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Sample records for false positive reaction

  1. Phenolphthalein false-positive reactions from legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Daniel; Kovacs, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Presumptive tests for blood play a critical role in the examination of physical evidence and in the determination of subsequent analysis. The catalytic power of hemoglobin allows colorimetric reactions employing phenolphthalein (Kastle-Meyer test) to indicate "whether" blood is present. Consequently, DNA profiles extracted from phenolphthalein-positive stains are presumed to be from blood on the evidentiary item and can lead to the identification of "whose" blood is present. Crushed nodules from a variety of legumes yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactions that were indistinguishable from true bloodstains both in color quality and in developmental time frame. Clothing and other materials stained by nodules also yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactivity for several years after nodule exposure. Nodules from leguminous plants contain a protein (leghemoglobin) which is structurally and functionally similar to hemoglobin. Testing of purified leghemoglobin confirmed this protein as a source of phenolphthalein reactivity. A scenario is presented showing how the presence of leghemoglobin from nodule staining can mislead investigators. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. False positive reaction for carboxyhemoglobin in blood from liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Lund, A

    1979-01-01

    On spectrophotometric determination of carboxyhemoglobin in blood collected from the liver of three bodies at three days post-mortem, false positive results were found (5--15 per cent saturation), since samples of heart blood collected a few hours after death did not contain carboxyhemoglobin.

  3. Investigation of false-positive reactions for CBH351 maize in screening PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Monma, Kimio; Moriuchi, Rie; Sagi, Naoki; Ichikawa, Hisatsugu; Satoh, Kazue; Tobe, Takashi; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2006-02-01

    Examination for CBH351 maize was conducted by the qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in maize grain and maize processed foods obtained in the Tokyo area. The numbers of samples possibly positive in the screening test were 7 of 22 (31.8%) for maize grain samples, 4 of 14 (28.6%) for semi-processed foods, 11 of 30 (36.7%) for canned products, 3 of 30 (10.0%) for maize snacks, 3 of 4 (75%) for tacos and 1 of 3 (33.3%) for tortillas. However, CBH351 maize was not detected in the confirmation test. Therefore, the results of the screening test were false-positive. Since the reaction might have been caused by the base sequences of the 3'-end of primers CaM03-5' and CBH02-3' used in the screening test, a new primer pair was designed. The PCR products obtained with the new primer pair TMC2-5'--TMS2-3' were specific for CBH351 and were not obtained with barley, wheat, rice, RRS, Bt11, or Event176. Thus, the new primer pair shows high specificity. CBH351 maize was detected from samples containing at least 0.05% CBH 351 maize DNA by using this primer pair.

  4. Diagnostic performance of serological tests for swine brucellosis in the presence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; de Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2015-04-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in Europe. Currently used diagnostic tests for swine brucellosis detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) but their specificity is compromised by false-positive serological reactions (FPSRs) when bacteria carrying cross-reacting O-PS infect pigs. FPSRs occur throughout Europe, and the only tool available for a specific B. suis diagnosis is the intradermal test with Brucella protein extracts free of O-PS or S-LPS. Using sera of 162 sows naturally infected by B. suis biovar 2, 406 brucellosis-free sows, and 218 pigs of brucellosis-free farms affected by FPSR, we assessed the diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA with rough LPS (thus devoid of O-PS) and of gel immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and indirect ELISA with O-PS free proteins in comparison with several S-LPS tests (Rose Bengal, complement fixation, gel immunodiffusion and indirect ELISA). When adjusted to 100% specificity, the sensitivity of the rough LPS ELISA was very low (30%), and adoption of other cut-offs resulted in poor specificity/sensitivity ratios. Although their specificity was 100%, the sensitivity of protein tests (ELISA, latex agglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and gel immunodiffusion) was only moderate (45, 58, 61 and 63%, respectively). Among S-LPS tests, gel immunodiffusion was the only test showing acceptable sensitivity/specificity (68 and 100%, respectively). Despite these shortcomings, and when the purpose is to screen out FPSR at herd level, gel immunodiffusion tests may offer a technically simple and practical alternative to intradermal testing.

  5. The porcine brucellosis--evidence of the role of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 in occurrence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M; Szulowski, K; Iwaniak, W

    2013-01-01

    Forty four pigs with typical characteristics for false positive serolpgical reactions (FPSR) were examined for the presence of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9. The positive reactions were observed in rose bengal test (RBT, N = 23 sera), serum agglutination test (SAT, N = 16), complement fixation test (CFT, N = 9), indirect ELISA (i-ELISA, N= 11) in first, and in RBT (N = 14), SAT (N = 8), CFT (N = 7) and i-ELISA (N = 18) in second examination, respectively. In bacteriological examination Y enterocolitica was confirmed in 12 cases. Six of these isolates were identified with PCR as Y enterocolitica 0:9.

  6. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  7. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  8. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 cultured from Swedish sheep showing serologically false-positive reactions for Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Chenais, Erika; Bagge, Elisabeth; Lambertz, Susanne Thisted; Artursson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In a herd of 20 sheep in Sweden, a country where brucellosis has never been diagnosed in sheep or goats, a total of six sheep were found serologically positive to Brucella melitensis in two different rounds of sampling. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 could at the time of the second sampling be isolated from four sheep, one of them at the same time serologically positive for B. melitensis. The article describes the case and gives some background information on brucellosis and Y. enterocolitica in general as well as a more specific description of the Swedish surveillance program for B. melitensis and the test procedures used. The problem with false-positive reactions, in particular its implications for surveillance programs in low prevalence or officially brucellosis-free countries, is discussed.

  9. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 cultured from Swedish sheep showing serologically false-positive reactions for Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Chenais, Erika; Bagge, Elisabeth; Lambertz, Susanne Thisted; Artursson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In a herd of 20 sheep in Sweden, a country where brucellosis has never been diagnosed in sheep or goats, a total of six sheep were found serologically positive to Brucella melitensis in two different rounds of sampling. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 could at the time of the second sampling be isolated from four sheep, one of them at the same time serologically positive for B. melitensis. The article describes the case and gives some background information on brucellosis and Y. enterocolitica in general as well as a more specific description of the Swedish surveillance program for B. melitensis and the test procedures used. The problem with false-positive reactions, in particular its implications for surveillance programs in low prevalence or officially brucellosis-free countries, is discussed. PMID:23240071

  10. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  11. General false positive ELISA reactions in visceral leishmaniasis. Implications for the use of enzyme immunoassay analyses in tropical Africa.

    PubMed

    Elshafie, Amir I; Mullazehi, Mohammed; Rönnelid, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease in tropical countries. Clinical and laboratory features may mimic autoimmune diseases and this can complicate the Leishmania diagnosis. Due to our previous investigation for false anti-CCP2 reactivity in Leishmania-infected subjects and our interest in immunity against the joint-specific collagen type II (CII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) we investigated the same cohort for anti-CII antibodies. We found elevated anti-CII reactivity in Leishmania-infected patients as compared to controls. When anti-CII OD values were compared with BSA-blocked control plates we found higher reactivity against BSA than in CII-coated plates in many Leishmania-infected patients. The percentage of such false positive anti-CII reactions increased with inflammatory activity, and was found in almost all Leishmania patients with highly active inflammatory disease, but was as low in Sudanese healthy controls as well as among Swedish RA patients. The correlation coefficients between false positive anti-CII and anti-CCP2 measured with a commercial ELISA were highest for patients with the most inflammatory disease but non-significant for Sudanese controls and Swedish RA patients, arguing that our findings may have general implications for ELISA measurements in leishmaniasis. ELISA investigations in areas endemic for leishmaniasis might benefit from individual-specific control wells for each serum sample. This approach might also be applicable to other geographical areas or patient groups with high incidence of inflammatory and infectious diseases.

  12. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  13. Kepler Certified False Positive Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Batalha, Natalie Marie; Colon, Knicole Dawn; Coughlin, Jeffrey Langer; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Chris; Huber, Daniel; Morton, Tim; Rowe, Jason Frank; Mullally, Susan Elizabeth; hide

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the Kepler Certied False Positive table hosted at the Exoplanet Archive1, herein referred to as the CFP table. This table is the result of detailed examination by the Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) of declared false positives in the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) tables (see, for example, Batalha et al. (2012); Burke et al.(2014); Rowe et al. (2015); Mullally et al. (2015); Coughlin et al. (2015b)) at the Exoplanet Archive. A KOI is considered a false positive if it is not due to a planet orbiting the KOI's target star. The CFP table contains all KOIs in the Exoplanet Archive cumulative KOI table. The purpose of the CFP table is to provide a list of certified false positive KOIs. A KOI is certified as a false positive when, in the judgement of the FPWG, there is no plausible planetary interpretation of the observational evidence, which we summarize by saying that the evidence for a false positive is compelling. This certification process involves detailed examination using all available data for each KOI, establishing a high-reliability ground truth set. The CFP table can be used to estimate the reliability of, for example, the KOI tables which are created using only Kepler photometric data, so the disposition of individual KOIs may differ in the KOI and CFP tables. Follow-up observers may find the CFP table useful to avoid observing false positives.

  14. [The false positive reaction of the Triage panel drug-of-abuse by herbal drugs ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae))].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, M; Kinoshita, H; Higasa, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H; Minami, T; Marukawa, S; Yoshinaga, K; Yamauchi, J; Aoki, S; Hishida, S

    2001-11-01

    We investigated false-positive reactions obtained from a drug screening test using a Triage panel. We detected 2 cases giving false-positive reaction for AMP (amphetamine, methamphetamine) during the screening of 187 normal subjects. Subsequent follow up testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showed both to be false-positive reactions. As both cases have a history of ingesting the herbal drug, Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae)), containing ephedrine, we examined the relationship between false-positive reactions on Triage and Ma-huang. All urine samples collected from 7 healthy volunteers following administration of Ma-huang indicated AMP positive on Triage. Also a high ratio of AMP positives was observed in the patients who were administered Ma-huang-containing drugs at the hospital. However, none of them were identified as true-positives by HPLC or gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The extract of Ma-huang contained in herbal drugs, which otherwise contain neither amphetamine nor its derivatives, gives (AMP) positive indications on Triage. We speculate that unidentified components of Ma-huang cause the false-positive reactions. We suggest that follow-up tests by GC/MS or HPLC are needed wherever a positive result is obtained from a screening test by Triage. Furthermore, it will be established to continue collecting information on prescribed and non-prescribed drugs.

  15. False positives in cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joseph K; Tarone, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    A recent attempt to estimate the false-positive rate for cancer epidemiology studies is based on agents in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) category 3 (agent not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans) in the IARC Monographs Program. The estimation method is critiqued regarding biases caused by its reliance on the IARC classification criteria for assessing carcinogenic potential. The privileged position given to epidemiologic studies by the IARC criteria ensures that the percentage of positive epidemiologic studies for an agent will depend strongly on the IARC category to which the agent is assigned. Because IARC category 3 is composed of agents with the lowest-assessed carcinogenic potential to which the estimation approach in question could be applied, a spuriously low estimated false-positive rate was necessarily the outcome of this approach. Tendentious estimation approaches like that employed will by necessity produce spuriously low and misleading false positive rates. The recently reported estimates of the false-positive rate in cancer epidemiology are seriously biased and contribute nothing substantive to the literature on the very real problems related to false-positive findings in epidemiology.

  16. Cat-bite-induced Francisella tularensis infection with a false-positive serological reaction for Bartonella quintana

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Evelina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Tularaemia is caused by infection with Francisella tularensistransmitted via direct contact with an infected hare carcass or indirectly through the bites of vectors, but may be cat-bite-associated as well. Medical history and reliable diagnostic analysis are important in order to differentiate it from other cat-associated infections, e.g. Bartonella spp. Case presentation. A healthy 56-year-old man was examined because of a cat-bite-associated ulceroglandular wound on his right thumb. Nineteen days after the cat bite occurred, a serology test was positive for anti-Bartonella quintana, but negative for anti-F. tularensis. Since Bartonella infections are rare in Sweden, another serology test was analysed 2 weeks later with a positive result for anti-F. tularensis. The patient was treated with doxycycline for 14 days and recovered. The patient was re-sampled after 18 months to obtain a convalescent sample. The acute and the convalescent samples were both analysed at a reference centre, with negative results for anti-Bartonella spp. this time. Conclusion. This case is enlightening about the importance of extending the medical history and re-sampling the patient for antibody detection when the clinical suspicion of cat-bite-associated tularaemia is high. The false-positive result for anti-B. quintana antibodies may have been due to technical issues with the assay, cross-reactivity or both. PMID:28348802

  17. Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of urease-positive non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria on the results of a urea breath test (UBT) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a UBT using film-coated [(13)C]urea tablets. The UBT was performed in 102 patients treated with a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. Urease-producing bacteria other than H. pylori were isolated and identified from the oral cavity and stomach. In 4/102 patients, the UBT gave false-positive results. These false-positive results were found to be caused by the presence of urease-positive bacteria in the oral cavity and stomach. Five bacterial species with urease activity (Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus) were subsequently isolated from the oral cavity and/or stomach. As there was no correlation between the in vitro urease activity of urease-positive non-H. pylori bacteria and the UBT value, and all of the patients with a false-positive UBT result were suffering from atrophic gastritis, it is possible that the false-positive results in the UBT were a result of colonization of urease-positive bacteria and gastric hypochlorhydric conditions. Thus, for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection using a UBT, the influence of stomach bacteria must be considered when interpreting the results.

  18. Preventing intense false positive and negative reactions attributed to the principle of ELISA to re-investigate antibody studies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Terato, Kuniaki; Do, Christopher T; Cutler, Dawn; Waritani, Takaki; Shionoya, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    To study the possible involvement of potential environmental pathogens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, it is essential to investigate antibody responses to a variety of environmental agents and autologous components. However, none of the conventional ELISA buffers can prevent the false positive and negative reactions attributed to its principal, which utilizes the high binding affinity of proteins to plastic surfaces. The aims of this study are to reveal all types of non-specific reactions associated with conventional buffer systems, and to re-investigate antibody responses to potential environmental pathogenic and autologous antigens in patients with autoimmune diseases using a newly developed buffer system "ChonBlock™" by ELISA. Compared to conventional buffers, the new buffer was highly effective in reducing the most intense false positive reaction caused by hydrophobic binding of immunoglobulin in sample specimens to plastic surfaces, "background (BG) noise reaction", and other non-specific reactions without interfering with antigen-antibody reactions. Applying this buffer, we found that IgG antibody responses to Escherichia coli O111:B4, E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS) were significantly lower or tended to be lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas IgA antibody responses to these antigens were equal or tended to be higher compared to normal controls. As a consequence, the IgA/IgG antibody ratios against these agents were significantly higher in patients with RA and SLE, except for Crohn's disease, which showed significantly higher IgG responses to these antigens. To assay antibodies in human sera, it is indispensable to eliminate false positive and negative reactions by using an appropriate buffer system, and to include antigen non-coated blank wells to determine BG noise reactions of invidual samples. Finally, based on our preliminary analysis in

  19. False positive reaction of the immunohistochemistry technique using anti-BCG polyclonal antibodies to identify Mycobacterium leprae in wild nine-banded armadillos.

    PubMed

    Deps, Patrícia D; Michalany, Nilceo S; Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2004-09-01

    The authors studied 66 wild nine-banded armadillos from Brazil. The ear samples were collected and Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco stains were performed, as well as immunostaining using polyclonal BCG antibody, to avaluate the presence of the Mycobacterium leprae. The AFB were not detected by the Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco staining, neither immunoexpression of the BCG marker. However, many normal structures from the ears of the nine-banded armadillos, such as condrocytes, condroblasts, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, and Gram positive bacteria cocci, showed false positive reaction by the BCG marker. The authors discuss the use of the immunohistochemical studies with the polyclonal BCG antibody to identify M. leprae antigens in wild armadillos.

  20. [EXPERIENCE OF STUDY AND POSSIBLE WAYS OF ELIMINATION OF FALSE POSITIVE AND FALSE NEGATIVE RESULTS DURING EXECUTION OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ON AN EXAMPLE OF JUNIN VIRUS RNA DETECTION].

    PubMed

    Sizikova, T E; Lebedev, V N; Pantyukhov, V B; Borisevich, S V; Merkulov, V A

    2015-01-01

    Experience of study and possible ways of elimination of false positive and false negative results during execution of polymerase chain reaction on an example of Junin virus RNA detection. MATERIALSS AND METHODS: Junin virus--causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) strain XJpR37/5787 was obtained from the State collection of pathogenicity group I causative agents of the 48th Central Research Institute. Reagent kit for detection of Junin virus RNA by RT-PCR was developed in the Institute and consists of 4 sets: for isolation of RNA, execution of reverse-transcription reaction, execution of PCR and electrophoretic detection of PCR products. RT-PCR was carried out by a standard technique. Continuous cell cultures of African green monkey Vero B, GMK-AH-1(D) were obtained from the museum of cell culture department of the Centre. An experimental study of the effect of various factors of impact on the sample under investigation ("thawing-freezing", presence of formaldehyde, heparin) on the obtaining of false negative results during Junin virus RNA detection by using RT-PCR was studied. Addition of 0.01% heparin to the samples was shown to completely inhibit PCR. Addition of 0.05% formaldehyde significantly reduces sensitivity of the method. A possibility of reduction of analysis timeframe from 15 to 5 days was shown during detection of the causative agent in samples with low concentration of the latter by growing the samples and subsequent analysis of the material obtained by using RT-PCR. During detection of causative agent by using RT-PCR false negative results could appear in the presence of formaldehyde and heparin in the sample. A possibility of elimination of false negative PCR results due to concentration of the causative agent in the sample under investigation at a level below sensitivity threshold was shown on the example of Junin virus RNA detection by using growing of the pathogen in appropriate accumulation system with subsequent analysis of the

  1. The Dutch Brucella abortus monitoring programme for cattle: the impact of false-positive serological reactions and comparison of serological tests.

