strain P. falciparum array has shown good efficiency in detecting transcripts from P. falciparum parasite samples isolated from patients. The low parasite loads and presence of host RNA makes arrays a preferred platform for gene expression studies over RNA-Seq. PMID:27489776

  16. Branched Tricarboxylic Acid Metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Kellen L.; Mather, Michael W.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    A central hub of carbon metabolism is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle1, which serves to connect the processes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and other biosynthetic pathways. The protozoan intracellular malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), however, have long been suspected of possessing a significantly streamlined carbon metabolic network in which TCA metabolism plays a minor role2. Blood-stage Plasmodium parasites rely almost entirely on glucose fermentation for energy and consume minimal amounts of oxygen3, yet the parasite genome encodes all of the enzymes necessary for a complete TCA cycle4. By tracing 13C-labeled compounds using mass spectrometry5 we show that TCA metabolism in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum is largely disconnected from glycolysis and is organized along a fundamentally different architecture than the canonical textbook pathway. We find that this pathway is not cyclic but rather a branched structure in which the major carbon sources are the amino acids glutamate and glutamine. As a consequence of this branched architecture, several reactions must run in the reverse of the standard direction thereby generating two-carbon units in the form of acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We further show that glutamine-derived acetyl-CoA is used for histone acetylation while glucose-derived acetyl-CoA is used to acetylate aminosugars. Thus the parasite has evolved two independent acetyl-CoA-production mechanisms with different biological functions. These results significantly clarify our understanding of the Plasmodium metabolic network and highlight the ability of altered variants of central carbon metabolism to arise in response to unique environments. PMID:20686576

  17. Branched tricarboxylic acid metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Kellen L; Mather, Michael W; Morrisey, Joanne M; Garcia, Benjamin A; Vaidya, Akhil B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    A central hub of carbon metabolism is the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which serves to connect the processes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and other biosynthetic pathways. The protozoan intracellular malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), however, have long been suspected of possessing a significantly streamlined carbon metabolic network in which tricarboxylic acid metabolism plays a minor role. Blood-stage Plasmodium parasites rely almost entirely on glucose fermentation for energy and consume minimal amounts of oxygen, yet the parasite genome encodes all of the enzymes necessary for a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here, by tracing (13)C-labelled compounds using mass spectrometry we show that tricarboxylic acid metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is largely disconnected from glycolysis and is organized along a fundamentally different architecture from the canonical textbook pathway. We find that this pathway is not cyclic, but rather is a branched structure in which the major carbon sources are the amino acids glutamate and glutamine. As a consequence of this branched architecture, several reactions must run in the reverse of the standard direction, thereby generating two-carbon units in the form of acetyl-coenzyme A. We further show that glutamine-derived acetyl-coenzyme A is used for histone acetylation, whereas glucose-derived acetyl-coenzyme A is used to acetylate amino sugars. Thus, the parasite has evolved two independent production mechanisms for acetyl-coenzyme A with different biological functions. These results significantly clarify our understanding of the Plasmodium metabolic network and highlight the ability of altered variants of central carbon metabolism to arise in response to unique environments. PMID:20686576

  18. Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Rick M.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2016-01-01

    For more than five decades, Southeast Asia (SEA) has been fertile ground for the emergence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. After generating parasites resistant to chloroquine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, quinine, and mefloquine, this region has now spawned parasites resistant to artemisinins – the world's most potent antimalarial drugs. In areas where artemisinin resistance is prevalent, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) – the first-line treatments for malaria – are failing fast. This worrisome development threatens to make malaria practically untreatable in SEA, and threatens to compromise global endeavors to eliminate this disease. A recent series of clinical, in-vitro, genomics, and transcriptomics studies in SEA have defined in-vivo and in-vitro phenotypes of artemisinin resistance; identified its causal genetic determinant; explored its molecular mechanism; and assessed its clinical impact. Specifically, these studies have established that artemisinin resistance manifests as slow parasite clearance in patients and increased survival of early ring-stage parasites in vitro; is caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parasite's ‘K13’ gene; is associated with an upregulated “unfolded protein response” pathway that may antagonize the pro-oxidant activity of artemisinins; and selects for partner drug resistance that rapidly leads to ACT failures. In SEA, clinical studies are urgently needed to monitor ACT efficacy where K13 mutations are prevalent; test whether new combinations of currently-available drugs cure ACT failures; and advance new antimalarial compounds through preclinical pipelines and into clinical trials. Intensifying these efforts should help to forestall the spread of artemisinin and partner drug resistance from SEA to Sub-Saharan Africa, where the world's malaria transmission, morbidity, and mortality rates are highest. PMID:27337450

  19. Smac-Derived Aza-Peptide As an Aminopeptidase-Resistant XIAP BIR3 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Mohamed A; Tikhonova, Irina G; Martin, Lorraine; Walker, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The peptidic nature of anti-IAPs N-terminus Smac-derived peptides precludes their utilization as potential therapeutic anticancer agents. Recent advances in the development of novel Smacderived peptidomimetics and non-peptidic molecules with improved anti-IAPs activity and resistance to proteolytic cleavage have been reported and led to a number of candidates that are currently in clinical trials including LCL-161, SM-406/AT-406, GDC-0512/GDC-0917, and birinapant. As an attempt to improve the proteolytic stability of Smac peptides, we developed the Aza-peptide AzaAla- Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (2). Unlike unmodified peptide Ala-Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (1), analogue (2) exhibited resistance towards proteolytic cleavage by two aminopeptidases; LAP and DPP-IV, while retaining its IAP inhibitory activity. This was due to the altered planar geometry of the P1 residue side chain. Our findings showed that using aza-isosteres of bioactive peptide sequences imbue the residue with imperviousness to proteolysis; underscoring a potential approach for developing a new generation of Smac-derived Aza-peptidomimetics. PMID:26282728

  20. Recombinant methionine aminopeptidase protein of Babesia microti: immunobiochemical characterization as a vaccine candidate against human babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-09-01

    Human babesiosis is the most important zoonotic protozoan infection in the world. This is the first report of the cloning, expression, purification, and immunobiochemical characterization of a methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) protein from Babesia microti (B. microti). The gene encodes a MetAP1 protein of B. microti (BmMetAP1) of approximately 66.8 kDa that includes glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and shows MetAP activity. BmMetAP1 was detected in a lysate of B. microti and further localized in cytoplasm of the B. microti merozoite. rBmMetAP1 was found to be immunogenic, eliciting a high antibody titer in mice. Moreover, rBmMetAP1 stimulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-12 but not IL-4. Finally, rBmMetAP1 was able to provide considerable protection to mice against a B. microti challenge infection based on a reduction in peak parasitemia levels and earlier clearance of the parasite as compared with control mice. Taken together, these results suggest that rBmMetAP1 confers significant protection against experimental B. microti infection and might be considered a potential vaccine target against human babesiosis. PMID:27306898

  1. A new member of the leucyl aminopeptidase family purified and identified from a marine unicellular algae.

    PubMed

    Sankievicz, D; Colepicolo, P

    1999-08-27

    Leucyl aminopeptidase (LAP; EC 3.4.11.1) activity was purified from crude extracts of the marine unicellular algae Gonyaulax polyedra by a combination of hydrophobic interaction with phenyl sepharose, DEAE-cellulose, and mono-Q HR5/5 ion-exchange chromatography. The undenaturated protein has a molecular mass of about 110 kD and based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the enzyme appears to be composed of two possibly identical subunits of 55 kD. The identity of the protein was confirmed by a cross-reaction of the purified protein with an antibody raised against a commercial LAP. Biochemical characterization showed that the Gonyaulax enzyme was similar to most of the previously described LAPs. Gonyaulax LAP is a metallo-enzyme since EDTA and 1,10-phenathroline significantly inhibited activity. Addition of the metal ions Zn(2+), Cu(2+) inhibited 80% of LAP activity, suggesting they are not the natural cofactors of the enzyme. Other metals, such as Ca(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+), or Mg(2+) (concentrations up to 4 mM), caused no alteration in the total activity of Gonyaulax LAP.

  2. Involvement of Phenylalanine 297 in the Construction of the Substrate Pocket of Human Aminopeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Jobu; Ogawa, Yuko; Goto, Yoshikuni; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    Aminopeptidase B (APB, EC 3.4.11.6) preferentially hydrolyzes the N-terminal basic amino acids of synthetic and peptide substrates and requires a physiological concentration of NaCl for optimal activity. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling to search for an amino acid residue that is critical for the enzymatic properties of human APB. Substitution of Phe297 with Tyr caused a significant decrease in hydrolytic activity toward synthetic and peptide substrates as well as chloride anion sensitivity. Molecular modeling suggests that Phe297 contributes to the construction of the substrate pocket of APB, which is wide enough to hold a chloride anion and allow the interaction of Gln169 with the N-terminal Arg residue of the substrate through bridging with the chloride anion. These results indicate that Phe297 is crucial for the optimal enzymatic activity and chloride anion sensitivity of APB via formation of the optimal structure of the catalytic pocket.

  3. Structure of the dodecamer of the aminopeptidase APDkam598 from the archaeon Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T E; Slutskaya, E S; Boyko, K M; Sokolova, O S; Rakitina, T V; Korzhenevskiy, D A; Gorbacheva, M A; Bezsudnova, E Y; Popov, V O

    2015-03-01

    The crystal structure of the aminopeptidase APDkam589 from the thermophilic crenarchaeon Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis was determined at a resolution of 3.0 Å. In the crystal, the monomer of APDkam589 and its symmetry-related monomers are densely packed to form a 12-subunit complex. Single-particle electron-microscopy analysis confirms that APDkam589 is present as a compact dodecamer in solution. The APDkam589 molecule is built similarly to the molecules of the PhTET peptidases, which have the highest sequence identity to APDkam589 among known structures and were isolated from the more thermostable archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii. A comparison of the interactions of the subunits in APDkam589 with those in PhTET1, PhTET2 and PhTET3 reveals that APDkam589 has a much lower total number of salt bridges, which correlates with the lower thermostability of APDkam589. The monomer of APDkam589 has six Trp residues, five of which are on the external surface of the dodecamer. A superposition of the structure of APDkam589 with those having a high sequence similarity to APDkam589 reveals that, although the positions of Trp45, Trp252 and Trp358 are not conserved in the sequences, the spatial locations of the Trp residues in these models are similar.

  4. Histochemical demonstration of tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I in the rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2015-03-01

    Tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I (TPP I) is a lysosomal exopeptidase that is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and internal organs in many mammalian species. The enzyme is involved in the breakdown of collagen and different peptides. The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral arterial chemoreceptor playing an important role in the control of breathing and the autonomic control of cardiovascular function. In response to hypoxia its neuron-like glomus cells release a variety of peptide transmitters that trigger an action potential through the afferent fibers, thus conveying the chemosensory information to the CNS. In the present study we investigated the histochemical localization of TPP I in the CB of rats. Enzyme histochemistry showed high activity of TPP I in CB glomeruli. In particular, the glomus cells contained many TPP I-positive granules, while the glial-like sustentacular cells displayed a slightly fainter reaction. The interglomerular connective tissue was also weakly stained. The results show that both the parenchymal cells of the rat CB express, albeit with different intensity, TPP I. Taken together with our previous enzyme histochemical investigations on the rat CB, it seems likely that the glomus cells possess enzymatic equipment necessary for the neuropeptide intracellular and collagen extracellular initial degradation. These findings also suggest that TPP I is involved in the general turnover of chemotransmitters between glomus cells and sensory nerve endings which emphasizes its importance for chemoreception under hypoxic conditions.

  5. Smac-Derived Aza-Peptide As an Aminopeptidase-Resistant XIAP BIR3 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Mohamed A; Tikhonova, Irina G; Martin, Lorraine; Walker, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The peptidic nature of anti-IAPs N-terminus Smac-derived peptides precludes their utilization as potential therapeutic anticancer agents. Recent advances in the development of novel Smacderived peptidomimetics and non-peptidic molecules with improved anti-IAPs activity and resistance to proteolytic cleavage have been reported and led to a number of candidates that are currently in clinical trials including LCL-161, SM-406/AT-406, GDC-0512/GDC-0917, and birinapant. As an attempt to improve the proteolytic stability of Smac peptides, we developed the Aza-peptide AzaAla- Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (2). Unlike unmodified peptide Ala-Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (1), analogue (2) exhibited resistance towards proteolytic cleavage by two aminopeptidases; LAP and DPP-IV, while retaining its IAP inhibitory activity. This was due to the altered planar geometry of the P1 residue side chain. Our findings showed that using aza-isosteres of bioactive peptide sequences imbue the residue with imperviousness to proteolysis; underscoring a potential approach for developing a new generation of Smac-derived Aza-peptidomimetics.

  6. Novel adipocyte aminopeptidases are selectively upregulated by insulin in healthy and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Alves, Patricia Lucio; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2016-02-01

    The lack of a complete assembly of the sensitivity of subcellular aminopeptidase (AP) activities to insulin in different pathophysiological conditions has hampered the complete view of the adipocyte metabolic pathways and its implications in these conditions. Here we investigated the influence of insulin on basic AP (APB), neutral puromycin-sensitive AP (PSA), and neutral puromycin-insensitive AP (APM) in high and low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from adipocytes of healthy and obese rats. Catalytic activities of these enzymes were fluorometrically monitoring in these fractions with or without insulin stimulus. Canonical traffic such as insulin-regulated AP was not detected for these novel adipocyte APs in healthy and obese rats. However, insulin increased APM in low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from healthy rats, APB in high density microsomal fraction from obese rats and PSA in plasma membrane fraction from healthy rats. A new concept of intracellular compartment-dependent upregulation of AP enzyme activities by insulin emerges from these data. This relatively selective regulation has pathophysiological significance, since these enzymes are well known to act as catalysts and receptor of peptides directly related to energy metabolism. Overall, the regulation of each one of these enzyme activities reflects certain dysfunction in obese individuals.

  7. TLR-mediated secretion of endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages play an important role in host defense under several immunological, inflammatory, and/or infectious conditions. In our previous work, we demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) was secreted from macrophages in response to LPS and IFN-γ, and it enhanced their phagocytic activity. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of LPS/IFN-γ-induced ERAP1 secretion. LPS/IFN-γ-induced secretion of the enzyme from the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was suppressed by polymyxin B. Several agonists of TLRs, such as Pam3CSK4, FSL-1, and ODN1826, induced its secretion. In contrast, neutralizing Abs to IFN-β and TNF-α receptor type 1 suppressed its secretion. Using murine peritoneal macrophages derived from TNF-α and type 1 IFNR knockout mice, we confirmed the involvement of these two cytokines in ERAP1 secretion. In addition, secretion of ERAP1 from both RAW264.7 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages was induced by A23187 and thapsigargin and inhibited by BAPTA-AM and the calmodulin inhibitor W7. These results suggest that LPS/IFN-γ-induced secretion of ERAP1 is mediated by TLRs via induction of intermediate cytokines such as IFN-β and TNF-α, which in turn lead to enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin activation.

  8. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in adipocyte is Cys-specific and affected by obesity.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Viana, Luciana Godoy; Yamanouye, Norma; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-08-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP, EC 3.4.11.3) in adipocytes is well known to traffic between high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal fractions toward the plasma membrane (MF) under stimulation by insulin. However, its catalytic preference for aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Leu or Cys is controversial. Furthermore, possible changes in its traffic under metabolic challenges are unknown. The present study investigated the catalytic activity attributable to EC 3.4.11.3 in HDM, LDM and MF from isolated adipocytes of healthy (C), food deprived (FD) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats on aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Cys or Leu, in absence or presence of insulin. Efficacy and reproducibility of subcellular adipocyte fractionation procedure were demonstrated. Comparison among HDM vs LDM vs MF intragroup revealed that hydrolytic activity trafficking from LDM to MF under influence of insulin in C, MSG and FD is only on N-terminal Cys. In MSG the same pattern of anterograde traffic and aminoacyl preference occurred independently of insulin stimulation. The pathophysiological significance of IRAP in adipocytes seems to be linked to comprehensive energy metabolism related roles of endogenous substrates with N-terminal cysteine pair such as vasopressin and oxytocin.

  9. Effects of polymorphic variation on the mechanism of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Stamogiannos, Athanasios; Koumantou, Despoina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) generates antigenic peptides for loading onto Major Histocompatibility Class I molecules (MHCI) and can regulate adaptive immune responses. During the last few years, many genetic studies have revealed strong associations between coding Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in ERAP1 and common human diseases ranging from viral infections to cancer and autoimmunity. Functional studies have established that these SNPs affect enzyme activity resulting to changes in antigenic peptide processing, presentation by MHCI and cellular cytotoxic responses. These disease-associated polymorphisms are, however, located away from the enzyme's active site and are interspersed to different structural domains. As a result, the mechanism by which these SNPs can affect function remains largely elusive. ERAP1 utilizes a complex catalytic mechanism that involves a large conformational change between inactive and active forms and has the unique property to trim larger peptides more efficiently than smaller ones. We analyzed two of the most consistently discovered disease-associated polymorphisms, namely K528R and Q730E, for their effect on the ability of the enzyme to select substrates based on length and to undergo conformational changes. By utilizing enzymatic and computational analysis we propose that disease-associated SNPs can affect ERAP1 function by influencing: (i) substrate length selection and (ii) the conformational distribution of the protein ensemble. Our results provide novel insight on the mechanisms by which polymorphic variation distal from the active site of ERAP1 can translate to changes in function and contribute to immune system variability in humans.

  10. Aminopeptidase activity in rat brain synaptosomes - 2-mercaptoethanol stimulation and Arg-vasopressin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.H.; Orawski, A.T.

    1986-03-05

    Rat brain synaptic plasma membranes contain an amastatin-inhibited aminopeptidase activity which degrades Arg-vaso-pressin (AVP). The pH optimum for AVP cleavage was found to be 6.8, similar to that reported for oxytocin. The ability of other peptides and arylamides such as oxytocin, Tyr-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/ and Arg-Arg-..beta..NA to inhibit cleavage of (/sup 3/H-Tyr/sup 2/)-AVP suggests that the enzyme may not be specific for AVP. The AVP-cleaving activity has been solubilized and partially characterized. Synaptosomes were lysed with hypotonic buffer, washed, and extracted with 1% Nonidet P-40 detergent. The solubilized protein was chromatographed by gel filtration HPLC on Superose 6. A single peak of activity was found with a M.W. = 117,000 which could hydrolyze 1mM Ala-..beta..NA, Arg-..beta..NA, Arg-Arg-..beta..NA, Phe-Met and Phe-Arg as well as slowly cleave AVP with the ultimate release of /sup 3/H-Tyr. 2-Mercaptoethanol (3.9mM) (ME) stimulated activity 3.6 to 6.6-fold for arylamide and dipeptide substrates, but 35-fold for labelled AVP, possibly owing to reduction of the AVP disulfide bond. All activities in the presence of ME were completely inhibited by 0.2mM amastatin.

  11. Radiation inactivation probe of membrane-bound enzymes: gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, aminopeptidase N, and sucrase

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.R.; Kempner, E.S.; Wright, E.M.

    1986-11-01

    gamma-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), aminopeptidase N (AP-N), and sucrase in purified rabbit intestinal brush border membrane vesicles were irradiated in situ at -135 degrees C using high energy electrons. Surviving activities of the enzymes were measured as a function of radiation dose, and the functional unit target sizes (corresponding to carbohydrate-free polypeptides) were determined using target analysis. The in situ functional unit sizes were GGT 59 kDa, AP-N 59 kDa, and sucrase 63 kDa. Together with biochemical data determined previously, it is concluded that the noncovalently attached large (approximately 40 kDa) and small (approximately 25 kDa) subunits of GGT are both required for catalytic activity. Furthermore, these data suggest that (i) the membrane-bound form of AP-N consists of one or more noncovalently attached subunits of 59 kDa, each of which is enzymatically active; and (ii) in situ sucrase activity is associated with a subunit of 63 kDa which is noncovalently attached within the sucrase-isomaltase complex.

  12. Complexes of mutants of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase P and the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Stephen C.; Guss, J. Mitchell

    2008-09-17

    Aminopeptidase P (APPro) is a manganese-containing enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of the N-terminal residue of a polypeptide if the second residue is proline. Structures of APPro mutants with reduced or negligible activity have been determined in complex with the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu. In the complex of Glu383Ala APPro with ValProLeu one of the two metal sites is only partly occupied, indicating an essential role for Glu383 in metal binding in the presence of substrate. His361Ala APPro clearly possesses residual activity as the ValProLeu substrate has been cleaved in the crystals; difference electron density consistent with bound ProLeu dipeptide and a disordered Val amino acid is present at the active site. Contrary to previous suggestions, the His243Ala mutant is capable of binding substrate. The structure of the His243Ala APPro complex with ValProLeu shows that the peptide interacts with one of the active-site metal atoms via its terminal amino group. The implications of these complexes for the roles of the respective residues in APPro catalysis are discussed.

  13. Fungal Mimicry of a Mammalian Aminopeptidase Disables Innate Immunity and Promotes Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sterkel, Alana K; Lorenzini, Jenna L; Fites, J Scott; Subramanian Vignesh, Kavitha; Sullivan, Thomas D; Wuthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan; Hernandez-Santos, Nydiaris; Deepe, George S; Klein, Bruce S

    2016-03-01

    Systemic fungal infections trigger marked immune-regulatory disturbances, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We report that the pathogenic yeast of Blastomyces dermatitidis elaborates dipeptidyl-peptidase IVA (DppIVA), a close mimic of the mammalian ectopeptidase CD26, which modulates critical aspects of hematopoiesis. We show that, like the mammalian enzyme, fungal DppIVA cleaved C-C chemokines and GM-CSF. Yeast producing DppIVA crippled the recruitment and differentiation of monocytes and prevented phagocyte activation and ROS production. Silencing fungal DppIVA gene expression curtailed virulence and restored recruitment of CCR2(+) monocytes, generation of TipDC, and phagocyte killing of yeast. Pharmacological blockade of DppIVA restored leukocyte effector functions and stemmed infection, while addition of recombinant DppIVA to gene-silenced yeast enabled them to evade leukocyte defense. Thus, fungal DppIVA mediates immune-regulatory disturbances that underlie invasive fungal disease. These findings reveal a form of molecular piracy by a broadly conserved aminopeptidase during disease pathogenesis. PMID:26922990

  14. Structure of a microsporidian methionine aminopeptidase type 2 complexed with fumagillin and TNP-470

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, J.; Nemkal, A; Sauder, J; Russell, M; Akiyoshi, D; Shi, W; Almo, S; Weiss, L

    2009-01-01

    Microsporidia are protists that have been reported to cause infections in both vertebrates and invertebrates. They have emerged as human pathogens particularly in patients that are immunosuppressed and cases of gastrointestinal infection, encephalitis, keratitis, sinusitis, myositis and disseminated infection are well described in the literature. While benzimidazoles are active against many species of microsporidia, these drugs do not have significant activity against Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Fumagillin and its analogues have been demonstrated to have activity in vitro and in animal models of microsporidiosis and human infections due to E. bieneusi. Fumagillin and its analogues inhibit methionine aminopeptidase type 2. Encephalitozoon cuniculi MetAP2 (EcMetAP2) was cloned and expressed as an active enzyme using a baculovirus system. The crystal structure of EcMetAP2 was determined with and without the bound inhibitors fumagillin and TNP-470. This structure classifies EcMetAP2 as a member of the MetAP2c family. The EcMetAP2 structure was used to generate a homology model of the E. bieneusi MetAP2. Comparison of microsporidian MetAP2 structures with human MetAP2 provides insights into the design of inhibitors that might exhibit specificity for microsporidian MetAP2.

  15. Biochemical Properties and Potential Applications of Recombinant Leucine Aminopeptidase from Bacillus kaustophilus CCRC 11223

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanfei; Wang, Fanghua; Lan, Dongming; Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of various factors on the activity and conformation of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase of Bacillus kaustophilus CCRC 11223 (BkLAP) and potential utilization of BkLAP in the hydrolysis of anchovy protein. Optimal temperature and pH of BkLAP were 70 °C and 8.0 in potassium-phosphate buffer, respectively, and the activity was strongly stimulated by Ni2+, followed by Mn2+ and Co2+. Conformational studies via circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that various factors could influence the secondary structure of BkLAP to different extents and further induce the changes in enzymatic activity. The secondary structure of BkLAP was slightly modified by Ni2+ at the concentration of 1×10−4 M, however, significant changes on the secondary structures of the enzyme were observed when Hg2+ was added to the concentration of 1×10−4 M. The potential application of BkLAP was evaluated through combination with the commercial or endogenous enzyme to hydrolysis the anchovy protein. Results showed that combining the BkLAP with other enzymes could significantly increase the degree of hydrolysis and amino acid component of hydrolysate. In this regard, BkLAP is a potential enzyme that can be used in the protein hydrolysate industry. PMID:22174620

  16. Localization, Shedding, Regulation and Function of Aminopeptidase N/CD13 on Fibroblast like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rachel L.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Endres, Judith; Amin, M. Asif; Lepore, Nick J.; Du, Yuxuan; Urquhart, Andrew; Chung, Kevin C.; Fox, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is highly expressed by fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) and may play a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CD13 was previously detected in human synovial fluid where it was significantly increased in RA compared to osteoarthritis. In this study we found that CD13 in biological fluids (plasma, synovial fluid, FLS culture supernatant) is present as both a soluble molecule and on extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, as assessed by differential ultracentrifugation and density gradient separation. Having determined CD13 could be released as a soluble molecule from FLS, we examined potential mechanisms by which CD13 might be shed from the FLS membrane. The use of protease inhibitors revealed that CD13 is cleaved from the FLS surface by metalloproteinases. siRNA treatment of FLS revealed one of those proteases to be MMP14. We determined that pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-17) upregulated CD13 mRNA in FLS, which may contribute to the increased CD13 in RA synovium and synovial fluid. Inhibition of CD13 function by either inhibitors of enzymatic activity or anti-CD13 antibodies resulted in decreased growth and diminished migration of FLS. This suggests that CD13 may be involved in the pathogenic hyperplasia of RA FLS. This data expands potential roles for CD13 in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:27658265

  17. Paracrine regulation of fibroblast aminopeptidase N/CD13 expression by keratinocyte-releasable stratifin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Amy; Ghaffari, Abdi; Li, Yunyuan; Ghahary, Aziz

    2011-12-01

    As wound healing proceeds into the tissue remodeling phase, cellular interactions become dominated by the interplay of keratinocytes with fibroblasts in the skin, which is largely mediated through paracrine signaling and greatly affects the molecular constitution of the extracellular matrix. We have recently identified aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 as a potential fibroblast receptor for 14-3-3 sigma (also known as stratifin), a keratinocyte-releasable protein with potent matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) stimulatory activity. The present study demonstrates that the expression of APN on dermal fibroblasts is regulated through paracrine signaling by keratinocyte-derived soluble factors. By using an in vitro keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture system, we showed that APN expression in dermal fibroblasts is induced in the presence of keratinocytes or in response to keratinocyte-conditioned medium. Conditioned medium collected from differentiated keratinocytes further increases APN protein production, suggesting an amplified stimulatory effect by keratinocyte differentiation. Recombinant stratifin potently induces APN synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. A consistent correlation between the protein expression levels of APN and MMP1 was also observed. These results confirm paracrine regulation of APN expression in dermal fibroblasts by keratinocyte-derived stimuli, in particular stratifin, and provide evidence that APN may serve as a target in the regulation of MMP1 expression in epidermal-mesenchymal communication. PMID:21302309

  18. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae aminopeptidase 1, the major cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Nobuo N.; Fujioka, Yuko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The vacuole hydrolase aminopeptidase 1 (Ape1) is a cargo protein transported to the vacuole by the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ape1 is processed into mature Ape1 (mApe1). mApe1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 120.6, b = 219.5, c = 133.1 Å, β = 116.5°. Form II belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 141.2, c = 349.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 2.5 Å for form I and 1.83 Å for form II. Self-rotation functions and the volume-to-weight ratio values suggest that forms I and II contain 12 and four mApe1 molecules per asymmetric unit, respectively, and that mApe1 exists as a tetrahedral dodecamer in both crystal forms. PMID:17329814

  19. Purification and characterisation of a tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I from rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Vines, D; Warburton, M J

    1998-05-19

    A tripeptidyl aminopeptidase I with an M(r) of 47,000 Da has been purified from rat spleen. The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme and internal sequences did not resemble that of any known protein. The enzyme cleaves tripeptides from synthetic substrates provided that the N-terminus is unsubstituted and the amino acid in the P1 position is not charged. The enzyme also cleaves small peptides (angiotensin II and glucagon) releasing tripeptides but does not appear to demonstrate any preference for amino acids on either side of the cleavage site. The enzyme had maximum activity at pH 4 but was unstable above pH 7. Rat spleen tripeptidyl peptidase I was not inhibited by classical inhibitors of serine, cysteine, aspartate or metalloproteinases. The peptidase was potently inhibited by a series of substrate-based tripeptidyl chloromethyl ketones (Ki's of 10(-6)-10(-8) M). Inhibition was rapid and reversible. This mode of inhibition is different to the interaction between chloromethyl ketones and cysteine or serine peptidases. These tripeptidyl chloromethyl ketones were also inhibitors of bone resorption using an in vitro assay suggesting that a tripeptidyl peptidase is involved in the degradation of bone matrix proteins.

  20. Immunomodulatory activity of a methionine aminopeptidase-2 inhibitor on B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Priest, R C; Spaull, J; Buckton, J; Grimley, R L; Sims, M; Binks, M; Malhotra, R

    2009-03-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase-2 (MetAP-2) inhibitors have potent anti-angiogenesis activity and are being developed for the treatment of solid tumours. The recently observed specific expression of MetAP-2 in germinal centre B cells suggests that it has a role in regulating B cell function. We have demonstrated a potent MetAP-2-dependent inhibitory effect on the antibody secretion from B cell receptor and CD40 co-stimulated primary human B cells in the presence of interleukin-21. The effect of MetAP-2 inhibition on antibody secretion was due to a block in differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of germinal centres from human, mouse and marmoset spleen showed a similar expression pattern of MetAP-2 in the marmoset and man, whereas mouse spleen showed no detectable expression. In a marmoset, T dependent immunization model, the MetAP-2 inhibitor suppressed an antigen-specific antibody response. Furthermore, histological analysis showed loss of B cells in the spleen and disrupted germinal centre formation. These results provide experimental evidence to support a novel role for MetAP-2 in immunomodulation. These effects of MetAP-2 are mediated by disruption of the germinal centre reaction and a block in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells.

  1. The rat dermorphin-like immunoreactivity is supported by an aminopeptidase resistant peptide.

    PubMed

    Cucumel, K; Bagnol, D; Moinier, D; Fischer, J; Conrath, M; Cupo, A

    1998-01-01

    Site-directed antibodies against synthetic related dermorphin peptides were previously produced and characterized. One of them, which specifically recognizes the crucial 'opioid message' (the N-terminal part of the dermorphin molecule (i.e. Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Gly) was selected in order to detect and locate endogenous dermorphin-like molecules in rat, mouse and guinea pig tissues. Dermorphin-like peptides were found to be present in tissues known to contain peptides such as neurons in the central nervous system, nerve fibers in the gut and B and T immune cells. With all the tissues assayed, the HPLC profile obtained on the immunoreactive material showed the same main peak eluted at a retention time of 32 +/- 1 min. The results of biochemical experiments in which enzymatic treatments were performed on the dermorphin-like immunoreactivity indicate the immunoreactivity is a peptide resistant to aminopeptidase hydrolysis. This finding suggests the presence of a residue conferring resistance to proteolytic processes of this kind, which is likely to be a D-amino acid residue.

  2. Puromycin insensitive leucyl-specific aminopeptidase (PILSAP) affects RhoA activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Abe, Mayumi; Miyashita, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Sato, Yasufumi

    2007-06-01

    Puromycin insensitive leucyl-specific aminopeptidase (PILSAP) expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) plays an important role in angiogenesis due to its involvement in migration, proliferation and network formation. Here we examined the biological function of PILSAP with respect to EC morphogenesis and the related intracellular signaling for this process. When mouse endothelial MSS31 cells were cultured, a dominant negative PILSAP mutant converted cell shape to disk-like morphology, blocked stress fiber formation, and augmented membrane ruffling in random directions. These phenotypic changes led us to test whether PILSAP affected activities of Rho family small G-proteins. Abrogation of PILSAP enzymatic activity or its expression attenuated RhoA but not Rac1 activation during cell adhesion. This attenuation of RhoA activation was also evident when G-protein coupled receptors such as proteinase-activated receptor or lysophosphatidic acid receptor were activated in ECs. These results indicate that PILSAP affects RhoA activation and that influences the proper function of ECs.

  3. Molecular characterization and dietary regulation of aminopeptidase N (APN) in the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianzhou; Qu, Fufa; Tang, Xiangbei; Zhao, Qiong; Wang, Yonghong; Zhou, Yi; Feng, Junchang; Lu, Shuangqing; Hou, Dexing; Liu, Zhen

    2016-05-10

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is a member of the peptidase M1 family and plays an important role in protein digestion. In the present study, an APN gene was cloned from the intestine of Ctenopharyngodon idellus. The full-length cDNA sequence of APN encodes an 892-amino-acid peptide that includes one helix trans-membrane region. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the APN sequence clustered with Danio rerio as its closest neighbor, sharing a sequence similarity of 81.5%. APN mRNA was differentially expressed in different tissues, with a gradient expression from high to low in the tissues of the fore-intestine, hind-intestine, liver, mid-intestine, kidney, muscle, spleen and heart. APN expression in grass carp had a circadian pattern, showing time-dependent higher expression between 06:00 and 18:00 and lower expression between 18:00 and 06:00. In addition, the protein levels and resource in the diet-regulated APN expression suggested that low crude protein (CP) level and fish meal stimulated APN gene expression. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of APN in the intestine was significantly suppressed by high concentrations of glutamine and glutamine dipeptides, respectively. This study may provide valuable knowledge on the regulation of APN expression in teleost, which has potential applications for improving fish dietary formulations.

  4. Identification of the FTBL protein of Sumner and Dounce as a leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Dounce, A L; Allen, P Z

    1987-08-15

    The crystalline beef liver protein of Sumner and Dounce (A. L. Dounce, P. Z. Allen, and G. A. Mourtzikos (1978) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 188, 251-265) termed FTBL (football) protein because of the shape of its crystals, has been identified as a crystalline leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), on the basis of its high specific LAP activity and coincidence of its N terminal amino acid sequence (30 amino acids) with that of beef eye lens LAP. Amino acid analyses of the two proteins are also in reasonable agreement when based on the exact monomer molecular weight of beef eye lens protein obtained by the van Loon group ((1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 7077-7081). Our previously published monomer molecular weight of the FTBL protein was 25% too high, leading to the erroneous conclusion that the beef liver FTBL-LAP protein was a tetramer rather than a hexamer, as found by the van Loon group for beef lens LAP. The present report, taken together with our first paper on the FTBL protein establishes that the FTBL-LAP protein has been isolated from beef kidney and beef spleen as well as from beef liver. We now find that the properties of FTBL-LAP protein indicate that it is the same protein as beef eye lens LAP. The cellular and intracellular distributions of the FTBL-LAP protein have been considered in our first publication on the FTBL protein.

