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Sample records for false positive reaction

  1. False positive reaction for carboxyhemoglobin in blood from liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Lund, A

    1979-01-01

    On spectrophotometric determination of carboxyhemoglobin in blood collected from the liver of three bodies at three days post-mortem, false positive results were found (5--15 per cent saturation), since samples of heart blood collected a few hours after death did not contain carboxyhemoglobin.

  2. Investigation of false-positive reactions for CBH351 maize in screening PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Monma, Kimio; Moriuchi, Rie; Sagi, Naoki; Ichikawa, Hisatsugu; Satoh, Kazue; Tobe, Takashi; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2006-02-01

    Examination for CBH351 maize was conducted by the qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in maize grain and maize processed foods obtained in the Tokyo area. The numbers of samples possibly positive in the screening test were 7 of 22 (31.8%) for maize grain samples, 4 of 14 (28.6%) for semi-processed foods, 11 of 30 (36.7%) for canned products, 3 of 30 (10.0%) for maize snacks, 3 of 4 (75%) for tacos and 1 of 3 (33.3%) for tortillas. However, CBH351 maize was not detected in the confirmation test. Therefore, the results of the screening test were false-positive. Since the reaction might have been caused by the base sequences of the 3'-end of primers CaM03-5' and CBH02-3' used in the screening test, a new primer pair was designed. The PCR products obtained with the new primer pair TMC2-5'--TMS2-3' were specific for CBH351 and were not obtained with barley, wheat, rice, RRS, Bt11, or Event176. Thus, the new primer pair shows high specificity. CBH351 maize was detected from samples containing at least 0.05% CBH 351 maize DNA by using this primer pair.

  3. Diagnostic performance of serological tests for swine brucellosis in the presence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; de Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2015-04-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in Europe. Currently used diagnostic tests for swine brucellosis detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) but their specificity is compromised by false-positive serological reactions (FPSRs) when bacteria carrying cross-reacting O-PS infect pigs. FPSRs occur throughout Europe, and the only tool available for a specific B. suis diagnosis is the intradermal test with Brucella protein extracts free of O-PS or S-LPS. Using sera of 162 sows naturally infected by B. suis biovar 2, 406 brucellosis-free sows, and 218 pigs of brucellosis-free farms affected by FPSR, we assessed the diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA with rough LPS (thus devoid of O-PS) and of gel immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and indirect ELISA with O-PS free proteins in comparison with several S-LPS tests (Rose Bengal, complement fixation, gel immunodiffusion and indirect ELISA). When adjusted to 100% specificity, the sensitivity of the rough LPS ELISA was very low (30%), and adoption of other cut-offs resulted in poor specificity/sensitivity ratios. Although their specificity was 100%, the sensitivity of protein tests (ELISA, latex agglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and gel immunodiffusion) was only moderate (45, 58, 61 and 63%, respectively). Among S-LPS tests, gel immunodiffusion was the only test showing acceptable sensitivity/specificity (68 and 100%, respectively). Despite these shortcomings, and when the purpose is to screen out FPSR at herd level, gel immunodiffusion tests may offer a technically simple and practical alternative to intradermal testing.

  4. The porcine brucellosis--evidence of the role of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 in occurrence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M; Szulowski, K; Iwaniak, W

    2013-01-01

    Forty four pigs with typical characteristics for false positive serolpgical reactions (FPSR) were examined for the presence of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9. The positive reactions were observed in rose bengal test (RBT, N = 23 sera), serum agglutination test (SAT, N = 16), complement fixation test (CFT, N = 9), indirect ELISA (i-ELISA, N= 11) in first, and in RBT (N = 14), SAT (N = 8), CFT (N = 7) and i-ELISA (N = 18) in second examination, respectively. In bacteriological examination Y enterocolitica was confirmed in 12 cases. Six of these isolates were identified with PCR as Y enterocolitica 0:9.

  5. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  6. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 cultured from Swedish sheep showing serologically false-positive reactions for Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Chenais, Erika; Bagge, Elisabeth; Lambertz, Susanne Thisted; Artursson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In a herd of 20 sheep in Sweden, a country where brucellosis has never been diagnosed in sheep or goats, a total of six sheep were found serologically positive to Brucella melitensis in two different rounds of sampling. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 could at the time of the second sampling be isolated from four sheep, one of them at the same time serologically positive for B. melitensis. The article describes the case and gives some background information on brucellosis and Y. enterocolitica in general as well as a more specific description of the Swedish surveillance program for B. melitensis and the test procedures used. The problem with false-positive reactions, in particular its implications for surveillance programs in low prevalence or officially brucellosis-free countries, is discussed.

  7. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  8. General false positive ELISA reactions in visceral leishmaniasis. Implications for the use of enzyme immunoassay analyses in tropical Africa.

    PubMed

    Elshafie, Amir I; Mullazehi, Mohammed; Rönnelid, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease in tropical countries. Clinical and laboratory features may mimic autoimmune diseases and this can complicate the Leishmania diagnosis. Due to our previous investigation for false anti-CCP2 reactivity in Leishmania-infected subjects and our interest in immunity against the joint-specific collagen type II (CII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) we investigated the same cohort for anti-CII antibodies. We found elevated anti-CII reactivity in Leishmania-infected patients as compared to controls. When anti-CII OD values were compared with BSA-blocked control plates we found higher reactivity against BSA than in CII-coated plates in many Leishmania-infected patients. The percentage of such false positive anti-CII reactions increased with inflammatory activity, and was found in almost all Leishmania patients with highly active inflammatory disease, but was as low in Sudanese healthy controls as well as among Swedish RA patients. The correlation coefficients between false positive anti-CII and anti-CCP2 measured with a commercial ELISA were highest for patients with the most inflammatory disease but non-significant for Sudanese controls and Swedish RA patients, arguing that our findings may have general implications for ELISA measurements in leishmaniasis. ELISA investigations in areas endemic for leishmaniasis might benefit from individual-specific control wells for each serum sample. This approach might also be applicable to other geographical areas or patient groups with high incidence of inflammatory and infectious diseases.

  9. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  10. [The false positive reaction of the Triage panel drug-of-abuse by herbal drugs ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae))].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, M; Kinoshita, H; Higasa, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H; Minami, T; Marukawa, S; Yoshinaga, K; Yamauchi, J; Aoki, S; Hishida, S

    2001-11-01

    We investigated false-positive reactions obtained from a drug screening test using a Triage panel. We detected 2 cases giving false-positive reaction for AMP (amphetamine, methamphetamine) during the screening of 187 normal subjects. Subsequent follow up testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showed both to be false-positive reactions. As both cases have a history of ingesting the herbal drug, Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae)), containing ephedrine, we examined the relationship between false-positive reactions on Triage and Ma-huang. All urine samples collected from 7 healthy volunteers following administration of Ma-huang indicated AMP positive on Triage. Also a high ratio of AMP positives was observed in the patients who were administered Ma-huang-containing drugs at the hospital. However, none of them were identified as true-positives by HPLC or gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The extract of Ma-huang contained in herbal drugs, which otherwise contain neither amphetamine nor its derivatives, gives (AMP) positive indications on Triage. We speculate that unidentified components of Ma-huang cause the false-positive reactions. We suggest that follow-up tests by GC/MS or HPLC are needed wherever a positive result is obtained from a screening test by Triage. Furthermore, it will be established to continue collecting information on prescribed and non-prescribed drugs.

  11. Cat-bite-induced Francisella tularensis infection with a false-positive serological reaction for Bartonella quintana

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Evelina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Tularaemia is caused by infection with Francisella tularensistransmitted via direct contact with an infected hare carcass or indirectly through the bites of vectors, but may be cat-bite-associated as well. Medical history and reliable diagnostic analysis are important in order to differentiate it from other cat-associated infections, e.g. Bartonella spp. Case presentation. A healthy 56-year-old man was examined because of a cat-bite-associated ulceroglandular wound on his right thumb. Nineteen days after the cat bite occurred, a serology test was positive for anti-Bartonella quintana, but negative for anti-F. tularensis. Since Bartonella infections are rare in Sweden, another serology test was analysed 2 weeks later with a positive result for anti-F. tularensis. The patient was treated with doxycycline for 14 days and recovered. The patient was re-sampled after 18 months to obtain a convalescent sample. The acute and the convalescent samples were both analysed at a reference centre, with negative results for anti-Bartonella spp. this time. Conclusion. This case is enlightening about the importance of extending the medical history and re-sampling the patient for antibody detection when the clinical suspicion of cat-bite-associated tularaemia is high. The false-positive result for anti-B. quintana antibodies may have been due to technical issues with the assay, cross-reactivity or both. PMID:28348802

  12. Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of urease-positive non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria on the results of a urea breath test (UBT) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a UBT using film-coated [(13)C]urea tablets. The UBT was performed in 102 patients treated with a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. Urease-producing bacteria other than H. pylori were isolated and identified from the oral cavity and stomach. In 4/102 patients, the UBT gave false-positive results. These false-positive results were found to be caused by the presence of urease-positive bacteria in the oral cavity and stomach. Five bacterial species with urease activity (Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus) were subsequently isolated from the oral cavity and/or stomach. As there was no correlation between the in vitro urease activity of urease-positive non-H. pylori bacteria and the UBT value, and all of the patients with a false-positive UBT result were suffering from atrophic gastritis, it is possible that the false-positive results in the UBT were a result of colonization of urease-positive bacteria and gastric hypochlorhydric conditions. Thus, for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection using a UBT, the influence of stomach bacteria must be considered when interpreting the results.

  13. Preventing intense false positive and negative reactions attributed to the principle of ELISA to re-investigate antibody studies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Terato, Kuniaki; Do, Christopher T; Cutler, Dawn; Waritani, Takaki; Shionoya, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    To study the possible involvement of potential environmental pathogens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, it is essential to investigate antibody responses to a variety of environmental agents and autologous components. However, none of the conventional ELISA buffers can prevent the false positive and negative reactions attributed to its principal, which utilizes the high binding affinity of proteins to plastic surfaces. The aims of this study are to reveal all types of non-specific reactions associated with conventional buffer systems, and to re-investigate antibody responses to potential environmental pathogenic and autologous antigens in patients with autoimmune diseases using a newly developed buffer system "ChonBlock™" by ELISA. Compared to conventional buffers, the new buffer was highly effective in reducing the most intense false positive reaction caused by hydrophobic binding of immunoglobulin in sample specimens to plastic surfaces, "background (BG) noise reaction", and other non-specific reactions without interfering with antigen-antibody reactions. Applying this buffer, we found that IgG antibody responses to Escherichia coli O111:B4, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS) were significantly lower or tended to be lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas IgA antibody responses to these antigens were equal or tended to be higher compared to normal controls. As a consequence, the IgA/IgG antibody ratios against these agents were significantly higher in patients with RA and SLE, except for Crohn's disease, which showed significantly higher IgG responses to these antigens. To assay antibodies in human sera, it is indispensable to eliminate false positive and negative reactions by using an appropriate buffer system, and to include antigen non-coated blank wells to determine BG noise reactions of invidual samples. Finally, based on our preliminary analysis in

  14. False Positive Mammograms and Detection Controlled Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kleit, Andrew N; Ruiz, James F

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes of false positive in mammograms. Data Sources Secondary data collected from extracts from computerized medical records from 1999 from five thousand patients at a single hospital in a medium-sized Southern city. Study Design Retrospective analysis of electronic medical data on screening and diagnostic mammograms. Detection-controlled estimation (DCE) was used to compare the efficacy of alternative readers of mammogram films. Analysis was also conducted on follow-up exams of women who tested positive in the first stage of investigation. Key variables included whether the patient had had a prior mammogram, age of the patient, and identifiers for the individual physicians. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospital maintains electronic medical records (EMR) on all patients. Extracts were performed on this EMR system under the guidance of clinical expertise. Data were collected for all women who had mammograms in 1999. Random samples were employed for screening mammograms, and all data was used for diagnostic mammograms. Principal Findings Study results imply that access to a previous mammogram greatly reduces the incidence of false positives readings. This has important consequences for benefit-cost, and cost-effectiveness analysis of mammography. Were previous mammograms always available, the results imply the number of false positives would decrease by at least half. The results here also indicate that there is no reason to believe this decrease in false positive would be accompanied by an increase in the number of false negatives. Other attributes also affected the number of false positives. Mondays and Wednesdays appear to be more prone to false positives than the other days in the week. There is also some disparity in false positive outcomes among the five physicians studied. With respect to detection-controlled estimation, the results are mixed. With follow-up data, the DCE estimator appears to generate reasonable, robust

  15. False positive reduction for lung nodule CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luyin; Boroczky, Lilla; Drysdale, Jeremy; Agnihotri, Lalitha; Lee, Michael C.

    2007-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms 'automatically' identify lung nodules on thoracic multi-slice CT scans (MSCT) thereby providing physicians with a computer-generated 'second opinion'. While CAD systems can achieve high sensitivity, their limited specificity has hindered clinical acceptance. To overcome this problem, we propose a false positive reduction (FPR) system based on image processing and machine learning to reduce the number of false positive lung nodules identified by CAD algorithms and thereby improve system specificity. To discriminate between true and false nodules, twenty-three 3D features were calculated from each candidate nodule's volume of interest (VOI). A genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) were then used to select an optimal subset of features from this pool of candidate features. Using this feature subset, we trained an SVM classifier to eliminate as many false positives as possible while retaining all the true nodules. To overcome the imbalanced nature of typical datasets (significantly more false positives than true positives), an intelligent data selection algorithm was designed and integrated into the machine learning framework, thus further improving the FPR rate. Three independent datasets were used to train and validate the system. Using two datasets for training and the third for validation, we achieved a 59.4% FPR rate while removing one true nodule on the validation datasets. In a second experiment, 75% of the cases were randomly selected from each of the three datasets and the remaining cases were used for validation. A similar FPR rate and true positive retention rate was achieved. Additional experiments showed that the GA feature selection process integrated with the proposed data selection algorithm outperforms the one without it by 5%-10% FPR rate. The methods proposed can be also applied to other application areas, such as computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules.

  16. View from Spirit's Overwintering Position (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has this view northward from the position at the north edge of the 'Home Plate' plateau where the rover will spend its third Martian winter.

    Husband Hill is on the horizon. The dark area in the middle distance is 'El Dorado' sand dune field.

    Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this image during the rover's 1,448th Martian day, of sol (Jan. 29, 2008).

    This view combines separate images taken through the Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. It is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene.

  17. Accounting for False Positive HIV Tests: Is Visceral Leishmaniasis Responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Leslie; Ritmeijer, Koert; Piriou, Erwan; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Co-infection with HIV and visceral leishmaniasis is an important consideration in treatment of either disease in endemic areas. Diagnosis of HIV in resource-limited settings relies on rapid diagnostic tests used together in an algorithm. A limitation of the HIV diagnostic algorithm is that it is vulnerable to falsely positive reactions due to cross reactivity. It has been postulated that visceral leishmaniasis (VL) infection can increase this risk of false positive HIV results. This cross sectional study compared the risk of false positive HIV results in VL patients with non-VL individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants were recruited from 2 sites in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian algorithm of a tiebreaker using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was used to test for HIV. The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. Every RDT screen positive individual was included for testing with the gold standard along with 10% of all negatives. The final analysis included 89 VL and 405 non-VL patients. HIV prevalence was found to be 12.8% (47/ 367) in the VL group compared to 7.9% (200/2526) in the non-VL group. The RDT algorithm in the VL group yielded 47 positives, 4 false positives, and 38 negatives. The same algorithm for those without VL had 200 positives, 14 false positives, and 191 negatives. Specificity and positive predictive value for the group with VL was less than the non-VL group; however, the difference was not found to be significant (p = 0.52 and p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusion The test algorithm yielded a high number of HIV false positive results. However, we were unable to demonstrate a significant difference between groups with and without VL disease. This suggests that the presence of endemic visceral leishmaniasis alone cannot account for the high number of false positive HIV results in our study. PMID:26161864

  18. Excluding False Positive Detections in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, John J.; Ouvarova, T.; Borucki, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    The NASA Kepler Mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, will search for Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in or near habitable zones. A high precision photometer will search for planetary transits of parent stars. For a system similar to the Earth-Sun, the decrease in light during a central transit will be one part in 10,000 of the total stellar brightness out of transit. This poster discusses the effort to address a significant concern: the possibility of false positive detections of extra-solar Earth analogs. The concern arises because about 50 per cent of star systems are double or multiple. Further, because the photometer design is constrained by the requirement for high sensitivity to changes of low light levels, the optical resolution is not high compared to other space or terrestrial telescopes. If a relatively nearby Kepler target star happens to contain, within the Kepler PSF, an eclipsing binary system that is reduced in brightness by a factor of 10,000, say because it is 100 times farther away, the photometric profile of an eclipse could mimic a planetary transit. We have therefore developed a program to use archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope to quantify the number density of faint stars in the Kepler field that are in the brightness range that could cause confusion. Since the beginning of the project, the location of the Kepler field itself has been changed to optimize observing efficiency. The work originally included HST/WFPC2 data, and has now been expanded to ACS data as well. We present here a summary of completed and continuing work on faint background systems in the new Kepler field.

  19. False positives in psychiatric diagnosis: implications for human freedom.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2010-02-01

    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a sick role on individuals and place a burden upon them to change; thus, disorders decrease the level of respect and acceptance generally accorded to those with even annoying normal variations in traits and features. Thus, minimizing false positives is important to a pluralistic society. The harmful dysfunction analysis of disorder is used to diagnose the sources of likely false positives, and propose potential remedies to the current weaknesses in the validity of diagnostic criteria.

  20. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  1. A closer look at self-reported suicide attempts: false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Plöderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-02-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing false positives decreased the rate of suicide attempters from 4.3% to 2.7%. Probing questions also revealed 0.8% false negatives. We recommend using probing questions with both those who report a suicide attempt and those who do not report a suicide attempt to increase the validity of self-reported suicide-related information.

  2. On False-Positive and False-Negative Decisions with a Mastery Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    Wilcox (1977) examines two methods of estimating the probability of a false-positive on false-negative decision with a mastery test. Both procedures make assumptions about the form of the true score distribution which might not give good results in all situations. In this paper, upper and lower bounds on the two possible error types are described…

  3. False-positive and false-negative rates in meconium drug testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, C; Lewis, D; Leikin, J

    1995-11-01

    To determine the number of false-negative results produced by inefficient extraction of drugs from meconium, three published procedures were compared by using previously confirmed positive and negative meconium specimens. The methods were not equivalent in their ability to extract drugs from the matrix. To determine the number of false positives reported by the use of screen-only (unconfirmed) results, 535 screen-positive meconium specimens were subjects to confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-seven percent of the samples were confirmed positive for one or more of the drugs under investigation, showing that a false-positive rate as high as 43% may exist when unconfirmed screening results are used.

  4. Automated Astrophysical False Positive Analysis of Transiting Planet Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Beginning with Kepler, but continuing with K2 and TESS, transiting planet candidates are now found at a much faster rate than follow-up observations can be obtained. Thus, distinguishing true planet candidates from astrophysical false positives has become primarily a statistical exercise. I will describe a new publicly available open-source Python package for analyzing the astrophysical false positive probabilities of transiting exoplanet signals. In addition, I will present results of applying this analysis to both Kepler and K2 planet candidates, resulting in the probabilistic validation of thousands of exoplanets, as well as identifying many likely false positives.

  5. Designing occupancy studies when false-positive detections occur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    1.Recently, estimators have been developed to estimate occupancy probabilities when false-positive detections occur during presence-absence surveys. Some of these estimators combine different types of survey data to improve estimates of occupancy. With these estimators, there is a tradeoff between the number of sample units surveyed, and the number and type of surveys at each sample unit. Guidance on efficient design of studies when false positives occur is unavailable. 2.For a range of scenarios, I identified survey designs that minimized the mean square error of the estimate of occupancy. I considered an approach that uses one survey method and two observation states and an approach that uses two survey methods. For each approach, I used numerical methods to identify optimal survey designs when model assumptions were met and parameter values were correctly anticipated, when parameter values were not correctly anticipated, and when the assumption of no unmodelled detection heterogeneity was violated. 3.Under the approach with two observation states, false positive detections increased the number of recommended surveys, relative to standard occupancy models. If parameter values could not be anticipated, pessimism about detection probabilities avoided poor designs. Detection heterogeneity could require more or fewer repeat surveys, depending on parameter values. If model assumptions were met, the approach with two survey methods was inefficient. However, with poor anticipation of parameter values, with detection heterogeneity, or with removal sampling schemes, combining two survey methods could improve estimates of occupancy. 4.Ignoring false positives can yield biased parameter estimates, yet false positives greatly complicate the design of occupancy studies. Specific guidance for major types of false-positive occupancy models, and for two assumption violations common in field data, can conserve survey resources. This guidance can be used to design efficient

  6. Epidemiology, Public Health, and the Rhetoric of False Positives

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Aaron; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vineis, Paolo; Cocco, Pierluigi; Forastiere, Francesco; Grandjean, Philippe; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; McMichael, Anthony; Pearce, Neil; Porta, Miquel; Samet, Jonathan; Sandler, Dale P.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Vainio, Harri

    2009-01-01

    Background As an observational science, epidemiology is regarded by some researchers as inherently flawed and open to false results. In a recent paper, Boffetta et al. [Boffetta P, McLaughlin JK, LaVecchia C, Tarone RE, Lipworth L, Blot WJ. False-positive results in cancer epidemiology: a plea for epistemological modesty. J Natl Cancer Inst 100:988–995 (2008)] argued that “epidemiology is particularly prone to the generation of false-positive results.” They also said “the tendency to emphasize and over-interpret what appear to be new findings is commonplace, perhaps in part because of a belief that the findings provide information that may ultimately improve public health” and that “this tendency to hype new findings increases the likelihood of downplaying inconsistencies within the data or any lack of concordance with other sources of evidence.” The authors supported these serious charges against epidemiology and epidemiologists with few examples. Although we acknowledge that false positives do occur, we view the position of Boffetta and colleagues on false positives as unbalanced and potentially harmful to public health. Objective We aim to provide a more balanced evaluation of epidemiology and its contribution to public health discourse. Discussion Boffetta and colleagues ignore the fact that false negatives may arise from the very processes that they tout as generating false-positive results. We further disagree with their proposition that false-positive results from a single study will lead to faulty decision making in matters of public health importance. In practice, such public health evaluations are based on all the data available from all relevant disciplines and never to our knowledge on a single study. Conclusions The lack of balance by Boffetta and colleagues in their evaluation of the impact of false-positive findings on epidemiology, the charge that “methodological vigilance is often absent” in epidemiologists’ interpretation of

  7. Verification of false-positive blood culture results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Daxboeck, Florian; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Krause, Robert; Assadian, Ojan; Wenisch, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    A small but significant proportion of blood cultures processed by the BACTEC 9000 series systems is signaled positive, while subsequent Gram's stain and culture on solid media yield no pathogens. In this study, 15 "false-positive" vials (7 aerobes, 8 anaerobes) from 15 patients were investigated for the presence of bacteria and fungi by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA amplification, respectively. All samples turned out negative by both methods. Most patients (7) had neutropenia, which does not support the theory that high leukocyte counts enhance the generation of false-positive results. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that false-negative results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series are inherent to the automated detection and not due to the growth of fastidious organisms.

  8. Escitalopram-Induced Amenorrhea and False Positive Urine Pregnancy Test

    PubMed Central

    Hour, Siv; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Gray, Caron; Smith, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Escitalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. A 34-year-old female patient with major depressive disorder developed amenorrhea and had a false-positive urine pregnancy test after initiation of escitalopram treatment. To our knowledge, no published case report of amenorrhea and false-positive urine pregnancy tests in women taking escitalopram exists. This case report suggests that women of child-bearing age should be carefully monitored for amenorrhea while they are on an antidepressant treatment regimen. PMID:28197332

  9. High False Positives and False Negatives in Yeast Parameter in an Automated Urine Sediment Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Eren, Esin; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Automated urine sediment analyzers have proven their feasibility in medical laboratories. However, editing manual microscopic review of some specimens severely limits the usefulness of such systems. This study aims to give feedback on the practical experience on »Yeast«, which is one of the parameters that compel frequent manual reviews. Methods 5448 freshly collected urine specimens submitted from various departments of our hospital for diagnostic urinalysis were studied by the UriSed® (77 Elektronika, Hungary). A specialist medical doctor inspected every image on-board, and reviewed the ones with a »Yeast« alarm by traditional manual microscopy. Results UriSed alarmed in 491 samples (9%) for yeast. In 59 samples (1%) the number of particles exceeded the cut-off and a »positive for yeast« was set. A false positive report of yeast +1 to 3+/HPF was found in 51 samples (0.9%). There were 8 cases with positive for yeast from both microscopic methods. Thirty-three »negative for yeast« samples were corrected as positive after the manual microscopic review. Conclusions We report a high percentage of false positives and negatives in the yeast parameter, in line with other studies on UriSed as well as on other instruments in the market. As an important feedback, our observations showed that the major concern in false results was »the focusing problem«. We believe in the necessity of a focus check and comparison of alarms between images on board. PMID:28356844

  10. Looking for Childhood Schizophrenia: Case Series of False Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayer, Catherine; Sporn, Alexandra; Gogtay, Nitin; Tossell, Julia; Lenane, Marge; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experience with the diagnosis of childhood-onset schizophrenia indicates a high rate of false positives. Most mislabeled patients have chronic disabling, affective, or behavioral disorders. The authors report the cases of three children who passed stringent initial childhood-onset schizophrenia "screens" but had no chronic psychotic…

  11. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  12. Detecting False Positives in Multielement Designs: Implications for Brief Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Sara M.; Rapp, John T.; Henrickson, Marissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the extent to which multielement designs produced false positives using continuous duration recording (CDR) and interval recording with 10-s and 1-min interval sizes. Specifically, they created 6,000 graphs with multielement designs that varied in the number of data paths, and the number of data points per data path, using a…

  13. Reducing False Positives in Runtime Analysis of Deadlocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensalem, Saddek; Havelund, Klaus; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement of a standard algorithm for detecting dead-lock potentials in multi-threaded programs, in that it reduces the number of false positives. The standard algorithm works as follows. The multi-threaded program under observation is executed, while lock and unlock events are observed. A graph of locks is built, with edges between locks symbolizing locking orders. Any cycle in the graph signifies a potential for a deadlock. The typical standard example is the group of dining philosophers sharing forks. The algorithm is interesting because it can catch deadlock potentials even though no deadlocks occur in the examined trace, and at the same time it scales very well in contrast t o more formal approaches to deadlock detection. The algorithm, however, can yield false positives (as well as false negatives). The extension of the algorithm described in this paper reduces the amount of false positives for three particular cases: when a gate lock protects a cycle, when a single thread introduces a cycle, and when the code segments in different threads that cause the cycle can actually not execute in parallel. The paper formalizes a theory for dynamic deadlock detection and compares it to model checking and static analysis techniques. It furthermore describes an implementation for analyzing Java programs and its application to two case studies: a planetary rover and a space craft altitude control system.

  14. Analysis for chemical agent breakdown products: Avoiding IMPA false positives

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, K.M.; Markowitz, V.

    1996-12-31

    Cleanup of DOD sites where chemical warfare agents have been used or stored presents a number of unique problems. Isopropylmethylphosphonic Acid (IMPA), a degradation product of Sarin (GB), is one important contaminant to be monitored at many such sites. IMPA has historically been determined by Army Environmental Center (AEC) method UT02, an ion chromatography method. This method is prone to serious interference problems which can lead an inexperienced analyst to report false positive results. A study of interferences present in groundwater samples taken from a US military installation was undertaken. The interference problems were identified, and techniques were developed which minimize the problem in most samples. These techniques have been used by the authors in several large studies at DOD sites, and have virtually eliminated false positive problems.

  15. MTS in false positive reduction for multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Cudney, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    The Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MTS) is a relatively new tool in the vehicle health maintenance domain, but has some distinct advantages in current multi-sensor implementations. The use of Mahalanobis Spaces (MS) allows the algorithm to identify characteristics of sensor signals to identify behaviors in machines. MTS is extremely powerful with the caveat that the correct variables are selected to form the MS. In this research work, 56 sensors monitor various aspects of the vehicles. Typically, using the MTS process, identification of useful variables is preceded by validation of the measurements scale. However, the MTS approach doesn't directly include any mitigating steps should the measurement scale not be validated. Existing work has performed outlier removal in construction of the MS, which can lead to better validation. In our approach, we modify the outlier removal process with more liberal definitions of outliers to better identify variables' impact prior to identification of useful variables. This subtle change substantially lowered the false positive rate due to the fact that additional variables were retained. Traditional MTS approaches identify useful variables only to the extent they provide usefulness in identifying the positive (abnormal) condition. The impact of removing false negatives is not included. Initial results show our approach can reduce false positive values while still maintaining complete fault identification for this vehicle data set.

  16. Consequences of treating false positive heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marler, Jacob; Unzaga, Jessica; Stelts, Sundae; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2015-11-01

    Identification of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is encumbered by false positive enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) antibody results, therefore a serotonin release assay (SRA) is used for confirmation. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that increasing the optical density (OD) threshold (currently at 0.4) of the antibody test enhances the positive predictive value. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of patients who were ELISA antibody positive but SRA negative, and the costs and bleeding events associated with alternative anticoagulant treatment. We hypothesized that treating patients with a positive ELISA antibody OD value of <1.0 would result in increased cost and bleeding risk. This retrospective chart review was conducted on adult hospitalized patients from 2011 to 2013. Patients with positive ELISA antibodies (OD of 0.4-1.0) and an SRA result were included. Eighty-five patients were identified with positive antibodies (average OD of 0.66), 100 % of which were found to be SRA negative. A total of 59 patients (69 %) received alternative anticoagulants. The average duration of treatment was 3.1 days, and 4 patients (4.7 %) experienced a bleeding event. The cost of testing and laboratory monitoring was $36,346 and the cost of the alternative anticoagulants totaled $47,179. The total cost was $83,525, with an average total cost per patient of $982. This study adds to the body of literature suggesting treatment should only be initiated if the OD is one or greater. The high false positive rate caused increased cost and some bleeding events.

  17. "False negatives" and "false positives" in acute pulmonary embolism: a clinical-postmortem comparison.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, V; Schmid, C; Zogno, C; Morpurgo, M

    1997-02-01

    Although recent advances have been made in understanding its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, pulmonary embolism (PE) is still largely undetected and untreated, and the mortality rate has not appreciably changed in the last decades. The aim of this study was to: compare the postmortem frequency of massive and sub-massive PE during two different time periods in the same general hospital; ascertain whether the percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE has changed; identify factors which might contribute to the inaccuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PE. Altogether, 288 patients with autopsy-proven PE and adequate clinical data were collected in the first period; 182 subjects with the same characteristics were found in the second period. Cases observed from 1989 through 1994 were evaluated in terms of frequency of false negatives and false positives, predictive value of the clinical diagnosis of PE, and correlations between clinical and post-mortem diagnosis of PE on one side and several independent variables such as age, gender, associated diseases, recent surgery on the other. In our hospital the frequency of massive and submassive PE at autopsy was 8.6% from 1966 through 1974, 12.6% from 1989 through 1994 (p < 0.01). The percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE was 19.6% in the former period, 21.6% in the latter (NS) with 78.57% of false negatives and only 1.73% of false positives. Altogether the true positives were 21.42%, most of them being patients with massive PE. Clinical findings showed the coexistence of heart disease in 51.6% of the cases, congestive heart failure in 20.15%, metabolic disease in 7%, stroke in 12.5%, recent surgery in 12.5%. Autopsy revealed the presence of pulmonary infarction in 22% of cases, malignancy in 24.0%, pneumonia in 17.05%, acute myocardial infarction in 14.8%. Seventy percent of the cases in whom the point of origin of thromboemboli could be demonstrated had one or more thrombus in the district of inferior vena

  18. Abort Trigger False Positive and False Negative Analysis Methodology for Threshold-Based Abort Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Cruz, Jose A.; Johnson Stephen B.; Lo, Yunnhon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quantitative methodology for bounding the false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) probabilities associated with a human-rated launch vehicle abort trigger (AT) that includes sensor data qualification (SDQ). In this context, an AT is a hardware and software mechanism designed to detect the existence of a specific abort condition. Also, SDQ is an algorithmic approach used to identify sensor data suspected of being corrupt so that suspect data does not adversely affect an AT's detection capability. The FP and FN methodologies presented here were developed to support estimation of the probabilities of loss of crew and loss of mission for the Space Launch System (SLS) which is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The paper provides a brief overview of system health management as being an extension of control theory; and describes how ATs and the calculation of FP and FN probabilities relate to this theory. The discussion leads to a detailed presentation of the FP and FN methodology and an example showing how the FP and FN calculations are performed. This detailed presentation includes a methodology for calculating the change in FP and FN probabilities that result from including SDQ in the AT architecture. To avoid proprietary and sensitive data issues, the example incorporates a mixture of open literature and fictitious reliability data. Results presented in the paper demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in providing quantitative estimates that bound the probability of a FP or FN abort determination.

  19. ON THE LOW FALSE POSITIVE PROBABILITIES OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R{sub +} < R{sub p} < 20 R{sub +}. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal-deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  20. False-positive results with amylase testing of citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Ugo; Carboni, Ilaria; Torricelli, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    In a case of robbery in which the criminals passed through the garden adorned with calamondin trees (Citrus madurensis), the investigators found in the grass six calamondin fruits, some undamaged, while others apparently bitten. The fruits were collected and sent to the laboratory for DNA analysis to verify the presence of saliva and robbers' DNA profile. A specific immunochromatographic strip test for saliva confirmed the presence of human salivary α-amylase, but similar positive results were also observed for intact calamondin and other citrus fruits. Further analysis with a specific automated amylase test confirmed the absence of amylase activity. DNA quantification and typing using a specific forensic kit revealed no human DNA presence in any fruits. This case report demonstrates for the first time the occurrence of false positives when human saliva is sought on citrus fruits.

  1. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies.

  2. Distinguishing true from false positives in genomic studies: p values.

    PubMed

    Broer, Linda; Lill, Christina M; Schuur, Maaike; Amin, Najaf; Roehr, Johannes T; Bertram, Lars; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-02-01

    Distinguishing true from false positive findings is a major challenge in human genetic epidemiology. Several strategies have been devised to facilitate this, including the positive predictive value (PPV) and a set of epidemiological criteria, known as the "Venice" criteria. The PPV measures the probability of a true association, given a statistically significant finding, while the Venice criteria grade the credibility based on the amount of evidence, consistency of replication and protection from bias. A vast majority of journals use significance thresholds to identify the true positive findings. We studied the effect of p value thresholds on the PPV and used the PPV and Venice criteria to define usable thresholds of statistical significance. Theoretical and empirical analyses of data published on AlzGene show that at a nominal p value threshold of 0.05 most "positive" findings will turn out to be false if the prior probability of association is below 0.10 even if the statistical power of the study is higher than 0.80. However, in underpowered studies (0.25) with a low prior probability of 1 × 10(-3), a p value of 1 × 10(-5) yields a high PPV (>96 %). Here we have shown that the p value threshold of 1 × 10(-5) gives a very strong evidence of association in almost all studies. However, in the case of a very high prior probability of association (0.50) a p value threshold of 0.05 may be sufficient, while for studies with very low prior probability of association (1 × 10(-4); genome-wide association studies for instance) 1 × 10(-7) may serve as a useful threshold to declare significance.

  3. THE XO PLANETARY SURVEY PROJECT: ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Poleski, Radosaw; McCullough, Peter R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Burke, Christopher J.; Machalek, Pavel; Janes, Kenneth

    2010-07-15

    Searches for planetary transits find many astrophysical false positives as a by-product. There are four main types analyzed in the literature: a grazing-incidence eclipsing binary (EB) star, an EB star with a small radius companion star, a blend of one or more stars with an unrelated EB star, and a physical triple star system. We present a list of 69 astrophysical false positives that had been identified as candidates of transiting planets of the on-going XO survey. This list may be useful in order to avoid redundant observation and characterization of these particular candidates that have been independently identified by other wide-field searches for transiting planets. The list may be useful for those modeling the yield of the XO survey and surveys similar to it. Subsequent observations of some of the listed stars may improve mass-radius relations, especially for low-mass stars. From the candidates exhibiting eclipses, we report three new spectroscopic double-line binaries and give mass function estimations for 15 single-line spectroscopic binaries.

  4. DSM-5, psychiatric epidemiology and the false positives problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, J C

    2015-06-01

    The revision effort leading to the publication of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was flawed in process, goals and outcome. The revision process suffered from lack of an adequate public record of the rationale for changes, thus shortchanging future scholarship. The goals, such as dimensionalising diagnosis, incorporating biomarkers and separating impairment from diagnosis, were ill-considered and mostly abandoned. However, DSM-5's greatest problem, and the target of the most vigorous and sustained criticism, was its failure to take seriously the false positives problem. By expanding diagnosis beyond plausible boundaries in ways inconsistent with DSM-5's own definition of disorder, DSM-5 threatened the validity of psychiatric research, including especially psychiatric epidemiology. I present four examples: increasing the symptom options while decreasing the diagnostic threshold for substance use disorder, elimination of the bereavement exclusion from major depression, allowing verbal arguments as evidence of intermittent explosive disorder and expanding attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder to adults before addressing its manifest false positives problems.

  5. Decoy Methods for Assessing False Positives and False Discovery Rates in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W.; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2008-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs. stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs. unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs. composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size, but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from separate search was about three times that from composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when multiple

  6. False-Positive Viability PCR Results: An Association with Microtubes.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Gemma; Fittipaldi, Mariana; Codony, Francesc

    2017-03-01

    Currently, one of the most challenged points to expand the use of viability PCR technique is achieving the complete exclusion of dead cells amplification signals, thus avoiding the overestimation of live cells population. Considering that, and based on the hypothesis that DNA may be retained by microtube walls, the impact of the microtube was addressed on signals from live and heat-killed cells. A double-dye reagent, PEMAX™, which comprises a mix of photo-reactive azide forms of phenanthridium, was used in this work. We found that if both the incubation and the photoactivation steps are carried out in different microtubes, the dead cell signal is greatly reduced than when those steps are done in the same tube. Therefore, the strategy depicted in this study presents a simple and efficient step in minimizing false-positive signal when employing viability PCR.

  7. False-positive tangible outcomes of functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Rooker, Griffin W; Iwata, Brian A; Harper, Jill M; Fahmie, Tara A; Camp, Erin M

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the most precise method for identifying variables that maintain problem behavior. Occasionally, however, results of an FA may be influenced by idiosyncratic sensitivity to aspects of the assessment conditions. For example, data from several studies suggest that inclusion of a tangible condition during an FA may be prone to a false-positive outcome, although the extent to which tangible reinforcement routinely produces such outcomes is unknown. We examined susceptibility to tangible reinforcement by determining whether a new response was acquired more readily when exposed to a tangible contingency relative to others commonly used in an FA (Study 1), and whether problem behavior known not to have a social function nevertheless emerged when exposed to tangible reinforcement (Study 2). Results indicated that inclusion of items in the tangible condition should be done with care and that selection should be based on those items typically found in the individual's environment.

  8. Risk factors for false positive and for false negative test results in screening with fecal occult blood testing.

    PubMed

    Stegeman, Inge; de Wijkerslooth, Thomas R; Stoop, Esther M; van Leerdam, Monique; van Ballegooijen, M; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Dekker, Evelien; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2013-11-15

    Differences in the risk of a false negative or a false positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) across subgroups may affect optimal screening strategies. We evaluate whether subgroups are at increased risk of a false positive or a false negative FIT result, whether such variability in risk is related to differences in FIT sensitivity and specificity or to differences in prior CRC risk. Randomly selected, asymptomatic individuals were invited to undergo colonoscopy. Participants were asked to undergo one sample FIT and to complete a risk questionnaire. We identified patient characteristics associated with a false negative and false positive FIT results using logistic regression. We focused on statistically significant differences as well as on variables influencing the false positive or negative risk for which the odds ratio exceeded 1.25. Of the 1,426 screening participants, 1,112 (78%) completed FIT and the questionnaire; 101 (9.1%) had advanced neoplasia. 102 Individuals were FIT positive, 65 (64%) had a false negative FIT result and 66 (65%) a false positive FIT result. Participants at higher age and smokers had a significantly higher risk of a false negative FIT result. Males were at increased risk of a false positive result, so were smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in females. Specificity was lower for males, smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in women. FIT specificity was lower in males, smokers and regular NSAID users. Our results can be used for further evidence based individualization of screening strategies.

  9. Selective reduction of CAD false-positive findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Gori, I.; Retico, A.; Bagagli, F.

    2010-03-01

    Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) systems are becoming widespread supporting tools to radiologists' diagnosis, especially in screening contexts. However, a large amount of false positive (FP) alarms would inevitably lead both to an undesired possible increase in time for diagnosis, and to a reduction in radiologists' confidence in CAD as a useful tool. Most CAD systems implement as final step of the analysis a classifier which assigns a score to each entry of a list of findings; by thresholding this score it is possible to define the system performance on an annotated validation dataset in terms of a FROC curve (sensitivity vs. FP per scan). To use a CAD as a supportive tool for most clinical activities, an operative point has to be chosen on the system FROC curve, according to the obvious criterion of keeping the sensitivity as high as possible, while maintaining the number of FP alarms still acceptable. The strategy proposed in this study is to choose an operative point with high sensitivity on the CAD FROC curve, then to implement in cascade a further classification step, constituted by a smarter classifier. The key issue of this approach is that the smarter classifier is actually a meta-classifier of more then one decision system, each specialized in rejecting a particular type of FP findings generated by the CAD. The application of this approach to a dataset of 16 lung CT scans previously processed by the VBNACAD system is presented. The lung CT VBNACAD performance of 87.1% sensitivity to juxtapleural nodules with 18.5 FP per scan is improved up to 10.1 FP per scan while maintaining the same value of sensitivity. This work has been carried out in the framework of the MAGIC-V collaboration.

  10. False positive of an immunochromatography kit for detection of norovirus in neonatal feces.

    PubMed

    Niizuma, Takahiro; Obinata, Kaoru; Ikari, Hiromi; Kamata, Ayako; Lee, Tsubasa; Kinoshita, Keiji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-02-01

    Norovirus was detected in the feces from five neonates in the growing care unit by a rapid immunochromatography (ICG) kit. However, confirmation using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), RT-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), and nested RT-PCR methods showed negative results from all the feces. In addition, the ICG test for the detection of norovirus was positive for four cases out of the 16 feces from other asymptomatic neonates/infants. Only one feces out of the four samples was positive by RT-LAMP. In this study, among the factors related to false positives with the norovirus ICG kit, there were no differences regarding the commencement of feeding, nutrition, and sample collection methods. Since the false positive rate of ICG in the diagnosis of norovirus infection in neonates and early infancy is high, ICG is not an appropriate method, and it is necessary to confirm the results using reliable methods like RT-PCR.

  11. False-positive indium-111 labeled leukocyte scintigram in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, N.; Makler, P.T. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    A Tronzo hip prosthesis is designed to elicit an inflammatory reaction in order to promote prosthesis stability. A three-phased bone scan and Ga-67 imaging in conjunction with physical examination and laboratory findings failed to demonstrate evidence for osteomyelitis in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis, in whom images obtained with In-111-labeled leukocytes were positive. This observation demonstrated that the interpretation of the latter technique in demonstrating inflammation can cause a false impression of an infectious process.

  12. Quantification of false positives within Moon Zoo crater annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how a quantitative pattern recognition system can be used to estimate the quantity of contamination in Moon Zoo data from erroneous annotations. The proposed method produces not only estimates of true verses false crater annotations, but also a full error covariance, with additional conformity checks, which is essential for the meaningful interpretation of measurements, e.g. for plotting error bars.

  13. False-positive cancer screens and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Patricia M; Gross, Cynthia R; Krueger, Richard A; Engelhard, Deborah A; Cordes, Jill E; Church, Timothy R

    2004-01-01

    By design, screening tests are imperfect-unresponsive to some cancers (false negatives) while occasionally raising suspicion of cancer where none exists (false positives). This pilot study describes patients' responses to having a false-positive screening test for cancer, and identifies screening effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The pilot findings suggest issues important for incorporation in future evaluations of the impact of screening for prostate, lung, colon, or ovarian (PLCO) cancers. Seven focus groups were conducted to identify the nature and meaning of all phases of PLCO screening. Minnesota participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial who had completed screening, with at least 1 false-positive screen, participated (N = 47). Participants' reactions to abnormal screens and diagnostic work-ups were primarily emotional (eg, anxiety and distress), not physical, and ultimately positive for the majority. Health distress and fear of cancer and death were the major negative aspects of HRQoL identified. These concepts are not typically included in generic HRQoL questionnaires like the SF-36, but are highly relevant to PLCO screening. Clinicians were regarded as underestimating the discomfort of follow-up diagnostic testing. However, relief and assurance appeared to eventually outweigh the negative emotions for most participants. Implications for oncology nurses include the need to consider the emotional consequences of screening in association with screen reliability and validity.

  14. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  15. False-Positive PET/CT After Cyanoacrylate Sealing of a Pancreaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Orlin; Munding, Johanna; Tannapfel, Andrea; Uhl, Waldemar

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, a 68-year-old male had a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. The pancreaticojejunostomy was sealed with cyanoacrylate (Dermabond) to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula. Local recurrence of malignancy at the anastomosis was suspected 18 months later in PET/CT. Surgical revision was performed and anastomosis resected. However, histology showed no tumor recurrence, but strong inflammation and foreign-body reaction towards Dermabond. The sealant caused false-positive PET/CT findings, so its use in oncologic surgery should be abandoned.

  16. [A pseudo-outbreak of pharyngeal gonorrhoea related to a false-positive PCR-result].

    PubMed

    Verzijl, A; Berretty, P J M; Erceg, A; Krekels, G A M; Van den Brule, A J C; Boel, C H E

    2007-03-24

    Nucleic acid amplification tests, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are sensitive and specific tests that are often used for diagnosing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). A pseudo-outbreak of pharyngeal gonorrhoea in a group of prostitutes turned out to have been caused by false-positive test results due to commensal oropharyngeal Neisseria species. Specific molecular tests may yield erroneous results. When the results of an STD study have major consequences at a legal or social level, it is advisable, in consultation with a medical microbiologist, to take a sample for culture or to carry out a second molecular test aimed at a different part of the bacterial genome.

  17. The Clinical Significance of the Biological False Positive Serologic Reactor: A Study of 113 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Allan; Wilkinson, R. D.

    1963-01-01

    Biological false positive serologic reactors were studied during a long-term follow-up of asymptomatic patients with chronic false positive serology for syphilitic reagin. This was done with a view to facilitating the early diagnosis of systemic disease, particularly collagen disorders, which are frequently associated with this finding in women. One hundred and thirteen cases were studied. Thirty-eight were “acute”, i.e. positive for less than six months, 58 were “chronic”, i.e. positive for more than six months, and the remainder still positive but followed for less than six months. Of 39 female chronic reactors, 10 were diagnosed as having collagen disease, and in six the BFP reaction preceded clinical diagnosis of the disease. Five had no apparent disease. In 19 male chronic reactors, there was no evidence of collagen disorders and five were free of any recognizable pathology. The remainder in both sexes were found to have a wide variety of systemic illnesses. PMID:14033756

  18. I am Not Dead Yet: Identification of False-Positive Matches to Death Master File

    PubMed Central

    Turchin, Alexander; Shubina, Maria; Murphy, Shawn N

    2010-01-01

    Patient death is an important clinical outcome. It is typically ascertained by matching database records with external death indices. Accuracy of the matching algorithms is imperfect. We have investigated whether clinical records made > 1 month after the date of death accurately identify false positive matches to the Death Master File. Positive predictive value (PPV) varied from 74.7% (notes) to 95.9% (labs) and sensitivity from 57.4% (adverse medication reactions) to 94.9% (notes). Presence of any two out of four (billing data, labs, vital signs and medications) data elements had sensitivity of 83.0% and PPV of 98.3%. Area under the ROC curve for a multivariable logistic model that included the number of these four data elements recorded > 1 month after death was 0.987. Clinical data recorded after the date of death can help identify false positive matches to death indices and could be utilized to improve existing record linkage algorithms. PMID:21347090

  19. A retrospective analysis of false-positive infectious screening results in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Michelle T.; Bruhn, Roberta; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Custer, Brian S.; Murphy, Edward L.; Bloch, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND False-positive infectious transfusion screening results remain a challenge with continued loss of both donors and blood products. We sought to identify associations between donor demographic characteristics (age, race, sex, education, first-time donor status) and testing false positive for viruses during routine blood donation screening. In addition the study assessed the prevalence of high-risk behaviors in false-positive donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Blood Systems, Inc. donors with allogeneic donations between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, were compared in a case-control study. Those with a false-positive donation for one of four viruses (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], human T-lymphotropic virus [HTLV], hepatitis B virus [HBV], and hepatitis C virus [HCV]) were included as cases. Those with negative test results were controls. For a subset of cases, infectious risk factors were evaluated. RESULTS Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with HCV and HTLV false-positive results. Male sex and lower education were associated with HCV false positivity, and age 25 to 44 was associated with HTLV false positivity. First-time donors were more likely to be HCV false positive although less likely to be HBV and HTLV false positive. No significant associations between donor demographics and HIV false positivity were observed. A questionnaire for false-positive donors showed low levels of high-risk behaviors. CONCLUSION Demographic associations with HCV and HTLV false-positive results overlap with those of true infection. While true infection is unlikely given current testing algorithms and risk factor evaluation, the findings suggest nonrandom association. Further investigation into biologic mechanisms is warranted. PMID:26509432

  20. Single-primer PCR correction: a strategy for false-positive exclusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, P W; Yao, D; Wang, Y P; Yan, W; Guan, S C

    2011-02-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology plays an important role in molecular biology research, but false-positive and nonspecific PCR amplification have plagued many researchers. Currently, research on the optimization of the PCR system focuses on double-primer-based PCR products. This research has shown that PCR amplification based on single-primer binding to the DNA template is an important contributing factor to obtaining false-positive results, fragment impurity, and nonspecific fragment amplification, when the PCR conditions are highly restricted during PCR-based target gene cloning, detection of transgenic plants, simple-sequence repeat marker-assisted selection, and mRNA differential display. Here, we compared single- and double-primer amplification and proposed "single-primer PCR correction"; improvements in PCR that eliminate interference caused by single-primer-based nonspecific PCR amplification were demonstrated and the precision and success rates of experiments were increased. Although for some kinds of experiments, the improvement effect of single-primer PCR correction was variable, the precision and success rate could be elevated at 12-50% in our experiment by this way.