    PubMed

    Emmerzaal, A; de Wit, J J; Dijkstra, Th; Bakker, D; van Zijderveld, F G

    2002-02-01

    The Dutch national Brucella abortus eradication programme for cattle started in 1959. Sporadic cases occurred yearly until 1995; the last infected herd was culled in 1996. In August 1999 the Netherlands was declared officially free of bovine brucellosis by the European Union. Before 1999, the programme to monitor the official Brucella-free status of bovine herds was primarily based on periodical testing of dairy herds with the milk ring test (MRT) and serological testing of all animals older than 1 year of age from non-dairy herds, using the micro-agglutination test (MAT) as screening test. In addition, serum samples of cattle that aborted were tested with the MAT. The high number of false positive reactions in both tests and the serum agglutination test (SAT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for confirmation seemed to result in unnecessary blockade of herds, subsequent testing and slaughter of animals. For this reason, a validation study was performed in which three indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), the CFT and the SAT were compared using a panel of sera from brucellosis-free cattle, sera from experimentally infected cattle, and sera from cattle experimentally infected with bacteria which are known to induce cross-reactive antibodies (Pasteurella, Salmonella, Yersinia, and Escherichia). Moreover, four ELISAs and the MRT were compared using a panel of 1000 bulk milk samples from Brucella-free herds and 12 milk samples from Brucella abortus- infected cattle. It is concluded that the ELISA obtained from ID-Lelystad is the most suitable test to monitor the brucelosis free status of herds because it gives rise to fewer false-positive reactions than the SAT.

  2. Consequences of false-positive screening mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, Anna N A; Fryback, Dennis G; Hammond, Cristina S; Hanna, Lucy G; Grove, Margaret R; Brown, Mary; Wang, Qianfei; Lindfors, Karen; Pisano, Etta D

    2014-06-01

    False-positive mammograms, a common occurrence in breast cancer screening programs, represent a potential screening harm that is currently being evaluated by the US Preventive Services Task Force. To measure the effect of false-positive mammograms on quality of life by measuring personal anxiety, health utility, and attitudes toward future screening. The Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) quality-of-life substudy telephone survey was performed shortly after screening and 1 year later at 22 DMIST sites and included randomly selected DMIST participants with positive and negative mammograms. Mammogram requiring follow-up testing or referral without a cancer diagnosis. The 6-question short form of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory state scale (STAI-6) and the EuroQol EQ-5D instrument with US scoring. Attitudes toward future screening as measured by women's self-report of future intention to undergo mammographic screening and willingness to travel and stay overnight to undergo a hypothetical new type of mammography that would identify as many cancers with half the false-positive results. Among 1450 eligible women invited to participate, 1226 (84.6%) were enrolled, with follow-up interviews obtained in 1028 (83.8%). Anxiety was significantly higher for women with false-positive mammograms (STAI-6, 35.2 vs 32.7), but health utility scores did not differ and there were no significant differences between groups at 1 year. Future screening intentions differed by group (25.7% vs 14.2% more likely in false-positive vs negative groups); willingness to travel and stay overnight did not (9.9% vs 10.5% in false-positive vs negative groups). Future screening intention was significantly increased among women with false-positive mammograms (odds ratio, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.54-2.93), younger age (2.78; 1.5-5.0), and poorer health (1.63; 1.09-2.43). Women's anticipated high-level anxiety regarding future false-positive mammograms was associated with willingness

  3. False Positive Mammograms and Detection Controlled Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kleit, Andrew N; Ruiz, James F

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes of false positive in mammograms. Data Sources Secondary data collected from extracts from computerized medical records from 1999 from five thousand patients at a single hospital in a medium-sized Southern city. Study Design Retrospective analysis of electronic medical data on screening and diagnostic mammograms. Detection-controlled estimation (DCE) was used to compare the efficacy of alternative readers of mammogram films. Analysis was also conducted on follow-up exams of women who tested positive in the first stage of investigation. Key variables included whether the patient had had a prior mammogram, age of the patient, and identifiers for the individual physicians. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospital maintains electronic medical records (EMR) on all patients. Extracts were performed on this EMR system under the guidance of clinical expertise. Data were collected for all women who had mammograms in 1999. Random samples were employed for screening mammograms, and all data was used for diagnostic mammograms. Principal Findings Study results imply that access to a previous mammogram greatly reduces the incidence of false positives readings. This has important consequences for benefit-cost, and cost-effectiveness analysis of mammography. Were previous mammograms always available, the results imply the number of false positives would decrease by at least half. The results here also indicate that there is no reason to believe this decrease in false positive would be accompanied by an increase in the number of false negatives. Other attributes also affected the number of false positives. Mondays and Wednesdays appear to be more prone to false positives than the other days in the week. There is also some disparity in false positive outcomes among the five physicians studied. With respect to detection-controlled estimation, the results are mixed. With follow-up data, the DCE estimator appears to generate reasonable, robust

  4. Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Fryback, Dennis G.; Hammond, Cristina S.; Hanna, Lucy G.; Grove, Margaret R.; Brown, Mary; Wang, Qianfei; Lindfors, Karen; Pisano, Etta D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance False-positive mammograms, a common occurrence in breast cancer screening programs, represent a potential screening harm that is currently being evaluated by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Objective To measure the impact of false-positive mammograms on quality of life by measuring personal anxiety, health utility and future screening attitudes. Design Longitudinal Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) quality-of-life sub-study telephone survey shortly after screening and one year later. Setting Twenty-two DMIST sites Participants Randomly-selected DMIST participants with positive and negative mammograms. Exposure(s) for observational studies Mammogram requiring follow-up testing or referral without a cancer diagnosis. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Index short-form (STAI-6) and the EuroQol EQ-5D with United States scoring. Attitudes toward future screening measured by women’s self-report of future intention to undergo mammography screening and willingness to travel and stay overnight to receive a hypothetical new mammogram that would detect as many cancers with half the false-positives. Results Among 1,450 eligible women invited to participate, 1,226 women (85%) were enrolled with follow-up interviews obtained for 1,028 (84%). Anxiety was significantly higher for women with false-positive mammograms (STAI-6:35.2 vs. 32.7), but health utility did not differ and there were no significant differences between groups at one year. Future screening intentions differed by group (26% vs. 14% more likely in false-positive vs. negative); willingness to travel and stay overnight did not (11% vs. 10% in false-positive vs. negative). Future screening intention was significantly increased among women with false-positive mammograms (OR: 2.12; 95%CI:1.54, 2.93), younger age (OR:2.78; 95%CI:1.5,5.0) and poorer health (OR: 1.63; 95%CI:1.09, 2.43). Women’s anticipated high-level anxiety regarding

  5. False positive reduction for lung nodule CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luyin; Boroczky, Lilla; Drysdale, Jeremy; Agnihotri, Lalitha; Lee, Michael C.

    2007-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms 'automatically' identify lung nodules on thoracic multi-slice CT scans (MSCT) thereby providing physicians with a computer-generated 'second opinion'. While CAD systems can achieve high sensitivity, their limited specificity has hindered clinical acceptance. To overcome this problem, we propose a false positive reduction (FPR) system based on image processing and machine learning to reduce the number of false positive lung nodules identified by CAD algorithms and thereby improve system specificity. To discriminate between true and false nodules, twenty-three 3D features were calculated from each candidate nodule's volume of interest (VOI). A genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) were then used to select an optimal subset of features from this pool of candidate features. Using this feature subset, we trained an SVM classifier to eliminate as many false positives as possible while retaining all the true nodules. To overcome the imbalanced nature of typical datasets (significantly more false positives than true positives), an intelligent data selection algorithm was designed and integrated into the machine learning framework, thus further improving the FPR rate. Three independent datasets were used to train and validate the system. Using two datasets for training and the third for validation, we achieved a 59.4% FPR rate while removing one true nodule on the validation datasets. In a second experiment, 75% of the cases were randomly selected from each of the three datasets and the remaining cases were used for validation. A similar FPR rate and true positive retention rate was achieved. Additional experiments showed that the GA feature selection process integrated with the proposed data selection algorithm outperforms the one without it by 5%-10% FPR rate. The methods proposed can be also applied to other application areas, such as computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules.

  6. False positive reactions for IgA and IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in liver cirrhosis are common and method-dependent.

    PubMed

    Villalta, Danilo; Crovatto, Marina; Stella, Sergio; Tonutti, Elio; Tozzoli, Renato; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2005-06-01

    Conflicting results were obtained in the assay of anti-transglutaminase (anti-tTG) autoantibodies in patients with chronic liver disease. In order to establish whether this was attributable to methodological differences, anti-tTG antibodies were assayed in a large number of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC). 54 patients with LC and 29 patients suffering from celiac disease (CD), used as controls, were tested for IgA and IgG anti-tTG with 11 different commercial methods. In the patients with LC, positivity ranged from 0% to 33.3% for IgA anti-tTG and from 0% to 11.1% for anti-tTG of the IgG class. The largest number of false positives was found with methods that used tTG in association with gliadin peptides as antigen substrate. A significant association was found between IgA anti-tTG antibodies and serum immunoglobulin concentration. The results of the various methods of assaying anti-tTG antibodies in patients with LC are highly variable, and the positives found are generally false positives, partly due to the high immunoglobulin concentration.

  7. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 in the faeces of cattle with false positive reactions in serological tests for brucellosis in Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Don; Kenny, Kevin; Power, Seamus; Egan, John; Ryan, Fergus

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal infection by Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 (YeO9) in cattle has been linked to false positive serological reactivity (FPSR) in diagnostic tests for brucellosis. Although eradicated in Ireland, brucellosis monitoring still identifies seropositive animals, usually one or two (termed singletons) per herd, which are classed as FPSR. To investigate a link between FPSR and YeO9, faeces and blood were collected from singleton FPSR cattle, and from companion animals, in eight selected herds with more than one FPSR animal, for YeO9 culture and Brucella serology. YeO9 was isolated from 76/474 (16%) FPSR singletons in 309 herds, but not from any of 621 animals in 122 control non-FPSR herds. In the FPSR herds 52/187 (27.8%) animals were culture positive, and 17% of the isolates were from seronegative animals. Seropositive animals were more likely to have a rising antibody titre when culture positive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. View from Spirit's Overwintering Position (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has this view northward from the position at the north edge of the 'Home Plate' plateau where the rover will spend its third Martian winter.

    Husband Hill is on the horizon. The dark area in the middle distance is 'El Dorado' sand dune field.

    Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this image during the rover's 1,448th Martian day, of sol (Jan. 29, 2008).

    This view combines separate images taken through the Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. It is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene.

  9. Accounting for False Positive HIV Tests: Is Visceral Leishmaniasis Responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Leslie; Ritmeijer, Koert; Piriou, Erwan; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Co-infection with HIV and visceral leishmaniasis is an important consideration in treatment of either disease in endemic areas. Diagnosis of HIV in resource-limited settings relies on rapid diagnostic tests used together in an algorithm. A limitation of the HIV diagnostic algorithm is that it is vulnerable to falsely positive reactions due to cross reactivity. It has been postulated that visceral leishmaniasis (VL) infection can increase this risk of false positive HIV results. This cross sectional study compared the risk of false positive HIV results in VL patients with non-VL individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants were recruited from 2 sites in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian algorithm of a tiebreaker using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was used to test for HIV. The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. Every RDT screen positive individual was included for testing with the gold standard along with 10% of all negatives. The final analysis included 89 VL and 405 non-VL patients. HIV prevalence was found to be 12.8% (47/ 367) in the VL group compared to 7.9% (200/2526) in the non-VL group. The RDT algorithm in the VL group yielded 47 positives, 4 false positives, and 38 negatives. The same algorithm for those without VL had 200 positives, 14 false positives, and 191 negatives. Specificity and positive predictive value for the group with VL was less than the non-VL group; however, the difference was not found to be significant (p = 0.52 and p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusion The test algorithm yielded a high number of HIV false positive results. However, we were unable to demonstrate a significant difference between groups with and without VL disease. This suggests that the presence of endemic visceral leishmaniasis alone cannot account for the high number of false positive HIV results in our study. PMID:26161864

  10. Excluding False Positive Detections in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, John J.; Ouvarova, T.; Borucki, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    The NASA Kepler Mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, will search for Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in or near habitable zones. A high precision photometer will search for planetary transits of parent stars. For a system similar to the Earth-Sun, the decrease in light during a central transit will be one part in 10,000 of the total stellar brightness out of transit. This poster discusses the effort to address a significant concern: the possibility of false positive detections of extra-solar Earth analogs. The concern arises because about 50 per cent of star systems are double or multiple. Further, because the photometer design is constrained by the requirement for high sensitivity to changes of low light levels, the optical resolution is not high compared to other space or terrestrial telescopes. If a relatively nearby Kepler target star happens to contain, within the Kepler PSF, an eclipsing binary system that is reduced in brightness by a factor of 10,000, say because it is 100 times farther away, the photometric profile of an eclipse could mimic a planetary transit. We have therefore developed a program to use archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope to quantify the number density of faint stars in the Kepler field that are in the brightness range that could cause confusion. Since the beginning of the project, the location of the Kepler field itself has been changed to optimize observing efficiency. The work originally included HST/WFPC2 data, and has now been expanded to ACS data as well. We present here a summary of completed and continuing work on faint background systems in the new Kepler field.

  11. False positives in psychiatric diagnosis: implications for human freedom.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2010-02-01

    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a sick role on individuals and place a burden upon them to change; thus, disorders decrease the level of respect and acceptance generally accorded to those with even annoying normal variations in traits and features. Thus, minimizing false positives is important to a pluralistic society. The harmful dysfunction analysis of disorder is used to diagnose the sources of likely false positives, and propose potential remedies to the current weaknesses in the validity of diagnostic criteria.

  12. A Closer Look at Self-Reported Suicide Attempts: False Positives and False Negatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing…

  13. Diagnosing periprosthetic infection: false-positive intraoperative Gram stains.

    PubMed

    Oethinger, Margret; Warner, Debra K; Schindler, Susan A; Kobayashi, Hideo; Bauer, Thomas W

    2011-04-01

    Intraoperative Gram stains have a reported low sensitivity but high specificity when used to help diagnose periprosthetic infections. In early 2008, we recognized an unexpectedly high frequency of apparent false-positive Gram stains from revision arthroplasties. The purpose of this report is to describe the cause of these false-positive test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of all intraoperative Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasty cases during a 3-month interval using microbiologic cultures of the same samples as the gold standard. Methods of specimen harvesting, handling, transport, distribution, specimen processing including tissue grinding/macerating, Gram staining, and interpretation were studied. After a test modification, results of specimens were prospectively collected for a second 3-month interval, and the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative Gram stains were calculated. The retrospective review of 269 Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasties indicated historic sensitivity and specificity values of 23% and 92%, respectively. Systematic analysis of all steps of the procedure identified Gram-stained but nonviable bacteria in commercial broth reagents used as diluents for maceration of periprosthetic membranes before Gram staining and culture. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing showed mixed bacterial DNA. Evaluation of 390 specimens after initiating standardized Millipore filtering of diluent fluid revealed a reduced number of positive Gram stains, yielding 9% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Clusters of false-positive Gram stains have been reported in other clinical conditions. They are apparently rare related to diagnosing periprosthetic infections but have severe consequences if used to guide treatment. Even occasional false-positive Gram stains should prompt review of laboratory methods. Our observations implicate dead bacteria in microbiologic reagents as potential sources of false-positive Gram

  14. Reducing false-negative and false-positive diagnoses in anatomic pathology consultation material.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Gould, Edwin W

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that there are disagreements in interlaboratory consultation, including false-negative and false-positive diagnoses. To date, methods to reduce false-negative and false-positive diagnoses have been poorly documented. To identify features associated with false-negative and false-positive diagnoses in anatomic pathology. We reviewed the results of interlaboratory consultation in our institution during a 9-year period. For false-negative and false-positive diagnoses, methods that might have prevented the error were identified. Disagreements were identified in 810 of 8082 consults (10%). Fifty-four false-negative cases (0.7% of all consults) and 27 false-positive cases (0.3%) were identified. False-negative cases were more common in breast (20 of 1131; 1.8%), genitourinary (16 of 970; 1.7%), hematologic (3 of 242; 1.3%), and cytology (3 of 404; 0.8%) than in all other sites combined (P < .001); no significant difference in sites were identified for false-positive cases. Overall, there was no difference in the percentage of cases that were reviewed by more than one pathologist in either false-negative cases (109 of 810; 13.5%) or false-positive cases (135 of 810; 16.7%), compared with all other consults (858 of 7272; 11.8%) (P = .74 and .59, respectively). However, on review, 12 of all 27 false-positive cases (44%) might have been prevented by the use of immunohistochemistry alone, and 36 of all 54 false-negative cases (67%) might have been prevented by the use of a second review; special stains, including immunohistochemistry; additional levels; changes in processing; and hedges. Approximately one-half of false-negative and false-positive cases (48 of 81; 59%) might be preventable by the use of a combination of pathologic methods.

  15. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  16. A closer look at self-reported suicide attempts: false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Plöderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-02-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing false positives decreased the rate of suicide attempters from 4.3% to 2.7%. Probing questions also revealed 0.8% false negatives. We recommend using probing questions with both those who report a suicide attempt and those who do not report a suicide attempt to increase the validity of self-reported suicide-related information.