  5. Structure of a microsporidian methionine aminopeptidase type 2 complexed with fumagillin and TNP-470.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, John Jeff; Nemkal, Anjana; Sauder, J Michael; Russell, Marijane; Akiyoshi, Donna E; Shi, Wuxian; Almo, Steven C; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-12-01

    Microsporidia are protists that have been reported to cause infections in both vertebrates and invertebrates. They have emerged as human pathogens particularly in patients that are immunosuppressed and cases of gastrointestinal infection, encephalitis, keratitis, sinusitis, myositis and disseminated infection are well described in the literature. While benzimidazoles are active against many species of microsporidia, these drugs do not have significant activity against Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Fumagillin and its analogues have been demonstrated to have activity invitro and in animal models of microsporidiosis and human infections due to E. bieneusi. Fumagillin and its analogues inhibit methionine aminopeptidase type 2. Encephalitozoon cuniculi MetAP2 (EcMetAP2) was cloned and expressed as an active enzyme using a baculovirus system. The crystal structure of EcMetAP2 was determined with and without the bound inhibitors fumagillin and TNP-470. This structure classifies EcMetAP2 as a member of the MetAP2c family. The EcMetAP2 structure was used to generate a homology model of the E. bieneusi MetAP2. Comparison of microsporidian MetAP2 structures with human MetAP2 provides insights into the design of inhibitors that might exhibit specificity for microsporidian MetAP2.

  6. Removal of N-terminal methionine from recombinant proteins by engineered E. coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Liao, You-Di; Jeng, Jen-Chong; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Wang, Sui-Chi; Chang, Shu-Ting

    2004-01-01

    The removal of N-terminal translation initiator Met by methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is often crucial for the function and stability of proteins. On the basis of crystal structure and sequence alignment of MetAPs, we have engineered Escherichia coli MetAP by the mutation of three residues, Y168G, M206T, Q233G, in the substrate-binding pocket. Our engineered MetAPs are able to remove the Met from bulky or acidic penultimate residues, such as Met, His, Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Leu, Ile, Tyr, and Trp, as well as from small residues. The penultimate residue, the second residue after Met, was further removed if the antepenultimate residue, the third residue after Met, was small. By the coexpression of engineered MetAP in E. coli through the same or a separate vector, we have successfully produced recombinant proteins possessing an innate N terminus, such as onconase, an antitumor ribonuclease from the frog Rana pipiens. The N-terminal pyroglutamate of recombinant onconase is critical for its structural integrity, catalytic activity, and cyto-toxicity. On the basis of N-terminal sequence information in the protein database, 85%–90% of recombinant proteins should be produced in authentic form by our engineered MetAPs. PMID:15215523

  7. Chronic ethanol intake modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Carrera, M P; Cobo, M; Camacho, B; Martínez Martos, J M

    2005-04-01

    In developing cerebellum, where critical periods of vulnerability have been established for several basic substances, it has been extensively studied the wide array of abnormalities induced by exposure to ethanol (EtOH). However, little is known about the effects of EtOH consumption on cerebellar functions in adult individuals. Several studies show participation in cognitive activities to be concentrated in the lateral cerebellum (hemispheres), whereas basic motor functions such as balance and coordination are represented in the medial parts of the cerebellum (vermis and paravermis). In addition to the circulating renin angiotensin system (RAS), a local system has been postulated in brain. The effector peptides of the RAS are formed via the activity of several aminopeptidases (AP). The present work analyses the effect of chronic EtOH intake on the RAS-regulating AP activities in the soluble and membrane-bound fractions of two cerebellar locations: the hemispheres and the vermis. We hypothesize that cerebellar RAS is involved in basic motor functions rather than in cognitive activities.

  8. Tumor suppression by a rationally designed reversible inhibitor of methionine aminopeptidase-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieyi; Sheppard, George S; Lou, Pingping; Kawai, Megumi; BaMaung, Nwe; Erickson, Scott A; Tucker-Garcia, Lora; Park, Chang; Bouska, Jennifer; Wang, Yi-Chun; Frost, David; Tapang, Paul; Albert, Daniel H; Morgan, Sherry J; Morowitz, Michael; Shusterman, Suzanne; Maris, John M; Lesniewski, Rick; Henkin, Jack

    2003-11-15

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP)-2 has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy because the anticancer agent TNP-470 irreversibly inactivates the catalytic activity of this enzyme. However, the importance of MetAP2 in cell growth and tumor progression was uncertain because previous data were based on the chemically reactive TNP-470. Here we show that a rationally designed reversible MetAP2 inhibitor, A-357300, suppresses tumor growth preclinically without the toxicities observed with TNP-470. We have synthesized this bestatin-type MetAP2 inhibitor with the aid of crystal structures of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes and parallel synthesis. A-357300 induces cytostasis by cell cycle arrest at the G(1) phase selectively in endothelial cells and in a subset of tumor cells, but not in most primary cells of nonendothelial type. A-357300 inhibits angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo and shows potent antitumor efficacy in carcinoma, sarcoma, and neuroblastoma murine models. These data affirm that MetAP2 plays a pivotal role in cell growth and establish that reversible MetAP2 inhibitors are promising novel cancer therapeutic agents.

  9. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasunori; Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Kuninori; Matoba, Kazuaki; Kirisako, Hiromi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Noda, Nobuo N

    2016-06-28

    Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1), and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity. PMID:27320913

  10. Novel adipocyte aminopeptidases are selectively upregulated by insulin in healthy and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Alves, Patricia Lucio; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2016-02-01

    The lack of a complete assembly of the sensitivity of subcellular aminopeptidase (AP) activities to insulin in different pathophysiological conditions has hampered the complete view of the adipocyte metabolic pathways and its implications in these conditions. Here we investigated the influence of insulin on basic AP (APB), neutral puromycin-sensitive AP (PSA), and neutral puromycin-insensitive AP (APM) in high and low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from adipocytes of healthy and obese rats. Catalytic activities of these enzymes were fluorometrically monitoring in these fractions with or without insulin stimulus. Canonical traffic such as insulin-regulated AP was not detected for these novel adipocyte APs in healthy and obese rats. However, insulin increased APM in low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from healthy rats, APB in high density microsomal fraction from obese rats and PSA in plasma membrane fraction from healthy rats. A new concept of intracellular compartment-dependent upregulation of AP enzyme activities by insulin emerges from these data. This relatively selective regulation has pathophysiological significance, since these enzymes are well known to act as catalysts and receptor of peptides directly related to energy metabolism. Overall, the regulation of each one of these enzyme activities reflects certain dysfunction in obese individuals. PMID:26577934

  11. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor-Cardoso, Mónica I.; Frausto-Del-Río, Dulce A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs). In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages. PMID:24063007

  12. Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weimin; Li, Yingying; Learn, Gerald H; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Robertson, Joel D; Keele, Brandon F; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N; Sanz, Crickette M; Morgan, David B; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K; Kranzusch, Philip J; Walsh, Peter D; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Georgiev, Alexander V; Muller, Martin N; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Sharp, Paul M; Rayner, Julian C; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most prevalent and lethal of the malaria parasites infecting humans, yet the origin and evolutionary history of this important pathogen remain controversial. Here we develop a single-genome amplification strategy to identify and characterize Plasmodium spp. DNA sequences in faecal samples from wild-living apes. Among nearly 3,000 specimens collected from field sites throughout central Africa, we found Plasmodium infection in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), but not in eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei) or bonobos (Pan paniscus). Ape plasmodial infections were highly prevalent, widely distributed and almost always made up of mixed parasite species. Analysis of more than 1,100 mitochondrial, apicoplast and nuclear gene sequences from chimpanzees and gorillas revealed that 99% grouped within one of six host-specific lineages representing distinct Plasmodium species within the subgenus Laverania. One of these from western gorillas comprised parasites that were nearly identical to P. falciparum. In phylogenetic analyses of full-length mitochondrial sequences, human P. falciparum formed a monophyletic lineage within the gorilla parasite radiation. These findings indicate that P. falciparum is of gorilla origin and not of chimpanzee, bonobo or ancient human origin.

  13. Blood coagulation in falciparum malaria--a review.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2008-03-01

    Falciparum malaria infection influences blood coagulation by various interacting pathobiological mechanisms, the most important being the overwhelming response of the host to sepsis resulting in a cytokine storm. In addition, the parasite infects the red cells leading to changes in the red cell phospholipid composition which supports blood coagulation. Red cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum also adhere to deeper tissue capillary endothelium leading to profound damage to endothelial cells leading to further activation. This results in widespread consumption of platelets and activation of blood coagulation which at times culminates in a clinically and pathologically detectable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Monocyte-macrophage system also gets activated in this infection compounding the hypercoagulable state. Heavy parasitaemia leading to occlusion of hepatic microcirculation leads to abnormalities in synthesis and secretion of coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Drugs used in the treatment for falciparum malaria can cause thrombocytopaenia, bone marrow suppression and haemolytic anaemia, all of which can interfere indirectly with blood coagulation. Microparticle formation from platelets, red cells and macrophages also causes widespread activation of blood coagulation, and this recently observed mechanism is the focus of intense research in many other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions where there is activation of blood coagulation system. Thus, in severe falciparum malaria, there is activation of blood coagulation system along with thrombocytopaenia, even before widespread DIC and coagulation failure occur.

  14. Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weimin; Li, Yingying; Learn, Gerald H.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Robertson, Joel D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Morgan, David B.; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Walsh, Peter D.; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Muller, Martin N.; Shaw, George M.; Peeters, Martine; Sharp, Paul M.; Rayner, Julian C.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most prevalent and lethal of the malaria parasites infecting humans, yet the origin and evolutionary history of this important pathogen remain controversial. Here, we developed a novel polymerase chain reaction based single genome amplification strategy to identify and characterize Plasmodium spp. DNA sequences in fecal samples of wild-living apes. Among nearly 3,000 specimens collected from field sites throughout central Africa, we found Plasmodium infection in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), but not in eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei) or bonobos (Pan paniscus). Ape plasmodial infections were highly prevalent, widely distributed, and almost always comprised of mixed parasite species. Analysis of more than 1,100 mitochondrial, apicoplast and nuclear gene sequences from chimpanzees and gorillas revealed that 99% grouped within one of six host-specific lineages representing distinct Plasmodium species within the subgenus Laverania. One of these from western gorillas was comprised of parasites that were nearly identical to P. falciparum. In phylogenetic analyses of full-length mitochondrial sequences, human P. falciparum formed a monophyletic lineage within the gorilla parasite radiation. These findings indicate that P. falciparum is of gorilla and not of chimpanzee, bonobo or ancient human origin. PMID:20864995

  15. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; De la Chica, Susana; Cortés, Pedro; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2008-07-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in the maintenance of cardiovascular functions and in the control of blood pressure. By other hand, it is known that blood pressure regulation and HPA activity are affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of estradiol and progesterone on renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-regulating aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis of ovariectomized mice and ovariectomized mice treated subscutaneously with different doses of estradiol and progesterone. Our data suggest that in female mice, estradiol and progesterone influence RAS-regulating and vasopressin-degrading activities at different levels of the HPA axis.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Endemicity in Indonesia in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Gething, Peter W.; Patil, Anand P.; Rogayah, Hanifah; Kusriastuti, Rita; Wismarini, Desak M.; Tarmizi, Siti N.; Baird, J. Kevin; Hay, Simon I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria control programs require a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of infection risk to efficiently allocate resources. We used model based geostatistics (MBG) techniques to generate a contemporary map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria risk in Indonesia in 2010. Methods Plasmodium falciparum Annual Parasite Incidence (PfAPI) data (2006–2008) were used to map limits of P. falciparum transmission. A total of 2,581 community blood surveys of P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) were identified (1985–2009). After quality control, 2,516 were included into a national database of age-standardized 2–10 year old PfPR data (PfPR2–10) for endemicity mapping. A Bayesian MBG procedure was used to create a predicted surface of PfPR2–10 endemicity with uncertainty estimates. Population at risk estimates were derived with reference to a 2010 human population count surface. Results We estimate 132.8 million people in Indonesia, lived at risk of P. falciparum transmission in 2010. Of these, 70.3% inhabited areas of unstable transmission and 29.7% in stable transmission. Among those exposed to stable risk, the vast majority were at low risk (93.39%) with the reminder at intermediate (6.6%) and high risk (0.01%). More people in western Indonesia lived in unstable rather than stable transmission zones. In contrast, fewer people in eastern Indonesia lived in unstable versus stable transmission areas. Conclusion While further feasibility assessments will be required, the immediate prospects for sustained control are good across much of the archipelago and medium term plans to transition to the pre-elimination phase are not unrealistic for P. falciparum. Endemicity in areas of Papua will clearly present the greatest challenge. This P. falciparum endemicity map allows malaria control agencies and their partners to comprehensively assess the region-specific prospects for reaching pre-elimination, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of

  17. Plasma Concentration of Parasite DNA as a Measure of Disease Severity in Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles J.; Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Veenemans, Jacobien; Verhoef, Hans; Faiz, M. Abul; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; White, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed whether the plasma Plasmodium falciparum DNA concentration is a useful datum for distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in African children and Asian adults. P. falciparum DNA concentrations were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 224 African children (111 with uncomplicated malaria and 113 with severe malaria) and 211 Asian adults (100 with uncomplicated malaria and 111 with severe malaria) presenting with acute falciparum malaria. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations in identifying severe malaria was 0.834 for children and 0.788 for adults, similar to that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 levels and substantially superior to that of parasite densities (P < .0001). The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations plus plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations was significantly greater than that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations alone (0.904 for children [P = .004] and 0.847 for adults [P = .003]). Quantitative real-time PCR measurement of parasite DNA in plasma is a useful method for diagnosing severe falciparum malaria on fresh or archived plasma samples. PMID:25344520

  18. [From malaria parasite point of view--Plasmodium falciparum evolution].

    PubMed

    Zerka, Agata; Kaczmarek, Radosław; Jaśkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium, which have arguably exerted the greatest selection pressure on humans in the history of our species. Besides humans, different Plasmodium parasites infect a wide range of animal hosts, from marine invertebrates to primates. On the other hand, individual Plasmodium species show high host specificity. The extraordinary evolution of Plasmodium probably began when a free-living red algae turned parasitic, and culminated with its ability to thrive inside a human red blood cell. Studies on the African apes generated new data on the evolution of malaria parasites in general and the deadliest human-specific species, Plasmodium falciparum, in particular. Initially, it was hypothesized that P. falciparum descended from the chimpanzee malaria parasite P. reichenowi, after the human and the chimp lineage diverged about 6 million years ago. However, a recently identified new species infecting gorillas, unexpectedly showed similarity to P. falciparum and was therefore named P. praefalciparum. That finding spurred an alternative hypothesis, which proposes that P. falciparum descended from its gorilla rather than chimp counterpart. In addition, the gorilla-to-human host shift may have occurred more recently (about 10 thousand years ago) than the theoretical P. falciparum-P. reichenowi split. One of the key aims of the studies on Plasmodium evolution is to elucidate the mechanisms that allow the incessant host shifting and retaining the host specificity, especially in the case of human-specific species. Thorough understanding of these phenomena will be necessary to design effective malaria treatment and prevention strategies.

  19. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  20. Endemicity response timelines for Plasmodium falciparum elimination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David L; Hay, Simon I

    2009-01-01

    Background The scaling up of malaria control and renewed calls for malaria eradication have raised interest in defining timelines for changes in malaria endemicity. Methods The epidemiological theory for the decline in the Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate (PfPR, the prevalence of infection) following intervention was critically reviewed and where necessary extended to consider superinfection, heterogeneous biting, and aging infections. Timelines for malaria control and elimination under different levels of intervention were then established using a wide range of candidate mathematical models. Analysis focused on the timelines from baseline to 1% and from 1% through the final stages of elimination. Results The Ross-Macdonald model, which ignores superinfection, was used for planning during the Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP). In models that consider superinfection, PfPR takes two to three years longer to reach 1% starting from a hyperendemic baseline, consistent with one of the few large-scale malaria control trials conducted in an African population with hyperendemic malaria. The time to elimination depends fundamentally upon the extent to which malaria transmission is interrupted and the size of the human population modelled. When the PfPR drops below 1%, almost all models predict similar and proportional declines in PfPR in consecutive years from 1% through to elimination and that the waiting time to reduce PfPR from 10% to 1% and from 1% to 0.1% are approximately equal, but the decay rate can increase over time if infections senesce. Conclusion The theory described herein provides simple "rules of thumb" and likely time horizons for the impact of interventions for control and elimination. Starting from a hyperendemic baseline, the GMEP planning timelines, which were based on the Ross-Macdonald model with completely interrupted transmission, were inappropriate for setting endemicity timelines and they represent the most optimistic scenario for

  1. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri aminopeptidase and evidence for its influence on an early stage of squid colonization.

    PubMed

    Fidopiastis, Pat M; Rader, Bethany A; Gerling, David G; Gutierrez, Nestor A; Watkins, Katherine H; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and k(cat) and K(m) values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization.

  2. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

  3. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri Aminopeptidase and Evidence for Its Influence on an Early Stage of Squid Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Bethany A.; Gerling, David G.; Gutierrez, Nestor A.; Watkins, Katherine H.; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V.; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and kcat and Km values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization. PMID:22636772

  4. Cathepsins S, B and L with aminopeptidases display β-secretase activity associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Israel; Ziv, Etty

    2011-04-01

    β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) cleaves the wild type (WT) β-site very slowly (k(cat)/K(m): 46.6 m(-1) s(-1)). Therefore we searched for additional β-secretases and identified three cathepsins that split the WT β-site much faster. Human cathepsin S cleaves the WT β-site (k(cat)/K(m): 54 700 m(-1) s(-1)) 1170-fold faster than BACE1 and cathepsins B and L are 440- and 74-fold faster than BACE1, respectively. These cathepsins split two bonds flanking the WT β-site (K-MD-A), where the K-M bond (85%) is cleaved more efficiently than the D-A bond (15%). Cleavage at the major K-M bond yields Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) extended by N-terminal Met that should be removed to generate Aβ initiated by Asp1. The activity of cytosol and microsomal aminopeptidases on relevant peptides revealed rapid removal of N-terminal Met but not N-terminal Asp. Brain aminopeptidases showed similar specificity. Thus, aminopeptidases would convert Aβ extended by Met into regular Aβ (Asp1) found in amyloid plaques. Earlier studies indicate that Aβ is likely produced in the endosome and lysosome system where cathepsins S, B and L are localized and cysteine cathepsin inhibitors reduce the level of Aβ in cells and animals. Taken together, cathepsins S, B and L deserve further evaluation as therapeutic targets to develop disease modifying drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  5. The monoclonal antibody ER-BMDM1 recognizes a macrophage and dendritic cell differentiation antigen with aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Leenen, P J; Melis, M; Kraal, G; Hoogeveen, A T; Van Ewijk, W

    1992-06-01

    Here we describe the reactivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) ER-BMDM1, directed against a 160-kDa cell membrane-associated antigen (Ag) with amino-peptidase activity. The aminopeptidase recognized by ER-BMDM1 is present on various mouse macrophage (M phi) and dendritic cell (DC) subpopulations as well as on microvillous epithelia. Analysis of ER-BMDM1 Ag expression in in vitro models of M phi maturation revealed that the Ag is expressed at increasing levels upon maturation of M phi. In vivo, high level expression of the ER-BMDM1 Ag occurs after the monocytic stage of maturation, since bone marrow cells and peripheral blood monocytes are essentially ER-BMDM1 negative. Analysis of isolated-resident and elicited M phi populations showed that ER-BMDM1 recognizes a specific subpopulation of mature M phi: only some resident peritoneal and alveolar M phi are ER-BMDM1 positive, whereas virtually all thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal exudate M phi bind the mAb. In lymphoid organs, a subpopulation of M phi is recognized as well as interdigitating cells (IDC) located in T cell areas. Phenotypic analysis of isolated DC--the in vitro equivalents of IDC--from spleen and lymph nodes confirmed that the majority of this important antigen-presenting cell population expresses the ER-BMDM1 aminopeptidase. The molecular characteristics of the ER-BMDM1 Ag suggest that it may represent the mouse homolog of human CD13.

  6. Biochemical studies of aminopeptidase polymorphism in Mytilus edulis. II. Dependence of reaction rate on physical factors and enzyme concentration.

    PubMed

    Koehn, R K; Siebenaller, J F

    1981-12-01

    Enzymatic parameters of aminopeptidase-I that may be sensitive to temperature an solute variations were investigated to provide a functional explanation for specific activity differences among genotypes in natural populations. The effect of temperature on the apparent Km of L-leucyl-4-methoxy 2-naphthylamide and th dipeptide phenylalanyl-glycine was small, especially between 10 and 25 C. The apparent Km varied only between 36.7 and 49.8 microM at these temperatures and the six common genotypes did not differ in temperature-dependent substrate affinities. While pH had a significant effect on Km, no differences among genotypes were observed. Activation enthalpies were also identical among genotypes. Thermal inactivation was slowest at 15 C and the same for all genotypes. Of 18 tested amino acids, only phenylalanine inhibited aminopeptidase-I; K1 values ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 mM and were the same for all genotypes. Small differences among genotypes were detected in the inhibitory effect of zinc. The concentration of aminopeptidase-I enzyme was the same for all genotypes in a population exposed to oceanic salinity, but the concentration of Lap 94/94 was 15% lower than that of other genotypes in a population experiencing estuarine salinity. Genotypes with the Lap 94 allele exhibited higher apparent Kcat values in all population samples.The probable genotype-dependent effects of enzyme concentration and Kcat differences are discussed with regard to maintenance of the polymorphism and genetic differences among populations.

  7. Direct N-terminal sequencing of polypeptides using a thermostable bacterial aminopeptidase and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kishor, Nitin; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2015-11-01

    Mass spectrometry-based amino acid sequencing is currently based almost entirely on collision-induced peptide fragmentation and analyses. Here, we describe a single-stage MS-based technique for amino acid sequencing involving partial, heterogenous digestion of a peptide by a processive, non-specific, heat-loving Bacillus subtilis-derived aminopeptidase (BsuAP), which acts optimally at 70 °C and allows 'single-shot' sequencing to be carried out through simultaneous accumulation, and detection of sub-populations of peptides of progressively reducing length.

  8. Metabolism of enkephalins in head membranes of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum by peptidases: isolation of an enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Laurent, V; Salzet, M

    1996-09-01

    Metabolism of leucine and methionine enkephalins by enzyme preparations from head parts of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum was investigated. Leech homogenate degraded enkephalins by cleavage of the Tyr1-Gly2 and Gly3-Phe4 bonds. The Tyr1-Gly2-Gly3 was detected as a major metabolite when amastatin (aminopeptidase inhibitor) was present to prevent Tyr1-Gly2 breakdown. Around 50% of enkephalin-degrading activity was isolated in a 20000 x g membrane fraction and was shown to be almost entirely due to an aminopeptidase activity. This enzyme, a homodimer of approx. 70 kDa, has been purified to homogeneity by a combined approach including gel permeation and anion exchange chromatographies followed by reversed-phase HPLC. This enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase is a typical integral membrane 'zincin' metalloprotein with an apparent k(m) of 30 microM, a specific activity of 12 nmol GGFM min-1 mg protein-1 and a catalytic efficiency (kcat/k(m)) of 46 x 10(6) mol-1 min-1. This enzyme is specifically inhibited by amastatin (IC50 = 0.5 microM), but not by bestatin and actinonin. In leech membranes, the other degrading activities performed at the same time were due to a neuropeptide-endopeptidase (NEP)-like enzyme attack, inhibited by phosphoramidon (IC50 = 0.1 microM) and in the case of the Met-enkephalin by a combined action of an angiotensin-converting-like enzyme, inhibited by captopril (IC50 = 0.2 microM) and the NEP-like enzyme. These two enzymes were previously isolated from head membranes of T. tessulatum and possess towards Met-enkephalin a catalytic efficiency (kcat/k(m)) of, respectively, 12 x 10(6) mol-1 min-1 and 78 x 10(6) mol-1 min-1. These findings constitute the first report in leeches on the nature and the sites of attack of the membrane peptidases involved in the metabolism of enkephalins and also the first biochemical evidence for a novel member of the aminopeptidase family.

  9. Screening and Antiviral Analysis of Phages That Display Peptides with an Affinity to Subunit C of Porcine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Feng, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purified C subunit of the recombinant porcine aminopeptidase N (rpAPN-C) protein was used as an immobilized target to screen potential ligands against rpAPN-C from a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, five phage clones showed specific binding affinities to rpAPN-C. In 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, the phage clone PM1, which contained the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence, had a protective effect against TGEV infection in swine testis cells. Therefore, the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence has a potential use as a small molecular therapeutic agent against TGEV infection. PMID:24111863

  10. Multiple dimensions of epigenetic gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: gene regulation via histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and nuclear architecture in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ferhat; Bunnik, Evelien M; Varoquaux, Nelle; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William Stafford; Le Roch, Karine G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most deadly human malarial parasite, responsible for an estimated 207 million cases of disease and 627,000 deaths in 2012. Recent studies reveal that the parasite actively regulates a large fraction of its genes throughout its replicative cycle inside human red blood cells and that epigenetics plays an important role in this precise gene regulation. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of three aspects of epigenetic regulation in P. falciparum: changes in histone modifications, nucleosome occupancy and the three-dimensional genome structure. We compare these three aspects of the P. falciparum epigenome to those of other eukaryotes, and show that large-scale compartmentalization is particularly important in determining histone decomposition and gene regulation in P. falciparum. We conclude by presenting a gene regulation model for P. falciparum that combines the described epigenetic factors, and by discussing the implications of this model for the future of malaria research.

  11. Association of Plasmodium falciparum isolates encoding the p. Falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene K76T polymorphism with anemia and splenomegaly, but not with multiple infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Inas Z; Oster, Nadja; Stich, August; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Guigemdé, Wendyam A; Wickert, Hannes; Andrews, Kathy T; Kouyaté, Bocar; Lanzer, Michael

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether infections with Plasmodium falciparum isolates encoding the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene K76T polymorphism, a molecular marker for chloroquine resistance, are associated with multiple infections, age, or clinical signs of malaria in a semi-immune population in a holoendemic area of Burkina Faso. The parameters of interest were investigated in 210 P. falciparum-positive inhabitants. Logistic regression analysis showed that pfcrt K76T-carrying isolates are significantly more likely to cause anemia and splenomegaly. Furthermore, we found that infections with P. falciparum isolates encoding pfcrt K76T are dependent on age rather than multiple infections. Our findings suggest that pfcrt K76T might serve as a valuable marker for assessing the long-term clinical effect of chronic infections with chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum isolates in populations, without the need of drug efficacy trials.

  12. [Activity of alanine aminopeptidase in blood and in urine of smoking and non-smoking smelters].

    PubMed

    Bizoń, Anna; Stasiak, Karolina; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2010-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to xenobiotics. This will include exogenous substances from environmental pollution such as heavy metals and lifestyle such as smoking, which may lead to impaired functioning of many organs. The liver and kidney are the critical organs in the case of a long-term occupational or environmental exposure to heavy metals and tobacco smoke. In diagnostics of liver and kidney damage useful are the methods which determine the activity of enzymes such as alanine aminopeptidase (AAP). AAP is a marker for early detection of acute kidney damage, and presence of AAP derive mainly from proximal tubular brush-border. Activity of AAP in urine allows to assess the damage resulting from the nephrotoxic exposure to heavy metals. In the serum AAP is mainly from hepatic. Activity of AAP may be useful to identify liver cancer. The investigation was shown, that AAP activity in the blood is used to detect hepatic cholestasis and congestive jaundice. The aim of present study was to assess the influence of occupational exposure of copper-foundry workers to heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead) on activity of alanine aminopeptidase in blood and urine. The investigations were performed in blood and urine of 166 subjects: 101 male copper smelters and 65 non-exposed male subjects. The study protocol was approved by Local Bioethics Committee of Wroclaw Medical University (KB No: 469/2008). The data on smoking which had been obtained from a direct personal interview were verified by determination of serum cotinine concentrations. Biological material collected from the control group and smelters was divided into subgroups of nonsmokers and smokers. The concentrations of lead and cadmium were determined in whole blood, whilst the level of arsenic and cadmium were determined in urine using FAAS method (Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) in the acetylate flame on the SOLAAR M6. The activity of AA was determined in blood and in urine. The results showed a 9-fold

  13. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans-expressed Trans-HPS, partial aminopeptidase H11 from Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian-Jin; Yang, Yi; Guo, Xiao-Lu; Duan, Li-Jun; Chen, Xue-Qiu; Yan, Bao-Long; Zhang, Hong-Li; Du, Ai-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Aminopeptidase H11 present in the surface of intestine microvilli in Haemonchus contortus was identified as the most effective antigen candidate. However, its recombinant forms produced in Escherichiacoli, insect cells and yeast could not provide promising protection against H. contortus challenge, probably due to the inappropriate glycosylation and/or conformational folding. Herein, partial H11 containing the potential zinc-binding domain and two predicted glycosylation sites (nt 1 bp-1710 bp, Trans-HPS) was subcloned downstream of 5' flanking region of Caenorhabditis elegans cpr-1 gene in pPD95.77 vector, with the deletion of GFP gene. The recombinant was expressed in C. elegans and verified by blotting with anti-H11 and anti-Trans-HPS rabbit polyclonal antibodies and anti-His monoclonal antibody. Stably inherited Trans-HPS in worm descendants was achieved by integration using UV irradiation. Immunization with the crude Trans-HPS extracted from transgenic worms resulted in 37.71% reduction in faecal egg counts (FEC) (P<0.05) and 24.91% reduction in worm burden, but an upward curve with moderate rate of daily FEC in goats. These results suggested an apparent delay against H. contortus egg-laying in goats, which differed from that with bacteria-origin form of partial H11 (nt 670 bp-1710 bp, HPS) (26.04% reduction in FEC and 18.46% reduction in worm burden). These findings indicate the feasibility of sufficient C. elegans-expressed H11 for the immunological research and vaccine development.

  14. Binding to and Inhibition of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase by Macrocyclic Disulfides Enhances Spine Density.

    PubMed

    Diwakarla, Shanti; Nylander, Erik; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Vanga, Sudarsana Reddy; Khan, Yasmin Shamsudin; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Ng, Leelee; Pham, Vi; Sävmarker, Jonas; Lundbäck, Thomas; Jenmalm-Jensen, Annika; Andersson, Hanna; Engen, Karin; Rosenström, Ulrika; Larhed, Mats; Åqvist, Johan; Chai, Siew Yeen; Hallberg, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV) and related peptide analogs, as well as nonpeptide inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), have previously been shown to enhance memory and cognition in animal models. Furthermore, the endogenous IRAP substrates oxytocin and vasopressin are known to facilitate learning and memory. In this study, the two recently synthesized 13-membered macrocyclic competitive IRAP inhibitors HA08 and HA09, which were designed to mimic the N terminus of oxytocin and vasopressin, were assessed and compared based on their ability to bind to the IRAP active site, and alter dendritic spine density in rat hippocampal primary cultures. The binding modes of the IRAP inhibitors HA08, HA09, and of Ang IV in either the extended or γ-turn conformation at the C terminus to human IRAP were predicted by docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energies calculated with the linear interaction energy method, which are in excellent agreement with experimental data and simulations, have been used to explain the differences in activities of the IRAP inhibitors, both of which are structurally very similar, but differ only with regard to one stereogenic center. In addition, we show that HA08, which is 100-fold more potent than the epimer HA09, can enhance dendritic spine number and alter morphology, a process associated with memory facilitation. Therefore, HA08, one of the most potent IRAP inhibitors known today, may serve as a suitable starting point for medicinal chemistry programs aided by MD simulations aimed at discovering more drug-like cognitive enhancers acting via augmenting synaptic plasticity.

  15. Investigations into microsporidian methionine aminopeptidase type 2: a therapeutic target for microsporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Huang, Huan; Cali, Ann; Takvorian, Peter M.; Feng, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Ghou; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    The Microsporidia have been reported to cause a wide range of clinical diseases particularly in patients that are immunosuppressed. They can infect virtually any organ system and cases of gastrointestinal infection, encephalitis, ocular infection, sinusitis, myositis and disseminated infection are well described in the literature. While benzimidazoles such as albendazole are active against many species of Microsporidia, these drugs do not have significant activity against Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Fumagillin, ovalicin and their analogues have been demonstrated to have antimicrosporidial activity in vitro and in animal models of microsporidiosis. Fumagillin has also been demonstrated to have efficacy in human infections due to E. bieneusi. Fumagillin is an irreversible inhibitor of methionine aminopeptidase type 2 (MetAP2). Homology cloning employing the polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the MetAP2 gene from the human pathogenic microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Encephalitozoon hellem, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Brachiola algerae and E. bieneusi. The full-length MetAP2 coding sequence was obtained for all of the Encephalitozoonidae. Recombinant E. cuniculi MetAP2 was produced in baculovirus and purified using chromatographic techniques. The in vitro activity and effect of the inhibitors bestatin and TNP-470 on this recombinant microsporidian MetAP2 was characterized. An in silico model of E. cuniculi MetAP2 was developed based on crystallographic data on human MetAP2. These reagents provide new tools for the development of in vitro assay systems to screen candidate compounds for use as new therapeutic agents for the treatment of microsporidiosis. PMID:16004378

  16. Chloride channel ClC-5 binds to aspartyl aminopeptidase to regulate renal albumin endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aven; Slattery, Craig; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wilk, Sherwin; Wilk, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yuan; Valova, Valentina A; Robinson, Phillip J; Kelly, Darren J; Poronnik, Philip

    2015-04-01

    ClC-5 is a chloride/proton exchanger that plays an obligate role in albumin uptake by the renal proximal tubule. ClC-5 forms an endocytic complex with the albumin receptor megalin/cubilin. We have identified a novel ClC-5 binding partner, cytosolic aspartyl aminopeptidase (DNPEP; EC 3.4.11.21), that catalyzes the release of N-terminal aspartate/glutamate residues. The physiological role of DNPEP remains largely unresolved. Mass spectrometric analysis of proteins binding to the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-ClC-5 C terminus identified DNPEP as an interacting partner. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed that DNPEP and ClC-5 also associated in cells. Further experiments using purified GST-ClC-5 and His-DNPEP proteins demonstrated that the two proteins bound directly to each other. In opossum kidney (OK) cells, confocal immunofluorescence studies revealed that DNPEP colocalized with albumin-containing endocytic vesicles. Overexpression of wild-type DNPEP increased cell-surface levels of ClC-5 and albumin uptake. Analysis of DNPEP-immunoprecipitated products from rat kidney lysate identified β-actin and tubulin, suggesting a role for DNPEP in cytoskeletal maintenance. A DNase I inhibition assay showed a significant decrease in the amount of G actin when DNPEP was overexpressed in OK cells, suggesting a role for DNPEP in stabilizing the cytoskeleton. DNPEP was not present in the urine of healthy rats; however, it was readily detected in the urine in rat models of mild and heavy proteinuria (diabetic nephropathy and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, respectively). Urinary levels of DNPEP were found to correlate with the severity of proteinuria. Therefore, we have identified another key molecular component of the albumin endocytic machinery in the renal proximal tubule and describe a new role for DNPEP in stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 functions regulate key aspects of the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Aylsworth, Charles F; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Busuito, Christopher J; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Kim, Sungjin; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitously expressed enzyme whose peptide-trimming role during antigen processing for presentation by MHC I molecules is well established, however, a role for ERAP1 in modulating global innate immune responses has not been described to date. Here we demonstrate that, relative to wild type mice, mice lacking ERAP1 exhibit exaggerated innate immune responses early during pathogen recognition, as characterized by increased activation of splenic and hepatic NK and NKT cells and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL12 and MCP1. Our data also revealed that ERAP1 is playing a critical role in NK cell development and function. We observed higher frequencies of terminally matured NK cells, as well as higher frequencies of licensed NK cells (expressing the Ly49C and Ly49I receptors) in ERAP1-KO mice, results that positively correlated with an enhanced NK activation and IFNγ production by ERAP1-KO mice challenged with pro-inflammatory stimuli. Furthermore, during pathogen recognition, ERAP1 regulates IL12 production by CD11c(+) DCs specifically, with increases in IL12 production positively correlated with an increased phagocytic activity of splenic DCs and macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized, more central role for the ERAP1 protein in modulating several aspects of both the development of the innate immune system, and its responses during the initial stages of pathogen recognition. Such a role may explain why ERAP1 has been implicated by GWAS in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases that may be precipitated by aberrant responses to pathogen encounters.