  1. Statistical approaches to account for false-positive errors in environmental DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Monfort, José J; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Tingley, Reid

    2016-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is prone to both false-positive and false-negative errors. We review statistical methods to account for such errors in the analysis of eDNA data and use simulations to compare the performance of different modelling approaches. Our simulations illustrate that even low false-positive rates can produce biased estimates of occupancy and detectability. We further show that removing or classifying single PCR detections in an ad hoc manner under the suspicion that such records represent false positives, as sometimes advocated in the eDNA literature, also results in biased estimation of occupancy, detectability and false-positive rates. We advocate alternative approaches to account for false-positive errors that rely on prior information, or the collection of ancillary detection data at a subset of sites using a sampling method that is not prone to false-positive errors. We illustrate the advantages of these approaches over ad hoc classifications of detections and provide practical advice and code for fitting these models in maximum likelihood and Bayesian frameworks. Given the severe bias induced by false-negative and false-positive errors, the methods presented here should be more routinely adopted in eDNA studies.

  2. Consequences of a false-positive mammography result: drug consumption before and after screening.

    PubMed

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Bæksted, Christina; Vejborg, Ilse; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-05-01

    Background Previous research showed women experiencing false-positive mammograms to have greater anxiety about breast cancer than women with normal mammograms. To elucidate psychological effects of false-positive mammograms, we studied impact on drug intake. Methods We calculated the ratio of drug use for women with false-positive versus women with normal mammograms, before and after the event, using population-based registers, 1997-2006. The ratio of the ratios (RRR) assessed the impact. Results Before the test, 40.3% of women from the false-positive group versus 36.2% from the normal group used anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs. There was no difference in use of beta blockers. Hormone therapy was used more frequently by the false-positive, 36.6% versus 28.7%. The proportion of women using anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs increased with 19% from the before to the after period in the false-positive group, and with 16% in the normal group, resulting in an RRR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92-1.14). RRR was 1.03 for beta blockers, 0.97 for hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) Drugs used to mitigate mood disorders were used more frequently by women with false-positive than by women with normal mammograms already before the screening event, while the changes from before to after screening were similar for both groups. The results point to the importance of control for potential selection in studies of screening effects.

  3. False-positive methadone urine drug screen in a patient treated with quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Lasić, Davor; Uglesić, Boran; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Supe-Domić, Daniela; Uglesić, Lovro

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of T.M. admitted to University Department of Psychiatry, Split University Hospital Center, in Croatia, because of the acute psychotic reaction (F23.9). The patient's urine tested positive for methadone without a history of methadone ingestion. Urine drug screen was performed with the COBAS Integra Methadone II test kit (kinetic interaction of microparticles in solution /KIMS/ methodology) by Roche. Drugs that have been shown to cross-react with methadone feature a tricyclic structure with a sulfur and nitrogen atom in the middle ring, which is common for both quetiapine and methadone. Therefore, it is plausible that this structural similarity between quetiapine and methadone could underlie the cross-reactivity on methadone drug screen. Besides quetiapine, a number of routinely prescribed medications have been associated with triggering false-positive urine drug screen results. Verification of the test results with a different screening test or additional analytical tests should be performed to avoid adverse consequences for the patients.

  4. Doxylamine: a cause for false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Schaldenbrand, J D; McClatchey, K D; Patel, J A; Muilenberg, M J

    1981-01-01

    A 25-year-old white woman ingested an unknown quantity of doxylamine succinate and flurazepam. Urine immunoassay screen (EMIT-dau) was positive for benzodiazopine and negative for phencyclidine. Subsequent gas chromatographic assay of the urine revealed a markedly positive assay for phencyclidine. Doxylamine was ultimately found to be the cause for the false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

  5. Experimental investigation of false positive errors in auditory species occurrence surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.; Weir, Linda A.; McClintock, Brett T.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    False positive errors are a significant component of many ecological data sets, which in combination with false negative errors, can lead to severe biases in conclusions about ecological systems. We present results of a field experiment where observers recorded observations for known combinations of electronically broadcast calling anurans under conditions mimicking field surveys to determine species occurrence. Our objectives were to characterize false positive error probabilities for auditory methods based on a large number of observers, to determine if targeted instruction could be used to reduce false positive error rates, and to establish useful predictors of among-observer and among-species differences in error rates. We recruited 31 observers, ranging in abilities from novice to expert, that recorded detections for 12 species during 180 calling trials (66,960 total observations). All observers made multiple false positive errors and on average 8.1% of recorded detections in the experiment were false positive errors. Additional instruction had only minor effects on error rates. After instruction, false positive error probabilities decreased by 16% for treatment individuals compared to controls with broad confidence interval overlap of 0 (95% CI: -46 to 30%). This coincided with an increase in false negative errors due to the treatment (26%; -3 to 61%). Differences among observers in false positive and in false negative error rates were best predicted by scores from an online test and a self-assessment of observer ability completed prior to the field experiment. In contrast, years of experience conducting call surveys was a weak predictor of error rates. False positive errors were also more common for species that were played more frequently, but were not related to the dominant spectral frequency of the call. Our results corroborate other work that demonstrates false positives are a significant component of species occurrence data collected by auditory

  6. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique.

  7. False positive stress-test in a patient with pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Mateja, Candice; Mishkin, Joseph; George, Malika; Chheda, Hemant; Guglin, Maya

    2009-10-02

    We report a case of false positive stress test in a patient with cardiac tamponade. After the drainage of pericardial effusion, reversible defect on a stress test resolved. Cardiac catheterization revealed normal coronary arteries.

  8. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  9. Congenital absence of the gallbladder: another cause of false-positive hepatobiliary image

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.Z.; Powers, T.A.; Sandler, M.P.; Partain, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatobiliary imaging with the various technetium-labeled IDA compounds is more than 90% sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Causes of false-positive studies include chronic cholecystitis, cystic-duct obstruction by tumor, prolonged fasting, the nonfasting state, pancreatitis, alcoholism, parenteral hyperalimentation, and severe intercurrent illness. A case of congenital absence of the gallbladder is sumbitted as another cause of a false-positive scan.

  10. Study of false positives in 5-ALA induced photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draga, Ronald O. P.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Kok, Esther T.; Jonges, Trudy G. N.; Bosch, J. L. H. R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is a technique that enhances the detection of tumors during cystoscopy using a photosensitizer which accumulates primarily in cancerous cells and will fluoresce when illuminated by violetblue light. A disadvantage of PDD is the relatively low specificity. In this retrospective study we aimed to identify predictors for false positive findings in PDD. Factors such as gender, age, recent transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT), previous intravesical therapy (IVT) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were examined for association with the false positive rates in a multivariate analysis. Data of 366 procedures and 200 patients were collected. Patients were instilled with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) intravesically and 1253 biopsies were taken from tumors and suspicious lesions. Female gender and TURBT are independent predictors of false positives in PDD. However, previous intravesical therapy with Bacille Calmette-Guérin is also an important predictor of false positives. The false positive rate decreases during the first 9-12 weeks after the latest TURBT and the latest intravesical chemotherapy. Although shortly after IVT and TURBT false positives increase, PDD improves the diagnostic sensitivity and results in more adequate treatment strategies in a significant number of patients.

  11. Constraining the false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates with multicolour photometry from the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.

    2012-10-01

    Using the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) instrument installed on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), we acquired multicolour transit photometry of four small (Rp≲5 R⊕) short-period (P ≲ 6 d) planet candidates recently identified by the Kepler space mission. These observations are part of a programme to constrain the false positive rate for small, short-period Kepler planet candidates. Since planetary transits should be largely achromatic when observed at different wavelengths (excluding the small colour changes due to stellar limb darkening), we use the observed transit colour to identify candidates as either false positives (e.g. a blend with a stellar eclipsing binary either in the background/foreground or bound to the target star) or validated planets. Our results include the identification of KOI 225.01 and KOI 1187.01 as false positives and the tentative validation of KOI 420.01 and KOI 526.01 as planets. The probability of identifying two false positives out of a sample of four targets is less than 1 per cent, assuming an overall false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates of 10 per cent (as estimated by Morton & Johnson). Therefore, these results suggest a higher false positive rate for the small, short-period Kepler planet candidates than has been theoretically predicted by other studies which consider the Kepler planet candidate sample as a whole. Furthermore, our results are consistent with a recent Doppler study of short-period giant Kepler planet candidates. We also investigate how the false positive rate for our sample varies with different planetary and stellar properties. Our results suggest that the false positive rate varies significantly with orbital period and is largest at the shortest orbital periods (P < 3 d), where there is a corresponding rise in the number of detached eclipsing binary stars (i.e. systems that can easily mimic planetary transits) that have been discovered by

  12. Aerosolized vaccine as an unexpected source of false-positive Bordetella pertussis PCR results.

    PubMed

    Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul R; Asmar, Basim I; Prebelich, Dawn; Paulson, Erin; Fairfax, Marilynn R

    2012-02-01

    When 13 of 13 nasal wash specimens from a single pediatrician's office tested positive for low quantities of Bordetella pertussis DNA, we suspected prelaboratory contamination. Investigation revealed that Pentacel and Adacel vaccines contain high copy numbers of B. pertussis DNA, which can be aerosolized, causing false-positive B. pertussis PCR results.

  13. Quantitative real-time PCR eliminates false-positives in colony screening PCR.

    PubMed

    Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We report an alternative approach to colony screening using real-time PCR (qPCR) which can be used instead of the traditional end-point PCR to eliminate false-positives and reduce processing times. False-positive transformants can easily be distinguished from true-positives by comparing Ct values derived from qPCR amplification curves. In addition, the use of qPCR allows for more efficient processing since a gel electrophoresis step is not required and the screening process is no longer limited by the capacity of the gel apparatus.

  14. False positive results for antibody to HIV in two men with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, M H; Blasini, A M; Ogly, D; Rodríguez, M A

    1992-01-01

    False positive results were obtained for HIV tests in two men with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were suspected of being infected with HIV because of fever, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and inflammatory myopathy. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for HIV were twice positive when tested three times over a period of six months. Western blot analysis showed reactivity against the gp41 band in patient 1. False positive results for HIV tests can occur in patients with SLE, potentially leading to an erroneous diagnosis of HIV infection. PMID:1417140

  15. False-positive scalp activity in 131I imaging associated with hair coloring.

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Doss, Mohan; Mehra, Ranee; Parsons, Rosaleen B; Milestone, Barton N; Yu, Jian Q

    2013-03-01

    A patient with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma (after surgical resection of tumor and positive lymph nodes) undergoing thyroid ablation therapy with (131)I is described. Whole-body scintigraphy was performed 1 wk after ablation therapy to evaluate the presence of residual disease. The whole-body images demonstrated an artifact caused by tracer accumulation in the patient's scalp related to recent hair coloring. Common etiologies of false-positive (131)I scintigraphic findings are briefly reviewed. The importance of taking preventative measures to decrease the number of false-positive findings and recognizing these findings when they occur is discussed.

  16. False-positive identification of Escherichia coli in treated municipal wastewater and wastewater-irrigated soils.

    PubMed

    McLain, Jean E T; Rock, Channah M; Lohse, Kathleen; Walworth, James

    2011-10-01

    The increasing use of treated wastewater for irrigation heightens the importance of accurate monitoring of water quality. Chromogenic media, because they are easy to use and provide rapid results, are often used for detection of Escherichia coli in environmental samples, but unique levels of organic and inorganic compounds alter the chemistry of treated wastewater, potentially hindering the accurate performance of chromogenic media. We used MI agar and molecular confirmatory methods to assess false-positive identification of E. coli in treated wastewater samples collected from municipal utilities, an irrigation holding pond, irrigated soils, and in samples collected from storm flows destined for groundwater recharge. False-positive rates in storm flows (4.0%) agreed closely with USEPA technical literature but were higher in samples from the pond, soils, and treatment facilities (33.3%, 38.0%, and 48.8%, respectively). Sequencing of false-positive isolates confirmed that most were, like E. coli, of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and many of the false-positive isolates were reported to produce the β-D-glucuronidase enzyme targeted by MI agar. False-positive identification rates were inversely related to air temperature, suggesting that seasonal variations in water quality influence E. coli identification. Knowledge of factors contributing to failure of chromogenic media will lead to manufacturer enhancements in media quality and performance and will ultimately increase the accuracy of future water quality monitoring programs.

  17. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients.

  18. False positives and false negatives in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: issues, challenges, and the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We highlight a significant problem that needs to be considered and addressed when performing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies, namely the possibility of inadvertently measuring fNIRS hemodynamic responses that are not due to neurovascular coupling. These can be misinterpreted as brain activity, i.e., “false positives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a detected hemodynamic response to functional brain activity), or mask brain activity, i.e., “false negatives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a not observed hemodynamic response in the presence of functional brain activity). Here, we summarize the possible physiological origins of these issues and suggest ways to avoid and remove them. PMID:27054143

  19. Positive roles of compartmentalization in internal reactions.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many researchers have attempted to construct artificial cell models using a bottom-up approach in which various biochemical reactions that involve a defined set of molecules are reconstructed in cell-like compartments, such as liposomes and water-in-oil droplets. In many of these studies, the cell-like compartments have acted only as containers for the encapsulated biochemical reactions, whereas other studies have indicated that compartmentalization improves the rates and yields of these reactions. Here, we introduce two ways in which compartmentalization can improve internal reactions: the isolation effect and the condensation effect. These positive effects of compartmentalization might have played an important role in the genesis of the first primitive cell on early Earth.

  20. Are False-Positive Rates Leading to an Overestimation of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Carney, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate false-positive rates for rules proposed to identify early noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using the presence of notches in audiograms. Method: Audiograms collected from school-age children in a national survey of health and nutrition (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES III]; National Center…

  1. IS HCI THAT IS USED AS A PRESERVATIVE CREATING FALSE POSITIVES FOR TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will hydrochloric acid produce false positives for TBA? Yes, if you heat the sample to get a lower detection limit for TBA. Conventional purge and trap methods at ambient temperature have a reporting limit for TBA between 50 and 100 g/liter. This is higher than the provisiona...

  2. EMPLOYING TOPOGRAPHICAL HEIGHT MAP IN COLONIC POLYP MEASUREMENT AND FALSE POSITIVE REDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Li, Jiang; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    CT Colonography (CTC) is an emerging minimally invasive technique for screening and diagnosing colon cancers. Computer Aided Detection (CAD) techniques can increase sensitivity and reduce false positives. Inspired by the way radiologists detect polyps via 3D virtual fly-through in CTC, we borrowed the idea from geographic information systems to employ topographical height map in colonic polyp measurement and false positive reduction. After a curvature based filtering and a 3D CT feature classifier, a height map is computed for each detection using a ray-casting algorithm. We design a concentric index to characterize the concentric pattern in polyp height map based on the fact that polyps are protrusions from the colon wall and round in shape. The height map is optimized through a multi-scale spiral spherical search to maximize the concentric index. We derive several topographic features from the map and compute texture features based on wavelet decomposition. We then send the features to a committee of support vector machines for classification. We have trained our method on 394 patients (71 polyps) and tested it on 792 patients (226 polyps). Results showed that we can achieve 95% sensitivity at 2.4 false positives per patient and the height map features can reduce false positives by more than 50%. We compute the polyp height and width measurements and correlate them with manual measurements. The Pearson correlations are 0.74 (p=0.11) and 0.75 (p=0.17) for height and width, respectively. PMID:19578483

  3. False Positives in Multiple Regression: Unanticipated Consequences of Measurement Error in the Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shear, Benjamin R.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Type I error rates in multiple regression, and hence the chance for false positive research findings, can be drastically inflated when multiple regression models are used to analyze data that contain random measurement error. This article shows the potential for inflated Type I error rates in commonly encountered scenarios and provides new…

  4. PCR evaluation of false-positive signals from two automated blood-culture systems.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Z Ceren; Mumcuoglu, Ipek; Guriz, Haluk; Tamer, Deniz; Balaban, Neriman; Aysev, Derya; Akar, Nejat

    2006-01-01

    Rapid detection of micro-organisms from blood is one of the most critical functions of a diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Automated blood-culture systems reduce the time needed to detect positive cultures, and reduce specimen handling. The false-positive rate of such systems is 1-10%. In this study, the presence of pathogens in 'false-positive' bottles obtained from BACTEC 9050 (Becton Dickinson) and BacT/Alert (Biomérieux) systems was investigated by eubacterial and fungal PCR. A total of 169 subculture-negative aerobic blood-culture bottles (104 BacT/Alert and 65 BACTEC) were evaluated. Both fungal and eubacterial PCRs were negative for all BACTEC bottles. Fungal PCR was also negative for the BacT/Alert system, but 10 bottles (9.6%) gave positive results by eubacterial PCR. Sequence analysis of the positive PCR amplicons indicated the presence of the following bacteria (number of isolates in parentheses): Pasteurella multocida (1), Staphylococcus epidermidis (2), Staphylococcus hominis (1), Micrococcus sp. (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1), Corynebacterium spp. (2), Brachibacterium sp. (1) and Arthrobacter/Rothia sp. (1). Antibiotic usage by the patients may be responsible for the inability of the laboratory to grow these bacteria on subcultures. For patients with more than one false-positive bottle, molecular methods can be used to evaluate the microbial DNA in these bottles. False positives from the BACTEC system may be due to elevated patient leukocyte counts or the high sensitivity of the system to background increases in CO(2) concentration.

  5. New Constraints on the False Positive Rate for Short-Period Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler space mission has discovered thousands of potential planets orbiting other stars, thereby setting the stage for in-depth studies of different populations of planets. We present new multi-wavelength transit photometry of small (Rp < 6 Earth radii), short-period (P < 6 days) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. Multi-wavelength transit photometry allows us to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and subsequently identify eclipsing binary false positives (which are especially prevalent at the shortest orbital periods). We combine these new observations of three candidates with previous results for five other candidates (Colón & Ford 2011 and Colón, Ford, & Morehead 2012) to provide new constraints on the false positive rate for small, close-in candidates. In our full sample, we identify four candidates as viable planets and four as eclipsing binary false positives. We therefore find a higher false positive rate for small, close-in candidates compared to the lower false positive rate of ~10% determined by other studies for the full sample of Kepler planet candidates (e.g. Fressin et al. 2013). We also discuss the dearth of known planets with periods less than ~2.5 days and radii between ~3 and 11 Earth radii (the so-called 'sub-Jovian desert'), since the majority of the candidates in our study are located in or around this 'desert.' The lack of planets with these orbital and physical properties is not expected to be due to observational bias, as short-period planets are generally easier to detect (especially if they are larger or more massive than Earth). We consider the implications of our results for the other ~20 Kepler planet candidates located in this desert. Characterizing these candidates will allow us to better understand the formation processes of this apparently rare class of planets.

  6. Copy-number variation and false positive prenatal aneuploidy screening results.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew W; Simmons, LaVone E; Kitzman, Jacob O; Coe, Bradley P; Henson, Jessica M; Daza, Riza M; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S

    2015-04-23

    Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  7. Copy-Number Variation and False Positive Prenatal Aneuploidy Screening Results

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Matthew W.; Simmons, LaVone E.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Coe, Bradley P.; Henson, Jessica M.; Daza, Riza M.; Eichler, Evan E.; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:25830323

  8. Decisions to Shoot in a Weapon Identification Task: The Influence of Cultural Stereotypes and Perceived Threat on False Positive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Kevin K.; Bandy, Carole L.; Kimble, Matthew O.

    2014-01-01

    The decision to shoot engages executive control processes that can be biased by cultural stereotypes and perceived threat. The neural locus of the decision to shoot is likely to be found in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) where cognition and affect converge. Male military cadets at Norwich University (N=37) performed a weapon identification task in which they made rapid decisions to shoot when images of guns appeared briefly on a computer screen. Reaction times, error rates, and EEG activity were recorded. Cadets reacted more quickly and accurately when guns were primed by images of middle-eastern males wearing traditional clothing. However, cadets also made more false positive errors when tools were primed by these images. Error-related negativity (ERN) was measured for each response. Deeper ERN’s were found in the medial-frontal cortex following false positive responses. Cadets who made fewer errors also produced deeper ERN’s, indicating stronger executive control. Pupil size was used to measure autonomic arousal related to perceived threat. Images of middle-eastern males in traditional clothing produced larger pupil sizes. An image of Osama bin Laden induced the largest pupil size, as would be predicted for the exemplar of Middle East terrorism. Cadets who showed greater increases in pupil size also made more false positive errors. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate predictions based on current models of perceived threat, stereotype activation, and cognitive control. Measures of pupil size (perceived threat) and ERN (cognitive control) explained significant proportions of the variance in false positive errors to middle-eastern males in traditional clothing, while measures of reaction time, signal detection response bias, and stimulus discriminability explained most of the remaining variance. PMID:19813139

  9. Frequency of false positive amphetamine screens due to bupropion using the Syva EMIT II immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Casey, Erica R; Scott, Mitchell G; Tang, Schirin; Mullins, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Bupropion is a commonly prescribed, monocyclic antidepressant often used as an aid for smoking cessation. Several case reports have described false positive amphetamine urine drug screens (UDS) associated with bupropion. We sought to determine whether false positive amphetamine UDS due to the use of bupropion would be a frequent occurrence. We conducted an IRB-approved, retrospective chart review of all emergency department patients who underwent UDS between 1 January 2006 and 31 July 2007. All urine samples were screened using Syva EMIT II Plus immunoassay reagents. All positive screens underwent confirmation by gas chromatography (GC). We reviewed the records of patients with positive amphetamine UDS. We documented prescription use of bupropion, other antidepressants, stimulants, antipsychotics, and anti-hypertensives. We recorded evidence of polysubstance abuse (PSA) as patients who had had a documented diagnosis or laboratory evidence of abuse of at least two substances (drugs or ethanol). Of 10,011 urine drug screens, 362 (3.6%) were positive for amphetamine. GC confirmed amphetamines in 234 (65%), but failed to confirm in 128 (35%). Among the 234 confirmed, records reflected use of bupropion in three (1.3%), other antidepressants in 38 (16%), antipsychotics in 17 (8%), and amphetamine in 50 (21%). Records indicated evidence of PSA in 55 (24%). Among the 128 which failed to confirm, records reflected prescription use of bupropion in 53 (41%). None whose drug screen failed to confirm had evidence of PSA. Therapeutic use of bupropion appears to be the most frequent cause of false positive urine drug screens for amphetamines in our population.

  10. KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, S. J.; Welch, D. L.; Kavelaars, J. J. E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2009-05-15

    A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

  11. Diagnostic Issues and Controversies in DSM-5: Return of the False Positives Problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2016-01-01

    The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was the most controversial in the manual's history. This review selectively surveys some of the most important changes in DSM-5, including structural/organizational changes, modifications of diagnostic criteria, and newly introduced categories. It analyzes why these changes led to such heated controversies, which included objections to the revision's process, its goals, and the content of altered criteria and new categories. The central focus is on disputes concerning the false positives problem of setting a valid boundary between disorder and normal variation. Finally, this review highlights key problems and issues that currently remain unresolved and need to be addressed in the future, including systematically identifying false positive weaknesses in criteria, distinguishing risk from disorder, including context in diagnostic criteria, clarifying how to handle fuzzy boundaries, and improving the guidelines for "other specified" diagnosis.

  12. Modeling false positive detections in species occurrence data under different study designs.

    PubMed

    Chambert, Thierry; Miller, David A W; Nichols, James D

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of false positive detections in presence-absence data, even when they occur infrequently, can lead to severe bias when estimating species occupancy patterns. Building upon previous efforts to account for this source of observational error, we established a general framework to model false positives in occupancy studies and extend existing modeling approaches to encompass a broader range of sampling designs. Specifically, we identified three common sampling designs that are likely to cover most scenarios encountered by researchers. The different designs all included ambiguous detections, as well as some known-truth data, but their modeling differed in the level of the model hierarchy at which the known-truth information was incorporated (site level or observation level). For each model, we provide the likelihood, as well as R and BUGS code needed for implementation. We also establish a clear terminology and provide guidance to help choosing the most appropriate design and modeling approach.

  13. Chromosomes Emission of Planet Candidate Host Stars: A Way to Identify False Positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Albrecht, Simon; Bonanno, Alfio; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant-planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems that are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant-planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant-planet systems, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypothesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbital period.

  14. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone.

    PubMed

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving.

  15. Improved diagnosis of spring viremia of carp by nested reverse-transcription PCR: development of a chimeric positive control for prevention of false-positive diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Jun

    2012-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays allow for the rapid and accurate detection of infectious agents through identification of nucleic acid sequences. However, contamination of samples with positive DNA can lead to false-positive results. In this study, positive control plasmids were developed to minimize false-positive reactions due to PCR contamination during detection of SVCV by semi-nested reverse-transcription PCR. An ampicillin resistance gene was truncated by PCR amplification, and the fragments were inserted into pGEM-T Easy vectors; the resulting plasmids were named SVCV chimeric plasmid-1 and chimeric plasmid-2, respectively. Through a series of semi-nested PCRs, the use of SVCV chimeric plasmids-1 and -2 was shown to ensure correct diagnoses, free from PCR contamination. The results of this study show that PCR positive controls can be created without use of viral nucleic acids or pathogen-infected tissues. The technique can be applied to quarantined material and can be used to detect other pathogens.

  16. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  17. "Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?: Response"

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A response to Toplak et al: Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery? BMC Genomics 2010, 11:58. Background The genomewide evaluation of genetic epistasis is a computationally demanding task, and a current challenge in Genetics. HFCC (Hypothesis-Free Clinical Cloning) is one of the methods that have been suggested for genomewide epistasis analysis. In order to perform an exhaustive search of epistasis, HFCC has implemented several tools and data filters, such as the use of multiple replication groups, and direction of effect and control filters. A recent article has claimed that the use of multiple replication groups (as implemented in HFCC) does not reduce the false positive rate, and we hereby try to clarify these issues. Results/Discussion HFCC uses, as an analysis strategy, the possibility of replicating findings in multiple replication groups, in order to select a liberal subset of preliminary results that are above a statistical criterion and consistent in direction of effect. We show that the use of replication groups and the direction filter reduces the false positive rate of a study, although at the expense of lowering the overall power of the study. A post-hoc analysis of these selected signals in the combined sample could then be performed to select the most promising results. Conclusion Replication of results in independent samples is generally used in scientific studies to establish credibility in a finding. Nonetheless, the combined analysis of several datasets is known to be a preferable and more powerful strategy for the selection of top signals. HFCC is a flexible and complete analysis tool, and one of its analysis options combines these two strategies: A preliminary multiple replication group analysis to eliminate inconsistent false positive results, and a post-hoc combined-group analysis to select the top signals. PMID:20576100

  18. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  19. The trazodone metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine can cause false-positive urine amphetamine immunoassay results.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jason M; Griggs, David A; Nixon, Andrea L; Long, William H; Flood, James G

    2011-07-01

    Amphetamines and methamphetamines are part of an important class of drugs included in most urine drugs of abuse screening panels, and a common assay to detect these drugs is the Amphetamines II immunoassay (Roche Diagnostics). To demonstrate that meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), a trazodone metabolite, cross-reacts in the Amphetamines II assay, we tested reference standards of m-CPP at various concentrations (200 to 20,000 g/L). We also tested real patient urine samples containing m-CPP (detected and quantified by HPLC) with no detectable amphetamine, methamphetamine, or MDMA (demonstrated by GC MS). In both the m-CPP standards and the patient urine samples, we found a strong association between m-CPP concentration and Amphetamines II immunoreactivity (r = 0.990 for the urine samples). Further, we found that patients taking trazodone can produce urine with sufficient m-CPP to result in false-positive Amphetamines II results. At our institution, false-positive amphetamine results occur not infrequently in patients taking trazodone with at least 8 trazodone-associated false-positive results during a single 26-day period. Laboratories should remain cognizant of this interference when interpreting results of this assay.

  20. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  1. False-Positive Results in Cancer Epidemiology: A Plea for Epistemological Modesty

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joseph K.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tarone, Robert E.; Lipworth, Loren; Blot, William J.

    2008-01-01

    False-positive results are inherent in the scientific process of testing hypotheses concerning the determinants of cancer and other human illnesses. Although much of what is known about the etiology of human cancers has arisen from well-conducted epidemiological studies, epidemiology has been increasingly criticized for producing findings that are often sensationalized in the media and fail to be upheld in subsequent studies. Herein we describe examples from cancer epidemiology of likely false-positive findings and discuss conditions under which such results may occur. We suggest general guidelines or principles, including the endorsement of editorial policies requiring the prominent listing of study caveats, which may help reduce the reporting of misleading results. Increased epistemological humility regarding findings in epidemiology would go a long way to diminishing the detrimental effects of false-positive results on the allocation of limited research resources, on the advancement of knowledge of the causes and prevention of cancer, and on the scientific reputation of epidemiology and would help to prevent oversimplified interpretations of results by the media and the public. PMID:18612135

  2. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  3. THE FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER AND THE OCCURRENCE OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Christiansen, Jessie; Jenkins, Jon M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-04-01

    The Kepler mission is uniquely suited to study the frequencies of extrasolar planets. This goal requires knowledge of the incidence of false positives such as eclipsing binaries in the background of the targets, or physically bound to them, which can mimic the photometric signal of a transiting planet. We perform numerical simulations of the Kepler targets and of physical companions or stars in the background to predict the occurrence of astrophysical false positives detectable by the mission. Using real noise level estimates, we compute the number and characteristics of detectable eclipsing pairs involving main-sequence stars and non-main-sequence stars or planets, and we quantify the fraction of those that would pass the Kepler candidate vetting procedure. By comparing their distribution with that of the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) detected during the first six quarters of operation of the spacecraft, we infer the false positive rate of Kepler and study its dependence on spectral type, candidate planet size, and orbital period. We find that the global false positive rate of Kepler is 9.4%, peaking for giant planets (6-22 R{sub Circled-Plus }) at 17.7%, reaching a low of 6.7% for small Neptunes (2-4 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and increasing again for Earth-size planets (0.8-1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus }) to 12.3%. Most importantly, we also quantify and characterize the distribution and rate of occurrence of planets down to Earth size with no prior assumptions on their frequency, by subtracting from the population of actual Kepler candidates our simulated population of astrophysical false positives. We find that 16.5% {+-} 3.6% of main-sequence FGK stars have at least one planet between 0.8 and 1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus} with orbital periods up to 85 days. This result is a significant step toward the determination of eta-earth, the occurrence of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of their parent stars. There is no significant dependence of the rates of planet

  4. Detection of false positive mutations in BRCA gene by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Moushumi; Kumar, Dushyant; Panigrahi, Manoj Kumar; Chowdhary, Meenakshi; Mehta, Anurag

    2016-11-15

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are implicated in 20-25% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. New age sequencing platforms have revolutionized massively parallel sequencing in clinical practice by providing cost effective, rapid, and sensitive sequencing. This study critically evaluates the false positives in multiplex panels and suggests the need for careful analysis. We employed multiplex PCR based BRCA1 and BRCA2 community Panel with ion torrent PGM machine for evaluation of these mutations. Out of all 41samples analyzed for BRCA1 and BRCA2 five were found with 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) at Chr13:32906565 position and one sample with 1032_1033 insA(Asn346fs) at Chr13:32906647, both being frame-shift mutations in BRCA2 gene. 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) mutation is reported as pathogenic allele in NCBI dbSNP. On examination of IGV for all these samples, it was seen that both mutations had 'A' nucleotide insertion at 950, and 1032 position in exon 10 of BRCA2 gene. Sanger Sequencing did not confirm these insertions. Next-generation sequencing shows great promise by allowing rapid mutational analysis of multiple genes in human cancer but our results indicate the need for careful sequence analysis to avoid false positive results.

  5. Occurrence of false-positive most probable number tests for fecal streptococci in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Buck, J D

    1969-10-01

    By the use of the most probable number technique with azide dextrose and ethyl violet azide broths for enterococci, the common occurrence of false-positive tests was noted when marine and estuarine waters were sampled. Organisms isolated included a marine bacterium, gram-positive and gram-negative nonmarine bacteria, and yeasts. All cultures were capable of growth in azide-dextrose, ethyl violet-azide, and KF broths. Representative isolates grew in media containing 0.08% NaN(3). The tentatively accepted most probable number method for fecal streptococci is thus of dubious value in assessment of sewage pollution levels in estuarine waters. All positive tubes must be examined microscopically for the presence of nonstreptococcal forms.

  6. Occurrence of False-Positive Most Probable Number Tests for Fecal Streptococci in Marine Waters1

    PubMed Central

    Buck, John D.

    1969-01-01

    By the use of the most probable number technique with azide dextrose and ethyl violet azide broths for enterococci, the common occurrence of false-positive tests was noted when marine and estuarine waters were sampled. Organisms isolated included a marine bacterium, gram-positive and gram-negative nonmarine bacteria, and yeasts. All cultures were capable of growth in azide-dextrose, ethyl violet-azide, and KF broths. Representative isolates grew in media containing 0.08% NaN3. The tentatively accepted most probable number method for fecal streptococci is thus of dubious value in assessment of sewage pollution levels in estuarine waters. All positive tubes must be examined microscopically for the presence of nonstreptococcal forms. PMID:4983956

  7. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  8. Estimating False Positive Contamination in Crater Annotations from Citizen Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P. D.; Bugiolacchi, R.; Thacker, N. A.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based citizen science often involves the classification of image features by large numbers of minimally trained volunteers, such as the identification of lunar impact craters under the Moon Zoo project. Whilst such approaches facilitate the analysis of large image data sets, the inexperience of users and ambiguity in image content can lead to contamination from false positive identifications. We give an approach, using Linear Poisson Models and image template matching, that can quantify levels of false positive contamination in citizen science Moon Zoo crater annotations. Linear Poisson Models are a form of machine learning which supports predictive error modelling and goodness-of-fits, unlike most alternative machine learning methods. The proposed supervised learning system can reduce the variability in crater counts whilst providing predictive error assessments of estimated quantities of remaining true verses false annotations. In an area of research influenced by human subjectivity, the proposed method provides a level of objectivity through the utilisation of image evidence, guided by candidate crater identifications.

  9. Estimating False Positive Contamination in Crater Annotations from Citizen Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P. D.; Bugiolacchi, R.; Thacker, N. A.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Web-based citizen science often involves the classification of image features by large numbers of minimally trained volunteers, such as the identification of lunar impact craters under the Moon Zoo project. Whilst such approaches facilitate the analysis of large image data sets, the inexperience of users and ambiguity in image content can lead to contamination from false positive identifications. We give an approach, using Linear Poisson Models and image template matching, that can quantify levels of false positive contamination in citizen science Moon Zoo crater annotations. Linear Poisson Models are a form of machine learning which supports predictive error modelling and goodness-of-fits, unlike most alternative machine learning methods. The proposed supervised learning system can reduce the variability in crater counts whilst providing predictive error assessments of estimated quantities of remaining true verses false annotations. In an area of research influenced by human subjectivity, the proposed method provides a level of objectivity through the utilisation of image evidence, guided by candidate crater identifications.

  10. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy.

  11. Parathyroid incidentalomas detected during thyroid ultrasonography and effect of chronic thyroiditis on false positive parathyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Didem; Arpaci, Dilek; Ucler, Rifki; Cuhaci, Neslihan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of parathyroid incidentalomas in patients referred for thyroid ultrasonography (US) and investigate the role of chronic thyroiditis on false positive lesions. Patients suspected to have parathyroid lesions during thyroid US were recorded prospectively between August 2009 and January 2010. Patients referred for parathyroid US and patients with known high serum calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were excluded. Suspected parathyroid lesions were defined as hypoechoic, homogeneous, solid lesions with regular margins located outside the thyroid lobe, most commonly inferior to the thyroid gland. Thyroid US was performed in 6,528 patients. There were 78 patients (1.19 %) (73 female and 5 male) with suspected parathyroid lesion. The diagnosis of a true parathyroid adenoma was confirmed in 6 (7.69 %) patients. In patients with true adenoma, mean serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH levels were 10.57 ± 0.48 mg/dl, 3.03 ± 0.52 mg/dl, and 182.91 ± 46.62 pg/ml, respectively. Among 72 patients with false positive parathyroid lesion, antithyroid peroxidase antibody was positive in 50 (69.4 %), antithyroglobulin antibody was positive in 46 (63.9 %), and one of these antibodies were positive in 59 (81.9 %) patients. Also, 46 (63.9 %) of these patients had thyroid dysfunctions (43 hypothyroidism and 3 hyperthyroidism) and 59 (81.9 %) had chronic thyroiditis ultrasonographically. Parathyroid incidentaloma was detected in 0.09 % of patients referred for thyroid US. The presence of clinically or ultrasonographically chronic thyroiditis might cause inadvertent interpretation of a hypoechoic lesion as a parathyroid pathology during thyroid US.

  12. AN A PRIORI INVESTIGATION OF ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES IN GROUND-BASED TRANSITING PLANET SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Tom M.; Sackett, Penny D.

    2010-03-20

    Astrophysical false positives due to stellar eclipsing binaries pose one of the greatest challenges to ground-based surveys for transiting hot Jupiters. We have used known properties of multiple star systems and hot Jupiter systems to predict, a priori, the number of such false detections and the number of genuine planet detections recovered in two hypothetical but realistic ground-based transit surveys targeting fields close to the galactic plane (b {approx} 10{sup 0}): a shallow survey covering a magnitude range 10 < V < 13 and a deep survey covering a magnitude range 15 < V < 19. Our results are consistent with the commonly reported experience of false detections outnumbering planet detections by a factor of {approx}10 in shallow surveys, while in our synthetic deep survey we find {approx}1-2 false detections for every planet detection. We characterize the eclipsing binary configurations that are most likely to cause false detections and find that they can be divided into three main types: (1) two dwarfs undergoing grazing transits, (2) two dwarfs undergoing low-latitude transits in which one component has a substantially smaller radius than the other, and (3) two eclipsing dwarfs blended with one or more physically unassociated foreground stars. We also predict that a significant fraction of hot Jupiter detections are blended with the light from other stars, showing that care must be taken to identify the presence of any unresolved neighbors in order to obtain accurate estimates of planetary radii. This issue is likely to extend to terrestrial planet candidates in the CoRoT and Kepler transit surveys, for which neighbors of much fainter relative brightness will be important.

  13. Power and false-positive rate in QTL detection with near-isogenic line libraries.

    PubMed

    Falke, K C; Frisch, M

    2011-04-01

    Libraries of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection in model species and economically important crops. The experimental design and genetic architecture of the considered traits determine the statistical properties of QTL detection. The objectives of our simulation study were to (i) investigate the population sizes required to develop NIL libraries in barley and maize, (ii) compare NIL libraries with nonoverlapping and overlapping donor segments and (iii) study the number of QTLs and the size of their effects with respect to the power and the false-positive rate of QTL detection. In barley, the development of NIL libraries with target segment lengths of 10 c and marker distances of 5 cM was possible using a BC(3)S(2) backcrossing scheme and population sizes of 140. In maize, population sizes larger than 200 were required. Selection for the recipient parent genome at markers flanking the target segments with distances between 5 and 10 cM was required for an efficient control of the false-positive rate. NIL libraries with nonoverlapping donor chromosome segments had a greater power of QTL detection and a smaller false-positive rate than libraries with overlapping segments. Major genes explaining 30% of the genotypic difference between the donor and recipient were successfully detected even with low heritabilities of 0.5, whereas for minor genes explaining 5 !or 10%, high heritabilities of 0.8 or 0.9 were required. The presented results can assist geneticists and breeders in the efficient development of NIL libraries for QTL detection.

  14. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE Team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  15. Distinguishing True and False Positive Oxygen Signatures with Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria; Luger, Rodrigo; Barnes, Rory; Wordsworth, Robin; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    The spectral detection of oxygen (O2) or its photochemical bi-product ozone (O3) in a planetary atmosphere has been considered a robust signature of life because O2 is highly reactive and significant continuous abiotic sources were thought to be implausible. However, recent work has revealed the possibility that O2 or O3 may build up to spectrally detectable levels due to enhanced photolysis of O-bearing molecules by UV-active host stars (Domagal-Goldman et al. 2014, Tian et al. 2014) or photolysis of water and subsequent escape of hydrogen in thin (< 0.2 bar) atmospheres where the water is not cold trapped in the troposphere (Wordsworth et al. 2014). Additionally, there is the possibility that significant amounts of abiotic O2 could remain in post-runaway greenhouse atmospheres in the habitable zone of late type stars (Luger & Barnes 2014). Using photochemical and spectral models, we examine possible observing strategies that could discriminate between abiotic and biogenic oxygen scenarios. For example, false positives may be confirmed by the spectral detection of sibling molecules generated when large amounts of oxygen are photochemically produced (such as CO). False positives that result from H escape could be detected by measuring the mixing ratio of O2, which should be high (~1) when H escape causes O2 buildup. In contrast, true biosignatures could be confirmed by the simultaneous presence of a detectable reduced gas such as methane (CH4) which should not persist when O2 build up is caused by past H escape or by photochemical production of O2 in H-poor atmospheres. We use photochemical and spectral models to predict which combinations of planetary and stellar parameters will be most likely to produce conditions that would allow observational discrimination between true and false positives. We examine the spectral range, resolving power, and minimum integration times necessary to detect true and false positive indicators for a cross-section of model scenarios

  16. False positive I-131 MIBG due to dilated renal pelvis: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, R.H.; Mahmoud, S.; Ibrahim, A.; al-Gazzar, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    A case of false positive I-131 MIBG imaging for detection of pheochromocytoma is presented. There was an area of increased tracer uptake in the left renal region that showed steadily reducing activity over a period of three days. This raised the suspicion of a dilated renal pelvis, which was later confirmed by Tc-99m DTPA imaging. It is advisable in cases of ambiguous I-131 MIBG imaging to use Tc-99m DTPA rather than Tc-99m DMSA for localizing the kidneys and renal pelvis.

  17. False positive RNA binding activities after Ni-affinity purification from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Milojevic, Tetyana; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Romeo, Alessandra; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-06-01

    A His-tag is often added by means of recombinant DNA technology to a heterologous protein of interest, which is then over-produced in Escherchia coli and purified by one-step immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Owing to the presence of 24 histidines at the C-termini of the hexameric E. coli RNA chaperone Hfq, the protein co-purifies with His-tagged proteins of interest. As Hfq can bind to distinct RNA substrates with high affinity, its presence can obscure studies performed with (putative) RNA binding activities purified by IMAC. Here, we present results for a seemingly positive RNA-binding activity, exemplifying that false-positive results can be avoided if the protein of interest is either subjected to further purification step(s) or produced in an E. coli hfq- strain.

  18. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  19. Robust correlation analyses: false positive and power validation using a new open source matlab toolbox.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Cyril R; Wilcox, Rand; Rousselet, Guillaume A

    2012-01-01

    Pearson's correlation measures the strength of the association between two variables. The technique is, however, restricted to linear associations and is overly sensitive to outliers. Indeed, a single outlier can result in a highly inaccurate summary of the data. Yet, it remains the most commonly used measure of association in psychology research. Here we describe a free Matlab((R)) based toolbox (http://sourceforge.net/projects/robustcorrtool/) that computes robust measures of association between two or more random variables: the percentage-bend correlation and skipped-correlations. After illustrating how to use the toolbox, we show that robust methods, where outliers are down weighted or removed and accounted for in significance testing, provide better estimates of the true association with accurate false positive control and without loss of power. The different correlation methods were tested with normal data and normal data contaminated with marginal or bivariate outliers. We report estimates of effect size, false positive rate and power, and advise on which technique to use depending on the data at hand.

  20. Pulmonary Nodule Detection in CT Images: False Positive Reduction Using Multi-View Convolutional Networks.

    PubMed

    Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Litjens, Geert; Gerke, Paul; Jacobs, Colin; van Riel, Sarah J; Wille, Mathilde Marie Winkler; Naqibullah, Matiullah; Sanchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) system for pulmonary nodules using multi-view convolutional networks (ConvNets), for which discriminative features are automatically learnt from the training data. The network is fed with nodule candidates obtained by combining three candidate detectors specifically designed for solid, subsolid, and large nodules. For each candidate, a set of 2-D patches from differently oriented planes is extracted. The proposed architecture comprises multiple streams of 2-D ConvNets, for which the outputs are combined using a dedicated fusion method to get the final classification. Data augmentation and dropout are applied to avoid overfitting. On 888 scans of the publicly available LIDC-IDRI dataset, our method reaches high detection sensitivities of 85.4% and 90.1% at 1 and 4 false positives per scan, respectively. An additional evaluation on independent datasets from the ANODE09 challenge and DLCST is performed. We showed that the proposed multi-view ConvNets is highly suited to be used for false positive reduction of a CAD system.

  1. False-Positive Results after Environmental Pinworm PCR Testing due to Rhabditid Nematodes in Corncob Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-01-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and –negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  2. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-07-13

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses.

  3. A High False Positive Rate for Kepler Planetary Candidates of Giant Stars using Asterodensity Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-01

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ~= 70% ± 30%. Based on archival data of the Kepler telescope.

  4. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses. PMID:26166306

  5. Detection of circulating prostate tumor cells: alternative spliced variant of PSM induced false-positive result.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Hisashi; Nagao, Kumi; Kawakita, Mutsuji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Harasawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Noboru; Hikiji, Kazumasa; Tsukada, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    RT-nested PCR has been introduced as a highly specific and sensitive assay method to detect the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) mRNA in peripheral blood. However, appreciable percentages of false-positive cases have been reported. Additionally, primer sets reported previously could not discriminate between PSM and PSM', an alternatively spliced variant, mRNA. These isoforms can be produced from a single gene. Switches in alternative splicing patterns are often controlled with strict cell-type or developmental-stage specificity. Therefore, it is most important to discriminate between PSM mRNA and PSM' mRNA. Using our highly specific primer sets, PSM mRNA was detected in 3 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (12.5%) and was not detected in peripheral blood of 11 normal female volunteers. PSM' mRNA was detected in 5 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (20.8%) and in 4 of 11 of normal female volunteers (36.4%). PSM' mRNA induced false-positive results, it is important for genetic diagnosis of prostate cancer to discriminate between PSM and PSM' using our primer sets with high specificity. The advances in the uniquely designed primer sets may allow researchers to detect a real PSM mRNA without PSM' mRNA.

  6. A high false positive rate for Kepler planetary candidates of giant stars using asterodensity profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-20

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ≅ 70% ± 30%.

  7. False-positive results after environmental pinworm PCR testing due to Rhabditid nematodes in Corncob bedding.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and -negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding.

  8. False-positive rates associated with the use of multiple performance and symptom validity tests.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-06-01

    Performance validity test (PVT) error rates using Monte Carlo simulation reported by Berthelson and colleagues (in False positive diagnosis of malingering due to the use of multiple effort tests. Brain Injury, 27, 909-916, 2013) were compared with PVT and symptom validity test (SVT) failure rates in two nonmalingering clinical samples. At a per-test false-positive rate of 10%, Monte Carlo simulation overestimated error rates for: (i) failure of ≥2 out of 5 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (in Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003) and ACS (Pearson, Advanced clinical solutions for use with WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. San Antonio: Pearson Education, 2009) and (ii) failure of ≥2 out of 7 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003; Malingering scales for the Continuous Recognition Memory Test and Continuous Visual Memory Test. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 23, 167-180, 2009 combined). Monte Carlo overestimation is likely because PVT performances are atypical in pattern or degree for what occurs in actual neurologic, psychiatric, or developmental disorders. Consequently, PVT scores form skewed distributions with performance at ceiling and restricted range, rather than forming a standard normal distribution with mean of 0 and standard deviation of 1.0. These results support the practice of using ≥2 PVT/SVT failures as representing probable invalid clinical presentation.

  9. Fenofibric Acid Can Cause False-Positive Urine Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Immunoassay Results.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Loreto; Gomila, Isabel; Fe, Antonia; Servera, Miguel A; Yates, Christopher; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Castanyer, Bartomeu; Barceló, Bernardino

    2015-01-01

    We present a false-positive result of ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxy-NN-methylamphetamine) screening due to the therapeutic use of fenofibrate, an antihyperlipidemic drug. Our hypothesis was that the main metabolite of fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, was responsible for this cross-reactivity on a DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay, using a cut-off of 500 ng/mL. We estimated that the addition of 225 µg/mL pure fenofibric acid to blank urine would be sufficient to result in a positive DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay. The results obtained on the urine samples analyses of the patient show that the DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay resulted negative 2 days after discontinuing fenofibrate treatment, when the urine fenofibric acid concentration corrected by creatinine and determinated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was 20.3 µg/mg creatinine. The cross-reactivity data for fenofibric acid would seem to indicate that there was insufficient concentration of measured compound to account for the positive immunochemical results for ecstasy. This apparent discrepancy can be explained in several ways, one of them is that the β-glucuronidase-resistent fenofibric acid isomers are responsible. This process could explain the low recovery of free fenofibric acid when we use the developed method for its quantification in urine samples. Positive results on immunoassay screening must be considered presumptive until confirmation with another method based on a different principle, preferably gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  10. Implications for the False-positive Rate in Kepler Planet Systems from Transit Duration Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Confirming transiting exoplanet candidates through traditional follow-up methods is challenging, especially for faint host stars. Most of Kepler's validated planets relied on statistical methods to separate true planets from false-positives. Multiple transiting planet systems (MTPS) have been previously shown to have low false-positive rates and over 851 planets in MTPSs have been statistically validated so far (Lissauer et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2014). We show that the period-normalized transit duration ratio (ξ) offers additional information that can be used to establish the planetary nature of these systems. We briefly discuss the observed distribution of ξ for the Q1-Q16 Kepler Candidate Search. We also utilize ξ to develop a Bayesian statistical framework combined with Monte Carlo methods to determine which pairs of planet candidates in a MTPS are consistent with the planet hypothesis for a sample of 676 MTPSs that include both candidate and confirmed planets. This analysis proves to be efficient and advantageous in that it only requires catalog-level bulk candidate properties and galactic population modeling to compute the probabilities of a myriad of stellar blend scenarios, without needing additional observational follow-up. Our results agree with the previous results of a low false-positive rate in the Kepler MTPSs. Out of our sample of 1,358 pairs of candidates, we find that about 100 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star, over 800 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star or another star blended in the photometric aperture. Further more, we find that well over a 1,000 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 to be planetary in nature, either orbiting the same star or separately orbiting two different stars in the aperture. This implies, independently of any other estimates, that most of the MTPSs detected by Kepler are very likely to be planetary in

  11. OIE white spot syndrome virus PCR gives false-positive results in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Kerry; Cullen, Bradford; Owens, Leigh

    2004-12-13

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an intranuclear bacilliform virus (IBV) that is a serious, notifiable crustacean pathogen. The Office International des Epizooties (OIE) PCR protocol for WSSV uses primer sets initially developed by Lo et al. (1996). It yields a first-step PCR amplicon of 1441 bp and a nested PCR amplicon of 941 bp. An amplicon (941 bp) purported to specifically detect WSSV was obtained when using template DNA extracted from Cherax quadricarinatus in a WSSV PCR detection protocol recommended by the OIE. Sequencing and analysis of the 941 bp amplicon and an occasional 550 bp amplicon from C. quadricarinatus revealed no phylogenetic relationship with WSSV, and suggested a possible lack of sufficient primer specificity for WSSV in the OIE test. This suggestion was supported by the fact that the OIE outer primer sequence (146F1) was present in both the forward and reverse position of the 941 bp and the forward position of the 550 bp nested amplicons from C. quadricarinatus. As WSSV is a notifiable pathogen, the consequences of false-positive results are harsh in WSSV-free zones and can lead to incorrect quarantine and unnecessary destruction of animals. Therefore, urgent attention and revision is necessary for the current OIE PCR protocol for WSSV detection.