  17. On False-Positive and False-Negative Decisions with a Mastery Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    Wilcox (1977) examines two methods of estimating the probability of a false-positive on false-negative decision with a mastery test. Both procedures make assumptions about the form of the true score distribution which might not give good results in all situations. In this paper, upper and lower bounds on the two possible error types are described…

  18. False positive test results for pheochromocytoma from 2000 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Yu, R; Wei, M

    2010-10-01

    Testing for pheochromocytoma becomes more frequent in clinical practice. False positive test results may cause patient anxiety and unnecessary imaging studies. The data on false positive results for pheochromocytoma in routine clinical practice are lacking. To examine the prevalence of false positive results and to reveal the clinical features and laboratory tests of patients with markedly elevated but false positive test results, a database of tests for pheochromocytoma at a large general hospital between 2000 and 2008 was reviewed. Of 1,896 patients tested, 417 (22.0%) had at least one abnormal test result and 66 (3.5%) had markedly elevated results. 24 patients with markedly elevated but false positive results received 65 imaging studies and 1 adrenalectomy. The causes of the misleading results included physiological variations (33%), laboratory errors (29%), and drug interference with measurement (21%). The false positive rate of a markedly elevated result was lowest for vanillylmandelic acid (9%) and highest for urine metanephrines (50%) (p = 0.03). Nearly half of all test results were normal and 79% of patients had at least one normal result. Therefore false positive test results for pheochromocytoma are rather common. Markedly elevated but false positive test results can potentially be avoided by judicious selection of patients and tests. Pretest risk, physiological variations of catecholamine levels, laboratory errors, and drug interference should be considered in interpreting abnormal test results. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. False-positive and false-negative rates in meconium drug testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, C; Lewis, D; Leikin, J

    1995-11-01

    To determine the number of false-negative results produced by inefficient extraction of drugs from meconium, three published procedures were compared by using previously confirmed positive and negative meconium specimens. The methods were not equivalent in their ability to extract drugs from the matrix. To determine the number of false positives reported by the use of screen-only (unconfirmed) results, 535 screen-positive meconium specimens were subjects to confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-seven percent of the samples were confirmed positive for one or more of the drugs under investigation, showing that a false-positive rate as high as 43% may exist when unconfirmed screening results are used.

  20. Generalized site occupancy models allowing for false positive and false negative errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Site occupancy models have been developed that allow for imperfect species detection or ?false negative? observations. Such models have become widely adopted in surveys of many taxa. The most fundamental assumption underlying these models is that ?false positive? errors are not possible. That is, one cannot detect a species where it does not occur. However, such errors are possible in many sampling situations for a number of reasons, and even low false positive error rates can induce extreme bias in estimates of site occupancy when they are not accounted for. In this paper, we develop a model for site occupancy that allows for both false negative and false positive error rates. This model can be represented as a two-component finite mixture model and can be easily fitted using freely available software. We provide an analysis of avian survey data using the proposed model and present results of a brief simulation study evaluating the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator and the naive estimator in the presence of false positive errors.

  1. Automated Astrophysical False Positive Analysis of Transiting Planet Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Beginning with Kepler, but continuing with K2 and TESS, transiting planet candidates are now found at a much faster rate than follow-up observations can be obtained. Thus, distinguishing true planet candidates from astrophysical false positives has become primarily a statistical exercise. I will describe a new publicly available open-source Python package for analyzing the astrophysical false positive probabilities of transiting exoplanet signals. In addition, I will present results of applying this analysis to both Kepler and K2 planet candidates, resulting in the probabilistic validation of thousands of exoplanets, as well as identifying many likely false positives.

  2. False-Positive Stress Echocardiograms: A Continuing Challenge.

    PubMed

    Qamruddin, Salima

    2016-01-01

    Stress echocardiography is an integral test in the cardiac diagnostic laboratory and has high sensitivity and specificity. Despite the excellent specificity of stress echocardiography, we continue to see a subset of patients with false-positive tests (defined as <50% diameter stenosis on subsequent coronary angiography). These false-positive findings present a management challenge because it remains unclear if and how to treat these patients. This article reviews relevant clinical studies and their outcomes. Studies suggest that a group of patients develops a hypertensive response to exercise and therefore may have false-positive stress echocardiography. Hence, superior blood pressure control prior to stress echocardiography may prevent some false-positive tests. In addition, a subset of patients has microvascular abnormalities, vasomotor changes, endothelial dysfunction, and/or small vessel coronary disease that can lead to false-positive stress echocardiography. The evidence is insufficient to state that a false-positive stress echocardiography in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease portends a poor outcome, but considerable evidence shows that some of these patients have microvascular abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction and consequently may benefit from aggressive medical management and further testing.

  3. Designing occupancy studies when false-positive detections occur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    1.Recently, estimators have been developed to estimate occupancy probabilities when false-positive detections occur during presence-absence surveys. Some of these estimators combine different types of survey data to improve estimates of occupancy. With these estimators, there is a tradeoff between the number of sample units surveyed, and the number and type of surveys at each sample unit. Guidance on efficient design of studies when false positives occur is unavailable. 2.For a range of scenarios, I identified survey designs that minimized the mean square error of the estimate of occupancy. I considered an approach that uses one survey method and two observation states and an approach that uses two survey methods. For each approach, I used numerical methods to identify optimal survey designs when model assumptions were met and parameter values were correctly anticipated, when parameter values were not correctly anticipated, and when the assumption of no unmodelled detection heterogeneity was violated. 3.Under the approach with two observation states, false positive detections increased the number of recommended surveys, relative to standard occupancy models. If parameter values could not be anticipated, pessimism about detection probabilities avoided poor designs. Detection heterogeneity could require more or fewer repeat surveys, depending on parameter values. If model assumptions were met, the approach with two survey methods was inefficient. However, with poor anticipation of parameter values, with detection heterogeneity, or with removal sampling schemes, combining two survey methods could improve estimates of occupancy. 4.Ignoring false positives can yield biased parameter estimates, yet false positives greatly complicate the design of occupancy studies. Specific guidance for major types of false-positive occupancy models, and for two assumption violations common in field data, can conserve survey resources. This guidance can be used to design efficient

  4. Epidemiology, Public Health, and the Rhetoric of False Positives

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Aaron; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vineis, Paolo; Cocco, Pierluigi; Forastiere, Francesco; Grandjean, Philippe; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; McMichael, Anthony; Pearce, Neil; Porta, Miquel; Samet, Jonathan; Sandler, Dale P.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Vainio, Harri

    2009-01-01

    Background As an observational science, epidemiology is regarded by some researchers as inherently flawed and open to false results. In a recent paper, Boffetta et al. [Boffetta P, McLaughlin JK, LaVecchia C, Tarone RE, Lipworth L, Blot WJ. False-positive results in cancer epidemiology: a plea for epistemological modesty. J Natl Cancer Inst 100:988–995 (2008)] argued that “epidemiology is particularly prone to the generation of false-positive results.” They also said “the tendency to emphasize and over-interpret what appear to be new findings is commonplace, perhaps in part because of a belief that the findings provide information that may ultimately improve public health” and that “this tendency to hype new findings increases the likelihood of downplaying inconsistencies within the data or any lack of concordance with other sources of evidence.” The authors supported these serious charges against epidemiology and epidemiologists with few examples. Although we acknowledge that false positives do occur, we view the position of Boffetta and colleagues on false positives as unbalanced and potentially harmful to public health. Objective We aim to provide a more balanced evaluation of epidemiology and its contribution to public health discourse. Discussion Boffetta and colleagues ignore the fact that false negatives may arise from the very processes that they tout as generating false-positive results. We further disagree with their proposition that false-positive results from a single study will lead to faulty decision making in matters of public health importance. In practice, such public health evaluations are based on all the data available from all relevant disciplines and never to our knowledge on a single study. Conclusions The lack of balance by Boffetta and colleagues in their evaluation of the impact of false-positive findings on epidemiology, the charge that “methodological vigilance is often absent” in epidemiologists’ interpretation of

  5. Verification of false-positive blood culture results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Daxboeck, Florian; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Krause, Robert; Assadian, Ojan; Wenisch, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    A small but significant proportion of blood cultures processed by the BACTEC 9000 series systems is signaled positive, while subsequent Gram's stain and culture on solid media yield no pathogens. In this study, 15 "false-positive" vials (7 aerobes, 8 anaerobes) from 15 patients were investigated for the presence of bacteria and fungi by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA amplification, respectively. All samples turned out negative by both methods. Most patients (7) had neutropenia, which does not support the theory that high leukocyte counts enhance the generation of false-positive results. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that false-negative results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series are inherent to the automated detection and not due to the growth of fastidious organisms.

  6. Escitalopram-Induced Amenorrhea and False Positive Urine Pregnancy Test

    PubMed Central

    Hour, Siv; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Gray, Caron; Smith, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Escitalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. A 34-year-old female patient with major depressive disorder developed amenorrhea and had a false-positive urine pregnancy test after initiation of escitalopram treatment. To our knowledge, no published case report of amenorrhea and false-positive urine pregnancy tests in women taking escitalopram exists. This case report suggests that women of child-bearing age should be carefully monitored for amenorrhea while they are on an antidepressant treatment regimen. PMID:28197332

  7. High False Positives and False Negatives in Yeast Parameter in an Automated Urine Sediment Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Eren, Esin; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Automated urine sediment analyzers have proven their feasibility in medical laboratories. However, editing manual microscopic review of some specimens severely limits the usefulness of such systems. This study aims to give feedback on the practical experience on »Yeast«, which is one of the parameters that compel frequent manual reviews. Methods 5448 freshly collected urine specimens submitted from various departments of our hospital for diagnostic urinalysis were studied by the UriSed® (77 Elektronika, Hungary). A specialist medical doctor inspected every image on-board, and reviewed the ones with a »Yeast« alarm by traditional manual microscopy. Results UriSed alarmed in 491 samples (9%) for yeast. In 59 samples (1%) the number of particles exceeded the cut-off and a »positive for yeast« was set. A false positive report of yeast +1 to 3+/HPF was found in 51 samples (0.9%). There were 8 cases with positive for yeast from both microscopic methods. Thirty-three »negative for yeast« samples were corrected as positive after the manual microscopic review. Conclusions We report a high percentage of false positives and negatives in the yeast parameter, in line with other studies on UriSed as well as on other instruments in the market. As an important feedback, our observations showed that the major concern in false results was »the focusing problem«. We believe in the necessity of a focus check and comparison of alarms between images on board. PMID:28356844

  8. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  9. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  10. Looking for Childhood Schizophrenia: Case Series of False Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayer, Catherine; Sporn, Alexandra; Gogtay, Nitin; Tossell, Julia; Lenane, Marge; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experience with the diagnosis of childhood-onset schizophrenia indicates a high rate of false positives. Most mislabeled patients have chronic disabling, affective, or behavioral disorders. The authors report the cases of three children who passed stringent initial childhood-onset schizophrenia "screens" but had no chronic psychotic…

  11. High false positive rates in common sensory threshold tests.

    PubMed

    Running, Cordelia A

    2015-02-01

    Large variability in thresholds to sensory stimuli is observed frequently even in healthy populations. Much of this variability is attributed to genetics and day-to-day fluctuation in sensitivity. However, false positives are also contributing to the variability seen in these tests. In this study, random number generation was used to simulate responses in threshold methods using different "stopping rules": ascending 2-alternative forced choice (AFC) with 5 correct responses; ascending 3-AFC with 3 or 4 correct responses; staircase 2-AFC with 1 incorrect up and 2 incorrect down, as well as 1 up 4 down and 5 or 7 reversals; staircase 3-AFC with 1 up 2 down and 5 or 7 reversals. Formulas are presented for rates of false positives in the ascending methods, and curves were generated for the staircase methods. Overall, the staircase methods generally had lower false positive rates, but these methods were influenced even more by number of presentations than ascending methods. Generally, the high rates of error in all these methods should encourage researchers to conduct multiple tests per individual and/or select a method that can correct for false positives, such as fitting a logistic curve to a range of responses.

  12. Detecting False Positives in Multielement Designs: Implications for Brief Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Sara M.; Rapp, John T.; Henrickson, Marissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the extent to which multielement designs produced false positives using continuous duration recording (CDR) and interval recording with 10-s and 1-min interval sizes. Specifically, they created 6,000 graphs with multielement designs that varied in the number of data paths, and the number of data points per data path, using a…

  13. Ascites causing a false-positive radionuclide liver image

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.G. Jr.; Christie, J.H.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Wicks, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    False-positive radionuclide liver images can occur due to impingement on the liver by adjacent normal anatomic structures or adjacent pathologic masses or fluid collections. A patient with ascites in the anterior subphrenic space had an apparent cold lesion in the left lobe of the liver. Ultrasonography demonstrated a normal left lobe and localized the fluid collection.

  14. Looking for Childhood Schizophrenia: Case Series of False Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayer, Catherine; Sporn, Alexandra; Gogtay, Nitin; Tossell, Julia; Lenane, Marge; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experience with the diagnosis of childhood-onset schizophrenia indicates a high rate of false positives. Most mislabeled patients have chronic disabling, affective, or behavioral disorders. The authors report the cases of three children who passed stringent initial childhood-onset schizophrenia "screens" but had no chronic psychotic…

  15. Detecting False Positives in Multielement Designs: Implications for Brief Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Sara M.; Rapp, John T.; Henrickson, Marissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the extent to which multielement designs produced false positives using continuous duration recording (CDR) and interval recording with 10-s and 1-min interval sizes. Specifically, they created 6,000 graphs with multielement designs that varied in the number of data paths, and the number of data points per data path, using a…

  16. Occupancy models for data with false positive and false negative errors and heterogeneity across sites and surveys

    Treesearch

    Paige F.B. Ferguson; Michael J. Conroy; Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman; Nigel Yoccoz

    2015-01-01

    False positive detections, such as species misidentifications, occur in ecological data, although many models do not account for them. Consequently, these models are expected to generate biased inference.The main challenge in an analysis of data with false positives is to distinguish false positive and false negative...

  17. Reducing False Positives in Runtime Analysis of Deadlocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensalem, Saddek; Havelund, Klaus; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement of a standard algorithm for detecting dead-lock potentials in multi-threaded programs, in that it reduces the number of false positives. The standard algorithm works as follows. The multi-threaded program under observation is executed, while lock and unlock events are observed. A graph of locks is built, with edges between locks symbolizing locking orders. Any cycle in the graph signifies a potential for a deadlock. The typical standard example is the group of dining philosophers sharing forks. The algorithm is interesting because it can catch deadlock potentials even though no deadlocks occur in the examined trace, and at the same time it scales very well in contrast t o more formal approaches to deadlock detection. The algorithm, however, can yield false positives (as well as false negatives). The extension of the algorithm described in this paper reduces the amount of false positives for three particular cases: when a gate lock protects a cycle, when a single thread introduces a cycle, and when the code segments in different threads that cause the cycle can actually not execute in parallel. The paper formalizes a theory for dynamic deadlock detection and compares it to model checking and static analysis techniques. It furthermore describes an implementation for analyzing Java programs and its application to two case studies: a planetary rover and a space craft altitude control system.

  18. Understanding the mechanisms creating false positive lumpectomy margins.

    PubMed

    Dooley, William C; Parker, Jeanene

    2005-10-01

    All breast surgeons deal with the frustration of initial pathologic close or positive margins that have no residual cancer upon re-excision. To understand the mechanisms that create false positive margins, specimen handling was standardized in a single surgeon's practice and margin issues were tracked. Prospectively over a 3.5-year period, needle-localized lumpectomies for the management of early-stage breast cancer were standardized in all aspects of specimen handling, including surgeon inking and specimen compression for specimen radiography for quality assurance. The current study reviews 220 such cases where the original lumpectomy included a small piece of overlying skin from over the target lesion. All specimen radiography was performed with compression at the skin to deep level to bias the "pancaking" effect of pushing tumor to specimen surface to the deep margin. Of the 220 therapeutic lumpectomies performed for clinical stage 0-2 breast cancer in this fashion, 175 (79.5%) had negative margins by a distance of 10 mm or more. Margins less than 10 mm were classified as close and were present in 20 (9.1%) of cases. These were heavily biased toward margins closer than 2 mm. Positive initial margins accounted for 25 (11.4%) of cases. Of the 45 close or positive margin cases, 12 involved the deep margin only, and on re-excision none was found to have residual tumor. When other single margins were involved, re-excision found tumor in 5 of 14 cases (35.7%). When multiple margins were close or positive, 9 of 19 cases (47.3%) were found to have residual tumor at re-excision. Specimen compression increases the incidence of false margin positivity. The best predictors of true margin positivity are multiple close or positive margins or margin positivity in a direction not associated with specimen ex vivo compression.

  19. Analysis for chemical agent breakdown products: Avoiding IMPA false positives

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, K.M.; Markowitz, V.

    1996-12-31

    Cleanup of DOD sites where chemical warfare agents have been used or stored presents a number of unique problems. Isopropylmethylphosphonic Acid (IMPA), a degradation product of Sarin (GB), is one important contaminant to be monitored at many such sites. IMPA has historically been determined by Army Environmental Center (AEC) method UT02, an ion chromatography method. This method is prone to serious interference problems which can lead an inexperienced analyst to report false positive results. A study of interferences present in groundwater samples taken from a US military installation was undertaken. The interference problems were identified, and techniques were developed which minimize the problem in most samples. These techniques have been used by the authors in several large studies at DOD sites, and have virtually eliminated false positive problems.

  20. Gallbladder tuberculosis: False-positive PET diagnosis of gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramia, JM; Muffak, K; Fernández, A; Villar, J; Garrote, D; Ferron, JA

    2006-01-01

    Gallbladder tuberculosis (GT) is an extremely rare disease, and very few cases have been reported in the literature. The first case of GT was described in 1870 by Gaucher. A correct preoperative diagnosis of GT is unusual, and it is frequently confused with various gallbladder diseases. We present a new case of a patient who underwent surgery with the preoperative diagnosis of gallbladder cancer after a false positive positron emission tomography scan in the diagnostic work-up. PMID:17072992

  1. False-positive colorimetric capnometry after ingestion of carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Keller, William Ryan; Biehler, Jefrey; Linares, Marc Yves-Rene; Garcia-Pena, Barbara M

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the potential for false-positive colorimetric capnometric readings during esophageal intubation after ingestion of carbonated beverages. The study was conducted in the human patient simulation laboratory of a tertiary care pediatric hospital. The sole outcome measurement was the capnometric indicator membrane color after expiration for 10 breaths. Readings were recorded for scenarios simulating 8 different models. For all carbonated beverage trials with a cuffed endotracheal tube (ETT) and those with 2 and 6 oz of beverage in the gastric sac with an uncuffed ETT, a false-positive result was observed on the capnometer's indicator for breaths 1 through 10. The sensitivity of the capnometer for the detection of CO2 after full exhalation of breath 6 for these trials was 100%. For trials containing 12 oz in the gastric sac and an uncuffed ETT, yellow was observed on the capnometer indicator for breaths 1 through 3, tan for breaths 4 through 6, and purple for breath 7. The sensitivity of the capnometer for the detection of adequate CO2 after full exhalation of breath 6 for these trials was 0%. The overall sensitivity of the capnometer for the carbonated beverage models with a cuffed ETT was 100%, whereas the combined sensitivity for the trials with an uncuffed ETT was 67%. Under proper circumstances, a significant potential exists for false-positive colorimetric capnometric results in the presence of even small amounts of carbonated beverages.