  18. Surface aminopeptidase activity of rat natural killer cells. I. Biochemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Amoscato, A A; Spiess, R R; Brumfield, A M; Herberman, R B; Chambers, W H

    1994-04-28

    Aminopeptidase (AP) activity on rat natural killer (NK) cells was found to have the following characteristics: (1) the activity was surface associated and not secreted, as determined by extracellular location of product and by the cessation of hydrolysis of substrate upon removal of the cells from the medium. (2) The activity was linear with respect to time and cell number. (3) The enzymatic activity on splenocytes and on the NK leukemia cell line CRNK-16, but not on IL-2 activated NK (A-NK) cells, was sensitive to trypsin treatment. (4) The AP activity on intact cells had a broad pH dependency with optimal activity at slightly alkaline pH but lower activity at acidic pH. (5) There was a preference for neutral substrates and essentially no activity towards acidic substrates. (6) Enzymatic activity was inhibited in the presence of the AP inhibitors bestatin and amastatin, and in the presence of the chelator, 1,10 phenanthroline, indicating the involvement of a metalloprotease. (7) Culture of A-NK cells with bestatin resulted in a decrease in cytotoxicity against YAC-1 and P815 targets. Amastatin treatment caused only a slight decrease in cytotoxicity against YAC-1 targets, but a significant decrease in cytotoxicity against P815 targets. (8) Treatment of A-NK cultures with specific inhibitors of APases caused an increase in expression of CD2 (an increase from 20-80% with bestatin and an increase from 25-35% in the presence of amastatin). These results provide the first evidence for the existence of APases on the surface of NK cells and suggest a role for these enzymes in the regulation of cytotoxic activity and of CD2 surface expression.

  19. Structural Bases of Coronavirus Attachment to Host Aminopeptidase N and Its Inhibition by Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mudgal, Gaurav; Ordoño, Desiderio; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The coronaviruses (CoVs) are enveloped viruses of animals and humans associated mostly with enteric and respiratory diseases, such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome and 10–20% of all common colds. A subset of CoVs uses the cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN), a membrane-bound metalloprotease, as a cell entry receptor. In these viruses, the envelope spike glycoprotein (S) mediates the attachment of the virus particles to APN and subsequent cell entry, which can be blocked by neutralizing antibodies. Here we describe the crystal structures of the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) of two closely related CoV strains, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine respiratory CoV (PRCV), in complex with their receptor, porcine APN (pAPN), or with a neutralizing antibody. The data provide detailed information on the architecture of the dimeric pAPN ectodomain and its interaction with the CoV S. We show that a protruding receptor-binding edge in the S determines virus-binding specificity for recessed glycan-containing surfaces in the membrane-distal region of the pAPN ectodomain. Comparison of the RBDs of TGEV and PRCV to those of other related CoVs, suggests that the conformation of the S receptor-binding region determines cell entry receptor specificity. Moreover, the receptor-binding edge is a major antigenic determinant in the TGEV envelope S that is targeted by neutralizing antibodies. Our results provide a compelling view on CoV cell entry and immune neutralization, and may aid the design of antivirals or CoV vaccines. APN is also considered a target for cancer therapy and its structure, reported here, could facilitate the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:22876187

  20. Structural bases of coronavirus attachment to host aminopeptidase N and its inhibition by neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Juan; Santiago, César; Mudgal, Gaurav; Ordoño, Desiderio; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M

    2012-01-01

    The coronaviruses (CoVs) are enveloped viruses of animals and humans associated mostly with enteric and respiratory diseases, such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome and 10-20% of all common colds. A subset of CoVs uses the cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN), a membrane-bound metalloprotease, as a cell entry receptor. In these viruses, the envelope spike glycoprotein (S) mediates the attachment of the virus particles to APN and subsequent cell entry, which can be blocked by neutralizing antibodies. Here we describe the crystal structures of the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) of two closely related CoV strains, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine respiratory CoV (PRCV), in complex with their receptor, porcine APN (pAPN), or with a neutralizing antibody. The data provide detailed information on the architecture of the dimeric pAPN ectodomain and its interaction with the CoV S. We show that a protruding receptor-binding edge in the S determines virus-binding specificity for recessed glycan-containing surfaces in the membrane-distal region of the pAPN ectodomain. Comparison of the RBDs of TGEV and PRCV to those of other related CoVs, suggests that the conformation of the S receptor-binding region determines cell entry receptor specificity. Moreover, the receptor-binding edge is a major antigenic determinant in the TGEV envelope S that is targeted by neutralizing antibodies. Our results provide a compelling view on CoV cell entry and immune neutralization, and may aid the design of antivirals or CoV vaccines. APN is also considered a target for cancer therapy and its structure, reported here, could facilitate the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:22876187

  1. A Novel Glutamyl (Aspartyl)-Specific Aminopeptidase A from Lactobacillus delbrueckii with Promising Properties for Application

    PubMed Central

    Stressler, Timo; Ewert, Jacob; Merz, Michael; Funk, Joshua; Claaßen, Wolfgang; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Schmidt, Herbert; Kuhn, Andreas; Fischer, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are auxotrophic for a number of amino acids. Thus, LAB have one of the strongest proteolytic systems to acquit their amino acid requirements. One of the intracellular exopeptidases present in LAB is the glutamyl (aspartyl) specific aminopeptidase (PepA; EC 3.4.11.7). Most of the PepA enzymes characterized yet, belonged to Lactococcus lactis sp., but no PepA from a Lactobacillus sp. has been characterized so far. In this study, we cloned a putative pepA gene from Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis DSM 20072 and characterized it after purification. For comparison, we also cloned, purified and characterized PepA from Lc. lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481. Due to the low homology between both enzymes (30%), differences between the biochemical characteristics were very likely. This was confirmed, for example, by the more acidic optimum pH value of 6.0 for Lb-PepA compared to pH 8.0 for Lc-PepA. In addition, although the optimum temperature is quite similar for both enzymes (Lb-PepA: 60°C; Lc-PepA: 65°C), the temperature stability after three days, 20°C below the optimum temperature, was higher for Lb-PepA (60% residual activity) than for Lc-PepA (2% residual activity). EDTA inhibited both enzymes and the strongest activation was found for CoCl2, indicating that both enzymes are metallopeptidases. In contrast to Lc-PepA, disulfide bond-reducing agents such as dithiothreitol did not inhibit Lb-PepA. Finally, Lb-PepA was not product-inhibited by L-Glu, whereas Lc-PepA showed an inhibition. PMID:27003449

  2. Identification of Threonine 348 as a Residue Involved in Aminopeptidase A Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Claperon, Cédric; Banegas-Font, Inmaculada; Iturrioz, Xavier; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Maigret, Bernard; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA; EC 3.4.11.7) is a membrane-bound zinc metalloprotease cleaving in the brain the N-terminal aspartyl residue of angiotensin II to generate angiotensin III, which exerts a tonic stimulatory effect on the central control of blood pressure in hypertensive animals. We docked the specific APA inhibitor, glutamate phosphonate, in the three-dimensional model of the mouse APA ectodomain in the presence of Ca2+. In the S1 subsite of this model, the Ca2+ atom was coordinated with Asp-213, Asp-218,y and Glu-215 and three water molecules, one of which formed a hydrogen bond with the carboxylate side chain of the inhibitor. We report here that the carboxylate side chain of glutamate phosphonate also formed a hydrogen bond with the alcohol side chain of Thr-348. Mutagenic replacement of Thr-348 with an aspartate, tyrosine, or serine residue led to a modification of the hydrolysis velocity, with no change in the affinity of the recombinant enzymes for the substrate GluNA, either in the absence or presence of Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, the mutations modified the substrate specificity of APA, which was nevertheless restored by the addition of Ca2+. An analysis of three-dimensional models of the corresponding Thr-348 mutants revealed that the interaction between this residue and the inhibitor was abolished or disturbed, leading to a change in the position of the inhibitor in the active site. These findings demonstrate a key role of Thr-348 in substrate specificity of APA for N-terminal acidic amino acids by insuring the optimal positioning of the substrate during catalysis. PMID:19228697

  3. Antimalarial Activity of KAF156 in Falciparum and Vivax Malaria.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas J; Duong, Tran T; Uthaisin, Chirapong; Nosten, François; Phyo, Aung P; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Jittamala, Podjanee; Chuthasmit, Kittiphum; Cheung, Ming S; Feng, Yiyan; Li, Ruobing; Magnusson, Baldur; Sultan, Marc; Wieser, Daniela; Xun, Xiaolei; Zhao, Rong; Diagana, Thierry T; Pertel, Peter; Leong, F Joel

    2016-09-22

    Background KAF156 belongs to a new class of antimalarial agents (imidazolopiperazines), with activity against asexual and sexual blood stages and the preerythrocytic liver stages of malarial parasites. Methods We conducted a phase 2, open-label, two-part study at five centers in Thailand and Vietnam to assess the antimalarial efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profile of KAF156 in adults with acute Plasmodium vivax or P. falciparum malaria. Assessment of parasite clearance rates in cohorts of patients with vivax or falciparum malaria who were treated with multiple doses (400 mg once daily for 3 days) was followed by assessment of the cure rate at 28 days in a separate cohort of patients with falciparum malaria who received a single dose (800 mg). Results Median parasite clearance times were 45 hours (interquartile range, 42 to 48) in 10 patients with falciparum malaria and 24 hours (interquartile range, 20 to 30) in 10 patients with vivax malaria after treatment with the multiple-dose regimen and 49 hours (interquartile range, 42 to 54) in 21 patients with falciparum malaria after treatment with the single dose. Among the 21 patients who received the single dose and were followed for 28 days, 1 had reinfection and 7 had recrudescent infections (cure rate, 67%; 95% credible interval, 46 to 84). The mean (±SD) KAF156 terminal elimination half-life was 44.1±8.9 hours. There were no serious adverse events in this small study. The most common adverse events included sinus bradycardia, thrombocytopenia, hypokalemia, anemia, and hyperbilirubinemia. Vomiting of grade 2 or higher occurred in 2 patients, 1 of whom discontinued treatment because of repeated vomiting after receiving the single 800-mg dose. More adverse events were reported in the single-dose cohort, which had longer follow-up, than in the multiple-dose cohorts. Conclusions KAF156 showed antimalarial activity without evident safety concerns in a small number of adults with uncomplicated P. vivax or P

  4. Over-expression of a proline specific aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae JN-412 and its application in collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Nan-Di; Tian, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    A strain that exhibited intracellular proline-specific aminopeptidase (PAP) activity was isolated from soy sauce koji and identified as Aspergillus oryzae JN-412. The gene coding PAP was cloned and efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 in a biologically active form. The highest specific activity reached 52.28 U mg(-1) at optimum cultivation conditions. The recombinant enzyme was purified 3.3-fold to homogeneity with a recovery of 36.7% from cell-free extract using Ni-affinity column chromatography. It appeared as a single protein band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibited the highest activity at 60 °C and pH 7.5. The enzyme activity was inhibited by PMSF and ions like Zn2+ and Cu2+. DTT, β-mercaptoethanol, EDTA, and ions like Co2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ had no influence on enzyme activity, whereas Ni2+ enhanced the enzyme activity. By using collagen as a substrate, the purified recombinant prolyl aminopeptidase contributed to the hydrolysis of collagen when used in combination with neutral protease, and free amino acids in collagen hydrolysates was significantly increased.

  5. Crystal and molecular structure of bestatin and its implications regarding substrate binding to the active site of leucine aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, J.S. Jr.; Bousvaros, A.; Taylor, A.

    1982-07-30

    The X-ray crystal structure of bestatin, ((2S,3R)-3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutanoyl)-L-leucine (C/sub 16/H/sub 24/N/sub 2/O/sub 4/), has been determined. Four molecules of bestatin crystallize with four molecules of 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) and eight molecules of water in the space group P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2/sub 1/. Unit cell dimensions are a = 6.653 (1), b = 15.150 (3), and c = 27.309 (4) angstrom. The final R was 8.5%, based on 2871 independent structure amplitudes. The MPD was found to be disordered. In addition to the usual functional groups needed for binding to leucine aminopeptidase, bestatin includes a tetrahedral carbon, C(8), as might be found in the putative transition-state intermediate. The structure indicates that the nonpolar side chains are oppositely disposed and separated by approx.10 angstrom. The peptide bond is trans. There is no H bonding between OH on C(8) and the adjacent carbonyl. These data suggest possible modes of binding of this transition-state analogue to leucine aminopeptidase.

  6. Reduced activity of CD13/aminopeptidase N (APN) in aggressive meningiomas is associated with increased levels of SPARC.

    PubMed

    Mawrin, Christian; Wolke, Carmen; Haase, Daniela; Krüger, Sabine; Firsching, Raimund; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Paulus, Werner; Gutmann, David H; Lal, Anita; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common brain tumors in adults, and meningiomas exhibit a tendency to invade adjacent structures. Compared with high-grade gliomas, little is known about the molecular changes that potentially underlie the invasive behavior of meningiomas. In this study, we examined the expression and function of the membrane alanyl-aminopeptidase [mAAP, aminopeptidase N (APN), CD13, EC3.4.11.2] zinc-dependent ectopeptidase in meningiomas and meningioma cell lines, based on its prior association with tumor invasion in colorectal and renal carcinomas. We found a significant reduction of APNmRNA and protein expression, as well as enzymatic activity, in high-grade meningiomas. While meningioma tumor cell proliferation was not affected by either pharmacologic APN inhibition or siRNA-mediated APN silencing, APN pharmacologic and siRNA knockdown significantly reduced meningioma cell invasion in vitro. Next, we employed pathway-specific cDNA microarray analyses to identify extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules regulated by APN, and found that APN-siRNA knockdown substantially increased the expression of secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)/osteonectin. Finally, we demonstrated that SPARC, which has been previously associated with meningioma invasiveness, was increased in aggressive meningiomas. Collectively, these results suggest that APN expression and enzymatic function is reduced in aggressive meningiomas, and that alterations in the balance between APN and SPARC might favor meningioma invasion.

  7. Unusual Extra Space at the Active Site and High Activity for Acetylated Hydroxyproline of Prolyl Aminopeptidase from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi; Sakata, Makoto; Xu, Yue; Nakashima, Kanako; Matsubara, Futoshi; Hatakeyama, Susumi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    The prolyl aminopeptidase complexes of Ala-TBODA [2-alanyl-5-tert-butyl-(1, 3, 4)-oxadiazole] and Sar-TBODA [2-sarcosyl-5-tert-butyl-(1, 3, 4)-oxadiazole] were analyzed by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. Frames of alanine and sarcosine residues were well superimposed on each other in the pyrrolidine ring of proline residue, suggesting that Ala and Sar are recognized as parts of this ring of proline residue by the presence of a hydrophobic proline pocket at the active site. Interestingly, there was an unusual extra space at the bottom of the hydrophobic pocket where proline residue is fixed in the prolyl aminopeptidase. Moreover, 4-acetyloxyproline-βNA (4-acetyloxyproline β-naphthylamide) was a better substrate than Pro-βNA. Computer docking simulation well supports the idea that the 4-acetyloxyl group of the substrate fitted into that space. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of Phe139, Tyr149, Tyr150, Phe236, and Cys271, consisting of the hydrophobic pocket, revealed that all of these five residues are involved significantly in the formation of the hydrophobic proline pocket for the substrate. Tyr149 and Cys271 may be important for the extra space and may orient the acetyl derivative of hydroxyproline to a preferable position for hydrolysis. These findings imply that the efficient degradation of collagen fragment may be achieved through an acetylation process by the bacteria. PMID:16452443

  8. Unlinked genetic loci control the reduced transcription of aminopeptidase N 1 and 3 in the European corn borer and determine tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystalline (Cry) toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) control insect feeding damage on crop plants via foliar applications or by expression within transgenic plants, but continued Bt use is threatened by the buildup of insect resistance traits. Aminopeptidase N (apn) gene family members encode m...

  9. Molecular characterization and RNA interference of three midgut aminopeptidase N isozymes from bacillus thuringiensis-susceptible and -resistant strains of sugarcane borer diatraea saccharalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) proteins located at the midgut epithelium of some lepidopterous species have been implicated as receptors for insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis. cDNAs of three APN isoforms, DsAPN1, DsAPN2, and DsAPN3, from Cry1Ab-susceptible (Cry1Ab-SS) and -resistant (Cry1Ab-...

  10. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-10-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two-dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples.

  11. Polysome profiling of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Lacsina, Joshua R; LaMonte, Gregory; Nicchitta, Christopher V; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2011-09-01

    In the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, global studies of translational regulation have been hampered by the inability to isolate malaria polysomes. We describe here a novel method for polysome profiling in P. falciparum, a powerful approach which allows both a global view of translation and the measurement of ribosomal loading and density for specific mRNAs. Simultaneous lysis of infected erythrocytes and parasites releases stable, intact malaria polysomes, which are then purified by centrifugation through a sucrose cushion. The polysomes are resuspended, separated by velocity sedimentation and then fractionated, yielding a characteristic polysome profile reflecting the global level of translational activity in the parasite. RNA isolated from specific fractions can be used to determine the density of ribosomes loaded onto a particular transcript of interest, and is free of host ribosome contamination. Thus, our approach opens translational regulation in malaria to genome-wide analysis.

  12. The mechanism of resistance to sulfa drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    1999-02-01

    The sulfonamide and sulfone (sulfa) group of antimalarials has been used extensively throughout malaria endemic regions of the world to control this important infectious disease of humans. Sulfadoxine is the most extensively used drug of this group of drugs and is usually combined with pyrimethamine (Fansidar), particularly for the control of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria. Resistance to the sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination is widespread. Analysis using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has shown that the mechanism of resistance to sulfadoxine involves mutation of dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme target of this group of drugs. Understanding the mechanism of resistance of P. falciparum to sulfa drugs has allowed detailed analysis of the epidemiology of the spread of drug resistance alleles in the field(1)and, in the future, opens the way to the development of novel antimalarials to this target enzyme. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014.

    PubMed

    Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Camara, Cheikhou; Amalvict, Rémy; Fall, Mansour; Nakoulima, Aminata; Diatta, Bakary; Diémé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar; Pradines, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    We successfully cultured 36 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from blood samples of 44 malaria patients admitted to the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Dakar, Senegal) during August-December 2014. The prevalence of isolates with in vitro reduced susceptibility was 30.6% for monodesethylamodiaquine, 52.8% for chloroquine, 44.1% for mefloquine, 16.7% for doxycycline, 11.8% for piperaquine, 8.3% for artesunate, 5.9% for pyronaridine, 2.8% for quinine and dihydroartemisinin, and 0.0% for lumefantrine. The prevalence of isolates with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the artemisinin-based combination therapy partner monodesethylamodiaquine increased from 5.6% in 2013 to 30.6% in 2014. Because of the increased prevalence of P. falciparum parasites with impaired in vitro susceptibility to monodesethylamodiaquine, the implementation of in vitro and in vivo surveillance of all artemisinin-based combination therapy partners is warranted. PMID:27088703

  14. First evidence of pfcrt mutant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Fidock, David A; Belmonte, Olivier; Valderramos, Stephanie G; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ariey, Frédéric

    2006-09-01

    The island of Madagascar, lying in the Indian Ocean approximately 250 miles from the African coast, has so far remained one of the few areas in the world without noticeable Plasmodium falciparum high-grade chloroquine (CQ) resistance. Here we report genotyping data on pfcrt in Madagascar. The pfcrt K76T mutation, which is critical for resistance to CQ, was detected in six (3.3%) of 183 P. falciparum isolates screened, within the mutant haplotypes CVIET and CVIDT. This is the first observation of pfcrt mutant parasites on the island. The current massive distribution of CQ for in-home management of fever in children will promote the dissemination of these mutant CQ-resistant parasites. In this context, genotyping of pfcrt remains a useful tool for CQ resistance surveillance as the prevalence of pfcrt mutations is far from saturation in Madagascar.

  15. Squalestatin Is an Inhibitor of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Heloisa B.; Silva, Marcia F.; Kimura, Emília A.; Wunderlich, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of malaria parasites to almost all available drugs calls for the characterization of novel targets and the identification of new compounds. Carotenoids are polyisoprenoids from plants, algae, and some bacteria, and they are biosynthesized by Plasmodium falciparum but not by mammalian cells. Biochemical and reverse genetics approaches were applied to demonstrate that phytoene synthase (PSY) is a key enzyme for carotenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum and is essential for intraerythrocytic growth. The known PSY inhibitor squalestatin reduces biosynthesis of phytoene and kills parasites during the intraerythrocytic cycle. PSY-overexpressing parasites showed increased biosynthesis of phytoene and its derived product phytofluene and presented a squalestatin-resistant phenotype, suggesting that this enzyme is the primary target of action of this drug in the parasite. PMID:25779575

  16. Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Camara, Cheikhou; Amalvict, Rémy; Fall, Mansour; Nakoulima, Aminata; Diatta, Bakary; Diémé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar

    2016-01-01

    We successfully cultured 36 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from blood samples of 44 malaria patients admitted to the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Dakar, Senegal) during August–December 2014. The prevalence of isolates with in vitro reduced susceptibility was 30.6% for monodesethylamodiaquine, 52.8% for chloroquine, 44.1% for mefloquine, 16.7% for doxycycline, 11.8% for piperaquine, 8.3% for artesunate, 5.9% for pyronaridine, 2.8% for quinine and dihydroartemisinin, and 0.0% for lumefantrine. The prevalence of isolates with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the artemisinin-based combination therapy partner monodesethylamodiaquine increased from 5.6% in 2013 to 30.6% in 2014. Because of the increased prevalence of P. falciparum parasites with impaired in vitro susceptibility to monodesethylamodiaquine, the implementation of in vitro and in vivo surveillance of all artemisinin-based combination therapy partners is warranted. PMID:27088703

  17. [Plasmodium falciparum malaria: epidemiology and clinical features at Tarapoto Hospital].

    PubMed

    Calderon, J; Rodriguez, J; Romero, D

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted of the clinical records of 41 patients discharged from a hospital in Tarapoto, Peru, between August 1992 and June 1996 following treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 65 years; 25 were male. The cases were uniformly distributed throughout the year. The duration of illness averaged 11 days. At admission, 40 patients had fever, 36 had shaking chills, 29 had headache, 21 had nausea and vomiting, 21 had hyporexia, 15 had pallor, and 13 had splenomegaly. 3 of the 16 women were pregnant. 7 patients reported a history of malaria. The admission diagnosis was malaria in 33 cases. 31 patients were treated with chloroquine; 18 were subsequently treated with pyrimethamine-sulfadoxin and 1 received doxycycline. No cases of grave illness or death occurred. The increasing presence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Peruvian lowlands should promote review of the adequacy of control programs.

  18. Microscopic Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytemia and Infectivity to Mosquitoes in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jessica T; Ubalee, Ratawan; Lon, Chanthap; Balasubramanian, Sujata; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Rahman, Rifat; Saingam, Piyaporn; Heng, Thay Kheang; Vy, Dav; San, Savoeun; Nuom, Sarath; Burkly, Hana; Chanarat, Nitima; Ponsa, Chanudom; Levitz, Lauren; Parobek, Christian; Chuor, Char Meng; Somethy, Sok; Spring, Michele; Lanteri, Charlotte; Gosi, Panita; Meshnick, Steven R; Saunders, David L

    2016-05-01

    Although gametocytes are essential for malaria transmission, in Africa many falciparum-infected persons without smear-detectable gametocytes still infect mosquitoes. To see whether the same is true in Southeast Asia, we determined the infectiousness of 119 falciparum-infected Cambodian adults to Anopheles dirus mosquitoes by membrane feeding. Just 5.9% of subjects infected mosquitoes. The 8.4% of patients with smear-detectable gametocytes were >20 times more likely to infect mosquitoes than those without and were the source of 96% of all mosquito infections. In low-transmission settings, targeting transmission-blocking interventions to those with microscopic gametocytemia may have an outsized effect on malaria control and elimination.

  19. Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: A process linked to dormancy?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qin; Kyle, Dennis E; Gatton, Michelle L

    2012-12-01

    Artemisinin (ART) based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in over 100 countries and is the cornerstone of malaria control and elimination programs in these areas. However, despite the high potency and rapid parasite killing action of ART derivatives there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy and recrudescence is not uncommon even when ACT is used. Compounding this problem are reports that some parasites in Cambodia, a known foci of drug resistance, have decreased in vivo sensitivity to ART. This raises serious concerns for the development of ART resistance in the field even though no major phenotypic and genotypic changes have yet been identified in these parasites. In this article we review available data on the characteristics of ART, its effects on Plasmodium falciparum parasites and present a hypothesis to explain the high rate of recrudescence associated with this potent class of drugs and the current enigma surrounding ART resistance.

  20. Correlation between 'H' blood group antigen and Plasmodium falciparum invasion.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    The ABO blood group system is the most important blood group system in clinical practice. The relationship between Plasmodium falciparum and ABO blood groups has been studied for many years. This study was undertaken to investigate the abilities of different blood group erythrocytes to support in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasites. P. falciparum parasites of four different strains (3D7, 7G8, Dd2 and RKL9) were co-cultured with erythrocytes of blood group 'A', 'B', 'O' (n = 10 for each) and 'O(h)' (Bombay group) (n = 7) for 5 days. Statistically significant differences were observed on the fourth day among the mean percent parasitemias of 'O', non-'O' ('A' and 'B') and 'O(h)' group cultures. The parasitemias of four strains ranged from 12.23 to 14.66, 11.68 to 13.24, 16.89 to 22.3, and 7.37 to 11.27 % in 'A', 'B', 'O' and Bombay group cultures, respectively. As the expression of H antigen decreased from 'O' blood group to 'A' and 'B' and then to Bombay blood group, parasite invasion (percent parasitemia) also decreased significantly (p < 0.01) and concomitantly, indicating the association of parasite invasion with the amount of H antigen present on the surface of erythrocyte. Thus, the question arises, could H antigen be involved in P. falciparum invasion? To evaluate erythrocyte invasion inhibition, 'O' group erythrocytes were virtually converted to Bombay group-like erythrocytes by the treatment of anti-H lectins extracted from Ulex europaeus seeds. Mean percent parasitemia of lectin-treated cultures on the fourth day was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of non-treated cultures and was found to be similar with the mean percent parasitemia demonstrated by the Bombay group erythrocyte cultures, thus further strengthening the hypothesis.

  1. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  2. The Fragmented Mitochondrial Ribosomal RNAs of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Feagin, Jean E.; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Lee, Jung C.; Coe, Kevin J.; Sands, Bryan H.; Cannone, Jamie J.; Tami, Germaine; Schnare, Murray N.; Gutell, Robin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is most unusual. Over half the genome is composed of the genes for three classic mitochondrial proteins: cytochrome oxidase subunits I and III and apocytochrome b. The remainder encodes numerous small RNAs, ranging in size from 23 to 190 nt. Previous analysis revealed that some of these transcripts have significant sequence identity with highly conserved regions of large and small subunit rRNAs, and can form the expected secondary structures. However, these rRNA fragments are not encoded in linear order; instead, they are intermixed with one another and the protein coding genes, and are coded on both strands of the genome. This unorthodox arrangement hindered the identification of transcripts corresponding to other regions of rRNA that are highly conserved and/or are known to participate directly in protein synthesis. Principal Findings The identification of 14 additional small mitochondrial transcripts from P. falcipaurm and the assignment of 27 small RNAs (12 SSU RNAs totaling 804 nt, 15 LSU RNAs totaling 1233 nt) to specific regions of rRNA are supported by multiple lines of evidence. The regions now represented are highly similar to those of the small but contiguous mitochondrial rRNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. The P. falciparum rRNA fragments cluster on the interfaces of the two ribosomal subunits in the three-dimensional structure of the ribosome. Significance All of the rRNA fragments are now presumed to have been identified with experimental methods, and nearly all of these have been mapped onto the SSU and LSU rRNAs. Conversely, all regions of the rRNAs that are known to be directly associated with protein synthesis have been identified in the P. falciparum mitochondrial genome and RNA transcripts. The fragmentation of the rRNA in the P. falciparum mitochondrion is the most extreme example of any rRNA fragmentation discovered. PMID:22761677

  3. Protein farnesyltransferase and protein prenylation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Debopam; Da Silva, Thiago; Barger, Jennifer; Paquette, Steve; Patel, Hetal; Patterson, Shelley; Allen, Charles M

    2002-11-01

    Comparison of the malaria parasite and mammalian protein prenyltransferases and their cellular substrates is important for establishing this enzyme as a target for developing antimalarial agents. Nineteen heptapeptides differing only in their carboxyl-terminal amino acid were tested as alternative substrates of partially purified Plasmodium falciparum protein farnesyltransferase. Only NRSCAIM and NRSCAIQ serve as substrates, with NRSCAIM being the best. Peptidomimetics, FTI-276 and GGTI-287, inhibit the transferase with IC(50) values of 1 and 32 nm, respectively. Incubation of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes with [(3)H]farnesol labels 50- and 22-28-kDa proteins, whereas [(3)H]geranylgeraniol labels only 22-28-kDa proteins. The 50-kDa protein is shown to be farnesylated, whereas the 22-28-kDa proteins are geranylgeranylated, irrespective of the labeling prenol. Protein labeling is inhibited more than 50% by either 5 microm FTI-277 or GGTI-298. The same concentration of inhibitors also inhibits parasite growth from the ring stage by 50%, decreases expression of prenylated proteins as measured with prenyl-specific antibody, and inhibits parasite differentiation beyond the trophozoite stage. Furthermore, differentiation specific prenylation of P. falciparum proteins is demonstrated. Protein labeling is detected predominantly during the trophozoite to schizont and schizont to ring transitions. These results demonstrate unique properties of protein prenylation in P. falciparum: a limited specificity of the farnesyltransferase for peptide substrates compared with mammalian enzymes, the ability to use farnesol to label both farnesyl and geranylgeranyl moieties on proteins, differentiation specific protein prenylation, and the ability of peptidomimetic prenyltransferase inhibitors to block parasite differentiation.

  4. CRISPR-mediated genome editing of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marcus Cs; Fidock, David A

    2014-01-01

    The development of the CRISPR-Cas system is revolutionizing genome editing in a variety of organisms. The system has now been used to manipulate the genome of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal malaria-causing species. The ability to generate gene deletions or nucleotide substitutions rapidly and economically promises to accelerate the analysis of novel drug targets and to help elucidate the function of specific genes or gene families, while complementing genome-wide association studies.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum genetic crosses in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Ashley M.; Pinapati, Richard S.; Cheeseman, Ian H.; Camargo, Nelly; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Checkley, Lisa A.; Nair, Shalini; Hutyra, Carolyn A.; Nosten, François H.; Anderson, Timothy J. C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic crosses of phenotypically distinct strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are a powerful tool for identifying genes controlling drug resistance and other key phenotypes. Previous studies relied on the isolation of recombinant parasites from splenectomized chimpanzees, a research avenue that is no longer available. Here, we demonstrate that human-liver chimeric mice support recovery of recombinant progeny for the identification of genetic determinants of parasite traits and adaptations. PMID:26030447

  6. Parasite-induced permeation of nucleosides in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Upston, J M; Gero, A M

    1995-06-14

    A mechanism which mediates the transport of the nonphysiological nucleoside, L-adenosine, was demonstrated in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes and naturally released merozoites. L-Adenosine was not a substrate for influx in freed intraerythrocytic parasites or in normal human erythrocytes nor was L-adenosine transported in a variety of cell types including other parasitic protozoa such as Crithidia luciliae, Trichomonas vaginalis, Giardia intestinalis, or the mammalian cells, Buffalo Green Monkey and HeLa cells. L-Adenosine transport in P. falciparum infected cells was nonsaturable, with a rate of 0.13 +/- 0.01 pmol/microliter cell water per s per microM L-adenosine, yet the transport was inhibited by furosemide, phloridzin and piperine with IC50 values between 1-13 microM, distinguishing the transport pathway from simple diffusion. The channel-like permeation was selective as disaccharides were not permeable to parasitised cells. In addition, an unusual metabolic property of parasitic adenosine deaminase was found in that L-adenosine was metabolised to L-inosine by both P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and merozoites, an activity which was inhibited by 50 nM deoxycoformycin. No other cell type examined displayed this enzymic activity. The results further substantiate that nucleoside transport in P. falciparum infected cells was significantly altered compared to uninfected erythrocytes and that L-adenosine transport and metabolism was a biochemical property of Plasmodium infected cells and merozoites and not found in normal erythrocytes nor any of the other cell types investigated.

  7. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using /sup 125/T-antibodies were done.

  8. An outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait.

    PubMed

    Preston-Thomas, Annie; Gair, Richard W; Hosking, Kelly A; Devine, Gregor J; Donohue, Steven D

    2012-06-01

    This report describes the largest outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Torres Strait for more than 25 years. It details factors that may have contributed to the outbreak, the public health response and implications for the broader region. Eight cases of locally-acquired falciparum malaria occurred on Saibai and Dauan islands during March and April 2011. Including imports, there were 17 P. falciparum notifications between February and May 2011. Three cases of pure P. vivax malaria that might have been locally acquired have been omitted from this report. Malaria is endemic on the nearby coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG), and regularly imported to the Torres Strait where a competent vector exists in sufficient numbers to transmit the disease to the local population. The most common malaria vectors in northern Australia and Torres Strait are the Anopheles farauti complex. Factors contributing to the outbreak may include an increase in travel between the outer islands and PNG, inadequate local vector control and late or missed diagnoses of malaria. Outbreak management involved intensive case finding and treatment, vector control and health promotion. Reducing the risk of future outbreaks requires studies of vector behaviour, ecology and management, health promotion, improvements to protective infrastructure, and clinical guideline revision. Further malaria outbreaks are likely in the Torres Strait and elsewhere in northern Australia. It is important to maintain awareness and be prepared to respond rapidly. PMID:23186217

  9. Pfcrt Gene in Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates from Muzaffargarh, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Sumrin; Tanveer, Akhtar; Ali, Akbar; Bilal, Hazrat; Muhammad Saleem, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of different species of Plasmodium and haplotypes of pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum from the selected area. Methods: Overall, 10,372 blood films of suspected malarial patients were examined microscopically from rural health center Sinawan, district Muzaffargarh, Pakistan from November 2008 to November 2010. P. falciparum positive samples (both whole blood and FTA blood spotted cards) were used for DNA extraction. Nested PCR was used to amplify the pfcrt (codon 72–76) gene fragment. Sequencing was carried out to find the haplotypes in the amplified fragment of pfcrt gene. Result: Over all slide positivity rate (SPR), P. vivax and P. falciparum positivity rate was 21.40 %, 19.37 % and 2.03% respectively. FTA blood spotted cards were equally efficient in the blood storage for PCR and sequencing. Analysis of sequencing results of pfcrt showed only one type of haplotype SagtVMNT (AGTGTAATGAATACA) from codon 72–76 in all samples. Conclusion: The results show high prevalence of CQ resistance and AQ resistant genes. AQ is not recommended to be used as a partner drug in ACT in this locality, so as to ward off future catastrophes. PMID:26623432

  10. Aminopeptidase activity in seminal plasma and effect of dilution rate on rabbit reproductive performance after insemination with an extender supplemented with buserelin acetate.