  12. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  13. False positive reduction for pulmonary nodule detection using two-dimensional principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wook-Jin; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary nodule detection is a binary classification problem. The main objective is to classify nodule from the lung computed tomography (CT) images. The intra class variability is mainly due to the grey-level variance, texture differences and shape. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel nodule detection method which is based on Two-dimensional Principal Component Analysis (2DPCA). We extract the futures using 2DPCA from nodule candidate images. Nodule candidates are classified using threshold. The proposed method reduces False Positive (FP) rate. We tested the proposed algorithm by using Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC) database of National Cancer Institute (NCI). The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. The proposed method achieved 85.11% detection rate with 1.13 FPs per scan.

  14. The patterns of false positive lesions for chest radiography observer performance: insights into errors and locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John W.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2014-03-01

    To examine the lobar distribution of false positives on a set of nodule-free and nodule-containing chest radiographs when radiologists are requested to perform an unframed task (oral report) compared to a framed task (nodule/s identification). A set of 40 chest images, 21 nodule-free (NF) and 19 nodule-containing (NC), was used. Ten radiologists participated in the study; first an oral clinical report was performed (unframed task, UFT) naming any abnormality seen, a confidence score and the location of reported abnormalities. The second (framed task, FT) had the same images randomly presented and radiologists were asked to locate any lung nodule/s and record their confidence and location of nodules. There was no statistical difference between the mean number of false positives (FPs) per lobe per case type (UFT or FT) with the exception of the right lower lobe (RLL) P=0.021. When the comparison of FPs for tasks and case types was carried out there were significant changes. For the NF cases there are significant differences for right upper lobe (RUL) P=0.0003, left upper lobe (LUL) P=0.0412; for NC cases there are significant differences for RUL P=0.009, RLL P=0.0112, LUL P=0.0337 and left lower lobe (LLL) P=0.0209. There was no significant correlation between the presence of a nodule in a given lobe and the occurrence of a FP in that lobe. The number and lobar location of FPs identified on a chest image by a radiologist is influenced by the task and case type.

  15. A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Voigt, Aiko

    2012-06-10

    Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ('glint'), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected light curves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: (1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice; and (2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this 'latitude-albedo effect' will operate even for large obliquities: in that case the equator receives less orbit-averaged flux than the poles, and the equator is preferentially sampled at crescent phase. Using rotational and orbital color variations to map the surfaces of directly imaged planets and estimate their obliquity will therefore be a necessary pre-condition for properly interpreting their reflected phase variations. The latitude-albedo effect is a particularly convincing glint false positive for zero-obliquity planets, and such worlds are not amenable to latitudinal mapping. This effect severely limits the utility of specular reflection for detecting oceans on exoplanets.

  16. Eliminating false positive C4 sugar tests on New Zealand Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karyne M; Somerton, Kerry; Rogers, Pamela; Cox, Julie

    2010-08-30

    Carbon isotope analyses (delta(13)C) of some New Zealand Manuka honeys show that they often fail the internationally recognised Association of Official Analytical Chemists sugar test (AOAC method 998.12) which detects added C(4) sugar, although these honeys are from unadulterated sources. Failure of these high value products is detrimental to the New Zealand honey industry, not only in lost export revenue, but also in brand and market reputation damage. The standard AOAC test compares the carbon isotope value of the whole honey and corresponding protein isolated from the same honey. Differences between whole honey and protein delta(13)C values should not be greater than +1.0 per thousand, as it indicates the possibility of adulteration with syrups or sugars from C(4) plants such as high fructose corn syrup or cane sugar.We have determined that during the standard AOAC method, pollen and other insoluble components are isolated with the flocculated protein. These non-protein components have isotope values which are considerably different from those of the pure protein, and can shift the apparent delta(13)C value of protein further away from the delta(13)C value of the whole honey, giving a false positive result for added C(4) sugar. To eliminate a false positive C(4) sugar test for Manuka honey, prior removal of pollen and other insoluble material from the honey is necessary to ensure that only the pure protein is isolated. This will enable a true comparison between whole honey and protein delta(13)C isotopes. Furthermore, we strongly suggest this modification to the AOAC method be universally adopted for all honey C(4) sugar tests.

  17. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT: false positive reduction by combining multiple classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Cuenca, Jorge Juan; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of various classifier combination methods for improving the performance of a CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in CT. We employed CT cases in the publicly available lung image database consortium (LIDC) dataset, which included 85 CT cases with 110 nodules. We first used six individual classifiers for nodule detection in CT, including linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), artificial neural network (ANN), and three types of support vector machines (SVM). Five informationfusion methods were then employed to combine the classifiers' outputs for improving detection performance. The five combination methods included two supervised (likelihood ratio method and neural network) and three unsupervised ones (the mean, the product, and the majority-vote of the output scores from the six individual classifiers). Leave-one-caseout was employed to train and test individual classifiers and supervised combination methods. At a sensitivity of 80 %, the numbers of false positives per case for the six individual classifiers were 6.1 for LDA, 19.9 for QDA, 8.6 for ANN, 23.7 for SVM-dot, 17.0 for SVM-poly, and 23.35 for SVM-ANOVA; the numbers of false positives per case for the five combination methods were 3.4 for the majority-vote rule, 6.2 for the mean, 5.7 for the product, 9.7 for the neural network, and 28.1 for the likelihood ratio method. The majority-vote rule achieved higher performance levels than other combination methods. It also achieved higher performance than the best individual classifier, which is not the case for other combination methods.

  18. False-positive PCR results linked to administration of seasonal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Curran, T; McCaughey, C; Ellis, J; Mitchell, S J; Feeney, S A; Watt, A P; Mitchell, F; Fairley, D; Crawford, L; McKenna, J; Coyle, P V

    2012-03-01

    False-positive PCR results usually occur as a consequence of specimen-to-specimen or amplicon-to-specimen contamination within the laboratory. Evidence of contamination at time of specimen collection linked to influenza vaccine administration in the same location as influenza sampling is described. Clinical, circumstantial and laboratory evidence was gathered for each of five cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) with unusual patterns of PCR reactivity for seasonal H1N1, H3N2, H1N1 (2009) and influenza B viruses. Two 2010 trivalent influenza vaccines and environmental swabs of a hospital influenza vaccination room were also tested for influenza RNA. Sequencing of influenza A matrix (M) gene amplicons from the five cases and vaccines was undertaken. Four 2009 general practitioner (GP) specimens were seasonal H1N1, H3N2 and influenza B PCR positive. One 2010 GP specimen was H1N1 (2009), H3N2 and influenza B positive. PCR of 2010 trivalent vaccines showed high loads of detectable influenza A and B RNA. Sequencing of the five specimens and vaccines showed greatest homology with the M gene sequence of Influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1 virus (used in generation of influenza vaccine strains). Environmental swabs had detectable influenza A and B RNA. RNA detection studies demonstrated vaccine RNA still detectable for at least 66 days. Administration of influenza vaccines and clinical sampling in the same room resulted in the contamination with vaccine strains of surveillance swabs collected from patients with ILI. Vaccine contamination should therefore be considered, particularly where multiple influenza virus RNA PCR positive signals (e.g. H1N1, H3N2 and influenza B) are detected in the same specimen.

  19. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  20. Case Report: Direct Access Genetic Testing and A False-Positive Result For Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Predham, Sarah; Hamilton, Sara; Elliott, Alison M; T Gibson, William

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a woman who pursued direct access genetic testing and then presented with concerns regarding a positive test result for Long-QT syndrome. Although the result ultimately proved to be a false positive, this case illustrates that costs associated with follow-up of direct access genetic testing results can be non-trivial for both the patient and for health care systems. Here we raise policy questions regarding the appropriate distribution of these costs. We also discuss the possibility that, when confronted by a direct access genetic test result that reports high risk for one or more actionable diseases, a family physician might feel compelled to act out of a desire to avoid liability, even when information regarding the accuracy and validity of the testing were not easily accessible. This case outlines lessons that can easily be translated into clinical practice, not only by genetic counselors, but also by family physicians, medical specialists and members of the public.

  1. Are Hemorrhoids Associated with False-Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il; Choi, Kyuyong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose False-positive (FP) results of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) conducted in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening could lead to performing unnecessary colonoscopies. Hemorrhoids are a possible cause of FP FIT results; however, studies on this topic are extremely rare. We investigated whether hemorrhoids are associated with FP FIT results. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted at a university hospital in Korea from June 2013 to May 2015. Of the 34547 individuals who underwent FITs, 3946 aged ≥50 years who underwent colonoscopies were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with FP FIT results. Results Among 3946 participants, 704 (17.8%) showed positive FIT results and 1303 (33.0%) had hemorrhoids. Of the 704 participants with positive FIT results, 165 had advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN) and 539 had no ACRN (FP results). Of the 1303 participants with hemorrhoids, 291 showed FP results, of whom 81 showed FP results because of hemorrhoids only. Participants with hemorrhoids had a higher rate of FP results than those without hemorrhoids (291/1176, 24.7% vs. 248/2361, 10.5%; p<0.001). Additionally, the participants with hemorrhoids as the only abnormality had a higher rate of FP results than those experiencing no such abnormalities (81/531, 15.3% vs. 38/1173, 3.2%; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the presence of hemorrhoids was identified as an independent predictor of FP results (adjusted odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 2.24–3.40; p<0.001). Conclusion Hemorrhoids are significantly associated with FP FIT results. Their presence seemed to be a non-negligible contributor of FP results in FIT-based CRC screening programs. PMID:27873508

  2. A new method with flexible and balanced control of false negatives and false positives for hit selection in RNA interference high-throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2007-08-01

    The z-score method and its variants for testing mean difference are commonly used for hit selection in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) offers a way to measure and classify the short interfering RNA (siRNA) effects. In this article, based on SSMD, the authors propose a new testing method for hit selection in RNA interference (RNAi) HTS assays. This SSMD-based method allows the differentiation between siRNAs with large and small effects on the assay output and maintains flexible and balanced control of both the false-negative rate, in which the siRNAs with strong effects are not selected as hits, and the restricted false-positive rate, in which the siRNAs with weak or no effects are selected as hits. This method directly addresses the size of siRNA effects represented by the strength of difference between an siRNA and a negative reference, whereas the classic z-score method and t-test of testing no mean difference address whether the mean of an siRNA is exactly the same as the mean of a negative reference. This method can readily control the false-negative rate, whereas it is nontrivial for the classic z-score method and t-test to control the false-negative rate. Therefore, theoretically, the SSMD-based method offers better control of the sizes of siRNA effects and the associated false-positive and false-negative rates than the commonly used z-score method and t-test for hit selection in HTS assays. The SSMD-based method should generally be applicable to any assay in which the end point is a difference in signal compared to a reference sample, including those for RNAi, receptor, enzyme, and cellular function.

  3. Commercial reverse transcriptase as source of false-positive strand-specific RNA detection in human cells.

    PubMed

    Moison, Celine; Arimondo, Paola B; Guieysse-Peugeot, Anne-Laure

    2011-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies describe the existence of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in gene expression modulation. Since the observation that antisense ncRNAs are implicated in human disorders, there is more and more interest in ncRNAs. A commonly used technique to investigate the expression of an antisense ncRNAs is strand-specific reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The advantage of this accurate technique is that it does not require any special equipment or expertise. The disadvantage is that it can lead easily to false-positive results. We applied strand-specific RT-PCR to investigate the presence of antisense ncRNA associated to Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta 2 (RARβ2) in different human tumoral cell lines. By performing this technique, we observed false-positive detection of ncRNA. For accurate interpretation of the results in RT-PCR experiments, we introduced a «No primer» control that reveals non-specific cDNA synthesis. Moreover, we report the presence of non-specific cDNA amplification with five of the most frequently used reverse transcriptase in absence of added primers. We found that the choice of the reverse transcriptase as well as the conditions of the reaction (RT temperature and PCR cycle number) are important parameters to choose as the different reverse transcriptases do not display the same cDNA synthesis background. This previously observed phenomenon was reported to originate from the «self-priming» of RNA template. Here, we report rather the presence of RNA contaminants associated with one of the reverse transcriptase studied that might contribute to non-specific cDNA synthesis.

  4. Searching for Long-Period Companions and False Positives within the APOGEE Catalog of Companion Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy; Troup, Nicholas William; Majewski, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a large-scale, high-resolution, H-band, spectroscopic survey that has acquired high S/N spectra of 146,000 stars distributed across the Galactic bulge, disk, and halo with a radial velocity (RV) precision of ~100 m/s. We follow up stellar companion detections from the APOGEE DR12 catalog of 382 total APOGEE-identified companions, of which 376 are previously unknown companion candidates. The APOGEE team strives not only to continue expanding the census of extrasolar companions, but also to confirm and characterize our RV detections through a variety of means.We present findings from our investigation of the Kozai mechanism, which explains the development of close-orbiting binaries through an ejected third companion. To do so, we are undertaking a targeted search for long-period companions with hopes to provide further evidence for the Kozai mechanism. This hunt for longer period companions begins with a search for long-term RV trends within the APOGEE data. We have also obtained diffraction-limited imaging using speckle interferometry at WIYN and Gemini North Observatories, as well as AO LMIRcam images from the LBT, to make direct searches for long-period stellar companions.It is critical to purge our companion candidate detections of false positives, and we discuss several methods we are pursuing to do this. For example, highly active stars have been observed to mimic RV measurements. We have obtained optical high-resolution spectral follow-ups from the ARC 3.5m, the HET, and MMT to analyze potential stellar activity indicators such as Calcium H and K. Emission detected in these well-known stellar activity indicators suggests a false radial velocity measurement.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler Mission. VIII. 285 false positives (Abdul-Masih+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, M.; Prsa, A.; Conroy, K.; Bloemen, S.; Boyajian, T.; Doyle, L. R.; Johnston, C.; Kostov, V.; Latham, D. W.; Matijevic, G.; Shporer, A.; Southworth, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Kepler mission was launched in 2009 and provided photometric data for ~200000 objects in the 105deg2 contained in the Kepler field of view (FOV; Batalha et al. 2013, Cat. J/ApJS/204/24). Each of the 95 million Kepler pixels cover 3.98*3.98'' and are designed to maximize the number of resolvable stars with magnitudes brighter than 15. There are approximately 500000 objects in the Kepler FOV that are brighter than V=16; however, only ~200000 were assigned as targets for observation, leaving many bright objects in the field unobserved. Since the main goal of Kepler is to find Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, the targets that were chosen for observation were those with the highest potential for terrestrial planet detection. Thus, many objects in the Kepler FOV have not been observed. Due to the proximity of some of these unobserved objects to the identified targets, the possibility of contaminated signals arises. Of the observed targets, 2772 eclipsing binaries have been found and cataloged in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (http://keplerebs.villanova.edu/; see also Kirk et al. 2016, Cat. J/AJ/151/68). A false positive is a case where the signal from a binary object in close proximity to a target contaminates the aperture pixels, causing the target light curve to show a binary signal. This means that the incorrect object is being identified as the source of the binary signal. Once the source of the binary signal is identified, a new light curve can be extracted. The re-extraction process is comprised of several automated steps and results in three new light curves generated for the true source of the binary signal for each quarter of available data. These light curves are generated by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N light curve), percent eclipse depth (PED light curve), and flux eclipse depth (FED light curve). Before re-extracting the new light curves, we obtain the S/N, the PED, and the FED for the original false

  6. Astrophysical false positives in direct imaging for exoplanets: a white dwarf close to a rejuvenated star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Hagelberg, J.; Desidera, S.; Chauvin, G.; Almenara, J. M.; Biazzo, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Carson, J. C.; Covino, E.; Delorme, P.; D'Orazi, V.; Gratton, R.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Moutou, C.; Segransan, D.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Wildi, F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. As is the case for all techniques involved in the research for exoplanets, direct imaging has to take into account the probability of so-called astrophysical false positives, which are phenomena that mimic the signature of the objects we are seeking. Aims: In this work we present the case of a false positive found during a direct-imaging survey conducted with VLT/NACO. A promising exoplanet candidate was detected around the K2-type star HD 8049 in July 2010. Its contrast of ΔH = 7.05 at 1.57 arcsec allowed us to assume a 35 MJup companion at 50 projected AU, for the nominal system age and heliocentric distance. Methods: To check whether it was gravitationally bound to the host star, as opposed to an unrelated background object, we re-observed the system one year later and concluded a high probability of a bound system. We also used radial velocity measurements of the host star, spanning a time range of ~30 yr, to constrain the companion's mass and orbital properties, as well as to probe the host star's spectral age indicators and general spectral energy distribution. We also obtained U-band imaging with EFOSC and near-infrared spectroscopy for the companion. Results: Combining all these information we conclude that the companion of HD 8049 is a white dwarf (WD) with temperature Teff = 18 800 ± 2100 K and mass MWD = 0.56 ± 0.08 M⊙. The significant radial velocity trend combined with the imaging data indicates that the most probable orbit has a semi-major axis of about 50 AU. The discrepancy between the age indicators speaks against a bona-fide young star. The moderately high level of chromospheric activity and fast rotation, mimicking the properties of a young star, might be induced by the exchange of mass with the progenitor of the WD. This example demonstrates some of the challenges in determining accurate age estimates and identifications of faint companions. Based on observations collected at La Silla and Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile): Programs

  7. False-positive diatom test: a real challenge? A post-mortem study using standardized protocols.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Philippe; Miettinen, Arto; Spilling, Kristian; Sajantila, Antti

    2013-09-01

    The main criticism of the validity of the diatom test for the diagnosis of drowning is based on the potential ante- and post-mortem penetration of diatoms and the finding of diatoms in bodies of non-drowned human beings. However, qualitative and quantitative studies on diatoms in organs of the non-drowned have yielded both conflicting and contradictory results. In the present study, we have analysed under standardised methods the diatom content in several organs of 14 non-drowned human bodies. Overall, only 9 diatoms (6 entire, 3 fragmented) were disclosed in 6 of the 14 non-drowned bodies. Each of these 6 cadavers had only a single "positive" organ. Six diatoms were found in the bone marrow, 2 in the lung, and one in the pleural liquid. No diatoms were recovered from the brain, liver, kidney, or blood samples of any of these 14 bodies. Moreover, in five additional cadavers, whose lungs were injected, prior autopsy, with a 3.5L solution containing a bi-cellulate diatom culture (Thalassiosira baltica, Thalassiosira levanderi) via tracheostomy, a few diatoms appeared in the pleural cavity and in the blood from the left heart chamber, but none in any other internal organs investigated. The results of the presented study demonstrate that the issue of the false-positive diatom test should not be a logical impediment to the performance of the diatom method. However, strict and standardized protocols aimed at avoiding contamination during sample preparation must be used, appropriate separation values set and taxonomic analysis of all diatoms performed.

  8. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B Pablo

    2015-11-10

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804-12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious-reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results.

  9. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B. Pablo

    2015-01-01

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804–12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious—reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results. PMID:26504202

  10. Risk of false positive genetic associations in complex traits with underlying population structure: a case study.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Aleman, Monica; Higgins, Robert J; Madigan, John E; Bannasch, Danika L

    2014-12-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are widely used to investigate the genetic etiology of diseases in domestic animals. In the horse, GWA studies using 40-50,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sample sizes of 30-40 individuals, consisting of only 6-14 affected horses, have led to the discovery of genetic mutations for simple monogenic traits. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy is a common inherited neurological disorder characterized by symmetric ataxia. A case-control GWA study was performed using genotypes from 42,819 SNP marker loci distributed across the genome in 99 clinically phenotyped Quarter horses (37 affected, 62 unaffected). A significant GWA was not achieved although a suggestive association was uncovered when only the most stringently phenotyped NAD-affected horses (n = 10) were included (chromosome 8:62130605 and 62134644 [log(1/P) = 5.56]). Candidate genes (PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4) within the associated region were excluded through sequencing, association testing of uncovered variants and quantitative RT-PCR. It was concluded that variants in PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4 are not responsible for equine neuroaxonal dystrophy. This study demonstrates the risk of false positive associations when performing GWA studies on complex traits and underlying population structure when using 40-50,000 SNP markers and small sample size.

  11. False positives in multiplex PCR-based next-generation sequencing have unique signatures.

    PubMed

    McCall, Chad M; Mosier, Stacy; Thiess, Michele; Debeljak, Marija; Pallavajjala, Aparna; Beierl, Katie; Deak, Kristen L; Datto, Michael B; Gocke, Christopher D; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Eshleman, James R

    2014-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing shows great promise by allowing rapid mutational analysis of multiple genes in human cancers. Recently, we implemented the multiplex PCR-based Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel (>200 amplicons in 50 genes) to evaluate EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF in lung and colorectal adenocarcinomas. In 10% of samples, automated analysis identified a novel G873R substitution mutation in EGFR. By examining reads individually, we found this mutation in >5% of reads in 50 of 291 samples and also found similar events in 18 additional amplicons. These apparent mutations are present only in short reads and within 10 bases of either end of the read. We therefore hypothesized that these were from panel primers promiscuously binding to nearly complementary sequences of nontargeted amplicons. Sequences around the mutations matched primer binding sites in the panel in 18 of 19 cases, thus likely corresponding to panel primers. Furthermore, because most primers did not show this effect, we demonstrated that next-generation sequencing may be used to better design multiplex PCR primers through iterative elimination of offending primers to minimize mispriming. Our results indicate the need for careful sequence analysis to avoid false-positive mutations that can arise in multiplex PCR panels. The AmpliSeq Cancer panel is a valuable tool for clinical diagnostics, provided awareness of potential artifacts.

  12. Computerized detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images: reduction of false positives using anatomical location features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Gao, Xin; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Asano, Takahiko; Kato, Hiroki; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    The detection of unruptured aneurysms is a major subject in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). However, their accurate detection is often difficult because of the overlapping between the aneurysm and the adjacent vessels on maximum intensity projection images. The purpose of this study is to develop a computerized method for the detection of unruptured aneurysms in order to assist radiologists in image interpretation. The vessel regions were first segmented using gray-level thresholding and a region growing technique. The gradient concentration (GC) filter was then employed for the enhancement of the aneurysms. The initial candidates were identified in the GC image using a gray-level threshold. For the elimination of false positives (FPs), we determined shape features and an anatomical location feature. Finally, rule-based schemes and quadratic discriminant analysis were employed along with these features for distinguishing between the aneurysms and the FPs. The sensitivity for the detection of unruptured aneurysms was 90.0% with 1.52 FPs per patient. Our computerized scheme can be useful in assisting the radiologists in the detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images.

  13. Computer-aided detection of breast masses on mammograms: bilateral analysis for false positive reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2006-03-01

    In this study, our purpose was to develop a false positive (FP) reduction method for computerized mass detection systems based on the analysis of bilateral mammograms. We first detect the mass candidates on each view by utilizing our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, the regional registration technique is used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is "symmetrical" to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Spatial gray level dependence matrices (SGLD) texture features and morphological features are extracted from both the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features are then generated from the extracted unilateral features and a final bilateral score is formed as a new feature to differentiate symmetric from asymmetric ROIs. By incorporating the unilateral features of the mass candidates and their bilateral scores, a bilateral classifier was trained to reduce the FPs. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at 0.52, 0.83, and 1.05 FPs/image on the test data set. In comparison to the FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.67, 1.11, and 1.69, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 22%, 25%, and 37% with the bilateral symmetry information.

  14. THE POSSIBLE MOON OF KEPLER-90g IS A FALSE POSITIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Huang, X.; Bakos, G. Á.; Nesvorný, D.; Schmitt, A. R.

    2015-01-20

    The discovery of an exomoon would provide deep insights into planet formation and the habitability of planetary systems, with transiting examples being particularly sought after. Of the hundreds of Kepler planets now discovered, the seven-planet system Kepler-90 is unusual for exhibiting an unidentified transit-like signal in close proximity to one of the transits of the long-period gas-giant Kepler-90g, as noted by Cabrera et al. As part of the ''Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler'' project, we investigate this possible exomoon signal and find it passes all conventional photometric, dynamical, and centroid diagnostic tests. However, pixel-level light curves indicate that the moon-like signal occurs on nearly all of the target's pixels, which we confirm using a novel way of examining pixel-level data which we dub the ''transit centroid''. This test reveals that the possible exomoon to Kepler-90g is likely a false positive, perhaps due to a cosmic ray induced sudden pixel sensitivity dropout. This work highlights the extreme care required for seeking non-periodic low-amplitude transit signals, such as exomoons.

  15. Rates of False-Positive Classification Resulting From the Analysis of Additional Embedded Performance Validity Measures.

    PubMed

    Silk-Eglit, Graham M; Stenclik, Jessica H; Miele, Andrea S; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented improvements in the classification accuracy of performance validity tests (PVTs) when they are combined to form aggregated models. Fewer studies have evaluated the impact of aggregating additional PVTs and changing the classification threshold within these models. A recent Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that to maintain a false-positive rate (FPR) of ≤.10, only 1, 4, 8, 10, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. The current study sought to evaluate these findings with embedded PVTs in a sample of real-life litigants and to highlight a potential danger in analytic flexibility with embedded PVTs. Results demonstrated that to maintain an FPR of ≤.10, only 3, 7, 10, 14, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. Analyzing more than these numbers of PVTs resulted in a dramatic increase in the FPR. In addition, in the most extreme case, flexibility in analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs increased the FPR by 67%. Given these findings, a more objective approach to analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs should be introduced.

  16. The uterine blush. A potential false-positive in Meckel's scan interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.

    1982-10-01

    To determine the presence, prevalence, and clinical importance of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate uterine uptake, this retrospective analysis of 71 Meckel's scans was undertaken. Specifically, each study was evaluated for the presence of a focal accumulation of radiotracer cephalad to the bladder. Patients received an intravenous dose of 150 microCi/kg of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. Each study consisted of 15 one minute anterior serial gamma camera images, and a 15, 30, and 60 minute anterior, right lateral and posterior scintiscan. Menstrual histories were obtained from all patients except two. No males (33/33), nor premenstrual (13/13), menopausal (4/4) or posthysterectomy (2/2) patients revealed a uterine blush. Eleven of 15 patients (73%) with regular menses demonstrated a uterine blush. They were in the menstrual or secretory phases of their cycle. Four demonstrated no uterine uptake, had regular periods, but were in the proliferative phase of their cycle. Two with irregular periods, and one with no recorded menstrual history, manifested the blush. Radiotracer should be expected in the uterus during the menstrual and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle. It is a manifestation of a normal physiologic phenomenon, and must be recognized to prevent false-positive Meckel's scan interpretations.

  17. From Docking False-Positive to Active Anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T.; Guimarães, Cristiano R. W.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70,000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and MM-GB/SA post-processing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Though known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential “near-miss” with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to evolve efficiently a false positive into a true active. In addition, the need for adequate structure validation was confirmed by the apparent misrepresentation of a purchased compound elsewhere as the present oxadiazole core compound, 16. PMID:17918923

  18. Reduction of false positives by machine learning for computer-aided detection of colonic polyps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Su; Zhu, Hongbin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    With the development of computer-aided detection of polyps (CADpolyp), various features have been extracted to detect the initial polyp candidates (IPCs). In this paper, three approaches were utilized to reduce the number of false positives (FPs): the multiply linear regression (MLR) and two modified machine learning methods, i.e., neural network (NN) and support vector machine (SVM), based on their own characteristics and specific learning purposes. Compared to MLR, the two modified machine learning methods are much more sophisticated and well-adapted to the data provided. To achieve the optimal sensitivity and specificity, raw features were pre-processed by the principle component analysis (PCA) in the hope of removing the second-order statistical correlation prior to any learning actions. The gain by the use of PCA was evidenced by the collected 26 patient studies, which included 32 colonic polyps confirmed by both optical colonoscopy (OC) and virtual colonoscopy (VC). The learning and testing results showed that the two modified machine-learning methods can reduce the number of FPs by 48.9% (or 7.2 FPs per patient) and 45.3% (or 7.7 FPs per patient) respectively, at 100% detection sensitivity in comparison with that of traditional MLR method. Generally, more than necessary number of features were stacked as input vectors to machine learning algorithms, dimensionality reduction for a more compact feature combination, i.e., how to determine the remaining dimensionality via PCA linear transform was considered and discussed in this paper. In addition, we proposed a new PCA-scaled data pre-processing method to help reduce the FPs significantly. Finally, fROC (free-response receiver operating characteristic) curves corresponding to three FP-reduction approaches were acquired, and comparative analysis was conducted.

  19. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  20. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  1. Is the false-positive rate in mammography in North America too high?

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle T; Mothersill, Carmel E; Seymour, Colin B; McNeill, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    The practice of investigating pathological abnormalities in the breasts of females who are asymptomatic is primarily employed using X-ray mammography. The importance of breast screening is reflected in the mortality-based benefits observed among females who are found to possess invasive breast carcinoma prior to the manifestation of clinical symptoms. It is estimated that population-based screening constitutes a 17% reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate among females affected by invasive breast carcinoma. In spite of the significant utility that screening confers in those affected by invasive cancer, limitations associated with screening manifest as potential harms affecting individuals who are free of invasive disease. Disease-free and benign tumour-bearing individuals who are subjected to diagnostic work-up following a screening examination constitute a population of cases referred to as false positives (FPs). This article discusses factors contributing to the FP rate in mammography and extends the discussion to an assessment of the consequences associated with FP reporting. We conclude that the mammography FP rate in North America is in excess based upon the observation of overtreatment of in situ lesions and the disproportionate distribution of detriment and benefit among the population of individuals recalled for diagnostic work-up subsequent to screening. To address the excessive incidence of FPs in mammography, we investigate solutions that may be employed to remediate the current status of the FP rate. Subsequently, it can be suggested that improvements in the breast-screening protocol, medical litigation risk, image interpretation software and the implementation of image acquisition modalities that overcome superimposition effects are promising solutions.

  2. High frequency of false-positive signals in a real-time PCR-based "Plus/Minus" assay.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzian, Forough L; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular biological methods using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of bacterial and viral genes in different environments have been developed into assays from different commercial sources. Applied Biosystems include and support two applications with their TaqMan instrument: the "Plus/Minus" and the "Allelic Discrimination" assays. These approaches are RT-PCR based, use short primers and fluorescent-labeled TaqMan probes and include three processes: a pre-read run, a PCR-amplification run, and a post-read run. In the "Plus/Minus" assay, samples and controls (distilled water) are loaded into the instrument, which calculates a positive or a negative outcome based on differences in signals between samples and the controls. When testing the "Plus/Minus" assay for detection of usp genes encoding a uropathogenic specific protein in Escherichia coli, an inordinately high proportion of false-positive signals was observed. This was shown to be due to a serious methodological deficiency. Our observations indicate that an adequate no-template control closely matching the target samples in all aspects, including amount of DNA, is required to establish a correct threshold in the pre-read run that forms the basis for further calculations in the post-read run of the "Plus/Minus" assay.

  3. Bilateral analysis based false positive reduction for computer-aided mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou Chuan; Ge Jun; Shi Jiazheng; Zhang Yiheng; Chan Heangping

    2007-08-15

    We have developed a false positive (FP) reduction method based on analysis of bilateral mammograms for computerized mass detection systems. The mass candidates on each view were first detected by our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, a regional registration technique was used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is ''symmetrical'' to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Texture features derived from the spatial gray level dependence matrices and morphological features were extracted from the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features were then generated from corresponding pairs of unilateral features for each object. Two linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers were trained from the unilateral and the bilateral feature spaces, respectively. Finally, the scores from the unilateral LDA classifier and the bilateral LDA asymmetry classifier were fused with a third LDA whose output score was used to distinguish true mass from FPs. A data set of 341 cases of bilateral two-view mammograms was used in this study, of which 276 cases with 552 bilateral pairs contained 110 malignant and 166 benign biopsy-proven masses and 65 cases with 130 bilateral pairs were normal. The mass data set was divided into two subsets for twofold cross-validation training and testing. The normal data set was used for estimation of FP rates. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at average FP rates of 0.35, 0.75, and 0.95 FPs/image, respectively, on the test data sets with malignant masses. In comparison to the average FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.58, 1.33, and 1.63, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 40%, 44%, and 42% with the bilateral symmetry information. The improvement was statistically significance (p<0.05) as estimated by

  4. Bilateral analysis based false positive reduction for computer-aided mass detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Shi, Jiazheng; Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a false positive (FP) reduction method based on analysis of bilateral mammograms for computerized mass detection systems. The mass candidates on each view were first detected by our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, a regional registration technique was used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is "symmetrical" to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Texture features derived from the spatial gray level dependence matrices and morphological features were extracted from the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features were then generated from corresponding pairs of unilateral features for each object. Two linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers were trained from the unilateral and the bilateral feature spaces, respectively. Finally, the scores from the unilateral LDA classifier and the bilateral LDA asymmetry classifier were fused with a third LDA whose output score was used to distinguish true mass from FPs. A data set of 341 cases of bilateral two-view mammograms was used in this study, of which 276 cases with 552 bilateral pairs contained 110 malignant and 166 benign biopsy-proven masses and 65 cases with 130 bilateral pairs were normal. The mass data set was divided into two subsets for twofold cross-validation training and testing. The normal data set was used for estimation of FP rates. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at average FP rates of 0.35, 0.75, and 0.95 FPs/image, respectively, on the test data sets with malignant masses. In comparison to the average FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.58, 1.33, and 1.63, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 40%, 44%, and 42% with the bilateral symmetry information. The improvement was statistically significance (p < 0.05) as estimated by

  5. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  6. On minimizing assignment errors and the trade-off between false positives and negatives in parentage analysis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Hugo B; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Planes, Serge; Jones, Geoffrey P; Berumen, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    Genetic parentage analyses provide a practical means with which to identify parent-offspring relationships in the wild. In Harrison et al.'s study (2013a), we compare three methods of parentage analysis and showed that the number and diversity of microsatellite loci were the most important factors defining the accuracy of assignments. Our simulations revealed that an exclusion-Bayes theorem method was more susceptible to false-positive and false-negative assignments than other methods tested. Here, we analyse and discuss the trade-off between type I and type II errors in parentage analyses. We show that controlling for false-positive assignments, without reporting type II errors, can be misleading. Our findings illustrate the need to estimate and report both the rate of false-positive and false-negative assignments in parentage analyses.

  7. Ruling out False-Positive Urinary Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae Antigen Test Results by Heating Urine

    PubMed Central

    Pontoizeau, C.; Dangers, L.; Jarlier, V.; Luyt, C. E.; Guiller, E.; Fievet, M. H.; Lecsö-Bornet, M.; Aubry, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report here false-positive urinary Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen test results due to rabbit antilymphocyte serum treatment and provide a simple and fast solution to rule them out by heating urine. PMID:25253788

  8. Exploring Habitability Markers, Biosignatures, and Their False Positives Using Spectral Models of Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.

    )2 feature in a variety of simulated atmospheres with different N2 abundances with both synthetic direct-imaging and transit transmission spectra. Third, I investigate observational indicators of planetary mechanisms that may generate abiotic oxygen (O2 or O3) on exoplanets, leading to potential "false positives" for life. Abiotic production of O2 from CO2 photolysis potentially leads to detectable amounts of CO as a byproduct. Oxygen build up from massive H-loss during a runaway greenhouse could leave behind more O2 than could be plausibly produced by biology. In this case density dependent O4 features would be strong and potentially indicative of this process. I investigate the strength and detectability of CO (at 2.35 and 4.6 mum) and O4 (at 0.345, 0.36, 0.38, 0.445, 0.475, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, 1.06, and 1.27 mum) absorption for these abiotic oxygen scenarios in both transmission and direct-imaging spectroscopy. Finally, I present an interdisciplinary study of nonphotosynthetic pigments as alternative surface reflectance biosignatures, in contrast to direct photosynthetic signatures like the vegetation red edge. This study includes reflectance measurements of a variety of pigmented organisms in the laboratory, illustrating a wide range of spectral diversity. I also model the spectra of hypothetical planets containing nonphotosynthetic pigment biosignatures including the confounding spectral effects of the atmosphere. I find that these signatures could potentially be observable in disk-averaged spectra depending on the fraction of the planet containing the signature. Organisms with nonphotosynthetic pigments will produce reflectance signatures different than that of the commonly referenced vegetation red edge, and push us to broaden our understanding of what surface biosignatures might look like on Earth-like exoplanets once remote characterization of these worlds becomes possible.

  9. Detection of false-positives among total and fecal coliform counts by factorial analysis of correspondence.

    PubMed Central

    Joncas, M; Michaud, S; Carmichael, J P; Lavoie, M C

    1985-01-01

    Application of an analysis of correspondence to the biochemical characteristics of total and fecal coliforms isolated in the Ivory Coast permitted us to separate two small clusters of isolates different from the main clusters, which included isolates from human and animal feces. The isolates grouped in the small clusters were from water samples. An analysis of the biochemical characteristics which permitted the segregation of the "water-specific" isolates from the main clusters indicates that water-specific total coliforms were citrate positive, indole negative, and amygdaline positive. Water-specific fecal coliforms were either citrate positive, indole negative, amygdaline positive, and inositol negative or indole negative, amygdaline positive, and inositol positive. Any isolates not fitting the above patterns could be considered of fecal origin. If this observation is confirmed under temperate climates and for a greater number of isolates, these simple tests could be used to confirm the fecal origin of coliforms. PMID:2983607

  10. Background parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging: normal patterns, diagnostic challenges, and potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretation.

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Yeh, Eren D; Raza, Sughra; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2014-01-01

    At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, both normal and abnormal breast tissue enhances after contrast material administration. The morphology and temporal degree of enhancement of pathologic breast tissue relative to normal breast tissue form the basis of MR imaging's diagnostic accuracy in the detection and diagnosis of breast disease. Normal parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging is termed background parenchymal enhancement (BPE). BPE may vary in degree and distribution in different patients as well as in the same patient over time. Typically BPE is minimal or mild in overall degree, with a bilateral, symmetric, diffuse distribution and slow early and persistent delayed kinetic features. However, BPE may sometimes be moderate or marked in degree, with an asymmetric or nondiffuse distribution and rapid early and plateau or washout delayed kinetic features. These patterns cause diagnostic difficulty because these features can be seen with malignancy. This article reviews typical and atypical patterns of BPE seen at breast MR imaging. The anatomic and physiologic influences on BPE in women undergoing diagnostic and screening breast MR imaging are reviewed. The potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretations due to BPE are discussed. Radiologists can improve their interpretive accuracy by increasing their understanding of various BPE patterns, influences on BPE, and the potential effects of BPE on MR imaging interpretation.

  11. Positive Psychology and Adolescent Mental Health: False Promise or True Breakthrough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness…

  12. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men.

  13. False positive dengue NS1 antigen test in a traveller with an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gyurech, Danielle; Schilling, Julian; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Cassinotti, Pascal; Kaeppeli, Franz; Dobec, Marinko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland by a traveller returning from Canoa Quebrada, Ceará state, in the north-eastern part of Brazil. Due to a false positive dengue virus NS1 antigen test, IgG antibody seroconversion and a suggestive clinical picture,an acute dengue fever was initially considered. However, because of lack of specific IgM-antibodies, stationary IgG antibody titre and a negative dengue virus PCR test result, a dengue virus infection was excluded and a cross-reaction with other, causative flaviviruses was postulated. Based on recent reports of Zika fever cases in the north-eastern parts of Brazil, an acute Zika virus infection was suspected. Because of a lack of commercially available Zika virus diagnostic tests, the case was confirmed in the WHO reference laboratory. As the clinical presentation of Zika virus infection can be confused with dengue fever and chikungunya fever, and because of possible public health implications, all patients returning from affected areas should be additionally tested for Zika virus. This case illustrates the urgent medical need for a broadly available assay capable of differentiating Zika from Dengue infections.

  14. All That Glisters Is Not Gold: Sampling-Process Uncertainty in Disease-Vector Surveys with False-Negative and False-Positive Detections

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Sarquis, Otília; Lima, Marli M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases are major public health concerns worldwide. For many of them, vector control is still key to primary prevention, with control actions planned and evaluated using vector occurrence records. Yet vectors can be difficult to detect, and vector occurrence indices will be biased whenever spurious detection/non-detection records arise during surveys. Here, we investigate the process of Chagas disease vector detection, assessing the performance of the surveillance method used in most control programs – active triatomine-bug searches by trained health agents. Methodology/Principal Findings Control agents conducted triplicate vector searches in 414 man-made ecotopes of two rural localities. Ecotope-specific ‘detection histories’ (vectors or their traces detected or not in each individual search) were analyzed using ordinary methods that disregard detection failures and multiple detection-state site-occupancy models that accommodate false-negative and false-positive detections. Mean (±SE) vector-search sensitivity was ∼0.283±0.057. Vector-detection odds increased as bug colonies grew denser, and were lower in houses than in most peridomestic structures, particularly woodpiles. False-positive detections (non-vector fecal streaks misidentified as signs of vector presence) occurred with probability ∼0.011±0.008. The model-averaged estimate of infestation (44.5±6.4%) was ∼2.4–3.9 times higher than naïve indices computed assuming perfect detection after single vector searches (11.4–18.8%); about 106–137 infestation foci went undetected during such standard searches. Conclusions/Significance We illustrate a relatively straightforward approach to addressing vector detection uncertainty under realistic field survey conditions. Standard vector searches had low sensitivity except in certain singular circumstances. Our findings suggest that many infestation foci may go undetected during routine surveys, especially when vector

  15. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

  16. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and <0.8 % are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  17. False-positive rate determination of protein target discovery using a covalent modification- and mass spectrometry-based proteomics platform.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Erin C; Geer, M Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  18. False Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False positive rates of 1.2–2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed. PMID:24114261

  19. Efficient information theoretic strategies for classifier combination, feature extraction and performance evaluation in improving false positives and false negatives for spam e-mail filtering.

    PubMed

    Zorkadis, V; Karras, D A; Panayotou, M

    2005-01-01

    Spam emails are considered as a serious privacy-related violation, besides being a costly, unsolicited communication. Various spam filtering techniques have been so far proposed, mainly based on Naïve Bayesian algorithms. Other Machine Learning algorithms like Boosting trees, or Support Vector Machines (SVM) have already been used with success. However, the number of False Positives (FP) and False Negatives (FN) resulting through applying various spam e-mail filters still remains too high and the problem of spam e-mail categorization cannot be solved completely from a practical viewpoint. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for spam e-mail filtering based on efficient information theoretic techniques for integrating classifiers, for extracting improved features and for properly evaluating categorization accuracy in terms of FP and FN. The goal of the presented methodology is to empirically but explicitly minimize these FP and FN numbers by combining high-performance FP filters with high-performance FN filters emerging from a previous work of the authors [Zorkadis, V., Panayotou, M., & Karras, D. A. (2005). Improved spam e-mail filtering based on committee machines and information theoretic feature extraction. Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, July 31-August 4, 2005, Montreal, Canada]. To this end, Random Committee-based filters along with ADTree-based ones are efficiently combined through information theory, respectively. The experiments conducted are of the most extensive ones so far in the literature, exploiting widely accepted benchmarking e-mail data sets and comparing the proposed methodology with the Naive Bayes spam filter as well as with the Boosting tree methodology, the classification via regression and other machine learning models. It is illustrated by means of novel information theoretic measures of FP & FN filtering performance that the proposed approach is very favorably compared to the other rival methods

  20. False positives and false negatives measure less than 0.001% in labeling ssDNA with osmium tetroxide 2,2’-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Osmium tetroxide 2,2’-bipyridine (OsBp) is known to react with pyrimidines in ssDNA and preferentially label deoxythymine (T) over deoxycytosine (C). The product, osmylated DNA, was proposed as a surrogate for nanopore-based DNA sequencing due to OsBp’s “perfect” label attributes. Osmylated deoxyoligos translocate unassisted and measurably slow via sub-2 nm SiN solid-state nanopores, as well as via the alpha-hemolysin (α-HL) pore. Both nanopores discriminate clearly between osmylated and intact nucleobase; α-HL was also shown to discriminate between osmylated T and osmylated C. Experiments presented here confirm that the kinetics of osmylation are comparable for short oligos and long ssDNA and show that pyrimidine osmylation is practically complete in two hours at room temperature with less than 15 mM OsBp. Under the proposed labeling conditions: deoxyoligo backbone degradation measures less than 1/1,000,000; false positives such as osmylated deoxyadenine (A) and osmylated deoxyguanine (G) measure less than 1/100,000; false negatives, i.e., unosmylated C measure less than 1/10,000; and unosmylated T must measure substantially lower than 1/10,000 due to the 27-fold higher reactivity of T compared to C. However, osmylated C undergoes degradation that amounts to about 1–2% for the duration of the labeling protocol. This degradation may be further characterized, possibly suppressed, and the properties of the degradation products via nanopore translocation can be evaluated to assure base calling quality in a DNA sequencing effort. PMID:27826518

  1. Way forward in case of a false positive in vitro genotoxicity result for a cosmetic substance?

    PubMed

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Ates, Gamze; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-02-01

    The currently used regulatory in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity test battery has a high sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants, but it suffers from a large number of irrelevant positive results (i.e. low specificity) thereby imposing the need for additional follow-up by in vitro and/or in vivo genotoxicity tests. This could have a major impact on the cosmetic industry in Europe, seen the imposed animal testing and marketing bans on cosmetics and their ingredients. Afflicted, but safe substances could therefore be lost. Using the example of triclosan, a cosmetic preservative, we describe here the potential applicability of a human toxicogenomics-based in vitro assay as a potential mechanistically based follow-up test for positive in vitro genotoxicity results. Triclosan shows a positive in vitro chromosomal aberration test, but is negative during in vivo follow-up tests. Toxicogenomics analysis unequivocally shows that triclosan is identified as a compound acting through non-DNA reactive mechanisms. This proof-of-principle study illustrates the potential of genome-wide transcriptomics data in combination with in vitro experimentation as a possible weight-of-evidence follow-up approach for de-risking a positive outcome in a standard mutagenicity/genotoxicity battery. As such a substantial number of cosmetic compounds wrongly identified as genotoxicants could be saved for the future.

  2. A False-Positive Detection Bias as a Function of State and Trait Schizotypy in Interaction with Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Phillip; Balser, Mona; Munk, Aisha Judith Leila; Linder, Jens; Hennig, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Hallucinatory experiences are by far not limited to patients with clinical psychosis. A number of internal and external factors may bring about such experiences in healthy individuals, whereby the personality trait of (positive) schizotypy is a major mediator of individual differences. Psychotic experiences are defined as associating abnormal meaning to real but objectively irrelevant perceptions. Especially, the ambiguity of a stimulus correlates positively with the likelihood of abnormal interpretation, and intelligence is believed to have an important influence and act as protective against clinical psychosis in highly schizotypic individuals. In this study, we presented 131 healthy participants with 216 15-letter strings containing either a word, a non-word, or only random letters and asked them to report, whether or not they believed to have seen a word. The aim was to replicate findings that participants with high values in positive schizotypy on the trait-level make more false-positive errors and assess the role of stimulus-ambiguity and verbal intelligence. Additionally, we wanted to examine whether the same effect could be shown for indices of state schizotypy. Our results support findings that both state and trait positive schizotypy explain significant variance in “seeing things that are not there” and that the properties of individual stimuli have additional strong effects on the false-positive hit rates. Finally, we found that verbal intelligence and positive schizotypy interact with stimulus-ambiguity in the production of false-positive perceptions. PMID:25309464

  3. Sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia: apparent false positive MIBG scan and expected MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Yung, B C; Loke, T K; Tse, T W; Tsang, M W; Chan, J C

    2000-10-01

    Adrenal medullary hyperplasia is a rare cause of clinical symptoms and biochemical findings identical to pheochromocytoma occurring mostly in multiple endocrine neoplasia patients. The scenario of positive MIBG scan, but no focal lesion found on CT and MRI led to diagnostic and management difficulties. Like pheochromocytoma, surgical excision can lead to clinical and biochemical recovery. We report this unusual case of sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia, with hypertension and biochemical abnormalities alleviated after surgical adrenalectomy. Based on T2 values reported in literature, high signal focal lesions may not appear on T2-weighted MRI images until development of frank pheochromocytoma. MIBG scan remains the most sensitive imaging modality for this condition.

  4. False-Positive Serum Botulism Bioassay in Miller-Fisher Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeylikman, Yuriy; Shah, Vishal; Shah, Umang; Mirsen, Thomas R; Campellone, Joseph V

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with acute progressive weakness and areflexia. Both botulism and Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome were initial diagnostic considerations, and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and botulinum antitoxin. A mouse bioassay was positive for botulinum toxin A, although her clinical course, electrodiagnostic studies, and cerebrospinal fluid findings supported Miller-Fisher syndrome. This patient's atypical features offer points of discussion regarding the evaluation of patients with acute neuromuscular weakness and emphasize the limitations of the botulism bioassay.

  5. Pathways to false positive diagnoses using molecular genetic detection methods; Phytophthora cinnamomi a case study.

    PubMed

    Kunadiya, Manisha; White, Diane; Dunstan, William A; St, Giles E; Hardy, J; Andjic, Vera; Burgess, Treena I

    2017-01-12

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the world's most invasive plant pathogens affecting ornamental plants, horticultural crops and natural ecosystems. Accurate diagnosis is very important to determine the presence or absence of this pathogen in diseased and asymptomatic plants. In previous studies, P. cinnamomi species-specific primers were designed and tested using various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques including conventional PCR, nested PCR, and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). In all cases, the primers were stated to be highly specific and sensitive to P. cinnamomi However, few of these studies tested their primers against closely related Phytophthora species (Phytophthora clade 7). In this study, we tested these purported P. cinnamomi specific primer sets with eleven other species from clade 7 and determined their specificity; of the eight tested primer sets only three were specific to P. cinnamomi This study demonstrated the importance of testing primers against closely related species within the same clade, and not just other species within the same genus. The findings of this study are relevant to all species-specific microbial diagnosis.

  6. Use of propidium monoazide and increased amplicon length reduce false-positive signals in quantitative PCR for bioburden analysis.