  2. MTS in false positive reduction for multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Cudney, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    The Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MTS) is a relatively new tool in the vehicle health maintenance domain, but has some distinct advantages in current multi-sensor implementations. The use of Mahalanobis Spaces (MS) allows the algorithm to identify characteristics of sensor signals to identify behaviors in machines. MTS is extremely powerful with the caveat that the correct variables are selected to form the MS. In this research work, 56 sensors monitor various aspects of the vehicles. Typically, using the MTS process, identification of useful variables is preceded by validation of the measurements scale. However, the MTS approach doesn't directly include any mitigating steps should the measurement scale not be validated. Existing work has performed outlier removal in construction of the MS, which can lead to better validation. In our approach, we modify the outlier removal process with more liberal definitions of outliers to better identify variables' impact prior to identification of useful variables. This subtle change substantially lowered the false positive rate due to the fact that additional variables were retained. Traditional MTS approaches identify useful variables only to the extent they provide usefulness in identifying the positive (abnormal) condition. The impact of removing false negatives is not included. Initial results show our approach can reduce false positive values while still maintaining complete fault identification for this vehicle data set.

  3. "False Positive" Claims of Near-Death Experiences and "False Negative" Denials of Near-Death Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyson, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Some persons who claim to have had near-death experiences (NDEs) fail research criteria for having had NDEs ("false positives"); others who deny having had NDEs do meet research criteria for having had NDEs ("false negatives"). The author evaluated false positive claims and false negative denials in an organization that promotes near-death…

  4. Consequences of treating false positive heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marler, Jacob; Unzaga, Jessica; Stelts, Sundae; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2015-11-01

    Identification of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is encumbered by false positive enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) antibody results, therefore a serotonin release assay (SRA) is used for confirmation. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that increasing the optical density (OD) threshold (currently at 0.4) of the antibody test enhances the positive predictive value. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of patients who were ELISA antibody positive but SRA negative, and the costs and bleeding events associated with alternative anticoagulant treatment. We hypothesized that treating patients with a positive ELISA antibody OD value of <1.0 would result in increased cost and bleeding risk. This retrospective chart review was conducted on adult hospitalized patients from 2011 to 2013. Patients with positive ELISA antibodies (OD of 0.4-1.0) and an SRA result were included. Eighty-five patients were identified with positive antibodies (average OD of 0.66), 100 % of which were found to be SRA negative. A total of 59 patients (69 %) received alternative anticoagulants. The average duration of treatment was 3.1 days, and 4 patients (4.7 %) experienced a bleeding event. The cost of testing and laboratory monitoring was $36,346 and the cost of the alternative anticoagulants totaled $47,179. The total cost was $83,525, with an average total cost per patient of $982. This study adds to the body of literature suggesting treatment should only be initiated if the OD is one or greater. The high false positive rate caused increased cost and some bleeding events.

  5. "False negatives" and "false positives" in acute pulmonary embolism: a clinical-postmortem comparison.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, V; Schmid, C; Zogno, C; Morpurgo, M

    1997-02-01

    Although recent advances have been made in understanding its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, pulmonary embolism (PE) is still largely undetected and untreated, and the mortality rate has not appreciably changed in the last decades. The aim of this study was to: compare the postmortem frequency of massive and sub-massive PE during two different time periods in the same general hospital; ascertain whether the percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE has changed; identify factors which might contribute to the inaccuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PE. Altogether, 288 patients with autopsy-proven PE and adequate clinical data were collected in the first period; 182 subjects with the same characteristics were found in the second period. Cases observed from 1989 through 1994 were evaluated in terms of frequency of false negatives and false positives, predictive value of the clinical diagnosis of PE, and correlations between clinical and post-mortem diagnosis of PE on one side and several independent variables such as age, gender, associated diseases, recent surgery on the other. In our hospital the frequency of massive and submassive PE at autopsy was 8.6% from 1966 through 1974, 12.6% from 1989 through 1994 (p < 0.01). The percentage of correct clinical diagnosis of PE was 19.6% in the former period, 21.6% in the latter (NS) with 78.57% of false negatives and only 1.73% of false positives. Altogether the true positives were 21.42%, most of them being patients with massive PE. Clinical findings showed the coexistence of heart disease in 51.6% of the cases, congestive heart failure in 20.15%, metabolic disease in 7%, stroke in 12.5%, recent surgery in 12.5%. Autopsy revealed the presence of pulmonary infarction in 22% of cases, malignancy in 24.0%, pneumonia in 17.05%, acute myocardial infarction in 14.8%. Seventy percent of the cases in whom the point of origin of thromboemboli could be demonstrated had one or more thrombus in the district of inferior vena

  6. Abort Trigger False Positive and False Negative Analysis Methodology for Threshold-Based Abort Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Cruz, Jose A.; Johnson Stephen B.; Lo, Yunnhon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quantitative methodology for bounding the false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) probabilities associated with a human-rated launch vehicle abort trigger (AT) that includes sensor data qualification (SDQ). In this context, an AT is a hardware and software mechanism designed to detect the existence of a specific abort condition. Also, SDQ is an algorithmic approach used to identify sensor data suspected of being corrupt so that suspect data does not adversely affect an AT's detection capability. The FP and FN methodologies presented here were developed to support estimation of the probabilities of loss of crew and loss of mission for the Space Launch System (SLS) which is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The paper provides a brief overview of system health management as being an extension of control theory; and describes how ATs and the calculation of FP and FN probabilities relate to this theory. The discussion leads to a detailed presentation of the FP and FN methodology and an example showing how the FP and FN calculations are performed. This detailed presentation includes a methodology for calculating the change in FP and FN probabilities that result from including SDQ in the AT architecture. To avoid proprietary and sensitive data issues, the example incorporates a mixture of open literature and fictitious reliability data. Results presented in the paper demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in providing quantitative estimates that bound the probability of a FP or FN abort determination.

  7. Mechanisms for Generating False Positives for Extrasolar Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria; Schwieterman, Edward; Luger, Rodrigo; Wordsworth, Robin; Barnes, Rory; Segura, Antigona; Claire, Mark; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    Future mission concepts designed to look for life generally plan to search for oxygen (O2), ozone (O3), and/or methane (CH4). However, mechanisms exist for generating each of these species abiotically. In this presentation, we will review these processes, and discuss the atmospheres that result from them. In general, false positives can form in atmospheres with severe redox imbalance. This redox imbalance can also be thought of as extreme elemental composition, skewed towards very high or very low O/H ratios. Specific examples of this include: 1) loss of H through the top of a planetary atmosphere that leads to high O/H and an atmosphere rich in O2 and O3 2) atmospheres whose volcanism is O-rich and H-poor (i.e., highly oxidized), which leads to an atmosphere that with high O/H that can accumulate O3 and potentially O2 3) atmospheres in which H escape is slow, leading to low O/H and accumulation of CH4 and 4) atmospheres in which volcanic outgassing is H-rich (highly reduced), leading to low O/H and potential accumulation of CH4. Each of these cases would constitute a 'false positive' for life if O2, O3, or CH4 were detected without obtaining the chemical atmospheric context that could indicate a severe redox imbalance exists.Methods exist for discriminating between these 'false positives' where the gases arise from abiotic sources, and 'true positives' where the gases arise by biological sources. The best means of doing this is to obtain measurements of both O-rich (O2/O3) and H-rich (CH4) species, allowing identification of non-extreme O/H ratios in the atmosphere, and eliminating this abiotic source of O2, O3, and CH4. Because this is the most likely cause of abiotic production of these species, the elimination of this explanation would indicate that these gases were instead likely produced by biology.More specific methods to identify each of these false positives mechanisms also exist, but will not be discussed in detail in this presentation.

  8. ON THE LOW FALSE POSITIVE PROBABILITIES OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R{sub +} < R{sub p} < 20 R{sub +}. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal-deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  9. On the Low False Positive Probabilities of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-09-01

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R ⊕ < Rp < 20 R ⊕. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal—deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  10. Decreasing the number of false positives in sequence classification.

    PubMed

    Machado-Lima, Ariane; Kashiwabara, André Yoshiaki; Durham, Alan Mitchell

    2010-12-22

    A large number of probabilistic models used in sequence analysis assign non-zero probability values to most input sequences. To decide when a given probability is sufficient the most common way is bayesian binary classification, where the probability of the model characterizing the sequence family of interest is compared to that of an alternative probability model. We can use as alternative model a null model. This is the scoring technique used by sequence analysis tools such as HMMER, SAM and INFERNAL. The most prevalent null models are position-independent residue distributions that include: the uniform distribution, genomic distribution, family-specific distribution and the target sequence distribution. This paper presents a study to evaluate the impact of the choice of a null model in the final result of classifications. In particular, we are interested in minimizing the number of false predictions in a classification. This is a crucial issue to reduce costs of biological validation. For all the tests, the target null model presented the lowest number of false positives, when using random sequences as a test. The study was performed in DNA sequences using GC content as the measure of content bias, but the results should be valid also for protein sequences. To broaden the application of the results, the study was performed using randomly generated sequences. Previous studies were performed on aminoacid sequences, using only one probabilistic model (HMM) and on a specific benchmark, and lack more general conclusions about the performance of null models. Finally, a benchmark test with P. falciparum confirmed these results. Of the evaluated models the best suited for classification are the uniform model and the target model. However, the use of the uniform model presents a GC bias that can cause more false positives for candidate sequences with extreme compositional bias, a characteristic not described in previous studies. In these cases the target model is more

  11. False-positive results with amylase testing of citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Ugo; Carboni, Ilaria; Torricelli, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    In a case of robbery in which the criminals passed through the garden adorned with calamondin trees (Citrus madurensis), the investigators found in the grass six calamondin fruits, some undamaged, while others apparently bitten. The fruits were collected and sent to the laboratory for DNA analysis to verify the presence of saliva and robbers' DNA profile. A specific immunochromatographic strip test for saliva confirmed the presence of human salivary α-amylase, but similar positive results were also observed for intact calamondin and other citrus fruits. Further analysis with a specific automated amylase test confirmed the absence of amylase activity. DNA quantification and typing using a specific forensic kit revealed no human DNA presence in any fruits. This case report demonstrates for the first time the occurrence of false positives when human saliva is sought on citrus fruits. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Distinguishing true from false positives in genomic studies: p values.

    PubMed

    Broer, Linda; Lill, Christina M; Schuur, Maaike; Amin, Najaf; Roehr, Johannes T; Bertram, Lars; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-02-01

    Distinguishing true from false positive findings is a major challenge in human genetic epidemiology. Several strategies have been devised to facilitate this, including the positive predictive value (PPV) and a set of epidemiological criteria, known as the "Venice" criteria. The PPV measures the probability of a true association, given a statistically significant finding, while the Venice criteria grade the credibility based on the amount of evidence, consistency of replication and protection from bias. A vast majority of journals use significance thresholds to identify the true positive findings. We studied the effect of p value thresholds on the PPV and used the PPV and Venice criteria to define usable thresholds of statistical significance. Theoretical and empirical analyses of data published on AlzGene show that at a nominal p value threshold of 0.05 most "positive" findings will turn out to be false if the prior probability of association is below 0.10 even if the statistical power of the study is higher than 0.80. However, in underpowered studies (0.25) with a low prior probability of 1 × 10(-3), a p value of 1 × 10(-5) yields a high PPV (>96 %). Here we have shown that the p value threshold of 1 × 10(-5) gives a very strong evidence of association in almost all studies. However, in the case of a very high prior probability of association (0.50) a p value threshold of 0.05 may be sufficient, while for studies with very low prior probability of association (1 × 10(-4); genome-wide association studies for instance) 1 × 10(-7) may serve as a useful threshold to declare significance.

  13. DSM-5, psychiatric epidemiology and the false positives problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, J C

    2015-06-01

    The revision effort leading to the publication of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was flawed in process, goals and outcome. The revision process suffered from lack of an adequate public record of the rationale for changes, thus shortchanging future scholarship. The goals, such as dimensionalising diagnosis, incorporating biomarkers and separating impairment from diagnosis, were ill-considered and mostly abandoned. However, DSM-5's greatest problem, and the target of the most vigorous and sustained criticism, was its failure to take seriously the false positives problem. By expanding diagnosis beyond plausible boundaries in ways inconsistent with DSM-5's own definition of disorder, DSM-5 threatened the validity of psychiatric research, including especially psychiatric epidemiology. I present four examples: increasing the symptom options while decreasing the diagnostic threshold for substance use disorder, elimination of the bereavement exclusion from major depression, allowing verbal arguments as evidence of intermittent explosive disorder and expanding attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder to adults before addressing its manifest false positives problems.

  14. THE XO PLANETARY SURVEY PROJECT: ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Poleski, Radosaw; McCullough, Peter R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Burke, Christopher J.; Machalek, Pavel; Janes, Kenneth

    2010-07-15

    Searches for planetary transits find many astrophysical false positives as a by-product. There are four main types analyzed in the literature: a grazing-incidence eclipsing binary (EB) star, an EB star with a small radius companion star, a blend of one or more stars with an unrelated EB star, and a physical triple star system. We present a list of 69 astrophysical false positives that had been identified as candidates of transiting planets of the on-going XO survey. This list may be useful in order to avoid redundant observation and characterization of these particular candidates that have been independently identified by other wide-field searches for transiting planets. The list may be useful for those modeling the yield of the XO survey and surveys similar to it. Subsequent observations of some of the listed stars may improve mass-radius relations, especially for low-mass stars. From the candidates exhibiting eclipses, we report three new spectroscopic double-line binaries and give mass function estimations for 15 single-line spectroscopic binaries.

  15. Decoy Methods for Assessing False Positives and False Discovery Rates in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W.; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2008-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs. stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs. unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs. composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size, but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from separate search was about three times that from composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when multiple

  16. Decoy methods for assessing false positives and false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2009-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from the separate search was about three times that from the composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when

  17. Location of mammograms ROI's and reduction of false-positive.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Licea, Luis Antonio; Pedraza-Ortega, Jesús Carlos; Pastrana-Palma, Alberto; Aceves-Fernandez, Marco A

    2017-05-01

    There are many work related with segmentation techniques, including nearest neighbor algorithm, fuzzy rules, morphological filters, image entropy, thresholding, machine learning, wavelet analysis, and so on. Such methods carry out the segmentation, but take a lot of processing time by modifying the content of the image or showing discern problems in homogeneous areas, and the segmentation technique is designed to work efficiently only with the techniques used. In this paper a method to segment mammograms in order to separate breast area from pectoral-muscle avoiding bright areas that produce noise and therefore reducing false-positives is presented. The proposed methodology is divided into four sections: 1) Pre-processing to acquire image and decreasing its size. 2) Improving the image quality through image thresholding and histogram equalization. 3) Localization of regions of interest (ROI) applying Scale-Invariant Feature Transform to find image's descriptors. Clustering methods were implemented to determine the best number of clusters and which of these represent the most significant breast area. Then found ROI's coordinates are compared with the position of abnormalities diagnosed by the Mammographic Image Analysis Society. 4) Microcalcifications (mcc) detection; wavelet transform is used, and to enhance its performance different high-pass filters and high-frequency emphasis filters are evaluated. Symlet wavelets: Sym8 and Sym16 were used with different decomposition level; images results from both processes are compared and only those elements in common are detected as microcalcifications. Moreover, muscle's remnants in the corners of the regions of interest were removed using fuzzy c-means clustering. The best results in terms of sensitivity (91.27), false-positives per image (80.25), and precision (74.38) are compared with previous work. Results shows that the breast area can be discriminated from the pectoral-muscle by avoiding to work with brightness areas

  18. Protein complex prediction via dense subgraphs and false positive analysis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Cecilia; Mella, Carlos; Navarro, Gonzalo; Olivera-Nappa, Alvaro; Araya, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Many proteins work together with others in groups called complexes in order to achieve a specific function. Discovering protein complexes is important for understanding biological processes and predict protein functions in living organisms. Large-scale and throughput techniques have made possible to compile protein-protein interaction networks (PPI networks), which have been used in several computational approaches for detecting protein complexes. Those predictions might guide future biologic experimental research. Some approaches are topology-based, where highly connected proteins are predicted to be complexes; some propose different clustering algorithms using partitioning, overlaps among clusters for networks modeled with unweighted or weighted graphs; and others use density of clusters and information based on protein functionality. However, some schemes still require much processing time or the quality of their results can be improved. Furthermore, most of the results obtained with computational tools are not accompanied by an analysis of false positives. We propose an effective and efficient mining algorithm for discovering highly connected subgraphs, which is our base for defining protein complexes. Our representation is based on transforming the PPI network into a directed acyclic graph that reduces the number of represented edges and the search space for discovering subgraphs. Our approach considers weighted and unweighted PPI networks. We compare our best alternative using PPI networks from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Homo sapiens (human) with state-of-the-art approaches in terms of clustering, biological metrics and execution times, as well as three gold standards for yeast and two for human. Furthermore, we analyze false positive predicted complexes searching the PDBe (Protein Data Bank in Europe) database in order to identify matching protein complexes that have been purified and structurally characterized. Our analysis shows that more than 50

  19. False-Positive Viability PCR Results: An Association with Microtubes.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Gemma; Fittipaldi, Mariana; Codony, Francesc

    2017-03-01

    Currently, one of the most challenged points to expand the use of viability PCR technique is achieving the complete exclusion of dead cells amplification signals, thus avoiding the overestimation of live cells population. Considering that, and based on the hypothesis that DNA may be retained by microtube walls, the impact of the microtube was addressed on signals from live and heat-killed cells. A double-dye reagent, PEMAX™, which comprises a mix of photo-reactive azide forms of phenanthridium, was used in this work. We found that if both the incubation and the photoactivation steps are carried out in different microtubes, the dead cell signal is greatly reduced than when those steps are done in the same tube. Therefore, the strategy depicted in this study presents a simple and efficient step in minimizing false-positive signal when employing viability PCR.