    PubMed

    Viudes-de-Castro, M P; Mocé, E; Lavara, R; Marco-Jiménez, F; Vicente, J S

    2014-06-01

    Ovulation induction in artificially inseminated rabbits by adding GnRH synthetic analogues in the seminal doses is a welfare-orientated method to induce ovulation in rabbits and could have some advantages in field practice. This study was conducted to determine the effect of male genotype on the aminopeptidase activity in rabbit seminal plasma and the effects of dilution rate of semen on availability and reproductive performance when buserelin acetate is added to the seminal dose. To study the aminopeptidase activity, 12 mature bucks belonging to a paternal line and 12 from a maternal line were used. The bucks from the paternal line were used to study the effect of dilution rate on the availability of buserelin acetate after 2 hours of dilution and on the reproductive performance of the doses after artificial insemination of 389 commercial crossbreed does. Aminopeptidase activity in seminal plasma is dependent on the male genotype. The paternal line resulted 27% more aminopeptidase activity than the maternal line (P < 0.05). On the other hand, semen diluted 1:20 exhibited a marked increase in the availability of buserelin acetate and the fertility in this group was significantly higher than females from dilution rate 1:5 group, which showed similar results to that of the negative control group (does inseminated with semen diluted 1:20 in non-GnRH-supplemented extender). We conclude that the bioavailability of buserelin acetate when added to the seminal dose appears to be determined by the activity of the existing aminopeptidases and is consequently affected by the dilution rate used to prepare the artificial insemination doses.

  11. Dietary fatty acid composition affects aminopeptidase activities in the testes of mice.

    PubMed

    Arechaga, Garbiñe; Prieto, Isabel; Segarra, Ana B; Alba, Francisco; Ruiz-Larrea, María B; Ruiz-Sanz, José I; de Gasparo, Marc; Ramirez, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    The autocrine/paracrine control mechanisms of local factors, such as the renin-angiotensin system and the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), seem to play a relevant role in testicular physiology. It has been proposed that dietary fat composition influences male reproductive function modifying the cholesterol-phospholipid composition of testicular plasma membranes. Modifications in the composition and physical properties of the membranes may lead to alterations in the activities of membrane-bound (M-B) enzymes. We have previously demonstrated that cholesterol and steroid hormones affect aminopeptidase (AP) activities. Dietary fatty acids with different degrees of saturation modified AP activities in the serum of mice and an olive oil supplemented diet influenced the AP activities in the testes of mice. We hypothesized that the modification of dietary fat composition may affect angiotensin- [glutamyl-AP (GluAP), aspartyl-AP (AspAP)] and TRH- [pyroglutamyl-AP (pGluAP)] degrading activities in the testis. In this study, we investigated the effect of diets supplemented with sunflower oil (SFO), fish oil (FO), olive oil (OO), lard (L) or coconut oil (CO) on soluble (Sol) and M-B GluAP, AspAP and pGluAP in mice testis, using arylamides as substrates. Sol GluAP activity did not show differences among groups. However, Sol AspAP and Sol pGluAP progressively decreased with the degree of saturation of the fatty acid used in the diet. In contrast, M-B GluAP progressively increased with the degree of saturation of the fatty acid used in the diet. For M-B AspAP activity, mice fed diets containing FO showed significantly higher levels than those fed diets containing SFO, OO and L but not those containing CO. For M-B pGluAP activity, the highest levels were observed for mice fed diets containing FO and OO. The present data suggest that the type of fat used in the diet may influence the autocrine/paracrine functions of locally synthesized angiotensin peptides and TRH in the testis

  12. Two molecular species of oxytocinase (L-cystine aminopeptidase) in human placenta: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Itoh, C; Watanabe, M; Nagamatsu, A; Soeda, S; Kawarabayashi, T; Shimeno, H

    1997-01-01

    Two different forms of oxytocinase (L-cystine aminopeptidase, CAP; EC 3.4.11.3) were purified from the 9000 g and 105000 g precipitate fractions of human placenta homogenate by sequential chromatography on columns of hydroxyapatite, DE-32, nickel ion affinity, and Sephadex G-200. One species (CAP-I) purifed from the mitochondrial/lysosomal fraction migrated on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 61 kDa; the other (CAP-II) from the microsomal fraction was composed of two subunits with molecular masses of 56 and 40 kDa. The molecular masses of CAP-I and CAP-II estimated by gel filtration were 64 and 97 kDa, respectively. The specific activities of the two species for S-benzyl-L-cysteine p-nitroanilide increased by 357- (for CAP-I) and 139-fold (for CAP-II) compared with the starting preparations. The optimal pH values toward the artificial substrate were approx. 7.4-8.0 for CAP-I and 6.8-8.0 for CAP-II. The Km and Vmax values toward oxytocin were 5.6 microM and 23.4 micromol/h/mg protein for CAP-I, and 38 microM and 15.6 micromol/h/mg protein for CAP-II. Both enzymes were inhibited by the metal-chelating agents, EDTA and o-phenanthroline, whereas they were specifically activated by addition of Co2+: CAP-I was more sensitive to these reagents than CAP-II. L-Methionine strongly inhibited CAP-I, while CAP-II activity was only slightly affected. CAP-II was more sensitive to amastatin than CAP-I. Thus, the two enzymes are quite distinct in their molecular nature and biochemical properties. They may play a regulatory role in the metabolism of oxytocin and other biologically active peptides in intact placenta.

  13. Influence of bestatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidases, on T and B lymphocyte subsets in mice.

    PubMed

    Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Suszko, A; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2011-01-01

    Bestatin, a low-molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidase N which has been demonstrated to have antitumor and immunomodulatory effects. The effects of bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally once, five or ten times to mice on the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets (CD4+CD8+, CD4-CD8-, CD4+, CD8+) in the thymus and T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were studied. It has been found that bestatin administered ten times at doses of 10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes and lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph nodes. Bestatin also changed the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral lymphatic organs. Five and ten exposures to bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) increased the absolute count of both immature CD4+CD8+ and CD4-CD8- thymic cells. Moreover, both a single and multiple administration of bestatin (1 and 0.1 mg/kg) decreased the percentage and absolute count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Both a single and multiple administration of bestatin at all the doses under investigation augmented the percentage and the absolute count of CD19+ (B lymphocytes) in the peripheral lymphatic organs. The results of the study show that there is a relationship between the effect induced by bestatin and the dose of the drug as well as the number of doses applied. The strongest effect on the T and B lymphocyte subsets was noted after five injections of bestatin at doses of 1 and 0.1 mg/kg.

  14. Purification and characterization of hyperthermotolerant leucine aminopeptidase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans 47b.

    PubMed

    Deejing, Somkid; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2005-07-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, which we designated as Geobacillus thermoleovorans 47b was isolated from a hot spring in Beppu, Oita Prefecture, Japan, on the basis of its ability to grow on bitter peptides as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The cell-free extract from G. thermoleovorans 47b contained leucine aminopeptidase (LAP; EC 3.4.11.10), which was purified 164-fold to homogeneity in seven steps, using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by the column chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl, hydroxyapatite, MonoQ and Superdex 200 PC gel filtration, followed again by MonoQ and hydroxyapatite. The enzyme was a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 42,977.2 Da, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and was found to be thermostable at 90 degrees C for up to 1 h. Its optimal pH and temperature were observed to be 7.6-7.8 and 60 degrees C, respectively, and it had high activity towards the substrates Leu-p-nitroanilide (p-NA)(100%), Arg-p-NA (56.3%) and LeuGlyGly (486%). The K(m) and V(max) values for Leu-p-NA and LeuGlyGly were 0.658 mM and 25.0 mM and 236.2 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 1,149 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. The turnover rate (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/ K(m)) for Leu-p-NA and LeuGlyGly were 10,179 s(-1) and 49,543 s(-1) and 15,470 mM(-1 ) s(-1) and 1981.7 mM(-1 ) s(-1), respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, dithiothreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol, iodoacetate and bestatin; and its apoenzyme was found to be reactivated by Co(2+) .

  15. A new world malaria map: Plasmodium falciparum endemicity in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmission intensity affects almost all aspects of malaria epidemiology and the impact of malaria on human populations. Maps of transmission intensity are necessary to identify populations at different levels of risk and to evaluate objectively options for disease control. To remain relevant operationally, such maps must be updated frequently. Following the first global effort to map Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity in 2007, this paper describes the generation of a new world map for the year 2010. This analysis is extended to provide the first global estimates of two other metrics of transmission intensity for P. falciparum that underpin contemporary questions in malaria control: the entomological inoculation rate (PfEIR) and the basic reproductive number (PfR). Methods Annual parasite incidence data for 13,449 administrative units in 43 endemic countries were sourced to define the spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission in 2010 and 22,212 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) surveys were used in a model-based geostatistical (MBG) prediction to create a continuous contemporary surface of malaria endemicity within these limits. A suite of transmission models were developed that link PfPR to PfEIR and PfR and these were fitted to field data. These models were combined with the PfPR map to create new global predictions of PfEIR and PfR. All output maps included measured uncertainty. Results An estimated 1.13 and 1.44 billion people worldwide were at risk of unstable and stable P. falciparum malaria, respectively. The majority of the endemic world was predicted with a median PfEIR of less than one and a median PfRc of less than two. Values of either metric exceeding 10 were almost exclusive to Africa. The uncertainty described in both PfEIR and PfR was substantial in regions of intense transmission. Conclusions The year 2010 has a particular significance as an evaluation milestone for malaria global health policy. The maps presented here

  16. Possible Clinical Failure of Artemether-Lumefantrine in an Italian Traveler with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Ernestina C.; Traverso, Antonio; Giacomazzi, Claudio G.

    2011-01-01

    Artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs) are recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in endemic areas with multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum. We report a case of possible artemether-lumefantrine clinical failure in an Italian traveler with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria imported from Democratic Republic of Congo. PMID:22084655

  17. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  18. Falciparum malaria and climate change in the northwest frontier province of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bouma, M J; Dye, C; van der Kaay, H J

    1996-08-01

    Following a striking increase in the severity of autumnal outbreaks of Plasmodium falciparum during the last decade in the Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan, the role of climatologic variables was investigated. A multivariate analysis showed that during the transmission season of P. falciparum, the amount of rainfall in September and October, the temperature in November and December, and the humidity in December were all correlated (r2 = 0.82) with two measures of P. falciparum, the falciparum rate (percent of slides examined positive for P. falciparum) since 1981 and the annual P. falciparum proportion (percent of all malaria infections diagnosed as P. falciparum) since 1978. Climatologic records since 1876 show an increase in mean November and December temperatures by 2 degrees C and 1.5 degrees C, respectively, and in October rainfall. Mean humidity in December has also been increasing since 1950. These climatologic changes in the area appear to have made conditions for transmission of P. falciparum more favorable, and may account for the increase in incidence observed in the NWFP in recent years.

  19. Efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Mejia Torres, Rosa Elena; Banegas, Engels Ilich; Mendoza, Meisy; Diaz, Cesar; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Fontecha, Gustavo A; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Goldman, Ira; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Zambrano, Jose Orlinder Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is officially used for the primary treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of CQ for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in the municipality of Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios, Honduras was evaluated using the Pan American Health Organization-World Health Organization protocol with a follow-up of 28 days. Sixty-eight patients from 6 months to 60 years of age microscopically diagnosed with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were included in the final analysis. All patients who were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg over 3 days) cleared parasitemia by day 3 and acquired no new P. falciparum infection within 28 days of follow-up. All the parasite samples sequenced for CQ resistance mutations (pfcrt) showed only the CQ-sensitive genotype (CVMNK). This finding shows that CQ remains highly efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Gracias a Dios, Honduras.

  20. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of affinity-purified Plasmodium falciparum exoantigens in Aotus nancymai monkeys.

    PubMed

    James, M A; Fajfar-Whetstone, C J; Kakoma, I; Buese, M M; Clabaugh, G W; Hansen, R; Ristic, M

    1991-03-01

    Soluble Plasmodium falciparum polypeptides, affinity-purified from culture supernatant fluids using sequential immunoadsorptions employing both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, induced protective immunity against experimental falciparum malaria in Peruvian Aotus nancymai monkeys. Susceptible monkeys were vaccinated with polypeptides affinity-purified from supernatant fluids of P. falciparum Indochina I/CDC cultures. Eighteen animals (6 immunized with purified antigens plus adjuvants, 6 injected with only the adjuvant preparation, and 6 untreated) were challenged with whole blood containing monkey-adapted virulent organisms of the Indochina I/CDC strain. Selected hematologic, serologic and parasitologic profiles served as potential indicators of protection. This immunogen, when fortified with an aluminum hydroxide/Quil-A saponin adjuvant combination, elicited good antibody responses to major P. falciparum antigens. Protection in vaccinated animals was evidenced by a significantly limited reduction in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels and a relatively moderate course of infection after homologous needle-challenge with Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum parasites.

  1. Identification of the molecular basis of inhibitor selectivity between the human and streptococcal type I methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Arya, Tarun; Reddi, Ravikumar; Kishor, Chandan; Ganji, Roopa Jones; Bhukya, Supriya; Gumpena, Rajesh; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-03-12

    The methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) family is responsible for the cleavage of the initiator methionine from newly synthesized proteins. Currently, there are no small molecule inhibitors that show selectivity toward the bacterial MetAPs compared to the human enzyme. In our current study, we have screened 20 α-aminophosphonate derivatives and identified a molecule (compound 15) that selectively inhibits the S. pneumonia MetAP in low micromolar range but not the human enzyme. Further bioinformatics, biochemical, and structural analyses suggested that phenylalanine (F309) in the human enzyme and methionine (M205) in the S. pneumonia MetAP at the analogous position render them with different susceptibilities against the identified inhibitor. X-ray crystal structures of various inhibitors in complex with wild type and F309M enzyme further established the molecular basis for the inhibitor selectivity.

  2. Chemical shift assignments of zinc finger domain of methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Arya, Tarun; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-10-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase Type I (MetAP1) cleaves the initiator methionine from about 70 % of all newly synthesized proteins in almost every living cell. Human MetAP1 is a two domain protein with a zinc finger on the N-terminus and a catalytic domain on the C-terminus. Here, we report the chemical shift assignments of the amino terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) (1-83 residues) of the human MetAP1 derived by using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. We were able to assign the chemical shifts of ZBD of MetAP1 nearly complete, which reveal two helical fragments involving residues P44-L49 (α1) and Q59-K82 (α2). The protein structure unfolds upon complex formation with the addition of 2 M excess EDTA, indicated by the appearance of amide resonances in the random coil chemical shift region of (15)NHSQC spectrum.

  3. The trigger enzyme PepA (aminopeptidase A) of Escherichia coli, a transcriptional repressor that generates positive supercoiling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Nadal, Marc; Charlier, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli aminopeptidase A (PepA) is a trigger enzyme endowed with catalytic activity and DNA-binding properties prominent in transcriptional regulation and site-specific DNA recombination. The current work demonstrates that PepA is a repressor in its own right, capable of specifically inhibiting transcription initiation at promoter P1 of the carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase. Furthermore, in vitro topology studies performed with DNA minicircles demonstrate that PepA binding constrains a single positive supercoil in the carP1 control region. Such a topological event is understood to constitute an impediment to transcription initiation and may serve as a mechanism to regulate gene expression.

  4. [Proteolysis of simple glyprolines by leucine aminopeptidase and enzymes from nasal slime, brain membranes, and rat blood].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; V'iunova, T V; Nagaev, I Iu; Andreeva, L A; Miasoedov, N F

    2013-01-01

    Proteolysis of Pro-Gly-Pro-Leu, Pro-Gly-Pro-Gly and Pro-Gly-Pro were studied comparatively to Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (semax). It is shown that all three peptides are considerably more stable to proteolysis by N-leucine-aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1, Sigma, type VI, 9.2 units/mg), and by enzymes of nasal slime, brain microsomal fractions, and rat blood. Metabolites of the proteolysis showed that semax derives His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro only, Pro-Gly-Pro-Leu forms Gly-Pro-Leu, Pro-Gly-Pro and Gly-Pro, Pro-Gly-Pro-Gly gives Pro-Gly-Pro and Gly-Pro, and Pro-Gly-Pro forms Gly-Pro.

  5. Histidine 450 plays a critical role in catalysis and, with Ca2+, contributes to the substrate specificity of aminopeptidase A.

    PubMed

    Iturrioz, X; Vazeux, G; Célérier, J; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortès, C

    2000-03-21

    Aminopeptidase A (EC 3.4.11.7, APA) is a 130 kDa membrane-bound protease that contains the HEXXH consensus sequence found in the zinc metalloprotease family, the zincins. In addition to the catalytic zinc atom, APA contains a Ca2+ ion that increases its enzymatic activity. Aligning the sequences of the mouse APA, APN, and other monozinc aminopeptidases led to the identification of a conserved histidine (His 450 in mouse APA). Replacing this residue with a phenylalanine (Phe 450) by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in markedly lower levels of APA activity and in a change in the sensitivity of APA to Ca2+ (the EC50 for Ca2+ was 25 microM in the wild type and only 279 microM in the mutant). Kinetic studies, with a supramaximal Ca2+ concentration (4 mM), showed that the Km of the mutant enzyme for the substrate alpha-L-glutamyl-beta-naphthylamide was 25 times higher than that of the wild type, whereas the kcat value was much lower (factor of 22). Thus, overall, the wild-type enzyme had a cleavage efficiency that was 571 times higher than that of the mutant. The inhibitory potencies of two different classes of inhibitors, a glutamate thiol and a glutamate phosphonate compound, were significantly lower (factors of 19 and 22, respectively) for the mutated enzyme than for the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, inhibition by lysine thiol was unaffected. These data strongly suggest that His 450 is critical for catalytic activity and is involved in substrate binding via interaction with the P1 carboxylate side chain of the substrate. Furthermore, His 450, together with Ca2+, may contribute to the substrate specificity of APA for N-terminal acidic amino acid residues.

  6. TsPAP1 encodes a novel plant prolyl aminopeptidase whose expression is induced in response to suboptimal growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Szawlowska, Urszula; Grabowska, Agnieszka; Zdunek-Zastocka, Edyta; Bielawski, Wieslaw

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cDNA encoding a novel plant prolyl aminopeptidase, TsPAP1, was obtained from triticale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cloned TsPAP1 cDNA is 1387 bp long and encodes a protein of 390 amino acids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The deduced TsPAP1 protein revealed characteristics of the monomeric bacterial PAPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TsPAP1 mRNA level increased under drought, salinity and in the presence of metal ions. -- Abstract: A triticale cDNA encoding a prolyl aminopeptidase (PAP) was obtained by RT-PCR and has been designated as TsPAP1. The cloned cDNA is 1387 bp long and encodes a protein of 390 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 43.9 kDa. The deduced TsPAP1 protein exhibits a considerable sequence identity with the biochemically characterized bacterial and fungal PAP proteins of small molecular masses ({approx}35 kDa). Moreover, the presence of conserved regions that are characteristic for bacterial monomeric PAP enzymes (the GGSWG motif, the localization of the catalytic triad residues and the segment involved in substrate binding) has also been noted. Primary structure analysis and phylogenetic analysis revealed that TsPAP1 encodes a novel plant PAP protein that is distinct from the multimeric proteins that have thus far been characterized in plants and whose counterparts have been recognized only in bacteria and fungi. A significant increase in the TsPAP1 transcript level in the shoots of triticale plants was observed under drought and saline conditions as well as in the presence of cadmium and aluminium ions in the nutrient medium. This paper is the first report describing changes in the transcript levels of any plant PAP in response to suboptimal growth conditions.

  7. [Plasmodium falciparum malaria: evaluation of three imported cases].

    PubMed

    İnkaya, Ahmet Çağkan; Kaya, Filiz; Yıldız, İrem; Uzun, Ömrüm; Ergüven, Sibel

    2016-04-01

    Among Plasmodium species the causative agent of malaria in Turkey is P.vivax, however the incidence of imported falciparum malaria cases is steadily increasing. P.falciparum may cause severe malaria with the involvement of central nervous system, acute renal failure, severe anemia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Furhermore most of the casualties due to malaria are related with P.falciparum. There is recently, a considerable increase in malaria infections especially in tropical areas. In this report, three cases, who have admitted to our hospital with three different clinical presentations of falciparum malaria, and all shared common history of travelling to Africa were presented. First case was a 27 years old, male patient who returned from Malawi seven days ago where he stayed for two weeks. He admitted to our hospital with the complaints of sensation of cold, shivering and fever. In physical examination his body temperature was 37.9°C, C-reactive protein level was high, and the other systemic results were normal. The second case was a 25 years old, male patient who returned from Gambia two weeks ago. He was suffering from fever, headache, shivering and unable to maintain his balance. The patient's body temperature was 38°C. Laboratory tests revealed hyperbilirubinemia and thrombocytopenia. Parasitological examination of the Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smear of these two patients demonstrated ring forms compatible with P.falciparum. Treatment was commenced with arthemeter plus lumefantrine, resulting with complete cure. Third case was a 46 years old, male patient who had been working in Uganda, and returned to Turkey two weeks ago. He had sudden onset of fever, headache, nausea and vomiting and impaired consciousness. His peripheral blood smear revealed ring-formed trophozoites and banana-shaped gametocytes of P.falciparum. Arthemeter plus lumefantrine therapy was started, however, he developed severe thrombocytopenia and jaundice under treatment

  8. A World Malaria Map: Plasmodium falciparum Endemicity in 2007

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Simon I; Guerra, Carlos A; Gething, Peter W; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Noor, Abdisalan M; Kabaria, Caroline W; Manh, Bui H; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F; Brooker, Simon; Smith, David L; Moyeed, Rana A; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efficient allocation of resources to intervene against malaria requires a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of malaria risk. It is exactly 40 y since the last global map of malaria endemicity was published. This paper describes the generation of a new world map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity for the year 2007. Methods and Findings A total of 8,938 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) surveys were identified using a variety of exhaustive search strategies. Of these, 7,953 passed strict data fidelity tests for inclusion into a global database of PfPR data, age-standardized to 2–10 y for endemicity mapping. A model-based geostatistical procedure was used to create a continuous surface of malaria endemicity within previously defined stable spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission. These procedures were implemented within a Bayesian statistical framework so that the uncertainty of these predictions could be evaluated robustly. The uncertainty was expressed as the probability of predicting correctly one of three endemicity classes; previously stratified to be an informative guide for malaria control. Population at risk estimates, adjusted for the transmission modifying effects of urbanization in Africa, were then derived with reference to human population surfaces in 2007. Of the 1.38 billion people at risk of stable P. falciparum malaria, 0.69 billion were found in Central and South East Asia (CSE Asia), 0.66 billion in Africa, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia (Africa+), and 0.04 billion in the Americas. All those exposed to stable risk in the Americas were in the lowest endemicity class (PfPR2−10 ≤ 5%). The vast majority (88%) of those living under stable risk in CSE Asia were also in this low endemicity class; a small remainder (11%) were in the intermediate endemicity class (PfPR2−10 > 5 to < 40%); and the remaining fraction (1%) in high endemicity (PfPR2−10 ≥ 40%) areas. High endemicity was widespread in the

  9. Identification of Novel Plasmodium falciparum Hexokinase Inhibitors with Antiparasitic Activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Patrick, Stephen L; Blanding, Walker M; Dwivedi, Varun; Suryadi, Jimmy; Golden, Jennifer E; Coussens, Nathan P; Lee, Olivia W; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Hall, Matthew D; Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Drew, Mark E; Morris, James C

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest species of malaria parasites, is dependent on glycolysis for the generation of ATP during the pathogenic red blood cell stage. Hexokinase (HK) catalyzes the first step in glycolysis, transferring the γ-phosphoryl group of ATP to glucose to yield glucose-6-phosphate. Here, we describe the validation of a high-throughput assay for screening small-molecule collections to identify inhibitors of the P. falciparum HK (PfHK). The assay, which employed an ADP-Glo reporter system in a 1,536-well-plate format, was robust with a signal-to-background ratio of 3.4 ± 1.2, a coefficient of variation of 6.8% ± 2.9%, and a Z'-factor of 0.75 ± 0.08. Using this assay, we screened 57,654 molecules from multiple small-molecule collections. Confirmed hits were resolved into four clusters on the basis of structural relatedness. Multiple singleton hits were also identified. The most potent inhibitors had 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as ∼1 μM, and several were found to have low-micromolar 50% effective concentrations against asexual intraerythrocytic-stage P. falciparum parasites. These molecules additionally demonstrated limited toxicity against a panel of mammalian cells. The identification of PfHK inhibitors with antiparasitic activity using this validated screening assay is encouraging, as it justifies additional HTS campaigns with more structurally amenable libraries for the identification of potential leads for future therapeutic development. PMID:27458230

  10. Amodiaquine failure associated with erythrocytic glutathione in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Lina; Pabón, Adriana; López, Carlos; Ochoa, Aleida; Blair, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between production of glutathione and the therapeutic response to amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy in Plasmodium falciparum non-complicated malaria patients. Methodology Therapeutic response to AQ was evaluated in 32 patients with falciparum malaria in two townships of Antioquia, Colombia, and followed-up for 28 days. For every patient, total glutathione and enzymatic activity (glutathione reductase, GR, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, γ-GCS) were determined in parasitized erythrocytes, non-infected erythrocytes and free parasites, on the starting day (day zero, before ingestion of AQ) and on the day of failure (in case of occurrence). Results There was found an AQ failure of 31.25%. Independent of the therapeutic response, on the starting day and on the day of failure, lower total glutathione concentration and higher GR activities in parasitized erythrocytes were found, compared with non-infected erythrocytes (p < 0.003). In addition, only on the day of failure, γ-GCS activity of parasitized erythrocytes was higher, compared with that of healthy erythrocytes (p = 0.01). Parasitized and non-parasitized erythrocytes in therapeutic failure patients (TF) had higher total glutathione on the starting day compared with those of adequate clinical response (ACR) (p < 0.02). Parasitized erythrocytes of TF patients showed lower total glutathione on the failure day, compared with starting day (p = 0.017). No differences was seen in the GR and γ-GCS activities by compartment, neither between the two therapeutic response groups nor between the two treatment days. Conclusion This study is a first approach to explaining P. falciparum therapeutic failure in humans through differences in glutathione metabolism in TF and ACR patients. These results suggest a role for glutathione in the therapeutic failure to antimalarials. PMID:17451604

  11. Transition State Analogues of Plasmodium falciparum and Human Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Evans, Gary B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Harris, Lawrence D.; Fröhlich, Richard F. G.; Tyler, Peter C.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Cassera, María B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The survival and proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum parasites and human cancer cells require de novo pyrimidine synthesis to supply RNA and DNA precursors. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is an indispensible component in this metabolic pathway and is a target for antimalarials and antitumor drugs. P. falciparum (Pf) and Homo sapiens (Hs) OPRTs are characterized by highly dissociative transition states with ribocation character. On the basis of the geometrical and electrostatic features of the PfOPRT and HsOPRT transition states, analogues were designed, synthesized, and tested as inhibitors. Iminoribitol mimics of the ribocation transition state in linkage to pyrimidine mimics using methylene or ethylene linkers gave dissociation constants (Kd) as low as 80 nm. Inhibitors with pyrrolidine groups as ribocation mimics displayed slightly weaker binding affinities for OPRTs. Interestingly, p-nitrophenyl riboside 5′-phosphate bound to OPRTs with Kd values near 40 nm. Analogues designed with a C5-pyrimidine carbon–carbon bond to ribocation mimics gave Kd values in the range of 80–500 nm. Acyclic inhibitors with achiral serinol groups as the ribocation mimics also displayed nanomolar inhibition against OPRTs. In comparison with the nucleoside derivatives, inhibition constants of their corresponding 5′-phosphorylated transition state analogues are largely unchanged, an unusual property for a nucleotide-binding site. In silico docking of the best inhibitor into the HsOPRT active site supported an extensive hydrogen bond network associated with the tight binding affinity. These OPRT transition state analogues identify crucial components of potent inhibitors targeting OPRT enzymes. Despite their tight binding to the targets, the inhibitors did not kill cultured P. falciparum. PMID:24158442

  12. [Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: global status and basic research].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shao-min; Wang, Man-yuan

    2014-10-01

    Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has been identified by WHO in the Greater Mekong subregion. While there is no report on artemisinin resistance in Africa and South America by now, related surveillance measures have been taken place. The genes related artemisinin-resistance has been identified and the molecular markers will be used for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance. The emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance worldwide is a present danger and needs more attention. This article reviews the progress of artemisininresistance malaria parasites and artemisinin-based combination therapies. PMID:25726605

  13. The epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes: weapons of mass dispersion.

    PubMed

    Drakeley, Chris; Sutherland, Colin; Bousema, J Teun; Sauerwein, Robert W; Targett, Geoffrey A T

    2006-09-01

    Much of the epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum in Sub-Saharan Africa focuses on the prevalence patterns of asexual parasites in people of different ages, whereas the gametocytes that propagate the disease are often neglected. One expected benefit of the widespread introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria is a reduction in gametocyte carriage. However, the factors that affect the transmission of parasites from humans to mosquitoes show complex dynamics in relation to the intensity and seasonality of malaria transmission, and thus such benefits might not be automatic. Here, we review data on gametocyte carriage in the context of the development of naturally acquired immunity and population infectivity. PMID:16846756

  14. Replication and maintenance of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome.

    PubMed

    Milton, Morgan E; Nelson, Scott W

    2016-08-01

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for many devastating diseases including malaria (Plasmodium spp.), toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii), babesiosis (Babesia bovis), and cyclosporiasis (Cyclospora cayetanensis). Most Apicomplexans contain a unique and essential organelle called the apicoplast. Derived from an ancient chloroplast, the apicoplast replicates and maintains a 35 kilobase (kb) circular genome. Due to its essential nature within the parasite, drugs targeted to proteins involved in DNA replication and repair of the apicoplast should be potent and specific. This review summarizes the current knowledge surrounding the replication and repair of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome and identifies several putative proteins involved in replication and repair pathways. PMID:27338018

  15. The redox systems of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax: comparison, in silico analyses and inhibitor studies.

    PubMed

    Mohring, F; Pretzel, J; Jortzik, E; Becker, K

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the most severe form of human malaria. P. vivax, in contrast, is the most widespread malaria parasite with an enormous impact on health and economy, since the infection is characterized by high rates of relapses. Due to the mild course of malaria tertiana and complicated in vitro culturing conditions of P. vivax, most of the research on malaria parasites has focused on P. falciparum so far. The redox metabolism of P. falciparum is a promising target for novel antimalarial drugs, since maintaining a redox equilibrium is of fundamental importance for the parasite. P. falciparum contains a cytosolic glutathione and thioredoxin system, as well as redox systems in the apicoplast and the mitochondrion. In contrast to P. falciparum, little is known about the redox processes in P. vivax so far. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the redox metabolism in malaria parasites and provides a detailed in silico comparison of the known and mostly well characterized redox enzymes from P. falciparum and the largely unknown redox proteins from P. vivax. Known antimalarials at least partially mediating their antiparasitic activity by influencing the redox balance of Plasmodium, including dehydroepiandrosterone, Mannich bases, methylene blue, and naphthoquinones, are discussed. Furthermore, we present novel inhibitors identified via screening of a compound library from the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology, Jena that are active against the redox-related enzymes thioredoxin reductase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 6- phosphoglucono- lactonase from P. falciparum.

  16. Potentiation of antimalarial drug action by chlorpheniramine against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Sunan; Konthiang, Phattanapong

    2006-09-01

    Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, was assayed for in vitro antimalarial activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum T9/94 clone, by measuring the 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation. Chlorphenirame inhibited P. falciparum K1 and T9/94 growth with IC50 values of 136.0+/-40.2 microM and 102.0+/-22.6 microM respectively. A combination of antimalarial drug and chlorpheniramine was tested against resistant P. falciparum in vitro. Isobologram analysis showed that chlorpheniramine exerts marked synergistic action on chloroquine against P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. Chlorpheniramine also potentiated antimalarial action of mefloquine, quinine or pyronaridine against both of the resistant strains of P. falciparum. However, chlorpheniramine antagonism with artesunate was obtained in both P. falciparum K1 and T9/94. The results in this study indicate that antihistaminic drugs may be promising candidates for potentiating antimalarial drug action against drug resistant malarial parasites.

  17. Characterization of promoters and stable transfection by homologous and nonhomologous recombination in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, B S; Cowman, A F

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been severely limited by the inability to introduce or modify genes. In this paper we describe a system of stable transfection of P. falciparum using a Toxoplasma gondii dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene, modified to confer resistance to pyrimethamine, as a selectable marker. This gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the P. falciparum calmodulin gene flanking sequences. Transfected parasites generally maintained plasmids episomally while under selection; however, parasite clones containing integrated forms of the plasmid were obtained. Integration occurred by both homologous and nonhomologous recombination. In addition to the flanking sequence of the P. falciparum calmodulin gene, the 5' sequences of the P. falciparum and P. chabaudi dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase genes were also shown to be transcriptionally active in P. falciparum. The minimal 5' sequence that possessed significant transcriptional activity was determined for each gene and short sequences containing important transcriptional control elements were identified. These sequences will provide considerable flexibility in the future construction of plasmid vectors to be used for the expression of foreign genes or for the deletion or modification of P. falciparum genes of interest. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692985

  18. Discovery of potent and selective inhibitors of human aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 by screening libraries of phosphorus-containing amino acid and dipeptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Vassiliou, Stamatia; Mucha, Artur

    2016-08-15

    A collection of fifty phosphonic and phosphinic acids was screened for inhibition of ERAP1 and ERAP2, the human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases. The cooperative action of these enzymes is manifested by trimming a variety of antigenic precursors to be presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility class I. The SAR studies revealed several potent compounds, particularly among the phosphinic dipeptide analogues, that were strong inhibitors of ERAP2 (Ki=100-350nM). A wide structural diversity of the applied organophosphorus compounds, predominantly non-proteinogenic analogues, allowed identification of representatives selective toward only one form of ERAP. For example, N'-substituted α,β-diaminophosphonates and phosphinates exhibited potency only toward ERAP2, which is in agreement with the P1 basic substrate-oriented specificity. Such discriminating ligands are invaluable tools for elucidating the precise role of a particular aminopeptidase in the concerted function of antigen processing and in human diseases. PMID:27390066

  19. Response of falciparum malaria to different antimalarials in Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Ejov, M. N.; Tun, T.; Aung, S.; Sein, K.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the therapeutic efficacy of different treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the hospitals in Sagaing, northern and eastern Shan, to facilitate updating the existing national antimalarial drug policy. The proposed 14-day trial for monitoring the efficacy of treatments of uncomplicated falciparum malaria is an efficient method for identifying treatment failure patterns at the intermediate level (township hospital) in the Union of Myanmar. Minimal clinical and parasitological data for days 0-14 were required to classify treatment failure and success. Clinical and parasitiological responses on day 3 and days 4-14 were used as clear examples of early and late treatment failure, respectively. Mefloquine is five times more likely to be effective than chloroquine and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine (S-P), whereas chloroquine and S-P treatments have nearly identical failure patterns. The alarming frequency of clinical and parasitological failure (failure rate > 50%) following chloroquine treatment was reported in Sagaing and following S-P treatment in Sagaing and eastern Shan. PMID:10212515

  20. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R.; Becker, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world’s population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26639022

  1. Dynamic alteration in splenic function during acute falciparum malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Looareesuwan, S.; Ho, M.; Wattanagoon, Y.; White, N.J.; Warrell, D.A.; Bunnag, D.; Harinasuta, T.; Wyler, D.J.

    1987-09-10

    Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes lose their normal deformability and become susceptible to splenic filtration. In animal models, this is one mechanism of antimalarial defense. To assess the effect of acute falciparum malaria on splenic filtration, we measured the clearance of heated /sup 51/Cr-labeled autologous erythrocytes in 25 patients with acute falciparum malaria and in 10 uninfected controls. Two groups of patients could be distinguished. Sixteen patients had splenomegaly, markedly accelerated clearance of the labeled erythrocytes (clearance half-time, 8.4 +/- 4.4 minutes (mean +/- SD) vs. 62.5 +/- 36.5 minutes in controls; P less than 0.001), and a lower mean hematocrit than did the patients without splenomegaly (P less than 0.001). In the nine patients without splenomegaly, clearance was normal. After institution of antimalarial chemotherapy, however, the clearance in this group accelerated to supernormal rates similar to those in the patients with splenomegaly, but without the development of detectable splenomegaly. Clearance was not significantly altered by treatment in the group with splenomegaly. Six weeks later, normal clearance rates were reestablished in most patients in both groups. We conclude that splenic clearance of labeled erythrocytes is enhanced in patients with malaria if splenomegaly is present and is enhanced only after treatment if splenomegaly is absent. Whether this enhanced splenic function applies to parasite-infected erythrocytes in patients with malaria and has any clinical benefit will require further studies.