    PubMed

    Schnetzinger, Franz; Pan, Youwen; Nocker, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Rapid microbiological methods (RMMs) as an alternative to conventional cultivation-based bioburden analysis are receiving increasing attention although no single technology is currently able to satisfy the needs of the health care industry. Among the RMMs, quantitative PCR (qPCR) seems particularly suited. Its implementation is, however, hampered by false-positive signals originating from free DNA in PCR reagents or from dead cells in the samples to be analysed. In this study, we assessed the capability of propidium monoazide (PMA) to inactivate exogenous DNA in PCR reagents and thus to minimise its impact in bioburden analysis. PMA is a membrane-impermeant dye that intercalates into DNA and covalently binds to it upon photoactivation leading to strong inhibition of PCR amplification. PMA is currently used mainly for treatment of microbiological samples to exclude signals from membrane-compromised cells, but is also very useful for suppression of exogenous DNA signals. In addition to testing the effect of different PMA concentrations on non-template controls and target DNA, we demonstrate the effect of amplicon length on the exclusion of background amplification. Targeting a 1,108-bp 16S rRNA gene fragment using universal bacterial primers and PCR reagents treated with 5 μM PMA resulted in complete suppression of signals from exogenous DNA within 50 cycles of amplification, while a limit of detection of 10 copies of Escherichia coli genomic DNA per PCR reaction was achieved. A combined PMA treatment of sample and PCR reagents furthermore improved the selective detection of live cells making this method appear a highly attractive RMM.

  7. DNA typing by microbead arrays and PCR-SSP: apparent false-negative or -positive hybridization or amplification signals disclose new HLA-B and -DRB1 alleles.

    PubMed

    Rahal, M; Kervaire, B; Villard, J; Tiercy, J-M

    2008-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) hybridization on solid phase (microbead assay) or polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) requires interpretation softwares to detect all possible allele combinations. These programs propose allele calls by taking into account false-positive or false-negative signal(s). The laboratory has the option to validate typing results in the presence of strongly cross-reacting or apparent false-negative signals. Alternatively, these seemingly aberrant signals may disclose novel variants. We report here four new HLA-B (B*5620 and B*5716) and HLA-DRB1 alleles (DRB1*110107 and DRB1*1474) that were detected by apparent false-negative or -positive hybridization or amplification patterns, and ultimately resolved by sequencing. To avoid allele misassignments, a comprehensive evaluation of acquired data as documented in a quality assurance system is therefore required to confirm unambiguous typing interpretation.

  8. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Zaid; Sengupta, Ruchira; Johnson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis. PMID:27895946

  9. Suture Granuloma With False-Positive Findings on FDG-PET/CT Resected via Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Tohma, Takayuki; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Nishimori, Takanori; Ohira, Gaku; Narushima, Kazuo; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Toyozumi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman who had undergone total hysterectomy 16 years previously exhibited a pelvic tumor on computed tomography (CT). F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) combined positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging revealed a solitary small focus of increased FDG activity in the pelvis. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor originating in the small intestine or another type of tumor originating in the mesentery (desmoid, schwannoma, or foreign body granuloma) was suspected; therefore, laparoscopic resection was conducted. A white, hard tumor was found to originate from the mesentery of the sigmoid colon and adhered slightly to the small intestine. The tumor was resected with a negative margin, and the pathologic diagnosis was suture granuloma. The possibility of suture granuloma should be kept in mind in cases of tumors with positive PET findings and a history of surgery close to the lesion. However, it is difficult to preoperatively diagnose pelvic tumors using a biopsy. Therefore, considering the possibility of malignancy, it is necessary to achieve complete resection without exposing the tumor.

  10. Intelligent Mixing of Proteomes for Elimination of False Positives in Affinity Purification-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eyckerman, Sven; Impens, Francis; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Samyn, Noortje; Vandemoortele, Giel; De Sutter, Delphine; Tavernier, Jan; Gevaert, Kris

    2016-10-07

    Protein complexes are essential in all organizational and functional aspects of the cell. Different strategies currently exist for analyzing such protein complexes by mass spectrometry, including affinity purification (AP-MS) and proximal labeling-based strategies. However, the high sensitivity of current mass spectrometers typically results in extensive protein lists mainly consisting of nonspecifically copurified proteins. Finding the true positive interactors in these lists remains highly challenging. Here, we report a powerful design based on differential labeling with stable isotopes combined with nonequal mixing of control and experimental samples to discover bona fide interaction partners in AP-MS experiments. We apply this intelligent mixing of proteomes (iMixPro) concept to overexpression experiments for RAF1, RNF41, and TANK and also to engineered cell lines expressing epitope-tagged endogenous PTPN14, JIP3, and IQGAP1. For all baits, we confirmed known interactions and found a number of novel interactions. The results for RNF41 and TANK were compared to a classical affinity purification experiment, which demonstrated the efficiency and specificity of the iMixPro approach.

  11. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test.

  12. False-positive cryptococcal antigen test associated with use of BBL Port-a-Cul transport vials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah A; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2011-02-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed.

  13. Determining Occurrence Dynamics when False Positives Occur: Estimating the Range Dynamics of Wolves from Public Survey Data.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A W; Nichols, James D; Gude, Justin A; Rich, Lindsey N; Podruzny, Kevin M; Hines, James E; Mitchell, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale presence-absence monitoring programs have great promise for many conservation applications. Their value can be limited by potential incorrect inferences owing to observational errors, especially when data are collected by the public. To combat this, previous analytical methods have focused on addressing non-detection from public survey data. Misclassification errors have received less attention but are also likely to be a common component of public surveys, as well as many other data types. We derive estimators for dynamic occupancy parameters (extinction and colonization), focusing on the case where certainty can be assumed for a subset of detections. We demonstrate how to simultaneously account for non-detection (false negatives) and misclassification (false positives) when estimating occurrence parameters for gray wolves in northern Montana from 2007-2010. Our primary data source for the analysis was observations by deer and elk hunters, reported as part of the state's annual hunter survey. This data was supplemented with data from known locations of radio-collared wolves. We found that occupancy was relatively stable during the years of the study and wolves were largely restricted to the highest quality habitats in the study area. Transitions in the occupancy status of sites were rare, as occupied sites almost always remained occupied and unoccupied sites remained unoccupied. Failing to account for false positives led to over estimation of both the area inhabited by wolves and the frequency of turnover. The ability to properly account for both false negatives and false positives is an important step to improve inferences for conservation from large-scale public surveys. The approach we propose will improve our understanding of the status of wolf populations and is relevant to many other data types where false positives are a component of observations.

  14. Determining Occurrence Dynamics when False Positives Occur: Estimating the Range Dynamics of Wolves from Public Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David A. W.; Nichols, James D.; Gude, Justin A.; Rich, Lindsey N.; Podruzny, Kevin M.; Hines, James E.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale presence-absence monitoring programs have great promise for many conservation applications. Their value can be limited by potential incorrect inferences owing to observational errors, especially when data are collected by the public. To combat this, previous analytical methods have focused on addressing non-detection from public survey data. Misclassification errors have received less attention but are also likely to be a common component of public surveys, as well as many other data types. We derive estimators for dynamic occupancy parameters (extinction and colonization), focusing on the case where certainty can be assumed for a subset of detections. We demonstrate how to simultaneously account for non-detection (false negatives) and misclassification (false positives) when estimating occurrence parameters for gray wolves in northern Montana from 2007–2010. Our primary data source for the analysis was observations by deer and elk hunters, reported as part of the state’s annual hunter survey. This data was supplemented with data from known locations of radio-collared wolves. We found that occupancy was relatively stable during the years of the study and wolves were largely restricted to the highest quality habitats in the study area. Transitions in the occupancy status of sites were rare, as occupied sites almost always remained occupied and unoccupied sites remained unoccupied. Failing to account for false positives led to over estimation of both the area inhabited by wolves and the frequency of turnover. The ability to properly account for both false negatives and false positives is an important step to improve inferences for conservation from large-scale public surveys. The approach we propose will improve our understanding of the status of wolf populations and is relevant to many other data types where false positives are a component of observations. PMID:23840372

  15. Distinguishing binders from false positives by free energy calculations: fragment screening against the flap site of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nanjie; Forli, Stefano; He, Peng; Perryman, Alex; Wickstrom, Lauren; Vijayan, R S K; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, David; Gallicchio, Emilio; Olson, Arthur J; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-01-22

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand-receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein-ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets.

  16. A new yield simulator for transiting planets and false positives: application to the Next Generation Transit Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Maximilian N.; Queloz, Didier; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Bouchy, Francois

    2017-03-01

    We present a yield simulator to predict the number and characteristics of planets, false positives and false alarms in transit surveys. The simulator is based on a galactic model and the planet occurrence rates measured by the Kepler mission. It takes into account the observation window function and measured noise levels of the investigated survey. Additionally, it includes vetting criteria to identify false positives. We apply this simulator to the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), a wide-field survey designed to detect transiting Neptune-sized exoplanets. We find that red noise is the main limitation of NGTS up to 14 mag, and that its obtained level determines the expected yield. Assuming a red noise level of 1 mmag, the simulation predicts the following for a 4-yr survey: 4 ± 3 Super-Earths, 19 ± 5 Small Neptunes, 16 ± 4 Large Neptunes, 55 ± 8 Saturn-sized planets and 150 ± 10 Jupiter-sized planets, along with 4688 ± 45 eclipsing binaries and 843 ± 75 background eclipsing binaries. We characterize the properties of these objects to enhance the early identification of false positives and discuss follow-up strategies for transiting candidates.

  17. Primers determine the sensitivity of PCR-mediated hepatitis B virus DNA detection and pretreatment of PCR mixture with 8-methoxypsoralen eliminates false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Keum, W K; Park, C E; Lee, J H; Khil, L Y; Kang, I; Kim, S S; Jung, J C; Oh, S M; Woo, H J; Lee, J H; Kim, Y C; Yoon, Y; Choi, J W; Ha, J

    1997-04-30

    Most methods for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection largely depend on viral DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or radioimmunological assay of viral antigens or antibodies. The quality assurance program recently established in Europe reported that PCR-mediated HBV DNA detection methods used in many laboratories produced a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results. Thus, we attempted to improve the conditions of current PCR methods for detection of HBV DNA. In the present study, we applied a recently developed method of releasing HBV DNA from virion by NaOH treatment of patient serum. Using four different primer sets specific to the HBV core region, we found that the sensitivity of first-round PCR can be improved by more than two orders of magnitude depending on the primers. The second round of PCR using nested primers was sensitive enough to detect up to 10(-6) pg of the HBV DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 3 copies of the HBV genome. Among the approximately 800 HBV-infected patient sera investigated in our laboratory, more than 60% of the tested samples gave positive results in the first-round PCR. The rate of positive results obtained using our experimental conditions is very high in comparison with other reports. The reamplification of the first-round PCR reaction mixture with the nested primers produced practically 100% positive results. For diagnosis of HBV infection, we routinely used 1 microliter of patient serum, which was found to be optimum in our laboratory. Surprisingly, from 20% of our positive results, even serum diluted to 1/100 (0.01 microliter) produced a stronger signal than 1 microliter. This observation suggests that direct PCR amplification of HBV DNA released from serum by NaOH treatment has to be compensated by other DNA detection methods for correct quantitation. In order to eliminate the false positive signal resulting from the carry-over due to massive screening of a large number of

  18. The Effect of False-Positive Results on Subsequent Participation in Chest X-ray Screening for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Hamada, Shota; Urashima, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiro; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background High attendance rates and regular participation in disease screening programs are important contributors to program effectiveness. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an initial false-positive result in chest X-ray screening for lung cancer on subsequent screening participation. Methods This historical cohort study analyzed individuals who first participated in a lung cancer screening program conducted by Yokohama City between April 2007 and March 2011, and these participants were retrospectively tracked until March 2013. Subsequent screening participation was compared between participants with false-positive results and those with negative results in evaluation periods between 365 (for the primary outcome) and 730 days. The association of screening results with subsequent participation was evaluated using a generalized linear regression model, with adjustment for characteristics of patients and screening. Results The proportions of subsequent screening participation within 365 days were 12.9% in 3132 participants with false-positive results and 6.7% in 15 737 participants with negative results. Although the differences in attendance rates were reduced with longer cutoffs, participants with false-positive results were consistently more likely to attend subsequent screening than patients with negative results (P < 0.01). The predictors of subsequent screening participation were false-positive results (risk ratio [RR] 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.92), older age (RR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11–1.23), male sex (RR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.29–1.64), being a current smoker (RR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69–0.93), current employment (RR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70–0.90), and being screened at a hospital cancer center (vs public health centers; RR 1.36; 95% CI, 1.15–1.60). Conclusions Our findings indicated that subsequent participation in lung cancer screening was more likely among participants with false-positive results in an initial screening than

  19. Blood stained cerebrospinal fluid responsible for false positive reactions of latex particle agglutination tests.

    PubMed Central

    Camargos, P A; Almeida, M S; Filho, G L; Batista, K W; Carvalho, A G; Pereira, C L

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of the latex particle agglutination test (LPAT) was assessed in blood stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 166 paediatric patients, aged from three months to 13 years. A commercial LPAT kit was used to detect Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis A, B, and C soluble antigens. Culture of CSF specimens was used as the standard and all laboratory procedures were performed blind. The mean CSF erythrocyte count was 66,406 cells/mm3 in the cases and 11,560 cells/mm3 in the controls. The sensitivity and the specificity of LPAT were 83.8 and 94.0%, respectively, suggesting that LPAT is a useful diagnostic tool even in blood stained CSF specimens. PMID:7876387

  20. Restricted Boltzmann machines based oversampling and semi-supervised learning for false positive reduction in breast CAD.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Liu, Xiaoli; Bao, Hang; Yang, Jinzhu; Zhao, Dazhe

    2015-01-01

    The false-positive reduction (FPR) is a crucial step in the computer aided detection system for the breast. The issues of imbalanced data distribution and the limitation of labeled samples complicate the classification procedure. To overcome these challenges, we propose oversampling and semi-supervised learning methods based on the restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) to solve the classification of imbalanced data with a few labeled samples. To evaluate the proposed method, we conducted a comprehensive performance study and compared its results with the commonly used techniques. Experiments on benchmark dataset of DDSM demonstrate the effectiveness of the RBMs based oversampling and semi-supervised learning method in terms of geometric mean (G-mean) for false positive reduction in Breast CAD.

  1. Differential gene expression segregates cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ailam; Steibel, Juan P; Coussens, Paul M; Grooms, Daniel L; Bolin, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Antemortem tests for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) currently used in the US measure cell-mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium bovis. Postmortem tests for bTB rely on observation of gross and histologic lesions of bTB, followed by bacterial isolation or molecular diagnostics. Cumulative data from the state of Michigan indicates that 98 to 99% of cattle that react positively in antemortem tests are not confirmed positive for bTB at postmortem examination. Understanding the fundamental differences in gene regulation between antemortem test-false positive cattle and cattle that have bTB may allow identification of molecular markers that can be exploited to better separate infected from noninfected cattle. An immunospecific cDNA microarray was used to identify altered gene expression (P ≤ 0.01) of 122 gene features between antemortem test-false positive cattle and bTB-infected cattle following a 4-hour stimulation of whole blood with tuberculin. Further analysis using quantitative real-time PCR assays validated altered expression of 8 genes that had differential power (adj  P ≤ 0.05) to segregate cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis.

  2. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  3. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Stephanie J.; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L.

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs. PMID:26342055

  4. Understanding false positives in reporter gene assays: in silico chemogenomics approaches to prioritize cell-based HTS data.

    PubMed

    Crisman, Thomas J; Parker, Christian N; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Scheiber, Josef; Thoma, Mathis; Kang, Zhao Bin; Kim, Richard; Bender, Andreas; Nettles, James H; Davies, John W; Glick, Meir

    2007-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) data is often noisy, containing both false positives and negatives. Thus, careful triaging and prioritization of the primary hit list can save time and money by identifying potential false positives before incurring the expense of followup. Of particular concern are cell-based reporter gene assays (RGAs) where the number of hits may be prohibitively high to be scrutinized manually for weeding out erroneous data. Based on statistical models built from chemical structures of 650 000 compounds tested in RGAs, we created "frequent hitter" models that make it possible to prioritize potential false positives. Furthermore, we followed up the frequent hitter evaluation with chemical structure based in silico target predictions to hypothesize a mechanism for the observed "off target" response. It was observed that the predicted cellular targets for the frequent hitters were known to be associated with undesirable effects such as cytotoxicity. More specifically, the most frequently predicted targets relate to apoptosis and cell differentiation, including kinases, topoisomerases, and protein phosphatases. The mechanism-based frequent hitter hypothesis was tested using 160 additional druglike compounds predicted by the model to be nonspecific actives in RGAs. This validation was successful (showing a 50% hit rate compared to a normal hit rate as low as 2%), and it demonstrates the power of computational models toward understanding complex relations between chemical structure and biological function.

  5. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs.

  6. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  7. High sensitivity to aligner and high rate of false positives in the estimates of positive selection in the 12 Drosophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    Markova-Raina, Penka; Petrov, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of aligner choice on inferences of positive selection using site-specific models of molecular evolution. We find that independently of the choice of aligner, the rate of false positives is unacceptably high. Our study is a whole-genome analysis of all protein-coding genes in 12 Drosophila genomes annotated in either all 12 species (∼6690 genes) or in the six melanogaster group species. We compare six popular aligners: PRANK, T-Coffee, ClustalW, ProbCons, AMAP, and MUSCLE, and find that the aligner choice strongly influences the estimates of positive selection. Differences persist when we use (1) different stringency cutoffs, (2) different selection inference models, (3) alignments with or without gaps, and/or additional masking, (4) per-site versus per-gene statistics, (5) closely related melanogaster group species versus more distant 12 Drosophila genomes. Furthermore, we find that these differences are consequential for downstream analyses such as determination of over/under-represented GO terms associated with positive selection. Visual analysis indicates that most sites inferred as positively selected are, in fact, misaligned at the codon level, resulting in false positive rates of 48%–82%. PRANK, which has been reported to outperform other aligners in simulations, performed best in our empirical study as well. Unfortunately, PRANK still had a high, and unacceptable for most applications, false positives rate of 50%–55%. We identify misannotations and indels, many of which appear to be located in disordered protein regions, as primary culprits for the high misalignment-related error levels and discuss possible workaround approaches to this apparently pervasive problem in genome-wide evolutionary analyses. PMID:21393387

  8. Pokorny's complaint: the insoluble problem of the overwhelming number of false positives generated by suicide risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nielssen, Olav; Wallace, Duncan; Large, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Alex Pokorny's 1983 prospective study of suicide found that 96.3% of high-risk predictions were false positives, and that more than half of the suicides occurred in the low-risk group and were hence false negatives. All subsequent prospective studies, including the recent US Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (STARRS), have reported similar results. We argue that since risk assessment cannot be a practical basis for interventions aimed at reducing suicide, the alternative is for mental health services to carefully consider what amounts to an adequate standard of care, and to adopt the universal precaution of attempting to provide that to all of our patients. PMID:28184312

  9. False-positive laboratory tests for Cryptosporidium involving an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay--United States, November 1997-March 1998.

    PubMed

    1999-01-15

    From November 1997 through March 1998, the number of positive tests for Cryptosporidium increased in several locations in the United States. Several laboratories (e.g., the New York state laboratory and the Medical Science Laboratories in Wisconsin) retested original stool specimens and could not confirm the original positive test result. Following reports to the manufacturer by the Massachusetts, New York, and Wisconsin state health departments about possibly inaccurate test results, Alexon-Trend (Ramsey, Minnesota) notified its laboratory customers in a March 25, 1998, letter that three lots of its enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) 24 well (catalog number 540-24) ProSpecT Cryptosporidium Microplate Assay (lot numbers 970717,975011, and 980401) and seven lots of its ELISA 96 well (catalog number 540-96) ProSpect Cryptosporidium Microplate Assay (lot numbers 970696, 970775, 970883, 975006, 980402, 980808, and 980809) were subject to a "non-specific reaction between some stool specimens and the microplate assay" (i.e., a false-positive test result) (K. Hood, Alexon-Trend, personal communication, March 25, 1998). Alexon-Trend directed laboratories to discontinue using kits with implicated lot numbers. This report summarizes an analysis of reports of false-positive tests and describes identification of apparent clusters in three states.

  10. Long-term serological follow-up of blood donors with an HTLV-indeterminate western blot: antibody profile of seroconverters and individuals with false reactions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marina Lobato; Santos, Ana Carolina da Silva; Namen-Lopes, Maria Sueli; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Utsch, Denise Gonçalves; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara de F

    2010-10-01

    The high proportion of indeterminate results of the screening test for human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection has been a challenge worldwide. In this study, 60 persons with seroindeterminate results for HTLV were followed until their serological status was defined. At least two independent serological tests (EIA and WB) from sequential samples were performed at an average interval of 4.4 years, totaling 141 serum samples tested. Seroconversion occurred in 12 individuals (reactive by EIA, positive by WB and PCR), and 48 were classified as false reactions (non-reactive EIA and negative PCR, but indeterminate WB). The seroconverter group had epidemiological features similar to those seen in HTLV-1 carriers, and the average time of follow-up for seroconversion was 4 years. In the group with false reactions, the most frequent indeterminate WB pattern in the samples was the presence of p24 alone. This pattern was absent in the seroconverter group, suggesting that p24 alone is an indicator of false reactivity. In contrast, the presence of p19 and p24 seems to be an indicator of true reactivity, since this pattern was frequent (66.7%) among the seroconverters and much less common (10.4% of the first samples) among the individuals with false reactions (P = 0.0001). Thus, HTLV infection may be suspected when reactivity to p19 and p24 is observed. Individuals with an indeterminate WB pattern should be followed-up and retested. The improvement of the HTLV algorithm screening of blood donors has been necessary to reduce inconclusive results and to avoid unnecessary follow-up to define the status of infection.

  11. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    PubMed

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique.

  12. Deblocking reaction of chemically amplified ArF positive resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, Mitsuharu; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Tanabe, Hiroyoshi; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1998-06-01

    Deblocking reaction mechanisms and lithographic performance in chemically amplified positive ArF resists were investigated by analyzing acid concentration and blocking level. The resists consisted of triphenylsulfonium triflate as a acid generator and either the copolymer, poly(carboxy- tetracyclododecyl methacrylate70-co- tetrahydropyranylcarboxy-tetracyclododecyl methacrylate30) or the terpolymer, poly(tricyclodecylacrylate60- co-tetrahydropyranylmethacrylate20-co-methacrylic acid20). The deblocking reaction mechanisms were evaluated from Arrhenius plots of the deblocking reaction rate constant. It was found that the deblocking reaction of both resists is ruled by two rate-determining steps, i.e., reaction-controlled in the low-temperature region and acid- diffusion-controlled in the high-temperature region. Furthermore, the copolymer resist had better post-exposure- delay (PED) stability. To clarify this result, acid loss caused by air-born contamination effect on deblocking reaction was investigated. The change of amount of blocking group by acid loss was small for the copolymer. Therefore the copolymer resist had better PED stability. Furthermore, the post-exposure bake (PEB) sensitivity of linewidth of the copolymer resist was smaller than that of the terpolymer resist. Both deblocking reaction rate constant and reverse reaction rate constant of the copolymer resist increased with PEB temperature. As a result, equilibrium constant of the copolymer was not valuable with temperature. This is the reason why the copolymer resist has low PEB sensitivity. It is concluded that small acid loss effect on deblocking reaction induces better PED stability. A resist with reverse reaction has an advantage for PEB temperature sensitivity.

  13. False Positive Findings on I-131 WBS and SPECT/CT in Patients with History of Thyroid Cancer: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Palacios, Juan D.; Kuker, Russ A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Although whole body scan (WBS) with I-131 is a highly sensitive tool for detecting normal thyroid tissue and metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), it is not specific. Additional information, provided by single photon emission computed tomography combined with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and by the serum thyroglobulin level, is extremely useful for the interpretation of findings. Case Presentation. We report four cases of false positive WBS in patients with DTC: ovarian uptake corresponding to an endometrioma, scrotal uptake due to a spermatocele, rib-cage uptake due to an old fracture, and hepatic and renal uptake secondary to a granuloma and simple cyst, respectively. Conclusions. Trapping, organification, and storage of iodine are more prominent in thyroid tissue but not specific. Physiologic sodium-iodine symporter expression in other tissues explains some, but not all, of the WBS false positive cases. Other proposed etiologies are accumulation of radioiodine in inflamed organs, metabolism of radiodinated thyroid hormone, presence of radioiodine in body fluids, and contamination. In our cases nonthyroidal pathologies were suspected since the imaging findings were not corroborated by an elevated thyroglobulin level, which is considered a reliable tumor marker for most well-differentiated thyroid cancers. Clinicians should be aware of the potential pitfalls of WBS in DTC to avoid incorrect management. PMID:28246564

  14. A novel spherical shell filter for reducing false positives in automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leemput, Sil; Dorssers, Frank; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of pulmonary nodules is crucial for improving prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans has a great potential to enhance the performance of the radiologist in detecting nodules. In this paper we present a computer-aided lung nodule detection system for computed tomography (CT) scans that works in three steps. The system first segments the lung using thresholding and hole filling. From this segmentation the system extracts candidate nodules using Laplacian of Gaussian. To reject false positives among the detected candidate nodules, multiple established features are calculated. We propose a novel feature based on a spherical shell filter, which is specifically designed to distinguish between vascular structures and nodular structures. The performance of the proposed CAD system was evaluated by partaking in the ANODE09 challenge, which presents a platform for comparing automatic nodule detection programs. The results from the challenge show that our CAD system ranks third among the submitted works, demonstrating the efficacy of our proposed CAD system. The results also show that our proposed spherical shell filter in combination with conventional features can significantly reduce the number of false positives from the detected candidate nodules.

  15. Balancing the false negative and positive rates in suspect screening with high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry using multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof

    2015-02-17

    Modern high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enables full-spectrum trace level analysis of emerging environmental organic contaminants. This raises the opportunity for post-acquisition suspect screening when no reference standards are a priori available. When setting up a conventional screening identification train based on successively different identification criteria including mass error and isotope fit, the false negative rate typically accumulates upon advancing through the decision tree. The challenge is thus to elaborate a well-balanced screening, in which the different criteria are equally stringent, leading to a controllable number of false negatives. Presented is a novel suspect screening approach using liquid-chromatography Orbitrap HRMS. Based on a multivariate statistical model, the screening takes into account the accurate mass error of the mono isotopic ion and up to three isotopes, isotope ratios, and a peak/noise filter. As such, for the first time, controlling the overall false negative rate of the screening algorithm to a desired level (5% in this study) is achieved. Simultaneously, a well-balanced identification decision is guaranteed taking the different identification criteria as a whole in a holistic statistical approach. Taking into account 1, 2, and 3 isotopes decreases the false positive rate from 22, 2.8 to <0.3%, but the cost of increasing the median limits of identification from 200, 2000 to 2062 ng L(-1), respectively, should also be considered. As proof of concept, 7 biologically treated wastewaters were screened toward 77 suspect pharmaceuticals resulting in the indicative identification of 25 suspects. Subsequently obtained reference standards allowed confirmation for 19 out of these 25 pharmaceutical contaminants.

  16. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  17. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  18. Experimental Null Method to Guide the Development of Technical Procedures and to Control False-Positive Discovery in Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jianmin; Qu, Jun

    2015-10-02

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation of data quality and false-positive biomarker discovery is critical to direct the method development/optimization for quantitative proteomics, which nonetheless remains challenging largely due to the high complexity and unique features of proteomic data. Here we describe an experimental null (EN) method to address this need. Because the method experimentally measures the null distribution (either technical or biological replicates) using the same proteomic samples, the same procedures and the same batch as the case-vs-contol experiment, it correctly reflects the collective effects of technical variability (e.g., variation/bias in sample preparation, LC-MS analysis, and data processing) and project-specific features (e.g., characteristics of the proteome and biological variation) on the performances of quantitative analysis. To show a proof of concept, we employed the EN method to assess the quantitative accuracy and precision and the ability to quantify subtle ratio changes between groups using different experimental and data-processing approaches and in various cellular and tissue proteomes. It was found that choices of quantitative features, sample size, experimental design, data-processing strategies, and quality of chromatographic separation can profoundly affect quantitative precision and accuracy of label-free quantification. The EN method was also demonstrated as a practical tool to determine the optimal experimental parameters and rational ratio cutoff for reliable protein quantification in specific proteomic experiments, for example, to identify the necessary number of technical/biological replicates per group that affords sufficient power for discovery. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of EN method to estimate levels of false-positives in the discovery of altered proteins, using two concocted sample sets mimicking proteomic profiling using technical and biological replicates, respectively, where the true-positives

  19. Blank-comparison matching-to-sample reveals a false positive symmetry test in a capuchin monkey

    PubMed Central

    de Faria Brino, Ana Leda; da Silva Campos, Rodolfo; de Faria Galvão, Olavo; McIlvane, William Jay

    2014-01-01

    A positive symmetry test result was obtained with a capuchin monkey that had previously exhibited virtually errorless AB and BA arbitrary matching-to-sample (MTS) with different stimuli. The symmetry test (BA) followed the acquisition of a new AB relation. It seemed possible, however, that the positive result could have occurred through the exclusion of previously defined comparison stimuli and not because the new AB and BA relations had the property of symmetry. To assess this possibility, a blank-comparison MTS procedure was implemented that permitted the separate assessment of select and reject (i.e., exclusion) control with both baseline and BA matching relations. In this assessment, the monkey did not exhibit reliable BA matching when exclusion was not possible, thus showing that the symmetry result was a false positive. However, the study demonstrated the feasibility of using a blank comparison MTS procedure with capuchins. The present results may set the stage for more successful methodology for establishing desired forms of relational stimulus control in capuchins and ultimately improving the assessment of relational learning capacity in that species, other nonhuman species, and nonverbal humans. PMID:25383161

  20. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  1. On the occurrence of false positives in tests of migration under an isolation-with-migration model.

    PubMed

    Hey, Jody; Chung, Yujin; Sethuraman, Arun

    2015-10-01

    The population genetic study of divergence is often carried out using a Bayesian genealogy sampler, like those implemented in ima2 and related programs, and these analyses frequently include a likelihood ratio test of the null hypothesis of no migration between populations. Cruickshank and Hahn (2014, Molecular Ecology, 23, 3133-3157) recently reported a high rate of false-positive test results with ima2 for data simulated with small numbers of loci under models with no migration and recent splitting times. We confirm these findings and discover that they are caused by a failure of the assumptions underlying likelihood ratio tests that arises when using marginal likelihoods for a subset of model parameters. We also show that for small data sets, with little divergence between samples from two populations, an excellent fit can often be found by a model with a low migration rate and recent splitting time and a model with a high migration rate and a deep splitting time.

  2. Automated detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on fundus images: false positive reduction based on vessel likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Ishida, Kyoko; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of glaucoma is important to slow down or cease progression of the disease and for preventing total blindness. We have previously proposed an automated scheme for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD), which is one of the early signs of glaucoma observed on retinal fundus images. In this study, a new multi-step detection scheme was included to improve detection of subtle and narrow NFLDs. In addition, new features were added to distinguish between NFLDs and blood vessels, which are frequent sites of false positives (FPs). The result was evaluated with a new test dataset consisted of 261 cases, including 130 cases with NFLDs. Using the proposed method, the initial detection rate was improved from 82% to 98%. At the sensitivity of 80%, the number of FPs per image was reduced from 4.25 to 1.36. The result indicates the potential usefulness of the proposed method for early detection of glaucoma.

  3. False-positive liver scans due to portal hypertension: correlation with percutaneous transhepatic portograms in 33 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Takayasu, K.; Moriyama, N.; Suzuki, M.; Yamada, T.; Fukutake, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, C.; Musha, H.; Okuda, K.

    1983-04-01

    Tc-99m-phytate scanning of the liver and percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein were performed in 33 patients--26 with cirrhosis, 3 with chronic active hepatitis, 2 with idiopathic portal hypertension, and 2 with unresolved acute hepatitis. A discrete defect in the porta hepatis area was seen in 6 of 28 patients who had portal vein pressure above 200 mm H2O. In 5 of the 6 patients with a false-positive scan, the umbilical portion of the left portal vein branch was dilated (larger than 25 x 20 mm) on the portogram, with or without a patent paraumbilical vein. The anatomical basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and it is suggested that this area be given special attention.

  4. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Jerwen

    2012-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be in the descending order of memory strength. The dual-retrieval process theory postulates two phases in a free recall, a first direct access phase in which items are output verbatim in the weakest-to-strongest order (cognitive triage) and a second reconstructive phase in which reconstructed items are output in the strongest-to-weakest order. In three experiments, all three indicators of memory strength (latency, accuracy, and confidence) consistently showed a descending-strength order of recall both for true and false memories. Additionally, false memory was found to be output in two phases and subjects’ confidence judgment of their own memory to be unaccountable by retrieval fluency (recall latency). PMID:22582008

  5. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jerwen

    2008-05-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be in the descending order of memory strength. The dual-retrieval process theory postulates two phases in a free recall, a first direct access phase in which items are output verbatim in the weakest-to-strongest order (cognitive triage) and a second reconstructive phase in which reconstructed items are output in the strongest-to-weakest order. In three experiments, all three indicators of memory strength (latency, accuracy, and confidence) consistently showed a descending-strength order of recall both for true and false memories. Additionally, false memory was found to be output in two phases and subjects' confidence judgment of their own memory to be unaccountable by retrieval fluency (recall latency).

  6. Validation of Candidate Multiple-Transiting Planet Systems and Assessing Possible False Positives based on Photometric Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert; Ford, E. B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Planetary systems with multiple planets that transit their host star are of great interest for studying the architecture of planetary systems (Steffen et al. 2010; Holman et al. 2010). Even space-based exoplanet transit surveys, such as CoRoT and Kepler, must be careful to exclude astrophysical false positives that can mimic the photometric signature of multiple-transiting planet system (MTPS). Due to large point spread functions, a putative MTPS might actually be: 1) a true MTPS, 2) a blend of an eclipsing binary and a star with a single transiting planet, 3) a blend of two eclipsing binaries, or 4) two stars each with a single transiting planet. Assessing the relative probability for each of these possibilities is important both for validating potential planets and for prioritizing the limited follow-up resources that can contribute to validation or confirmation of such systems. We introduce new observable parameters based on ratios of the measured transit durations in MTPSs, as well as the measured orbital periods and (when available) impact parameters. We explore the utility of these parameters for validating candidate MTPSs and/or rejecting false positives. For multiple planets around the same star, these parameters have values near one. The distribution of these parameters for certain blend scenarios can be markedly different. We investigate these distributions through Monte Carlo simulations of three different types of blends; planet-binary, binary-binary, and planet-planet and compare these to the distribution for true MTPSs. We present results based on previously released Kepler data and simulations using multiple distributions for the orbital inclinations, eccentricities, and binary star population. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate

  7. A Nested PCR Assay to Avoid False Positive Detection of the Microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) in Environmental Samples in Shrimp Farms.

    PubMed

    Jaroenlak, Pattana; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Williams, Bryony A P; Stentiford, Grant D; Flegel, Timothy W; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Itsathitphaisarn, Ornchuma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is an important disease of cultivated shrimp. Heavy infections may lead to retarded growth and unprofitable harvests. Existing PCR detection methods target the EHP small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene (SSU-PCR). However, we discovered that they can give false positive test results due to cross reactivity of the SSU-PCR primers with DNA from closely related microsporidia that infect other aquatic organisms. This is problematic for investigating and monitoring EHP infection pathways. To overcome this problem, a sensitive and specific nested PCR method was developed for detection of the spore wall protein (SWP) gene of EHP (SWP-PCR). The new SWP-PCR method did not produce false positive results from closely related microsporidia. The first PCR step of the SWP-PCR method was 100 times (104 plasmid copies per reaction vial) more sensitive than that of the existing SSU-PCR method (106 copies) but sensitivity was equal for both in the nested step (10 copies). Since the hepatopancreas of cultivated shrimp is not currently known to be infected with microsporidia other than EHP, the SSU-PCR methods are still valid for analyzing hepatopancreatic samples despite the lower sensitivity than the SWP-PCR method. However, due to its greater specificity and sensitivity, we recommend that the SWP-PCR method be used to screen for EHP in feces, feed and environmental samples for potential EHP carriers.

  8. A Nested PCR Assay to Avoid False Positive Detection of the Microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) in Environmental Samples in Shrimp Farms

    PubMed Central

    Jaroenlak, Pattana; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Williams, Bryony A. P.; Stentiford, Grant D.; Flegel, Timothy W.; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2016-01-01

    Hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is an important disease of cultivated shrimp. Heavy infections may lead to retarded growth and unprofitable harvests. Existing PCR detection methods target the EHP small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene (SSU-PCR). However, we discovered that they can give false positive test results due to cross reactivity of the SSU-PCR primers with DNA from closely related microsporidia that infect other aquatic organisms. This is problematic for investigating and monitoring EHP infection pathways. To overcome this problem, a sensitive and specific nested PCR method was developed for detection of the spore wall protein (SWP) gene of EHP (SWP-PCR). The new SWP-PCR method did not produce false positive results from closely related microsporidia. The first PCR step of the SWP-PCR method was 100 times (104 plasmid copies per reaction vial) more sensitive than that of the existing SSU-PCR method (106 copies) but sensitivity was equal for both in the nested step (10 copies). Since the hepatopancreas of cultivated shrimp is not currently known to be infected with microsporidia other than EHP, the SSU-PCR methods are still valid for analyzing hepatopancreatic samples despite the lower sensitivity than the SWP-PCR method. However, due to its greater specificity and sensitivity, we recommend that the SWP-PCR method be used to screen for EHP in feces, feed and environmental samples for potential EHP carriers. PMID:27832178

  9. True and false positive peaks in genomewide scans: applications of length-biased sampling to linkage mapping.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, J D; Shannon, W D; Lathrop, G M; Nolan, J P; Goldin, L R; Chase, G A; Weeks, D E

    1997-08-01

    Disease-susceptibility loci are now being mapped via genomewide scans in which a linkage statistic is computed at each of a large number of markers. Such disease-susceptibility loci may be identified via a peak in the test statistic when the latter is plotted against the genetic map. In this paper we establish, by appealing to renewal theory, that true positive peaks are expected to be longer than false positive peaks. These results are verified by a realistic simulation of a genomewide linkage study based on the affected-sib-pair design. Since longer peaks are more likely to contain a gene of interest than are shorter peaks, these differences may aid in linkage mapping, justifying assignment of lower priority to shorter peaks. However, since these differences are generally small, statistics based on both peak length and height may not be much more powerful than those based on height alone. The results presented here also provide a theoretical framework for methods that use the length of shared haplotypes in populations to map disease genes.

  10. Manufacturer's recall of rapid assay kits based on false positive Cryptosporidium antigen tests--Wisconsin, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    2002-03-08

    The Wisconsin Division of Public Health and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene (WSLH) reported that a recent cluster of cryptosporidiosis cases in a three-county area in southeastern Wisconsin was the result of false-positive tests. During December 1, 2001-February 1, 2002, approximately 30 cases of cryptosporidiosis were diagnosed at a laboratory in southeastern Wisconsin using the Becton, Dickinson, and Company (Franklin Lakes, New Jersey) ColorPAC Cryptosporidium/Giardia rapid assay (lot number 219370, expiration date 2002-06-05). Seventeen stool specimens, which were collected from 11 patients and tested positive by the rapid assay, were re-evaluated at WSLH. Six of these stool specimens were in EcoFix (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), eight were in Cary-Blair transport media, and three were formalin fixed. All 17 specimens tested negative for Cryptosporidium at WSLH using the hot safranin stain and MeriFluor (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) Cryptosporidium/Giardia direct fluorescent antibody kit with concentrated specimens.

  11. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Grace Y; Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D'Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P; Muggia, Victoria A

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation.

  12. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules: false positive reduction using a 3D gradient field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhanyu; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan

    2004-05-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection system to aid radiologists in diagnosing lung cancer in thoracic computed tomographic (CT) images. The purpose of this study was to improve the false-positive (FP) reduction stage of our algorithm by developing and incorporating a gradient field technique. This technique extracts 3D shape information from the gray-scale values within a volume of interest. The gradient field feature values are higher for spherical objects, and lower for elongated and irregularly-shaped objects. A data set of 55 thin CT scans from 40 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the gradient field technique. After initial nodule candidate detection and rule-based first stage FP reduction, there were 3487 FP and 65 true positive (TP) objects in our data set. Linear discriminant classifiers with and without the gradient field feature were designed for the second stage FP reduction. The accuracy of these classifiers was evaluated using the area Az under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Az values were 0.93 and 0.91 with and without the gradient field feature, respectively. The improvement with the gradient field feature was statistically significant (p=0.01).

  13. Resolution, target density and labeling effects in colocalization studies - suppression of false positives by nanoscopy and modified algorithms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Rönnlund, Daniel; Aspenström, Pontus; Braun, Laura J; Gad, Annica K B; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-03-01

    Colocalization analyses of fluorescence images are extensively used to quantify molecular interactions in cells. In recent years, fluorescence nanoscopy has approached resolutions close to molecular dimensions. However, the extent to which image resolution influences different colocalization estimates has not been systematically investigated. In this work, we applied simulations and resolution-tunable stimulated emission depletion microscopy to evaluate how the resolution, molecular density and label size of targeted molecules influence estimates of the most commonly used colocalization algorithms (Pearson correlation coefficient, Manders' M1 and M2 coefficients), as well as estimates by the image cross-correlation spectroscopy method. We investigated the practically measureable extents of colocalization for stimulated emission depletion microscopy with positive and negative control samples with an aim to identifying the strengths and weaknesses of nanoscopic techniques for colocalization studies. At a typical optical resolution of a confocal microscope (200-300 nm), our results indicate that the extent of colocalization is typically overestimated by the tested algorithms, especially at high molecular densities. Only minor effects of this kind were observed at higher resolutions (< 60 nm). By contrast, underestimation of colocalization may occur if the resolution is close to the size of the label/affinity molecules themselves. To suppress false positives at confocal resolutions and high molecular densities, we introduce a statistical variant of Costes' threshold searching algorithm, used in combination with correlation-based methods like the Pearson coefficient and the image cross-correlation spectroscopy approach, to set intensity thresholds separating background noise from signals.

  14. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W.; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D’Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Muggia, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation. PMID:28203425

  15. True and false positive peaks in genomewide scans: applications of length-biased sampling to linkage mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, J D; Shannon, W D; Lathrop, G M; Nolan, J P; Goldin, L R; Chase, G A; Weeks, D E

    1997-01-01

    Disease-susceptibility loci are now being mapped via genomewide scans in which a linkage statistic is computed at each of a large number of markers. Such disease-susceptibility loci may be identified via a peak in the test statistic when the latter is plotted against the genetic map. In this paper we establish, by appealing to renewal theory, that true positive peaks are expected to be longer than false positive peaks. These results are verified by a realistic simulation of a genomewide linkage study based on the affected-sib-pair design. Since longer peaks are more likely to contain a gene of interest than are shorter peaks, these differences may aid in linkage mapping, justifying assignment of lower priority to shorter peaks. However, since these differences are generally small, statistics based on both peak length and height may not be much more powerful than those based on height alone. The results presented here also provide a theoretical framework for methods that use the length of shared haplotypes in populations to map disease genes. PMID:9311749

  16. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  17. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  18. Predicting radiologists' true and false positive decisions in reading mammograms by using gaze parameters and image-based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Ryder, Will; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists' gaze-related parameters combined with image-based features were utilized to classify suspicious mammographic areas ultimately scored as True Positives (TP) and False Positives (FP). Eight breast radiologists read 120 two-view digital mammograms of which 59 had biopsy proven cancer. Eye tracking data was collected and nearby fixations were clustered together. Suspicious areas on mammograms were independently identified based on thresholding an intensity saliency map followed by automatic segmentation and pruning steps. For each radiologist reported area, radiologist's fixation clusters in the area, as well as neighboring suspicious areas within 2.5° of the center of fixation, were found. A 45-dimensional feature vector containing gaze parameters of the corresponding cluster along with image-based characteristics was constructed. Gaze parameters included total number of fixations in the cluster, dwell time, time to hit the cluster for the first time, maximum number of consecutive fixations, and saccade magnitude of the first fixation in the cluster. Image-based features consisted of intensity, shape, and texture descriptors extracted from the region around the suspicious area, its surrounding tissue, and the entire breast. For each radiologist, a userspecific Support Vector Machine (SVM) model was built to classify the reported areas as TPs or FPs. Leave-one-out cross validation was utilized to avoid over-fitting. A feature selection step was embedded in the SVM training procedure by allowing radial basis function kernels to have 45 scaling factors. The proposed method was compared with the radiologists' performance using the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC). The JAFROC figure of merit increased significantly for six radiologists.

  19. Factors affecting recall rate and false positive fraction in breast cancer screening with breast tomosynthesis - A statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Aldana; Lång, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigate which factors affect the false positive fraction (FPF) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to digital mammography (DM) in a screening population by using classification and regression trees (C&RT) and binary marginal generalized linear models. The data was obtained from the Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial, which aimed to compare the performance of DBT to DM in breast cancer screening. By using data from the first half of the study population (7500 women), a tree with the recall probability for different groups was calculated. The effect of age and breast density on the FPF was estimated using a binary marginal generalized linear model. Our results show that breast density and breast cancer were the main factors influencing recall. The FPF is mainly affected by breast density and increases with breast density for DBT and DM. In conclusion, the results obtained with C&RT are easy to interpret and similar to those obtained using binary marginal generalized linear models. The FPF is approximately 40% higher for DBT compared to DM for all breast density categories.

  20. False-positive reduction using Hessian features in computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules on thoracic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Ge, Zhanyu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2005-04-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung nodules in thoracic CT volumes. During false positive (FP) reduction, the image structures around the identified nodule candidates play an important role in differentiating nodules from vessels. In our previous work, we exploited shape and first-order derivative information of the images by extracting ellipsoid and gradient field features. The purpose of this study was to explore the object shape information using second-order derivatives and the Hessian matrix to further improve the performance of our detection system. Eight features related to the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix were extracted from a volume of interest containing the object, and were combined with ellipsoid and gradient field features to discriminate nodules from FPs. A data set of 82 CT scans from 56 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the FP reduction technique. The classification accuracy was assessed using the area Az under the receiving operating characteristic curve and the number of FPs per section at 80% sensitivity. In the combined feature space, we obtained a test Az of 0.97 +/- 0.01, and 0.27 FPs/section at 80% sensitivity. Our results indicate that combining the Hessian, ellipsoid and gradient field features can significantly improve the performance of our FP reduction stage.

  1. Computerized lung nodule detection on thoracic CT images: combined rule-based and statistical classifier for false-positive reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for lung nodule detection on thoracic helical computed tomography (CT) images. In the first stage of this CAD system, lung regions are identified and suspicious structures are segmented. These structures may include true lung nodules or normal structures that consist mainly of vascular structures. We have designed rule-based classifiers to distinguish nodules and normal structures using 2D and 3D features. After rule-based classification, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to further reduce the number of false positive (FP) objects. We have performed a preliminary study using CT images from 17 patients with 31 lung nodules. When only LDA classification was applied to the segmented objects, the sensitivity was 84% (26/31) with 2.53 (1549/612) FP objects per slice. When the LDA followed the rule-based classifier, the number of FP objects per slice decreased to 1.75 (1072/612) at the same sensitivity. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of our approach for nodule detection and FP reduction on CT images. The inclusion of rule-based classification leads to an improvement in detection accuracy for the CAD system.

  2. Microarray analysis of cytoplasmic versus whole cell RNA reveals a considerable number of missed and false positive mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Trask, Heidi W; Cowper-Sal-lari, Richard; Sartor, Maureen A; Gui, Jiang; Heath, Catherine V; Renuka, Janhavi; Higgins, Azara-Jane; Andrews, Peter; Korc, Murray; Moore, Jason H; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2009-10-01

    With no known exceptions, every published microarray study to determine differential mRNA levels in eukaryotes used RNA extracted from whole cells. It is assumed that the use of whole cell RNA in microarray gene expression analysis provides a legitimate profile of steady-state mRNA. Standard labeling methods and the prevailing dogma that mRNA resides almost exclusively in the cytoplasm has led to the long-standing belief that the nuclear RNA contribution is negligible. We report that unadulterated cytoplasmic RNA uncovers differentially expressed mRNAs that otherwise would not have been detected when using whole cell RNA and that the inclusion of nuclear RNA has a large impact on whole cell gene expression microarray results by distorting the mRNA profile to the extent that a substantial number of false positives are generated. We conclude that to produce a valid profile of the steady-state mRNA population, the nuclear component must be excluded, and to arrive at a more realistic view of a cell's gene expression profile, the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions should be analyzed separately.

  3. Automated segmentation of 3-D spectral OCT retinal blood vessels by neural canal opening false positive suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoft, Michael D; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for automatically segmenting the blood vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes, with a focus on the ability to segment the vessels in the region near the neural canal opening (NCO). The algorithm first pre-segments the NCO using a graph-theoretic approach. Oriented Gabor wavelets rotated around the center of the NCO are applied to extract features in a 2-D vessel-aimed projection image. Corresponding oriented NCO-based templates are utilized to help suppress the false positive tendency near the NCO boundary. The vessels are identified in a vessel-aimed projection image using a pixel classification algorithm. Based on the 2-D vessel profiles, 3-D vessel segmentation is performed by a triangular-mesh-based graph search approach in the SD-OCT volume. The segmentation method is trained on 5 and is tested on 10 randomly chosen independent ONH-centered SD-OCT volumes from 15 subjects with glaucoma. Using ROC analysis, for the 2-D vessel segmentation, we demonstrate an improvement over the closest previous work with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81 (0.72 for previously reported approach) for the region around the NCO and 0.84 for the region outside the NCO (0.81 for previously reported approach).

  4. Impact of a False-Positive Screening Mammogram on Subsequent Screening Behavior and Stage at Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dabbous, Firas M; Dolecek, Therese A; Berbaum, Michael L; Friedewald, Sarah M; Summerfelt, Wm Thomas; Hoskins, Kent; Rauscher, Garth H

    2017-03-01

    Background: Experiencing a false positive (FP) screening mammogram is economically, physically, and emotionally burdensome, which may affect future screening behavior by delaying the next scheduled mammogram or by avoiding screening altogether. We sought to examine the impact of a FP screening mammogram on the subsequent screening mammography behavior.Methods: Delay in obtaining subsequent screening was defined as any mammogram performed more than 12 months from index mammogram. The Kaplan-Meier (product limit) estimator and Cox proportional hazards model were used to estimate the unadjusted delay and the hazard ratio (HR) of delay of the subsequent screening mammogram within the next 36 months from the index mammogram date.Results: A total of 650,232 true negative (TN) and 90,918 FP mammograms from 261,767 women were included. The likelihood of a subsequent mammogram was higher in women experiencing a TN result than women experiencing a FP result (85.0% vs. 77.9%, P < 0.001). The median delay in returning to screening was higher for FP versus TN (13 months vs. 3 months, P < 0.001). Women with TN result were 36% more likely to return to screening in the next 36 months compared with women with a FP result HR = 1.36 (95% CI, 1.35-1.37). Experiencing a FP mammogram increases the risk of late stage at diagnosis compared with prior TN mammogram (P < 0.001).Conclusions: Women with a FP mammogram were more likely to delay their subsequent screening compared with women with a TN mammogram.Impact: A prior FP experience may subsequently increase the 4-year cumulative risk of late stage at diagnosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 397-403. ©2017 AACR.