  20. False-positive tangible outcomes of functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Rooker, Griffin W; Iwata, Brian A; Harper, Jill M; Fahmie, Tara A; Camp, Erin M

    2011-01-01

    Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the most precise method for identifying variables that maintain problem behavior. Occasionally, however, results of an FA may be influenced by idiosyncratic sensitivity to aspects of the assessment conditions. For example, data from several studies suggest that inclusion of a tangible condition during an FA may be prone to a false-positive outcome, although the extent to which tangible reinforcement routinely produces such outcomes is unknown. We examined susceptibility to tangible reinforcement by determining whether a new response was acquired more readily when exposed to a tangible contingency relative to others commonly used in an FA (Study 1), and whether problem behavior known not to have a social function nevertheless emerged when exposed to tangible reinforcement (Study 2). Results indicated that inclusion of items in the tangible condition should be done with care and that selection should be based on those items typically found in the individual's environment.

  1. microRNA target prediction programs predict many false positives.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Natalia; Li, Blaise; Martinez, Laura; Sergeeva, Anna; Presumey, Jessy; Apparailly, Florence; Seitz, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    According to the current view, each microRNA regulates hundreds of genes. Computational tools aim at identifying microRNA targets, usually selecting evolutionarily conserved microRNA binding sites. While the false positive rates have been evaluated for some prediction programs, that information is rarely put forward in studies making use of their predictions. Here, we provide evidence that such predictions are often biologically irrelevant. Focusing on miR-223-guided repression, we observed that it is often smaller than inter-individual variability in gene expression among wild-type mice, suggesting that most predicted targets are functionally insensitive to that microRNA. Furthermore, we found that human haplo-insufficient genes tend to bear the most highly conserved microRNA binding sites. It thus appears that biological functionality of microRNA binding sites depends on the dose-sensitivity of their host gene and that, conversely, it is unlikely that every predicted microRNA target is dose-sensitive enough to be functionally regulated by microRNAs. We also observed that some mRNAs can efficiently titrate microRNAs, providing a reason for microRNA binding site conservation for inefficiently repressed targets. Finally, many conserved microRNA binding sites are conserved in a microRNA-independent fashion: Sequence elements may be conserved for other reasons, while being fortuitously complementary to microRNAs. Collectively, our data suggest that the role of microRNAs in normal and pathological conditions has been overestimated due to the frequent overlooking of false positive rates. © 2017 Pinzón et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. microRNA target prediction programs predict many false positives

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Natalia; Martinez, Laura; Sergeeva, Anna; Presumey, Jessy; Apparailly, Florence

    2017-01-01

    According to the current view, each microRNA regulates hundreds of genes. Computational tools aim at identifying microRNA targets, usually selecting evolutionarily conserved microRNA binding sites. While the false positive rates have been evaluated for some prediction programs, that information is rarely put forward in studies making use of their predictions. Here, we provide evidence that such predictions are often biologically irrelevant. Focusing on miR-223-guided repression, we observed that it is often smaller than inter-individual variability in gene expression among wild-type mice, suggesting that most predicted targets are functionally insensitive to that microRNA. Furthermore, we found that human haplo-insufficient genes tend to bear the most highly conserved microRNA binding sites. It thus appears that biological functionality of microRNA binding sites depends on the dose-sensitivity of their host gene and that, conversely, it is unlikely that every predicted microRNA target is dose-sensitive enough to be functionally regulated by microRNAs. We also observed that some mRNAs can efficiently titrate microRNAs, providing a reason for microRNA binding site conservation for inefficiently repressed targets. Finally, many conserved microRNA binding sites are conserved in a microRNA-independent fashion: Sequence elements may be conserved for other reasons, while being fortuitously complementary to microRNAs. Collectively, our data suggest that the role of microRNAs in normal and pathological conditions has been overestimated due to the frequent overlooking of false positive rates. PMID:28148562

  3. Risk factors for false positive and for false negative test results in screening with fecal occult blood testing.

    PubMed

    Stegeman, Inge; de Wijkerslooth, Thomas R; Stoop, Esther M; van Leerdam, Monique; van Ballegooijen, M; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Dekker, Evelien; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2013-11-15

    Differences in the risk of a false negative or a false positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) across subgroups may affect optimal screening strategies. We evaluate whether subgroups are at increased risk of a false positive or a false negative FIT result, whether such variability in risk is related to differences in FIT sensitivity and specificity or to differences in prior CRC risk. Randomly selected, asymptomatic individuals were invited to undergo colonoscopy. Participants were asked to undergo one sample FIT and to complete a risk questionnaire. We identified patient characteristics associated with a false negative and false positive FIT results using logistic regression. We focused on statistically significant differences as well as on variables influencing the false positive or negative risk for which the odds ratio exceeded 1.25. Of the 1,426 screening participants, 1,112 (78%) completed FIT and the questionnaire; 101 (9.1%) had advanced neoplasia. 102 Individuals were FIT positive, 65 (64%) had a false negative FIT result and 66 (65%) a false positive FIT result. Participants at higher age and smokers had a significantly higher risk of a false negative FIT result. Males were at increased risk of a false positive result, so were smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in females. Specificity was lower for males, smokers and regular NSAID users. FIT sensitivity was lower in women. FIT specificity was lower in males, smokers and regular NSAID users. Our results can be used for further evidence based individualization of screening strategies.

  4. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies. https://github.com/byucsl/ogcleaner CONTACT: sfujimoto@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Selective reduction of CAD false-positive findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Gori, I.; Retico, A.; Bagagli, F.

    2010-03-01

    Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) systems are becoming widespread supporting tools to radiologists' diagnosis, especially in screening contexts. However, a large amount of false positive (FP) alarms would inevitably lead both to an undesired possible increase in time for diagnosis, and to a reduction in radiologists' confidence in CAD as a useful tool. Most CAD systems implement as final step of the analysis a classifier which assigns a score to each entry of a list of findings; by thresholding this score it is possible to define the system performance on an annotated validation dataset in terms of a FROC curve (sensitivity vs. FP per scan). To use a CAD as a supportive tool for most clinical activities, an operative point has to be chosen on the system FROC curve, according to the obvious criterion of keeping the sensitivity as high as possible, while maintaining the number of FP alarms still acceptable. The strategy proposed in this study is to choose an operative point with high sensitivity on the CAD FROC curve, then to implement in cascade a further classification step, constituted by a smarter classifier. The key issue of this approach is that the smarter classifier is actually a meta-classifier of more then one decision system, each specialized in rejecting a particular type of FP findings generated by the CAD. The application of this approach to a dataset of 16 lung CT scans previously processed by the VBNACAD system is presented. The lung CT VBNACAD performance of 87.1% sensitivity to juxtapleural nodules with 18.5 FP per scan is improved up to 10.1 FP per scan while maintaining the same value of sensitivity. This work has been carried out in the framework of the MAGIC-V collaboration.

  6. False positive malaria rapid diagnostic test in returning traveler with typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Meatherall, Bonnie; Preston, Keith; Pillai, Dylan R

    2014-07-09

    Rapid diagnostic tests play a pivotal role in the early diagnosis of malaria where microscopy or polymerase chain reaction are not immediately available. We report the case of a 39 year old traveler to Canada who presented with fever, headache, and abdominal pain after visiting friends and relatives in India. While in India, the individual was not ill and had no signs or symptoms of malaria. Laboratory testing upon his return to Canada identified a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic (BinaxNOW® malaria) result for P. falciparum with coincident Salmonella Typhi bacteraemia without rheumatoid or autoimmune factors. Rapid diagnostic test false positivity for malaria coincided with the presence or absence of Salmonella Typhi in the blood. Clinicians should be aware that Salmonella Typhi infection may result in a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic test. The mechanism of this cross-reactivity is not clear.

  7. False positive malaria rapid diagnostic test in returning traveler with typhoid fever

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid diagnostic tests play a pivotal role in the early diagnosis of malaria where microscopy or polymerase chain reaction are not immediately available. Case presentation We report the case of a 39 year old traveler to Canada who presented with fever, headache, and abdominal pain after visiting friends and relatives in India. While in India, the individual was not ill and had no signs or symptoms of malaria. Laboratory testing upon his return to Canada identified a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic (BinaxNOW® malaria) result for P. falciparum with coincident Salmonella Typhi bacteraemia without rheumatoid or autoimmune factors. Rapid diagnostic test false positivity for malaria coincided with the presence or absence of Salmonella Typhi in the blood. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that Salmonella Typhi infection may result in a false positive malaria rapid diagnostic test. The mechanism of this cross-reactivity is not clear. PMID:25005493

  8. False-positive postmortem EMIT drugs-of-abuse assay due to lactate dehydrogenase and lactate in urine.

    PubMed

    Sloop, G; Hall, M; Simmons, G T; Robinson, C A

    1995-01-01

    Three cases of multiple false-positive drug tests are described. Postmortem urine specimens were screened using the enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique. All patients had proteinuria and lactic aciduria. These false-positive reactions were due to the presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactic acid, and protein. This finding was confirmed by creating a multiple false-positive sample with a solution of LDH and lactate in 5% bovine serum albumin at pH 6.

  9. False positive of an immunochromatography kit for detection of norovirus in neonatal feces.

    PubMed

    Niizuma, Takahiro; Obinata, Kaoru; Ikari, Hiromi; Kamata, Ayako; Lee, Tsubasa; Kinoshita, Keiji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-02-01

    Norovirus was detected in the feces from five neonates in the growing care unit by a rapid immunochromatography (ICG) kit. However, confirmation using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), RT-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), and nested RT-PCR methods showed negative results from all the feces. In addition, the ICG test for the detection of norovirus was positive for four cases out of the 16 feces from other asymptomatic neonates/infants. Only one feces out of the four samples was positive by RT-LAMP. In this study, among the factors related to false positives with the norovirus ICG kit, there were no differences regarding the commencement of feeding, nutrition, and sample collection methods. Since the false positive rate of ICG in the diagnosis of norovirus infection in neonates and early infancy is high, ICG is not an appropriate method, and it is necessary to confirm the results using reliable methods like RT-PCR.

  10. False-positive indium-111 labeled leukocyte scintigram in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, N.; Makler, P.T. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    A Tronzo hip prosthesis is designed to elicit an inflammatory reaction in order to promote prosthesis stability. A three-phased bone scan and Ga-67 imaging in conjunction with physical examination and laboratory findings failed to demonstrate evidence for osteomyelitis in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis, in whom images obtained with In-111-labeled leukocytes were positive. This observation demonstrated that the interpretation of the latter technique in demonstrating inflammation can cause a false impression of an infectious process.

  11. False positivity of circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-ELISA in zoophilic anophelines in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Kabirul; Tuno, Nobuko; Ahmed, Touhid Uddin; Howlader, Abdul Jabber

    2013-02-01

    Circumsporozoite protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CSP-ELISAs) are widely used for malaria vector identification throughout the world. However, several studies have reported false-positive results when using this method. The present study was conducted to estimate the frequency of false positives among anopheline species in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. In total, 4724 Anopheles females belonging to 25 species were collected and tested for Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax-210, and P. vivax-247 CSP. Initially, 144 samples tested positive using routine CSP-ELISA, but the number of positive results declined to 85 (59%) when the samples were tested after heating at 100°C for 10min to remove false-positive specimens. Ten species, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles baimaii, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles jeyporiensis, Anopheles karwari, Anopheles kochi, Anopheles minimus s.l., Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles philippinensis, and Anopheles vagus were CSP-positive. The highest and lowest infection rates were found in An. baimaii (4/25, 16.0%) and An. jeyporiensis (1/139, 0.67%), respectively. A significant correlation was found (regression analysis, R(2)=0.49, F=8.25, P<0.05) between human blood index results and the true CSP-positive ratios in 15 Anopheles species. We confirmed that false-positive reactions occurred more frequently in zoophilic species. The relatively high proportion of false positives (40%) that was found in this study should warn malaria epidemiologists working in the field to be cautious when interpreting ELISA results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantification of false positives within Moon Zoo crater annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how a quantitative pattern recognition system can be used to estimate the quantity of contamination in Moon Zoo data from erroneous annotations. The proposed method produces not only estimates of true verses false crater annotations, but also a full error covariance, with additional conformity checks, which is essential for the meaningful interpretation of measurements, e.g. for plotting error bars.

  13. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  14. [A pseudo-outbreak of pharyngeal gonorrhoea related to a false-positive PCR-result].

    PubMed

    Verzijl, A; Berretty, P J M; Erceg, A; Krekels, G A M; Van den Brule, A J C; Boel, C H E

    2007-03-24

    Nucleic acid amplification tests, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are sensitive and specific tests that are often used for diagnosing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). A pseudo-outbreak of pharyngeal gonorrhoea in a group of prostitutes turned out to have been caused by false-positive test results due to commensal oropharyngeal Neisseria species. Specific molecular tests may yield erroneous results. When the results of an STD study have major consequences at a legal or social level, it is advisable, in consultation with a medical microbiologist, to take a sample for culture or to carry out a second molecular test aimed at a different part of the bacterial genome.

  15. False-Positive PET/CT After Cyanoacrylate Sealing of a Pancreaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Orlin; Munding, Johanna; Tannapfel, Andrea; Uhl, Waldemar

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, a 68-year-old male had a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer. The pancreaticojejunostomy was sealed with cyanoacrylate (Dermabond) to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula. Local recurrence of malignancy at the anastomosis was suspected 18 months later in PET/CT. Surgical revision was performed and anastomosis resected. However, histology showed no tumor recurrence, but strong inflammation and foreign-body reaction towards Dermabond. The sealant caused false-positive PET/CT findings, so its use in oncologic surgery should be abandoned.

  16. The Clinical Significance of the Biological False Positive Serologic Reactor: A Study of 113 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Allan; Wilkinson, R. D.

    1963-01-01

    Biological false positive serologic reactors were studied during a long-term follow-up of asymptomatic patients with chronic false positive serology for syphilitic reagin. This was done with a view to facilitating the early diagnosis of systemic disease, particularly collagen disorders, which are frequently associated with this finding in women. One hundred and thirteen cases were studied. Thirty-eight were “acute”, i.e. positive for less than six months, 58 were “chronic”, i.e. positive for more than six months, and the remainder still positive but followed for less than six months. Of 39 female chronic reactors, 10 were diagnosed as having collagen disease, and in six the BFP reaction preceded clinical diagnosis of the disease. Five had no apparent disease. In 19 male chronic reactors, there was no evidence of collagen disorders and five were free of any recognizable pathology. The remainder in both sexes were found to have a wide variety of systemic illnesses. PMID:14033756

  17. Sensitization to petrolatum: an unusual cause of false-positive drug patch-tests.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, G; Schmutz, J L; Trechot, Ph; Commun, N; Barbaud, A

    2004-09-01

    We report on an unexpected sensitization to petrolatum diagnosed with the occurrence of multiple nonrelevant and false-positive drug patch-tests performed while investigating a patient suffering from many cutaneous adverse drug reactions. All the positive drug patch-tests were prepared with GILBERT vaseline. This petrolatum reaction is positive as it was tested with five other brands of petrolatums a few months later. As the same petrolatums, but from different batches were tested, patch-tests with GILBERT petrolatum were doubtful, while other petrolatums were positive. White petrolatum is a mixture of semisolid hydrocarbons of the methane series. The sensitizing impurities of petrolatum are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g. phenanthrene derivatives. The purity of petrolatum depends on both the petroleum stock and on the production and packaging methods. Even if rare, contact sensitization to petrolatum can disturb the interpretation of drug patch-tests. It is necessary in the interpretation of drug patch-tests to test both in petrolatum and other vehicles and with all the different petrolatums used in preparing the material for drug patch-tests. So, it is essential to advise the patients sensitized to petrolatum to remove all the topical drugs, such as all the cosmetics, which contain petrolatum in their formulation.