  2. Glycerol inhibits water permeation through Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liao Y

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) is a multifunctional membrane protein in the plasma membrane of P. falciparum, the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. The current literature has established the science of PfAQP's structure, functions, and hydrogen-bonding interactions but left unanswered the following fundamental question: does glycerol modulate water permeation through aquaglyceroporin that conducts both glycerol and water? This paper provides an affirmative answer to this question of essential importance to the protein's functions. On the basis of the chemical-potential profile of glycerol from the extracellular bulk region, throughout PfAQP's conducting channel, to the cytoplasmic bulk region, this study shows the existence of a bound state of glycerol inside aquaglyceroporin's permeation pore, from which the dissociation constant is approximately 14μM. A glycerol molecule occupying the bound state occludes the conducting pore through which permeating molecules line up in single file by hydrogen-bonding with one another and with the luminal residues of aquaglyceroporin. In this way, glycerol inhibits permeation of water and other permeants through aquaglyceroporin. The biological implications of this theory are discussed and shown to agree with the existent in vitro data. It turns out that the structure of aquaglyceroporin is perfect for the van der Waals interactions between the protein and glycerol to cause the existence of the bound state deep inside the conducting pore and, thus to play an unexpected but significant role in aquaglyceroporin's functions.

  3. In vitro sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Wongsrichanalai, C.; Wimonwattrawatee, T.; Sookto, P.; Laoboonchai, A.; Heppner, D. G.; Kyle, D. E.; Wernsdorfer, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the in vitro susceptibilities of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate, mefloquine, quinine and chloroquine of 86 isolates and to dihydroartemisinin of 45 isolates collected from areas of high resistance to mefloquine within Thailand near the borders with Myanmar and Cambodia, and from southern Thailand where P. falciparum is generally still sensitive to mefloquine. All the isolates were highly sensitive to artesunate, but the geometric mean IC50S were higher in isolates from the Thai-Myanmar and Thai-Cambodian borders than in those from southern Thailand. The IC50S for mefloquine and artesunate were strongly correlated (Pearson r = 0.605; n = 86; P < 0.00001). As expected, the in vitro sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin and artesunate were similar and strongly correlated (at IC50, Pearson r = 0.695; n = 45; P < 0.00002). The correlation between the activity of mefloquine and artesunate requires further investigation in order to determine the potential for development of cross-resistance in nature. Our results suggest that combination with mefloquine is not the ideal way of protecting the usefulness of artemisinin and its derivatives. A search for more suitable partner drugs to these compounds and careful regulation of their use are necessary in the interest of ensuring their long therapeutic life span. PMID:10361756

  4. Delayed Diagnosis of Falciparum Malaria with Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Choi, Iee Ho; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Choi, Sam Im; Lee, Dae Yeol; Kim, Min Sun

    2016-09-01

    Prompt malaria diagnosis is crucial so antimalarial drugs and supportive care can then be rapidly initiated. A 15-year-old boy who had traveled to Africa (South Africa, Kenya, and Nigeria between January 3 and 25, 2011) presented with fever persisting over 5 days, headache, diarrhea, and dysuria, approximately 17 days after his return from the journey. Urinalysis showed pyuria and hematuria. Blood examination showed hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and hyperbilirubinemia. Plasmapheresis and hemodialysis were performed for 19 hospital days. Falciparum malaria was then confirmed by peripheral blood smear, and antimalarial medications were initiated. The patient's condition and laboratory results were quickly normalized. We report a case of severe acute renal failure associated with delayed diagnosis of falciparum malaria, and primary use of supportive treatment rather than antimalarial medicine. The present case suggests that early diagnosis and treatment is important because untreated tropical malaria can be associated with severe acute renal failure and fatality. Physicians must be alert for correct diagnosis and proper management of imported tropical malaria when patients have travel history of endemic areas. PMID:27510397

  5. The Molecular Basis of Folate Salvage in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sora, J. Enrique; Ochong, Edwin; Beveridge, Susan; Johnson, David; Nzila, Alexis; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Stocks, Paul A.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Bray, Patrick G.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrofolates are essential cofactors for DNA synthesis and methionine metabolism. Malaria parasites are capable both of synthesizing tetrahydrofolates and precursors de novo and of salvaging them from the environment. The biosynthetic route has been studied in some detail over decades, whereas the molecular mechanisms that underpin the salvage pathway lag behind. Here we identify two functional folate transporters (named PfFT1 and PfFT2) and delineate unexpected substrate preferences of the folate salvage pathway in Plasmodium falciparum. Both proteins are localized in the plasma membrane and internal membranes of the parasite intra-erythrocytic stages. Transport substrates include folic acid, folinic acid, the folate precursor p-amino benzoic acid (pABA), and the human folate catabolite pABAGn. Intriguingly, the major circulating plasma folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, was a poor substrate for transport via PfFT2 and was not transported by PfFT1. Transport of all folates studied was inhibited by probenecid and methotrexate. Growth rescue in Escherichia coli and antifolate antagonism experiments in P. falciparum indicate that functional salvage of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is detectable but trivial. In fact pABA was the only effective salvage substrate at normal physiological levels. Because pABA is neither synthesized nor required by the human host, pABA metabolism may offer opportunities for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:21998306

  6. Identification of a Plasmodium falciparum Phospholipid Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Christiaan; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Ringel, Alessa; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Haldar, Kasturi; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in dramatic modifications to the host cell, including changes to its antigenic and transport properties and the de novo formation of membranous compartments within the erythrocyte cytosol. These parasite-induced structures are implicated in the transport of nutrients, metabolic products, and parasite proteins, as well as in parasite virulence. However, very few of the parasite effector proteins that underlie remodeling of the host erythrocyte are functionally characterized. Using bioinformatic examination and modeling, we have found that the exported P. falciparum protein PFA0210c belongs to the START domain family, members of which mediate transfer of phospholipids, ceramide, or fatty acids between membranes. In vitro phospholipid transfer assays using recombinant PFA0210 confirmed that it can transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin between phospholipid vesicles. Furthermore, assays using HL60 cells containing radiolabeled phospholipids indicated that orthologs of PFA0210c can also transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Biochemical and immunochemical analysis showed that PFA0210c associates with membranes in infected erythrocytes at mature stages of intracellular parasite growth. Localization studies in live parasites revealed that the protein is present in the parasitophorous vacuole during growth and is later recruited to organelles in the parasite. Together these data suggest that PFA0210c plays a role in the formation of the membranous structures and nutrient phospholipid transfer in the malaria-parasitized erythrocyte. PMID:24043620

  7. Comparative Transcriptional and Genomic Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mackinnon, Margaret J.; Li, Jinguang; Mok, Sachel; Kortok, Moses M.; Marsh, Kevin; Preiser, Peter R.; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for differential regulation of gene expression may underlie much of the phenotypic variation and adaptability of malaria parasites. Here we describe transcriptional variation among culture-adapted field isolates of Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malarial disease. It was found that genes coding for parasite protein export into the red cell cytosol and onto its surface, and genes coding for sexual stage proteins involved in parasite transmission are up-regulated in field isolates compared with long-term laboratory isolates. Much of this variability was associated with the loss of small or large chromosomal segments, or other forms of gene copy number variation that are prevalent in the P. falciparum genome (copy number variants, CNVs). Expression levels of genes inside these segments were correlated to that of genes outside and adjacent to the segment boundaries, and this association declined with distance from the CNV boundary. This observation could not be explained by copy number variation in these adjacent genes. This suggests a local-acting regulatory role for CNVs in transcription of neighboring genes and helps explain the chromosomal clustering that we observed here. Transcriptional co-regulation of physical clusters of adaptive genes may provide a way for the parasite to readily adapt to its highly heterogeneous and strongly selective environment. PMID:19898609

  8. Molecular Aspects of Plasmodium falciparum Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Deloron, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Cytoadherence of Plasmodium-falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs) to host receptors is the key phenomenon in the pathological process of the malaria disease. Some of these interactions can originate poor outcomes responsible for 1 to 3 million annual deaths mostly occurring among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) represents an important exception of the disease occurring at adulthood in malaria endemic settings. Consequences of this are shared between the mother (maternal anemia) and the baby (low birth weight and infant mortality). Demonstrating that parasites causing PAM express specific variant surface antigens (VSAPAM), including the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (P f EMP1) variant VAR2CSA, that are targets for protective immunity has strengthened the possibility for the development of PAM-specific vaccine. In this paper, we review the molecular basis of malaria pathogenesis attributable to the erythrocyte stages of the parasites, and findings supporting potential anti-PAM vaccine components evidenced in PAM. PMID:17641725

  9. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  10. The use of activated protein C in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Rankin, L G; Austin, D L H

    2007-06-01

    A 56-year-old man presented to a peripheral hospital in New Zealand with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria with cerebral involvement and subsequently developed multi-system organ failure. Activated protein C was used in an attempt to stop the cascade of events into multi-organ failure. Severe infection with P. falciparum is life-threatening and appears to activate a hypercoagulable state similar to that of severe sepsis. Activated protein C is currently used in the treatment of severe sepsis and may provide a new adjuvant therapy for severe P. falciparum malaria.

  11. [Is Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for tropical malaria, resistant to fansidar?].

    PubMed

    Holzer, B; Keller, H; Frossard, E; Stürchler, D

    1980-03-01

    A world-wide increase of malaria infections is observed. Malaria is imported into Switzerland mainly by tourists and recently by refugees from South East Asia. The strains of P. falciparum resistant to treatment are of increasing importance. A patient with P. falciparum infection from Cambodia is reported, who suffered from three episodes of malaria recrudescence within ten weeks, in spite of adequate therapy with quinine and Fansidar. The definition, the significance and the geographical distribution of resistances and the possible cause for a P. falciparum recrudescence are discussed. For the treatment of repeating recrudescence quinine and Fansidar are recommended, followed by a suppressive Fansidar prophylaxy for 4--8 weeks.

  12. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray cystallographic studies of a proline-specific aminopeptidase from Aneurinibacillus sp. strain AM-1

    SciTech Connect

    Akioka, Makoto; Nakano, Hiroaki; Horikiri, Aya; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Nakatsu, Toru; Kato, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2006-12-01

    Preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of a proline-specific aminopepitdase from Aneurinibacillus sp, strain AM-1 was carried out. To elucidate the structure and molecular mechanism of a characteristic proline-specific aminopeptidase produced by the thermophile Aneurinibacillus sp. strain AM-1, its gene was cloned and the recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution from the recombinant aminopeptidase crystal. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.62, b = 68.20, c = 76.84 Å. A complete data set was also obtained from crystals of SeMet-substituted aminopeptidase. Data in the resolution range 20–2.1 Å from the MAD data set from the SeMet-substituted crystal were used for phase determination.

  13. The combination of HDAC and aminopeptidase inhibitors is highly synergistic in myeloma and leads to disruption of the NFκB signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emma M; Zhang, Lei; Walker, Brian A; Davenport, Emma L; Aronson, Lauren I; Krige, David; Hooftman, Leon; Drummond, Alan H; Morgan, Gareth J; Davies, Faith E

    2015-07-10

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of epigenetic therapies in the treatment of multiple myeloma. We show the novel HDAC inhibitor CHR-3996 induces apoptosis in myeloma cells at concentrations in the nanomolar range and with apoptosis mediated by p53 and caspase pathways. In addition, HDAC inhibitors are highly synergistic, both in vitro and in vivo, with the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797). We demonstrate that the basis for this synergy is a consequence of changes in the levels of NFκB regulators BIRC3/cIAP2, A20, CYLD, and IκB, which were markedly affected by the combination. When co-administered the HDAC and aminopeptidase inhibitors caused rapid nuclear translocation of NFκB family members p65 and p52, following activation of both canonical and non-canonical NFκB signalling pathways. The subsequent up-regulation of inhibitors of NFκB activation (most significantly BIRC3/cIAP2) turned off the cytoprotective effects of the NFκB signalling response in a negative feedback loop. These results provide a rationale for combining HDAC and aminopeptidase inhibitors clinically for the treatment of myeloma patients and support the disruption of the NFκB signalling pathway as a therapeutic strategy.

  14. Determining the involvement of two aminopeptidase Ns in the resistance of Plutella xylostella to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac: cloning and study of in vitro function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Wang, Ran; Yang, Zhongxia; Chen, Defeng; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Mao, Zhenchuan; Zhang, Youjun

    2012-02-01

    The cloning, expression in vitro, and characterization of two aminopeptidase Ns (APN5s and APN2s) isolated from the midgut of Cry1Ac-resistant (R) and susceptible (S) strains of Plutella xylostella larvae are presented in this paper. The deduced amino acid sequences of APN5s included C-terminal GPI-modification sites, the gluzincin aminopeptidase motif GATEN, and three N-glycosylated sites; those of APN2s had no GPI-modification sites, had gluzincin aminopeptidase motif GAMEN, and had four N-glycosylated sites. O-glycosylated sites were not predicted for either APN. Because APN2R and APN2S cDNAs contained the same nucleotides, only full-length cDNAs encoding APN5R and APN5S were expressed in Trichoplusia ni cells. Far-Western blotting showed that the expressed receptor APN5 bound to the Cry1Ac toxin. An enzyme-specific activity experiment also showed that APN5 genes were expressed in T. ni cells. ELISA revealed no differences in the binding of expression proteins from the resistant and susceptible strain with Cry1Ac. PMID:22371317

  15. Characterization of a salt-tolerant aminopeptidase from marine Bacillus licheniformis SWJS33 that improves hydrolysis and debittering efficiency for soy protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Lei, Fenfen; Zhao, Qiangzhong; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming

    2017-01-01

    An aminopeptidase was isolated from the marine Bacillus licheniformis SWJS33 (BLAP) and purified. According to the tandem mass spectrometry, the enzyme displayed 11% amino acid identity with the aminopeptidase from Bacillus (gi|496687392). BLAP exhibited maximum activity at 60°C and pH 8.0-8.5 and had a molecular mass of 100kDa. The presence of NaCl enabled 50% improvement of enzyme activity with 10-15% NaCl being the best. The observed inactivation by EDTA and bestatin and activation by Co(2+) and Ag(+) indicated that the obtained enzyme was a metalloaminopeptidase. Such an aminopeptidase could further improve the hydrolysis degree of soy protein isolate hydrolysates catalyzed by papain, Alcalase 2.4L or Flavourzyme 500MG from 8.5%, 9.5% or 14.4-18.8%, 18.7% or 20.1%, respectively, while decreasing the bitter intensity score of the SPI hydrolysates catalyzed by Alcalase 2.4L from 3.6 to 0.4. PMID:27507484

  16. Artemisinin-naphthoquine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Isba, Rachel; Zani, Babalwa; Gathu, Michael; Sinclair, David

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for treating people with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Five combinations are currently recommended, all administered over three days. Artemisinin-naphthoquine is a new combination developed in China, which is being marketed as a one-day treatment. Although shorter treatment courses may improve adherence, the WHO recommends at least three days of the short-acting artemisinin component to eliminate 90% P. falciparum parasites in the bloodstream, before leaving the longer-acting partner drug to clear the remaining parasites. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the artemisinin-naphthoquine combination for treating adults and children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; and LILACS up to January 2015. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) using 'malaria' and 'arte* OR dihydroarte*' as search terms. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials comparing artemisinin-naphthoquine combinations with established WHO-recommended ACTs for the treatment of adults and children with uncomplicated malaria due to P. falciparum. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. We analysed primary outcomes in line with the WHO 'Protocol for assessing and monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy' and compared drugs using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Secondary outcomes were effects on gametocytes, haemoglobin, and adverse events. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results Four trials, enrolling 740 adults and children, met the inclusion criteria. Artemisinin-naphthoquine was administered as a single dose (two

  17. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Albrow, Victoria E.; Leader, Brittany A.; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J.; Powers, James C.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite lifecycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a novel class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. PMID:21700207

  18. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K

    2004-05-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials.

  19. Profiling the Essential Nature of Lipid Metabolism in Asexual Blood and Gametocyte Stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sonia; Ekland, Eric H.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; Chan, Robin B.; Jayabalasingham, Bamini; Zhou, Bowen; Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Hjelmqvist, Daisy; Worgall, Tilla S.; Marti, Matthias; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY During its life cycle, Plasmodium falciparum undergoes rapid proliferation fueled by de novo synthesis and acquisition of host cell lipids. Consistent with this essential role, Plasmodium lipid synthesis enzymes are emerging as potential drug targets. To explore their broader potential for therapeutic interventions, we assayed the global lipid landscape during P. falciparum asexual blood stage (ABS) and sexual development. Using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we analyzed 304 lipids constituting 24 classes in ABS parasites, infected red blood cell (RBC)-derived microvesicles, gametocytes, and uninfected RBCs. Ten lipid classes were previously uncharacterized in P. falciparum and 70–75% of the lipid classes exhibited changes in abundance during ABS and gametocyte development. Utilizing compounds that target lipid metabolism, we affirmed the essentiality of major classes, including triacylglycerols. These studies highlight the interplay between host and parasite lipid metabolism and provide a comprehensive analysis of P. falciparum lipids with candidate pathways for drug discovery efforts. PMID:26355219

  20. Kinetic, Spectroscopic, and X-ray Crystallographic Characterization of the Functional E151H Aminopeptidase from Aeromonas proteolytica.

    SciTech Connect

    Bzymek,K.; Moulin, A.; Swierczek, S.; Ringe, D.; Petsko, G.; Holz, R.

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate151 (E151) has been shown to be catalytically essential for the aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus (AAP). E151 acts as the general acid/base during the catalytic mechanism of peptide hydrolysis. However, a glutamate residue is not the only residue capable of functioning as a general acid/base during catalysis for dinuclear metallohydrolases. Recent crystallographic characterization of the D-aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis (DppA) revealed a histidine residue that resides in an identical position to E151 in AAP. Because the active-site ligands for DppA and AAP are identical, AAP has been used as a model enzyme to understand the mechanistic role of H115 in DppA. Substitution of E151 with histidine resulted in an active AAP enzyme exhibiting a k{sub cat} value of 2.0 min{sup -1}, which is over 2000 times slower than r AAP (4380 min{sup -1}). ITC experiments revealed that Zn{sup II} binds 330 and 3 times more weakly to E151H-AAP compared to r-AAP. UV-vis and EPR spectra of Co{sup II}-loaded E151H-AAP indicated that the first metal ion resides in a hexacoordinate/pentacoordinate equilibrium environment, whereas the second metal ion is six-coordinate. pH dependence of the kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for the hydrolysis of L-leucine p-nitroanilide (L-pNA) revealed a change in an ionization constant in the enzyme-substrate complex from 5.3 in r-AAP to 6.4 in E151H-AAP, consistent with E151 in AAP being the active-site general acid/base. Proton inventory studies at pH 8.50 indicate the transfer of one proton in the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of [ZnZn(E151H-AAP)] has been solved to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, and alteration of E151 to histidine does not introduce any major conformational changes to the overall protein structure or the dinuclear Zn{sup II} active site. Therefore, a histidine residue can function as the general acid/base in hydrolysis reactions of peptides and, through analogy of

  1. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic characterization of the functional E151H aminopeptidase from Aeromonas proteolytica.

    PubMed

    Bzymek, Krzysztof P; Moulin, Aaron; Swierczek, Sabina I; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2005-09-13

    Glutamate151 (E151) has been shown to be catalytically essential for the aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus (AAP). E151 acts as the general acid/base during the catalytic mechanism of peptide hydrolysis. However, a glutamate residue is not the only residue capable of functioning as a general acid/base during catalysis for dinuclear metallohydrolases. Recent crystallographic characterization of the D-aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis (DppA) revealed a histidine residue that resides in an identical position to E151 in AAP. Because the active-site ligands for DppA and AAP are identical, AAP has been used as a model enzyme to understand the mechanistic role of H115 in DppA. Substitution of E151 with histidine resulted in an active AAP enzyme exhibiting a kcat value of 2.0 min(-1), which is over 2000 times slower than r AAP (4380 min(-1)). ITC experiments revealed that ZnII binds 330 and 3 times more weakly to E151H-AAP compared to r-AAP. UV-vis and EPR spectra of CoII-loaded E151H-AAP indicated that the first metal ion resides in a hexacoordinate/pentacoordinate equilibrium environment, whereas the second metal ion is six-coordinate. pH dependence of the kinetic parameters kcat and K(m) for the hydrolysis of L-leucine p-nitroanilide (L-pNA) revealed a change in an ionization constant in the enzyme-substrate complex from 5.3 in r-AAP to 6.4 in E151H-AAP, consistent with E151 in AAP being the active-site general acid/base. Proton inventory studies at pH 8.50 indicate the transfer of one proton in the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of [ZnZn(E151H-AAP)] has been solved to 1.9 A resolution, and alteration of E151 to histidine does not introduce any major conformational changes to the overall protein structure or the dinuclear ZnII active site. Therefore, a histidine residue can function as the general acid/base in hydrolysis reactions of peptides and, through analogy of the role of E151 in AAP, H115 in DppA likely

  2. In vitro response of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine.

    PubMed

    López Antuñano, F J; Wernsdorfer, W H

    1979-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the application of the in vitro microtechnique system in determining the response of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine.Using isolates of P. falciparum from Boa Vista, Brazil, and Villavicencio, Colombia, mefloquine was more than 7.7, 7.1, 7.1, and 6.4 times more effective than chloroquine in vitro at the ED(90), ED(95), ED(99), and ED(99.9) levels, respectively.

  3. Population genetics of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and asymptomatic malaria in Temotu Province, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Temotu Province, Solomon Islands is progressing toward malaria elimination. A baseline survey conducted in 2008 showed that most Plasmodium infections in the province were of low parasite density and asymptomatic infections. To better understand mechanisms underlying these malaria transmission characteristics genetic diversity and relationships among Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax populations in the province were examined. Methods Forty-five P. falciparum and 67 P. vivax samples collected in the 2008 baseline survey were successfully genotyped using eight P. falciparum and seven P. vivax microsatellite markers. Genetic diversity, relationships and distribution of both P. falciparum and P. vivax populations were analysed. Results Plasmodium falciparum population exhibited low diversity with 19 haplotypes identified and had closely related clusters indicating clonal expansion. Interestingly, a dominant haplotype was significantly associated with fever and high parasite density. In contrast, the P. vivax population was highly diverse with 58 haplotypes identified that were not closely related. Parasite populations between different islands in the province showed low genetic differentiation. Conclusion The low diversity and clonal population of P. falciparum population may partially account for clinical immunity developed against illness. However, it is possible that importation of a new P. falciparum strain was the major cause of illness. High diversity in P. vivax population and low relatedness between strains suggested clinical immunity to P. vivax may be maintained by different mechanisms. The genetic diversity, population structure and distribution of strains indicate that transmission of P. falciparum was low, but that of P. vivax was still high in 2008. These data will be useful for assessing changes in malaria transmission resulting from interventions. PMID:24261646

  4. Genome editing in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum using the CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Ghorbal, Mehdi; Gorman, Molly; Macpherson, Cameron Ross; Martins, Rafael Miyazawa; Scherf, Artur; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan

    2014-08-01

    Genome manipulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remains largely intractable and improved genomic tools are needed to further understand pathogenesis and drug resistance. We demonstrated the CRISPR-Cas9 system for use in P. falciparum by disrupting chromosomal loci and generating marker-free, single-nucleotide substitutions with high efficiency. Additionally, an artemisinin-resistant strain was generated by introducing a previously implicated polymorphism, thus illustrating the value of efficient genome editing in malaria research.

  5. African apes as reservoirs of Plasmodium falciparum and the origin and diversification of the Laverania subgenus.

    PubMed

    Duval, Linda; Fourment, Mathieu; Nerrienet, Eric; Rousset, Dominique; Sadeuh, Serge A; Goodman, Steven M; Andriaholinirina, Nicole V; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Paul, Richard E; Robert, Vincent; Ayala, Francisco J; Ariey, Frédéric

    2010-06-01

    We investigated two mitochondrial genes (cytb and cox1), one plastid gene (tufA), and one nuclear gene (ldh) in blood samples from 12 chimpanzees and two gorillas from Cameroon and one lemur from Madagascar. One gorilla sample is related to Plasmodium falciparum, thus confirming the recently reported presence in gorillas of this parasite. The second gorilla sample is more similar to the recently defined Plasmodium gaboni than to the P. falciparum-Plasmodium reichenowi clade, but distinct from both. Two chimpanzee samples are P. falciparum. A third sample is P. reichenowi and two others are P. gaboni. The other chimpanzee samples are different from those in the ape clade: two are Plasmodium ovale, and one is Plasmodium malariae. That is, we have found three human Plasmodium parasites in chimpanzees. Four chimpanzee samples were mixed: one species was P. reichenowi; the other species was P. gaboni in three samples and P. ovale in the fourth sample. The lemur sample, provisionally named Plasmodium malagasi, is a sister lineage to the large cluster of primate parasites that does not include P. falciparum or ape parasites, suggesting that the falciparum + ape parasite cluster (Laverania clade) may have evolved from a parasite present in hosts not ancestral to the primates. If malignant malaria were eradicated from human populations, chimpanzees, in addition to gorillas, might serve as a reservoir for P. falciparum. PMID:20498054

  6. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite's growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  7. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death

    PubMed Central

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K.; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite’s growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  8. J-dot targeting of an exported HSP40 in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wiebke; Külzer, Simone; Engels, Sonja; Zhang, Qi; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte, where they are involved in host cell modification. Amongst the proteins trafficked to the host cell, many are heat shock protein (HSP)40 homologues. We previously demonstrated that at least two exported PfHSP40s (referred to as PFE55 and PFA660) localise to mobile structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte (Kulzer et al., 2010), termed J-dots. The complete molecular content of these structures has not yet been completely resolved, however it is known that they also contain an exported HSP70, PfHSP70x, and are potentially involved in transport of the major cytoadherance ligand, PfEMP1, through the host cell. To understand more about the nature of the association of exported HSP40s with J-dots, here we have studied the signal requirements for recruitment of the proteins to these structures. By expressing various exported GFP chimeras, we can demonstrate that the predicted substrate binding domain is necessary and sufficient for J-dot targeting. This targeting only occurs in human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, as it is not conserved when expressing a P. falciparum HSP40 in Plasmodium berghei-infected murine red blood cells, suggesting that J-dots are P. falciparum-specific. This data reveals a new mechanism for targeting of exported proteins to intracellular structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

  9. Investigating the Roles of the C-Terminal Domain of Plasmodium falciparum GyrA

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Soshichiro; Seki, Eiko; Lin, Ting-Yu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains as one of the most deadly diseases in developing countries. The Plasmodium causative agents of human malaria such as Plasmodium falciparum possess an organelle, the apicoplast, which is the result of secondary endosymbiosis and retains its own circular DNA. A type II topoisomerase, DNA gyrase, is present in the apicoplast. In prokaryotes this enzyme is a proven, effective target for antibacterial agents, and its discovery in P. falciparum opens up the prospect of exploiting it as a drug target. Basic characterisation of P. falciparum gyrase is important because there are significant sequence differences between it and the prokaryotic enzyme. However, it has proved difficult to obtain soluble protein. Here we have predicted a new domain boundary in P. falciparum GyrA that corresponds to the C-terminal domain of prokaryotic GyrA and successfully purified it in a soluble form. Biochemical analyses revealed many similarities between the C-terminal domains of GyrA from E. coli and P. falciparum, suggesting that despite its considerably larger size, the malarial protein carries out a similar DNA wrapping function. Removal of a unique Asn-rich region in the P. falciparum protein did not result in a significant change, suggesting it is dispensable for DNA wrapping. PMID:26566222

  10. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C. Y.; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  11. Economic access to effective drugs for falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Panosian, Claire B

    2005-03-01

    The increasing death toll from drug-resistant falciparum malaria is cause for international concern. In 2002, the US Agency for International Development commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to recommend global actions to ensure the broadest possible access to new, effective antimalarial treatments. In a report issued in 2004, the IOM Committee on Economics of Antimalarial Drugs recommended a global subsidy of 300 million dollars to 500 million dollars per year to replace increasingly ineffective drugs with coformulated artemisinin combination treatments to be distributed through public and private channels in affected areas. This approach allows the existing market to support the switch to new drugs and keeps treatment costs for consumers at levels similar to the current price of chloroquine. The leverage of an international subsidy of combination therapy can also discourage the distribution of monotherapies (such as solo artemisinins), the use of which might foster increasing resistance to antimalarial drugs in the future. PMID:15714418

  12. Killing of Plasmodium falciparum by eosinophil secretory products.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, L S; Taverne, J; Tai, P C; Spry, C J; Targett, G A; Playfair, J H

    1987-01-01

    The multiplication of two strains of Plasmodium falciparum in culture, as measured by [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by granule proteins secreted by purified eosinophils obtained from patients with the hypereosinophilic syndrome. Morphological examination revealed the presence of abnormal parasites inside erythrocytes, indicating that they were killed in situ, and the later stages of the developmental cycle were found to be most susceptible to these toxic effects. A monoclonal antibody against eosinophil cationic protein partially blocked the inhibitory effect, suggesting that it was caused by more than one of the eosinophil granule proteins. Thus some of the antimalarial effects of molecules such as the tumor necrosis factor, which activates eosinophils, may be mediated through the enhanced production of eosinophil secretion products. PMID:3549562

  13. Plasmodium falciparum Rab1A Localizes to Rhoptries in Schizonts

    PubMed Central

    Morse, David; Webster, Wesley; Kalanon, Ming; Langsley, Gordon; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Over-expression of a GFP-PfRab1A fusion protein in Plasmodium falciparum schizonts produces a punctate pattern of fluorescence typical of rhoptries, secretory organelles involved in host cell invasion. The GFP-positive bodies were purified by a combination of differential and density gradient centrifugation and their protein content determined by MS/MS sequencing. Consistent with the GFP rhoptry-like pattern of transgenic parasites, four of the 19 proteins identified have been previously described to be rhoptry-associated and another four are ER or ER-associated proteins. Confirmation that GFP-PfRab1A decorates rhoptries was obtained by its co-localization with Rap1 and Ron4 in late phase schizonts. We conclude that PfRab1A potentially regulates vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the rhoptries in Apicomplexa parasites. PMID:27348424

  14. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C Y; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S W; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  15. Two cases of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Netherlands without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country.

    PubMed

    Arends, Joop E; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Kraaij-Dirkzwager, Marleen M; Kaan, Jan A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Haas, Pieter-Jan; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Kortbeek, Laetitia M; Sankatsing, Sanjay U C

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two patients of African origin were given a diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country. This observation highlights the importance for clinicians to consider tropical malaria in patients with fever. Possible transmission routes of P. falciparum to these patients will be discussed. From a public health perspective, international collaboration is crucial when potential cases of European autochthonous P. falciparum malaria in Europe re considered.

  16. Characterization of a PRL protein tyrosine phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Prakash Rao; Ayong, Lawrence; Eatrides, Jennifer; Schreiber, Melissa; Pham, Connie; Chakrabarti, Ratna; Fidock, David A; Allen, Charles M; Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenylated proteins have important functions in cell growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells. Inhibitors of protein prenylation in malaria have recently shown strong promise as effective antimalarials. In studying protein prenylation in the malaria protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have shown earlier that the incubation of P. falciparum cells with (3)H-prenol precursors resulted in various size classes of labeled proteins. To understand the physiological function of prenylated proteins of malaria parasites, that are targets of prenyltransferase inhibitors, we searched the PlasmoDB database for proteins containing the C-terminus prenylation motif. We have identified, among other potentially prenylated proteins, an orthologue of a PRL (protein of regenerating liver) subgroup protein tyrosine phosphatases, termed PfPRL. Here, we show that PfPRL is expressed in the parasite's intraerythrocytic stages, where it partially associates with endoplasmic reticulum and within a subcompartment of the food vacuole. Additionally, PfPRL targeting parallels that of apical membrane antigen-1 in developing merozoites. Recombinant PfPRL shows phosphatase activity that is preferentially inhibited by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor suggesting that PfPRL functions as a tyrosine phosphatase. Recombinant PfPRL can also be farnesylated in vitro. Inhibition of malarial farnesyltransferase activity can be achieved with the heptapetide RKCHFM, which corresponds to the C-terminus of PfPRL. This study provides the first evidence for expression of enzymatically active PRL-related protein tyrosine phosphatases in malarial parasites, and demonstrates the potential of peptides derived from Plasmodium prenylated proteins as malarial farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  17. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate inhibits Plasmodium falciparum cytoadhesion and merozoite invasion.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Marcele F; Albrecht, Letusa; Kozlowski, Eliene O; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Blanco, Yara C; Carlos, Bianca C; Castiñeiras, Catarina; Vicente, Cristina P; Werneck, Claudio C; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Marinho, Claudio R F; Mourão, Paulo A S; Pavão, Mauro S G; Costa, Fabio T M

    2014-01-01

    Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (Pf-iEs) in the microvasculature of vital organs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of life-threatening malaria complications, such as cerebral malaria and malaria in pregnancy. This phenomenon is marked by the cytoadhesion of Pf-iEs to host receptors on the surfaces of endothelial cells, on noninfected erythrocytes, and in the placental trophoblast; therefore, these sites are potential targets for antiadhesion therapies. In this context, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including heparin, have shown the ability to inhibit Pf-iE cytoadherence and growth. Nevertheless, the use of heparin was discontinued due to serious side effects, such as bleeding. Other GAG-based therapies were hampered due to the potential risk of contamination with prions and viruses, as some GAGs are isolated from mammals. In this context, we investigated the effects and mechanism of action of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS), a unique and highly sulfated GAG isolated from the sea cucumber, with respect to P. falciparum cytoadhesion and development. FucCS was effective in inhibiting the cytoadherence of Pf-iEs to human lung endothelial cells and placenta cryosections under static and flow conditions. Removal of the sulfated fucose branches of the FucCS structure virtually abolished the inhibitory effects of FucCS. Importantly, FucCS rapidly disrupted rosettes at high levels, and it was also able to block parasite development by interfering with merozoite invasion. Collectively, these findings highlight the potential of FucCS as a candidate for adjunct therapy against severe malaria.

  18. A molecular mechanism of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Alassane; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Pandharkar, Trupti; Liu, Haining; Estiu, Guillermina; Stahelin, Robert V; Rizk, Shahir S; Njimoh, Dieudonne L; Ryan, Yana; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nguon, Chea; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Pfrender, Michael; Emrich, Scott; Mohandas, Narla; Dondorp, Arjen M; Wiest, Olaf; Haldar, Kasturi

    2015-04-30

    Artemisinins are the cornerstone of anti-malarial drugs. Emergence and spread of resistance to them raises risk of wiping out recent gains achieved in reducing worldwide malaria burden and threatens future malaria control and elimination on a global level. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed parasite genetic loci associated with artemisinin resistance. However, there is no consensus on biochemical targets of artemisinin. Whether and how these targets interact with genes identified by GWAS, remains unknown. Here we provide biochemical and cellular evidence that artemisinins are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PfPI3K), revealing an unexpected mechanism of action. In resistant clinical strains, increased PfPI3K was associated with the C580Y mutation in P. falciparum Kelch13 (PfKelch13), a primary marker of artemisinin resistance. Polyubiquitination of PfPI3K and its binding to PfKelch13 were reduced by the PfKelch13 mutation, which limited proteolysis of PfPI3K and thus increased levels of the kinase, as well as its lipid product phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). We find PI3P levels to be predictive of artemisinin resistance in both clinical and engineered laboratory parasites as well as across non-isogenic strains. Elevated PI3P induced artemisinin resistance in absence of PfKelch13 mutations, but remained responsive to regulation by PfKelch13. Evidence is presented for PI3P-dependent signalling in which transgenic expression of an additional kinase confers resistance. Together these data present PI3P as the key mediator of artemisinin resistance and the sole PfPI3K as an important target for malaria elimination.