  5. Mixture of expert artificial neural networks with ensemble training for reduction of various sources of false positives in CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; He, Lifeng; Khankari, Shweta; Ge, Liang; Verceles, Joel; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose was to reduce false-positive (FP) detections generated by a computerized lesion detection scheme by using a "mixture of expert" massive-training artificial neural networks (MTANNs). Multiple MTANNs were trained with "ensemble training" for reduction of diverse types of non-lesions. We started from a seed MTANN trained with lesions and non-lesions of a seed type. We applied the trained seed MTANN to lesions and various types of non-lesions to analyze the weakness of the seed MTANN. We arranged the output scores of the MTANN for lesions and non-lesions in an ascending order to form the score scale representing the degree of difficulty in distinction between lesions and non-lesions by the seed MTANN. The score scale was divided into several segments, and ten non-lesions were sampled from the center of each segment so that sets of non-lesion samples covered diverse difficulties. We trained several MTANNs with several sets of non-lesions so that each MTANN became an expert for the non-lesions at a certain level of difficulty. We then combined expert MTANNs with a mixing ANN to form a "mixture of expert" MTANNs. Our database consisted of CT colonography datasets acquired from 100 patients, including 26 polyps. We applied our initial CAD scheme to this CTC database. FP sources included haustral folds, stool, colonic walls, the ileocecal valves, and rectal tubes. The mixture of expert MTANNs distinguished all polyps correctly from more than 50% of the non-polyps. Thus, the mixture of expert MTANNs was able reduce one half of the FPs generated by a computerized polyp detection scheme while the original sensitivity was maintained. We compare the effectiveness of ensemble training with that of training with manually selected cases. The performance of the MTANNs with ensemble training was superior to that of the MTANNs trained with manually selected cases.

  6. Selective Activation Around the Left Occipito-Temporal Sulcus for Words Relative to Pictures: Individual Variability or False Positives?

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nicholas D; Mechelli, Andrea; Noppeney, Uta; Veltman, Dick J; Rombouts, Serge ARB; Glensman, Janice; Haynes, John-Dylan; Price, Cathy J

    2008-01-01

    We used high-resolution fMRI to investigate claims that learning to read results in greater left occipito-temporal (OT) activation for written words relative to pictures of objects. In the first experiment, 9/16 subjects performing a one-back task showed activation in ≥1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures (P < 0.05 uncorrected). In a second experiment, another 9/15 subjects performing a semantic decision task activated ≥1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures. However, at this low statistical threshold false positives need to be excluded. The semantic decision paradigm was therefore repeated, within subject, in two different scanners (1.5 and 3 T). Both scanners consistently localised left OT activation for words relative to fixation and pictures relative to words, but there were no consistent effects for words relative to pictures. Finally, in a third experiment, we minimised the voxel size (1.5 × 1.5 × 1.5 mm3) and demonstrated a striking concordance between the voxels activated for words and pictures, irrespective of task (naming vs. one-back) or script (English vs. Hebrew). In summary, although we detected differential activation for words relative to pictures, these effects: (i) do not withstand statistical rigour; (ii) do not replicate within or between subjects; and (iii) are observed in voxels that also respond to pictures of objects. Our findings have implications for the role of left OT activation during reading. More generally, they show that studies using low statistical thresholds in single subject analyses should correct the statistical threshold for the number of comparisons made or replicate effects within subject. Hum Brain Mapp 2008. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:17712786

  7. Reaction Time Variability in HIV-Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ettenhofer, Mark L.; Foley, Jessica; Behdin, Nina; Levine, Andrew J.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of HIV/AIDS is frequently associated with frontal/subcortical dysfunction and mean reaction time (RT) slowing. Beyond group means, within-subject variability of RT has been found to be particularly sensitive to frontal/subcortical dysfunction in other populations. However, the possible relevance of RT variability to HIV/AIDS patients remains unknown. This study evaluated the relationships between RT variability and indicators such as neurocognitive, behavioral, and immunological status. A total of 46 HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral medication regimens were included in this study. Overall performance of this sample was poorer than normative means on measures of RT latency, RT variability, and traditional neurocognitive domains. Results demonstrated that the measures of RT variability were associated with global cognition, medication adherence rates, and peak immunological dysfunction, above and beyond the effects of RT latency. These preliminary findings suggest that measures of RT variability may provide enhanced sensitivity to neurocognitive disease burden in HIV/AIDS relative to more traditional measures of mean RT or cognitive function. PMID:20798183

  8. Retroperitoneal Endometriosis: A Possible Cause of False Positive Finding at 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Lisato, Laura Camilla; Ballotta, Maria; D'Isanto, Mariangela Zanforlini; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a frequent and clinically relevant problem in young women. Laparoscopy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of endometriosis, but frequently both morphologic and functional imaging techniques are involved in the diagnostic course before achieving a conclusive diagnosis. We present a case of a patient affected by infiltrating retroperitoneal endometriosis falsely interpreted as a malignant mass by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. PMID:26097425

  9. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  10. Development of a sensitive and false-positive free PMA-qPCR viability assay to quantify VBNC Escherichia coli and evaluate disinfection performance in wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Kibbee, Richard J; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-01-01

    The detection and quantification of viable Escherichia coli cells in wastewater treatment plant effluent is very important as it is the main disinfection efficacy parameter for assessing its public health risk and environmental impact. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and false-positive free propidium monoazide-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) assay to quantify the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) E. coli present in secondary wastewater effluent after chlorine disinfection. The qPCR target was the E. coli uidA gene, and native Taq was used to eliminate false positives caused by the presence of contaminant E. coli DNA in recombinant Taq polymerase reagents. Due to issues with qPCR inhibitors in wastewater, this study explored several pre-DNA extraction treatment methods for qPCR inhibitor removal. PMA-qPCR validation was done using salmon testes DNA (Sketa DNA) as an exogenous control added directly to the wastewater samples and amplified using a separate qPCR assay. After disinfection of secondary effluent with 2ppm chlorine at the plant, the mean Log10 CFU reduction in E. coli was 2.85 from a mean CFU of 3.48/10mL compared to 0.21 Log10 CCE mean reduction of the uidA gene from a mean CCE of 3.16/10mL. The VBNC cell concentrations were calculated as 2.32 Log10/10mL by subtracting the colony forming units (CFU) obtained from membrane filtration from the calculated CFU equivalent (CCE) values obtained from PMA-qPCR. These results demonstrate the effective use of a PMA-qPCR method for the quantification of the E. coli uidA gene and indicate there are high numbers (2.01×10(3)CCE/100mL) of VBNC E. coli cells leaving the wastewater treatment plant in the final effluent after chlorine treatment. VBNC bacterial cells are of concern as they have the potential to resuscitate and grow, regain virulence, affect natural microbiome in the discharge sites, and pass on antimicrobial resistant genes to other microorganisms.

  11. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jou, Jerwen

    2008-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be…

  12. False-positive synovial fluid alpha-defensin test in a patient with acute gout affecting a prosthetic knee.

    PubMed

    Partridge, D G; Gordon, A; Townsend, R

    2017-03-17

    The alpha-defensin test has demonstrated promising results in studies evaluating it for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. There are limited data in the literature regarding its use in patients with other inflammatory joint conditions, but a high specificity for infection has been reported. We describe a patient with a prosthetic knee joint, who had a positive alpha-defensin lateral flow assay but in whom subsequent results confirmed a diagnosis of acute gout with no evidence of infection.

  13. ABIOTIC O{sub 2} LEVELS ON PLANETS AROUND F, G, K, AND M STARS: POSSIBLE FALSE POSITIVES FOR LIFE?

    SciTech Connect

    Harman, C. E.; Kasting, J. F.; Schwieterman, E. W.; Schottelkotte, J. C.

    2015-10-20

    In the search for life on Earth-like planets around other stars, the first (and likely only) information will come from the spectroscopic characterization of the planet's atmosphere. Of the countless number of chemical species terrestrial life produces, only a few have the distinct spectral features and the necessary atmospheric abundance to be detectable. The easiest of these species to observe in Earth's atmosphere is O{sub 2} (and its photochemical byproduct, O{sub 3}). However, O{sub 2} can also be produced abiotically by photolysis of CO{sub 2}, followed by recombination of O atoms with each other. CO is produced in stoichiometric proportions. Whether O{sub 2} and CO can accumulate to appreciable concentrations depends on the ratio of far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation coming from the planet's parent star and on what happens to these gases when they dissolve in a planet's oceans. Using a one-dimensional photochemical model, we demonstrate that O{sub 2} derived from CO{sub 2} photolysis should not accumulate to measurable concentrations on planets around F- and G-type stars. K-star, and especially M-star planets, however, may build up O{sub 2} because of the low NUV flux from their parent stars, in agreement with some previous studies. On such planets, a “false positive” for life is possible if recombination of dissolved CO and O{sub 2} in the oceans is slow and if other O{sub 2} sinks (e.g., reduced volcanic gases or dissolved ferrous iron) are small. O{sub 3}, on the other hand, could be detectable at UV wavelengths (λ < 300 nm) for a much broader range of boundary conditions and stellar types.

  14. Invasive pulmonary mycosis due to Chaetomium globosum with false-positive galactomannan test: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Capoor, Malini R; Agarwal, Poojan; Goel, Manoj; Jain, Sarika; Shivaprakash, Mandya Rudramurthy; Honnavar, Prasanna; Gupta, Sunita; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the authors report Chaetomium globosum as a cause of invasive pulmonary infection in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Fungal hyphae (KOH and Calcofluor) were seen on direct microscopy of lung biopsy sample and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sample. C. globosum isolated on culture clinched the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary infection by Chaetomium spp. A positive galactomannan of serum and BAL was repeatedly seen and was utilised for follow-up and as prognostic marker in patient management. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B followed by voriconazole. All the Chaetomium infections reported till date since 1980 are reviewed. Chaetomium spp. with its unique ecology has a hidden clinical potential to cause invasive mould infections.

  15. Detecting cocaine use? The autobiographical implicit association test (aIAT) produces false positives in a real-world setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT) is a novel application of the implicit association concept for detecting life events. It has been used to reveal concealed knowledge in clinical and forensic settings, including detecting drug use. In this study, we aimed to explore the functionality of the aIAT to identify drug use in real-world settings. Methods The study used mixed methodology with known groups of drug users and nonusers. Recreational cocaine users (n = 23) and non-users (n = 23) were recruited through ethnographic methodology and assessed using a bespoke brief aIAT for cocaine use. An identical aIAT test for heroin detection was also administered to a sub-sample of 10 cocaine users and 13 nonusers. The accuracy of the cocaine aIAT was measured through ROC analysis. Paradoxical aIAT results were explored by integrating craving, consumption measures and life-story interviews into the analysis. Results Whilst the two brief aIATs showed good concurrent validity for cocaine users by accurately detecting drug using status for 18 of the 23 users (78.3%), the test falsely reported 61% cocaine users in the non-user comparison group. The average D-scores were 0.257±0.246 for the cocaine users and 0.134±0.367 for the non-users, showing no discriminatory power (t(44) = 1.339, p = 0.187; AUC = 0.605, p = 0.223). Results were independent from craving and recent cocaine use. The comparison group’s cocaine and heroin aIAT scores correlated significantly (r(13) = 0.776, p = 0.002) whilst an accurate absence of such relationship was evidenced in the cocaine using sample (r(10) = 0.061, p = 0.866). Triangulation with life-story interviews suggests that in the absence of an autobiographical event, this test may measure an alternative cognitive construct linked to the Self-concept. Conclusion The aIAT is a variant of an attitude measure and can be better rationalized if propositional thinking is implied to explain outcomes. The Relational Frame

  16. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of breast adenomyoepithelioma: a potential false positive pitfall and presence of intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Saad, Reda S; Richmond, Lara; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Ghorab, Zeina

    2012-11-01

    Cytologic diagnosis of adenomyoepithelioma can be very challenging. We report fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) findings of a benign adenomyoepithelioma. The cytologic features are characterized by hypercellularity and the presence of numerous atypical dispersed cells with epithelioid morphology and intact cytoplasm. The nuclei showed stippled chromatin, irregular nuclear membrane, and prominent eosinophilic nucleoli. No necrosis or mitoses were seen. The presence of naked nuclei, and extensive intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions were identified and raised the possibility of adenomyoepithelioma. Immunohistochemically, the atypical cells showed strong positivity for myosin heavy chain, p63, and CK5/6, while the epithelial cells reacted with estrogen receptors. This immunophenotypic pattern supports the myoepithelial origin of the atypical cell proliferation and favors the diagnosis of benign adenomyoepithelioma. However, biopsy was recommended to exclude malignancy. Histologically, the tumor showed prominent myoepithelial cells with significant atypia, intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions, and dense cytoplasm. No evidence of malignancy was identified. In conclusion, we report a case of adenomyoepithelioma with a significant cytological atypia that may result in confusion with malignant breast tumors. The presence of intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions, naked nuclei, and expression of myoepithelial markers should provide clues to the right diagnosis and benign nature of this lesion. Cytopathologists should be familiarized with this entity to avoid a misdiagnosis of carcinoma.

  17. False carbamazepine positives due to 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine breakdown in the GC-MS injector port.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Russell J; Angier, Mike K; Johnson, Robert D

    2014-10-01

    During the investigation of aviation accidents, postmortem specimens from accident victims are submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicological analysis. A case recently received by CAMI screened positive for the anticonvulsant medication carbamazepine (CBZ; Tegretol(®)) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The CBZ found during this routine screening procedure was subsequently confirmed using a CBZ-specific GC-MS procedure. It was later discovered that the accident victim had been prescribed oxcarbazepine (OXCBZ; Trileptal(®)). OXCBZ is structurally similar to CBZ and is metabolized by cytosolic enzymes in the liver to an active metabolite, 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (DiCBZ). It was determined that the CBZ initially found in this case was present due to the thermal breakdown of DiCBZ in the GC-MS injector port. In the current study, this conversion was investigated and the percentage of CBZ formed at various injector port temperatures was determined. Additionally, these three compounds were quantified in nine fluid and tissue specimens from the case in question. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was also incorporated to further demonstrate the absence/presence of CBZ in these samples.

  18. Sequence homologies between Mycoplasma and Chlamydia spp. lead to false-positive results in chlamydial cell cultures tested for mycoplasma contamination with a commercial PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Maass, Viola; Kern, Jan Marco; Poeckl, Matthias; Maass, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a frequent problem in chlamydial cell culture. After obtaining contradictory contamination results, we compared three commercial PCR kits for mycoplasma detection. One kit signaled contamination in mycoplasma-free Chlamydia pneumoniae cultures. Sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed primer homology with the chlamydial genome as the basis of this false-positive result.

  19. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  20. Colonization with nontuberculous mycobacteria is associated with positive tuberculin skin test reactions in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Wachtman, Lynn M; Miller, Andrew D; Xia, DongLing; Curran, Elizabeth H; Mansfield, Keith G

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections can result in significant morbidity and mortality in nonhuman primate colonies. Preventative health programs designed to detect infection routinely include tuberculin skin testing (TST). Because Mammalian Old Tuberculin used for TST contains antigens common to a variety of mycobacterial species, false-positive results can occur in animals sensitized to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Over 11 mo, a large colony of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) demonstrated a 3.6% prevalence of equivocal or positive TST reactions (termed 'suspect reactions'). Culture of gastric aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and feces revealed a single animal with a positive fecal culture for Mycobacterium gordonae. PCR amplification of M. gordonae DNA in feces collected from animals with suspect TST reactions (demonstrating a 66.7% colonization rate) and colony controls (demonstrating a 14.3% colonization rate) revealed a significant association between suspect TST reactions and intestinal colonization. Gross and histopathologic evaluation revealed a multifocal lymphadenopathy and granulomatous lymphadenitis in 2 of 4 TST-positive marmosets examined. Counter to expectations, granulomatous lymphoid tissue was culture-positive for M. kansasii rather than M. gordonae. Detection of M. gordonae in the feces of TST-suspect animals likely represents an apathogenic intestinal colonization that may serve as an indicator of NTM exposure, whereas evidence of histopathologic disease is associated with the more pathogenic M. kansasii. Although a high index of suspicion for M. tuberculosis should always be maintained, colonization with NTM organisms represents a cause of suspect TST reactions in common marmosets.

  1. False-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hisashi; Honda, Haruki; Egami, Shohei; Yokoyama, Tomoaki; Fujimoto, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Makiko; Sugiura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma are therapeutic options for patients with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. Passive acquisition of various clinically important antibodies through these therapies can occur, leading to false serology and negatively affecting patients' clinical care. It is recommended that dermatologists recognize the possibility of these phenomena and interpret them appropriately. Here, we report false-positive serology following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasma exchange through transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in a patient with refractory pemphigus vulgaris. We also discuss the measure for misinterpretation and unnecessary clinical intervention.

  2. False-positive Aspergillus real-time PCR assay due to a nutritional supplement in a bone marrow transplant recipient with GVH disease.

    PubMed

    Millon, L; Grenouillet, F; Crouzet, J; Larosa, F; Loewert, S; Bellanger, A P; Deconinck, E; Legrand, F

    2010-06-01

    PCR screening for circulating DNA, especially when combined with antigen testing, has shown promise for the definitive diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. False positives for Aspergillus real-time PCR assays have been described in several reports, but no sources of fungal DNA contamination could be clearly identified. We report a false-positive case for both galactomannan (GM) antigenemia and Aspergillus PCR due to nutritional supplement intake in a bone marrow transplant recipient with digestive graft-versus-host disease. Our case report also suggests that fungal DNA can pass into the serum from the intestinal tract in the same way as fungal GM. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility, so that the administration of costly, unnecessary antifungal treatments with potential adverse side-effects can be avoided.

  3. Comparative analyses across cattle genders and breeds reveal the pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Utsunomiya, Yuri T.; Xu, Lingyang; Hay, El Hamidi abdel; Bickhart, Derek M.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Liu, George E.

    2016-01-01

    We compared CNV region (CNVR) results derived from 1,682 Nellore cattle with equivalent results derived from our previous analysis of Bovine HapMap samples. By comparing CNV segment frequencies between different genders and groups, we identified 9 frequent, false positive CNVRs with a total length of 0.8 Mbp that were likely caused by assembly errors. Although there was a paucity of lineage specific events, we did find one 54 kb deletion on chr5 significantly enriched in Nellore cattle. A few highly frequent CNVRs present in both datasets were detected within genomic regions containing olfactory receptor, ATP-binding cassette, and major histocompatibility complex genes. We further evaluated their impacts on downstream bioinformatics and CNV association analyses. Our results revealed pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations and will increase the accuracy of future CNV studies in both taurine and indicine cattle. PMID:27381368

  4. Comparative analyses across cattle genders and breeds reveal the pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Xu, Lingyang; Hay, El Hamidi Abdel; Bickhart, Derek M; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Liu, George E

    2016-07-06

    We compared CNV region (CNVR) results derived from 1,682 Nellore cattle with equivalent results derived from our previous analysis of Bovine HapMap samples. By comparing CNV segment frequencies between different genders and groups, we identified 9 frequent, false positive CNVRs with a total length of 0.8 Mbp that were likely caused by assembly errors. Although there was a paucity of lineage specific events, we did find one 54 kb deletion on chr5 significantly enriched in Nellore cattle. A few highly frequent CNVRs present in both datasets were detected within genomic regions containing olfactory receptor, ATP-binding cassette, and major histocompatibility complex genes. We further evaluated their impacts on downstream bioinformatics and CNV association analyses. Our results revealed pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations and will increase the accuracy of future CNV studies in both taurine and indicine cattle.

  5. A clinical approach to determine false positive findings of clinical endometritis by vaginoscopy by the use of uterine bacteriology and cytology in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Westermann, S; Drillich, M; Kaufmann, T B; Madoz, L V; Heuwieser, W

    2010-10-15

    Clinical endometritis in dairy cows is defined as mucopurulent or purulent vulvar discharge 21 days or more after parturition. The diagnosis of clinical endometritis is commonly based on vaginal examination. Techniques to reduce the proportions of false negative findings have been described. This paper discusses a clinical approach to determine the proportion of false positive findings that might occur by vaginal inspection. The consequences of false positive findings in dairy practice are unnecessary or inadequate treatments. In research, incorrect diagnoses have an impact on the interpretation of studies on the diagnosis and treatment of clinical endometritis. The objective of the present study was to compare intrauterine bacteriology and endometrial cytology in cows diagnosed with clinical endometritis with findings obtained by vaginoscopy. Clinical endometritis was defined as mucopurulent or purulent vulvar discharge. On two commercial dairy farms, cows were examined 21 to 28 d postpartum. Uterine samples (n = 230) were collected from cows with clinical endometritis with the cytobrush technique to determine the proportion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and to culture smears for aerobic bacteria. Two threshold values for the proportion of PMN (5 and 18%) were chosen as possible indicators for an inflamed endometrium. Common uterine pathogens A. pyogenes and E. coli were found in 33.5 and 10.4% of the samples, respectively. With increasing vaginal discharge score, proportion of samples positive for A. pyogenes increased significantly. The proportion of cows exceeding the thresholds for PMN increased with vaginal discharge score and the presence of A. pyogenes. Considering only the presence of aerobic uterine pathogens and a proportion of PMN above the threshold values of 5 and 18% as indicative for endometritis, a proportion of 17.3 and 28.5%, respectively, of diagnoses by vaginoscopy were false positive.

  6. Selecting At-Risk First-Grade Readers for Early Intervention: Eliminating False Positives and Exploring the Promise of a Two-Stage Gated Screening Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Donald L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Bouton, Bobette; Gilbert, Jennifer K.; Barquero, Laura A.; Cho, Eunsoo; Crouch, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to identify measures that when added to a base 1st-grade screening battery help eliminate false positives and (b) to investigate gains in efficiency associated with a 2-stage gated screening procedure. We tested 355 children in the fall of 1st grade and assessed for reading difficulty at the end of 2nd grade.…

  7. False positive tumor markers: elevation in patients with breast cancer on FAC-type chemotherapy and correlation with the development of hand-foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tyshler, L B; Longton, G M; Ellis, G K; Livingston, R B

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer patients on dose-intensive chemotherapy often have elevated tumor markers during the course of treatment. Our objective was to estimate the incidence of a "false positive" tumor marker screen and to determine whether hand-foot epithelial damage was correlated. Data from 53 patients with high risk primary breast cancer who had undergone adjuvant or neoadjuvant 5FU-containing chemotherapy (FAC or FAC plus G-CSF) for 3 to 12 months were reviewed. The relationship between tumor marker elevation and disease recurrence, regimen intensity, and the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome was examined. Thirty-three of the 53 patients had elevated tumor markers in the absence of recurrent disease. The false positive rate was higher in patients who underwent FAC plus G-CSF chemotherapy than in patients who underwent FAC chemotherapy (92% vs 55%, p = .01). A false positive marker screen was associated with the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome even when the effect of regimen was accounted for by stratification (p = .01). Tumor marker screening of breast cancer patients on this type of adjuvant chemotherapy has poor specificity for recurrent malignancy. These data suggest tumor marker elevation may be an indicator of epithelial toxicity during chemotherapy, manifested clinically as hand-foot syndrome.

  8. Estimates for the sensitivity and false-positive rates for second trimester serum screening for Down syndrome and trisomy 18 with adjustment for cross-identification and double-positive results.

    PubMed

    Benn, P A; Ying, J; Beazoglou, T; Egan, J F

    2001-01-01

    Second trimester screening for fetal Down syndrome and trisomy 18 is available through separate protocols that combine the maternal age-specific risk and the analysis of maternal serum markers. We have determined the extent to which additional Down syndrome affected pregnancies may be identified through trisomy 18 screening, and the extent to which additional cases of trisomy 18 may be screen-positive for Down syndrome. The combined false-positive rate, taking into consideration those pregnancies that are screen-positive by both protocols, has also been determined. Sensitivity and false-positive rates were determined by computer simulation of results that incorporated previously published statistical variables into the model. Using second trimester risk cut-offs of 1:270 for Down syndrome and 1:100 for trisomy 18, it was found that few additional cases of Down syndrome are identified through trisomy 18 screening. However, approximately 6-10% of trisomy 18 affected pregnancies will be screen-positive for Down syndrome but screen-negative for trisomy 18. For women aged 40 or more, the false-positive rate for trisomy 18 exceeds 1% and approximately half of these cases will also be screen-positive for Down syndrome. For a population with maternal ages equivalent to that in the United States in 1998, after adjusting for the cross-identification, the sensitivity for three-analyte trisomy 18 screening is 78%. If this testing is performed in conjunction with Down syndrome "triple" screening, the Down syndrome sensitivity is 75% and the combined false-positive rate is 8.5%. If the three-analyte trisomy 18 screening is performed with the Down syndrome "quad" screen, the trisomy 18 sensitivity remains at 78%, the Down syndrome sensitivity is 79%, and combined false-positive rate is 7.5%. Sensitivity and false-positive rates are also provided for other widely used Down syndrome and trisomy 18 risk cut-offs. Sensitivity and false-positive rates that take into consideration

  9. When the Single Matters more than the Group (II): Addressing the Problem of High False Positive Rates in Single Case Voxel Based Morphometry Using Non-parametric Statistics.

    PubMed

    Scarpazza, Cristina; Nichols, Thomas E; Seramondi, Donato; Maumet, Camille; Sartori, Giuseppe; Mechelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have used Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) to compare a single patient with a psychiatric or neurological condition of interest against a group of healthy controls. However, the validity of this approach critically relies on the assumption that the single patient is drawn from a hypothetical population with a normal distribution and variance equal to that of the control group. In a previous investigation, we demonstrated that family-wise false positive error rate (i.e., the proportion of statistical comparisons yielding at least one false positive) in single case VBM are much higher than expected (Scarpazza et al., 2013). Here, we examine whether the use of non-parametric statistics, which does not rely on the assumptions of normal distribution and equal variance, would enable the investigation of single subjects with good control of false positive risk. We empirically estimated false positive rates (FPRs) in single case non-parametric VBM, by performing 400 statistical comparisons between a single disease-free individual and a group of 100 disease-free controls. The impact of smoothing (4, 8, and 12 mm) and type of pre-processing (Modulated, Unmodulated) was also examined, as these factors have been found to influence FPRs in previous investigations using parametric statistics. The 400 statistical comparisons were repeated using two independent, freely available data sets in order to maximize the generalizability of the results. We found that the family-wise error rate was 5% for increases and 3.6% for decreases in one data set; and 5.6% for increases and 6.3% for decreases in the other data set (5% nominal). Further, these results were not dependent on the level of smoothing and modulation. Therefore, the present study provides empirical evidence that single case VBM studies with non-parametric statistics are not susceptible to high false positive rates. The critical implication of this finding is that VBM can be used

  10. Case report of a false positive result of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay for rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Jolien; Mathys, Vanessa; Derdelinckx, Inge; Saegeman, Veroniek

    2016-06-10

    In the present case, we report a false positive result for the detection of rifampicin (RIF) resistance by the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay, version G4.Miliary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (miliary TB) was suspected in a 50-year old Angolan woman. Imaging of the thorax and abdomen displayed diffuse lesions. The Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay conducted on the broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was positive for TB and positive for RIF resistance. Confirmatory molecular tests and the phenotypic drug susceptibility determination supported the diagnosis of TB but not RIF resistance. The patient was treated successfully with a conventional therapeutic scheme. Because, the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay allows the simultaneous detection of TB and RIF resistance, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends its use as initial diagnostic test, over microscopy, culture and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Even though specificity of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay version G4 is high, false positive test results remain possible and have to be considered for the interpretation of the RIF resistance detection by Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay.

  11. Next-generation sequencing indicates false-positive MRD results and better predicts prognosis after SCT in patients with childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Kotrova, M; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Formankova, R; Sedlacek, P; Brüggemann, M; Zuna, J; Stary, J; Trka, J; Fronkova, E

    2017-02-27

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring via quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of Ag receptor gene rearrangements has been the most sensitive method for predicting prognosis and making post-transplant treatment decisions for patients with ALL. Despite the broad clinical usefulness and standardization of this method, we and others have repeatedly reported the possibility of false-positive MRD results caused by massive B-lymphocyte regeneration after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) enables precise and sensitive detection of multiple Ag receptor rearrangements, thus providing a more specific readout compared to qPCR. We investigated two cohorts of children with ALL who underwent SCT (30 patients and 228 samples). The first cohort consisted of 17 patients who remained in long-term CR after SCT despite having low MRD positivity (<0.01%) at least once during post-SCT monitoring using qPCR. Only one of 27 qPCR-positive samples was confirmed to be positive by NGS. Conversely, 10 of 15 samples with low qPCR-detected MRD positivity from 13 patients who subsequently relapsed were also confirmed to be positive by NGS (P=0.002). These data show that NGS has a better specificity in post-SCT ALL management and indicate that treatment interventions aimed at reverting impending relapse should not be based on qPCR only.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.16.

  12. Facing the problem of "false positives": re-assessment and improvement of a multiplex RT-PCR procedure for the diagnosis of A. flavus mycotoxin producers.

    PubMed

    Degola, F; Berni, E; Spotti, E; Ferrero, I; Restivo, F M

    2009-02-28

    The aim of our research project was to consolidate a multiplex RT-PCR protocol to detect aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus. Several independent A. flavus strains were isolated from corn and flour samples from the North of Italy and from three European countries. Aflatoxin producing/not producing phenotype was assessed by qualitative and quantitative assays at day five of growth in aflatoxin inducing conditions. Expression of 16 genes belonging to the aflatoxin cluster was assayed by multiplex or monomeric RT-PCR. There is a good correlation between gene expression and aflatoxin production. Strains that apparently transcribed all the relevant genes but did not release aflatoxin in the medium ("false positives") were re-assessed for mycotoxin production after extended growth in inducing condition. All the "false positive" strains in actual fact were positive when aflatoxin determination was performed after 10 days of growth. These strains should then be re-classified as "slow aflatoxin accumulators". To optimise the diagnostic procedure, a quintuplex RT-PCR procedure was designed consisting of a primer set directed against four informative aflatoxin cluster genes and the beta-tubulin gene as an internal amplification control. In conclusion we have provided evidence for the robustness and reliability of our RT-PCR protocol in discriminating mycotoxin producer from non-producer strains of A. flavus. and the molecular procedure we devised is a promising tool with which to screen and control the endemic population of A. flavus colonising different areas of the World.

  13. Risk assessment of false-positive quantitative real-time PCR results in food, due to detection of DNA originating from dead cells.

    PubMed

    Wolffs, Petra; Norling, Börje; Rådström, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Real-time PCR technology is increasingly used for detection and quantification of pathogens in food samples. A main disadvantage of nucleic acid detection is the inability to distinguish between signals originating from viable cells and DNA released from dead cells. In order to gain knowledge concerning risks of false-positive results due to detection of DNA originating from dead cells, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to investigate the degradation kinetics of free DNA in four types of meat samples. Results showed that the fastest degradation rate was observed (1 log unit per 0.5 h) in chicken homogenate, whereas the slowest rate was observed in pork rinse (1 log unit per 120.5 h). Overall results indicated that degradation occurred faster in chicken samples than in pork samples and faster at higher temperatures. Based on these results, it was concluded that, especially in pork samples, there is a risk of false-positive PCR results. This was confirmed in a quantitative study on cell death and signal persistence over a period of 28 days, employing three different methods, i.e. viable counts, direct qPCR, and finally floatation, a recently developed discontinuous density centrifugation method, followed by qPCR. Results showed that direct qPCR resulted in an overestimation of up to 10 times of the amount of cells in the samples compared to viable counts, due to detection of DNA from dead cells. However, after using floatation prior to qPCR, results resembled the viable count data. This indicates that by using of floatation as a sample treatment step prior to qPCR, the risk of false-positive PCR results due to detection of dead cells, can be minimized.

  14. A Discovery of a Candidate Companion to a Transiting System KOI-94: A Direct Imaging Study for a Possibility of a False Positive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Sato, Bun'ei; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; McElwain, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    We report a discovery of a companion candidate around one of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), KOI-94, and results of our quantitative investigation of the possibility that planetary candidates around KOI-94 are false positives. KOI-94 has a planetary system in which four planetary detections have been reported by Kepler, suggesting that this system is intriguing to study the dynamical evolutions of planets. However, while two of those detections (KOI-94.01 and 03) have been made robust by previous observations, the others (KOI-94.02 and 04) are marginal detections, for which future confirmations with various techniques are required. We have conducted high-contrast direct imaging observations with Subaru/HiCIAO in H band and detected a faint object located at a separation of approximately 0.6 sec from KOI-94. The object has a contrast of approximately 1 × 10(exp -3) in H band, and corresponds to an M type star on the assumption that the object is at the same distance of KOI-94. Based on our analysis, KOI-94.02 is likely to be a real planet because of its transit depth, while KOI-94.04 can be a false positive due to the companion candidate. The success in detecting the companion candidate suggests that high-contrast direct imaging observations are important keys to examine false positives of KOIs. On the other hand, our transit light curve reanalyses lead to a better period estimate of KOI-94.04 than that on the KOI catalogue and show that the planetary candidate has the same limb darkening parameter value as the other planetary candidates in the KOI-94 system, suggesting that KOI-94.04 is also a real planet in the system.

  15. Massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2003-07-01

    In this study, we investigated a pattern-recognition technique based on an artificial neural network (ANN), which is called a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN), for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography (CT) images. The MTANN consists of a modified multilayer ANN, which is capable of operating on image data directly. The MTANN is trained by use of a large number of subregions extracted from input images together with the teacher images containing the distribution for the "likelihood of being a nodule." The output image is obtained by scanning an input image with the MTANN. The distinction between a nodule and a non-nodule is made by use of a score which is defined from the output image of the trained MTANN. In order to eliminate various types of non-nodules, we extended the capability of a single MTANN, and developed a multiple MTANN (Multi-MTANN). The Multi-MTANN consists of plural MTANNs that are arranged in parallel. Each MTANN is trained by using the same nodules, but with a different type of non-nodule. Each MTANN acts as an expert for a specific type of non-nodule, e.g., five different MTANNs were trained to distinguish nodules from various-sized vessels; four other MTANNs were applied to eliminate some other opacities. The outputs of the MTANNs were combined by using the logical AND operation such that each of the trained MTANNs eliminated none of the nodules, but removed the specific type of non-nodule with which the MTANN was trained, and thus removed various types of non-nodules. The Multi-MTANN consisting of nine MTANNs was trained with 10 typical nodules and 10 non-nodules representing each of nine different non-nodule types (90 training non-nodules overall) in a training set. The trained Multi-MTANN was applied to the reduction of false positives reported by our current computerized scheme for lung nodule detection based on a database of 63 low-dose CT scans (1765

  16. A false positive case due to matrix interference in the analysis of ronidazole residues in muscle tissue using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Companyó, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    In contrast with the information of the inspection body concerning the use of ronidazole, several non compliant muscle samples were detected using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in accordance with confirmation criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC. This led to the suspicion that non compliance could be due to false positive results. In this context, a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and sample extracts were re-analyzed, resolving the co eluting isobaric interfering peak, which also has an interfering product ion with the transition product (m/z 201>140).

  17. Avian metapneumovirus RT-nested-PCR: a novel false positive reducing inactivated control virus with potential applications to other RNA viruses and real time methods.

    PubMed

    Falchieri, Marco; Brown, Paul A; Catelli, Elena; Naylor, Clive J

    2012-12-01

    Using reverse genetics, an avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) was modified for use as a positive control for validating all stages of a popular established RT-nested PCR, used in the detection of the two major AMPV subtypes (A and B). Resultant amplicons were of increased size and clearly distinguishable from those arising from unmodified virus, thus allowing false positive bands, due to control virus contamination of test samples, to be identified readily. Absorption of the control virus onto filter paper and subsequent microwave irradiation removed all infectivity while its function as an efficient RT-nested-PCR template was unaffected. Identical amplicons were produced after storage for one year. The modified virus is likely to have application as an internal standard as well as in real time methods. Additions to AMPV of RNA from other RNA viruses, including hazardous examples such HIV and influenza, are likely to yield similar safe RT-PCR controls.

  18. An automatic spike detection system based on elimination of false positives using the large-area context in the scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhanfeng; Sugi, Takenao; Goto, Satoru; Wang, Xingyu; Ikeda, Akio; Nagamine, Takashi; Shibasaki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    2011-09-01

    Most automatic spike detection systems in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) focused on the characteristics of "spike." However, the characteristics of "false positives" (FPs) have not been fully studied. In this paper, we proposed a system that contains a series of algorithms to eliminate FPs and a template method to confirm spikes. The system used large area context available on 49 channels from two common montages. The impact of slow-waves after spikes was taken into consideration, as well as the information from single channel, multichannel, and whole recording. Two types of FPs were identified in this paper. The ones from typical artifacts were identified by analysis of background EEG activities, and the ones from other EEG activities were declared by spatial and temporal characteristics of spike activities. Finally, a multichannel template method was used to assess the performance of the proposed system. The system was evaluated using 17 routine EEG recordings. Spike activities were observed in six of them. Effective multichannel templates were extracted from four recordings containing frequent spikes. The least selectivity was 92.6% and the most false positive rate was 0.26 min(-1). Proposed algorithms for elimination of FPs are also suitable for other algorithms to enhance performance since most FPs can be identified while few true spikes are eliminated.

  19. The background rate of false positives: Combining simulations of gravitational wave events with an unsupervised algorithm for transient identification in crowded image-subtracted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We are now entering the era of multimessenger gravitational wave (GW) astronomy with the completion of the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. Multiwavelength electromagnetic (EM) emission is expected to accompany gravitational radiation from compact object binary mergers, such as those between neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, where Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to their detection. Attempting to perform EM follow-up over the 10-100s deg2 error regions will be faced with many challenges, including the identification and removal of O (105) false positive transients that appear as a commotion of background events and as image artifacts in crowded image-subtracted fields. We present an update to our automated unsupervised algorithm including how our pipeline uses the existing coherent WaveBurst pipeline in an attempt to develop optimized EM follow-up schema. Our end-to-end pipeline combines simulated GW events with actual observational data from a number of ground-based optical observatories, including PTF, ROTSE, and DECam. Our performance is reported both in terms of the number of coincident false positives as well as the efficiency of recovery.

  20. Investigation of false positives associated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in archived tissue samples of captive felids.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Essa; Mtshali, Moses Sibusiso; Lane, Emily

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite that infects humans and many different animals, including felids. Many molecular and serologic tests have been developed for detection of T. gondii in a wide range of hosts. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field-friendly technique that lacks the practical drawbacks of other molecular and serologic tests, and LAMP assays have been successfully developed for detection of T. gondii in fresh tissue samples. In the current study, both a previously published and a de-novo designed LAMP assay were compared to a quantitative real-time (q)PCR assay, for the detection of T. gondii in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from captive wildlife. The LAMP assays produced conflicting results, generating both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the LAMP assays were unable to positively identify samples with low levels of parasites as determined by qPCR and histopathology. Therefore, these LAMP assays may not be the most suitable assays for detection of T. gondii in archived FFPE and frozen tissue samples.

  1. The Application of Voltammetric Analysis of Δ(9) -THC for the Reduction of False Positive Results in the Analysis of Suspected Marijuana Plant Matter.

    PubMed

    Balbino, Marco A; de Oliveira, Laura S; Eleotério, Izabel C; Oiye, Erica N; Ribeiro, Maria F M; McCord, Bruce R; Ipolito, Antonio J; de Oliveira, Marcelo F

    2016-07-01

    The development of methodologies using inexpensive, fast, and reliable instrumention is desirable in illicit drug analysis. The purpose of this study was based on cyclic voltammetry technique to differentiate the electrochemical behavior of ∆(9) -THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana, and five different extract plants to yield false positive results after analysis protocol for cannabinoids using thin-layer chromatography and Fast Blue B salt. After applying a deposition potential of -0.5 V in a glassy carbon working electrode, the results indicated an anodic peak current at 0.0 V versus Ag/AgCl after addition of ∆(9) -THC solution in the electrochemical cell, and limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 ng mL(-1) and 3.5 ng mL(-1) , respectively. Other interfering plants showed distinct amperometric responses. This methodology was useful to detect ∆(9) -THC even in the presence of the Fast Blue B salt, which avoided false positive results for all the studied extract plants.

  2. False-positive amphetamine/ecstasy (MDMA/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) (CEDIA) and ecstasy (MDMA/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) (DRI) test results with fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Yusuf Cem; Erol, Almla; Karadaş, Barş

    2012-10-01

    This case report describes a false-positive amphetamine/ecstasy [3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)] and ecstasy (MDMA) screen after therapeutic use of antihyperlipidemic drug, fenofibrate. A 60-year-old male patient was admitted to inpatient psychiatry unit with the diagnosis of alcohol dependency. He was prescribed diazepam 30 mg/day, thiamine 300 mg/day, and naltrexone 50 mg/day. He had also been using fenofibrate 267 mg/day for 3 years for hyperlipidemia and trazodone 100 mg/day for 5 months for insomnia. On routine, urine drugs-of-abuse screening amphetamine/MDMA (CEDIA) test was positive for 4 different occasions and MDMA (DRI) test was positive on 5 different occasions. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry confirmation of the first positive 3 samples were negative for amphetamine and MDMA. After discontinuation of fenofibrate, amphetamine/MDMA, and MDMA immunoassay results turned out to be negative. Caution should be given to interpretation of amphetamine/MDMA (CEDIA) and MDMA (DRI) tests in patients taking fenofibrate. Specific confirmation with a suitable method should be used to prevent erroneous interpretations.

  3. [Anti-deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies and coeliac disease: state of art and analysis of false-positive results from five assays].

    PubMed

    Lutteri, Laurence; Sagot, Clémence; Chapelle, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recently, anti-deamidated gliadin antibodies were proposed for the serological diagnosis of celiac disease. We evaluate the specificity of different anti-deamidated gliadin antibodies ELISA in comparison with conventional anti-native gliadin kits. Serum samples from 46 non celiac patients were analyzed by five different quantitative ELISA for anti-native gliadin, anti-deamidated gliadin and anti-transglutaminase neo-epitope antibodies together with a screening ELISA. Twenty-four percent of the patients demonstrated anti-native gliadin IgA and 63% IgG antibodies. Using anti-deamidated gliadin antibodies, the number of false positive IgA and, particularly, IgG results, markedly decreased in the non celiac patients: 21 and 24% respectively with anti-Gliadin (GAF-3X) Euroimmun kit, 7 and 26% with Bindazyme Human Anti-Gliadin (MGP) The Binding Site kit and 0 and 41% with Celiac G+ Immco kit. The new assay which makes use of the physiological complex of tissue transglutaminase cross-linked with deamidated gliadin peptides, called neo-epitope, did not improve the differential diagnosis of celiac disease with 30% of false positive results in IgG (2% in IgA). Using the Inova screening kit, a positive result for IgA and/or IgG anti-deamidated gliadin and/or anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies was obtained in 24% of the non celiac patients. In conclusion, our study assessed the superiority, in terms of specificity, of anti-deamidated gliadin antibodies, over the conventional anti-gliadin antibodies for the differential diagnosis of celiac disease.

  4. False assumptions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M

    1997-01-01

    Indian women do not have to be told the benefits of breast feeding or "rescued from the clutches of wicked multinational companies" by international agencies. There is no proof that breast feeding has declined in India; in fact, a 1987 survey revealed that 98% of Indian women breast feed. Efforts to promote breast feeding among the middle classes rely on such initiatives as the "baby friendly" hospital where breast feeding is promoted immediately after birth. This ignores the 76% of Indian women who give birth at home. Blaming this unproved decline in breast feeding on multinational companies distracts attention from more far-reaching and intractable effects of social change. While the Infant Milk Substitutes Act is helpful, it also deflects attention from more pressing issues. Another false assumption is that Indian women are abandoning breast feeding to comply with the demands of employment, but research indicates that most women give up employment for breast feeding, despite the economic cost to their families. Women also seek work in the informal sector to secure the flexibility to meet their child care responsibilities. Instead of being concerned about "teaching" women what they already know about the benefits of breast feeding, efforts should be made to remove the constraints women face as a result of their multiple roles and to empower them with the support of families, governmental policies and legislation, employers, health professionals, and the media.

  5. On the risk of false positive identification using multiple ion monitoring in qualitative mass spectrometry: large-scale intercomparisons with a comprehensive mass spectral library.

    PubMed

    Stein, Stephen E; Heller, David N

    2006-06-01

    Analysts involved in qualitative mass spectrometry have long debated the minimum data requirements for demonstrating that signals from an unknown sample are identical to those from a known compound. Often this process is carried out by comparing a few selected ions acquired by multiple ion monitoring (MIM), with due allowance for expected variability in response. In a few past experiments with electron-ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS), the number of ions selected and the allowable variability in relative abundance were tested by comparing one spectrum against a library of mass spectra, where library spectra served to represent potential false positive signals in an analysis. We extended these experiments by carrying out large-scale intercomparisons between thousands of spectra and a library of one hundred thousand EI mass spectra. The results were analyzed to gain insights into the identification confidence associated with various numbers of selected ions. A new parameter was investigated for the first time, to take into account that a library spectrum with a different base peak than the search spectrum may still cause a false positive identification. The influence of peak correlation among the specific ions in all the library mass spectra was also studied. Our computations showed that (1) false positive identifications can result from similar compounds, or low-abundance peaks in unrelated compounds if the method calls for detection at very low levels; (2) a MIM method's identification confidence improves in a roughly continuous manner as more ions are monitored, about one order of magnitude for each additional ion selected; (3) full scan spectra still represent the best alternative, if instrument sensitivity is adequate. The use of large scale intercomparisons with a comprehensive library is the only way to provide direct evidence in support of these conclusions, which otherwise depend on the judgment and experience of individual analysts. There are

  6. Filter-based feature selection and support vector machine for false positive reduction in computer-aided mass detection in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Nguyen, D. T.; Nguyen, T. D.; Phan, V. A.; Truong, Q. D.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a method for reducing false positive in computer-aided mass detection in screening mammograms is proposed. A set of 32 features, including First Order Statistics (FOS) features, Gray-Level Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features, Block Difference Inverse Probability (BDIP) features, and Block Variation of Local Correlation coefficients (BVLC) are extracted from detected Regions-Of-Interest (ROIs). An optimal subset of 8 features is selected from the full feature set by mean of a filter-based Sequential Backward Selection (SBS). Then, Support Vector Machine (SVM) is utilized to classify the ROIs into massive regions or normal regions. The method's performance is evaluated using the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC or AZ). On a dataset consisting about 2700 ROIs detected from mini-MIAS database of mammograms, the proposed method achieves AZ=0.938.

  7. The impact of missing data and how it is handled on the rate of false-positive results in drug development.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sunni A; Mallinckrodt, Craig H; Lindborg, Stacy R; Carter, M Kallin

    2008-01-01

    In drug development, a common choice for the primary analysis is to assess mean changes via analysis of (co)variance with missing data imputed by carrying the last or baseline observations forward (LOCF, BOCF). These approaches assume that data are missing completely at random (MCAR). Multiple imputation (MI) and likelihood-based repeated measures (MMRM) are less restrictive as they assume data are missing at random (MAR). Nevertheless, LOCF and BOCF remain popular, perhaps because it is thought that the bias in these methods lead to protection against falsely concluding that a drug is more effective than the control. We conducted a simulation study that compared the rate of false positive results or regulatory risk error (RRE) from BOCF, LOCF, MI, and MMRM in 32 scenarios that were generated from a 2(5) full factorial arrangement with data missing due to a missing not at random (MNAR) mechanism. Both BOCF and LOCF inflated RRE were compared to MI and MMRM. In 12 of the 32 scenarios, BOCF yielded inflated RRE compared with eight scenarios for LOCF, three scenarios for MI and four scenarios for MMRM. In no situation did BOCF or LOCF provide adequate control of RRE when MI and MMRM did not. Both MI and MMRM are better choices than either BOCF or LOCF for the primary analysis.

  8. The system on positioning detecting plasma fluorescence spectrum in reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenjiang; Yang, Guanling; Huang, Zuohua; Huang, Linhai; Gu, Xiaoju

    2005-02-01

    The real-time detection of plasma fluorescence spectrum in reaction chamber is significant for optimizing running parameters of the plasma syntonization enhanced system and finding sample reaction state. This paper present the new type detection system of fluorescence spectrum. This system applies a principle of control light beam transmitting by entrance pupil and viewing field, and rotated method of optical tube. It can monitor fluorescence spectrum of pointed position in reaction chamber. Some designed essentials about plan of detection range, position optical path and optical path of detecting plasma fluorescence spectrum in the system are introduced in detail. The system features are that it can aim at pointed positions of big luminophor and measure spectrum. It especially suit to real-time detect for plasma states in range nearly substrate holder. This system can applied in PECVD and some research as Chemiluminescence reaction chamber.

  9. Analysis and solution of false-positives when testing CVA16 sera using an antibody assay against the EV71 virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changbing; You, Aiping; Tian, Xingui; Zhao, Mingqi; Chen, Yi; Lin, Tao; Zheng, Jianbin; Xiao, Misi; Zhang, Yingying; Kuang, Lu; Zhou, Zhenwen; Zhu, Bing

    2013-09-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in humans is caused mainly by Enterovirus 71(EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16). EV71 is associated with severe HFMD cases but not CVA16. Use of IgM-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is important for the early diagnosis of EV71 infection, but cross-reactivity of the anti-CVA16 IgM antibody with EV71 produces false-positive results. In this report, we designed a new EV71 IgM-capture ELISA method using the EV71 VP1 peptide instead of the EV71 virion as the detectable antigen, and tested sera from patients infected with EV71 or CVA16. The results showed that acute sera from 76 EV71-infected patients had similar sensitivity for virus detection (98.68%) or VP1 detection (97.37%). When acute sera from patients infected with CVA16 were used, significant differences between the two methods were observed. The cross-reactivity rate of the virus detection method was 29.4% (5/17), but no cross-reactivity was observed using the VP1 detection method. Western immunoblotting demonstrated that EV71 VP3 cross-reacted with part of the CVA16 IgM antibody. The results demonstrate that EV71 VP3 is the cross-reactive antigen in the EV71 IgM-capture ELISA when testing CVA16 sera using the virus-antibody detection method. The problem of false-positive results was resolved by using the VP1 peptide as the detectable antigen.