  18. I am Not Dead Yet: Identification of False-Positive Matches to Death Master File

    PubMed Central

    Turchin, Alexander; Shubina, Maria; Murphy, Shawn N

    2010-01-01

    Patient death is an important clinical outcome. It is typically ascertained by matching database records with external death indices. Accuracy of the matching algorithms is imperfect. We have investigated whether clinical records made > 1 month after the date of death accurately identify false positive matches to the Death Master File. Positive predictive value (PPV) varied from 74.7% (notes) to 95.9% (labs) and sensitivity from 57.4% (adverse medication reactions) to 94.9% (notes). Presence of any two out of four (billing data, labs, vital signs and medications) data elements had sensitivity of 83.0% and PPV of 98.3%. Area under the ROC curve for a multivariable logistic model that included the number of these four data elements recorded > 1 month after death was 0.987. Clinical data recorded after the date of death can help identify false positive matches to death indices and could be utilized to improve existing record linkage algorithms. PMID:21347090

  19. The risk factor of false-negative and false-positive for T-SPOT.TB in active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Li, Yan

    2017-06-08

    T-SPOT.TB is a promising diagnosis tool to identify both pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, as well as latent tuberculosis; however, the factors that affect the results of T-SPOT.TB remains unclear. In this study, we aim to figure out the risk factor of T-SPOT.TB for active TB. A total of 349 patients were recruited between January 1st, 2016 and January 22st, 2017 at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, including 98 subjects with TB and 251 subjects with non-TB disease, and received T-SPOT.TB (Oxford Immunotec Ltd). Statistics were analyzed by SPSS 19.0 using logistic regression. The overall specificity and sensitivity of the T-SPOT.TB was 92.83% (233/251; 95%CI 0.8872-0.9557) and 83.67% (82/98; 95%CI 0.7454-0.9010), respectively. Patients with tuberculous meningitis were more likely to have false-negative results (OR 17.4, 95%CI 3.068-98.671; P<.001) while patients with cured TB tended to induce false-positive results (OR 30.297; 95%CI 7.069-129.849; P<.001). The results were not affected by sex, age, onset time, smoke, alcohol, treatment, allergic history, co-morbidity, TB (exclude tuberculous meningitis) (P>.05). Tuberculous meningitis was a risk factor of false-negative for T-SPOT.TB, while cured TB was a risk factor of false-positive. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A retrospective analysis of false-positive infectious screening results in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Michelle T.; Bruhn, Roberta; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Custer, Brian S.; Murphy, Edward L.; Bloch, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND False-positive infectious transfusion screening results remain a challenge with continued loss of both donors and blood products. We sought to identify associations between donor demographic characteristics (age, race, sex, education, first-time donor status) and testing false positive for viruses during routine blood donation screening. In addition the study assessed the prevalence of high-risk behaviors in false-positive donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Blood Systems, Inc. donors with allogeneic donations between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, were compared in a case-control study. Those with a false-positive donation for one of four viruses (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], human T-lymphotropic virus [HTLV], hepatitis B virus [HBV], and hepatitis C virus [HCV]) were included as cases. Those with negative test results were controls. For a subset of cases, infectious risk factors were evaluated. RESULTS Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with HCV and HTLV false-positive results. Male sex and lower education were associated with HCV false positivity, and age 25 to 44 was associated with HTLV false positivity. First-time donors were more likely to be HCV false positive although less likely to be HBV and HTLV false positive. No significant associations between donor demographics and HIV false positivity were observed. A questionnaire for false-positive donors showed low levels of high-risk behaviors. CONCLUSION Demographic associations with HCV and HTLV false-positive results overlap with those of true infection. While true infection is unlikely given current testing algorithms and risk factor evaluation, the findings suggest nonrandom association. Further investigation into biologic mechanisms is warranted. PMID:26509432

  1. CT Colonography with Computer-aided Detection: Recognizing the Causes of False-Positive Reader Results

    PubMed Central

    Dachman, Abraham H.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Vannier, Michael W.; Horne, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) colonography is a screening modality used to detect colonic polyps before they progress to colorectal cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) is designed to decrease errors of detection by finding and displaying polyp candidates for evaluation by the reader. CT colonography CAD false-positive results are common and have numerous causes. The relative frequency of CAD false-positive results and their effect on reader performance on the basis of a 19-reader, 100-case trial shows that the vast majority of CAD false-positive results were dismissed by readers. Many CAD false-positive results are easily disregarded, including those that result from coarse mucosa, reconstruction, peristalsis, motion, streak artifacts, diverticulum, rectal tubes, and lipomas. CAD false-positive results caused by haustral folds, extracolonic candidates, diminutive lesions (<6 mm), anal papillae, internal hemorrhoids, varices, extrinsic compression, and flexural pseudotumors are almost always recognized and disregarded. The ileocecal valve and tagged stool are common sources of CAD false-positive results associated with reader false-positive results. Nondismissable CAD soft-tissue polyp candidates larger than 6 mm are another common cause of reader false-positive results that may lead to further evaluation with follow-up CT colonography or optical colonoscopy. Strategies for correctly evaluating CAD polyp candidates are important to avoid pitfalls from common sources of CAD false-positive results. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25384290

  2. Reagent decontamination to eliminate false-positives in Escherichia coli qPCR.

    PubMed

    Silkie, Sarah S; Tolcher, Matthew P; Nelson, Kara L

    2008-03-01

    The application of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the detection of low concentrations of Escherichia coli as well as universal 16S rDNA has been hindered by false-positives due to endogenous contamination of PCR reagents with E. coli and other bacterial DNA. We optimized a DNase I decontamination method to eliminate false-positives in a qPCR assay targeting the uidA gene in E. coli. In contrast to previous methods reported in the literature, our decontamination method did not cause PCR inhibition. We determined that residual DNase I activity was the cause of the inhibition in the previous methods, and eliminated it by ensuring complete inactivation prior to qPCR. DNase inactivation was accomplished by adding dithiothreitol (DTT) and then heating for 30 min at 80 degrees C. The optimized DNase method was compared to another decontamination method, ultrafiltration, and to untreated controls. We detected contamination in 85% of the untreated commercial PCR master mix samples at a level of about 10 copies per well (12.5 microL of master mix). Both decontamination methods could eliminate up to 100 copies of added contaminant DNA and did not cause PCR inhibition, resulting in a reduction of the detection limit to 10 copies per reaction well.

  3. Single-primer PCR correction: a strategy for false-positive exclusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, P W; Yao, D; Wang, Y P; Yan, W; Guan, S C

    2011-02-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology plays an important role in molecular biology research, but false-positive and nonspecific PCR amplification have plagued many researchers. Currently, research on the optimization of the PCR system focuses on double-primer-based PCR products. This research has shown that PCR amplification based on single-primer binding to the DNA template is an important contributing factor to obtaining false-positive results, fragment impurity, and nonspecific fragment amplification, when the PCR conditions are highly restricted during PCR-based target gene cloning, detection of transgenic plants, simple-sequence repeat marker-assisted selection, and mRNA differential display. Here, we compared single- and double-primer amplification and proposed "single-primer PCR correction"; improvements in PCR that eliminate interference caused by single-primer-based nonspecific PCR amplification were demonstrated and the precision and success rates of experiments were increased. Although for some kinds of experiments, the improvement effect of single-primer PCR correction was variable, the precision and success rate could be elevated at 12-50% in our experiment by this way.

  4. Statistical approaches to account for false-positive errors in environmental DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Monfort, José J; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Tingley, Reid

    2016-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is prone to both false-positive and false-negative errors. We review statistical methods to account for such errors in the analysis of eDNA data and use simulations to compare the performance of different modelling approaches. Our simulations illustrate that even low false-positive rates can produce biased estimates of occupancy and detectability. We further show that removing or classifying single PCR detections in an ad hoc manner under the suspicion that such records represent false positives, as sometimes advocated in the eDNA literature, also results in biased estimation of occupancy, detectability and false-positive rates. We advocate alternative approaches to account for false-positive errors that rely on prior information, or the collection of ancillary detection data at a subset of sites using a sampling method that is not prone to false-positive errors. We illustrate the advantages of these approaches over ad hoc classifications of detections and provide practical advice and code for fitting these models in maximum likelihood and Bayesian frameworks. Given the severe bias induced by false-negative and false-positive errors, the methods presented here should be more routinely adopted in eDNA studies.

  5. Addressing False Positives in Early Reading Assessment Using Intervention Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlenney, Athena Lentini; Coyne, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined a solution to high false positive reading risk classification rates in early kindergarten by investigating a method of identifying students with possible false positive risk classifications and returning them to general classroom instruction. Researchers assessed kindergarten students (N = 105) identified as at risk who…

  6. Participation behaviour following a false positive test in the Copenhagen mammography screening programme.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Vejborg, Ilse; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2008-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate concerning possible disadvantages of mammography screening, one being the consequence of receiving a false positive test-result. It is argued that receiving a false positive answer may have short- and/or long-term adverse psychological effects on women, but results from different studies are conflicting. We tested if there was a difference in continued participation behaviour between the group of women who have been subject to a false positive result and those who have not. The study used the registers from the first six invitation rounds of the mammography screening programme in Copenhagen (1991-2003). We estimated the relative risk of not participating in the subsequent screening round for women with a false positive test using women with a negative test as baseline. As outcome measure odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used. There was no significant difference in participation in the subsequent round between women with a false positive test and women with a negative test. The proportion of screens resulting in false positive answers, both after assessment and after surgery, decreased from 5.54% in Round 1 to 1.79% in Round 5. Participation in the subsequent screening round was well above 80% in all five screening rounds. Our results showed that women experiencing a false positive test at mammography screening participated in the subsequent screening round to the same extent as did women experiencing a negative screening test, regardless of whether the false positive statement was given following assessment or following surgery. The benign to malignant biopsy ratio, comparing the type B false positives to the true positives, was by the fifth round well below the desirable level of

  7. Consequences of a false-positive mammography result: drug consumption before and after screening.

    PubMed

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Bæksted, Christina; Vejborg, Ilse; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-05-01

    Background Previous research showed women experiencing false-positive mammograms to have greater anxiety about breast cancer than women with normal mammograms. To elucidate psychological effects of false-positive mammograms, we studied impact on drug intake. Methods We calculated the ratio of drug use for women with false-positive versus women with normal mammograms, before and after the event, using population-based registers, 1997-2006. The ratio of the ratios (RRR) assessed the impact. Results Before the test, 40.3% of women from the false-positive group versus 36.2% from the normal group used anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs. There was no difference in use of beta blockers. Hormone therapy was used more frequently by the false-positive, 36.6% versus 28.7%. The proportion of women using anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs increased with 19% from the before to the after period in the false-positive group, and with 16% in the normal group, resulting in an RRR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92-1.14). RRR was 1.03 for beta blockers, 0.97 for hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) Drugs used to mitigate mood disorders were used more frequently by women with false-positive than by women with normal mammograms already before the screening event, while the changes from before to after screening were similar for both groups. The results point to the importance of control for potential selection in studies of screening effects.

  8. False-positive ethyl glucuronide immunoassay screening caused by a propyl alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Torsten; Grüner, Joachim; Schröfel, Stefanie; Stemmerich, Karsten

    2012-11-30

    Urine ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is considered as a specific marker of recent ethanol consumption. We describe false-positive DRI(®) EIA EtG enzyme immunoassay results caused by propyl glucuronides in urine after using a propanol-based hand sanitizer. EtG screening was done with the DRI(®) EIA EtG assay (Microgenics), using a cut-off of 0.5 mg/L as recommended by the manufacturer and of 0.1 mg/L as demanded by the German Regulations for Reissuing Drivers Licenses. Confirmatory EtG analysis was done with the ClinMass(®) EtG LC-MS/MS testkit (Recipe), extended by the mass transitions 235.1→75.1, 235.1→85.1, and 235.1→113.1 for the detection of the 1- and 2-propyl glucuronides. Self-experiments were done by staff members of our lab (n=7), using 3 mL Sterillium(®) Classic Pure (30 g/100 g 1-propanol and 45 g/100 g 2-propanol) for hand sanitation every quarter of an hour for 8 h according to DIN EN 1500:2011-05 with and without an exhauster and by passive inhalation of the sanitizer vapor. Spot urine samples were taken immediately before and up to 24 h after the first sanitizer use. False-positive immunoassay results of up to 4 mg/L or 2.3 mg/g creatinine were obtained after normal use of the sanitizer and also after passive inhalation of the sanitizer vapor (up to 0.89 mg/L or 0.61 mg/g). Immunoassay results were positive even after 4-fold use of the sanitizer (up to 0.14 mg/L or 0.38 mg/g) and up to 6 h after the last sanitizer contact (maximum 0.63 mg/L and 0.33 mg/g for sanitizer users and 0.25 mg/g after passive inhalation). Spiking of EtG-free urine with 1-propyl glucuronide (Athena Environmental Sciences) between 0.05 and 10 mg/L clearly demonstrated a cross reaction of the immunoassay of approx. 10% as compared to EtG. LC-MS/MS of urines with a positive immunoassay EtG result did not show EtG signals, but distinct signals of 1-propyl glucuronide (n-propyl glucuronide) and 2-propyl glucuronide (iso-propyl glucuronide). An exhauster effectively prevented

  9. False-positive outcome and drug residue in milk samples over withdrawal times.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Jin, J H; Kondo, F

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to identify false-positive outcomes and drug residues in milk samples over withdrawal times and to determine whether the positive results were caused by drug residues or natural inhibitors. A total of 73 milk samples over withdrawal times after the last intramammary infusion were collected from each treated quarter of cows and tested using the Delvotest SP assay. Reading time was 150, 165, and 180 min, and results of samples were recorded according to the color of the well containing the control milk sample. There were 24, 20, and 12 positive samples at the reading times of 150, 165, and 180 min, respectively. All 24 positive milk samples were heated at 82 degrees C for 5 min and retested to verify that the positive results were caused by drug residues or natural inhibitors. Twenty-one samples that exhibited positive results were negative after heat treatment, and drug residues were not identified by LacTek and Charm tests. However, 3 samples that exhibited positive results from heat treatment of 82 degrees C were positive for drugs. In our study, most positive results (89%) in the milk samples over withdrawal times were false-positive results by natural inhibitors. Moreover, the heat treatment is a fast, simple, and inexpensive method to remove false-positive results and has no effect on positive samples containing drugs. We suggest that heat treatment before screening tests is an effective way to reduce false-positive results in the milk samples.

  10. False-positive methadone urine drug screen in a patient treated with quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Lasić, Davor; Uglesić, Boran; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Supe-Domić, Daniela; Uglesić, Lovro

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of T.M. admitted to University Department of Psychiatry, Split University Hospital Center, in Croatia, because of the acute psychotic reaction (F23.9). The patient's urine tested positive for methadone without a history of methadone ingestion. Urine drug screen was performed with the COBAS Integra Methadone II test kit (kinetic interaction of microparticles in solution /KIMS/ methodology) by Roche. Drugs that have been shown to cross-react with methadone feature a tricyclic structure with a sulfur and nitrogen atom in the middle ring, which is common for both quetiapine and methadone. Therefore, it is plausible that this structural similarity between quetiapine and methadone could underlie the cross-reactivity on methadone drug screen. Besides quetiapine, a number of routinely prescribed medications have been associated with triggering false-positive urine drug screen results. Verification of the test results with a different screening test or additional analytical tests should be performed to avoid adverse consequences for the patients.

  11. Experimental investigation of false positive errors in auditory species occurrence surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.; Weir, Linda A.; McClintock, Brett T.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    False positive errors are a significant component of many ecological data sets, which in combination with false negative errors, can lead to severe biases in conclusions about ecological systems. We present results of a field experiment where observers recorded observations for known combinations of electronically broadcast calling anurans under conditions mimicking field surveys to determine species occurrence. Our objectives were to characterize false positive error probabilities for auditory methods based on a large number of observers, to determine if targeted instruction could be used to reduce false positive error rates, and to establish useful predictors of among-observer and among-species differences in error rates. We recruited 31 observers, ranging in abilities from novice to expert, that recorded detections for 12 species during 180 calling trials (66,960 total observations). All observers made multiple false positive errors and on average 8.1% of recorded detections in the experiment were false positive errors. Additional instruction had only minor effects on error rates. After instruction, false positive error probabilities decreased by 16% for treatment individuals compared to controls with broad confidence interval overlap of 0 (95% CI: -46 to 30%). This coincided with an increase in false negative errors due to the treatment (26%; -3 to 61%). Differences among observers in false positive and in false negative error rates were best predicted by scores from an online test and a self-assessment of observer ability completed prior to the field experiment. In contrast, years of experience conducting call surveys was a weak predictor of error rates. False positive errors were also more common for species that were played more frequently, but were not related to the dominant spectral frequency of the call. Our results corroborate other work that demonstrates false positives are a significant component of species occurrence data collected by auditory

  12. Doxylamine: a cause for false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Schaldenbrand, J D; McClatchey, K D; Patel, J A; Muilenberg, M J

    1981-01-01

    A 25-year-old white woman ingested an unknown quantity of doxylamine succinate and flurazepam. Urine immunoassay screen (EMIT-dau) was positive for benzodiazopine and negative for phencyclidine. Subsequent gas chromatographic assay of the urine revealed a markedly positive assay for phencyclidine. Doxylamine was ultimately found to be the cause for the false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

  13. False-Positive Results of Enzyme Immunoassays for Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Patients with Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gasasira, Anne F.; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane; Kiggundu, Moses; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Charlebois, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria may impact upon human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test results. We evaluated two HIV enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) by testing 1,965 Ugandans with malaria. We found poor positive predictive values (53% and 76%), particularly with younger age. Combining EIAs eliminated false positives but missed 21% of true positives. Performance of HIV EIAs in malaria may be unsatisfactory. PMID:16891532

  14. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique.

  15. False positive stress-test in a patient with pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Mateja, Candice; Mishkin, Joseph; George, Malika; Chheda, Hemant; Guglin, Maya

    2009-10-02

    We report a case of false positive stress test in a patient with cardiac tamponade. After the drainage of pericardial effusion, reversible defect on a stress test resolved. Cardiac catheterization revealed normal coronary arteries.

  16. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  17. Risk of breast cancer after false-positive results in mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Román, Marta; Castells, Xavier; Hofvind, Solveig; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2016-06-01

    Women with false-positive results are commonly referred back to routine screening. Questions remain regarding their long-term outcome of breast cancer. We assessed the risk of screen-detected breast cancer in women with false-positive results. We conducted a joint analysis using individual level data from the population-based screening programs in Copenhagen and Funen in Denmark, Norway, and Spain. Overall, 150,383 screened women from Denmark (1991-2008), 612,138 from Norway (1996-2010), and 1,172,572 from Spain (1990-2006) were included. Poisson regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of screen-detected cancer for women with false-positive versus negative results. We analyzed information from 1,935,093 women 50-69 years who underwent 6,094,515 screening exams. During an average 5.8 years of follow-up, 230,609 (11.9%) women received a false-positive result and 27,849 (1.4%) were diagnosed with screen-detected cancer. The adjusted RR of screen-detected cancer after a false-positive result was 2.01 (95% CI: 1.93-2.09). Women who tested false-positive at first screen had a RR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.77-1.96), whereas those who tested false-positive at third screening had a RR of 2.42 (95% CI: 2.21-2.64). The RR of breast cancer at the screening test after the false-positive result was 3.95 (95% CI: 3.71-4.21), whereas it decreased to 1.25 (95% CI: 1.17-1.34) three or more screens after the false-positive result. Women with false-positive results had a twofold risk of screen-detected breast cancer compared to women with negative tests. The risk remained significantly higher three or more screens after the false-positive result. The increased risk should be considered when discussing stratified screening strategies. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Congenital absence of the gallbladder: another cause of false-positive hepatobiliary image

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.Z.; Powers, T.A.; Sandler, M.P.; Partain, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatobiliary imaging with the various technetium-labeled IDA compounds is more than 90% sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Causes of false-positive studies include chronic cholecystitis, cystic-duct obstruction by tumor, prolonged fasting, the nonfasting state, pancreatitis, alcoholism, parenteral hyperalimentation, and severe intercurrent illness. A case of congenital absence of the gallbladder is sumbitted as another cause of a false-positive scan.