  19. Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate Inhibits Plasmodium falciparum Cytoadhesion and Merozoite Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Marcele F.; Albrecht, Letusa; Kozlowski, Eliene O.; Lopes, Stefanie C. P.; Blanco, Yara C.; Carlos, Bianca C.; Castiñeiras, Catarina; Vicente, Cristina P.; Werneck, Claudio C.; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Mourão, Paulo A. S.; Pavão, Mauro S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (Pf-iEs) in the microvasculature of vital organs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of life-threatening malaria complications, such as cerebral malaria and malaria in pregnancy. This phenomenon is marked by the cytoadhesion of Pf-iEs to host receptors on the surfaces of endothelial cells, on noninfected erythrocytes, and in the placental trophoblast; therefore, these sites are potential targets for antiadhesion therapies. In this context, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including heparin, have shown the ability to inhibit Pf-iE cytoadherence and growth. Nevertheless, the use of heparin was discontinued due to serious side effects, such as bleeding. Other GAG-based therapies were hampered due to the potential risk of contamination with prions and viruses, as some GAGs are isolated from mammals. In this context, we investigated the effects and mechanism of action of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS), a unique and highly sulfated GAG isolated from the sea cucumber, with respect to P. falciparum cytoadhesion and development. FucCS was effective in inhibiting the cytoadherence of Pf-iEs to human lung endothelial cells and placenta cryosections under static and flow conditions. Removal of the sulfated fucose branches of the FucCS structure virtually abolished the inhibitory effects of FucCS. Importantly, FucCS rapidly disrupted rosettes at high levels, and it was also able to block parasite development by interfering with merozoite invasion. Collectively, these findings highlight the potential of FucCS as a candidate for adjunct therapy against severe malaria. PMID:24395239

  20. A molecular mechanism of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Mbengue, Alassane; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Pandharkar, Trupti; Liu, Haining; Estiu, Guillermina; Stahelin, Robert V.; Rizk, Shahir; Njimoh, Dieudonne L.; Ryan, Yana; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nguon, Chea; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Pfrender, Michael; Emrich, Scott; Mohandas, Narla; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Wiest, Olaf; Haldar, Kasturi

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinins are the corner stone of anti-malarial drugs1. Emergence and spread of resistance to them2–4 raises risk of wiping out recent gains achieved in reducing world-wide malaria burden and threatens future malaria control and elimination on a global level. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed parasite genetic loci associated with artemisinin resistance5–10. However, there is no consensus on biochemical targets of artemisinin. Whether and how these targets interact with genes identified by GWAS, remains unknown. Here we provide biochemical and cellular evidence that artemisinins are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PfPI3K), revealing an unexpected mechanism of action. In resistant clinical strains, increased PfPI3K was associated with the C580Y mutation in P. falciparum Kelch13 (PfKelch13), a primary marker of artemisinin resistance. Polyubiquitination of PfPI3K and its binding to PfKelch13 were reduced by PfKelch13 mutation, which limited proteolysis of PfPI3K and thus increased levels of the kinase as well as its lipid product phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P). We find PI3P levels to be predictive of artemisinin resistance in both clinical and engineered laboratory parasites as well as across non-isogenic strains. Elevated PI3P induced artemisinin resistance in absence of PfKelch13 mutations, but remained responsive to regulation by PfKelch13. Evidence is presented for PI3P-dependent signaling, where transgenic expression of an additional kinase confers resistance. Together these data present PI3P as the key mediator of artemisinin resistance and the sole PfPI3K as an important target for malaria elimination. PMID:25874676

  1. Plasmodium falciparum myosins: transcription and translation during asexual parasite development.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Olaya, Jacqueline; Margos, Gabriele; Coles, Deborah J; Dluzewski, Anton R; Mitchell, Graham H; Wasserman, Moisés M; Pinder, Jennifer C

    2005-04-01

    Six myosins genes are now annotated in the Plasmodium falciparum Genome Project. Malaria myosins have been named alphabetically; accordingly, we refer to the two latest additions as Pfmyo-E and Pfmyo-F. Both new myosins contain regions characteristic of the functional motor domain of "true" myosins and, unusually for P. falciparum myosins, Pfmyo-F encodes two consensus IQ light chain-binding motifs. Phylogenetic analysis of the 17 currently known apicomplexan myosins together with one representative of each myosin class clusters all but one of the apicomplexan sequences together in Class XIV. This refines the earlier definition of the Class XIV Subclasses XIVa and XIVb. RT-PCR on blood stage parasite mRNA amplifies a specific product for all six myosins and each shows developmentally regulated transcription. Thus: Pfmyo-A and Pfmyo-B genes are transcribed throughout development; Pfmyo-C is predominant in trophozoites; Pfmyo-D occurs in trophozoites and schizonts; Pfmyo-E though barely present in earlier stages is abundant in schizonts; Pfmyo-F increases steadily throughout development and maturation. It is known that Pfmyo-A and Pfmyo-B are synthesised during late schizogony and we now show that Pfmyo-D expression is also temporally regulated to late trophozoites and schizonts where it distributes close to segregating nuclei. Thus, in asexual stages myosin synthesis does not always parallel transcript accumulation, showing that translation is also regulated. The implication is that the mRNAs are either subjected to turnover, synthesised and degraded, or that they are sequestered in an inactivate form until required for protein synthesis.

  2. A domain-specific marker for the hepatocyte plasma membrane: localization of leucine aminopeptidase to the bile canalicular domain

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to establish a domain-specific marker for hepatocyte plasma membranes. In frozen sections of fixed rat liver (0.5-4 microns), antibodies directed against rat intestinal leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) recognized an antigen that was restricted to the bile canalicular plasma membrane. Fluorescence was not observed on the sinusoidal or lateral membranes, and intracellular staining was not detected. The liver antigen was identified as LAP, based on its chemical similarity to intestinal LAP. First, immunoprecipitation experiments using trypsin-solubilized intestinal LAP (G-200 fraction, 91% pure) established a correlation between the loss of LAP enzyme activity from the soluble fraction and the appearance in the specific immunoprecipitates of polypeptides migrating on SDS PAGE between 110,000 and 130,000 daltons. The antigen precipitated from a detergent extract of liver plasma membranes had the same electrophoretic mobility. Second, the chymotryptic map of the major band in the liver immunoprecipitate was similar to that of purified intestinal LAP. PMID:6304108

  3. Comparison of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and alanine aminopeptidase activities for evaluation of microangiopathy in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shimojo, N; Kitahashi, S; Naka, K; Fujii, A; Okuda, K; Tanaka, S; Fujii, S

    1987-03-01

    The activities of urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and alanine aminopeptidase (AAP) were measured in 207 diabetic patients and 57 healthy controls, and the relationship of these enzymes to different stages of diabetic microangiopathy was studied. Diabetics with clinical proteinuria had higher urinary NAG and AAP (17.7 +/- 1.9 and 42.8 +/- 4.9 U/g creatinine, mean +/- SE, respectively) than healthy controls (1.8 +/- 0.1 and 10.0 +/- 0.4) or diabetics without proteinuria. Among diabetics without proteinuria, NAG excretion in those with retinopathy was slightly higher than in those without (6.4 +/- 0.5 v 5.4 +/- 0.4), and AAP in those with retinopathy was significantly higher than in those without (23.0 +/- 1.5 v 17.4 +/- 0.8, P less than 0.01). Urinary albumin measured by radioimmunoassay and lysozyme in diabetics with retinopathy but without proteinuria was higher than those without retinopathy (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.01). The increase in albumin was the greatest in diabetics with long duration of the disease (greater than or equal to 8 years); however, NAG and AAP increased more significantly in those with high hemoglobin A1c than in patients with long duration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2881186

  4. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases.

  5. Gene cloning and biochemical characterization of eryngase, a serine aminopeptidase of Pleurotus eryngii belonging to the family S9 peptidases.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Tokai, Shota; Chiba, Masanori; Ichiyanagi, Tsuyoshi; Yabuta, Yukinori; Mori, Nobuhiro; Aimi, Tadanori

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii serine aminopeptidase that has peptide bond formation activity, redesignated as eryngase, was cloned and expressed. Eryngase has a family S9 peptidase unit in the C-terminal region having a catalytic triad of Ser, Asp, and His. In the phylogenetic relations among the subfamilies of family S9 peptidase (S9A, prolyl oligopeptidase; S9B, dipeptidyl peptidase; S9C, acylaminoacyl peptidase; S9D, glutamyl endopeptidase), eryngase existed alone in the neighbor of S9C subfamily. Mutation of the active site Ser524 of the eryngase with Ala eliminated its catalytic activity. In contrast, S524C mutant maintained low catalytic activity. Investigation of aminolysis activity using l-Phe-NH2 as a substrate showed that S524C mutant exhibited no hydrolysis reaction but synthesized a small amount of l-Phe-l-Phe-NH2 by the catalysis of aminolysis. In contrast, wild-type eryngase hydrolyzed the product of aminolysis l-Phe-l-Phe-NH2. Results show that the S524C mutant preferentially catalyzed aminolysis when on an l-Phe-NH2 substrate.

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering reveals the assembly mode and oligomeric architecture of TET, a large, dodecameric aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Girard, Eric; Colombo, Matteo; Durá, M Asunción; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The specific self-association of proteins into oligomeric complexes is a common phenomenon in biological systems to optimize and regulate their function. However, de novo structure determination of these important complexes is often very challenging for atomic-resolution techniques. Furthermore, in the case of homo-oligomeric complexes, or complexes with very similar building blocks, the respective positions of subunits and their assembly pathways are difficult to determine using many structural biology techniques. Here, an elegant and powerful approach based on small-angle neutron scattering is applied, in combination with deuterium labelling and contrast variation, to elucidate the oligomeric organization of the quaternary structure and the assembly pathways of 468 kDa, hetero-oligomeric and symmetric Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2-TET3 aminopeptidase complexes. The results reveal that the topology of the PhTET2 and PhTET3 dimeric building blocks within the complexes is not casual but rather suggests that their quaternary arrangement optimizes the catalytic efficiency towards peptide substrates. This approach bears important potential for the determination of quaternary structures and assembly pathways of large oligomeric and symmetric complexes in biological systems.

  7. Targeting aminopeptidase N, a newly identified receptor for F4ac fimbriae, enhances the intestinal mucosal immune response.

    PubMed

    Melkebeek, V; Rasschaert, K; Bellot, P; Tilleman, K; Favoreel, H; Deforce, D; De Geest, B G; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E

    2012-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea in human and animal. In piglets, ETEC having F4 fimbriae (F4(+) ETEC) induce severe diarrhea, dependent on the presence of receptors for F4 (F4R). In this study, porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) was identified as an F4R by comparative proteomic analysis of brush border proteins of F4R(+) and F4R(-) pigs and by adherence/internalization experiments on pAPN-transfected cells. Binding of F4 fimbriae to pAPN depended on sialic acid containing carbohydrate moieties, and resulted in clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the fimbriae. Endocytosis via pAPN was not restricted to F4 fimbriae, but was also observed for anti-pAPN antibodies. Both F4 fimbriae- and pAPN-specific antibodies were taken up in vivo by porcine enterocytes and induced subsequently a rapid immunoglobulin A and G response. In conclusion, we identified pAPN as an endocytotic receptor for F4 fimbriae and highlight the opportunity to target vaccine antigens to this epithelial receptor. PMID:22669578

  8. Mutation of an aminopeptidase N gene is associated with Helicoverpa armigera resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoping; Cheng, Hongmei; Gao, Yulin; Wang, Guirong; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming

    2009-07-01

    A Cry1Ac-resistant strain (Bt-R) of Helicoverpa armigera, with 2971-fold resistance, was derived by selection with Cry1Ac toxin for 75 generations. We used cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis to identify those genes differentially expressed in the Cry1Ac-resistant and -susceptible strains, which revealed 212 differentially expressed transcripts among 2000 screened cDNAs. Among these transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), 37 showed some homology to known sequences, including Aminopeptidase N (APN), which is expressed in the midgut epithelium and has been implicated as a Cry1A subfamily receptor in several moths, including H. armigera. We confirmed the TDF by RT-PCR and identified a deletion mutation of apn1 in the Bt-R strain. We expressed the TDF in bacteria. The partial HaAPN1-96S wild-type protein, bound to Cry1Ac on ligand blots, whereas HaAPN1-BtR did not. This suggested that HaAPN1 is a receptor for Bt Cry1Ac and that its deletion mutation is associated with Cry1Ac resistance in H. armigera. The absence of one binding site is responsible for its resistance to Cry1Ac. We developed an allele-specific PCR to monitor whether the apn1 gene in an H. armigera field population produced a similar mutation. No deleted mutants were found in 2250 individuals collected from the field in 2006-2007. PMID:19376227

  9. Microarray-based identification of aminopeptidase N target genes in keratinocyte conditioned medium-stimulated dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lai, Amy; Ghaffari, Abdi; Li, Yunyuan; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Of the many processes that affect the outcome of wound repair, epidermal-dermal interactions are essential to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and in particular, soluble factors released by keratinocytes are known to have a direct impact on the production of ECM by dermal fibroblasts. Aminopeptidase N (APN) has recently been proposed as a cell-surface receptor for stratifin and is responsible for the stratifin-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) upregulation in fibroblasts. The present study examines whether modulation of APN gene expression has any impact on the fibroblast ECM gene expression profile. The result reveals that in the presence of keratinocyte-derived soluble factors, transient knockdown of APN in dermal fibroblasts affects the expression of key ECM components such as fibronectin, tenascin-C, MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-12. The regulatory effects of APN on fibronectin and selective MMPs appear to be associated with receptor-mediated signal transduction independently of its peptidase activity. On the contrary, inhibition of the APN enzymatic activity by bestatin significantly reduces the tenascin-C expression and enhances the contraction of fibroblast-populated collagen gel, suggesting an activity-dependent regulation of fibroblast contractility by APN. The overall effects of APN on the expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C, and MMPs in fibroblasts propose an important role for APN in the regulation of keratinocyte-mediated ECM remodeling and fibroblast contractile activity. PMID:22065384

  10. A Novel Virulence Strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mediated by an Autotransporter with Arginine-Specific Aminopeptidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Chase; AbuOun, Manal; Wright, Victoria; Paredes-Osses, Esteban; Ward, Jenny; Goto, Hana; Heeb, Stephan; Pommier, Stéphanie; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Cámara, Miguel; Hardie, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a major cause of infections in chronic wounds, burns and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. The P. aeruginosa genome encodes at least three proteins exhibiting the characteristic three domain structure of autotransporters, but much remains to be understood about the functions of these three proteins and their role in pathogenicity. Autotransporters are the largest family of secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, and those characterised are virulence factors. Here, we demonstrate that the PA0328 autotransporter is a cell-surface tethered, arginine-specific aminopeptidase, and have defined its active site by site directed mutagenesis. Hence, we have assigned PA0328 with the name AaaA, for arginine-specific autotransporter of P. aeruginosa. We show that AaaA provides a fitness advantage in environments where the sole source of nitrogen is peptides with an aminoterminal arginine, and that this could be important for establishing an infection, as the lack of AaaA led to attenuation in a mouse chronic wound infection which correlated with lower levels of the cytokines TNFα, IL-1α, KC and COX-2. Consequently AaaA is an important virulence factor playing a significant role in the successful establishment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:22927813

  11. Probing the metal ion selectivity in methionine aminopeptidase via changes in the luminescence properties of the enzyme bound europium ion.

    PubMed

    Sule, Nitesh; Singh, Raushan K; Zhao, Pinjing; Srivastava, D K

    2012-01-01

    We report herein, for the first time, that Europium ion (Eu(3+)) binds to the "apo" form of Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcMetAP), and such binding results in the activation of the enzyme as well as enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the metal ion. Due to competitive displacement of the enzyme-bound Eu(3+) by different metal ions, we could determine the binding affinities of both "activating" and "non-activating" metal ions for the enzyme via fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that among all metal ions, Fe(2+) exhibited the highest binding affinity for the enzyme, supporting the notion that it serves as the physiological metal ion for the enzyme. However, the enzyme-metal binding data did not adhere to the Irving-William series. On accounting for the binding affinity vis a vis the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for different metal ions, it appears evident that that the "coordination states" and the relative softness" of metal ions are the major determinants in facilitating the EcMetAP catalyzed reaction.

  12. Propeptide of aminopeptidase 1 protein mediates aggregation and vesicle formation in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway.

    PubMed

    Morales Quinones, Mariana; Winston, Jared T; Stromhaug, Per E

    2012-03-23

    Misfolded protein aggregation causes disease and aging; autophagy counteracts this by eliminating damaged components, enabling cells to survive starvation. The cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway in yeast encompasses the aggregation of the premature form of aminopeptidase 1 (prApe1) in cytosol and its sequestration by autophagic proteins into a vesicle for vacuolar transport. We show that the propeptide of Ape1 is important for aggregation and vesicle formation and that it is sufficient for binding to prApe1 and Atg19. Defective aggregation disrupts vacuolar transport, suggesting that aggregate shape is important in vesicle formation, whereas Atg19 binding is not sufficient for vacuolar transport. Aggregation involves hydrophobicity, whereas Atg19 binding requires additional electrostatic interactions. Ape1 dodecamerization may cluster propeptides into trimeric structures, with sufficient affinity to form propeptide hexamers by binding to other dodecamers, causing aggregation. We show that Ape1 aggregates bind Atg19 and Atg8 in vitro; this could be used as a scaffold for an in vitro assay of autophagosome formation to elucidate the mechanisms of autophagy.

  13. The mechanism of action of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Inhibition by amino acid derivatives and amines; activation by aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Metrione, R M; MacGeorge, N L

    1975-12-01

    A variety of amino acid and peptide amides have been shown to be inhibitors of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. Among these compounds derivatives of strongly hydrophobic amino acids are the strongest inhibitors (Phe-NH2, Ki = 1.0 +/- 0.2 mM), while amides of basic amino acids were somewhat less effective (Lys-NH2, Ki = 36 +/- 3 mM). Short chain amino acid amides are notably weaker inhibitors (Gly-NH2, Ki = 293 +/- 50 mM). The interaction of the side chains of compounds with the enzyme appears to be at a site other than that at which the side chain of the amino-penultimate residue of the substrate interacts since the specificity of binding is different. Primary amines have been shown to inhibit, e.g., butylamine, Ki = 340 +/- 40 mM, and aromatic compounds have been shown to stimulate activity toward Gly-Gly-NH2 and Gly-Gly-OEt (phenol, 35% stimulation of activity at a 1:1 molar ratio with the substrate). The data suggest that inhibition involves binding at the site occupied by the free alpha-amino group and the N-terminal amino acid.

  14. Effects of orchidectomy and testosterone replacement on mouse enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase activity in the HPA axis.

    PubMed

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2003-12-01

    Opiates are involved in the regulation of several functions in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis under physiological conditions. The aim of the present work is to study the influence of orchidectomy and testosterone (T) replacement on soluble (S) and membrane bound (MB) enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase (EDA) activities in the HPA axis. Forty male mice (Balb/C) were distributed in five groups: sham-operated control (C), orchidectomized (OR-C), and orchidectomized treated with increasing doses of T (3, 6 or 12 mg/kg). In hypothalamus, orchidectomy did not modify either S or MB EDA, although T replacement increased S but not MB EDA. In pituitary, neither S nor MB EDA activities changed with orchidectomy, although both activities changed after T replacement. On the other hand, in adrenal glands, orchidectomy increased S and MB EDA activities, whereas T replacement returned both activities to control levels. These results suggest a direct effect of T in S and MB EDA activities and therefore, an influence on their endogenous substrates regulation.

  15. Calcium-dependent modulation by ethanol of mouse synaptosomal pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase activity under basal and K(+)-stimulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Tsuboyama, G; Ramírez, M; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2000-11-01

    We studied the in vitro effects of ethanol (25, 50 and 100 mM) on pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase activity (pGluAP), which has been reported as thyrotrophin-releasing-hormone-degrading activity. pGluAP was measured in presence or absence of calcium, under basal and K(+)-stimulated conditions, in synaptosomes and their incubation supernatant, using pyroglutamyl-beta-naphthylamide as substrate. In basal conditions, in synaptosomes, pGluAP was inhibited by ethanol in a calcium-independent way. In the supernatant, the response differed depending on the concentration of ethanol. Depolarization with K(+) modified pGluAP in synaptosomes and supernatant depending on the presence or not of calcium. In synaptosomes, in absence of calcium, the activity was inhibited at the highest concentrations of ethanol. In contrast, in the supernatant, under depolarizing conditions, ethanol increases pGluAP in absence of calcium. These changes may be in part responsible of the behavioural changes associated to alcohol intake.

  16. An enhancer with cell-type dependent activity is located between the myeloid and epithelial aminopeptidase N (CD 13) promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J; Kokholm, K; Troelsen, J T; Laustsen, L

    1997-01-01

    The 5' flanking region of the gene encoding the small intestinal brush-border peptidase aminopeptidase N (APN) was screened for the presence of enhancer regions. A 300 bp region with enhancer activity was identified 2.7 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site which is used in epithelial cells. The enhancer stimulated transcription from a heterologous promoter (the simian virus 40 early promoter) in a position- and orientation-independent manner. The activity of the enhancer is cell-type dependent and it is active in liver (HepG2), intestinal (Caco-2) and myeloid (K562) cells. As the epithelial APN promoter is active in the first two cell-types and the myeloid APN promoter in the last, the results may suggest that the enhancer, through a cooperation with either of the promoters, is important for the tissue-specific expression of APN. A detailed analysis of the enhancer led to the identification of four functionally important regions that are protected against DNase I digestion by Caco-2 nuclear extract. Sequence analysis suggests that two of the regions may interact with members of the Ets transcription factor family (Ets is a transformation-specific protein first discovered in the E26 avian erythroblastosis virus), one region with a CCAAT enhancer-binding protein and one region with Sp1, a transcriptional activator first described as a factor binding to the simian virus 40 early promoter. PMID:9148767

  17. A mutant leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces cinnamoneus with enhanced L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester synthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Kono, Mirai; Kita, Manami; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester was synthesized using a mutant of a thermostable leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces cinnamoneus, D198 K SSAP, obtained in previously. A peptide of high-intensity sweetener, L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, was selected as a model for demonstrating the synthesis of L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester. The hydrolytic activities of D198 K SSAP toward L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine and its methyl ester were, respectively, 74-fold and fourfold higher than those of wild type. Similarly, the initial rate of the enzyme for L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester synthesis was over fivefold higher than that of wild-type SSAP in 90% methanol (v/v) in a one-pot reaction. Furthermore, other L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl esters were synthesized efficiently using D198 K SSAP. Results show that the substitution of Asp198 of SSAP with Lys is effective for synthesizing L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester.

  18. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jeremy L; Dean, Donald H

    2001-01-01

    Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori) midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm) aminopeptidase N (APN) and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM), and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM), which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac) was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research. PMID:11722800

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin interaction with Manduca sexta aminopeptidase N in a model membrane environment.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, M A; Carroll, J; Travis, E R; Williams, D H; Ellar, D J

    1998-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac delta-endotoxin was shown to bind in a biphasic manner to Manduca sexta aminopeptidase N (APN) present in a novel model membrane. Surface plasmon resonance analysis allowed the quantification of toxin binding to M. sexta APN in a supported lipid monolayer. The initial binding was rapid and reversible, with an affinity constant of 110 nM. The second phase was slower and resulted in an overall affinity constant of 3.0 nM. Reagents used to disrupt protein-protein interactions did not dissociate the toxin after high-affinity binding was attained. The initial association between Cry1Ac and APN was inhibited by the sugar GalNAc, but the higher-affinity state was resistant to GalNAc-induced dissociation. The results suggest that after binding to M. sexta APN, the Cry1Ac toxin undergoes a rate-limiting step leading to a high-affinity state. A site-directed Cry1Ac mutant, N135Q, exhibited a similar initial binding affinity for APN but did not show the second slower phase. This inability to form an irreversible association with the APN-lipid monolayer helps explain the lack of toxicity of this protein towards M. sexta larvae and its deficient membrane-permeabilizing activity on M. sexta midgut brush border membrane vesicles. PMID:9677328

  20. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Arısoy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Yıldız, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130 MPa providing activity of 114.47 mU ml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09 mU ml(-1) at 28 min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:26584994

  1. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Arısoy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Yıldız, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130 MPa providing activity of 114.47 mU ml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09 mU ml(-1) at 28 min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium.

  2. Synthesis and potent antiprotozoal activity of mono/di amidino 2-anilinobenzimidazoles versus Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Cigdem; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Göker, Hakan

    2016-09-15

    A series of mono and dicationic new 2-anilinobenzimidazole carboxamidines were prepared in a four step process starting from 4-amino-3-nitrobenzonitrile and corresponding o-phenylenediamines. Their antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T.b. rhodesiense) were evaluated in vitro. Some of the dicationic compounds (10,12,14) showed equal or very close activity against T.b. rhodesiense with melarsoprol and also showed promising activity against P. falciparum as compared to chloroquine. Among the monocationic derivatives compound 21 exhibited best inhibitory activity against P. falciparum. PMID:27387356

  3. Erythrocyte Lysis and Xenopus laevis Oocyte Rupture by Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hemolysin III

    PubMed Central

    Moonah, Shannon; Sanders, Natalie G.; Persichetti, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills more than 1 million people per year worldwide, with severe malaria anemia accounting for the majority of the deaths. Malaria anemia is multifactorial in etiology, including infected erythrocyte destruction and decrease in erythrocyte production, as well as destruction or clearance of noninfected erythrocytes. We identified a panspecies Plasmodium hemolysin type III related to bacterial hemolysins. The identification of a hemolysin III homologue in Plasmodium suggests a potential role in host erythrocyte lysis. Here, we report the first characterization of Plasmodium falciparum hemolysin III, showing that the soluble recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III is a pore-forming protein capable of lysing human erythrocytes in a dose-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashion. The recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III-induced hemolysis was partially inhibited by glibenclamide, a known channel antagonist. Studies with polyethylene glycol molecules of different molecular weights indicated a pore size of approximately 3.2 nm. Heterologous expression of recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated early hypotonic lysis similar to that of the pore-forming aquaporin control. Live fluorescence microscopy localized transfected recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged P. falciparum hemolysin III to the essential digestive vacuole of the P. falciparum parasite. These transfected trophozoites also possessed a swollen digestive vacuole phenotype. Native Plasmodium hemolysin III in the digestive vacuole may contribute to lysis of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane derived from the host erythrocyte. After merozoite egress from infected erythrocytes, remnant P. falciparum hemolysin III released from digestive vacuoles could potentially contribute to lysis of uninfected erythrocytes to contribute to severe life-threatening anemia. PMID:25148832

  4. Erythrocyte lysis and Xenopus laevis oocyte rupture by recombinant Plasmodium falciparum hemolysin III.

    PubMed

    Moonah, Shannon; Sanders, Natalie G; Persichetti, Jason K; Sullivan, David J

    2014-10-01

    Malaria kills more than 1 million people per year worldwide, with severe malaria anemia accounting for the majority of the deaths. Malaria anemia is multifactorial in etiology, including infected erythrocyte destruction and decrease in erythrocyte production, as well as destruction or clearance of noninfected erythrocytes. We identified a panspecies Plasmodium hemolysin type III related to bacterial hemolysins. The identification of a hemolysin III homologue in Plasmodium suggests a potential role in host erythrocyte lysis. Here, we report the first characterization of Plasmodium falciparum hemolysin III, showing that the soluble recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III is a pore-forming protein capable of lysing human erythrocytes in a dose-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashion. The recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III-induced hemolysis was partially inhibited by glibenclamide, a known channel antagonist. Studies with polyethylene glycol molecules of different molecular weights indicated a pore size of approximately 3.2 nm. Heterologous expression of recombinant P. falciparum hemolysin III in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated early hypotonic lysis similar to that of the pore-forming aquaporin control. Live fluorescence microscopy localized transfected recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged P. falciparum hemolysin III to the essential digestive vacuole of the P. falciparum parasite. These transfected trophozoites also possessed a swollen digestive vacuole phenotype. Native Plasmodium hemolysin III in the digestive vacuole may contribute to lysis of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane derived from the host erythrocyte. After merozoite egress from infected erythrocytes, remnant P. falciparum hemolysin III released from digestive vacuoles could potentially contribute to lysis of uninfected erythrocytes to contribute to severe life-threatening anemia.

  5. Genetic structure of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in the Bannu district of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum are the major causative agents of malaria. While knowledge of the genetic structure of malaria parasites is useful for understanding the evolution of parasite virulence, designing anti-malarial vaccines and assessing the impact of malaria control measures, there is a paucity of information on genetic diversity of these two malaria parasites in Pakistan. This study sought to shed some light on the genetic structure of P. vivax and P. falciparum in this understudied region. Methods The genetic diversities of P. vivax and P. falciparum populations from the densely populated, malaria-endemic Bannu district of Pakistan were evaluated by analysis of their merozoite surface protein (msp) genes by PCR-RFLP. Specifically, the Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β genes of P. vivax and the Pfmsp-1 and Pfmsp-2 genes of P. falciparum were analysed. Results In P. vivax, genotyping of Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β genes showed a high level of diversity at these loci. Four distinct allele groups: A (1.9 kb), B (1.5 kb), C (1.2 kb), and D (0.3 kb) were detected for Pvmsp-3α, type A being the most prevalent (82%). Conversely, amplification of the P. vivax msp-3β locus produced two allele groups: A (1.7-2.2 kb, 62%) and B (1.4-1.5 kb, 33%), with 5% mixed-strain infections. Restriction analysis of Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β yielded 12 and 8 distinct alleles, respectively, with a combined mixed genotype prevalence of 20%. In P. falciparum, all three known genotypes of Pfmsp-1 and two of Pfmsp-2 were observed, with MAD20 occurring in 67% and 3D7/IC in 65% of the isolates, respectively. Overall, 24% P. falciparum samples exhibited mixed-strain infections. Conclusion These results indicate that both P. vivax and P. falciparum populations in Pakistan are highly diverse. PMID:20416089

  6. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369), containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds. PMID:23190769

  7. Primaquine or other 8-aminoquinoline for reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Patricia M; Gelband, Hellen; Garner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes become infected with Plasmodium when they ingest gametocyte-stage parasites from an infected person's blood. Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are sensitive to the drug primaquine (PQ) and other 8-aminoquinolines (8AQ); these drugs could prevent parasite transmission from infected people to mosquitoes, and consequently reduce the incidence of malaria. However, PQ will not directly benefit the individual, and could be harmful to those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In 2010, The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended a single dose of PQ at 0.75 mg/kg, alongside treatment for P. falciparum malaria to reduce transmission in areas approaching malaria elimination. In 2013 the WHO revised this to 0.25 mg/kg due to concerns about safety. Objectives To assess whether giving PQ or an alternative 8AQ alongside treatment for P. falciparum malaria reduces malaria transmission, and to estimate the frequency of severe or haematological adverse events when PQ is given for this purpose. Search methods We searched the following databases up to 10 Feb 2014 for trials: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); and the WHO trials search portal using 'malaria*', 'falciparum', and 'primaquine' as search terms. In addition, we searched conference proceedings and reference lists of included studies, and contacted researchers and organizations. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing PQ (or alternative 8AQ) given as a single dose or short course alongside treatment for P. falciparum malaria with malaria treatment given without PQ/8AQ in adults or children. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened all abstracts, applied inclusion criteria, and extracted data. We sought evidence of an impact on

  8. Experimental evidence for a metallohydrolase mechanism in which the nucleophile is not delivered by a metal ion: EPR spectrokinetic and structural studies of aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Periyannan, Gopal Raj; Narayanan, Beena; Kittell, Aaron W.; Kim, Jung-Ja; Bennett, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Metallohydrolases catalyse some of the most important reactions in biology and are targets for numerous chemotherapeutic agents designed to combat bacterial infectivity, antibiotic resistance, HIV infectivity, tumour growth, angiogenesis and immune disorders. Rational design of inhibitors of these enzymes with chemotherapeutic potential relies on detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism. The roles of the catalytic transition ions in these enzymes have long been assumed to include the activation and delivery of a nucleophilic hydroxy moiety. In the present study, catalytic intermediates in the hydrolysis of L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine by Vibrio proteolyticus aminopeptidase were characterized in spectrokinetic and structural studies. Rapid-freeze-quench EPR studies of reaction products of L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine and Co(II)-substituted aminopeptidase, and comparison of the EPR data with those from structurally characterized complexes of aminopeptidase with inhibitors, indicated the formation of a catalytically competent post-Michaelis pre-transition state intermediate with a structure analogous to that of the inhibited complex with bestatin. The X-ray crystal structure of an aminopeptidase–L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine complex was also analogous to that of the bestatin complex. In these structures, no water/hydroxy group was observed bound to the essential metal ion. However, a water/hydroxy group was clearly identified that was bound to the metal-ligating oxygen atom of Glu152. This water/hydroxy group is proposed as a candidate for the active nucleophile in a novel metallohydrolase mechanism that shares features of the catalytic mechanisms of aspartic proteases and of B2 metallo-β-lactamases. Preliminary studies on site-directed variants are consistent with the proposal. Other features of the structure suggest roles for the dinuclear centre in geometrically and electrophilically activating the substrate. PMID:17238863

  9. Artesunate plus pyronaridine for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bukirwa, Hasifa; Unnikrishnan, B; Kramer, Christine V; Sinclair, David; Nair, Suma; Tharyan, Prathap

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria are treated using Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT). ACT combines three-days of a short-acting artemisinin derivative with a longer-acting antimalarial which has a different mode of action. Pyronaridine has been reported as an effective antimalarial over two decades of use in parts of Asia, and is currently being evaluated as a partner drug for artesunate. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of artesunate-pyronaridine compared to alternative ACTs for treating people with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; ClinicalTrials.gov; the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); and the WHO International Clinical Trials Search Portal up to 16 January 2014. We searched reference lists and conference abstracts, and contacted experts for information about ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials of artesunate-pyronaridine versus other ACTs in adults and children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. For the safety analysis, we also included adverse events data from trials comparing any treatment regimen containing pyronaridine with regimens not containing pyronaridine. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. We combined dichotomous data using risk ratios (RR) and continuous data using mean differences (MD), and presented all results with a 95% confidence interval (CI). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included six randomized controlled trials enrolling 3718 children and adults. Artesunate-pyronaridine versus artemether-lumefantrine In two multicentre trials, enrolling

  10. In Vitro Evidence Supports Membrane Alanyl Aminopeptidase N as a Receptor for a Plant Virus in the Pea Aphid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Lucas B.; Liu, Sijun; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insect-borne plant viruses cause significant agricultural losses and jeopardize sustainable global food production. Although blocking plant virus transmission would allow for crop protection, virus receptors in insect vectors are unknown. Here we identify membrane alanyl aminopeptidase N (APN) as a receptor for pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) coat protein (CP) in the gut of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a far-Western blot method. Pulldown and immunofluorescence binding assays and surface plasmon resonance were used to confirm and characterize CP-APN interaction. PEMV virions and a peptide comprised of PEMV CP fused to a proline-rich hinge (-P-) and green fluorescent protein (CP-P-GFP) specifically bound to APN. Recombinant APN expressed in Sf9 cells resulted in internalization of CP-P-GFP, which was visualized by confocal microscopy; such internalization is an expected hallmark of a functional gut receptor. Finally, in assays with aphid gut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, binding of CP-P-GFP competed with binding of GBP3.1, a peptide previously demonstrated to bind to APN in the aphid gut and to impede PEMV uptake into the hemocoel; this finding supports the hypothesis that GBP3.1 and PEMV bind to and compete for the same APN receptor. These in vitro data combined with previously published in vivo experiments (S. Liu, S. Sivakumar, W. O. Sparks, W. A. Miller, and B. C. Bonning, Virology 401:107–116, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2010.02.009) support the identification of APN as the first receptor in a plant virus vector. Knowledge of this receptor will provide for technologies based on PEMV-APN interaction designed to block plant virus transmission and to suppress aphid populations. IMPORTANCE A significant proportion of global food production is lost to insect pests. Aphids, in addition to weakening plants by feeding on their sap, are responsible for transmitting about half of the plant viruses vectored by insects. Growers

  11. Molecular Determinants of Species Specificity in the Coronavirus Receptor Aminopeptidase N (CD13): Influence of N-Linked Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2001-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN), a 150-kDa metalloprotease also called CD13, serves as a receptor for serologically related coronaviruses of humans (human coronavirus 229E [HCoV-229E]), pigs, and cats. These virus-receptor interactions can be highly species specific; for example, the human coronavirus can use human APN (hAPN) but not porcine APN (pAPN) as its cellular receptor, and porcine coronaviruses can use pAPN but not hAPN. Substitution of pAPN amino acids 283 to 290 into hAPN for the corresponding amino acids 288 to 295 introduced an N-glycosylation sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 that blocked HCoV-229E receptor activity of hAPN. Substitution of two amino acids that inserted an N-glycosylation site at amino acid 291 also resulted in a mutant hAPN that lacked receptor activity because it failed to bind HCoV-229E. Single amino acid revertants that removed this sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 but had one or five pAPN amino acid substitution(s) in this region all regained HCoV-229E binding and receptor activities. To determine if other N-linked glycosylation differences between hAPN, feline APN (fAPN), and pAPN account for receptor specificity of pig and cat coronaviruses, a mutant hAPN protein that, like fAPN and pAPN, lacked a glycosylation sequon at 818 to 820 was studied. This sequon is within the region that determines receptor activity for porcine and feline coronaviruses. Mutant hAPN lacking the sequon at amino acids 818 to 820 maintained HCoV-229E receptor activity but did not gain receptor activity for porcine or feline coronaviruses. Thus, certain differences in glycosylation between coronavirus receptors from different species are critical determinants in the species specificity of infection. PMID:11559807

  12. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  13. Lack of angiotensin II conversion to angiotensin III increases water but not alcohol consumption in aminopeptidase A-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Faber, Franziska; Gembardt, Florian; Sun, Xiaoou; Mizutani, Shigehiko; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Walther, Thomas

    2006-09-11

    Elevated central concentrations of the vasopressor octapeptide angiotensin (Ang) II increase the water intake in mammals. Recently, we showed that central AngII is also crucial in alcohol-consuming behavior. Since the heptapeptide AngIII, an AngII metabolite, is discussed to mediate AngII-related effects, we investigated water and alcohol consumption in mice, genetically deficient in aminopeptidase A (APA), a peptidase responsible for AngII conversion to AngIII. Sixteen male APA-deficient mice and their age matched wild-type controls were monitored on their water intake under basal conditions and total fluid and alcohol intake before and after social stress in a two-bottle free-choice paradigm. Alterations were connected to the regulation in activity of Ang-related peptidases (APA, ACE; ACE2) in brain regions involved in alcohol intake and peripheral organs. In comparison to their wild-type controls, APA-deficient mice drank significantly more water but not more alcohol at all investigated time points. A reduction in water intake, as observed in wild-type animals after social stress, did not occur in knockout mice. However, the reduction in alcohol consumption after social stress was significantly reduced in both strains. Alcohol consumption upregulated all three peptidases in the kidney, but not in lung. Notable, renal ACE2 activity was significantly higher in APA-deficient mice under basal condition. While the inhibition of AngII metabolism to AngIII does not influence the alcohol intake, water consumption in mice deficient for APA was significantly elevated. These differences induced by an altered AngII/AngIII ratio oppose the hypothesis that central AngII and AngIII act in a congruent pattern.