  10. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. VII. A false-positive rate of 35% for Kepler close-in giant candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Díaz, R. F.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Deleuil, M.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-09-01

    The false-positive probability (FPP) of Kepler transiting candidates is a key value for statistical studies of candidate properties. A previous investigation of the stellar population in the Kepler field has provided an estimate for the FPP of less than 5% for most of the candidates. We report here the results of our radial velocity observations on a sample of 46 Kepler candidates with a transit depth greater than 0.4%, orbital period less than 25 days and host star brighter than Kepler magnitude 14.7. We used the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence to establish the nature of the transiting candidates. In this sample, we found five undiluted eclipsing binaries, two brown dwarfs, six diluted eclipsing binaries, and nine new transiting planets that complement the 11 already published planets. The remaining 13 candidates were not followed-up or remain unsolved due to photon noise limitation or lack of observations. From these results we computed the FPP for Kepler close-in giant candidates to be 34.8% ± 6.5%. We aimed to investigate the variation of the FPP for giant candidates with the longer orbital periods and found that it should be constant for orbital periods between 10 and 200 days. This significantly disagrees with the previous estimates. We discuss the reasons for this discrepancy and the possible extension of this work toward smaller planet candidates. Finally, taking the false-positive rate into account, we refined the occurrence rate of hot Jupiters from the Kepler data. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Figures 7, 8, and Tables 2-19 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Contribution of Haar wavelets and MPEG-7 textural features for false positive reduction in a CAD system for the detection of masses in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltonsy, Nevine H.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Elmaghraby, Adel S.

    2007-03-01

    The study investigates the significance of wavelet-based and MPEG-7 homogeneous textural features in an attempt to improve the specificity of an in-house CAD system for the detection of masses in screening mammograms. The detection scheme has been presented before and it relies on the concept of morphologic concentric layer (MCL) analysis to identify suspicious locations in a mammogram. The locations were deemed suspicious due to their morphology; especially an increased activity of iso-intensity layers around these locations. On a set of 270 mammographic images, the MCL detection scheme achieved 93% (131/141) mass detection rate with 4.8 FPs/image (1,296/270). In the present study, the textural signature of the detected location is analyzed for possible false positive reduction. For texture analysis, HAAR wavelet and MPEG-7 HTD textural features were extracted. In addition, the contribution of directional neighborhood (DN) features was studied as well. The extracted features were combined with a back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) to discriminate true masses from false positives. Using a database of 1,427 suspicious seeds (131 true masses and 1,296 FPs) and a 5-fold cross-validation sampling scheme, the ROC area index of the BPNN using the different sets of features were as follows: A z(HAAR)=0.87+/-0.01, A z(HTD)=0.91+/-0.02, A z(DN)=0.84+/-0.01. Averaging the scores of the three BPANNs resulted in statistically significantly better performance A z(ALL)=0.94+/-0.01. At 95% sensitivity, the FP rate was reduced by 77.5%. The overall performance of the system after incorporation of textural and directional features was 87.9% sensitivity for malignant masses at 1.1 FPs/image.

  12. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results.

  13. In-Flight Position Calibration of the Cassini Articulated Reaction Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's long-lived Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is currently in its 14th year of flight and in the midst of its second, and final, extended mission. Cassini is a massive interplanetary spacecraft that is three axis stabilized and can maintain attitude control using either its reaction control system thrusters or using reaction wheel control. Cassini has four identical reaction wheels, of which three are mutually orthogonal and have a fixed orientation. The fourth reaction wheel has an articulation motor that allows this reaction wheel to be aligned with the momentum direction of any of the other three fixed reaction wheels. The articulation motor allows this reaction wheel to be used as a replacement for any of the other three wheels without any performance degradation. However, due to limitations in the design of this backup system, there are few telemetric indications of the orientation of this reaction wheel following an articulation. This investigation serves to outline the procedures that have been developed by the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem to calibrate the position of the articulated reaction wheel assembly in the event that the momentum direction of this reaction wheel must be reoriented.

  14. Toward the breast screening balance sheet: cumulative risk of false positives for annual versus biennial mammograms commencing at age 40 or 50.

    PubMed

    Winch, Caleb J; Sherman, Kerry A; Boyages, John

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to: (1) Estimate cumulative risk of recall from breast screening where no cancer is detected (a harm) in Australia; (2) Compare women screened annually versus biennially, commencing age 40 versus 50; and (3) Compare with international findings. At the no-cost metropolitan program studied, women attended biennial screening, but were offered annual screening if regarded at elevated risk for breast cancer. The cumulative risk of at least one recall was estimated using discrete-time survival analysis. Cancer detection statistics were computed. In total, 801,636 mammograms were undertaken in 231,824 women. Over 10 years, cumulative risk of recall was 13.3 % (95 % CI 12.7-13.8) for those screened biennially, and 19.9 % (CI 16.6-23.2) for those screened annually from age 50-51. Cumulative risk of complex false positive involving a biopsy was 3.1 % (CI 2.9-3.4) and 5.0 % (CI 3.4-6.6), respectively. From age 40-41, the risk of recall was 15.1 % (CI 14.3-16.0) and 22.5 % (CI 17.9-27.1) for biennial and annual screening, respectively. Corresponding rates of complex false positive were 3.3 % (CI 2.9-3.8) and 6.3 % (CI 3.4-9.1). Over 10 mammograms, invasive cancer was detected in 3.4 % (CI 3.3-3.5) and ductal carcinoma in situ in 0.7 % (CI 0.6-0.7) of women, with a non-significant trend toward a larger proportion of Tis and T1N0 cancers in women screened annually (74.5 %) versus biennially (70.1 %), χ (2) = 2.77, p = 0.10. Cancer detection was comparable to international findings. Recall risk was equal to European estimates for women screening from 50 and lower for screening from 40. Recall risk was half of United States' rates across start age and rescreening interval categories. Future benefit/harm balance sheets may be useful for communicating these findings to women.

  15. Stability of position control of traveling waves in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löber, Jakob

    2014-06-01

    We consider the stability of position control of traveling waves in reaction-diffusion systems as proposed in Löber and Engel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 148305 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.148305]. Instead of analyzing the controlled reaction-diffusion system, stability is studied on the reduced level of the equation of motion for the position over time of perturbed traveling waves. We find an interval of perturbations of initial conditions for which position control is stable. This interval can be interpreted as a localized region where traveling waves are susceptible to perturbations. For stationary solutions of reaction-diffusion systems with reflection symmetry, this region does not exist. Analytical results are in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations of the controlled Schlögl model.

  16. Specificity and false positive rates of the Test of Memory Malingering, Rey 15-item Test, and Rey Word Recognition Test among forensic inpatients with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Love, Christopher M; Glassmire, David M; Zanolini, Shanna Jordan; Wolf, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the specificity and false positive (FP) rates of the Rey 15-Item Test (FIT), Word Recognition Test (WRT), and Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) in a sample of 21 forensic inpatients with mild intellectual disability (ID). The FIT demonstrated an FP rate of 23.8% with the standard quantitative cutoff score. Certain qualitative error types on the FIT showed promise and had low FP rates. The WRT obtained an FP rate of 0.0% with previously reported cutoff scores. Finally, the TOMM demonstrated low FP rates of 4.8% and 0.0% on Trial 2 and the Retention Trial, respectively, when applying the standard cutoff score. FP rates are reported for a range of cutoff scores and compared with published research on individuals diagnosed with ID. Results indicated that although the quantitative variables on the FIT had unacceptably high FP rates, the TOMM and WRT had low FP rates, increasing the confidence clinicians can place in scores reflecting poor effort on these measures during ID evaluations.

  17. Controlling false-positive results obtained with the Hodge and Masuda assays for detection of class a carbapenemase in species of enterobacteriaceae by incorporating boronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Mendez, Tania; Rapoport, Melina; Guerriero, Leonor; Corso, Alejandra

    2010-04-01

    The modified Hodge method (MHT) has been recommended by the CLSI for confirmation of suspected class A carbapenemase production in species of Enterobacteriaceae. This test and the Masuda method (MAS) have advantages over traditional phenotypic methods in that they directly analyze carbapenemase activity. In order to identify the potential interferences of these tests, we designed a panel composed of diverse bacterial genera with distinct carbapenem susceptibility patterns (42 carbapenemase producers and 48 nonproducers). About 25% of results among carbapenemase nonproducers, mainly strains harboring CTX-M and AmpC hyperproducers, were observed to be false positive. Subsequently, we developed an optimized approach for more-accurate detection of suspicious isolates of carbapenemase by addition of boronic acid (BA) derivatives (reversible inhibitor of class A carbapenemases and AmpC cephalosporinases) and oxacillin (inhibitor of AmpCs enzymes). The use of the modified BA- and oxacillin-based MHT and MAS resulted in high sensitivity (>90%) and specificity (100%) for class A carbapenemase detection. By use of these methodologies, isolates producing KPCs and GES, Sme, IMI, and NMC-A carbapenemases were successfully distinguished from those producing other classes of ss-lactamases (extended-spectrum beta-lactamases [ESBLs], AmpC beta-lactamases, metallo-beta-lactamases [MBLs], etc.). These methods will provide the fast and useful information needed for targeting of antimicrobial therapy and appropriate infection control.

  18. Contamination in the Kepler field. Identification of 685 KOIs as false positives via ephemeris matching based ON Q1-Q12 data

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Thompson, Susan E.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Mullally, Fergal R.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.

    2014-05-01

    The Kepler mission has to date found almost 6000 planetary transit-like signals, utilizing three years of data for over 170,000 stars at extremely high photometric precision. Due to its design, contamination from eclipsing binaries, variable stars, and other transiting planets results in a significant number of these signals being false positives (FPs). This directly affects the determination of the occurrence rate of Earth-like planets in our Galaxy, as well as other planet population statistics. In order to detect as many of these FPs as possible, we perform ephemeris matching among all transiting planet, eclipsing binary, and variable star sources. We find that 685 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs)—12% of all those analyzed—are FPs as a result of contamination, due to 409 unique parent sources. Of these, 118 have not previously been identified by other methods. We estimate that ∼35% of KOIs are FPs due to contamination, when performing a first-order correction for observational bias. Comparing single-planet candidate KOIs to multi-planet candidate KOIs, we find an observed FP fraction due to contamination of 16% and 2.4% respectively, bolstering the existing evidence that multi-planet KOIs are significantly less likely to be FPs. We also analyze the parameter distributions of the ephemeris matches and derive a simple model for the most common type of contamination in the Kepler field. We find that the ephemeris matching technique is able to identify low signal-to-noise FPs that are difficult to identify with other vetting techniques. We expect FP KOIs to become more frequent when analyzing more quarters of Kepler data, and note that many of them will not be able to be identified based on Kepler data alone.

  19. Caprine and ovine Greek dairy products: The official German method generates false-positive results due to κ-casein gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Tsartsianidou, V; Triantafillidou, D; Karaiskou, N; Tarantili, P; Triantafillidis, G; Georgakis, E; Triantafyllidis, A

    2017-03-16

    Caseins are widely used for species identification of dairy products. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of para-κ-casein peptide is used as the official German method for the differentiation between caprine (isoform A) and ovine (isoform B) dairy products, based on their different isoelectric points. The discrimination between Greek goat and ewe dairy products using IEF has, however, been shown to be problematic because of the existence of the ewe isoform in milk from Greek indigenous dairy goats. This could be due to nucleotide polymorphisms within the goat κ-casein gene of Greek indigenous breeds, which alter the isoelectric point of the para-κ-casein peptide and lead to false positive results. Previous DNA analysis of the goat κ-casein gene has shown high levels of polymorphism; however, no such information is available for Greek indigenous dairy goats. Therefore, 87 indigenous dairy goats were sequenced at exon IV of κ-casein gene. In total, 9 polymorphic sites were detected. Three nonsynonymous point mutations were identified, which change the isoelectric point of the goat para-κ-casein peptide so that it appears identical to that of the ewe peptide. Ten composite genotypes were reconstructed and 6 of them included the problematic point mutations. For the verification of genetic results, IEF was carried out. Both goat and ewe patterns appeared in the problematic genotypes. The frequency of these genotypes could be characterized as moderate (0.23) to high (0.60) within Greek indigenous breeds. However, this is not an issue restricted to Greece, as such genotypes have been detected in various non-Greek goat breeds. In conclusion, IEF based on the official German method is certainly inappropriate for ovine and caprine discrimination concerning Greek dairy goat products, and consequently a new method should be established.

  20. Differences between arms and legs on position sense and joint reaction angle.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Giakas, Giannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the arms and legs in relation to position sense and joint reaction angle. Position sense at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion as well as joint reaction angle to release from 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion of the elbow and knee joint were evaluated in 12 healthy men. The measurements were performed over 3 consecutive days to minimize the error attributable to the variability of the measured parameters. During the assessment of position sense, subjects had to place their limb as closely as possible to the reference angle. The joint reaction angle was measured by a new test in which the subjects had to stop the fall of their limb as soon as possible after it was released. All measurements were performed in a common isokinetic dynamometer. The results of position sense showed that the arms were placed closer to the reference angle compared with the legs (1.3 degrees vs. 3.1 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). The arms also exhibited faster reaction angle to release compared with legs (3.4 degrees vs. 6.3 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ability of arms to perform more accurate and faster movements than legs may mainly be attributed to the higher number of muscle spindles and the lower innervation ratio of arms. An imbalance of the determined relationship between arms and legs in position sense and reaction angle may indicate a neuromuscular disturbance.

  1. Positioning of Platinum Nanoparticles In Cation-exchange Membrane By Galvanic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Pandey, A. K.; Ramagiri, S. V.; Bellare, J. R.; Goswami, A.

    2010-12-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were formed at the surface of the poly (perfluorosulfonic) acid membrane (Nafion-117) by the galvanic reaction of PtCl62- ions with Ag nanoparticles positioned near the surface of the membrane. The reduction with BH4- ions produced Ag nanoparticles (15±4 nm size) mostly positioned near the surface of membrane due to Donnan exclusion of co-ions (BH4-). Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis of the membrane indicated that galvanic reaction proceeded quantitatively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the cross-sections of membrane samples indicated that the spherical Pt nanoparticles having size 2 to 8 nm were mostly located near the surface of the membrane. The positioning of Pt nanoparticles at surface of the membrane is important for using nano-composite in catalytical application.

  2. Positive and negative stimuli in relation to tennis players' reaction time.

    PubMed

    Mead, T P; Drowatzky, J N; Hardin-Crosby, L

    2000-02-01

    Research has indicated that negative and positive thoughts may affect sport performance. The purpose of this analogue study was to assess whether negative and positive stimuli influenced tennis performance similar to positive and negative thought. The reaction time (RT) of 40 competitive tennis players was measured during a timed response to a tennis ball rotating in a topspin, sidespin, or backspin direction on the computer screen. Immediately prior to the ball presentation, a phrase (accessory stimulus) was presented visually or aurally. The accessory stimulus provided either positive (e.g., 'nice shot') or negative information (e.g., 'bad shot') followed by the subject's name. Analysis showed a main effect only for the type of spin. The slowest RT occurred when responding to a tennis ball rotating in a backspin direction. A significant interaction was found for the sensory modality (audition vs vision) and polarity (positive vs negative) of the accessory stimulus. RT to negative stimuli was slowest when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. The quickest RT to positive stimuli occurred when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. These results indicated that negative and positive stimuli, when presented aurally, affected performance as positive and negative thoughts measured in other studies. Not measured was whether negative and positive stimuli actually produce the negative and positive thoughts, respectively, that have been reported to affect performance.

  3. Analysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction by positional isotope exchange and secondary deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.C.; Singh, A.N.; Raushel, F.M.

    1988-11-15

    The mechanism of the galactosyltransferase-catalyzed reaction was probed using positional isotope exchange, alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effects, and inhibition studies with potential transition state analogs. Incubation of (beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O)UDP-galactose and alpha-lactalbumin with galactosyltransferase from bovine milk did not result in any positional isotope exchange. The addition of 4-deoxy-4-fluoroglucose as a dead-end inhibitor did not induce any detectable positional isotope exchange. alpha-Secondary deuterium isotope effects of 1.21 +/- 0.04 on Vmax and 1.05 +/- 0.04 on Vmax/KM were observed for (1-2H)-UDP-galactose. D-Glucono-1,5-lactone, D-galactono-1,4-lactone, D-galactono-1,5-lactone, nojirimycin, and deoxynojirimycin, did not inhibit the galactosyl transfer reaction at concentrations less than 1.0 mM. The magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect supports a mechanism in which the anomeric carbon of the galactosyl moiety has substantial sp2 character in the transition state. Therefore, the cleavage of the bond between the galactose and UDP moieties in the transition state has proceeded to a much greater extent than the formation of the bond between the galactose and the incoming glucose. The lack of a positional isotope exchange reaction indicates that the beta-phosphoryl group of the UDP is not free to rotate in the absence of an acceptor substrate.

  4. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces the multi-element isotope data observed in previous experimental studies. Furthermore, it precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways as well as their range of variation consistent with observed bulk isotope fractionation. It was also possible to directly validate the model capability to predict the evolution of position-specific isotope ratios with available experimental data. Therefore, the approach is useful both for a mechanism-based evaluation of experimental results and as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available.

  5. Rapid identification of Escherichia coli by Fluorocult media and positive indole reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Heizmann, W; Döller, P C; Gutbrod, B; Werner, H

    1988-01-01

    To assess the specificity and sensitivity of Fluorocult media for the identification of Escherichia coli, the beta-glucuronidase activities of 1,258 bacterial strains, as well as 20 strains of Candida spp., were investigated. Fluorescence of colonies combined with positive indole reaction resulted in specificities of 99.6 to 99.8%. Sensitivities were 59.1% (MacConkey agar), 69.9% (brolacin agar), 85.5% (Columbia agar), and 85.8% (ECD agar). PMID:3068257

  6. Rapid identification of Escherichia coli by Fluorocult media and positive indole reaction.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, W; Döller, P C; Gutbrod, B; Werner, H

    1988-12-01

    To assess the specificity and sensitivity of Fluorocult media for the identification of Escherichia coli, the beta-glucuronidase activities of 1,258 bacterial strains, as well as 20 strains of Candida spp., were investigated. Fluorescence of colonies combined with positive indole reaction resulted in specificities of 99.6 to 99.8%. Sensitivities were 59.1% (MacConkey agar), 69.9% (brolacin agar), 85.5% (Columbia agar), and 85.8% (ECD agar).

  7. Output Position and Word Relatedness Effects in a DRM Paradigm: Support for a Dual-Retrieval Process Theory of Free Recall and False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, T. M.; Choi, H.; Gerkens, D. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Five experiments investigated predictions--derived from a dual-retrieval process approach to free recall (Brainerd, C. J., Wright, R., Reyna, V. F., & Payne, D. G. (2002). Dual-retrieval processes in free and associative recall. Journal of Memory and Language, 46, 120-152.)--about false memories in a DRM-like paradigm. In all the experiments, the…

  8. Some Synonymous and Nonsynonymous gyrA Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lead to Systematic False-Positive Fluoroquinolone Resistance Results with the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ajileye, Adebisi; Alvarez, Nataly; Merker, Matthias; Walker, Timothy M.; Akter, Suriya; Brown, Kerstin; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Schön, Thomas; Andres, Sönke; Schleusener, Viola; Omar, Shaheed V.; Coll, Francesc; Huang, Hairong; Diel, Roland; Ismail, Nazir; de Jong, Bouke C.; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.; Niemann, Stefan; Robledo, Jaime; Smith, E. Grace; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, using the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl assays (versions 1 and 2), we found that some nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations in gyrA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in systematic false-resistance results to fluoroquinolones by preventing the binding of wild-type probes. Moreover, such mutations can prevent the binding of mutant probes designed for the identification of specific resistance mutations. Although these mutations are likely rare globally, they occur in approximately 7% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains in some settings. PMID:28137812

  9. Abiotic production of nitrous oxide by lightning. Implications for a false positive identification of life on Earth-Like Planets around quiescent M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Karina F.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.

    _{2} dominated primitive Earth-like atmospheres. However, during the rise in atmospheric O _{2} at the start of the Proterozoic, the ocean became stratified (anoxic at the bottom and oxygenic at the surface). During this period, the emissions of N _{2}O were probably higher than today associated with a stronger microbial activity in the early anoxic ocean layer (Grenfell et al., 2011). Under this scenario, the predicted N _{2}O concentration would be about 3920 ppb, considering 10% the current atmospheric O _{2} concentrations, 100 times higher the current microbial N _{2}O flux, and a fainter Sun (94.3%) (Grenfell et al., 2011). This concentration would be still undetectable (Grenfell et al., 2011). A completely different scenario could be expected in Earth-like planets orbiting M dwarfs, which are the most abundant stars in the galaxy, representing about 75% of the total stellar population. M stars exhibit a large range in activity levels from very low levels of chromospheric and coronal activity, the so-called “quiescent” to high levels, the so-called “active" states. Photochemical models predict that the N _{2}O concentration would only increase to about 1,000 ppb for the current Earth orbiting an active M star, but surprisingly up to about 1,000 ppm for the current Earth orbiting a quiescent M star (Segura et al., 2005). Therefore, N _{2}O becomes a promising biomarker. Under this scenario it is important to constrain the abiotic sources of N _{2}O under different atmospheric conditions to avoid a false positive identification of life. Here we report an experimental study of the effects of lightning discharges on the nitrogen fixation rate during the evolution of the Earth’s early atmosphere from 10 to 1 percent of carbon dioxide in molecular nitrogen. We extended our study from no methane up to 1,000 ppm CH _{4}, which would be applicable to the postbiotic Earth (Tian et al., 2011). Lightning was simulated in the laboratory by a plasma generated with a

  10. A High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Assay Coupled with Redox Activity Testing Reduces Artifacts and False Positives in Lysine Demethylase Screening.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Swinger, Kerren K; Campbell, John E; Scholle, Michael D; Sherrill, John; Admirand, Elizabeth A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Kuntz, Kevin W; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Demethylation of histones by lysine demethylases (KDMs) plays a critical role in controlling gene transcription. Aberrant demethylation may play a causal role in diseases such as cancer. Despite the biological significance of these enzymes, there are limited assay technologies for study of KDMs and few quality chemical probes available to interrogate their biology. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of self-assembled monolayer desorption/ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry for the investigation of quantitative KDM enzyme kinetics and for high-throughput screening for KDM inhibitors. SAMDI can be performed in 384-well format and rapidly allows reaction components to be purified prior to injection into a mass spectrometer, without a throughput-limiting liquid chromatography step. We developed sensitive and robust assays for KDM1A (LSD1, AOF2) and KDM4C (JMJD2C, GASC1) and screened 13,824 compounds against each enzyme. Hits were rapidly triaged using a redox assay to identify compounds that interfered with the catalytic oxidation chemistry used by the KDMs for the demethylation reaction. We find that overall this high-throughput mass spectrometry platform coupled with the elimination of redox active compounds leads to a hit rate that is manageable for follow-up work.

  11. False-positive PCR detection of Tropheryma whipplei in cerebrospinal fluid and biopsy samples from a child with chronic lymphocytic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Goyo, Daniel; Camacho, Ana; Gómez, Carmen; de Las Heras, Rogelio Simón; Otero, Joaquín R; Chaves, Fernando

    2009-11-01

    We report the case of a teenager with chronic lymphocytic meningitis for whom Tropheryma whipplei 16S rRNA PCR results were positive in two cerebrospinal fluid samples and one duodenal biopsy specimen. PCR targeting another specific sequence of Tropheryma whipplei and sequencing of the initially amplified 16S rRNA fragment did not confirm the results.

  12. Positional information and reaction-diffusion: two big ideas in developmental biology combine.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B A; Sharpe, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in biology is that of biological pattern: how do the structures and shapes of organisms arise? Undoubtedly, the two most influential ideas in this area are those of Alan Turing's 'reaction-diffusion' and Lewis Wolpert's 'positional information'. Much has been written about these two concepts but some confusion still remains, in particular about the relationship between them. Here, we address this relationship and propose a scheme of three distinct ways in which these two ideas work together to shape biological form.

  13. A Segmented Neutron Detector with a High Position Resolution for the (p,pn) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yuki; Sasano, Masaki; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Dozono, Masanori; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Motoki; Lee, CheongSoo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Miki, Kenjiro; Miya, Hiroyuki; Ota, Shinsuke; Sekiguchi, Kimiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Wakui, Takashi; Yasuda, Jumpei; Zenihiro, Juzo

    We are developing a neutron detector with a high position resolution to study the single particle properties of nuclei by the knockout (p,pn) reaction at intermediate energies. We constructed a prototype detector consisting of plastic scintillating fibers and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Test experiments using 200- and 70-MeV proton and 199-, 188-, 68-, and 50-MeV neutron were performed for characterizing its performance. Preliminary results show that a position resolution of about 3 mm at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is realized as designed. The resulting separation-energy resolution to be obtained for (p,pn) measurement would be 1 MeV in FWHM, when the detector is used at a distance of 2 m from the target for measuring the neutron momentum.

  14. Assessment of skin sensitization under REACH: A case report on vehicle choice in the LLNA and its crucial role preventing false positive results.

    PubMed

    Watzek, Nico; Berger, Franz; Kolle, Susanne Noreen; Kaufmann, Tanja; Becker, Matthias; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2017-04-01

    In the EU, chemicals with a production or import volume in quantities of one metric ton per year or more have to be tested for skin sensitizing properties under the REACH regulation. The murine Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) and its modifications are widely used to fulfil the data requirement, as it is currently considered the first-choice method for in vivo testing to cover this endpoint. This manuscript describes a case study highlighting the importance of understanding the chemistry of the test material during testing for 'skin sensitization' of MCDA (mixture of 2,4- and 2,6-diamino-methylcyclohexane) with particular focus on the vehicle used. While the BrdU-ELISA modification of the LLNA using acetone/olive oil (AOO) as vehicle revealed expectable positive results. However, the concentration control analysis unexpectedly revealed an instability of MCDA in the vehicle AOO. Further studies on the reactivity showed MCDA to rapidly react with AOO under formation of various imine structures, which might have caused the positive LLNA result. The repetition of the LLNA using propylene glycol (PG) as vehicle did not confirm the positive results of the LLNA using AOO. Finally, a classification of MCDA as skin sensitizer according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) was not justified.

  15. Desensitization in delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions -- an EAACI position paper of the Drug Allergy Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Scherer, K; Brockow, K; Aberer, W; Gooi, J H C; Demoly, P; Romano, A; Schnyder, B; Whitaker, P; Cernadas, J S R; Bircher, A J

    2013-07-01

    Drug hypersensitivity may deprive patients of drug therapy, and occasionally no effective alternative treatment is available. Successful desensitization has been well documented in delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions. In certain situations, such as sulfonamide hypersensitivity in HIV-positive patients or hypersensitivity to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis, published success rates reach 80%, and this procedure appears helpful for the patient management. A state of clinical tolerance may be achieved by the administration of increasing doses of the previously offending drug. However, in most cases, a pre-existent sensitization has not been proven by positive skin tests. Successful re-administration may have occurred in nonsensitized patients. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of desensitization is needed. Currently, desensitization in delayed hypersensitivity reactions is restricted to mild, uncomplicated exanthems and fixed drug eruptions. The published success rates vary depending on clinical manifestations, drugs, and applied protocols. Slower protocols tend to be more effective than rush protocols; however, underreporting of unsuccessful procedures is very probable. The decision to desensitize a patient must always be made on an individual basis, balancing risks and benefits. This paper reviews the literature and presents the expert experience of the Drug Hypersensitivity Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

  16. Positive/negative ion velocity mapping apparatus for electron-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Xia, Lei; Li, Hong-Kai; Zeng, Xian-Jin; Tian, Shan Xi

    2012-01-01

    In molecular dissociative ionization by electron collisions and dissociative electron attachment to molecule, the respective positively and negatively charged fragments are the important products. A compact ion velocity mapping apparatus is developed for the angular distribution measurements of the positive or negative fragments produced in the electron-molecule reactions. This apparatus consists of a pulsed electron gun, a set of ion velocity mapping optic lenses, a two-dimensional position detector including two pieces of micro-channel plates, and a phosphor screen, and a charge-coupled-device camera for data acquisition. The positive and negative ion detections can be simply realized by changing the voltage polarity of ion optics and detector. Velocity sliced images can be directly recorded using a narrow voltage pulse applied on the rear micro-channel plate. The efficient performance of this system is evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of O(-) from the electron attachments to NO at 7.3 and 8.3 eV and O(+) from the electron collision with CO at 40.0 eV.

  17. MARVELS-1: A Face-on Double-lined Binary Star Masquerading as a Resonant Planetary System and Consideration of Rare False Positives in Radial Velocity Planet Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Payne, Matt; Lee, Brian L.; Wang, Ji; Crepp, Justin R.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Eastman, Jason; Pepper, Joshua; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Ghezzi, Luan; González-Hernández, Jonay I.; Cargile, Phillip; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wisniewski, John; Dutra-Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Maia, Márcio A. G.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hearty, Fred R.

    2013-06-01

    We have analyzed new and previously published radial velocity (RV) observations of MARVELS-1, known to have an ostensibly substellar companion in a ~6 day orbit. We find significant (~100 m s-1) residuals to the best-fit model for the companion, and these residuals are naïvely consistent with an interior giant planet with a P = 1.965 days in a nearly perfect 3:1 period commensurability (|Pb /Pc - 3| < 10-4). We have performed several tests for the reality of such a companion, including a dynamical analysis, a search for photometric variability, and a hunt for contaminating stellar spectra. We find many reasons to be critical of a planetary interpretation, including the fact that most of the three-body dynamical solutions are unstable. We find no evidence for transits, and no evidence of stellar photometric variability. We have discovered two apparent companions to MARVELS-1 with adaptive optics imaging at Keck; both are M dwarfs, one is likely bound, and the other is likely a foreground object. We explore false-alarm scenarios inspired by various curiosities in the data. Ultimately, a line profile and bisector analysis lead us to conclude that the ~100 m s-1 residuals are an artifact of spectral contamination from a stellar companion contributing ~15%-30% of the optical light in the system. We conclude that origin of this contamination is the previously detected RV companion to MARVELS-1, which is not, as previously reported, a brown dwarf, but in fact a G dwarf in a face-on orbit.

  18. Quantitative PCR for determining the infectivity of bacteriophage MS2 upon inactivation by heat, UV-B radiation, and singlet oxygen: advantages and limitations of an enzymatic treatment to reduce false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Pecson, Brian M; Martin, Luisa Valério; Kohn, Tamar

    2009-09-01

    Health risks posed by waterborne viruses are difficult to assess because it is tedious or impossible to determine the infectivity of many viruses. Recent studies hypothesized that quantitative PCR (qPCR) could selectively quantify infective viruses if preceded by an enzymatic treatment (ET) to reduce confounding false-positive signals. The goal of this study was to determine if ET with qPCR (ET-qPCR) can be used to accurately quantify the infectivity of the human viral surrogate bacteriophage MS2 upon partial inactivation by three treatments (heating at 72 degrees C, singlet oxygen, and UV radiation). Viruses were inactivated in buffered solutions and a lake water sample and assayed with culturing, qPCR, and ET-qPCR. To ensure that inactivating genome damage was fully captured, primer sets that covered the entire coding region were used. The susceptibility of different genome regions and the maximum genomic damage after each inactivating treatment were compared. We found that (i) qPCR alone caused false-positive results for all treatments, (ii) ET-qPCR significantly reduced (up to >5.2 log units) but did not eliminate the false-positive signals, and (iii) the elimination of false-positive signals differed between inactivating treatments. By assaying the whole coding region, we demonstrated that genome damage only partially accounts for virus inactivation. The possibility of achieving complete accordance between culture- and PCR-based assays is therefore called into doubt. Despite these differences, we postulate that ET-qPCR can track infectivity, given that decreases in infectivity were always accompanied by dose-dependent decreases in ET-qPCR signal. By decreasing false-positive signals, ET-qPCR improved the detection of infectivity loss relative to qPCR.

  19. Graded exposure therapy for addressing claustrophobic reactions to continuous positive airway pressure: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Means, Melanie K; Edinger, Jack D

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a safe, effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, and yet many patients develop claustrophobic reactions to the CPAP nasal mask and cannot tolerate this treatment. We examined the efficacy of a graded in-vivo exposure therapy for enhancing CPAP adherence using a retrospective, case series design. Objective CPAP adherence data were obtained on clinical patients who attended 1 or more sessions of exposure therapy with a behavioral sleep psychologist. Compared to pre-treatment, patients used CPAP significantly longer after exposure therapy. No predictors of treatment response were identified. CPAP exposure therapy may be beneficial in some cases; however, further research is needed to determine types of patients most likely to benefit from this therapy.

  20. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformations through different reaction pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Organic compounds are produced in vast quantities for industrial and agricultural use, as well as for human and animal healthcare [1]. These chemicals and their metabolites are frequently detected at trace levels in fresh water environments where they undergo degradation via different reaction pathways. Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. Recent advances in analytical techniques have promoted the fast development and implementation of multi-element CSIA. However, quantitative frameworks to evaluate multi-element stable isotope data and incorporating mechanistic information on the degradation processes [2,3] are still lacking. In this study we propose a mechanism-based modeling approach to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. We validate the proposed approach with the concentration and multi-element isotope data of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways and their range of variation consistent with observed multi-element (C, N) bulk isotope fractionation. The proposed approach can also be used as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. [1] Schwarzenbach, R.P., Egli, T., Hofstetter, T.B., von Gunten, U., Wehrli, B., 2010. Global Water Pollution and Human Health. Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. doi:10.1146/annurev-environ-100809-125342. [2] Jin, B., Haderlein, S.B., Rolle, M

  1. Synthesis of phosphatidylcholine with defined fatty acid in the sn-1 position by lipase-catalyzed esterification and transesterification reaction.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, Dietlind; Budde, Heike; Wehtje, Ernst

    2002-05-20

    The incorporation of caproic acid in the sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine (PC) catalyzed by lipase from Rhizopus oryzae was investigated in a water activity-controlled organic medium. The reaction was carried out either as esterification or transesterification. A comparison between these two reaction modes was made with regard to product yield, product purity, reaction time, and byproduct formation as a consequence of acyl migration. The yield in the esterification and transesterification reaction was the same under identical conditions. The highest yield (78%) was obtained at a water activity (a(w)) of 0.11 and a caproic acid concentration of 0.8 M. The reaction time was shorter in the esterification reaction than in the transesterification reaction. The difference in reaction time was especially pronounced at low water activities and high fatty acid concentrations. The loss in yield due to acyl migration and consequent enzymatic side reactions was around 16% under a wide range of conditions. The incorporation of a fatty acid in the sn-1 position of PC proved to be thermodynamically much more favorable than the incorporation of a fatty acid in the sn-2 position.

  2. Modeling Kepler Transit Light Curves as False Positives: Rejection of Blend Scenarios for Kepler-9, and Validation of Kepler-9 d, a Super-Earth-Size Planet in a Multiple System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-20

    imaging, centroid measurements, and photometry (colors). Therefore, even ignoring the evidence from TTVs, these results fully support the planetary ...inclinations. The light-curve parameters we obtain for Kepler-9 d by modeling the photometry using the formalism of Mandel & Agol (2002) are summarized in Table...an astrophysical false positive, we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a “blend” rather than a planet orbiting a star

  3. Competitive binding experiments can reduce the false positive results of affinity-based ultrafiltration-HPLC: A case study for identification of potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Perilla frutescens extract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of using competitive binding experiments with ultrafiltration-HPLC analysis to identify potent xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors from the Perilla frutescens extract as an attempt to reduce the number of false positive results. To isolate the enzyme-ligand complex from unbound compounds, the P. frutescens extract was either incubated in the absence of XO, in the presence of XO, or with the active site blocked XO before the ultrafiltration was performed. Allopurinaol was used as the XO active site blocker. The unbound compounds were subjected to HPLC analysis. The degree of total binding (TBD) and degree of specific binding (SBD) of each compound were calculated using the peak areas. TBD represents the binding affinities of compounds from the P. frutescens extract for the XO binding site. SBD represents the XO competitive binding between allopurinol and ligands from the extract samples. Two criteria were applied to select putative targets that could help avoid false positives. These include TBD>30% and SBD>10%. Using that approach, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, rosmarinic acid, methyl-rosmarinic acid, apigenin, and 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone were identified, from total 11 compounds, as potent XO inhibitors. Finally, apigenin, 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone, and luteolin were XO inhibitors verified through an XO inhibition assay and structural simulation of the complex. These results showed that the newly developed strategy has the advantage that the number of targets identified via ultrafiltration-HPLC can be narrowed from many false positives. However, not all false positives can be eliminated with this approach. Some potent inhibitors might also be excluded with the use of this method. The limitations of this method are also discussed herein.

  4. How useful are screening instruments for toddlers to predict outcome at age 4? General development, language skills, and symptom severity in children with a false positive screen for autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Dereu, Mieke; Roeyers, Herbert; Raymaekers, Ruth; Meirsschaut, Mieke; Warreyn, Petra

    2012-10-01

    Screening instruments for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often generate many false positives. It is argued that these children may have other developmental difficulties and are also in need of thorough assessment and early intervention. The current study looked at the predictive validity of positive screens on the Checklist for Early Signs of Developmental Disorders (CESDD) and the Early Screening of Autistic Traits questionnaire (ESAT) at age 2 towards language, cognitive function, and symptom severity at age 4. Children who screened positive on the ESAT scored lower for both language and cognitive functioning at age 4 compared with children who screened negative on the ESAT. Also, the more signs of ASD that were recognized on the CESDD or ESAT, the lower the scores for language and cognitive functioning at age 4. False positive screens could be differentiated from true positive screens on the CESDD only in symptom severity score on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). It seems that early screeners for ASD also detect children with other developmental disorders and that diagnostic instruments such as the ADOS are warranted to differentiate between children with ASD and other developmental problems.

  5. Effect of a small number of training cases on the performance of massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G., III; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we investigated a pattern-classification technique which can be trained with a small number of cases with a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT (LDCT). The MTANN consists of a modified multilayer artificial neural network (ANN), which is capable of operating on image data directly. The MTANN is trained by use of a large number of sub-regions extracted from input images together with the teacher images containing the distribution for the "likelihood of being a nodule." The output image is obtained by scanning of an input image with the MTANN. In the MTANN, the distinction between nodules and non-nodules is treated as an image-processing task, in other words, as a highly nonlinear filter that performs both nodule enhancement and non-nodule suppression. This allows us to train the MTANN not on a case basis, but on a sub-region basis. Therefore, the MTANN can be trained with a very small number of cases. Our database consisted of 101 LDCT scans acquired from 71 patients in a lung cancer screening program. The scans consisted of 2,822 sections, and contained 121 nodules including 104 nodules representing confirmed primary cancers. With our current CAD scheme, a sensitivity of 81.0% (98/121 nodules) with 0.99 false positives per section (2,804/2,822) was achieved. By use of the MTANN trained with a small number of training cases (n=10), i.e., five pairs of nodules and non-nodules, we were able to remove 55.8% of false positives without a reduction in the number of true positives, i.e., a classification sensitivity of 100%. Thus, the false-positive rate of our current CAD scheme was reduced from 0.99 to 0.44 false positive per section, while the current sensitivity (81.0%) was maintained.

  6. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  7. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications.

    PubMed

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Go, Eden P; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. A Metric for Reducing False Positives in the Computer-Aided Detection of Breast Cancer from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Screening Examinations of High-Risk Women.

    PubMed

    Levman, Jacob E D; Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Warner, Ellen; Causer, Petrina; Martel, Anne L

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-enabled cancer screening has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the early detection of breast cancer. Computer-aided detection systems have the potential to improve the screening process by standardizing radiologists to a high level of diagnostic accuracy. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. This study compares the performance of a proposed method for computer-aided detection (based on the second-order spatial derivative of the relative signal intensity) with the signal enhancement ratio (SER) on MRI-based breast screening examinations. Comparison is performed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis as well as free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis. A modified computer-aided detection system combining the proposed approach with the SER method is also presented. The proposed method provides improvements in the rates of false positive markings over the SER method in the detection of breast cancer (as assessed by FROC analysis). The modified computer-aided detection system that incorporates both the proposed method and the SER method yields ROC results equal to that produced by SER while simultaneously providing improvements over the SER method in terms of false positives per noncancerous exam. The proposed method for identifying malignancies outperforms the SER method in terms of false positives on a challenging dataset containing many small lesions and may play a useful role in breast cancer screening by MRI as part of a computer-aided detection system.

  9. Competition between "Meta Effect" Photochemical Reactions of Selected Benzophenone Compounds Having Two Different Substituents at Meta Positions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiani; Li, Huai; Zhang, Xiting; Tang, Wen-Jian; Li, Mingde; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-10-21

    Recent studies conducted on some "meta effect" photochemical reactions focused on aromatic carbonyls having a substitution on one meta position of the benzophenone (BP) and anthraquinone parent compound. In this paper, two different substitutions were introduced with one at each meta position of the BP parent compound to investigate possible competition between different types of meta effect photochemistry observed in acidic solutions containing water. The photochemical pathways of 3-hydroxymethyl-3'-fluorobenzophenone (1) and 3-fluoro-3'-methylbenzophenone (2) were explored in several solvents, including acidic water-containing solutions, using time-resolved spectroscopic experiments and density functional theory computations. It is observed that 1 can undergo a photoredox reaction and 2 can undergo a meta-methyl deprotonation reaction in acidic water-containing solutions. Comparison of these results to those previously reported for the analogous BP derivatives that contain only one substituent at a meta position indicates the introduction of electron-donating (such as hydroxyl) and electron-withdrawing groups (such as F) on the meta positions of BP can influence the meta effect photochemical reactions. It was found that involvement of an electron-donating moiety facilitates the meta effect photochemical reactions by stabilizing the crucial reactive biradical intermediate associated with the meta effect photochemical reactions.

  10. MODELING KEPLER TRANSIT LIGHT CURVES AS FALSE POSITIVES: REJECTION OF BLEND SCENARIOS FOR KEPLER-9, AND VALIDATION OF KEPLER-9 d, A SUPER-EARTH-SIZE PLANET IN A MULTIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Charbonneau, David; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Brown, Timothy M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N. III; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2011-01-20

    Light curves from the Kepler Mission contain valuable information on the nature of the phenomena producing the transit-like signals. To assist in exploring the possibility that they are due to an astrophysical false positive, we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a 'blend' rather than a planet orbiting a star. A blend may consist of a background or foreground eclipsing binary (or star-planet pair) whose eclipses are attenuated by the light of the candidate and possibly other stars within the photometric aperture. We apply BLENDER to the case of Kepler-9 (KIC 3323887), a target harboring two previously confirmed Saturn-size planets (Kepler-9 b and Kepler-9 c) showing transit timing variations, and an additional shallower signal with a 1.59 day period suggesting the presence of a super-Earth-size planet. Using BLENDER together with constraints from other follow-up observations we are able to rule out all blends for the two deeper signals and provide independent validation of their planetary nature. For the shallower signal, we rule out a large fraction of the false positives that might mimic the transits. The false alarm rate for remaining blends depends in part (and inversely) on the unknown frequency of small-size planets. Based on several realistic estimates of this frequency, we conclude with very high confidence that this small signal is due to a super-Earth-size planet (Kepler-9 d) in a multiple system, rather than a false positive. The radius is determined to be 1.64{sup +0.19}{sub -0.14} R{sub +}, and current spectroscopic observations are as yet insufficient to establish its mass.

  11. Modeling Kepler Transit Light Curves as False Positives: Rejection of Blend Scenarios for Kepler-9, and Validation of Kepler-9 d, a Super-Earth-Size Planet in a Multiple System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David R.; Dunham, Edward W.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Gauthier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Holman, Matthew J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Monet, David G.; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N.

    2011-01-01

    Light curves from the Kepler Mission contain valuable information on the nature of the phenomena producing the transit-like signals. To assist in exploring the possibility that they are due to an astrophysical false positive we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a blend rather than a planet orbiting a star. A blend may consist of a background or foreground eclipsing binary (or star-planet pair) whose eclipses are attenuated by the light of the candidate and possibly other stars within the photometric aperture. We apply BLENDER to the case of Kepler-9 (KIC 3323887), a target harboring two previously confirmed Saturn-size planets (Kepler-9 b and Kepler-9 c) showing transit timing variations, and an additional shallower signal with a 1.59 day period suggesting the presence of a super-Earth-size planet. Using BLENDER together with constraints from other follow-up observations we are able to rule out all blends for the two deeper signals and provide independent validation of their planetary nature. For the shallower signal, we rule out a large fraction of the false positives that might mimic the transits. The false alarm rate for remaining blends depends in part (and inversely) on the unknown frequency of small-size planets. Based on several realistic estimates of this frequency, we conclude with very high confidence that this small signal is due to a super-Earth-size planet (Kepler-9 d) in a multiple system, rather than a false positive. The radius is determined to be 1.64(exp)(sub-14),R, and current spectroscopic observations are as yet insufficient to establish its mass.

  12. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  13. Eccentric exercise affects the upper limbs more than the lower limbs in position sense and reaction angle.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Giakas, Giannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of eccentric exercise on position sense and reaction angle of the elbow and knee flexors. Twelve males underwent two eccentric exercise sessions involving a randomized crossover design. In the first session participants used their elbow flexors and in the other session their knee flexors. Muscle damage indices, position sense, and joint reaction angle to release of the elbow and knee flexors were measured before, immediately after, and up to 7 days after exercise. Exercise induced greater muscle damage in the elbow flexors than knee flexors. Exercise disturbed position sense of the elbow and knee joint. For both limbs, the participants adopted a more extended position than the reference angle. The elbow and knee joint reaction angles to release increased after exercise for both the elbow and knee flexors. The disturbances in position sense and reaction angle after exercise were greater in the elbow flexors than knee flexors. The elbow flexors remained more accurate and faster than the knee flexors at all time points. These results may be explained by the higher density of muscle spindles and the lower innervation ratio of the elbow flexors compared with the knee flexors, as well as the fact that the arms are more accustomed than the legs to perform fast and accurate movements.

  14. The Rapid Test Based on Leishmania infantum Chimeric rK28 Protein Improves the Diagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis by Reducing the Detection of False-Positive Dogs.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Pacheco, Luciano Vasconcellos; Borja, Lairton Souza; Tuy, Pétala Gardênia da Silva Estrela; Bastos, Leila Andrade; Solcà, Manuela da Silva; Amorim, Leila Denise Alves Ferreira; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) has spread to many urban centers worldwide. Dogs are considered the main reservoir of VL, because canine cases often precede the occurrence of human cases. Detection and euthanasia of serologically positive dogs is one of the primary VL control measures utilized in some countries, including Brazil. Using accurate diagnostic tests can minimize one undesirable consequence of this measure, culling false-positive dogs, and reduce the maintenance of false-negative dogs in endemic areas. In December 2011, the Brazilian Ministry of Health replaced the ELISA (EIE CVL) screening method and Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IFI CVL) confirmatory method with a new protocol using the rapid DPP CVL screening test and EIE CVL confirmatory test. A study of diagnostic accuracy of these two protocols was done by comparing their performance using serum samples collected from a random sample of 780 dogs in an endemic area of VL. All samples were evaluated by culture and real time PCR; 766 out of the 780 dogs were tested using the previous protocol (IFI CVL + EIE CVL) and all 780 were tested using the current protocol (DPP CVL + EIE CVL). Performances of both diagnostic protocols were evaluated using a latent class variable as the gold standard. The current protocol had a higher specificity (0.98 vs. 0.95) and PPV (0.83 vs. 0.70) than the previous protocol, although sensitivity of these two protocols was similar (0.73). When tested using sera from asymptomatic animals, the current protocol had a much higher PPV (0.63 vs. 0.40) than the previous protocol (although the sensitivity of either protocol was the same, 0.71). Considering a range of theoretical CVL prevalences, the projected PPVs were higher for the current protocol than for the previous protocol for each theoretical prevalence value. The findings presented herein show that the current protocol performed better than previous protocol primarily by reducing false-positive results.

  15. The Rapid Test Based on Leishmania infantum Chimeric rK28 Protein Improves the Diagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis by Reducing the Detection of False-Positive Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Borja, Lairton Souza; Tuy, Pétala Gardênia da Silva Estrela; Bastos, Leila Andrade; Solcà, Manuela da Silva; Amorim, Leila Denise Alves Ferreira; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) has spread to many urban centers worldwide. Dogs are considered the main reservoir of VL, because canine cases often precede the occurrence of human cases. Detection and euthanasia of serologically positive dogs is one of the primary VL control measures utilized in some countries, including Brazil. Using accurate diagnostic tests can minimize one undesirable consequence of this measure, culling false-positive dogs, and reduce the maintenance of false-negative dogs in endemic areas. In December 2011, the Brazilian Ministry of Health replaced the ELISA (EIE CVL) screening method and Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IFI CVL) confirmatory method with a new protocol using the rapid DPP CVL screening test and EIE CVL confirmatory test. A study of diagnostic accuracy of these two protocols was done by comparing their performance using serum samples collected from a random sample of 780 dogs in an endemic area of VL. All samples were evaluated by culture and real time PCR; 766 out of the 780 dogs were tested using the previous protocol (IFI CVL + EIE CVL) and all 780 were tested using the current protocol (DPP CVL + EIE CVL). Performances of both diagnostic protocols were evaluated using a latent class variable as the gold standard. The current protocol had a higher specificity (0.98 vs. 0.95) and PPV (0.83 vs. 0.70) than the previous protocol, although sensitivity of these two protocols was similar (0.73). When tested using sera from asymptomatic animals, the current protocol had a much higher PPV (0.63 vs. 0.40) than the previous protocol (although the sensitivity of either protocol was the same, 0.71). Considering a range of theoretical CVL prevalences, the projected PPVs were higher for the current protocol than for the previous protocol for each theoretical prevalence value. The findings presented herein show that the current protocol performed better than previous protocol primarily by reducing false-positive results. PMID:26731098

  16. Different percentages of false-positive results obtained using five methods for the calculation of reference change values based on simulated normal and ln-normal distributions of data.

    PubMed

    Lund, Flemming; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Fraser, Callum G; Sölétormos, György

    2016-11-01

    Background Reference change values provide objective tools to assess the significance of a change in two consecutive results for a biomarker from an individual. The reference change value calculation is based on the assumption that within-subject biological variation has random fluctuation around a homeostatic set point that follows a normal (Gaussian) distribution. This set point (or baseline in steady-state) should be estimated from a set of previous samples, but, in practice, decisions based on reference change value are often based on only two consecutive results. The original reference change value was based on standard deviations according to the assumption of normality, but was soon changed to coefficients of variation (CV) in the formula (reference change value = ± Z ċ 2(½) ċ CV). Z is being dependent on the desired probability of significance, which also defines the percentages of false-positive results. The aim of this study was to investigate false-positive results using five different published methods for calculation of reference change value. Methods The five reference change value methods were examined using normally and ln-normally distributed simulated data. Results One method performed best in approaching the theoretical false-positive percentages on normally distributed data and another method performed best on ln-normally distributed data. The commonly used reference change value method based on two results (without use of estimated set point) performed worst both on normally distributed and ln-normally distributed data. Conclusions The optimal choice of method to calculate reference change value limits requires knowledge of the distribution of data (normal or ln-normal) and, if possible, knowledge of the homeostatic set point.