  19. False-positive cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination caused by disinfectants and soaps.

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, L B; Fenn, J; Segal, H; Newcomb-Gayman, P; Carroll, K C

    1995-01-01

    Five disinfectants or soaps were tested to determine if any could be responsible for false-positive results obtained with the Latex-Crypto Antigen Detection System kit (Immuno-Mycologics, Inc., Norman, Okla.). Three disinfectants or soaps (Derma soap, 7X, and Bacdown) produced false-positive agglutination after repeated washing of ring slides during testing of a known negative cerebrospinal fluid specimen. PMID:7650214

  20. Screening Mammograms by Community Radiologists: Variability in False-Positive Rates

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joann G.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Reisch, Lisa M.; Barton, Mary B.; Kreuter, William; Christiansen, Cindy L.; Fletcher, Suzanne W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the agreement among radiologists interpreting a test set of mammograms is relatively low. However, data available from real-world settings are sparse. We studied mammographic examination interpretations by radiologists practicing in a community setting and evaluated whether the variability in false-positive rates could be explained by patient, radiologist, and/or testing characteristics. Methods We used medical records on randomly selected women aged 40–69 years who had had at least one screening mammographic examination in a community setting between January 1, 1985, and June 30, 1993. Twenty-four radiologists interpreted 8734 screening mammograms from 2169 women. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to examine the impact of patient, radiologist, and testing characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Radiologists varied widely in mammographic examination interpretations, with a mass noted in 0%–7.9%, calcification in 0%–21.3%, and fibrocystic changes in 1.6%–27.8% of mammograms read. False-positive rates ranged from 2.6% to 15.9%. Younger and more recently trained radiologists had higher false-positive rates. Adjustment for patient, radiologist, and testing characteristics narrowed the range of false-positive rates to 3.5%–7.9%. If a woman went to two randomly selected radiologists, her odds, after adjustment, of having a false-positive reading would be 1.5 times greater for the radiologist at higher risk of a false-positive reading, compared with the radiologist at lowest risk (95% highest posterior density interval [similar to a confidence interval] = 1.17 to 2.08). Conclusion Community radiologists varied widely in their false-positive rates in screening mammograms; this variability range was reduced by half, but not eliminated, after statistical adjustment for patient, radiologist, and testing characteristics. These characteristics need to be considered when evaluating false-positive

  1. Study of false positives in 5-ALA induced photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draga, Ronald O. P.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Kok, Esther T.; Jonges, Trudy G. N.; Bosch, J. L. H. R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is a technique that enhances the detection of tumors during cystoscopy using a photosensitizer which accumulates primarily in cancerous cells and will fluoresce when illuminated by violetblue light. A disadvantage of PDD is the relatively low specificity. In this retrospective study we aimed to identify predictors for false positive findings in PDD. Factors such as gender, age, recent transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT), previous intravesical therapy (IVT) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were examined for association with the false positive rates in a multivariate analysis. Data of 366 procedures and 200 patients were collected. Patients were instilled with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) intravesically and 1253 biopsies were taken from tumors and suspicious lesions. Female gender and TURBT are independent predictors of false positives in PDD. However, previous intravesical therapy with Bacille Calmette-Guérin is also an important predictor of false positives. The false positive rate decreases during the first 9-12 weeks after the latest TURBT and the latest intravesical chemotherapy. Although shortly after IVT and TURBT false positives increase, PDD improves the diagnostic sensitivity and results in more adequate treatment strategies in a significant number of patients.

  2. Constraining the false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates with multicolour photometry from the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C.

    2012-10-01

    Using the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) instrument installed on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), we acquired multicolour transit photometry of four small (Rp≲5 R⊕) short-period (P ≲ 6 d) planet candidates recently identified by the Kepler space mission. These observations are part of a programme to constrain the false positive rate for small, short-period Kepler planet candidates. Since planetary transits should be largely achromatic when observed at different wavelengths (excluding the small colour changes due to stellar limb darkening), we use the observed transit colour to identify candidates as either false positives (e.g. a blend with a stellar eclipsing binary either in the background/foreground or bound to the target star) or validated planets. Our results include the identification of KOI 225.01 and KOI 1187.01 as false positives and the tentative validation of KOI 420.01 and KOI 526.01 as planets. The probability of identifying two false positives out of a sample of four targets is less than 1 per cent, assuming an overall false positive rate for Kepler planet candidates of 10 per cent (as estimated by Morton & Johnson). Therefore, these results suggest a higher false positive rate for the small, short-period Kepler planet candidates than has been theoretically predicted by other studies which consider the Kepler planet candidate sample as a whole. Furthermore, our results are consistent with a recent Doppler study of short-period giant Kepler planet candidates. We also investigate how the false positive rate for our sample varies with different planetary and stellar properties. Our results suggest that the false positive rate varies significantly with orbital period and is largest at the shortest orbital periods (P < 3 d), where there is a corresponding rise in the number of detached eclipsing binary stars (i.e. systems that can easily mimic planetary transits) that have been discovered by

  3. Hypertension is strongly associated with false-positive bicycle exercise stress echocardiography testing results.

    PubMed

    Keller, Karsten; Stelzer, Kathrin; Munzel, Thomas; Ostad, Mir Abolfazl

    2016-12-01

    Exercise echocardiography is a reliable routine test in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. However, in ∼15% of all patients, stress echocardiography leads to false-positive stress echocardiography results. We aimed to investigate the impact of hypertension on stress echocardiographic results. We performed a retrospective study of patients with suspected or known stable coronary artery disease who underwent a bicycle exercise stress echocardiography. Patients with false-positive stress results were compared with those with appropriate results. 126 patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease were included in this retrospective study. 23 patients showed false-positive stress echocardiography results. Beside comparable age, gender distribution and coronary artery status, hypertension was more prevalent in patients with false-positive stress results (95.7% vs. 67.0%, p = 0.0410). Exercise peak load revealed a borderline-significance with lower loads in patients with false-positive results (100.0 (IQR 75.0/137.5) vs. 125.0 (100.0/150.0) W, p = 0.0601). Patients with false-positive stress results showed higher systolic (2.05 ± 0.69 vs. 1.67 ± 0.39 mmHg/W, p = 0.0193) and diastolic (1.03 ± 0.38 vs. 0.80 ± 0.28 mmHg/W, p = 0.0165) peak blood pressure (BP) per wattage. In a multivariate logistic regression test, hypertension (OR 17.6 [CI 95% 1.9-162.2], p = 0.0115), and systolic (OR 4.12 [1.56-10.89], p = 0.00430) and diastolic (OR 13.74 [2.46-76.83], p = 0.00285) peak BP per wattage, were associated with false-positive exercise results. ROC analysis for systolic and diastolic peak BP levels per wattage showed optimal cut-off values of 1.935mmHg/W and 0.823mmHg/W, indicating false-positive exercise echocardiographic results with AUCs of 0.660 and 0.664, respectively. Hypertension is a risk factor for false-positive stress exercise echocardiographic results in patients with known or

  4. Aerosolized vaccine as an unexpected source of false-positive Bordetella pertussis PCR results.

    PubMed

    Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul R; Asmar, Basim I; Prebelich, Dawn; Paulson, Erin; Fairfax, Marilynn R

    2012-02-01

    When 13 of 13 nasal wash specimens from a single pediatrician's office tested positive for low quantities of Bordetella pertussis DNA, we suspected prelaboratory contamination. Investigation revealed that Pentacel and Adacel vaccines contain high copy numbers of B. pertussis DNA, which can be aerosolized, causing false-positive B. pertussis PCR results.

  5. Psychological distress in U.S. women who have experienced false-positive mammograms.

    PubMed

    Jatoi, Ismail; Zhu, Kangmin; Shah, Mona; Lawrence, William

    2006-11-01

    In the United States, approximately 10.7% of all screening mammograms lead to a false-positive result, but the overall impact of false-positives on psychological well-being is poorly understood. Data were analyzed from the 2000 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the most recent national survey that included a cancer control module. Study subjects were 9,755 women who ever had a mammogram, of which 1,450 had experienced a false-positive result. Psychological distress was assessed using the validated K6 questionnaire and logistic regression was used to discern any association with previous false-positive mammograms. In a multivariate analysis, women who had indicated a previous false-positive mammogram were more likely to report feeling sad (OR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.03-1.35), restless (OR = 1.23, 95% CI, 1.08-1.40), worthless (OR = 1.27, 95% CI, 1.04-1.54), and finding that everything was an effort (OR = 1.27, 95% CI, 1.10-1.47). These women were also more likely to have seen a mental health professional in the 12 months preceding the survey (OR = 1.28, 95% CI, 1.03-1.58) and had a higher composite score on all items of the K6 scale (P < 0.0001), a reflection of increased psychological distress. Analyses by age and race revealed that, among women who had experienced false-positives, younger women were more likely to feel that everything was an effort, and blacks were more likely to feel restless. In a random sampling of the U.S. population, women who had previously experienced false-positive mammograms were more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression.

  6. False-positive scalp activity in 131I imaging associated with hair coloring.

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Doss, Mohan; Mehra, Ranee; Parsons, Rosaleen B; Milestone, Barton N; Yu, Jian Q

    2013-03-01

    A patient with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma (after surgical resection of tumor and positive lymph nodes) undergoing thyroid ablation therapy with (131)I is described. Whole-body scintigraphy was performed 1 wk after ablation therapy to evaluate the presence of residual disease. The whole-body images demonstrated an artifact caused by tracer accumulation in the patient's scalp related to recent hair coloring. Common etiologies of false-positive (131)I scintigraphic findings are briefly reviewed. The importance of taking preventative measures to decrease the number of false-positive findings and recognizing these findings when they occur is discussed.

  7. Quantitative real-time PCR eliminates false-positives in colony screening PCR.

    PubMed

    Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We report an alternative approach to colony screening using real-time PCR (qPCR) which can be used instead of the traditional end-point PCR to eliminate false-positives and reduce processing times. False-positive transformants can easily be distinguished from true-positives by comparing Ct values derived from qPCR amplification curves. In addition, the use of qPCR allows for more efficient processing since a gel electrophoresis step is not required and the screening process is no longer limited by the capacity of the gel apparatus.

  8. False positive results for antibody to HIV in two men with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, M H; Blasini, A M; Ogly, D; Rodríguez, M A

    1992-01-01

    False positive results were obtained for HIV tests in two men with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were suspected of being infected with HIV because of fever, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and inflammatory myopathy. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for HIV were twice positive when tested three times over a period of six months. Western blot analysis showed reactivity against the gp41 band in patient 1. False positive results for HIV tests can occur in patients with SLE, potentially leading to an erroneous diagnosis of HIV infection. PMID:1417140

  9. Evaluation of causes of false positive Tc-99m IDA scintigraphy in biliary atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumura, D.; Miller, J.H.; Sinatra, F.

    1985-05-01

    Forty-four patients between 1 1/2 and 25 weeks of age with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated by Tc-99m IDA scintigraphy for possible biliary atresia (BA). There were 21 true positives, defined as no GI activity by twenty-four hours after pretreatment with phenobarbital 5 mg/kg/day for three days. There were 15 true negatives, eight false positives and no false negatives. Causes for false positives included five neonatal hepatitis and three patients with of cholestasis associated with septo-optic dyplasia. Sensitivity of this procedure was 100% and specificity was 65% with an accuracy of 82%. Recognizing septo-optic dysplasia as a cause of cholestasis clinically further increases specificity to 79% and an accuracy of 90%. In the remaining false positives with neonatal hepatitis, four had poor hepatic uptake, however two of sixteen BA cases also had poor hepatic uptake. If reduced hepatic activity is used as a criterion against BA, specificity increases to 95% but sensitivity decreases to 88%. Septo-optic dysplasia is an unusual syndrome characterized by absent septum pellucidum, hypoplasia of one or both optic nerves, and hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction. Recognition of this entity will reduce false positive interpretation. Poor hepatic uptake with no twenty-four hour GI activity is helpful in excluding BA.

  10. False-positive identification of Escherichia coli in treated municipal wastewater and wastewater-irrigated soils.

    PubMed

    McLain, Jean E T; Rock, Channah M; Lohse, Kathleen; Walworth, James

    2011-10-01

    The increasing use of treated wastewater for irrigation heightens the importance of accurate monitoring of water quality. Chromogenic media, because they are easy to use and provide rapid results, are often used for detection of Escherichia coli in environmental samples, but unique levels of organic and inorganic compounds alter the chemistry of treated wastewater, potentially hindering the accurate performance of chromogenic media. We used MI agar and molecular confirmatory methods to assess false-positive identification of E. coli in treated wastewater samples collected from municipal utilities, an irrigation holding pond, irrigated soils, and in samples collected from storm flows destined for groundwater recharge. False-positive rates in storm flows (4.0%) agreed closely with USEPA technical literature but were higher in samples from the pond, soils, and treatment facilities (33.3%, 38.0%, and 48.8%, respectively). Sequencing of false-positive isolates confirmed that most were, like E. coli, of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and many of the false-positive isolates were reported to produce the β-D-glucuronidase enzyme targeted by MI agar. False-positive identification rates were inversely related to air temperature, suggesting that seasonal variations in water quality influence E. coli identification. Knowledge of factors contributing to failure of chromogenic media will lead to manufacturer enhancements in media quality and performance and will ultimately increase the accuracy of future water quality monitoring programs.

  11. Receipt of a false positive test result during routine screening for ovarian cancer: a teachable moment?

    PubMed

    Floyd, Andrea; Steffens, Rachel F; Pavlik, Edward; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2011-03-01

    The term "teachable moment" (TM) has been used to describe a life transition or event which motivates an individual to change a behavior or presents an opportunity to intervene to prompt behavior change. We examined whether receipt of a false positive ovarian cancer (OC) screening result may represent a TM. 403 women participating in an OC screening program completed questionnaires assessing demographic, clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial information. The TM was operationalized as expressed interest in receiving health-related information. We hypothesized that among women receiving a false positive screening test result, those women who had experienced greater personal perceived risk for OC as well as distress would be more interested in receiving health-related information than women receiving a normal result. Analyses revealed that women receiving a false positive screening result were less interested in receiving health-related information than women receiving a normal screening result. For women receiving a false positive result, expressed interest in receipt of health-related information was only modestly related to distress and related even less to perceptions of OC risk. Our data do not support viewing a false positive OC screening result as a TM. Potential explanations for the current findings as well as recommendations for future research investigating the TM are discussed.

  12. Positive roles of compartmentalization in internal reactions.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many researchers have attempted to construct artificial cell models using a bottom-up approach in which various biochemical reactions that involve a defined set of molecules are reconstructed in cell-like compartments, such as liposomes and water-in-oil droplets. In many of these studies, the cell-like compartments have acted only as containers for the encapsulated biochemical reactions, whereas other studies have indicated that compartmentalization improves the rates and yields of these reactions. Here, we introduce two ways in which compartmentalization can improve internal reactions: the isolation effect and the condensation effect. These positive effects of compartmentalization might have played an important role in the genesis of the first primitive cell on early Earth.

  13. Sherlock Holmes and child psychopathology assessment approaches: the case of the false-positive.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S; Watanabe, H

    1999-02-01

    To explore the relative value of various methods of assessing childhood psychopathology, the authors compared 4 groups of children: those who met criteria for one or more DSM diagnoses and scored high on parent symptom checklists, those who met psychopathology criteria on either one of these two assessment approaches alone, and those who met no psychopathology assessment criterion. Parents of 201 children completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), after which children and parents were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (version 2.1). Children and parents also completed other survey measures and symptom report inventories. The 4 groups of children were compared against "external validators" to examine the merits of "false-positive" and "false-negative" cases. True-positive cases (those that met DSM criteria and scored high on the CBCL) differed significantly from the true-negative cases on most external validators. "False-positive" and "false-negative" cases had intermediate levels of most risk factors and external validators. "False-positive" cases were not normal per se because they scored significantly above the true-negative group on a number of risk factors and external validators. A similar but less marked pattern was noted for "false-negatives." Findings call into question whether cases with high symptom checklist scores despite no formal diagnoses should be considered "false-positive." Pending the availability of robust markers for mental illness, researchers and clinicians must resist the tendency to reify diagnostic categories or to engage in arcane debates about the superiority of one assessment approach over another.

  14. Automatic lung nodule graph cuts segmentation with deep learning false positive reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenqing; Huang, Xia; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Qian, Wei

    2017-03-01

    To automatic detect lung nodules from CT images, we designed a two stage computer aided detection (CAD) system. The first stage is graph cuts segmentation to identify and segment the nodule candidates, and the second stage is convolutional neural network for false positive reduction. The dataset contains 595 CT cases randomly selected from Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative (LIDC/IDRI) and the 305 pulmonary nodules achieved diagnosis consensus by all four experienced radiologists were our detection targets. Consider each slice as an individual sample, 2844 nodules were included in our database. The graph cuts segmentation was conducted in a two-dimension manner, 2733 lung nodule ROIs are successfully identified and segmented. With a false positive reduction by a seven-layer convolutional neural network, 2535 nodules remain detected while the false positive dropped to 31.6%. The average F-measure of segmented lung nodule tissue is 0.8501.

  15. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients.

  16. Reducing False-Positive Pregnancy Test Results in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    McCash, Samuel I; Goldfrank, Deborah J; Pessin, Melissa S; Ramanathan, Lakshmi V

    2017-09-05

    To assess whether the use of a laboratory test specific for intact human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) would reduce the number of false-positive pregnancy test results. From October 21, 2014, to January 20, 2015, and April 1, 2015, to June 2, 2015, all serum samples sent for pregnancy screening at a large cancer center with a value of 5 milli-international units/mL or greater total β-hCG were frozen and stored and then retested using intact hCG reagent. We compared the accuracy of total β-hCG and intact hCG results for the diagnosis of clinically confirmed pregnancy. A negative test was defined as 14 milli-international units/mL or less, our current institutional cutoff. We also assessed a cutoff of less than 5 milli-international units/mL, a historical cutoff to rule out pregnancy. We performed intact hCG testing on 64 patient samples, of which 34 had originally resulted positive when tested for total β-hCG. These included 21 cases of clinically confirmed pregnancy and 13 false-positive cases. No women were pregnant when their intact hCG concentration was 14 milli-international units/mL or less, and all pregnancies were detected at and above this concentration. Intact hCG reduced the number of false-positive pregnancy test results from 13 to 1, a 92% reduction (95% CI 64-99%), corresponding to a reduction in the false-positive rate from 38% (95% CI 22-56%) to 3% (95% CI 1-15%). The use of intact hCG reagent in patients with cancer reduces the rate of false-positive pregnancy test results without increasing the rate of false-negative test results.