  14. Involvement of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in the effects of the renin-angiotensin fragment angiotensin IV: a review.

    PubMed

    Stragier, Bart; De Bundel, Dimitri; Sarre, Sophie; Smolders, Ilse; Vauquelin, Georges; Dupont, Alain; Michotte, Yvette; Vanderheyden, Patrick

    2008-09-01

    For decades, angiotensin (Ang) II was considered as the end product and the only bioactive peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). However, later studies revealed biological activity for other Ang fragments. Amongst those, Ang IV has drawn a lot of attention since it exerts a wide range of central and peripheral effects including the ability to enhance learning and memory recall, anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties, protection against cerebral ischemia, activity at the vascular level and an involvement in atherogenesis. Some of these effects are AT(1) receptor dependent but others most likely result from the binding of Ang IV to insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) although the exact mechanism(s) of action that mediate the Ang IV-induced effects following this binding are until now not fully known. Nevertheless, three hypotheses have been put forward: since Ang IV is an inhibitor of the catalytic activity of IRAP, its in vivo effects might result from a build-up of IRAP's neuropeptide substrates. Second, IRAP is co-localized with the glucose transporter GLUT4 in several tissue types and therefore, Ang IV might interact with the uptake of glucose. A final and more intriguing hypothesis ascribes a receptor function to IRAP and hence an agonist role to Ang IV. Taken together, it is clear that further work is required to clarify the mechanism of action of Ang IV. On the other hand, a wide range of studies have made it clear that IRAP might become an important target for drug development against different pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy and ischemia.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering reveals the assembly mode and oligomeric architecture of TET, a large, dodecameric aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Appolaire, Alexandre; Girard, Eric; Colombo, Matteo; Durá, M. Asunción; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2014-11-01

    The present work illustrates that small-angle neutron scattering, deuteration and contrast variation, combined with in vitro particle reconstruction, constitutes a very efficient approach to determine subunit architectures in large, symmetric protein complexes. In the case of the 468 kDa heterododecameric TET peptidase machine, it was demonstrated that the assembly of the 12 subunits is a highly controlled process and represents a way to optimize the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The specific self-association of proteins into oligomeric complexes is a common phenomenon in biological systems to optimize and regulate their function. However, de novo structure determination of these important complexes is often very challenging for atomic-resolution techniques. Furthermore, in the case of homo-oligomeric complexes, or complexes with very similar building blocks, the respective positions of subunits and their assembly pathways are difficult to determine using many structural biology techniques. Here, an elegant and powerful approach based on small-angle neutron scattering is applied, in combination with deuterium labelling and contrast variation, to elucidate the oligomeric organization of the quaternary structure and the assembly pathways of 468 kDa, hetero-oligomeric and symmetric Pyrococcus horikoshii TET2–TET3 aminopeptidase complexes. The results reveal that the topology of the PhTET2 and PhTET3 dimeric building blocks within the complexes is not casual but rather suggests that their quaternary arrangement optimizes the catalytic efficiency towards peptide substrates. This approach bears important potential for the determination of quaternary structures and assembly pathways of large oligomeric and symmetric complexes in biological systems.

  16. Aminopeptidase inhibitor ubenimex (bestatin) inhibits the growth of human choriocarcinoma in nude mice through its direct cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Inoi, K; Goto, S; Nomura, S; Isobe, K; Nawa, A; Okamoto, T; Tomoda, Y

    1995-01-01

    Ubenimex (bestatin), a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidases, is known to have immunomodulatory and host-mediated antitumor activities. In this paper, we investigated the inhibitory effects of bestatin on the growth of human choriocarcinoma both in vitro and in vivo using the established choriocarcinoma cell line NaUCC-4. Bestatin inhibited the in vitro proliferation of NaUCC-4 cells concentration- and time-dependently at more than 72 h incubation. DNA histograms by flow cytometric analysis revealed that exposure to bestatin at 5 to 20 micrograms/ml for 72 h caused mild accumulation of NaUCC-4 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, although no clear arrest was observed in any phase of cell cycle. In vivo antitumor activity of bestatin was examined using the NaUCC-4 choriocarcinoma-xenografted nude mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by daily i.p. administration of bestatin for 4 weeks at doses of 2 and 20 mg/kg (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not by 0.2 mg/kg as compared with control. No significant augmentation of NK activity or B cell mitogenicity in spleen cells taken from these NaUCC-4-hearing nude mice was observed following treatment with bestatin at either 2 or 20 mg/kg. These results indicate that bestatin inhibits the growth of NaUCC-4 choriocarcinoma in vivo as well as in vitro not via potentiation of effector cells but rather by its direct cytostatic activity, and suggest that bestatin may have an additional therapeutic property besides as a BRM for its use in the treatment of choriocarcinoma.

  17. Generation of a mouse scFv library specific for porcine aminopeptidase N using the T7 phage display system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongbo; Shi, Hongyan; Chen, Jianfei; Shi, Da; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Shengwang; Wang, Yunfeng; Qiu, Huaji; Feng, Li

    2012-06-01

    Porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) is a common cellular receptor for swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). To investigate single-chain fragment variable (scFv) repertoire against pAPN, the genes encoding the immunoglobulin light chain variable region (VL) and heavy chain variable region (VH) were amplified by reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a series of degenerate primers from the spleen of BABL/c mice immunized with native pAPN. The VL and VH amplicons were combined randomly by a 12 amino acid flexible linker by splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR), which produced the scFv gene repertoire. After ligation of the scFv gene repertoire into the T7Select10-3b vector, a mouse scFv phage library specific for pAPN was produced through in vitro packaging. The primary scFv library against pAPN contained 2.0×10(7) recombinant phage clones, and the titer of the amplified library was 3.6×10(9)pfu/mL. BstNI restriction analysis and DNA sequencing revealed that 28 phage clones from the primary pAPN scFv library showed excellent diversity. The effectiveness of the scFv library against pAPN was verified further by phage ELISA using the recombinant protein of the pAPN C subunit as coating antigen. The construction and evaluation of a murine scFv library against the common receptor pAPN of porcine coronaviruses TGEV and PEDV using the T7 phage display system are described.

  18. MT95-4, a fully humanized antibody raised against aminopeptidase N, reduces tumor progression in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Shin; Hattori, Noboru; Masuda, Takeshi; Horimasu, Yasushi; Nakashima, Taku; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Miyake, Masayuki; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) is involved in tumor cell invasion and tumor angiogenesis and is considered a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. To develop a novel monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy targeting APN/CD13, we established a fully humanized anti-APN/CD13 monoclonal antibody, MT95-4. In vitro, MT95-4 inhibited APN/CD13 enzymatic activity on the tumor cell surface and blocked tumor cell invasion. B16 mouse melanoma cells stably expressing human APN/CD13 were also established and were inoculated s.c. or injected i.v. into nude mice. We found that expression of human APN/CD13 in murine melanoma cells increased the size of subcutaneous tumors, extent of lung metastasis and degree of angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tumors; these tumor-promoting and angiogenesis-promoting characteristics were reduced by the i.p. administration of MT95-4. To further verify the specificity of MT95-4 for neutralization of APN/CD13 activity, MT95-4 was administered into NOD/SCID mice inoculated s.c. with H1299 or PC14 cells, which exhibit high expression of APN/CD13, or with A549 cells, which exhibit weak expression of APN/CD13. MT95-4 reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in mice bearing H1299-derived and PC14-derived tumors, but not in mice bearing A549-derived tumors. These results suggested that the antitumor and anti-angiogenic effects of MT95-4 were dependent on APN/CD13 expression in tumor cells. Given that MT95-4 is the first fully humanized monoclonal antibody against APN/CD13, MT95-4 should be recognized as a promising candidate for monoclonal antibody therapy against tumors expressing APN/CD13. PMID:25950387

  19. The Formin family protein, formin homolog overexpressed in spleen, interacts with the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase and profilin IIa.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Hideaki; Kaieda, Isao; Hattori, Harumi; Katayama, Nozomi; Yoshimura, Koji; Kakimoto, Shigeya; Fujisawa, Yukio; Presman, Eleonora; Brooks, Cydney C; Pilch, Paul F

    2003-07-01

    Insulin stimulates translocation of glucose transporter isoform type 4 (GLUT4) and the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase (IRAP) from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane in muscle and fat cells. A role for the cytoskeleton in insulin action has been postulated, and the insulin signaling pathway has been well investigated; however, the molecular mechanism by which GLUT4/IRAP-containing vesicles move from an interior location to the cell surface in response to insulin is incompletely understood. Here, we have screened for IRAP-binding proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system and have found that the C-terminal domain of FHOS (formin homolog overexpressed in spleen) interacts with the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of IRAP. FHOS is a member of the Formin/Diaphanous family of proteins that is expressed most abundantly in skeletal muscle. In addition, there are two novel types of FHOS transcripts generated by alternative mRNA splicing. FHOS78 has a 78-bp insertion and it is expressed mainly in skeletal muscle where it may be the most abundant isoform in humans. The ubiquitously expressed FHOS24 has a 24-bp insertion encoding an in-frame stop codon that results in a truncated polypeptide. It is known that some formin family proteins interact with the actin-binding profilin proteins. Both FHOS and FHOS78 bound to profilin IIa via their formin homology 1 domains, but neither bound profilin I or IIb. Overexpression of FHOS and FHOS78 resulted in enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in L6 cells to similar levels. However, overexpression of FHOS24, lacking the IRAP-binding domain, did not affect insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that FHOS mediates an interaction between GLUT4/IRAP-containing vesicles and the cytoskeleton and may participate in exocytosis and/or retention of this membrane compartment.

  20. Location of the Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N type 1 binding site on Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shogo; Mizuno, Eri; Hara, Hirotaka; Nakanishi, Kazuko; Kitami, Madoka; Miura, Nami; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Watanabe, Ayako; Sato, Ryoichi

    2005-07-01

    We analyzed the binding site on Cry1Aa toxin for the Cry1Aa receptor in Bombyx mori, 115-kDa aminopeptidase N type 1 (BmAPN1) (K. Nakanishi, K. Yaoi, Y. Nagino, H. Hara, M. Kitami, S. Atsumi, N. Miura, and R. Sato, FEBS Lett. 519:215-220, 2002), by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that block binding between the binding site and the receptor. First, we produced a series of MAbs against Cry1Aa and obtained two MAbs, MAbs 2C2 and 1B10, that were capable of blocking the binding between Cry1Aa and BmAPN1 (blocking MAbs). The epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 2C2 overlapped the BmAPN1 binding site, whereas the epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 1B10 did not overlap but was located close to the binding site. Using three approaches for epitope mapping, we identified two candidate epitopes for the blocking MAbs on Cry1Aa. We constructed two Cry1Aa toxin mutants by substituting a cysteine on the toxin surface at each of the two candidate epitopes, and the small blocking molecule N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide (NAM) was introduced at each cysteine substitution to determine the true epitope. The Cry1Aa mutant with NAM bound to Cys582 did not bind either of the two blocking MAbs, suggesting that the true epitope for each of the blocking MAbs was located at the site containing Val582, which also consisted of 508STLRVN513 and 582VFTLSAHV589. These results indicated that the BmAPN1 binding site overlapped part of the region blocked by MAb 2C2 that was close to but excluded the actual epitope of MAb 2C2 on domain III of Cry1Aa toxin. We also discuss another area on Cry1Aa toxin as a new candidate site for BmAPN1 binding. PMID:16000811

  1. Location of the Bombyx mori Aminopeptidase N Type 1 Binding Site on Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Shogo; Mizuno, Eri; Hara, Hirotaka; Nakanishi, Kazuko; Kitami, Madoka; Miura, Nami; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Watanabe, Ayako; Sato, Ryoichi

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the binding site on Cry1Aa toxin for the Cry1Aa receptor in Bombyx mori, 115-kDa aminopeptidase N type 1 (BmAPN1) (K. Nakanishi, K. Yaoi, Y. Nagino, H. Hara, M. Kitami, S. Atsumi, N. Miura, and R. Sato, FEBS Lett. 519:215-220, 2002), by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that block binding between the binding site and the receptor. First, we produced a series of MAbs against Cry1Aa and obtained two MAbs, MAbs 2C2 and 1B10, that were capable of blocking the binding between Cry1Aa and BmAPN1 (blocking MAbs). The epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 2C2 overlapped the BmAPN1 binding site, whereas the epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 1B10 did not overlap but was located close to the binding site. Using three approaches for epitope mapping, we identified two candidate epitopes for the blocking MAbs on Cry1Aa. We constructed two Cry1Aa toxin mutants by substituting a cysteine on the toxin surface at each of the two candidate epitopes, and the small blocking molecule N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide (NAM) was introduced at each cysteine substitution to determine the true epitope. The Cry1Aa mutant with NAM bound to Cys582 did not bind either of the two blocking MAbs, suggesting that the true epitope for each of the blocking MAbs was located at the site containing Val582, which also consisted of 508STLRVN513 and 582VFTLSAHV589. These results indicated that the BmAPN1 binding site overlapped part of the region blocked by MAb 2C2 that was close to but excluded the actual epitope of MAb 2C2 on domain III of Cry1Aa toxin. We also discuss another area on Cry1Aa toxin as a new candidate site for BmAPN1 binding. PMID:16000811

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca-resistant Spodoptera exigua lacks expression of one of four Aminopeptidase N genes

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Salvador; Gechev, Tsanko; Bakker, Petra L; Moar, William J; de Maagd, Ruud A

    2005-01-01

    Background Insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bind to receptors on midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insect larvae. Aminopeptidases N (APNs) from several insect species have been shown to be putative receptors for these toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression analysis of four APN cDNAs from Spodoptera exigua. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was used to construct cDNA libraries of genes that are up-and down-regulated in the midgut of last instar larvae of beet armyworm, S. exigua exposed to B. thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin. Among the clones from the SSH libraries, cDNA fragments coding for two different APNs were obtained (APN2 and APN4). A similar procedure was employed to compare mRNA differences between susceptible and Cry1Ca resistant S. exigua. Among the clones from this last comparison, cDNA fragments belonging to a third APN (APN1) were detected. Using sequences obtained from the three APN cDNA fragments and degenerate primers for a fourth APN (APN3), the full length sequences of four S. exigua APN cDNAs were obtained. Northern blot analysis of expression of the four APNs showed complete absence of APN1 expression in the resistant insects, while the other three APNs showed similar expression levels in the resistant and susceptible insects. Conclusion We have cloned and characterized four different midgut APN cDNAs from S. exigua. Expression analysis revealed the lack of expression of one of these APNs in the larvae of a Cry1Ca-resistant colony. Combined with previous evidence that shows the importance of APN in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis toxins, these results suggest that the lack of APN1 expression plays a role in the resistance to Cry1Ca in this S. exigua colony. PMID:15978131

  3. Factors associated with regional bias of pfcrt (plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) haplotypes in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Megha Raj; Imwong, Mallika; Petmitr, Songsak; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Joshi, Anand B; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2011-01-01

    Evidences of reappearance of chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum haplotypes after cessation of chloroquine in many countries provide a rationale for the search of chloroquine sensitive haplotypes in P. falciparum isolates in Nepal where the use of chloroquine for falciparum malaria treatment has been ceased since 1988. P. falciparum chloroquine resistant transporter gene (pfcrt) haplotypes were determined and the factors associated with pfcrt haplotypes in the Eastern and Central regions of Nepal were identified. Blood samples from 106 microscopy-positive falciparum malaria patients (62 from the Eastern and 44 from the Central region) were collected on filter paper. Pfcrt region covering codons 72-76 was amplified by PCR and sequenced. SVMNT haplotype was predominant in the Central region, whereas CVIET haplotype significantly more common in the Eastern region. In multivariable analysis of factors associated with CVIET haplotype, the Eastern region and parasite isolates from patients visiting India within one month are significant at 5% level of significance. These findings suggest that antimalarial pressure is different between Eastern and Central regions of Nepal and there is a need of an effective malaria control program in the border areas between India and Nepal.

  4. Understanding the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast; an excellent target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arnish

    2016-08-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease, caused by the intracellular parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The World Health Organization counts malaria as one of the top ten causes of worldwide death. The unavailability of a successful malaria vaccine and the ever-increasing instances of drug resistance in the malaria parasite demand the discovery of new targets within P. falciparum for the development of next generation antimalarials. Fortunately, all apicomplexan parasites, including P. falciparum harbor a relict, non-photosynthetic plastid known as the apicoplast. The apicoplast is a semi-autonomous organelle within P. falciparum containing a 35kb circular genome. Despite a genome of its own, majority of the apicoplast proteins are encoded by the parasite nucleus and imported into the apicoplast. The organelle has been shown to be essential to P. falciparum survival and the loss the apicoplast manifests as a 'delayed death' response in the parasite. The apicoplast has evolved out of cyanobacteria in a complex, two step endosymbiotic event. As a result the architecture and the gene expression machinery of the apicoplast is quite bacteria-like and is susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics such as fosmidomycin, tetracycline, azithromycin, clindamycin and triclosan. The biosynthetic pathways for isoprenoids, fatty acids and heme operate within the malaria apicoplast, making the organelle an excellent target for drug development. The review focuses on the evolution, biology and the essentiality of the apicoplast within the malaria parasite and discusses some of the recent achievements towards the design and discovery of apicoplast targeted antimalarial compounds.

  5. Branch Point Identification and Sequence Requirements for Intron Splicing in Plasmodium falciparum ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Tolzmann, Caitlin A.; Melcher, Martin; Haas, Brian J.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Smith, Joseph D.; Feagin, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing of mRNA is an ancient and evolutionarily conserved process in eukaryotic organisms, but intron-exon structures vary. Plasmodium falciparum has an extreme AT nucleotide bias (>80%), providing a unique opportunity to investigate how evolutionary forces have acted on intron structures. In this study, we developed an in vivo luciferase reporter splicing assay and employed it in combination with lariat isolation and sequencing to characterize 5′ and 3′ splicing requirements and experimentally determine the intron branch point in P. falciparum. This analysis indicates that P. falciparum mRNAs have canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, the 5′ consensus motif is weakly conserved and tolerates nucleotide substitution, including the fifth nucleotide in the intron, which is more typically a G nucleotide in most eukaryotes. In comparison, the 3′ splice site has a strong eukaryotic consensus sequence and adjacent polypyrimidine tract. In four different P. falciparum pre-mRNAs, multiple branch points per intron were detected, with some at U instead of the typical A residue. A weak branch point consensus was detected among 18 identified branch points. This analysis indicates that P. falciparum retains many consensus eukaryotic splice site features, despite having an extreme codon bias, and possesses flexibility in branch point nucleophilic attack. PMID:21926333

  6. Trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital of India

    PubMed Central

    Saya, Rama Prakasha; Saya, Ganesh Kumar; Debabrata, Goswami

    2016-01-01

    Background: The recent focus is on the increase in the burden of falciparum cases with a varied spectrum of presentation and outcome, especially in developing countries like India. This study was undertaken to analyze the trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out at the Gauhati Government Medical College and Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. The data were collected on demographic and time characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, the outcome of disease and expressed in proportion or percentages. Results: Out of the 100 cases, around 2nd/3rd (63%) of cases were in the age group of 15–30 years and the mean age was found to be 29.51 years. About 66% of them were males. Clinical presentations included pain abdomen (42, 42%), nausea and vomiting (35, 35%), jaundice (34, 34%), oliguria (24, 24%), altered sensorium (24, 24%), breathing difficulty (10, 10%), and seizures (5, 5%). Number of cases and mortality were more with a peak in the month of May and September. Manifestations of severe falciparum malaria included hepatopathy (38%), renal failure (28%), shock (9%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (7%), hypoglycemia (3%), and severe anemia (1%). Eighty-two cases (82%) recovered and 18 cases (18%) expired. Conclusion: Falciparum malaria is more among younger adult age group and males. Complications and mortality are also more due to falciparum malaria. PMID:27563638

  7. Plasmodium falciparum proteins involved in cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to chemokine CX3CL1

    PubMed Central

    Hermand, Patricia; Cicéron, Liliane; Pionneau, Cédric; Vaquero, Catherine; Combadière, Christophe; Deterre, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is associated with cytoadherence of infected red blood cells (iRBC) to endothelial cells. Numerous host molecules have been involved in cytoadherence, including the adhesive chemokine CX3CL1. Most of the identified parasite ligands are from the multigenic and hypervariable Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) family which makes them poor targets for the development of a broadly protective vaccine. Using proteomics, we have identified two 25-kDa parasite proteins with adhesive properties for CX3CL1, called CBP for CX3CL1 Binding Proteins. CBPs are coded by single-copy genes with little polymorphic variation and no homology with other P. falciparum gene products. Specific antibodies raised against epitopes from the predicted extracellular domains of each CBP efficiently stain the surface of RBC infected with trophozoites or schizonts, which is a strong indication of CBP expression at the surface of iRBC. These anti-CBP antibodies partially neutralize iRBC adherence to CX3CL1. This adherence is similarly inhibited in the presence of peptides from the CBP extracellular domains, while irrelevant peptides had no such effect. CBP1 and CBP2 are new P. falciparum ligands for the human chemokine CX3CL1. The identification of this non-polymorphic P. falciparum factors provides a new avenue for innovative vaccination approaches. PMID:27653778

  8. Evolution of genetic polymorphisms of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein (PfMSP) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kuesap, Jiraporn; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Ketprathum, Kanchanok; Tattiyapong, Puntanat; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2014-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major public health problem in Thailand due to the emergence of multidrug resistance. The understanding of genetic diversity of malaria parasites is essential for developing effective drugs and vaccines. The genetic diversity of the merozoite surface protein-1 (PfMSP-1) and merozoite surface protein-2 (PfMSP-2) genes was investigated in a total of 145 P. falciparum isolates collected from Mae Sot District, Tak Province, Thailand during 3 different periods (1997-1999, 2005-2007, and 2009-2010). Analysis of genetic polymorphisms was performed to track the evolution of genetic change of P. falciparum using PCR. Both individual genes and their combination patterns showed marked genetic diversity during the 3 study periods. The results strongly support that P. falciparum isolates in Thailand are markedly diverse and patterns changed with time. These 2 polymorphic genes could be used as molecular markers to detect multiple clone infections and differentiate recrudescence from reinfection in P. falciparum isolates in Thailand.

  9. Select pyrimidinones inhibit the propagation of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Annette N.; Valderramos, Juan-Carlos; Balachandran, Raghavan; Chovatiya, Raj J.; Mead, Brian P.; Schneider, Corinne; Bell, Samantha L.; Klein, Michael G.; Huryn, Donna M.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Day, Billy W.; Fidock, David A.; Wipf, Peter; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the Apicomplexan parasite that is responsible for the most lethal forms of human malaria, is exposed to radically different environments and stress factors during its complex lifecycle. In any organism, Hsp70 chaperones are typically associated with tolerance to stress. We therefore reasoned that inhibition of P. falciparum Hsp70 chaperones would adversely affect parasite homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we measured whether pyrimidinone-amides, a new class of Hsp70 modulators, could inhibit the replication of the pathogenic P. falciparum stages in human red blood cells. Nine compounds with IC50 values from 30 nM to 1.6 μM were identified. Each compound also altered the ATPase activity of purified P. falciparum Hsp70 in single-turnover assays, although higher concentrations of agents were required than was necessary to inhibit P. falciparum replication. Varying effects of these compounds on Hsp70s from other organisms were also observed. Together, our data indicate that pyrimidinone-amides constitute a novel class of anti-malarial agents. PMID:19195901

  10. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background.  African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods.  Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results.  Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%-21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1-4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1-2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions.  Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded.

  11. Structural polymorphism in the promoter of pfmrp2 confers Plasmodium falciparum tolerance to quinoline drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Sachel; Liong, Kek-Yee; Lim, Eng-How; Huang, Ximei; Zhu, Lei; Preiser, Peter Rainer; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum remains a challenge for the malaria eradication programmes around the world. With the emergence of artemisinin resistance, the efficacy of the partner drugs in the artemisinin combination therapies (ACT) that include quinoline-based drugs is becoming critical. So far only few resistance markers have been identified from which only two transmembrane transporters namely PfMDR1 (an ATP-binding cassette transporter) and PfCRT (a drug-metabolite transporter) have been experimentally verified. Another P. falciparum transporter, the ATP-binding cassette containing multidrug resistance-associated protein (PfMRP2) represents an additional possible factor of drug resistance in P. falciparum. In this study, we identified a parasite clone that is derived from the 3D7 P. falciparum strain and shows increased resistance to chloroquine, mefloquine and quinine through the trophozoite and schizont stages. We demonstrate that the resistance phenotype is caused by a 4.1 kb deletion in the 5′ upstream region of the pfmrp2 gene that leads to an alteration in the pfmrp2 transcription and thus increased level of PfMRP2 protein. These results also suggest the importance of putative promoter elements in regulation of gene expression during the P. falciparum intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle and the potential of genetic polymorphisms within these regions to underlie drug resistance. PMID:24372851

  12. Malaria vaccines: identifying Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets.

    PubMed

    Longley, Rhea J; Hill, Adrian V S; Spencer, Alexandra J

    2015-01-01

    The development of a highly efficacious and durable vaccine for malaria remains a top priority for global health researchers. Despite the huge rise in recognition of malaria as a global health problem and the concurrent rise in funding over the past 10-15 years, malaria continues to remain a widespread burden. The evidence of increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs and insecticides is a growing concern. Hence, an efficacious and durable preventative vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective tools and have successfully been used in the prevention and control of many diseases, however, the development of a vaccine for the Plasmodium parasite has proved difficult. Given the early success of whole sporozoite mosquito-bite delivered vaccination strategies, we know that a vaccine for malaria is an achievable goal, with sub-unit vaccines holding great promise as they are simple and cheap to both manufacture and deploy. However a major difficulty in development of sub-unit vaccines lies within choosing the appropriate antigenic target from the 5000 or so genes expressed by the parasite. Given the liver-stage of malaria represents a bottle-neck in the parasite's life cycle, there is widespread agreement that a multi-component sub-unit malaria vaccine should preferably contain a liver-stage target. In this article we review progress in identifying and screening Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets for use in a malaria vaccine. PMID:26441899

  13. Analysis of Breath Specimens for Biomarkers of Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Amalia Z.; McCarthy, James S.; Wang, Rosalind X.; Saliba, Kevin J.; Bravo, Florence G.; Cassells, Julie; Padovan, Benjamin; Trowell, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the majority of diagnoses of malaria rely on a combination of the patient's clinical presentation and the visualization of parasites on a stained blood film. Breath offers an attractive alternative to blood as the basis for simple, noninvasive diagnosis of infectious diseases. In this study, breath samples were collected from individuals during controlled malaria to determine whether specific malaria-associated volatiles could be detected in breath. We identified 9 compounds whose concentrations varied significantly over the course of malaria: carbon dioxide, isoprene, acetone, benzene, cyclohexanone, and 4 thioethers. The latter group, consisting of allyl methyl sulfide, 1-methylthio-propane, (Z)-1-methylthio-1-propene, and (E)-1-methylthio-1-propene, had not previously been associated with any disease or condition. Before the availability of antimalarial drug treatment, there was evidence of concurrent 48-hour cyclical changes in the levels of both thioethers and parasitemia. When thioether concentrations were subjected to a phase shift of 24 hours, a direct correlation between the parasitemia and volatile levels was revealed. Volatile levels declined monotonically approximately 6.5 hours after initial drug treatment, correlating with clearance of parasitemia. No thioethers were detected in in vitro cultures of Plasmodium falciparum. The metabolic origin of the thioethers is not known, but results suggest that interplay between host and parasite metabolic pathways is involved in the production of these thioethers. PMID:25810441

  14. Genetic architecture of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Olivo; Amato, Roberto; Ashley, Elizabeth A; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Almagro-Garcia, Jacob; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Lim, Pharath; Mead, Daniel; Oyola, Samuel O; Dhorda, Mehul; Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles; Manske, Magnus; Stalker, Jim; Drury, Eleanor; Campino, Susana; Amenga-Etego, Lucas; Thanh, Thuy-Nhien Nguyen; Tran, Hien Tinh; Ringwald, Pascal; Bethell, Delia; Nosten, Francois; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Chuor, Char Meng; Nguon, Chea; Suon, Seila; Sreng, Sokunthea; Newton, Paul N; Mayxay, Mayfong; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Hongvanthong, Bouasy; Htut, Ye; Han, Kay Thwe; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Faiz, Md Abul; Fanello, Caterina I; Onyamboko, Marie; Mokuolu, Olugbenga A; Jacob, Christopher G; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher V; Day, Nicholas P; Dondorp, Arjen M; Spencer, Chris C A; McVean, Gilean; Fairhurst, Rick M; White, Nicholas J; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2015-03-01

    We report a large multicenter genome-wide association study of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin, the frontline antimalarial drug. Across 15 locations in Southeast Asia, we identified at least 20 mutations in kelch13 (PF3D7_1343700) affecting the encoded propeller and BTB/POZ domains, which were associated with a slow parasite clearance rate after treatment with artemisinin derivatives. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms in fd (ferredoxin), arps10 (apicoplast ribosomal protein S10), mdr2 (multidrug resistance protein 2) and crt (chloroquine resistance transporter) also showed strong associations with artemisinin resistance. Analysis of the fine structure of the parasite population showed that the fd, arps10, mdr2 and crt polymorphisms are markers of a genetic background on which kelch13 mutations are particularly likely to arise and that they correlate with the contemporary geographical boundaries and population frequencies of artemisinin resistance. These findings indicate that the risk of new resistance-causing mutations emerging is determined by specific predisposing genetic factors in the underlying parasite population.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum dolichol phosphate mannose synthase represents a novel clade

    SciTech Connect

    Shams-Eldin, Hosam Santos de Macedo, Cristiana; Niehus, Sebastian; Dorn, Caroline; Kimmel, Juergen; Azzouz, Nahid; Schwarz, Ralph T.

    2008-06-06

    Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase (DPM) catalyzes the reaction between dolichol phosphate (Dol-P) and guanosine diphosphate mannose (GDP-Man) to form dolichol-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man). This molecule acts as mannose donor for N-glycosylation and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. The Plasmodium falciparum DPM1 (Pfdpm1) possesses a single predicted transmembrane region near the N-, but not the C-terminus. Here we show that the cloned Pfdpm1 gene failed to complement a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant indicating that the parasite gene does not belong to the baker's yeast group, as was previously assumed. Furthermore, Pfdpm1 was unable to complement a mouse mutant deficient in DPM but efficiently complements the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast mutant, indicating a difference between fission yeast and mammalian DPM genes. Therefore, we reanalyzed the hydrophobicity scales of all known DPMs and consequently reclassify the DPM clade into six major novel subgroups. Furthermore, we show that Pfdpm1 represents a unique enzyme among these subgroups.

  16. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  17. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (‘K13-propeller’) with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

  18. Polycyclic amines as chloroquine resistance modulating agents in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Kapp, Erika; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2016-02-15

    Pentacycloundecylamines (PCUs) and adamantane amines, such as NGP1-01 (1) and amantadine, have shown significant channel blocking activities. They are postulated to act as chemosensitizers and circumvent the resistance of the plasmodia parasite against chloroquine (CQ) by inhibiting the p-glycoprotein efflux pump and enabling the accumulation of CQ inside the parasite digestive vacuole. Twelve polycyclic amines containing either a PCU or adamantane amine moiety conjugated to different aromatic functionalities through various tethered linkers were selected based on their channel blocking abilities and evaluated as potential chemosensitizers. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 10 showed significant voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocking ability (IC50=0.27-35 μM) and were able to alter the CQ IC50 in differing degrees (45-81%) in the multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 isolate. Among them, the PCU-dansyl amine compound (4) displayed the best potential to act as a chemosensitizer against the Dd2 strain at a 1 μM concentration (RMI=0.19) while displaying moderate antiplasmodial activity (Dd2 IC50=6.25 μM) and low in vitro cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line (CHO, IC50=119 μM). Compounds 2 and 10 also showed some promising chemosensitizing abilities (RMI=0.36 and 0.35 respectively). A direct correlation was found between the VGCC blocking ability of these polycyclic amines and their capacity to act as CQ resistance modulating agents.