  17. Anticipated and Actual Reactions to Receiving HIV Positive Results Through Self-Testing Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-01-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner’s HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  18. Coinfection of hepatitis A virus genotype IA and IIIA complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis E virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Sup; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Jang, Je Hyuck; Myung, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jin Wook; Bang, Soo Mee; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Haeryoung; Yun, Hae Sun

    2011-12-01

    A 37-year-old male presented with fever and jaundice was diagnosed as hepatitis A complicated with progressive cholestasis and severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia. He was treated with high-dose prednisolone (1.5 mg/kg), and eventually recovered. His initial serum contained genotype IA hepatitis A virus (HAV), which was subsequently replaced by genotype IIIA HAV. Moreover, at the time of development of hemolytic anemia, he became positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV). We detected HAV antigens in the liver biopsy specimen, while we detected neither HEV antigen in the liver nor HEV RNA in his serum. This is the first report of hepatitis A coinfected with two different genotypes manifesting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, prolonged cholestasis, and false-positive IgM anti-HEV.

  19. Effect of different hand positions on trunk and shoulder kinematics and reaction forces in sitting pivot transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Shin; Her, Jin Gan; Ko, Tae Sung

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in trunk and shoulder angles, and reaction forces under the two hands elicited by different hand base of support positions during sitting pivot transfer. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen unimpaired subjects performed independent sitting pivot transfer. Subjects performed sitting pivot transfer between an initial seat to a target seat by only using their hands positioned at the same height as and lower than the seat position. Trunk and shoulder kinematics, and reaction forces on the trailing and leading hands were calculated. Mean peak joint angles and forces were compared between the hand positions using the pared t-test for the lift phase of the transfer. [Results] There were significant increases in the trunk angles of forward and lateral flexion, even though rotation decreased while transferring in the lower hand position. Increased shoulder flexion, anterior/posterior forces and reduced lateral forces were also shown. [Conclusion] Placing the hands of the supporting arms lower than the seat position during sitting pivot transfer was identified as having biomechanical advantages. Therefore, the lower hand position can be recommended as an effective and safe method for sitting pivot transfer by patients with spinal cord injury and can be utilized as a reference data for considering the appropriate height of aids for a wheelchair.

  20. Effect of different hand positions on trunk and shoulder kinematics and reaction forces in sitting pivot transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Shin; Her, Jin Gan; Ko, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in trunk and shoulder angles, and reaction forces under the two hands elicited by different hand base of support positions during sitting pivot transfer. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen unimpaired subjects performed independent sitting pivot transfer. Subjects performed sitting pivot transfer between an initial seat to a target seat by only using their hands positioned at the same height as and lower than the seat position. Trunk and shoulder kinematics, and reaction forces on the trailing and leading hands were calculated. Mean peak joint angles and forces were compared between the hand positions using the pared t-test for the lift phase of the transfer. [Results] There were significant increases in the trunk angles of forward and lateral flexion, even though rotation decreased while transferring in the lower hand position. Increased shoulder flexion, anterior/posterior forces and reduced lateral forces were also shown. [Conclusion] Placing the hands of the supporting arms lower than the seat position during sitting pivot transfer was identified as having biomechanical advantages. Therefore, the lower hand position can be recommended as an effective and safe method for sitting pivot transfer by patients with spinal cord injury and can be utilized as a reference data for considering the appropriate height of aids for a wheelchair. PMID:26310994

  1. Gas-phase intramolecular elimination reaction studies of steviol glycosides in positive electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Mani; Clos, John F; Somayajula, Kasi V; Milanowski, Dennis J; Mocek, Ulla; Dubois, Grant E; Prakash, Indra

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the first study of the gas-phase intramolecular elimination reaction of steviol glycosides in positive electrospray mass spectrometry. The observed glycosylated product ions are proposed to be formed via an intramolecular elimination of sugar units from the parent molecule ion. It was further proven by MS/MS studies and deuterium labeling experiments with one of the steviol glycosides, rebaudioside A. These mass spectrometric results confirmed that the new glycosylated product ions observed are most likely formed by the combination of glucose moieties (Glu) II-IV and Glu I via a gas-phase intramolecular elimination reaction.

  2. Analysis of Reaction Times and Aerobic Capacities of Soccer Players According to Their Playing Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Cengiz; Karakoc, Onder; Taskin, Mine; Dural, Murat

    2016-01-01

    70 soccer players in Gaziantep amateur league voluntarily participated in this study, (average of their ages 19,17±1,34years, average of their heights 181,28±5,06 cm, average of their body weights 76,75±4,43 kg and average of their sports experiences 3,78±0,95 years) to analyze visual and auditory reaction times and aerobic capacities of amateur…

  3. Bifurcations and asymptotic behavior of positive steady-states of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wonlyul

    2016-12-01

    The current paper presents a better understanding of a diffusive enzyme-catalyzed system arising from glycolysis, describing a biochemical reaction in which a substrate is converted into a product with positive feedback and into a branched sink. Through theoretical analysis of the given partial differential system, the existence and nonexistence of nonconstant positive steady states are studied. Moreover, the global bifurcation structure and asymptotic behavior of the solutions are revealed. Our mathematical approach is based on bifurcation theory, index theory, and various elliptic estimates.

  4. A Luenberger observer for reaction-diffusion models with front position data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Annabelle; Chapelle, Dominique; Moireau, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We propose a Luenberger observer for reaction-diffusion models with propagating front features, and for data associated with the location of the front over time. Such models are considered in various application fields, such as electrophysiology, wild-land fire propagation and tumor growth modeling. Drawing our inspiration from image processing methods, we start by proposing an observer for the eikonal-curvature equation that can be derived from the reaction-diffusion model by an asymptotic expansion. We then carry over this observer to the underlying reaction-diffusion equation by an ;inverse asymptotic analysis;, and we show that the associated correction in the dynamics has a stabilizing effect for the linearized estimation error. We also discuss the extension to joint state-parameter estimation by using the earlier-proposed ROUKF strategy. We then illustrate and assess our proposed observer method with test problems pertaining to electrophysiology modeling, including with a realistic model of cardiac atria. Our numerical trials show that state estimation is directly very effective with the proposed Luenberger observer, while specific strategies are needed to accurately perform parameter estimation - as is usual with Kalman filtering used in a nonlinear setting - and we demonstrate two such successful strategies.

  5. Barriers to condom purchasing: Effects of product positioning on reactions to condoms.

    PubMed

    Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Glasford, Demis E; Marsh, Kerry L; Lust, Sarah A

    2006-12-01

    Correct and consistent condom use has been promoted as a method to prevent sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Yet research has repeatedly shown that people fail to use condoms consistently. One influence on the pervasive lack of condom use that has received relatively little attention is the context in which consumers are exposed to condoms (i.e., how condoms are displayed in retail settings). In this paper we present two studies explored variations in condom shelf placement and its effects on people's condom attitudes and acquisition. Study 1 explored the shelf placement of condoms in 59 retail outlets in Connecticut, USA and found that condoms were typically located in areas of high visibility (e.g., next to the pharmacy counter) and on shelves adjacent to feminine hygiene and disease treatment products. In Study 2, 120 heterosexual undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut were randomly assigned to evaluate condoms adjacent to sensual, positive, neutral, or negative products and found that overall men reported more positive attitudes and acquired more condoms when exposed to condoms in a sensual context compared to women in the same condition. Among women, condom attitudes were more positive in the context of neutral products; condom acquisition was strongest for women exposed to condoms in the positive aisles. These results suggest a gender-specific approach to condom promotion. Implications of these studies for HIV prevention, public health, and condom marketing strategies are discussed.

  6. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-07

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  7. Report: Quick Reaction Report: EPA Should Ensure Positions Vacated Under Buyouts Are Eliminated or Properly Filled

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #15-P-0184, July 14, 2015.The EPA paid staff up to $25,000 each to voluntarily separate from federal employment, but in some cases replaced them without modifying the positions. The EPA needs to improve its controls over this in light of the current

  8. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  9. Effects of intensity and positional predictability of a visual stimulus on simple reaction time.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Luiz Renato Rodrigues; Haddad, Hamilton; Baldo, Marcus Vinicius Chrysóstomo

    2011-01-10

    The influence of visual stimuli intensity on manual reaction time (RT) was investigated under two different attentional settings: high (Experiment 1) and low (Experiment 2) stimulus location predictability. These two experiments were also run under both binocular and monocular viewing conditions. We observed that RT decreased as stimulus intensity increased. It also decreased as the viewing condition was changed from monocular to binocular as well as the location predictability shifted from low to high. A significant interaction was found between stimulus intensity and viewing condition, but no interaction was observed between neither of these factors and location predictability. These findings support the idea that the stimulus intensity effect arises from purely sensory, pre-attentive mechanisms rather than deriving from more efficient attentional capture.

  10. MSPI False Indication Probability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Kurt Vedros; Robert Youngblood

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines false indication probabilities in the context of the Mitigating System Performance Index (MSPI), in order to investigate the pros and cons of different approaches to resolving two coupled issues: (1) sensitivity to the prior distribution used in calculating the Bayesian-corrected unreliability contribution to the MSPI, and (2) whether (in a particular plant configuration) to model the fuel oil transfer pump (FOTP) as a separate component, or integrally to its emergency diesel generator (EDG). False indication probabilities were calculated for the following situations: (1) all component reliability parameters at their baseline values, so that the true indication is green, meaning that an indication of white or above would be false positive; (2) one or more components degraded to the extent that the true indication would be (mid) white, and “false” would be green (negative) or yellow (negative) or red (negative). In key respects, this was the approach taken in NUREG-1753. The prior distributions examined were the constrained noninformative (CNI) prior used currently by the MSPI, a mixture of conjugate priors, the Jeffreys noninformative prior, a nonconjugate log(istic)-normal prior, and the minimally informative prior investigated in (Kelly et al., 2010). The mid-white performance state was set at ?CDF = ?10 ? 10-6/yr. For each simulated time history, a check is made of whether the calculated ?CDF is above or below 10-6/yr. If the parameters were at their baseline values, and ?CDF > 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false positive. Conversely, if one or all of the parameters are set to values corresponding to ?CDF > 10-6/yr but that time history’s ?CDF < 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false negative indication. The false indication (positive or negative) probability is then estimated as the number of false positive or negative counts divided by the number of time histories (100,000). Results are presented for a set of base case parameter values

  11. Radical formation in the FMN-photosensitized reactions of unsaturated fatty acids bearing double bonds at different positions.

    PubMed

    Nishihama, Nao; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2016-08-15

    Although the reaction mechanisms through which flavin mononucleotide works as an endogenous photosensitizer have been investigated (Baier et al., 2006; Edwards and Silva, 2001; Pajares et al., 2001; Criado et al., 2003; Massad et al., 2008) [23-27], few studies have been performed for the reactions of flavin mononucleotide with unsaturated fatty acids. To examine the reactions of flavin mononucleotide with unsaturated fatty acids bearing a double bond at different positions, an electron spin resonance, a high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance and a high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometry were employed. The control reaction mixtures contained 25μmolL(-1) of flavin mononucleotide, 1.0mmolL(-1) of FeSO4(NH4)2SO4, 10mmolL(-1) of cholic acid, 30mmolL(-1) of phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and 0.1molL(-1) of α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone in deuterium oxide. In addition, it also contained 4.3mmolL(-1) of one of the following: (z)-11-octadecenoic acid, (z)-6-octadecenoic acid, (z)-9-octadecenoic acid or (z, z)-9, 12-octadecadienoic acid. The control reaction mixtures without FeSO4(NH4)2SO4 and α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone were exposed to the visible light at 436nm (7.8Jcm(-2)). After the irradiation, α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone was added. The reactions started from adding FeSO4(NH4)2SO4 and performed at 25°C for 1min. Electron spin resonance measurements of the control reaction mixtures showed prominent signals (α(N)=1.58mT and α(Hβ)=0.26mT). High performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance analyses of the control reaction mixtures showed prominent peaks at the retention times of 31.1min {(z)-6-octadecenoic acid}, 39.6min {(z)-9-octadecenoic acid}, 44.9min {(z)-11-octadecenoic acid} and 40.2min {(z, z)-9, 12-octadecadienoic acid}. High performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass analyses of the control reaction mixtures showed that 4

  12. [Reaction of the uterine wall on IUD of abnormal positioning and size].

    PubMed

    Nesit, V

    1973-05-01

    The reliability of an IUD was examined in 9 women 1-7 days prior to hysterectomy or supracervical amputation of the uterus. An extra large Dana, Dana super, or Dana cor was inserted. All the women complained of hypogastric pains; in 2 cases, the IUD was removed after only a few hours. After the surgery, the uterus was prepared for histological verification of the effects of the IUD. Significant deformation of the uterine wall was found, especially in the region of the cervix and corpus uteri. This was particularly marked with the Dana super, which also caused a rotary deformation. There were changes seen in the IUD itself as well. The results show that an excessively large or incorrectly positioned IUD will cause pronounced deformation of the corpus, uterine cavity and of the cervix with subsequent pains, staining, and expulsion.

  13. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were ‘probable’ and 33.96% were ‘possible’. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  14. Ab initio study of nitrogen and position-specific oxygen kinetic isotope effects in the NO + O3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Wendell W.; Michalski, Greg

    2016-12-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate nitrogen (k15/k14) and position-specific oxygen (k17/k16O & k18/k16) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reaction between NO and O3 using CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) and CCSD(T)/6-311G(d) derived frequencies in the complete Bigeleisen equations. Isotopic enrichment factors are calculated to be -6.7‰, -1.3‰, -44.7‰, -14.1‰, and -0.3‰ at 298 K for the reactions involving the 15N16O, 14N18O, 18O16O16O, 16O18O16O, and 16O16O18O isotopologues relative to the 14N16O and 16O3 isotopologues, respectively (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)). Using our oxygen position-specific KIEs, a kinetic model was constructed using Kintecus, which estimates the overall isotopic enrichment factors associated with unreacted O3 and the oxygen transferred to NO2 to be -19.6‰ and -22.8‰, respectively, (CCSD(T)/6-311G(d)) which tends to be in agreement with previously reported experimental data. While this result may be fortuitous, this agreement suggests that our model is capturing the most important features of the underlying physics of the KIE associated with this reaction (i.e., shifts in zero-point energies). The calculated KIEs will useful in future NOx isotopic modeling studies aimed at understanding the processes responsible for the observed tropospheric isotopic variations of NOx as well as for tropospheric nitrate.

  15. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  16. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  17. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  18. False Color Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    In a gray scale image, the suble variations seen in this false color image are almost impossible to identify. Note the orange band in the center of the frame, and the bluer bands to either side of it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 87, Longitude 65.5 East (294.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Importance of the Voronoi domain partition for position-jump reaction-diffusion processes on nonuniform rectilinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Baker, Ruth E

    2013-11-01

    Position-jump processes are used for the mathematical modeling of spatially extended chemical and biological systems with increasing frequency. A large subset of the literature concerning such processes is concerned with modeling the effect of stochasticity on reaction-diffusion systems. Traditionally, computational domains have been divided into regular voxels. Molecules are assumed well mixed within each of these voxels and are allowed to react with other molecules within the same voxel or to jump to neighboring voxels with predefined transition rates. For a variety of reasons implementing position-jump processes on irregular grids is becoming increasingly important. However, it is not immediately clear what form an appropriate irregular partition of the domain should take if it is to allow the derivation of mean molecular concentrations that agree with a given partial differential equation for molecular concentrations. It has been demonstrated, in one dimension, that the Voronoi domain partition is the appropriate method with which to divide the computational domain. In this Brief Report, we investigate theoretically the propriety of the Voronoi domain partition as an appropriate method to partition domains for position-jump models in higher dimensions. We also provide simulations of diffusion processes in two dimensions in order to corroborate our results.

  20. Hybrid capacitors utilizing halogen-based redox reactions at interface between carbon positive electrode and aqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shigeaki; Ito, Tatsuya; Murakumo, Yuka; Naitou, Masashi; Shimooka, Toshiharu; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    We propose novel hybrid capacitors (HCs) with electrolyte-involved redox reactions of bromide or iodide species by pretreatment of an activated carbon positive electrode. The treatment is simple; impregnation of pores at an activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) as a positive electrode with bromine- or iodine-containing water before cell assembly. The treated positive electrode is applied to a HC cell with a non-treated negative electrode of ACFC and its electrochemical performance is investigated by galvanostatic cycling and leakage current tests. Few studies on such "electrolytic" charge storage systems have provided acceptable capacitor performance because of inevitable self-discharge caused by diffusion of charged species form an electrode to the other one through an electrolyte. Nevertheless, our electrolyte-redox-based HCs show excellent performance without undesirable diffusion of charged species. Moreover, the present HC utilizing a bromide redox system fulfills a practical cell voltage of 1.8 V in spite of an aqueous electrolyte system. This high voltage provides excellent energy density, which is 5 times higher than that in a conventional aqueous electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC), and 1.2 times higher even than that in a 2.7 V-class non-aqueous EDLC, while keeping high charge-discharge rate capability.

  1. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color mosaic was constructed from a series of 53 images taken through three spectral filters by Galileo's imaging system as the spacecraft flew over the northern regions of the Moon on December 7, 1992. The part of the Moon visible from Earth is on the left side in this view. The color mosaic shows compositional variations in parts of the Moon's northern hemisphere. Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Radiologists' interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection when screen-reading with tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) relative to standard mammography in population screening.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Tony M; Macaskill, Petra; Houssami, Nehmat

    2015-12-01

    We examined interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection (TP, FP) for radiologists screen-reading with digital breast tomosynthesis as adjunct to full-field digital mammography (2D/3D) relative to 2D alone in population-based screening studies. A systematic literature search was performed to identify screening studies that provided radiologist-specific data for TP and FP detection. Radiologist interpretive efficiency (trade-off between TPs and FPs) was calculated using the FP:TP ratio which expresses the number of FP recalls for each screen-detected breast cancer. We modeled a pooled FP:TP ratio to assess variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency at study-level using random effects logistic regression. FP:TP ratio improved (ratio decreased) for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D) for a majority of radiologists (18 of 22) across all studies. Variability in radiologists' FP:TP ratio was consistently lower in all studies for 2D/3D screen-reading, as suggested by lower variance in ratios. Study-level pooled FP:TP ratio for 2D- and 2D/3D-mammography respectively, were 5.96 (95%CI: 4.08 to 8.72) and 3.17 (95%CI: 2.25 to 4.47) for the STORM trial; 10.25 (95%CI: 6.42 to 16.35) and 7.07 (95%CI: 4.99 to 10.02) for the Oslo trial; and 20.84 (95%CI: 13.95 to 31.12) and 8.37 (95%CI: 5.87 to 11.93) for the Houston study. This transfers into study-level improved interpretative efficiencies of 48%, 30% and 55%, respectively, for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D). In summary, study-level FP:TP trade-off improved using 2D/3D-mammography for all studies, which was also seen for most individual radiologists. There was variability in the FP:TP trade-off between readers and studies for 2D-as well as for 2D/3D-interpretations but variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency was relatively lower using 2D/3D-mammography.

  3. North Polar False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image contains dunes, and small areas of 'blue' which may represent fresh (ie. not dust covered) frost or ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85, Longitude 235.8 East (124.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. False Color Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft were used to produce this false-color composite of Jupiter's northern aurora on the night side of the planet. The height of the aurora, the thickness of the auroral arc, and the small-scale structure are revealed for the first time. Images in Galileo's red, green, and clear filters are displayed in red, green, and blue respectively. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size, which is a ten-fold improvement over Hubble Space Telescope images and a hundred-fold improvement over ground-based images.

    The glow is caused by electrically charged particles impinging on the atmosphere from above. The particles travel along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which are nearly vertical at this latitude. The auroral arc marks the boundary between the 'closed' field lines that are attached to the planet at both ends and the 'open' field lines that extend out into interplanetary space. At the boundary the particles have been accelerated over the greatest distances, and the glow is especially intense.

    The latitude-longitude lines refer to altitudes where the pressure is 1 bar. The image shows that the auroral emissions originate about 500 kilometers (about 310 miles) above this surface. The colored background is light scattered from Jupiter's bright crescent, which is out of view to the right. North is at the top. The images are centered at 57 degrees north and 184 degrees west and were taken on April 2, 1997 at a range of 1.7 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by Galileo's Solid State Imaging (SSI) system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http:// galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  5. Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction.

    PubMed

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-12-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury.

  6. Unexpected heterogeneity of BCR-ABL fusion mRNA detected by polymerase chain reaction in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hooberman, A.L.; Carrino, J.J.; Leibowitz, D.; Rowley, J.D.; Le Beau, M.M.; Arlin, Z.A.; Westbrook, C.A. )

    1989-06-01

    The Philadelphia (Ph{sup 1}) chromosome results in a fusion of portions of the BCR gene from chromosome 22 and the ABL gene from chromosome 9, producing a chimeric BCR-ABL mRNA and protein. In lymphoblastic leukemias, there are two molecular subtypes of the Ph{sup 1} chromosome, one with a rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region (bcr) of the BCR gene, producing the same 8.5-kilobase BCR-ABL fusion mRNA seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the other, without a bcr rearrangement, producing a 7.0-kilobase BCR-ABL fusion mRNA that is seen only in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors studied the molecular subtype of the Ph{sup 1} chromosome in 11 cases of Ph{sup 1}-positive ALL, including 2 with a previous diagnosis of CML, using a sensitive method to analyze the mRNA species based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). They observed unexpected heterogeneity in BCR-ABL mRNA in this population. They conclude that the PCR gives additional information about the Ph{sup 1} chromosome gene products that cannot be obtained by genomic analysis, but that it cannot be used as the sole means of detection of this chromosomal abnormality in ALL because of the high incidence of false negative results.

  7. A novel duplex real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for rubella virus with armored RNA as a noncompetitive internal positive control.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Li, Ruiying; Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Shuping

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to build and apply a duplex real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for rubella virus. Firstly, a 60-bp-long armored RV RNA was constructed in the laboratory. Secondly, a duplex real time RT-PCR assay was established. Thirdly, the 60-bp-long armored RV RNA was used as an internal positive control (IPC) for the duplex real time RT-PCR. And finally the duplex real time RT-PCR assay was applied to detect RV RNA in clinical specimens. The in-house assay has a high amplification efficiency (0.99), a high analytical sensitivity (200 copies/mL), and a good reproducibility. The diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the in-house assay were both 100%, due to the monitoring of the armored RV RNA IPC. Therefore, the in-house duplex real time quantitative RT-PCR assay is a specific, sensitive, reproducible and accurate assay for quantitation of RV RNA in clinical specimens. And noncompetitive armored RV RNA IPC can monitor RT-PCR inhibition and prevent false-negative and inaccurate results in the real time detection system.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the position of the intervertebral centres of reaction in upright standing--a musculoskeletal model investigation of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Zander, Thomas; Dreischarf, Marcel; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    The loads between adjacent vertebrae can be generalised as a single spatial force acting at the intervertebral centre of reaction. The exact position in vivo is unknown. However, in rigid body musculoskeletal models that simulate upright standing, the position is generally assumed to be located at the discs' centres of rotation. The influence of the antero-posterior position of the centre of reaction on muscle activity and joint loads remains unknown. Thus, by using an inverse dynamic model, we varied the position of the centre of reaction at L4/L5 (i), simultaneously at all lumbar levels (ii), and by optimisation at all lumbar levels (iii). Variation of the centres of reaction can considerably influence the activities of lumbar muscles and the joint forces between vertebrae. The optimisation of the position of the centre of reaction reduced the maximum lumbar muscle activity and axial joint forces at L4/L5 from 17.5% to 1.5% of the muscle strength and from 490 N to 390 N, respectively. Thus, when studying individual postures, such as for therapeutic or preventive evaluations, potential differences between the centre of reaction and the centre of rotation might influence the study results. These differences could be taken into account by sensitivity analyses.

  9. False discoveries and models for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2003-10-01

    In the search for genes underlying complex traits, there is a tendency to impose increasingly stringent criteria to avoid false discoveries. These stringent criteria make it hard to find true effects, and we argue that it might be better to optimize our procedures for eliminating and controlling false discoveries. Focusing on achieving an acceptable ratio of true- and false-positives, we show that false discoveries could be eliminated much more efficiently using a stepwise approach. To avoid a relatively high false discovery rate, corrections for 'multiple testing' might also be needed in candidate gene studies. If the appropriate methods are used, detecting the proportion of true effects appears to be a more important determinant of the genotyping burden than the desired false discovery rate. This raises the question of whether current models for gene discovery are shaped excessively by a fear of false discoveries.

  10. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He3(e,e')

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; John, J. St.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3He asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.

  11. The clinical meaning of positive latex sIgE in patients with food/pollen adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Nucera, E; Rizzi, A; Buonomo, A; De Pasquale, T; Pecora, V; Colagiovanni, A; Pascolini, L; Ricci, A G; Sferrazza, A; Patriarca, G; Aruanno, A; Schiavino, D

    2012-01-01

    Natural rubber latex allergy (NRL-A) is an international problem of public health. About 50-60% of NRL-A patients may present adverse reactions after ingestion of cross-reacting vegetable foods. This condition, called "Latex-fruit Syndrome", is a matter of research. The aim of our study is to distinguish between clinical/subclinical latex-fruit syndrome and cross-sensitization to latex and food/pollen allergens on the basis of latex recombinant allergens. We studied 51 patients with food hypersensitivity and serological evidence of NRL sensitization. The subjects underwent an accurate allergological evaluation (skin prick test with latex, food and pollen extracts, specific IgE to latex and recombinant allergens, challenge provocation tests). The patients were divided in two groups: group A) 34 patients with clinical and serological latex and fruit/vegetable allergies; group B) 17 patients allergic to fruits/vegetables and/or pollens, with serological, but not clinical NRL-A. All the latex challenge tests resulted positive in group A patients and only two patients of group B presented positive cutaneous challenge tests. Moreover, specific IgE-antibodies were detected to rHev b 5, to rHev b 6.01, to rHev b 6.02 and to rHev b 8 (and other profilins) of group A patients, while in group B we observed a monosensitization to Hev b8, probably linked to a cross-sensitization to pollens and foods. At the present state of knowledge, we need a multi-parametric approach based on a combination of clinical history, diagnostic tests (CRD) and latex challenge tests to make diagnosis of latex-fruit syndrome.

  12. Sensitive detection of miRNA by using hybridization chain reaction coupled with positively charged gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiangmin; Ning, Xue; Li, Zongbing; Cheng, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Positively charged gold nanoparticles (+)AuNPs can adsorb onto the negatively charged surface of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Herein, long-range dsDNA polymers could form based on the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) of two hairpin probes (H1 and H2) by using miRNA-21 as an initiator. (+)AuNPs could adsorb onto the negatively charged surface of such long-range dsDNA polymers based on the electrostatic adsorption, which directly resulted in the precipitation of (+)AuNPs and the decrease of (+)AuNPs absorption spectra. Under optimal conditions, miRNA-21 detection could be realized in the range of 20 pM-10 nM with a detection limit of 6.8 pM. In addition, (+)AuNPs used here are much more stable than commonly used negatively charged gold nanoparticles ((−)AuNPs) in mixed solution that contained salt, protein or other metal ions. Importantly, the assay could realize the detection of miRNA in human serum samples. PMID:27576601

  13. Ab Initio many-body calculations of the H3(d,n)He4 and He3(d,p)He4 fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navráail, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2012-01-24

    We apply the ab initio no-core shell model combined with the resonating-group method approach to calculate the cross sections of the 3H(d,n)4He and 3He(d,p)4He fusion reactions. These are important reactions for the big bang nucleosynthesis and the future of energy generation on Earth. Starting from a selected similarity-transformed chiral nucleon-nucleon interaction that accurately describes two-nucleon data, we performed many-body calculations that predict the S factor of both reactions. Virtual three-body breakup effects are obtained by including excited pseudostates of the deuteron in the calculation. Lastly, our results are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data and pave the way for microscopic investigations of polarization and electron-screening effects, of the 3H(d,γn)4He bremsstrahlung and other reactions relevant to fusion research.

  14. Positive atopy patch test reaction to Malassezia furfur in atopic dermatitis correlates with a T helper 2-like peripheral blood mononuclear cells response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Catharina; Eshaghi, Hojjat; Linder, Maria Tengvall; Jakobson, Eva; Scheynius, Annika

    2002-06-01

    The yeast Malassezia furfur belongs to the normal cutaneous flora, but is also a triggering allergen that can contribute to atopic dermatitis. To illuminate the effect of circulating allergen-specific T cells in atopic dermatitis, the peripheral mononuclear cell response was correlated with the in vivo skin prick test and atopy patch test reactivity to M. furfur. None of 16 healthy controls showed any positive in vivo reaction. The 40 atopic dermatitis patients, of whom 18 had serum IgE reactivity to M. furfur, were subdivided according to their in vivo reaction to M. furfur extract into three groups: skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive (n = 12), skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative (n = 12), and skin prick test negative/atopy patch test negative (n = 16). The skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive and the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative groups had a significantly higher peripheral mononuclear cell stimulation index than the healthy controls. Interestingly, the stimulation index values in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive group were significantly higher than in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative group. In the M. furfur skin prick test positive atopic dermatitis patients (n = 24) a correlation was found between stimulation index and the M. furfur atopy patch test reactions, but not between stimulation index and M. furfur-specific serum IgE levels. Skin prick test positive and/or atopy patch test positive reactions to the recombinant M. furfur allergens rMal f 1, rMal f 5, and rMal f 6 were observed in 7, 14, and 16 of the 40 atopic dermatitis patients, respectively. Further, there was a correlation between production of the T helper 2-related cytokines interleukins 4, 5, and 13 and stimulation index to M. furfur extract, but not between the T helper 1-related interferon-gamma and stimulation index to M. furfur extract. Our data strongly suggest a relationship between

  15. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, B. Akshaya; Babu, S. Chandra; Yadav, Harlokesh Narayan; Jain, Sunil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%). The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52%) was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm3 with comorbid conditions. PMID:22470896

  16. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  17. Lichenoid drug reaction following influenza vaccination in an HIV-positive patient: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    de Golian, Emily W; Brennan, Christina B; Davis, Loretta S

    2014-07-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions to vaccinations are rare but well-documented events. The vast majority of these reported reactions have been triggered by Hepatitis B vaccination (HBV). We describe an impressive generalized lichenoid drug reaction following the influenza vaccination. A 46-year-old African-American woman with a history of treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease developed a diffuse, pruritic rash one day following vaccination against the influenza virus. Physical exam and histopathology were consistent with a lichenoid drug eruption. This is only the fifth reported case of lichenoid drug reaction, and only the second generalized case, following influenza vaccination. The patient's underlying HIV disease, known to be a risk factor for both cutaneous drug reactions and more severe manifestations of lichen planus, likely predisposed her to this generalized hypersensitivity phenomenon.

  18. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  19. A Comparison between Students Who Receive and Who Do Not Receive a Writing Readiness Interventions on Handwriting Quality, Speed and Positive Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz, Nirit; Har-Zvi, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Proper acquisition of handwriting is required for success in school. This study compared the effects of two writing readiness interventions, "Traffic Light" and "Word and Sound" on kindergartners' handwriting quality, speed and positive reactions to writing. Handwriting readiness training for kindergarten children is…

  20. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A.; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved. PMID:27965600

  1. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved.

  2. [Consensus position document on the child with an allergic reaction after vaccination or an allergy to vaccine components].

    PubMed

    Echeverría Zudaire, L; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Alonso Lebrero, E; Álvarez García, F J; Cortés Álvarez, N; García Sánchez, N; Martorell Aragonés, A

    2015-07-01

    Vaccinations are one of the main public health tools for the control of vaccine-preventable diseases. If a child is labeled to have had an allergic reaction to a vaccine, the next immunizations will probably be suspended in that child, with the risks involved in this decision. The rate of severe allergic reactions is very low, ranging between 0.5-1/100,000 doses. The causes of allergic reactions to vaccines, more than the vaccine itself, are often due to residual protein components in the manufacturing process, such as gelatin or egg, and rarely to yeast or latex. Most of vaccine reactions are mild, localized at the site of injection, but in some circumstances, severe anaphylactic reactions can occur. If an immediate-type allergic reaction is suspected when vaccinating, or a child allergic to some of the vaccine components has to be vaccinated, a correct diagnosis of the possible allergy has to be made. The usual components of each vaccine should be known, in order to determine if vaccination can be performed safely on the child.

  3. A Study of False-Positive and False-Negative Error Rates in Cartridge Case Comparisons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-07

    Defense Biometrics and Forensics Office, Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering), through the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No...official policies, either expressed or implied, of the Defense Biometrics and Forensics Office, Defense Forensic Science Center, or the U.S...Acknowledgements This work was supported by Defense Biometrics and Forensics Office through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02

  4. Identification and classification of skin sensitizers: identifying false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David A; McFadden, John; Evans, Peter; Andersen, Klaus E; Jowsey, Ian

    2006-11-01

    The first step in regulatory evaluation of substances involves the identification of their intrinsic hazards, including the potential for skin sensitization. This is, quite properly, entirely different from assessment of the risks to human health, which might arise from incorporation of substances in products. EU guidance on regulations concerning the classification of skin sensitizers suggests a range of sources of information be deployed in the hazard identification process. These include chemical structure, predictive animal tests, and various types of human data. Where the information is clear-cut, then uncertainties rarely arise. However, for some materials, discordant information arises, perhaps because the substance is on the borderline of test sensitivity and classification (sensitizing materials of insufficient potency do not classified according to the EU scheme), due to conflicting results in predictive tests or for other reasons. In this study, we review data on a number of substances where a classification decision is complicated by such discordances and seek to use these examples to demonstrate how best to make a weight of evidence decision on whether a substance should, or should not, be classified as a skin sensitizer.

  5. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  6. Study modality and false recall.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Engle, Randall W

    2011-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g., Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005).

  7. False Belief vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory?

    PubMed

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM), the ability to reason about other people's thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in "false belief" and "false photograph" (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed true ("reality" questions) or false beliefs ("representation" questions) appropriate to the stories. Stories and comprehension questions were read and answered, respectively, more slowly in the false photograph than false belief conditions, indicating their greater difficulty. Interestingly, accuracy on representation questions for false photograph stories was significantly lower than for all other conditions and correlated positively with participants' working memory span scores. These results suggest that drawing representational inferences from false photo stories is particularly difficult and places heavy demands on working memory. Extensive naturalistic practice with ToM reasoning may enable a more flexible and efficient mental representation of false belief stories, resulting in lower memory load requirements. An important implication of these results is that the differential modulation of right temporal-parietal junction (RTPJ) during ToM and "false photo" control conditions may reflect the documented negative correlation of RTPJ activity with working memory load rather than a specialized involvement in ToM processes.

  8. Study of the Positive Kaon, Neutral Antikaon, Negative Pion System Produced in the Reaction Negative Kaon Proton Goes to Positive Kaon Neutral Antikaon Negative Pion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward Walter

    The results of a partial wave analysis of the K^{+}overline{K^0 }pi^{-} system produced in the reaction K^{-}pto K^{+}overline{K^0 }pi^{-} (Lambda/ Sigma^0) at 8 GeV/c are presented. A total of 2043 events in the mass range 1.24 to 1.64 GeV/c ^2 was collected using Brookhaven National Laboratory's Multiparticle Spectrometer facility. The K^{+}overline {K^0}pi^{-} mass spectrum shows a small peak at 1.280 +/- .001 GeV/c^2 and a large peak at 1.438 +/-.003 GeV/c ^2. The large peak is consistent with an enhancement at K^{*}K threshold which is cut off by our falling acceptance. There is some evidence for an accumulation of events in the region near 1.53 GeV/c^2 where previous experiments find an enhancement. The results of the partial wave analysis show that the small peak at 1.28 GeV/c^2 contains very little J^{PG} = 1^{++} with a _0 as the isobar, which implies that the f_1(1285) contains very little soverline s. The large peak near 1.4 GeV/c^2 is largely produced by J^{PG} = 1 ^{+-} and, to a lesser extent, 1^{++} partial waves with K^* as the isobar and with evidence for these waves being produced coherently, 180 ^circ out of phase. There is evidence for a below K^* K threshold resonance in the J^{PG} = 1^{+-} partial waves with mass 1344 + 29 - 43 MeV/c ^2 and width 40 + 38 - 40 MeV/c^2. There is little evidence in the partial wave analysis results for the f _sp{1}{'}(1530). The J^{PG} = 0^ {-+} partial wave with a_0 as the isobar, although small, shows rising phase in the region from 1.34 to 1.64 GeV/c^2 indicating resonance behavior.

  9. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  10. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality.

  11. A new method to study Li-ion cell safety: laser beam initiated reactions on both charged negative and positive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérès, J. P.; Perton, F.; Audry, C.; Biensan, Ph; de Guibert, A.; Blanc, G.; Broussely, M.

    The improvement of Li-ion batteries safety in abuse use is one of the key issues for their establishment in future hybrid or electrical vehicles. Such a challenge requires a perfect understanding of phenomena which could occur in abuse situation. A new technique for a better understanding of Li-ion cell safety has been so investigated. Reactions between electrolyte and charged electrodes (positive and negative just recovered from dismantled charged 4/5A cells) have been initiated by a laser beam, having a monitored intensity and time pulse. From such a device, a strong and controlled heating can be generated, in a very short time scale, on a defined electrode surface area. This localized heating, which is supposed to be similar to that could occur from a cell internal short-circuit, is able to initiate "self-propagation reactions" on charged negative and positive electrodes. This new technique has allowed a ranking of charged electrodes in terms of "self-propagation ability". This range of new data has been compared to results obtained from classical thermal characterization methods (DSC, DTA) and results obtained from normalized abuse tests. Global charged negative and positive electrodes degradation mechanisms have been proposed in good agreement with the whole results. The safety of a done Li-ion cell seems mainly related to active negative and positive active materials, but also to other components of the electrodes, and especially additive carbons and aluminum collector of the positive side.

  12. False Positives in Recognition Memory Produced by Cohort Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, William P.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Undergraduates listened to a list of words and nonwords. They then listened to a list of items, some of which contained phonemic variations of items in the first list, and stated whether items had been presented previously. Subjects made more recognition errors to items that had phonemic variations occurring near the beginning rather than the end…

  13. Many Women Skip Mammograms After False-Positive Result

    MedlinePlus

    ... a screening mammogram to adhere to routine screening mammography recommendations, because it has been shown to reduce ... is extremely important that women continue annual screening mammography, even if they have had the experience of ...

  14. Diagnostic Mammograms Find More Cancers, and More False-Positives

    MedlinePlus

    ... new study found the breast cancer detection rate rose to nearly 35 per 1,000 diagnostic mammograms ... a biopsy -- surgical evaluation of the suspect tissue -- rose to over 12 percent from 8 percent in ...

  15. False-Positive Tangible Outcomes of Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooker, Griffin W.; Iwata, Brian A.; Harper, Jill M.; Fahmie, Tara A.; Camp, Erin M.

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the most precise method for identifying variables that maintain problem behavior. Occasionally, however, results of an FA may be influenced by idiosyncratic sensitivity to aspects of the assessment conditions. For example, data from several studies suggest that inclusion of a tangible condition during an FA…

  16. An effective method for controlling false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2010-10-01

    In most genome-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens, the ultimate goal is to select siRNAs with a large inhibition or activation effect. The selection of hits typically requires statistical control of 2 errors: false positives and false negatives. Traditional methods of controlling false positives and false negatives do not take into account the important feature in RNAi screens: many small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may have very small but real nonzero average effects on the measured response and thus cannot allow us to effectively control false positives and false negatives. To address for deficiencies in the application of traditional approaches in RNAi screening, the author proposes a new method for controlling false positives and false negatives in RNAi high-throughput screens. The false negatives are statistically controlled through a false-negative rate (FNR) or false nondiscovery rate (FNDR). FNR is the proportion of false negatives among all siRNAs examined, whereas FNDR is the proportion of false negatives among declared nonhits. The author also proposes new concepts, q*-value and p*-value, to control FNR and FNDR, respectively. The proposed method should have broad utility for hit selection in which one needs to control both false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens in a robust manner.

  17. Bubbling the false vacuum away

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Rogers, B.; Thorarinson, J.

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubblelike inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two- and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum, as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubblelike inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay--known as resonant nucleation--is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and crossover. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

  18. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  19. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  20. The Danger of False Dichotomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBoskey, Vicky Kubler

    1998-01-01

    Responds to an article that examined 10 dichotomies in teacher education (SP 527 128), suggesting that too much time and energy are spent debating false dichotomies and addressing two specific dichotomies (preservice versus inservice and campus versus school site). Recommends that professional educators pool their energy and collaborate (rather…

  1. Evolutionary Psychology and False Confession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, Jesse M.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on Kassin's review, (see record 2005-03019-002) of the psychology of false confessions. The authors note that Kassin's review makes a compelling argument for the need for legal reform in police interrogation practices. Because his work strikes at the heart of the American criminal justice system--its fairness--the…

  2. Sleep deprivation and false confessions

    PubMed Central

    Frenda, Steven J.; Berkowitz, Shari R.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125–128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the “Escape” key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  3. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",...), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  4. FALSE MEMORY AND OBSESSIVE–COMPULSIVE SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Heide; Amir, Nader; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The memory deficit hypothesis has been used to explain the maintenance of repetitive behavior in individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder, yet the majority of studies focusing on verbal memory show mixed results. These studies primarily evaluated memory accuracy via the inclusion or omission of previously encountered material, as opposed to false recognition (i.e., the inclusion of erroneous material). We evaluated false memories and memory processes in individuals with obsessive–compulsive washing symptoms (OC), individuals matched on depression and anxiety without OC symptoms (D/A), and in nonanxious individuals (NAC). Methods Twenty-eight OC, 28 D/A, and 29 NAC individuals read OC-threat relevant, positive, and neutral scenarios and then performed a recognition test. Erroneous recognition of words associated to encoded, but not previously viewed, scenarios were classified as false memories. To evaluate processes underlying memory, participants completed a modified remember/know task to examine whether the OC individuals differed from the other individuals in recollective clarity for false memories of OC-relevant (e.g., germs), positive (e.g., lottery), and neutral (e.g., bread) material. Results The OC individuals used “know” more than the D/A and NAC individuals for false memories of threat. For veridical memories, the OC individuals used “know” more than the NAC, but not, D/A individuals. Conclusions The greater reliance on “know” (i.e., feelings of familiarity) in general and false threat memories in particular in individuals with OC symptoms may add to feelings of uncertainty for threat-relevant material, which may contribute to compulsive behavior. PMID:18839404

  5. Meningitis with polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster positivity in cerebrospinal flid of a young immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja; Ranjan, Rajeev; Agrawal, C. S.; Muralikrishnan, K; Dave, Nikhil; Rana, Davinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) is quite rare among young immunocompetent adults though immunocompromised patients are often seen to be affected by reactivation of VZV presenting with primary clinical features of dermatomal rashes and neurological sequelae. Here, we report the clinical scenario of a young, healthy male who had presented with fever, headache, and onset of dermatomal rashes later than the fever and was eventually diagnosed to be a case of VZV meningitis. We would like to highlight the fact that even young immunocompetent patients though rarely, might contract VZV meningitis and clinicians should have a high index of suspicion and keen eyes to catch the more obvious features of VZV infection on complete physical examination and must not harbor any reservations in ordering polymerase chain reaction for VZV DNA or initiating aggressive antiviral therapy. PMID:27695246

  6. Underpowered samples, false negatives, and unconscious learning.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Konstantinidis, Emmanouil; Shanks, David R

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community has witnessed growing concern about the high rate of false positives and unreliable results within the psychological literature, but the harmful impact of false negatives has been largely ignored. False negatives are particularly concerning in research areas where demonstrating the absence of an effect is crucial, such as studies of unconscious or implicit processing. Research on implicit processes seeks evidence of above-chance performance on some implicit behavioral measure at the same time as chance-level performance (that is, a null result) on an explicit measure of awareness. A systematic review of 73 studies of contextual cuing, a popular implicit learning paradigm, involving 181 statistical analyses of awareness tests, reveals how underpowered studies can lead to failure to reject a false null hypothesis. Among the studies that reported sufficient information, the meta-analytic effect size across awareness tests was d z = 0.31 (95 % CI 0.24-0.37), showing that participants' learning in these experiments was conscious. The unusually large number of positive results in this literature cannot be explained by selective publication. Instead, our analyses demonstrate that these tests are typically insensitive and underpowered to detect medium to small, but true, effects in awareness tests. These findings challenge a widespread and theoretically important claim about the extent of unconscious human cognition.

  7. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis.

  8. Outcome Knowledge and False Belief

    PubMed Central

    Ghrear, Siba E.; Birch, Susan A. J.; Bernstein, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually every social interaction involves reasoning about the perspectives of others, or ‘theory of mind (ToM).’ Previous research suggests that it is difficult to ignore our current knowledge when reasoning about a more naïve perspective (i.e., the curse of knowledge). In this Mini Review, we discuss the implications of the curse of knowledge for certain aspects of ToM. Particularly, we examine how the curse of knowledge influences key measurements of false belief reasoning. In closing, we touch on the need to develop new measurement tools to discern the mechanisms involved in the curse of knowledge and false belief reasoning, and how they develop across the lifespan. PMID:26903922

  9. Does sleep promote false memories?

    PubMed

    Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige; Lahl, Olaf; Sterpenich, Virginie; Boly, Mélanie; Dang-Vu, Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Gais, Stephen; Matarazzo, Luca; Peters, Frédéric; Schabus, Manuel; Schmidt, Christina; Tinguely, Gilberte; Vandewalle, Gilles; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Memory is constructive in nature so that it may sometimes lead to the retrieval of distorted or illusory information. Sleep facilitates accurate declarative memory consolidation but might also promote such memory distortions. We examined the influence of sleep and lack of sleep on the cerebral correlates of accurate and false recollections using fMRI. After encoding lists of semantically related word associates, half of the participants were allowed to sleep, whereas the others were totally sleep deprived on the first postencoding night. During a subsequent retest fMRI session taking place 3 days later, participants made recognition memory judgments about the previously studied associates, critical theme words (which had not been previously presented during encoding), and new words unrelated to the studied items. Sleep, relative to sleep deprivation, enhanced accurate and false recollections. No significant difference was observed in brain responses to false or illusory recollection between sleep and sleep deprivation conditions. However, after sleep but not after sleep deprivation (exclusive masking), accurate and illusory recollections were both associated with responses in the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex. The data suggest that sleep does not selectively enhance illusory memories but rather tends to promote systems-level consolidation in hippocampo-neocortical circuits of memories subsequently associated with both accurate and illusory recollections. We further observed that during encoding, hippocampal responses were selectively larger for items subsequently accurately retrieved than for material leading to illusory memories. The data indicate that the early organization of memory during encoding is a major factor influencing subsequent production of accurate or false memories.

  10. False advertising in the greenhouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.

    1991-12-01

    Most scientists are convinced of the importance of their own research subjects. Broecker [1991] has deplored the temptation, if not the tendency, to go overboard and exaggerate this importance once funding enters the mind. In particular, he alleges inflated or even false claims by biological (and other) oceanographers regarding the relevance of their research to the "greenhouse effect," caused by the anthropogenic enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 content. He writes [Broecker, 1991, p. 191]: "In my estimation, on any list of subjects requiring intense study with regard to the prediction of the consequences of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, I would place marine biological cycles near the bottom."

  11. Moderate temperature sodium cells. V - Discharge reactions and rechargeability of NiS and NiS2 positive electrodes in molten NaAlCl4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Elliot, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    NiS2 and NiS have been characterized as high energy density rechargeable positive electrodes for moderate-temperature Na batteries of the configuration, Na(1)/beta double prime-Al2O3/NaAlCl4(1), NiSx. The batteries operate in the temperature range 170 - 190 C. Positive electrode reactions during discharge/charge cycles have been characterized. Excellent rechargeability of the batteries has been demonstrated by extended cell cycling. A Na/NiS2 cell, operating at 190 C, exceeded 600 deep discharge/charge cycles with practically no capacity deterioration. The feasibility of secondary Na/NiSx batteries with specific energies equal to or greater than 50 Wh/lb and cycle lifes exceeding 1000 deep discharge/charge cycles has been demonstrated.

  12. Occult H. pylori infection partially explains ‘false-positive’ results of 13C-urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Lázaro, María J; Lario, Sergio; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Quílez, Elisa M; Casalots, Alex; Suarez, David; Campo, Rafel; Brullet, Enric; Junquera, Félix; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, UBiT-100 mg, (Otsuka, Spain), a commercial 13C-urea breath test omitting citric acid pre-treatment, had a high rate of false-positive results; however, it is possible that UBiT detected low-density ‘occult’ infection missed by other routine reference tests. We aimed to validate previous results in a new cohort and to rule out the possibility that false-positive UBiT were due to an ‘occult’ infection missed by reference tests. Methods Dyspeptic patients (n = 272) were prospectively enrolled and UBiT was performed, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by combining culture, histology and rapid urease test results. We calculated UBiT sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (with 95% CI). In addition, we evaluated ‘occult’ H. pylori infection using two previously-validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for urease A (UreA) and 16 S sequences in gastric biopsies. We included 44 patients with a false-positive UBiT, and two control groups of 25 patients each, that were positive and negative for all H. pylori tests. Results UBiT showed a false-positive rate of 17%, with a specificity of 83%. All the positive controls and 12 of 44 patients (27%) with false-positive UBiT were positive for all two PCR tests; by contrast, none of our negative controls had two positive PCR tests. Conclusions UBiT suffers from a high rate of false-positive results and sub-optimal specificity, and the protocol skipping citric acid pre-treatment should be revised; however, low-density ‘occult’ H. pylori infection that was undetectable by conventional tests accounted for around 25% of the ‘false-positive’ results. PMID:26535122

  13. Dynamics of false vacuum bubbles with nonminimal coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Chul H.; Lee, Wonwoo; Nam, Siyoung; Park, Chanyong

    2008-03-15

    We study the dynamics of false vacuum bubbles. A nonminimally coupled scalar field gives rise to the effect of negative tension. The mass of a false vacuum bubble from an outside observer's point of view can be positive, zero, or negative. The interior false vacuum has de Sitter geometry, while the exterior true vacuum background can have geometry depending on the vacuum energy. We show that there exist expanding false vacuum bubbles without the initial singularity in the past.