  19. Interactive transcriptome analysis of malaria patients and infecting Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Junya; Natori, Anna; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Mongan, Arthur E; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Katayama, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Eshita, Yuki; Tuda, Josef; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of parasitism in vivo, it is essential to elucidate how the transcriptomes of the human hosts and the infecting parasites affect one another. Here we report the RNA-seq analysis of 116 Indonesian patients infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). We extracted RNAs from their peripheral blood as a mixture of host and parasite transcripts and mapped the RNA-seq tags to the human and Pf reference genomes to separate the respective tags. We were thus able to simultaneously analyze expression patterns in both humans and parasites. We identified human and parasite genes and pathways that correlated with various clinical data, which may serve as primary targets for drug developments. Of particular importance, we revealed characteristic expression changes in the human innate immune response pathway genes including TLR2 and TICAM2 that correlated with the severity of the malaria infection. We also found a group of transcription regulatory factors, JUND, for example, and signaling molecules, TNFAIP3, for example, that were strongly correlated in the expression patterns of humans and parasites. We also identified several genetic variations in important anti-malaria drug resistance-related genes. Furthermore, we identified the genetic variations which are potentially associated with severe malaria symptoms both in humans and parasites. The newly generated data should collectively lay a unique foundation for understanding variable behaviors of the field malaria parasites, which are far more complex than those observed under laboratory conditions.

  20. Antimalarial quinolines and artemisinin inhibit endocytosis in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Heinrich C; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Wiehart, Ursula I M; Meredith, Sandra A; Egan, Joanne; Weber, Brandon W

    2004-07-01

    Endocytosis is a fundamental process of eukaryotic cells and fulfills numerous functions, most notably, that of macromolecular nutrient uptake. Malaria parasites invade red blood cells and during their intracellular development endocytose large amounts of host cytoplasm for digestion in a specialized lysosomal compartment, the food vacuole. In the present study we have examined the effects of artemisinin and the quinoline drugs chloroquine and mefloquine on endocytosis in Plasmodium falciparum. By using novel assays we found that mefloquine and artemisinin inhibit endocytosis of macromolecular tracers by up to 85%, while the latter drug also leads to an accumulation of undigested hemoglobin in the parasite. During 5-h incubations, chloroquine inhibited hemoglobin digestion but had no other significant effect on the endocytic pathway of the parasite, as assessed by electron microscopy, the immunofluorescence localization of hemoglobin, and the distribution of fluorescent and biotinylated dextran tracers. By contrast, when chloroquine was added to late ring stage parasites, followed by a 12-h incubation, macromolecule endocytosis was inhibited by more than 40%. Moreover, there is an accumulation of transport vesicles in the parasite cytosol, possibly due to a disruption in vacuole-vesicle fusion. This fusion block is not observed with mefloquine, artemisinin, quinine, or primaquine but is mimicked by the vacuole alkalinizing agents ammonium chloride and monensin. These results are discussed in the light of present theories regarding the mechanisms of action of the antimalarials and highlight the potential use of drugs in manipulating and studying the endocytic pathway of malaria parasites.

  1. Rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing uncomplicated non-falciparum or Plasmodium vivax malaria in endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Katharine; Kirkham, Amanda J; Olliaro, Piero L; Deeks, Jonathan J; Donegan, Sarah; Garner, Paul; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2014-01-01

    Background In settings where both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection cause malaria, rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) need to distinguish which species is causing the patients' symptoms, as different treatments are required. Older RDTs incorporated two test lines to distinguish malaria due to P. falciparum, from malaria due to any other Plasmodium species (non-falciparum). These RDTs can be classified according to which antibodies they use: Type 2 RDTs use HRP-2 (for P. falciparum) and aldolase (all species); Type 3 RDTs use HRP-2 (for P. falciparum) and pLDH (all species); Type 4 use pLDH (fromP. falciparum) and pLDH (all species). More recently, RDTs have been developed to distinguish P. vivax parasitaemia by utilizing a pLDH antibody specific to P. vivax. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of RDTs for detecting non-falciparum or P. vivax parasitaemia in people living in malaria-endemic areas who present to ambulatory healthcare facilities with symptoms suggestive of malaria, and to identify which types and brands of commercial test best detect non-falciparum and P. vivax malaria. Search methods We undertook a comprehensive search of the following databases up to 31 December 2013: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; MEDION; Science Citation Index; Web of Knowledge; African Index Medicus; LILACS; and IndMED. Selection criteria Studies comparing RDTs with a reference standard (microscopy or polymerase chain reaction) in blood samples from a random or consecutive series of patients attending ambulatory health facilities with symptoms suggestive of malaria in non-falciparum endemic areas. Data collection and analysis For each study, two review authors independently extracted a standard set of data using a tailored data extraction form. We grouped comparisons by type of RDT (defined by the combinations of antibodies used), and combined in meta-analysis where appropriate. Average sensitivities and

  2. Population genetic study of Plasmodium falciparum parasites pertaining to dhps gene sequence in malaria endemic areas of Assam.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J; Dutta, P; Khan, S A

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite had developed resistance to almost all the currently used antimalarial drugs. The purpose of the study was to come across the genetic distances in P. falciparum dhps gene sequences circulating in Assam. A partial fragment of P. falciparum dhps gene containing major single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with sulphadoxine resistance were amplified and sequenced. Thereafter specific bioinformatics tools like BioEdit v7.0.9, ClustalW in Mega 5, DnaSP version v.5.10.01 etc were used for the analysis. A total of 100 P. falciparum positive cases in different malaria endemic areas of Assam were included for the study. Based upon the mutation analysis, a total of seven different P. falciparum dhps genotypes were observed with five variable sites. Maximum five haplotypes were found in the P. falciparum isolates from Jorhat district of Assam. Four polymorphic sites were observed in the P. falciparum dhps gene sequences in Karbi Anglong, NC Hills, Chirang and Jorhat whereas the isolates from other study areas had three polymorphic sites. A statistically significant positive value of Tajima's D were observed among the P. falciparum field isolates in Assam indicating that there is an excess of intermediate frequency alleles and can result from population bottlenecks, structure and/or balancing selection. Extensive gene flow took place among the P. falciparum population of Jorhat with Sivasagar, Chirang with Sivasagar and Chirang with Karbi Anglong. However, large genetic differentiation was observed among the P. falciparum isolates of NC Hills with Lakhimpur, Tinsukia, Dibrugarh and Golaghat and also the parasite population of Karbi Anglong with Lakhimpur and Tinsukia signifying little gene flow among the population. This finding has shown that mutant Pfdhps gene associated with sulphadoxine resistance is circulating in Assam. It is believed that, the parasite population may have undergone high level of breeding.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of Plasmodium falciparum infections in pregnant women of Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Valente, Bianor; Campos, Paulo A; do Rosário, Virgílio E; Varandas, Luis; Silveira, Henrique

    2011-10-01

    Pregnant women are at increased risk of malaria, but in Angola, epidemiologic data from this group is almost inexistent. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and risk factors of Plasmodium falciparum infections in 567 pregnant Angolan women living in Luanda province. One in five women had P. falciparum at delivery, diagnosed by PCR assay. Age, residence and history of malaria during pregnancy were significantly associated with P. falciparum infection, but gravidity and use of anti-malarial drugs were not. Placental infections were significantly more common in women ≤18 years old and in primigravidae, but we could not correlate placental infections with poor pregnancy outcomes. These findings are relevant to malaria control policies in Luanda, Angola.

  4. Versatile control of Plasmodium falciparum gene expression with an inducible protein-RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Goldfless, Stephen J.; Wagner, Jeffrey C.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2014-01-01

    The available tools for conditional gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum are limited. Here, to enable reliable control of target gene expression, we build a system to efficiently modulate translation. We overcame several problems associated with other approaches for regulating gene expression in P. falciparum. Specifically, our system functions predictably across several native and engineered promoter contexts, and affords control over reporter and native parasite proteins irrespective of their subcellular compartmentalization. Induction and repression of gene expression are rapid, homogeneous, and stable over prolonged periods. To demonstrate practical application of our system, we used it to reveal direct links between antimalarial drugs and their native parasite molecular target. This is an important out come given the rapid spread of resistance, and intensified efforts to efficiently discover and optimize new antimalarial drugs. Overall, the studies presented highlight the utility of our system for broadly controlling gene expression and performing functional genetics in P. falciparum. PMID:25370483

  5. A new method for culturing Plasmodium falciparum shows replication at the highest erythrocyte densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tao; Glushakova, Svetlana; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum replicates poorly in erythrocyte densities greater than a hematocrit of 20%. A new method to culture the major malaria parasite was developed by using a hollow fiber bioreactor that preserves healthy erythrocytes at hematocrit up to 100%. P. falciparum replicated equally well at all densities studied. This method proved advantageous for large-scale preparation of parasitized erythrocytes (and potentially immunogens thereof), because high yields ( approximately 10(10) in 4 days) could be prepared with less cost and labor. Concomitantly, secreted proteins were concentrated by molecular sieving during culture, perhaps contributing to the parasitemic limit of 8%-12% with the 3D7 strain. The finding that P. falciparum can replicate at packed erythrocyte densities suggests that this system may be useful for study of the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria, of which one feature is densely packed blood cells in brain microvasculature.

  6. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  7. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  8. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-07-25

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria.

  9. Crystal Structure Analyses of the Fosmidomycin-Target Enzyme from Plasmodium Falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Tomonobu; Kusakabe, Yoshio; Tanaka, Nobutada

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the death of more than a million people each year. Fosmidomycin has proved to be efficient in the treatment of P. falciparum malaria through the inhibition of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), an enzyme of the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, which is absent in humans. Crystal structure analyses of P. falciparum DXR (PfDXR) revealed that (i) an intrinsic flexibility of the PfDXR molecule accounts for the induced-fit movement to accommodate the bound inhibitor in the active site, and (ii) a cis arrangement of the oxygen atoms of the hydroxamate group of the bound inhibitor is essential for tight binding of the inhibitor to the active site metal. We believe that our study will serve as a useful guide to develop more potent PfDXR inhibitors.

  10. A forward genetic screen identifies erythrocyte CD55 as essential for Plasmodium falciparum invasion **

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Elizabeth S.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Moechtar, Mischka A.; Barteneva, Natasha S.; Weekes, Michael P.; Nobre, Luis V.; Gygi, Steven P.; Paulo, Joao A.; Frantzreb, Charles; Tani, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Junko; Watanabe, Seishi; Goldberg, Jonathan; Paul, Aditya S.; Brugnara, Carlo; Root, David E.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Doench, John G.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify host determinants for malaria have been hindered by the absence of a nucleus in erythrocytes, precluding genetic manipulation in the cell where the parasite replicates. We used cultured red blood cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells to carry out a forward genetic screen for Plasmodium falciparum host determinants. We found that CD55 is an essential host factor for P. falciparum invasion. CD55-null erythrocytes were refractory to invasion by all isolates of P. falciparum because parasites failed to attach properly to the erythrocyte surface. Thus, CD55 is an attractive target for the development of malaria therapeutics. Hematopoietic stem cell-based forward genetic screens may be valuable for the identification of additional host determinants of malaria pathogenesis. PMID:25954012

  11. Structure-guided, single-point modifications in the phosphinic dipeptide structure yield highly potent and selective inhibitors of neutral aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-01

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor-enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. Another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π-π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  12. 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid derivatives as inhibitors of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases with immune-regulating properties.

    PubMed

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Tsoukalidou, Sofia; Mauvais, Francois-Xavier; Sfyroera, Georgia; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; van Endert, Peter; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Vourloumis, Dionisios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-02-12

    Members of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases (ERAP1, ERAP2, and IRAP) play important roles in both the adaptive and innate human immune responses. Their enzymatic activity can contribute to the pathogenesis of several major human diseases ranging from viral and parasitic infections to autoimmunity and cancer. We have previously demonstrated that diaminobenzoic acid derivatives show promise as selective inhibitors for this group of aminopeptidases. In this study, we have thoroughly explored a series of 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid derivatives as inhibitors of this class of enzymes, achieving submicromolar inhibitors for ERAP2 (IC50 = 237 nM) and IRAP (IC50 = 105 nM). Cell-based analysis indicated that the lead compounds can be effective in downregulating macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ as well as cross-presentation by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Our results indicate that this class of inhibitors may be useful for the targeted downregulation of immune responses.

  13. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor–enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. In conclusion, another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π–π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  14. Aminopeptidase activity by spoilage bacteria and its relationship to microbial load and sensory attributes of poultry legs during aerobic cold storage.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Franco, José Alfredo; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2010-02-01

    The shelf life of poultry legs stored aerobically and the possible role of the aminopeptidase activity of gram-negative bacteria (p-nitroaniline test) as a predictor of poultry spoilage were evaluated on the basis of microbiological and sensory parameters. Chicken legs (n = 30) obtained immediately after evisceration in a local poultry processing plant were kept under aerobic refrigeration (4 +/- 1 degrees C) for 7 days. Microbiological (counts of aerobic bacteria and psychrotrophs) and sensory (odor, color, and general acceptability on a hedonic scale of 1 to 9) parameters and aminopeptidase activity (absorbance at 390 nm [A(390)]) determinations were performed after 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days of storage. Aerobic plate counts of 7 log CFU/g and a score of 6 for general acceptability were used as indicators of the end point of shelf life. Strong correlations (r > or = 0.76; P < 0.001) were obtained between bacterial counts, hedonic scores, and A(390) values. Samples were judged as unacceptable (shelf-life end point) after 2 and 4 days on the basis of sensory and microbiological analyses, respectively. A(390) values of 0.52 and 0.89 (corresponding to p-nitroaniline concentrations of 6.25 and 10.7 microg/ml, respectively) are proposed as the upper limits for acceptability on the basis of sensory and microbiological determinations, respectively. However, these recommendations are based on a small set of samples, and their general application is yet to be verified.

  15. Evaluation of the vapor-protection capabilities of the M17 respirator/hood assembly on the USAF ground-crew chemical defense ensemble. Interim report, 21 March-2 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.R.; Simpson, R.E.

    1989-10-01

    The hood used with the M17 respirator on the regulation United States Air Force (USAF) ground-crew chemical defense ensemble (CDE) may have deficiencies, both in construction and usage, in its ability to protect the neck from chemical agent vapors. The purpose of this study was to quantify vapor penetration under the hood skirt to the neck and measure the effect of this vapor penetration on vapor carry-through into the Toxic Free Area (TFA) of the Survivable Collective Protection Shelter Contamination Control Area (SCPS-2B CCA) facility at Brooks AFB, Texas. Test subjects, wearing the regulation ground-crew CDE, performed light exercises in a simulant vapor (methyl salicylate). Vapor concentrations were measured at the neck with Tenax tubes and in the SCPS-2B with sequential impingers. When the hood skirt was worn outside the CDE jacket, the standard configuration, the mean simulant vapor level at the neck was 29.6% of the outside vapor concentration. Placing the hood skirt underneath the CDE jacket resulted in an 87% decrease in the neck vapor concentrations and a 50% reduction in TFA vapor carry-through.

  16. Assessing functional annotation transfers with inter-species conserved coexpression: application to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum is the main causative agent of malaria. Of the 5 484 predicted genes of P. falciparum, about 57% do not have sufficient sequence similarity to characterized genes in other species to warrant functional assignments. Non-homology methods are thus needed to obtain functional clues for these uncharacterized genes. Gene expression data have been widely used in the recent years to help functional annotation in an intra-species way via the so-called Guilt By Association (GBA) principle. Results We propose a new method that uses gene expression data to assess inter-species annotation transfers. Our approach starts from a set of likely orthologs between a reference species (here S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster) and a query species (P. falciparum). It aims at identifying clusters of coexpressed genes in the query species whose coexpression has been conserved in the reference species. These conserved clusters of coexpressed genes are then used to assess annotation transfers between genes with low sequence similarity, enabling reliable transfers of annotations from the reference to the query species. The approach was used with transcriptomic data sets of P. falciparum, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, and enabled us to propose with high confidence new/refined annotations for several dozens hypothetical/putative P. falciparum genes. Notably, we revised the annotation of genes involved in ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis and assembly, thus highlighting several potential drug targets. Conclusions Our approach uses both sequence similarity and gene expression data to help inter-species gene annotation transfers. Experiments show that this strategy improves the accuracy achieved when using solely sequence similarity and outperforms the accuracy of the GBA approach. In addition, our experiments with P. falciparum show that it can infer a function for numerous hypothetical genes. PMID:20078859

  17. Maternal-foetal transfer of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antibodies in a low transmission setting

    PubMed Central

    Charnaud, Sarah C.; McGready, Rose; Herten-Crabb, Asha; Powell, Rosanna; Guy, Andrew; Langer, Christine; Richards, Jack S.; Gilson, Paul R.; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Narum, David L.; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Simpson, Julie A.; Beeson, James G.; Nosten, François; Fowkes, Freya J. I.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy immunolglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are transferred from mother to neonate across the placenta. Studies in high transmission areas have shown transfer of P. falciparum-specific IgG, but the extent and factors influencing maternal-foetal transfer in low transmission areas co-endemic for both P. falciparum and P. vivax are unknown. Pregnant women were screened weekly for Plasmodium infection. Mother-neonate paired serum samples at delivery were tested for IgG to antigens from P. falciparum, P. vivax and other infectious diseases. Antibodies to malarial and non-malarial antigens were highly correlated between maternal and neonatal samples (median [range] spearman ρ = 0.78 [0.57–0.93]), although Plasmodium spp. antibodies tended to be lower in neonates than mothers. Estimated gestational age at last P. falciparum infection, but not P. vivax infection, was positively associated with antibody levels in the neonate (P. falciparum merozoite, spearman ρ median [range] 0.42 [0.33–0.66], PfVAR2CSA 0.69; P. vivax ρ = 0.19 [0.09–0.3]). Maternal-foetal transfer of anti-malarial IgG to Plasmodium spp. antigens occurs in low transmission settings. P. vivax IgG acquisition is not associated with recent exposure unlike P. falciparum IgG, suggesting a difference in acquisition of antibodies. IgG transfer is greatest in the final weeks of pregnancy which has implications for the timing of future malaria vaccination strategies in pregnant women. PMID:26861682

  18. Biosynthesis of GDP-fucose and other sugar nucleotides in the blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Sílvia; Bandini, Giulia; Ospina, Diego; Bernabeu, Maria; Mariño, Karina; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Izquierdo, Luis

    2013-06-01

    Carbohydrate structures play important roles in many biological processes, including cell adhesion, cell-cell communication, and host-pathogen interactions. Sugar nucleotides are activated forms of sugars used by the cell as donors for most glycosylation reactions. Using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method, we identified and quantified the pools of UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, GDP-mannose, and GDP-fucose in Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic life stages. We assembled these data with the in silico functional reconstruction of the parasite metabolic pathways obtained from the P. falciparum annotated genome, exposing new active biosynthetic routes crucial for further glycosylation reactions. Fucose is a sugar present in glycoconjugates often associated with recognition and adhesion events. Thus, the GDP-fucose precursor is essential in a wide variety of organisms. P. falciparum presents homologues of GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-L-fucose synthase enzymes that are active in vitro, indicating that most GDP-fucose is formed by a de novo pathway that involves the bioconversion of GDP-mannose. Homologues for enzymes involved in a fucose salvage pathway are apparently absent in the P. falciparum genome. This is in agreement with in vivo metabolic labeling experiments showing that fucose is not significantly incorporated by the parasite. Fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged versions of P. falciparum GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and GDP-L-fucose synthase expressed in transgenic 3D7 parasites shows that these enzymes localize in the cytoplasm of P. falciparum during the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. Although the function of fucose in the parasite is not known, the presence of GDP-fucose suggests that the metabolite may be used for further fucosylation reactions.

  19. Increasing Plasmodium falciparum malaria in southwest London: a 25 year observational study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J; Chitre, M; Sharland, M

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To identify changes in the presenting number and species of imported malaria in children in southwest London. Methods: A prospective single observer study over 25 years (1975–99) of all cases of paediatric malaria seen at St George's Hospital. Results: A confirmed diagnosis was made in 249 children (56% boys; 44% girls; median age 8.0 years). Of these, 53% were UK residents and 44% were children travelling to the UK. A significant increase was noted in the number of cases over the 25 years (1975–79: mean 4.8 cases/year; 1990–99: mean 13.7 cases/year). Over the 25 years Plasmodium falciparum was seen in 77%, P vivax in 14%, P ovale in 6%, and P malariae in 3% of cases. P falciparum had increased in frequency (1975–79: P falciparum 50%, P vivax 50%; 1990–99: P falciparum 82%, P vivax 6%), associated with an increase in the proportion of children acquiring their infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Median time between arrival in the UK to the onset of fever was: P falciparum, 5 days; P ovale, 25 days; P malariae, 37 days; and P vivax, 62 days. Median time interval between the onset of fever to commencement of treatment was 4 days. This had not improved over the 25 year period. Only 41% of UK resident children presenting to hospital had taken prophylaxis and the overall number of symptomatic children taking no prophylaxis was increasing. Conclusion: Imported childhood P falciparum malaria is increasing in southwest London associated with increasing travel from sub-Saharan Africa. Over the 25 year period there has been no improvement in chemoprophylaxis rates or time to diagnosis. PMID:12023177

  20. Segregation of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, aminopeptidase 1, cadherin, and bre5-like alleles, from a colony resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxins, are not associated ...fed a diet containing Cry1Ab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptide receptors may be required for activated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins to bind midgut epithelium prior to pore formation. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from two Ostrinia nubilalis midgut peptide receptors, cadherin (OnCad) and aminopeptidase N 1 (OnAPN1), and OnBre5 (...

  1. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase, and the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestine and liver of post-hatch broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acid transporter (AAT) proteins are responsible for the movement of amino acids (AA) in and out of cells. Aminopeptidase (APN) cleaves AAs from the N terminus of polypeptides making them available for transport, while PepT1 is a di- and tri- peptide transporter. In the intestine, these prote...

  2. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase N, and the di- and tri- peptide transporter PepT1 in the embryo of the domesticated chicken (Gallus gallus) shows developmental regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mRNA expression profile for ten amino acid transporters (AAT), the di-and tri- peptide transporter (Pept1), and aminopeptidase N (APN) during chick embryogenesis was determined. Fertilized eggs were sampled at days 9, 11, 15, 17, 19, and 20, post fertilization. Three to four embryos were sampl...

  3. Identification of a novel aminopeptidase p-like gene (OnAPP) and it's possible involvement in Bt toxicity and resistance in a major corn pest(Ostrinia nubilalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies to understand the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance mechanism in European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis) suggest that resistance may be due to changes in the midgut-specific Bt toxin receptor. In this study we identified and characterized 10 aminopeptidase-like genes in relation t...

  4. Regulation of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum: censoring freedom of expression?

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael F; Reeder, John C; Brown, Graham V

    2003-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs a strategy of clonal antigenic variation to evade the host immune response during the intraerythrocytic stage of its life cycle. The major variant parasite molecule is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein (PfEMP)1, which is encoded by the var multigene family. The parasite switches between different PfEMP1 molecules through regulation of var transcription. Recent studies have shed considerable light on this process, but much remains unknown. However, striking parallels between transcriptional control of var and genes in other organisms provide direction for future studies.

  5. P. falciparum: merozoite surface protein-8 peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Ocampo, Marisol; Rodríguez, Luis; Vera, Ricardo; Curtidor, Hernando; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Valbuena, John; Vanegas, Magnolia; Guzman, Fanny; Tovar, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-01

    This work determined Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-8 (MSP-8) regions specifically binding to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Five high activity binding peptides (HABPs), whose binding to erythrocytes became saturable and sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and chymotrypsin were identified from the MSP-8 protein. Those amino acids directly involved in interaction with erythrocytes were also determined for each one of the HABPs. Some of them specifically recognized 28, 46, and 73 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. Some HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by up to 98%, suggesting the MSP-8 protein's possible role in the invasion process.

  6. In vitro cytocidal effect of novel lytic peptides on Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, J M; Burton, C A; Barr, S B; Jeffers, G W; Julian, G R; White, K L; Enright, F M; Klei, T R; Laine, R A

    1988-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi were killed by two novel lytic peptides (SB-37 and Shiva-1) in vitro. Human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, and Vero cells infected with T. cruzi, were exposed to these peptides. The result, in both cases, was a significant decrease in the level of parasite infection. Furthermore, the peptides had a marked cytocidal effect on trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi in media, whereas host eukaryotic cells were unaffected by the treatments. In view of the worldwide prevalence of these protozoan diseases and the lack of completely suitable treatments, lytic peptides may provide new and unique chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of these infections.

  7. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  8. Synergistic Mortality Caused by Plasmodium falciparum during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, G. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    At the end of World War I, British medical officers noted that soldiers infected with malaria were more likely to die during the 1918 influenza pandemic than those without malaria. This synergistic mortality appeared to be specific to Plasmodium falciparum and has not been generally noted since 1920. A possible explanation is that a malaria-induced procoagulant state enhanced the activation of influenza virus to increase inflammation and subsequent severe clinical outcomes. Falciparum proteins bind and likely inhibit antithrombin 3 and other factors. Pathogens interact in ways that may inform pathophysiology studies of remote epidemics. PMID:25802427

  9. Investigating the activity of quinine analogues vs. chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Dinio, Theresa; Gorka, Alexander P.; McGinniss, Andrew; Roepe, Paul D.; Morgan, Jeremy B.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malarial parasite species, has developed resistance against nearly all man-made antimalarial drugs within the past century. However, quinine (QN), the first antimalarial drug, remains efficacious worldwide. Some chloroquine resistant (CQR) P. falciparum strains or isolates show mild cross resistance to QN, but many do not. Further optimization of QN may provide well-tolerated therapy with improved activity vs. CQR malaria. Thus, using the Heck reaction, we have pursued a structure-activity relationship study, including vinyl group modifications of QN. Certain derivatives show good antiplasmodial activity in QN-resistant and QN-sensitive strains, with lower IC50 values relative to QN. PMID:22512909

  10. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  11. Adaptation of the Panama II strain of Plasmodium falciparum to Panamanian owl monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rossan, R N; Baerg, D C

    1987-09-01

    The Panama II strain of Plasmodium falciparum, acquired at the second passage level in splenectomized Colombian owl monkeys, was adapted to owl monkeys of Panamanian origin. Patent infections were induced in 22 of 27 unaltered and 20 of 21 splenectomized recipients during 19 serial passages. The infections were significantly more virulent in splenectomized than normal Panamanian owl monkeys, however recrudescences in seven normal monkeys achieved peak parasitemias 48 times greater than in the primary attack. These results describe the first reproducible infections of indigenous falciparum malaria in Panamanian owl monkeys. PMID:3310680

  12. A Lectin-Like Receptor is Involved in Invasion of Erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungery, M.; Pasvol, G.; Newbold, C. I.; Weatherall, D. J.

    1983-02-01

    Glycophorin both in solution and inserted into liposomes blocks invasion of erythrocytes by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Furthermore, one sugar, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), completely blocks invasion of the erythrocyte by this parasite. GlcNAc coupled to bovine serum albumin to prevent the sugar entering infected erythrocytes was at least 100,000 times more effective than GlcNAc alone. Bovine serum albumin coupled to lactose or bovine serum albumin alone had no effect on invasion. These results suggest that the binding of P. falciparum to erythrocytes is lectin-like and is determined by carbohydrates on glycophorin.

  13. L-nucleoside analogues as potential antimalarials that selectively target Plasmodium falciparum adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Brown, D M; Netting, A G; Chun, B K; Choi, Y; Chu, C K; Gero, A M

    1999-01-01

    The L-stereoisomer analogues of D-coformycin selectively inhibited P. falciparum adenosine deaminase (ADA) in the picomolar range (L-isocoformycin, Ki 7 pM; L-coformycin, Ki 250 pM). While the L-nucleoside analogues, L-adenosine, 2,6-diamino-9-(L-ribofuranosyl)purine and 4-amino-1-(L-ribofuranosyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine were selectively deaminated by P. falciparum ADA, L-thioinosine and L-thioguanosine were not. This is the first example of 'non-physiological' L-nucleosides that serve as either substrates or inhibitors of malarial ADA and are not utilised by mammalian ADA.

  14. Evidence of a novel dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in mammalian GH(3) cells: new insights into the processing of peptide hormone precursors.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Kwang Ho; Lee, Myung Ae; Han, Sang Yeol; Shields, Dennis; Park, Sang Dai; Hong, Seung Hwan

    2002-06-01

    strongly suggests that a novel dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activity - a yeast STE13-like enzyme - is present in the post-trans Golgi network compartment of GH(3) cells. The data from these studies indicate that mechanisms which control protein secretion are conserved between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:12207045

  15. Influence of hormonal status on enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase activity in the HPA axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2005-04-01

    Opioids are involved in the regulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity under physiological conditions. In the present work, we analyzed the influence of ovariectomy and estradiol (E), progesterone (P) or estradiol plus progesterone (E+P) replacement on soluble (S) and membrane-bound (MB) enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase activity (EDA) in the HPA axis. Female mice (Balb/C) were distributed in 15 groups of 10 animals each: sham-operated controls (C), ovariectomized controls (OV-C), and ovariectomized mice treated with increasing doses of E (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg), P (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg) or E+P (10+100, 20+200 or 40+400 mg/kg). In hypothalamus, ovariectomy increased both S and MB EDA activities, whereas E replacement returned them to control levels, although MB EDA activity increased again after the replacement with 40 mg/kg E. P replacement increased S EDA activity, but returned MB EDA activity to control levels. The replacement of E+P returned both S and MB EDA activities to control levels, although MB EDA activity was lower than control values after the replacement with 10+100 mg/kg E+P. In pituitary, neither ovariectomy nor the replacement of E or E+P changed S EDA, although the highest concentrations of P increased S EDA activity. However, ovariectomy increased MB EDA and E replacement returned the activity to control or below control levels, depending on the concentration used. However, P administration returned the activity to control or below control levels depending on the concentration used, although 200 mg/kg P had no effects on MB EDA. E+P replacement returned pituitary MB EDA activity to control levels. In adrenal glands, ovariectomy did change either S or MB EDA. However, E, P or E+P replacement decreased S EDA activity in different degrees, depending of the dose administrated. No changes were detected in MB EDA after hormone replacement. These results indicate that female steroid hormones influence EDA activity at different

  16. Functional Interpretation of a Non-Gut Hemocoelic Tissue Aminopeptidase N (APN) in a Lepidopteran Insect Pest Achaea janata

    PubMed Central

    Ningshen, Thuirei Jacob; Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Ventaku, Venkat Rao; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Insect midgut membrane-anchored aminopeptidases N (APNs) are Zn++ dependent metalloproteases. Their primary role in dietary protein digestion and also as receptors in Cry toxin-induced pathogenesis is well documented. APN expression in few non-gut hemocoelic tissues of lepidopteran insects has also been reported but their functions are widely unknown. In the present study, we observed specific in vitro interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with a 113 kDa AjAPN1 membrane protein of larval fat body, Malpighian tubule and salivary gland of Achaea janata. Analyses of 3D molecular structure of AjAPN1, the predominantly expressed APN isoform in these non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata showed high structural similarity to the Cry1Aa toxin binding midgut APN of Bombyx mori, especially in the toxin binding region. Structural similarity was further substantiated by in vitro binding of Cry1Aa toxin. RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in significant down-regulation of AjAPN1 transcript and protein expression in fat body and Malpighian tubule but not in salivary gland. Consequently, reduced AjAPN1 expression resulted in larval mortality, larval growth arrest, development of lethal larval-pupal intermediates, development of smaller pupae and emergence of viable defective adults. In vitro Cry1Aa toxin binding analysis of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of AjAPN1 knockdown larvae showed reduced interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with the 113 kDa AjAPN1 protein, correlating well with the significant silencing of AjAPN1 expression. Thus, our observations suggest AjAPN1 expression in non-gut hemocoelic tissues to play important physiological role(s) during post-embryonic development of A. janata. Though specific interaction of Cry1Aa toxin with AjAPN1 of non-gut hemocoelic tissues of A. janata was demonstrated, evidences to prove its functional role as a Cry1Aa toxin receptor will require more in-depth investigation. PMID:24244508

  17. Therapeutic efficacy test in malaria falciparum in Antioquia, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Silvia; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Piñeros, Juan G; Ríos, Alexandra; Álvarez, Tania; Álvarez, Gonzalo; Tobón, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the frequency of failure of eight treatments for non-complicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in patients from Turbo (Urabá region), El Bagre and Zaragoza (Bajo Cauca region), applying the 1998 protocol of the World Health Organization (WHO). Monotherapies using chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and combinations using chloroquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (CQ-SP), amodiaquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ-SP), mefloquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (MQ-SP) and artesunate-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS-SP), were examined. Methodology A balanced experimental design with eight groups. Samples were selected based on statistical and epidemiological criteria. Patients were followed for 21 to 28 days, including seven or eight parasitological and clinical evaluations, with an active search for defaulting patients. A non-blinded evaluation of the antimalarial treatment response (early failure, late failure, adequate response) was performed. Results Initially, the loss of patients to follow-up was higher than 40%, but the immediate active search for the cases and the monetary help for transportation expenses of patients, reduced the loss to 6%. The treatment failure was: CQ 82%, AQ 30%, MQ 4%, SP 24%, CQ-SP 17%, AQ-SP 2%, MQ-S-P 0%, AS-SP 3%. Conclusion The characteristics of an optimal epidemiological monitoring system of antimalarial treatment response in Colombia are discussed. It is proposed to focus this on early failure detection, by applying a screening test every two to three years, based on a seven to 14-day follow-up. Clinical and parasitological assessment would be carried out by a general physician and a field microscopist from the local hospital, with active measures to search for defaulter patients at follow-up. PMID:16504002

  18. Peripheral Blood Cell Signatures of Plasmodium falciparum Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ibitokou, Samad; Oesterholt, Mayke; Brutus, Laurent; Borgella, Sophie; Agbowaï, Carine; Ezinmègnon, Sèm; Lusingu, John; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Massougbodji, Achille; Deloron, Philippe; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Varani, Stefania; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Fievet, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in placental intervillous spaces causes inflammation and pathology. Knowledge of the profiles of immune cells associated with the physiopathology of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is scarce. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective study, both in Benin and Tanzania, including ∼1000 pregnant women in each site with systematic follow-up at scheduled antenatal visits until delivery. We used ex vivo flow cytometry to identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) profiles that are associated with PAM and anaemia, determining the phenotypic composition and activation status of PBMC in selected sub-groups with and without PAM both at inclusion and at delivery in a total of 302 women. Both at inclusion and at delivery PAM was associated with significantly increased frequencies both of B cells overall and of activated B cells. Infection-related profiles were otherwise quite distinct at the two different time-points. At inclusion, PAM was associated with anaemia, with an increased frequency of immature monocytes and with a decreased frequency of regulatory T cells (Treg). At delivery, infected women presented with significantly fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC), more myeloid DC expressing low levels of HLA-DR, and more effector T cells (Teff) compared to uninfected women. Independent associations with an increased risk of anaemia were found for altered antigen-presenting cell frequencies at inclusion, but for an increased frequency of Teff at delivery. Our findings emphasize the prominent role played by B cells during PAM whenever it arises during pregnancy, whilst also revealing signature changes in other circulating cell types that, we conclude, primarily reflect the relative duration of the infections. Thus, the acute, recently-acquired infections present at delivery were marked by changes in DC and Teff frequencies, contrasting with infections at inclusion, considered chronic in nature, that