  14. Psychoactive drugs and false memory: comparison of dextroamphetamine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on false recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Several psychoactive drugs are known to influence episodic memory. However, these drugs’ effects on false memory, or the tendency to incorrectly remember nonstudied information, remain poorly understood. Objectives Here, we examined the effects of two commonly used psychoactive drugs, one with memory-enhancing properties (dextroamphetamine; AMP), and another with memory-impairing properties (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), on false memory using the Deese/Roediger–McDermott (DRM) illusion. Methods Two parallel studies were conducted in which healthy volunteers received either AMP (0, 10, and 20 mg) or THC (0, 7.5, and 15 mg) in within-subjects, randomized, double-blind designs. Participants studied DRM word lists under the influence of the drugs, and their recognition memory for the studied words was tested 2 days later, under sober conditions. Results As expected, AMP increased memory of studied words relative to placebo, and THC reduced memory of studied words. Although neither drug significantly affected false memory relative to placebo, AMP increased false memory relative to THC. Across participants, both drugs’ effects on true memory were positively correlated with their effects on false memory. Conclusions Our results indicate that AMP and THC have opposing effects on true memory, and these effects appear to correspond to similar, albeit more subtle, effects on false memory. These findings are consistent with previous research using the DRM illusion and provide further evidence that psychoactive drugs can affect the encoding processes that ultimately result in the creation of false memories. PMID:21647577

  15. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  16. Dusty Crater In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This false color image of a crater rim illustrates just how complete the dust cover can be. The small white/blue regions on the rim are of areas where the dust cover has been removed - due to heating on sun facing slopes or by gravitational effects.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 70.1, Longitude 352.8 East (7.2 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. False-Positive Results in a Recombinant Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) Nucleocapsid-Based Western Blot Assay Were Rectified by the Use of Two Subunits (S1 and S2) of Spike for Detection of Antibody to SARS-CoV

    PubMed Central

    Maache, Mimoun; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Rajoharison, Alain; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Pouzol, Stéphane; Bagnaud, Audrey; Duverger, Blandine; Xu, Jianguo; Osuna, Antonio; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3), a Western blot assay was performed by using a panel of 78 serum samples obtained, respectively, from convalescent-phase patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (30 samples) and from healthy donors (48 samples). As antigen for detection of SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) showed high sensitivity and strong reactivity with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and cross-reacted with all serum samples from healthy subjects, with either those obtained from China (10 samples) or those obtained from France (38 serum samples), giving then a significant rate of false positives. Specifically, our data indicated that the two subunits, S1 (residues 14 to 760) and S2 (residues 761 to 1190), resulted from the divided spike reacted with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and without any cross-reactivity with any of the healthy serum samples. Consequently, these data revealed the nonspecific nature of N protein in serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV compared with the S1 and S2, where the specificity is of 100%. Moreover, the reported results indicated that the use of one single protein as a detection antigen of SARS-CoV infection may lead to false-positive diagnosis. These may be rectified by using more than one protein for the serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV. PMID:16522785

  18. Ice Surfaces In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image shows a marked difference in the 'blueness' of the ice surfaces. The lower (presumably older) surface is oranger and the top (presumably younger) surface is blue. This may represent the fresher ice of the upper surface which has not yet covered with as much dust as the lower surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.8, Longitude 302.1 East (57.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Polar Layers in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image again illustrates the oranger/bluer nature of the polar layers.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6, Longitude 70.2 East (289.8 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Sand Sea in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image is of part of the northern sand sea. The small dunes in the image are bluer than the ice/dust filled central crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 73.7, Longitude 323 East (37 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy.

  2. Rejection positivity predicts trial-to-trial reaction times in an auditory selective attention task: a computational analysis of inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sufen; Melara, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    A series of computer simulations using variants of a formal model of attention (Melara and Algom, 2003) probed the role of rejection positivity (RP), a slow-wave electroencephalographic (EEG) component, in the inhibitory control of distraction. Behavioral and EEG data were recorded as participants performed auditory selective attention tasks. Simulations that modulated processes of distractor inhibition accounted well for reaction-time (RT) performance, whereas those that modulated target excitation did not. A model that incorporated RP from actual EEG recordings in estimating distractor inhibition was superior in predicting changes in RT as a function of distractor salience across conditions. A model that additionally incorporated momentary fluctuations in EEG as the source of trial-to-trial variation in performance precisely predicted individual RTs within each condition. The results lend support to the linking proposition that RP controls the speed of responding to targets through the inhibitory control of distractors. PMID:25191244

  3. Positive patch- and photopatch-test reactions to methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol in patients with both atopic dermatitis and chronic actinic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mercedes E; Soter, Nicholas A; Cohen, David E

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet filters are the most common topical photoallergens. Although currently not available on the US market, methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol (referred to as bisoctrizole on product labels) represents a new class of UV filters that have both organic and inorganic properties and are widely available in different preparations in Europe, South America, and Asia. We report two patients with atopic dermatitis and chronic actinic dermatitis who had positive patch- and photopatch-test reactions, which suggested both an allergic contact and a photoallergic contact dermatitis from bisoctrizole. Neither patient could identify previous or current contact with the chemical; nonetheless, it is possible that either the allergic contact or photoallergic contact dermatitis from bisoctrizole led to their chronic actinic dermatitis.

  4. Mimas Showing False Colors #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false color image of Saturn's moon Mimas reveals variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    This image is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined with a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences to create the final product.

    Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of the image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy soil.

    This image was obtained when the Cassini spacecraft was above 25 degrees south, 134 degrees west latitude and longitude. The Sun-Mimas-spacecraft angle was 45 degrees and north is at the top.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian

  5. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  6. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  7. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  8. Cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of thyroid transcription factor-1 (clone 8G7G3/1) in hepatocytes: true positivity or cross-reaction?

    PubMed

    Gu, Keni; Shah, Veena; Ma, Chan; Zhang, Lixin; Yang, Maozhou

    2007-09-01

    The nuclear immunoreactivity for thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is a useful marker for identification of carcinomas of thyroid and lung origin. Our aim was to determine whether cytoplasmic staining in the liver is a result of cross-reaction of anti-TTF-1 antibody (clone 8G7G3/1, DAKO, Carpinteria, CA) or true positivity resulting from aberrant expression of TTF-1 or products of the alternatively sliced TTF-1 gene. Fresh tissue samples from liver, thyroid, and lung were obtained for H&E-stained sections, TTF-1 immunostaining, and RNA and protein analyses. Western blot revealed an abundant band corresponding to an approximately 160-kd protein from liver but not either thyroid or lung tissue samples. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, messenger RNA of TTF-1 was not detectable in liver tissue. Our study demonstrates that TTF-1 immunoreactivity (clone 8G7G3/1) in the hepatocyte cytoplasm is due to an approximately 160-kd protein; this unique protein is not an alternative splicing product of TTF-1 and neither is it expressed in thyroid and lung tissues.

  9. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  10. Drift and reactions of positive tetratomic ions in dry, atmospheric air: Their effects on the dynamics of primary and secondary streamers

    SciTech Connect

    Bekstein, A.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.; Ducasse, O.; Eichwald, O.

    2010-05-15

    The ion swarm data, namely, the reduced mobility, diffusion, and reaction rates of the positive tetratomic ions O{sub 4}{sup +} and N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup +} in N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} have been determined from a Monte Carlo simulation using calculated and fitted elastic and inelastic cross sections. The elastic momentum transfer cross sections have been determined from a semiclassical Jeffreys-Wentzell-Kramers-Brilouin (JWKB) approximation based on a rigid core potential model well adapted for polyatomic ions. The inelastic cross sections have been approximated from considerations based on the N{sub 4}{sup +}/O{sub 2} and N{sub 4}{sup +}/N{sub 2} systems. The validated cross section sets in pure N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} have been used to determine the O{sub 4}{sup +} and N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup +} swarm data in dry air over a large E/N range up to 1000 Td. However, due to the lack of experimental ion transport coefficients necessary for a more rigorous cross section validation, the present data, validated only at low E/N, should be regarded as a first approximation, susceptible to improvements as soon as measurements of ion transport coefficients become available in the literature. Then, the present data are used in a two-dimensional discharge dynamics fluid model for the simulation of the primary and secondary streamers for the case of a positive point-to-plane corona discharge in dry air. Relevant characteristics such as discharge current, charged particle densities, space charge electric field and the variation in active species like N and O radicals (very useful in many nonthermal plasma applications) are analyzed and discussed with and without the consideration of three positive tetratomic ions (N{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 4}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup +}). More particularly, the non-negligible effect of O{sub 4}{sup +}, in the dynamics of the primary and secondary streamers during the discharge propagation and relaxation stages is highlighted with an emphasis on the

  11. False discovery rates in spectral identification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyowon; Kim, Sangtae; Bandeira, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Automated database search engines are one of the fundamental engines of high-throughput proteomics enabling daily identifications of hundreds of thousands of peptides and proteins from tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. Nevertheless, this automation also makes it humanly impossible to manually validate the vast lists of resulting identifications from such high-throughput searches. This challenge is usually addressed by using a Target-Decoy Approach (TDA) to impose an empirical False Discovery Rate (FDR) at a pre-determined threshold x% with the expectation that at most x% of the returned identifications would be false positives. But despite the fundamental importance of FDR estimates in ensuring the utility of large lists of identifications, there is surprisingly little consensus on exactly how TDA should be applied to minimize the chances of biased FDR estimates. In fact, since less rigorous TDA/FDR estimates tend to result in more identifications (at higher 'true' FDR), there is often little incentive to enforce strict TDA/FDR procedures in studies where the major metric of success is the size of the list of identifications and there are no follow up studies imposing hard cost constraints on the number of reported false positives. Here we address the problem of the accuracy of TDA estimates of empirical FDR. Using MS/MS spectra from samples where we were able to define a factual FDR estimator of 'true' FDR we evaluate several popular variants of the TDA procedure in a variety of database search contexts. We show that the fraction of false identifications can sometimes be over 10× higher than reported and may be unavoidably high for certain types of searches. In addition, we further report that the two-pass search strategy seems the most promising database search strategy. While unavoidably constrained by the particulars of any specific evaluation dataset, our observations support a series of recommendations towards maximizing the number of resulting

  12. Neuroanatomical substrates involved in true and false memories for face.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Harada, Tokiko; Kawaguchi, Jun; Sadato, Norihiro

    2012-08-01

    We often mistake an unknown person for a familiar person because of the similarities in facial features. This phenomenon, known as false memory, has been investigated mainly using words, pictures, and shapes. Previous neuroimaging studies on false memory have shown that both true and false memories trigger a similar activation in the medial temporal lobe, suggesting that it plays a common role in both. However, no study to date has investigated neural substrates of false memories for faces. In the present fMRI study, we applied a modified version of the standard false memory paradigm, using morphed pictures of faces, to induce false memory in an MRI environment. We found that activity in the amygdala and orbital cortices was associated with the degree of familiarity of items. In particular, false responses to "lure" items evoked a level of activity in the amygdala between that evoked for correct or incorrect responses to "true" items. This indicates a possible role of the amygdala in false memory. A specific region in the anterior cingulate cortex was involved in false recognition; the activity being correlated to reaction times for the response types. These results suggest that the amygdala is involved in determining the relevance of items; therefore, ambiguousness of lure items in terms of familiarity and novelty may be related to decreased activity in the amygdala. The anterior cingulate activity in false memory may be caused not only by increased effort and motor demand but also by higher mnemonic processing of lure items.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods to Typing HLA-B*57:01 in HIV-1-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, Francesca; Russo, Cinzia Dello; Mora, Barbara; Pirazzoli, Antonella; Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Navarra, Pierluigi; Pizzuti, Antonio; De Vito, Corrado; Antonelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The HLA-B*57:01 allele is strongly associated with the hypersensitivity reaction to Abacavir (ABC). Therefore, treatment guidelines recommend that patients initiating ABC are preventively tested for the presence of this allele. To date, four different commercial assays based on the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) technique are available for the detection of HLA-B*57:01: Duplicα-RealTime Reagent Set HLA-B*57:01 by Euroclone, HLA-B*57:01 Real-TM by Sacace Biotechnologies, COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HLA-B*57:01 Screening Test by Roche Diagnostic, and HLA-B*57:01 by Nuclear Laser Medicine. The study was carried out to compare the performance of the first three commercially available Q-PCR kits in a routine clinical setting. A total of 98 samples from Policlinico Umberto I Hospital were tested. Results obtained by the Duplicα-RealTime Genotyping kit and AmpliPrep/TaqMan system were 100% concordant. In contrast, genotyping by the HLA-B*57:01 Real-TM kit showed poor agreement with the other systems, that is, 12 out of 33 positive samples were detected as HLA-B*57:01 negative. To confirm the correct genotype of these discordant samples, two additional methods with rapid turnaround times and already implemented into routine clinical practice were used, that is, a PCR-based microsequence-specific primer DNA typing test and a laboratory-developed screening test in Q-PCR. All 12 discordant samples were genotyped as HLA-B*57:01-positive samples using these two additional methods in a single-blinded manner, thus confirming the low sensitivity of HLA-B*57:01 Real-TM test. These findings underline the need to compare results obtained with commercial assays before choosing a test suitable for use in a routine clinical laboratory. PMID:26750774

  14. [Investigation of cytomegalovirus positivity in the peripheral blood samples of risky patients by shell-vial cell culture, antigenemia test and real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Yağmur, Gülhan; Mutlu Sarıgüzel, Fatma; Deniz, Esma

    2011-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in immunocompromised patients and congenital infections in infants have high morbidity and mortality while it may lead to asymptomatic infections in immunocompetent subjects. Serological tests, culture methods, antigenemia tests and molecular methods are applied in the diagnosis of CMV infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CMV in peripheral blood samples of patients who were at risk for CMV disease by shell vial cell culture, antigenemia test and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. A total of 141 blood specimens obtained from 91 patients (33 female, 58 male) with suspected CMV disease were included to the study. Five of the patients were newborns and the others aged between 17-79 years old were bone morrow (n= 81), kidney (n= 4) and liver (n= 1) transplantation patients. Shell vial (Vircell, Spain) cell culture method was applied for CMV isolation from the samples, while the detection of pp65 antigen in blood leukocytes was investigated by indirect immunofluorescence method (CINAkit Argene, Biosoft, France). The presence of CMV DNA in plasma samples was detected by RT-PCR (CMV QNP 2.0 kit; Fluorion, Iontek, Turkey) method. CMV was found positive in 72 (51%) of 141 samples by shell vial, 82 (58.2%) by antigenemia test and 49 (34.8%) by RT-PCR. Considering cell culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of antigenemia test were calculated as 81.9% and 66.6%, respectively; and for PCR those rates were 43% and 73.9%, respectively. In addition DNA sequencing (ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer; Perkin Elmer, USA) was performed for the samples of randomly selected three patients out of 15, who were yielded positive results with cell culture and antigenemia tests but negative CMV DNA by RT-PCR. In this analysis CMV DNA was found positive in three of the samples that were found negative by RT-PCR in spite of CMV isolation and positive antigenemia. DNA sequencing of those samples

  15. Identification and resection of the clipped node decreases the false negative rate of sentinel lymph node surgery in patients presenting with node positive breast cancer (T0-T4, N1-2) who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy – results from ACOSOG Z1071 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Boughey, Judy C.; Ballman, Karla V.; Le-Petross, Huong T.; McCall, Linda M.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Ahrendt, Gretchen M.; Wilke, Lee G.; Taback, Bret; Feliberti, Eric C.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z1071 trial reported a false negative rate (FNR) of 12.6% with sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women presenting with node-positive breast cancer. One proposed method to decrease the FNR is clip placement in the positive node at initial diagnosis with confirmation of clipped node resection at surgery. Methods Z1071 was a multi-institutional trial in which women with clinical T0-4,N1-2,M0 breast cancer underwent SLN surgery and axillary dissection (ALND) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In cases with a clip placed in the node, the clip location at surgery (SLN or ALND) was evaluated. Results A clip was placed at initial node biopsy in 203 patients. In the 170 (83.7%) patients with cN1 disease and at least 2 SLNs resected, clip location was confirmed in 141 cases. In 107 (75.9%) patients where the clipped node was within the SLN specimen, the FNR was 6.8% (CI:1.9–16.5%). In 34 (24.1%) cases where the clipped node was in the ALND specimen, the FNR was 19.0% (CI:5.4–41.9%). In cases without a clip placed (n=355) and those where clipped node location was not confirmed at surgery (n=29), the FNR was 13.4% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion Clip placement at diagnosis of node-positive disease with removal of the clipped node during SLN surgery reduces the FNR of SLN surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Clip placement in the biopsy-proven node at diagnosis and evaluation of resected specimens for the clipped node should be considered when performing SLN surgery in this setting. PMID:26649589

  16. Mood-congruent true and false memory: effects of depression.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Malone, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    The Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm was used to investigate the effect of depression on true and false recognition. In this experiment true and false recognition was examined across positive, neutral, negative, and depression-relevant lists for individuals with and without a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Results showed that participants with major depressive disorder falsely recognised significantly more depression-relevant words than non-depressed controls. These findings also parallel recent research using recall instead of recognition and show that there are clear mood congruence effects for depression on false memory performance.

  17. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  18. Clinical Significance of Folate Receptor-positive Circulating Tumor Cells Detected by Ligand-targeted Polymerase Chain Reaction in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wu, Chuanyong; Qiao, Lihua; Yu, Wenjun; Guo, Qiaomei; Zhao, Mingna; Yang, Guohua; Zhao, Hang; Lou, Jiatao

    2017-01-01

    Background: As the heterogeneity of CTCs is becoming increasingly better understood, it is clear that identifying particular subtypes of CTCs would be more relevant. Methods: We detected folate receptor (FR)-positive circulating tumor cells (FR+-CTCs) by a novel ligand-targeted polymerase chain reaction (LT-PCR) detection technique. Results: In the none-dynamic study, FR+-CTC levels of patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than controls (patients with benign lung diseases and healthy controls). With a threshold of 8.7 CTC units, FR+-CTC showed a sensitivity of 77.7% and specificity of 89.5% in the diagnosis of lung cancer. When compared with established clinical biomarkers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), FR+-CTC showed the highest diagnostic efficiency. Notably, the combination of FR+-CTC, CEA, NSE, and CYFRA21-1 could significantly improve the diagnostic efficacy in differentiating patients with lung cancer from benign lung disease. In our dynamic surveillance study, the CTC levels of 62 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients decreased significantly after tumor resection. Conclusion: We established a LT-PCR-based FR+-CTC detection platform for patients with lung cancer that exhibits high sensitivity and specificity. This platform would be clinical useful in lung cancer diagnosis and treatment response assessment. PMID:28123603

  19. Impact of the multiplex polymerase chain reaction in culture-positive samples on appropriate antibiotic use in patients with staphylococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Na, Sun Hee; Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Moonsuk; Park, Jeong Su; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Bang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Sang Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-Don; Kim, Hong Bin

    2016-04-01

    Rapid identification of the microorganisms in patients with bacteremia may be useful in clinical practice. We evaluated the impact of the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on appropriate antibiotic use for patients with gram-positive cocci cluster (GPCC) bacteremia. We divided the GPCC bacteremia cases into a pre-PCR group (2010-2011) and a post-PCR group (2012-2013). A total 664 cases were included in the pre-PCR group; and 570, in the post-PCR group. In methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) cases, optimal antibiotics were administered earlier in the post-PCR group (77.4h versus 42.6h, P=0.035). Although the proportions of glycopeptide exposure did not differ (54.7% versus 56.7%, P=0.799), the duration of exposure decreased (69.6h versus 30.7h, P=0.004). In methicillin-resistant S. aureus cases, the time to optimal antibiotics administration did not differ (45.4h versus 43.7h, P=0.275). Multiplex PCR test significantly improved the early initiation of optimal antibiotics in MSSA bacteremia and reduced the unnecessary glycopeptide exposure.

  20. The false classification of extinction risk in noisy environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, B. M.; Cooper, A. B.; Peterman, R. M.; Dulvy, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Abundance trends are the basis for many classifications of threat and recovery status, but they can be a challenge to interpret because of observation error, stochastic variation in abundance (process noise) and temporal autocorrelation in that process noise. To measure the frequency of incorrectly detecting a decline (false-positive or false alarm) and failing to detect a true decline (false-negative), we simulated stable and declining abundance time series across several magnitudes of observation error and autocorrelated process noise. We then empirically estimated the magnitude of observation error and autocorrelated process noise across a broad range of taxa and mapped these estimates onto the simulated parameter space. Based on the taxa we examined, at low classification thresholds (30% decline in abundance) and short observation windows (10 years), false alarms would be expected to occur, on average, about 40% of the time assuming density-independent dynamics, whereas false-negatives would be expected to occur about 60% of the time. However, false alarms and failures to detect true declines were reduced at higher classification thresholds (50% or 80% declines), longer observation windows (20, 40, 60 years), and assuming density-dependent dynamics. The lowest false-positive and false-negative rates are likely to occur for large-bodied, long-lived animal species. PMID:24898368

  1. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron-ion coincidence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztáray, Bálint

    2016-10-01

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ˜103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. This advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  2. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Voronova, Krisztina; Sztaray, Balint

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity at every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.

  3. Breaking through the false coincidence barrier in electron–ion coincidence experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, David L.; Hayden, Carl C.; Hemberger, Patrick; ...

    2016-10-31

    Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy holds the promise of a universal, isomer-selective, and sensitive analytical technique for time-resolved quantitative analysis of bimolecular chemical reactions. Unfortunately, its low dynamic range of ~103 has largely precluded its use for this purpose, where a dynamic range of at least 105 is generally required. This limitation is due to the false coincidence background common to all coincidence experiments, especially at high count rates. Electron/ion pairs emanating from separate ionization events but arriving within the ion time of flight (TOF) range of interest constitute the false coincidence background. Although this background has uniform intensity atmore » every m/z value, the Poisson scatter in the false coincidence background obscures small signals. In this paper, temporal ion deflection coupled with a position-sensitive ion detector enables suppression of the false coincidence background, increasing the dynamic range in the PEPICO TOF mass spectrum by 2–3 orders of magnitude. The ions experience a time-dependent electric deflection field at a well-defined fraction of their time of flight. This deflection defines an m/z- and ionization-time dependent ion impact position for true coincidences, whereas false coincidences appear randomly outside this region and can be efficiently suppressed. When cold argon clusters are ionized, false coincidence suppression allows us to observe species up to Ar9+, whereas Ar4+ is the largest observable cluster under traditional operation. As a result, this advance provides mass-selected photoelectron spectra for fast, high sensitivity quantitative analysis of reacting systems.« less

  4. An Association Account of False Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bruin, L. C.; Newen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The elicited-response false belief task has traditionally been considered as reliably indicating that children acquire an understanding of false belief around 4 years of age. However, recent investigations using spontaneous-response tasks suggest that false belief understanding emerges much earlier. This leads to a developmental paradox: if young…

  5. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  6. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  7. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.5 False statements. Under...

  8. Recollection rejection: false-memory editing in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Reyna, V F; Wright, Ron; Mojardin, A H

    2003-10-01

    Mechanisms for editing false events out of memory reports have fundamental implications for theories of false memory and for best practice in applied domains in which false reports must be minimized (e.g., forensic psychological interviews, sworn testimony). A mechanism posited in fuzzy-trace theory, recollection rejection, is considered. A process analysis of false-memory editing is presented, which assumes that false-but-gist-consistent events (e.g., the word SOFA, when the word COUCH was experienced) sometimes cue the retrieval of verbatim traces of the corresponding true events (COUCH), generating mismatches that counteract the high familiarity of false-but-gist-consistent events. Empirical support comes from 2 qualitative phenomena: recollective suppression of semantic false memory and inverted-U relations between retrieval time and semantic false memory. Further support comes from 2 quantitative methodologies: conjoint recognition and receiver operating characteristics. The analysis also predicts a novel false-memory phenomenon (erroneous recollection rejection), in which true events are inappropriately edited out of memory reports.

  9. Avoiding the False Peaks in Correlation Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2009-07-31

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In many video images, matched filtering is used to detect the location of these fiducials. Generally, the highest correlation peak is used to determine the position of the fiducials. However, when the signal to-be-detected is very weak compared to the noise, this approach totally breaks down. The highest peaks act as traps for false detection. The active target images used for automatic alignment in the National Ignition Facility are examples of such images. In these images, the fiducials of interest exhibit extremely low intensity and contrast, surrounded by high intensity reflection from metallic objects. Consequently, the highest correlation peaks are caused by these bright objects. In this work, we show how the shape of the correlation is exploited to isolate the valid matches from hundreds of invalid correlation peaks, and therefore identify extremely faint fiducials under very challenging imaging conditions.

  10. Valence, Implicated Actor, and Children's Acquiescence to False Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Kyndra C; Quas, Jodi A; Lyon, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Although adverse effects of suggestive interviewing on children's accuracy are well documented, it remains unclear as to whether these effects vary depending on the valence of and the actor implicated in suggestions. In this study, 124 3-8-year-olds participated in a classroom activity and were later questioned about positive and negative false details. The interviewer provided positive reinforcement when children acquiesced to suggestions and negative feedback when they did not. Following reinforcement or feedback, young children were comparably suggestible for positive and negative details. With age, resistance to suggestions about negative details emerged first, followed by resistance to suggestions about positive details. Across age, more negative feedback was required to induce acquiescence to negative than positive false details. Finally, children were less willing to acquiesce when they (versus the confederate) were implicated. Findings highlight the interactive effects of valence and children's age on their eyewitness performance in suggestive contexts.

  11. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  12. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  13. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  14. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  15. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  16. Motives for Filing a False Allegation of Rape.

    PubMed

    De Zutter, André W E A; Horselenberg, Robert; van Koppen, Peter J

    2017-02-17

    The list of motives by Kanin (1994) is the most cited list of motives to file a false allegation of rape. Kanin posited that complainants file a false allegation out of revenge, to produce an alibi or to get sympathy. A new list of motives is proposed in which gain is the predominant factor. In the proposed list, complainants file a false allegation out of material gain, emotional gain, or a disturbed mental state. The list can be subdivided into eight different categories: material gain, alibi, revenge, sympathy, attention, a disturbed mental state, relabeling, or regret. To test the validity of the list, a sample of 57 proven false allegations were studied at and provided by the National Unit of the Dutch National Police (NU). The complete files were studied to ensure correct classification by the NU and to identify the motives of the complainants. The results support the overall validity of the list. Complainants were primarily motivated by emotional gain. Most false allegations were used to cover up other behavior such as adultery or skipping school. Some complainants, however, reported more than one motive. A large proportion, 20% of complainants, said that they did not know why they filed a false allegation. The results confirm the complexity of motivations for filing false allegations and the difficulties associated with archival studies. In conclusion, the list of Kanin is, based on the current results, valid but insufficient to explain all the different motives of complainants to file a false allegation.

  17. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime.

  18. Explaining the Development of False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Holliday, Robyn; Marche, Tammy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews explanatory dimensions of children's false memory relevant to forensic practice: measurement, development, social factors, individual differences, varieties of memories and memory judgments, and varieties of procedures inducing false memories. Asserts that recent studies fail to use techniques that separate acquiescence from memory…

  19. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  20. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  1. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  2. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  3. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  4. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  5. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  6. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General §...

  7. Item method directed forgetting diminishes false memory.

    PubMed

    Marche, Tammy A; Brainerd, Charles J; Lane, David G; Loehr, Janeen D

    2005-10-01

    Directed forgetting may reduce DRM false memory illusion by interfering with meaning processing. Participants were presented with a list composed of six 10-word semantically associated sub-lists, and they were either (a) asked to remember all list items of (b) asked to remember all associates from sub-lists and to forget all associates from other sub-lists. All participants were requested to recall and recognise list items. Although directed forgetting effects have been previously reported only for true responses in the DRM paradigm with the list method, we also found directed forgetting for false responses with the item method. Such forgetting instructions reduced both verbatim and meaning processing, decreasing both the intrusion and the false alarm rate. These results are consistent with two-process explanations of DRM false memories, such as fuzzy-trace theory, and add to our understanding of false memory editing.

  8. Emotional content of true and false memories.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    Many people believe that emotional memories (including those that arise in therapy) are particularly likely to represent true events because of their emotional content. But is emotional content a reliable indicator of memory accuracy? The current research assessed the emotional content of participants' pre-existing (true) and manipulated (false) memories for childhood events. False memories for one of three emotional childhood events were planted using a suggestive manipulation and then compared, along several subjective dimensions, with other participants' true memories. On most emotional dimensions (e.g., how emotional was this event for you?), true and false memories were indistinguishable. On a few measures (e.g., intensity of feelings at the time of the event), true memories were more emotional than false memories in the aggregate, yet true and false memories were equally likely to be rated as uniformly emotional. These results suggest that even substantial emotional content may not reliably indicate memory accuracy.

  9. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems.

  10. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories.

  11. Belief and sign, true and false: the unique of false belief reasoning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yiyuan; Long, Changquan; Li, Hong

    2013-11-01

    For a long time, a controversy has been proposed that whether the process of theory of mind is a result of domain-specific or domain-general changes (Wellman in The handbook of childhood cognitive development. Blackwell Publication, New Jersey, 2011). This event-related potential study explored the neural time course of domain-general and domain-specific components in belief reasoning. Fourteen participants completed location transfer false belief (FB), true belief (TB), false sign (FS) and true sign (TS) tasks, in which two pictures told a story related to a dog that ran from a green into a red box. In the TB and FB tasks, a boy saw or did not see the transfer of the dog, respectively. In the FS and TS tasks, an arrow that pointed to the green box either altered its direction to the red box or did not alter following the transfer of the dog. Participants then inferred where the boy thought of, or the arrow indicated the location of the dog. FB and TB reasoning elicited lower N2 amplitudes than FS and TS reasoning, which is associated with domain-general components, the detection, and classification. The late slow wave (LSW) for FB was more positive at frontal, central, and parietal sites than FS because of the domain-specific component involved in FB reasoning. However, the LSW was less positive for TB than for FB but did not differ from the TS condition, which implies that mental representation might not be involved in TB reasoning.

  12. Social influence and mental routes to the production of authentic false memories and inauthentic false memories.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael F; Skowronski, John J

    2017-03-09

    Two studies assessed the extent to which people incorporated false facts provided by bogus others into their own recognition memory reports, and how these false memory reports were affected by: (a) truth of the information in others' summaries supporting the false facts, (b) motivation to process stories and summaries, (c) source credibility, and (d) ease of remembering original facts. False memory report frequency increased when false facts in a summary were supported by true information and varied inversely with the ease with which original facts could be remembered. Results from a measure probing participants' memory perceptions suggest that some false memories are authentic: People sometimes lack awareness of both the incorporation of false facts into their memory reports and where the false facts came from. However, many false memories are inauthentic: Despite reporting a false memory, people sometimes retain knowledge of the original stimulus and/or the origin of false facts.

  13. Blocking Mimicry Makes True and False Smiles Look the Same

    PubMed Central

    Rychlowska, Magdalena; Cañadas, Elena; Wood, Adrienne; Krumhuber, Eva G.; Fischer, Agneta; Niedenthal, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that facial mimicry underlies accurate interpretation of subtle facial expressions. In three experiments, we manipulated mimicry and tested its role in judgments of the genuineness of true and false smiles. Experiment 1 used facial EMG to show that a new mouthguard technique for blocking mimicry modifies both the amount and the time course of facial reactions. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants rated true and false smiles either while wearing mouthguards or when allowed to freely mimic the smiles with or without additional distraction, namely holding a squeeze ball or wearing a finger-cuff heart rate monitor. Results showed that blocking mimicry compromised the decoding of true and false smiles such that they were judged as equally genuine. Together the experiments highlight the role of facial mimicry in judging subtle meanings of facial expressions. PMID:24670316

  14. The consequences of suggesting false childhood food events.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Daniel M; Scoboria, Alan; Arnold, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We combined data across eight published experiments (N=1369) to examine the formation and consequences of false autobiographical beliefs and memories. Our path models revealed that the formation of false autobiographical belief fully mediated the pathway between suggesting to people that they had experienced a positive or negative food-related event in the past and current preference for that food. Suggestion indirectly affected intention to eat the food via change in autobiographical belief. The development of belief with and without memory produced similar changes in food preferences and behavior intention, indicating that belief in the event drives changes in suggestion-related attitudes. Finally, positive suggestions (e.g., "you loved asparagus the first time you tried it") yielded stronger effects than negative suggestions (e.g., "you got sick eating egg salad"). These findings show that false autobiographical suggestions lead to the development of autobiographical beliefs, which in turn, have consequences for one's attitudes and behaviors.

  15. Siblings, Language, and False Belief in Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Virginia; Farrar, M. Jeffrey; Guo, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between number of siblings and false belief understanding (FBU) in 94 low-income 4-5-year-olds. Previous research with middle-income children has shown a positive association between number of siblings and FBU. However, it is unclear whether having multiple siblings in low-income families is related to better…

  16. Teacher Education and the Enduring Significance of "False Empathy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Chezare A.; Hotchkins, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    The concept "False Empathy" posited by critical race theory luminary Richard Delgado ("Calif Law Rev" 84(1):61-100, 1996) easily obscures White teacher's good intentions to be effective educators of racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse students. It is argued here that critical race theory is useful for isolating and…

  17. Precise site-selective termination of DNA replication by caging the 3-position of thymidine and its application to polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Okada, Fuminori; Komiyama, Makoto

    2009-10-21

    A new caged thymidine, 3-N-(2-(2-nitrophenyl)propyloxymethyl)thymidine (T(NPPOM)) was synthesized and used as a site-selective terminator of DNA-polymerase reaction in light-assisted cohesive-ending PCR (LACE-PCR), which directly gives sticky-ended PCR products after brief UVA irradiation. Primer-extension experiments using a template involving T(NPPOM) have shown that this caged nucleotide efficiently and site-selectively blocks reactions of a variety of polymerases commonly used in PCR. Misincorporation of nucleobases, observed with the use of other previously reported caged thymidines, scarcely occurred. It has turned out that a slight structural difference of caging groups can significantly improve the termination yield of polymerase reactions. A LACE-PCR product coding GFP gene was prepared by using primers containing T(NPPOM) and was ligated with a vector fragment prepared using restriction enzymes. The resulting recombinant vector successfully transformed E. coli.

  18. Publication bias and the canonization of false facts.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Silas Boye; Magidson, Tali; Gross, Kevin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2016-12-20

    Science is facing a "replication crisis" in which many experimental findings cannot be replicated and are likely to be false. Does this imply that many scientific facts are false as well? To find out, we explore the process by which a claim becomes fact. We model the community's confidence in a claim as a Markov process with successive published results shifting the degree of belief. Publication bias in favor of positive findings influences the distribution of published results. We find that unless a sufficient fraction of negative results are published, false claims frequently can become canonized as fact. Data-dredging, p-hacking, and similar behaviors exacerbate the problem. Should negative results become easier to publish as a claim approaches acceptance as a fact, however, true and false claims would be more readily distinguished. To the degree that the model reflects the real world, there may be serious concerns about the validity of purported facts in some disciplines.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  20. False recognition of instruction-set lures.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Evan T; Chubala, Chrissy M; Spear, Jackie; Jamieson, Randall K; Hockley, William E; Crump, Matthew J C

    2016-01-01

    False remembering has been examined using a variety of procedures, including the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure, the false fame procedure and the two-list recognition procedure. We present six experiments in a different empirical framework examining false recognition of words included in the experimental instructions (instruction-set lures). The data show that participants' false alarm rate to instruction-set lures was twice their false alarm rate to standard lures. That result was statistically robust even when (1) the relative strength of targets to instruction-set lures was increased, (2) participants were warned about the instruction-set lures, (3) the instruction-set lures were camouflaged in the study instructions and (4) the instruction-set lures were presented verbally at study but visually at test. False recognition of instruction-set lures was only mitigated when participants were distracted between encountering the instruction-set lures and studying the training list. The results confirm the ease with which recognition succumbs to familiarity and demonstrate the robustness of false recognition.

  1. Justifying all the fuss about false belief.

    PubMed

    Russell, James

    2005-07-01

    The classic study by Wimmer and Perner showed that children below the age of about 4 years of age fail to appreciate others' false beliefs. This opened the floodgates to the theory-of-mind research programme. Recently, a study by Riggs and Simpson has called the central challenge of false belief into question, reporting similar difficulties with true belief. I would argue, however, that not only should the acquisition of false belief remain a central concern but that we should think harder about it and its earlier manifestations.

  2. Affective false memories in Dementia of Alzheimer's Type.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Colangelo, Mirco; Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the production of inferential false memories for complex pictorial stimuli and the implications of affective content in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A group of 24 AD patients and a group of 24 healthy older adults studied a sequence of pictures depicting stories that included positive, negative or neutral consequences of an unseen action, and then completed an old-new picture recognition test. The number of causal errors was higher in healthy older adults compared to AD patients but affective content attenuated the effect. Causal errors increased in AD patients when stories included affective (positive or negative) outcomes. In addition, negative content produced a larger number of errors than positive content across groups. This data confirms that although memory processing is poorer in AD, it is sensitive to affective content. Accordingly, the nature of affective false memory errors suggest the need to consider the use of affective information in the development of new cognitive training procedures.

  3. Visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Reza; Heydari, Ali Hosain; Abdollahi, Mohammad Hossain; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Dalgleish, Tim; Jobson, Laura

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Scenic False Memory paradigm (SFM, Hauschildt, Peters, Jelinek, & Moritz, 2012) was administered to male Iranian military personnel who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and were diagnosed with (n = 21) or without (n = 21) PTSD and a sample of healthy male non-trauma-exposed controls (n = 21). Trauma-exposed participants recalled and recognized a significantly lower percentage of hits and a significantly greater percentage of false memories for both trauma-related and non-trauma-related video scenes, than non-trauma-exposed controls. Among the trauma-exposed participants, those with and without PTSD did not differ significantly in terms of percentage of hits and false memories recalled on the SFM. Those with PTSD were found to recognize significantly fewer hits for both the trauma-related and non-trauma-related videos than those without PTSD. Those with PTSD also recognized significantly more false memories for the trauma video scene than the non-PTSD group. The findings suggest that those with trauma exposure, and in particular those with PTSD, may have a greater susceptibility to visual false memory.

  4. The role of articulatory suppression in immediate false recognition.

    PubMed

    Macé, Anne-Laure; Caza, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    False memory for critical lures has been widely documented in long-term memory using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Recent evidence suggests that false memory effects can also be found in short-term memory (STM), supporting models that assume a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes. However, no study has examined the role of articulatory suppression on immediate false memory, even though phono-articulatory factors are critically involved in STM performance and are an intrinsic part of all STM accounts. The current study proposes a novel paradigm to assess false memory effects in a STM task under both silent and articulatory suppression conditions. Using immediate serial recognition, in which participants had to judge whether two successive mixed lists of six associated and non-associated words were matched, we examined true recognition of matching lists and false recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure or unrelated distractor in two experiments. Results from both experiments indicated reduced true recognition of matching lists and greater false serial recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure under articulatory suppression relative to silence. These findings provide further support for some current models of verbal short-term memory, which posit a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes.

  5. Study of the Positive Kaon Neutral Antikaon Negative Pion System Produced in the Reaction Antiproton-Proton Going to Positive Kaon Neutral Antikaon Negative Pion + Chi at 8 Gev/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnlein, Amber Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    The results of an amplitude analysis to determine the spin-parity components of the K^+{ | K^0} pi^{-} system produced in the reaction { | p}pto K^+{| K^0 }pi^- + X at 8 GeV/c are presented. This experiment has better particle identification than the previously reported results examining this reaction. A total of 3595 events was collected in the mass range 1.24 -1.56 GeV/c^2. The data were collected at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Multi-Particle Spectrometer. Two peaks are observed in the K^+{| K^0}pi^- mass spectrum, one at (1279 +/- 2) MeV/c ^2 with a width of 21 +/- 2) MeV/c^2, and one at (1417 +/- 3) MeV/c^2 with a width of (62 +/- 5) MeV/c ^2. There is evidence for two resonances around 1.3 GeV/c^2. The J^ {PG} = 1^{++} resonance that peaks near 1.27 Gev/c^2 is identified with the f_1(1285). The J^{PG} = 0^ {-+} resonance observed at the same mass is identified with the eta(1280). In the 1.4 GeV/c^2 range, the data are consistant with the presence of at least one J^{PG} = 0^ {-+} resonance that peaks near 1.43 GeV/c ^2. This resonance decays only to a_{0}pi. There is also evidence for a 1^{++}K ^{*}K resonance that peaks around 1.40 GeV/c^2. These results are in agreement with the results from the partial wave analysis performed by members of this collaboration on the K^+{| K^0} pi^- system produced in the reaction pi^-pto K^+{| K^0}pi^-n at 8 GeV/c. This experiment also examined the reactions {| p}pto{| Lambda }p+pi s+X in a search for the U(3100). No evidence for the U(3100) is observed.

  6. Learning words from speakers with false beliefs.

    PubMed

    Papafragou, Anna; Fairchild, Sarah; Cohen, Matthew L; Friedberg, Carlyn

    2016-06-21

    During communication, hearers try to infer the speaker's intentions to be able to understand what the speaker means. Nevertheless, whether (and how early) preschoolers track their interlocutors' mental states is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, there is disagreement about how children's ability to consult a speaker's belief in communicative contexts relates to their ability to track someone's belief in non-communicative contexts. Here, we study young children's ability to successfully acquire a word from a speaker with a false belief; we also assess the same children's success on a traditional false belief attribution task. We show that the ability to consult the epistemic state of a speaker during word learning develops between the ages of three and five. We also show that false belief understanding in word-learning contexts proceeds similarly to standard belief-attribution contexts when the tasks are equated. Our data offer evidence for the development of mind-reading abilities during language acquisition.

  7. [The contamination under polymerase chain reaction studies: problems and solutions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Ameliushkina, V A; Rozhkova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine risk factors of false positive and false negative results under polymerase chain reaction-analysis of clinical material. The samples with high viral load can be the source of false positive results. The contamination with nucleic acids can occur at any section of polymerase chain reaction analysis. The study data permitted to establish that the most sensitive stage is isolation and purification of nucleic acids especially under manual mode of operation. The detection of positive signal in most samples of one setting indicates total contamination. The cases when only several samples are polluted are special challenge. The presence of sample with high concentration of viral nucleic acid and several samples with low concentration in one setting means necessity of repeated analysis beginning with stage of isolation of nucleic acid. The analysis of curves of accumulation of products of amplification, their forms and positioning on chart is the obligatory stage of polymerase chain reaction study in real time regimen. These actions permit to exclude the readouts of false negative testing results to departments. The study conclusions are equipotent for polymerase chain reaction testing of any nucleic acid targets.

  8. Pluto behaving badly: false beliefs and their consequences.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Shari R; Laney, Cara; Morris, Erin K; Garry, Maryanne; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    We exposed college students to suggestive materials in order to lead them to believe that, as children, they had a negative experience at Disneyland involving the Pluto character. A sizable minority of subjects developed a false belief or memory that Pluto had uncomfortably licked their ear. Suggestions about a positive experience with Pluto led to even greater acceptance of a lovable ear-licking episode. False beliefs and memories had repercussions; those seduced by the bad suggestions were not willing to pay as much for a Pluto souvenir. These findings are among the first to demonstrate that false beliefs can have repercussions for people, meaning that they can influence their later thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors.

  9. Infants' Reasoning about Others' False Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object's misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an…

  10. Development of the False-Memory Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Forrest, T. J.; Karibian, D.; Reyna, V. F.

    2006-01-01

    The counterintuitive developmental trend in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) illusion (that false-memory responses increase with age) was investigated in learning-disabled and nondisabled children from the 6- to 14-year-old age range. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that because there are qualitative differences in how younger versus older children…

  11. False Accusations of Nosocomial Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners performing routine physical examination may be falsely accused of sexual abuse. Criminal justice system is incompatible with biomedical system of prevention. It is responsible for establishment of sexual abuse industry, practitioners of which have vested interest in maintaining status quo of sexual criminalization. They themselves…

  12. Vendor cited for false PFC savings claim

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstein, I.

    1983-08-29

    A Cynex power factor controller (PFC) vendor claiming a 60% saving was cited by the Better Business Bureau for false advertising after a user survey revealed that savings were only 20% at best. The company plans no future advertising claims, although it insists that 60% savings are possible. The inventor disagrees. (DCK)

  13. How to Justify Teaching False Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Matthew H.

    2008-01-01

    We often knowingly teach false science. Such a practice conflicts with a prima facie pedagogical value placed on teaching only what is true. I argue that only a partial dissolution of the conflict is possible: the proper aim of instruction in science is not to provide an armory of facts about what things the world contains, how they interact, and…

  14. Memory distrust syndrome, confabulation and false confession.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, Gisli

    2017-02-01

    There are three types of false confessions: 'voluntary', 'pressured-compliant' and 'pressured-internalized'. On the basis of case studies, in the early 1980s Gudjonsson and MacKeith coined the term 'memory distrust syndrome (MDS)' to describe a condition where people develop profound distrust of their memory and become susceptible to relying on external cues and suggestions from others. Memory distrust can, under certain circumstances, lead to a false confession, particularly of the pressured-internalized type, described as 'confabulation'. This article reviews the evidence for the condition and the psychological mechanism and processes involved. A heuristic model is then presented of a 32 year old man who falsely confessed to murder whilst in police custody. The key elements of the model involve the impact of 'contextual risk factors' (i.e., isolation, long and persistent guilt presumptive interrogation, and high emotional intensity) on 'enduring' vulnerability and 'acute state' factors. The detainee had kept a detailed diary whilst in solitary confinement that provided a unique insight into the gradual development of a MDS, his mental state, and thinking process. This type of false confession is apparently quite rare, but it can occur in intellectually able and educated individuals and involves 'delayed' rather than 'immediate' suggestibility.

  15. Analysis of False Starts in Spontaneous Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    A primary difference between spontaneous speech and read speech concerns the use of false starts, where a speaker interrupts the flow of speech to restart his or her utterance. A study examined the acoustic aspects of such restarts in a widely-used speech database, examining approximately 1000 utterances, about 10% of which contained a restart.…

  16. A Synchronization Account of False Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Brendan T.; Jones, Michael N.; Mewhort, Douglas J. K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a computational model to explain a variety of results in both standard and false recognition. A key attribute of the model is that it uses plausible semantic representations for words, built through exposure to a linguistic corpus. A study list is encoded in the model as a gist trace, similar to the proposal of fuzzy trace theory…

  17. Dog behavior but not frontal brain reaction changes in repeated positive interactions with a human: a non-invasive pilot study using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS).

    PubMed

    Gygax, Lorenz; Reefmann, Nadine; Pilheden, Therese; Scholkmann, Felix; Keeling, Linda

    2015-03-15

    This study was conducted as a pilot test case to investigate potential behavioral and neural indicators of positive emotional states in dogs. These states were induced by subjecting each dog to three types of human interactions (verbal contact only, physical contact only, or both). Each stimulus was repeated 10 times, at 1-min intervals, alternating with a baseline phase (no interaction) while behavior was observed and frontal cortical brain activation was recorded by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Dogs reacted similarly to all 3 stimuli with a consistent hemodynamic pattern. Regarding behavior, dogs lay on their back, explored the handler and performed lip-licking more during exposure to the stimuli than during the baseline. There was only weak evidence that the dogs' behavioral reactions differed between the 3 stimuli, but their behavior changed markedly with repetition. For example, the proportion of time a dog spent lying with its head resting on the floor increased, whereas the probability of exploring the handler and the proportion of time spent lip-licking decreased over time. In contrast, the hemodynamic reaction did not change with repetition. The dogs' reactions are consistent with the stimuli being positive. The contrast between the changes in behavior with repetition and the consistency of the hemodynamic frontal cortical reaction would be in keeping with the assumption that there was a decrease in arousal as dogs habituated to the repetitions, reflected by their change in behavior, whereas because the valence of the stimuli remains constant, there was no change in the frontal hemodynamic reaction.

  18. False alarm reduction in critical care.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Li, Qiao; Kella, Danesh; Chahin, Abdullah; Kooistra, Tristan; Perry, Diane; Mark, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    High false alarm rates in the ICU decrease quality of care by slowing staff response times while increasing patient delirium through noise pollution. The 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge provides a set of 1250 multi-parameter ICU data segments associated with critical arrhythmia alarms, and challenges the general research community to address the issue of false alarm suppression using all available signals. Each data segment was 5 minutes long (for real time analysis), ending at the time of the alarm. For retrospective analysis, we provided a further 30 seconds of data after the alarm was triggered. A total of 750 data segments were made available for training and 500 were held back for testing. Each alarm was reviewed by expert annotators, at least two of whom agreed that the alarm was either true or false. Challenge participants were invited to submit a complete, working algorithm to distinguish true from false alarms, and received a score based on their program's performance on the hidden test set. This score was based on the percentage of alarms correct, but with a penalty that weights the suppression of true alarms five times more heavily than acceptance of false alarms. We provided three example entries based on well-known, open source signal processing algorithms, to serve as a basis for comparison and as a starting point for participants to develop their own code. A total of 38 teams submitted a total of 215 entries in this year's Challenge. This editorial reviews the background issues for this challenge, the design of the challenge itself, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Additionally we make some recommendations for future changes in the field of patient monitoring as a result of the Challenge.

  19. Immunoglobulin M for Acute Infection: True or False?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M (IgM) tests have clear clinical utility but also suffer disproportionately from false-positive results, which in turn can lead to misdiagnoses, inappropriate therapy, and premature closure of a diagnostic workup. Despite numerous reports in the literature, many clinicians and laboratorians remain unaware of this issue. In this brief review, a series of virology case examples is presented. However, a false-positive IgM can occur with any pathogen. Thus, when an accurate diagnosis is essential for therapy, prognosis, infection control, or public health, when the patient is sick enough to be hospitalized, or when the clinical or epidemiologic findings do not fit, IgM detection should not be accepted as a stand-alone test. Rather, whenever possible, the diagnosis should be confirmed by other means, including testing of serial samples and the application of additional test methods. PMID:27193039

  20. Black and green tea - luminol false-negative bloodstains detection.

    PubMed

    Bancirova, Martina

    2012-06-01

    The antioxidant properties of black and green teas are well known. It is also possible to determine their antioxidant capacity by using a chemiluminscent method. This method is based on the measurement of the delay in the emission of light from the luminol reaction in the presence of the antioxidant. Bloodstains which are invisible to the naked eye can also be detected by luminol. Three common methods (detection using the Grodsky or Weber formulations and by Bluestar® Forensic latent bloodstain reagent) are based on the luminol chemiluminescence reaction. The bloodstains can be masked by drinks and/or foods containing antioxidants. The aim of this work was to compare the ability of black and green teas containing antioxidants to cause false negative results during chemiluminescent bloodstain detection.