  17. False positives and false negatives in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: issues, challenges, and the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We highlight a significant problem that needs to be considered and addressed when performing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies, namely the possibility of inadvertently measuring fNIRS hemodynamic responses that are not due to neurovascular coupling. These can be misinterpreted as brain activity, i.e., “false positives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a detected hemodynamic response to functional brain activity), or mask brain activity, i.e., “false negatives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a not observed hemodynamic response in the presence of functional brain activity). Here, we summarize the possible physiological origins of these issues and suggest ways to avoid and remove them. PMID:27054143

  18. False positive diagnosis on (131)iodine whole-body scintigraphy of differentiated thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Iovino, Michele; De Pergola, Giovanni; Licchelli, Brunella; Varraso, Antonio; Dicembrino, Franca; Valle, Guido; Guastamacchia, Edoardo

    2016-09-01

    (131)Iodine is used both to ablate any residual thyroid tissue or metastatic disease and to obtain whole-body diagnostic images after total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Even though whole-body scan is highly accurate in showing thyroid residues as well as metastases of DTC, false positive results can be found, possibly leading to diagnostic errors and unnecessary treatments. This paper reviews the physiological and pathological processes involved as well as the strategy to recognize and rule out false positive radioiodine images.

  19. A case of false positive Troponin I in a patient affected by cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bellan, M; Pirisi, M; Bellomo, G; Sainaghi, P P

    2017-05-22

    Troponin I (TnI) false positive results have been reported in patients affected by immune disorders. We report the case of a 74-year-old woman affected by cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, admitted to the Emergency Room because of a lipotimic episode. A marked elevation of TnI plasma concentration was confirmed in multiple determinations, despite the absence of symptoms or electrocardiogram findings suggesting myocardial infarction. TnI plasma concentration was reported normal after re-testing with a different commercial kit. A false TnI positivity should be considered in patients with immune disorders, especially if seropositive for rheumatoid factor, when the clinical context does not suggest myocardial infarction.

  20. Modeling false positive error making patterns in radiology trainees for improved mammography education.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Silber, James I; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2015-04-01

    While mammography notably contributes to earlier detection of breast cancer, it has its limitations, including a large number of false positive exams. Improved radiology education could potentially contribute to alleviating this issue. Toward this goal, in this paper we propose an algorithm for modeling of false positive error making among radiology trainees. Identifying troublesome locations for the trainees could focus their training and in turn improve their performance. The algorithm proposed in this paper predicts locations that are likely to result in a false positive error for each trainee based on the previous annotations made by the trainee. The algorithm consists of three steps. First, the suspicious false positive locations are identified in mammograms by Difference of Gaussian filter and suspicious regions are segmented by computer vision-based segmentation algorithms. Second, 133 features are extracted for each suspicious region to describe its distinctive characteristics. Third, a random forest classifier is applied to predict the likelihood of the trainee making a false positive error using the extracted features. The random forest classifier is trained using previous annotations made by the trainee. We evaluated the algorithm using data from a reader study in which 3 experts and 10 trainees interpreted 100 mammographic cases. The algorithm was able to identify locations where the trainee will commit a false positive error with accuracy higher than an algorithm that selects such locations randomly. Specifically, our algorithm found false positive locations with 40% accuracy when only 1 location was selected for all cases for each trainee and 12% accuracy when 10 locations were selected. The accuracies for randomly identified locations were both 0% for these two scenarios. In this first study on the topic, we were able to build computer models that were able to find locations for which a trainee will make a false positive error in images that were not

  1. Research: Association of Low-Amplitude QRSs with False-Positive Asystole Alarms.

    PubMed

    Pelter, Michele M; Fidler, Richard; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Although electrocardiographic monitoring is valuable for continuous surveillance of intensive care unit (ICU) patients, false alarms are common and have been cited as a cause of alarm fatigue. ANSI/AAMI EC12:2002 states that electrocardiograms (ECGs) should not detect a QRS if the waveform is less than 0.15 mV (1.5 mm) for adult patients, in order to avoid mislabeling P waves or baseline noise as QRSs during complete heart block or asystole. However, ECG software algorithms often use more conservative QRS thresholds, which may result in false-positive asystole alarms in patients with low-amplitude QRS complexes. To 1) assess the frequency of low QRS amplitude in a group of ICU patients with one or more false-positive asystole alarms and 2) determine whether low-amplitude QRSs are associated with false-positive asystole alarms during continuous ECG monitoring. Hospital-acquired standard 12-lead ECGs were examined in a group of 82 ICU patients who had one or more false-positive asystole alarms. Low QRS amplitude was defined as a unidirectional (only positive or negative) QRS of less than 5 mm in two of four leads (I, II, III, and V1). Low-amplitude QRSs were present in 45 of 82 (55%) patients. The presence of low-amplitude QRSs did not differ according to age, sex, or race. Patients treated in the cardiac ICU had the highest proportion of low-amplitude QRSs. An equivalent proportion of patients had false-positive asystole alarms by group (no low-amplitude QRSs 95% vs. low-amplitude QRSs 87%; P = 0.229). Eight patients (10%) had both true- and false-positive asystole alarms (two [5%] with no low-amplitude QRSs and six [13%] with low-amplitude QRSs; P = 0.229). Low-amplitude QRS, as assessed from hospital 12-lead ECGs, occurs frequently and is more common in cardiac ICU patients. However, this ECG feature did not identify patients with false-positive asystole alarms during continuous ECG monitoring.

  2. [Dobutamine-related coronary spasm among patients with false positive dobutamine stress echocardiography: Prevalence and predictors].

    PubMed

    Aboukhoudir, F; Aboukhoudir, I; Pansieri, M; Rekik, S

    2015-11-01

    Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is being consistently used as an exercise-independent stress modality aimed at the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the evaluation of myocardial ischemia. It may though occasionally induce coronary vasospasm. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of dobutamine-related coronary spasm in patients without known CAD and false positive DSE (positive DSE but no significant coronary lesions on angiogram). Three thousand nine hundred and fifty-two patients referred to our echocardiography laboratory for DSE between January 2010 and May 2012 were prospectively investigated. Those with positive DSE underwent coronary angiograms with systematic methylergometrine intracoronary injection in case of absence of significant coronary stenosis or spontaneous occlusive coronary spasm. Patients with spontaneous occlusive coronary spasm or positive methylergometrine test but no significant stenoses were enrolled and compared with those with positive DSE but no coronary lesions nor spontaneous or induced spasm ("true" false positive DSE). Twenty-nine patients with DSE-related vasospasm (19.4% of positive DES without known CAD) were compared with 56 patients with no lesions and no spasm ("true" false positive DSE). They were more frequently smokers (72.4% vs 37.5%; P=0.003); they had more frequently dyslipidemia (79.3% vs 43%; P=0.001); they also had a larger ischemic area at peak DSE (3.4 segments vs 2.7 segments; P=0.05). On multivariate analysis, dyslipidemia (HR=10.7; 95% CI=[2.7-42.1]; P=0.001) and active smoking (HR=6.1; 95% CI=[1.7-21.1]; P=0.004) were found to be independent predictors of spasm-related DSE rather than "true" false positive DSE. DSE-related coronary spasm is present in a significant proportion of patients with erroneously labelled "false" positive DSE and should systematically be ruled out. Dyslipidemia and active smoking were independent predictors of spasm rather than "true" false

  3. Reducing false positives of microcalcification detection systems by removal of breast arterial calcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Mordang, Jan-Jurre Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Karssemeijer, Nico; Heeten, Gerard den

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In the past decades, computer-aided detection (CADe) systems have been developed to aid screening radiologists in the detection of malignant microcalcifications. These systems are useful to avoid perceptual oversights and can increase the radiologists’ detection rate. However, due to the high number of false positives marked by these CADe systems, they are not yet suitable as an independent reader. Breast arterial calcifications (BACs) are one of the most frequent false positives marked by CADe systems. In this study, a method is proposed for the elimination of BACs as positive findings. Removal of these false positives will increase the performance of the CADe system in finding malignant microcalcifications. Methods: A multistage method is proposed for the removal of BAC findings. The first stage consists of a microcalcification candidate selection, segmentation and grouping of the microcalcifications, and classification to remove obvious false positives. In the second stage, a case-based selection is applied where cases are selected which contain BACs. In the final stage, BACs are removed from the selected cases. The BACs removal stage consists of a GentleBoost classifier trained on microcalcification features describing their shape, topology, and texture. Additionally, novel features are introduced to discriminate BACs from other positive findings. Results: The CADe system was evaluated with and without BACs removal. Here, both systems were applied on a validation set containing 1088 cases of which 95 cases contained malignant microcalcifications. After bootstrapping, free-response receiver operating characteristics and receiver operating characteristics analyses were carried out. Performance between the two systems was compared at 0.98 and 0.95 specificity. At a specificity of 0.98, the sensitivity increased from 37% to 52% and the sensitivity increased from 62% up to 76% at a specificity of 0.95. Partial areas under the curve in the specificity

  4. False-positive cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcus antigen in Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Isseh, Iyad N; Bourgi, Kassem; Nakhle, Asaad; Ali, Mahmoud; Zervos, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Cryptococcus meningoencephalitis is a serious opportunistic infection associated with high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, particularly patients with advanced AIDS disease. The diagnosis is established through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcus antigen detection and cultures. Cryptococcus antigen testing is usually the initial test of choice due its high sensitivity and specificity along with the quick availability of the results. We hereby report a case of a false-positive CSF cryptococcus antigen assay in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with acute confusion. While initial CSF evaluation revealed a positive cryptococcus antigen assay, the patient's symptoms were inconsistent with cryptococcus meningoencephalitis. A repeat CSF evaluation, done 3 days later, revealed a negative CSF cryptococcus antigen assay. Given the patient's active lupus disease and the elevated antinuclear antibody titers, we believe that the initial positive result was a false positive caused by interference from autoantibodies.

  5. EMPLOYING TOPOGRAPHICAL HEIGHT MAP IN COLONIC POLYP MEASUREMENT AND FALSE POSITIVE REDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Li, Jiang; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    CT Colonography (CTC) is an emerging minimally invasive technique for screening and diagnosing colon cancers. Computer Aided Detection (CAD) techniques can increase sensitivity and reduce false positives. Inspired by the way radiologists detect polyps via 3D virtual fly-through in CTC, we borrowed the idea from geographic information systems to employ topographical height map in colonic polyp measurement and false positive reduction. After a curvature based filtering and a 3D CT feature classifier, a height map is computed for each detection using a ray-casting algorithm. We design a concentric index to characterize the concentric pattern in polyp height map based on the fact that polyps are protrusions from the colon wall and round in shape. The height map is optimized through a multi-scale spiral spherical search to maximize the concentric index. We derive several topographic features from the map and compute texture features based on wavelet decomposition. We then send the features to a committee of support vector machines for classification. We have trained our method on 394 patients (71 polyps) and tested it on 792 patients (226 polyps). Results showed that we can achieve 95% sensitivity at 2.4 false positives per patient and the height map features can reduce false positives by more than 50%. We compute the polyp height and width measurements and correlate them with manual measurements. The Pearson correlations are 0.74 (p=0.11) and 0.75 (p=0.17) for height and width, respectively. PMID:19578483

  6. False Positives in Multiple Regression: Unanticipated Consequences of Measurement Error in the Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shear, Benjamin R.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Type I error rates in multiple regression, and hence the chance for false positive research findings, can be drastically inflated when multiple regression models are used to analyze data that contain random measurement error. This article shows the potential for inflated Type I error rates in commonly encountered scenarios and provides new…

  7. IS HCI THAT IS USED AS A PRESERVATIVE CREATING FALSE POSITIVES FOR TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will hydrochloric acid produce false positives for TBA? Yes, if you heat the sample to get a lower detection limit for TBA. Conventional purge and trap methods at ambient temperature have a reporting limit for TBA between 50 and 100 g/liter. This is higher than the provisiona...

  8. IS HCI THAT IS USED AS A PRESERVATIVE CREATING FALSE POSITIVES FOR TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will hydrochloric acid produce false positives for TBA? Yes, if you heat the sample to get a lower detection limit for TBA. Conventional purge and trap methods at ambient temperature have a reporting limit for TBA between 50 and 100 g/liter. This is higher than the provisiona...

  9. Are False-Positive Rates Leading to an Overestimation of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Carney, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate false-positive rates for rules proposed to identify early noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using the presence of notches in audiograms. Method: Audiograms collected from school-age children in a national survey of health and nutrition (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES III]; National Center…

  10. Are False-Positive Rates Leading to an Overestimation of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Carney, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate false-positive rates for rules proposed to identify early noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using the presence of notches in audiograms. Method: Audiograms collected from school-age children in a national survey of health and nutrition (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES III]; National Center…

  11. PCR evaluation of false-positive signals from two automated blood-culture systems.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Z Ceren; Mumcuoglu, Ipek; Guriz, Haluk; Tamer, Deniz; Balaban, Neriman; Aysev, Derya; Akar, Nejat

    2006-01-01

    Rapid detection of micro-organisms from blood is one of the most critical functions of a diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Automated blood-culture systems reduce the time needed to detect positive cultures, and reduce specimen handling. The false-positive rate of such systems is 1-10%. In this study, the presence of pathogens in 'false-positive' bottles obtained from BACTEC 9050 (Becton Dickinson) and BacT/Alert (Biomérieux) systems was investigated by eubacterial and fungal PCR. A total of 169 subculture-negative aerobic blood-culture bottles (104 BacT/Alert and 65 BACTEC) were evaluated. Both fungal and eubacterial PCRs were negative for all BACTEC bottles. Fungal PCR was also negative for the BacT/Alert system, but 10 bottles (9.6%) gave positive results by eubacterial PCR. Sequence analysis of the positive PCR amplicons indicated the presence of the following bacteria (number of isolates in parentheses): Pasteurella multocida (1), Staphylococcus epidermidis (2), Staphylococcus hominis (1), Micrococcus sp. (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1), Corynebacterium spp. (2), Brachibacterium sp. (1) and Arthrobacter/Rothia sp. (1). Antibiotic usage by the patients may be responsible for the inability of the laboratory to grow these bacteria on subcultures. For patients with more than one false-positive bottle, molecular methods can be used to evaluate the microbial DNA in these bottles. False positives from the BACTEC system may be due to elevated patient leukocyte counts or the high sensitivity of the system to background increases in CO(2) concentration.

  12. The effects of gestational age and birth weight on false-positive newborn-screening rates.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Jonathan L; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Rose, Susan R; Leslie, Nancy D; Chandrasekar, Ram; Linard, Sharon M; Akinbi, Henry T

    2010-11-01

    Newborn-screening false-positive rates (FPRs) are disproportionately increased in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to determine variation in newborn screening FPRs according to birth weight and gestational age. Our secondary objective was to examine the effect of postnatal age on FPRs in preterm infants. The Ohio State Newborn Screening Program Database was analyzed to determine the overall and birth weight-specific FPRs for 18 analytes. Data were stratified into birth weight categories (<1000 g, 1000-1499 g, 1500-2499 g, 2500-3999 g, and >4000 g). In addition, to examine the effect of postnatal age on FPRs, we examined the 2 analytes with the highest FPRs, thyrotropin with back-up thyroxine and 17-hydroxyprogesterone, in infants whose gestational age was <32 weeks, determined on the basis of postnatal age at screening. Data from 448 766 neonates were reviewed. Infants with very low birth weight (VLBW) comprised 1.9% of the study cohort, but accounted for 18% of false-positive results. For 14 of 18 analytes studied, FPRs increased with decreasing birth weight/gestational age and were significantly increased in infants with VLBW compared with infants who weighed 2500 to 3999 g (P < .001). Thyrotropin/back-up thyroxine and 17-hydroxyprogesterone accounted for 62% of total false-positive results in VLBW infants. When blood specimens were collected at a postnatal age of ≥ 48 hours in infants born at <32 weeks, a 44% relative reduction in 17-hydroxyprogesterone false-positive results was detected. False-positive newborn-screening rates are disproportionately increased in VLBW infants. FPRs may be reduced by delaying screening of <32 weeks' gestation, preterm infants until 24 to 48 hours' postnatal age.

  13. Psychological consequences of false-positive screening mammograms in the UK.

    PubMed

    Bond, Mary; Pavey, Toby; Welch, Karen; Cooper, Chris; Garside, Ruth; Dean, Sarah; Hyde, Christopher J

    2013-04-01

    To identify the psychological effects of false-positive screening mammograms in the UK. Systematic review of all controlled studies and qualitative studies of women with a false-positive screening mammogram. The control group participants had normal mammograms. All psychological outcomes including returning for routine screening were permitted. All studies had a narrative synthesis. The searches returned seven includable studies (7/4423). Heterogeneity was such that meta-analysis was not possible. Studies using disease-specific measures found that, compared to normal results, there could be enduring psychological distress that lasted up to 3 years; the level of distress was related to the degree of invasiveness of the assessment. At 3 years the relative risks were, further mammography, 1.28 (95% CI 0.82 to 2.00), fine needle aspiration 1.80 (95% CI 1.17 to 2.77), biopsy 2.07 (95% CI 1.22 to 3.52) and early recall 1.82 (95% CI 1.22 to 2.72). Studies that used generic measures of anxiety and depression found no such impact up to 3 months after screening. Evidence suggests that women with false-positive mammograms have an increased likelihood of failing to reattend for routine screening, relative risk 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.98) compared with women with normal mammograms. Having a false-positive screening mammogram can cause breast cancer-specific distress for up to 3 years. The degree of distress is related to the invasiveness of the assessment. Women with false-positive mammograms are less likely to return for routine assessment than those with normal ones.

  14. New Constraints on the False Positive Rate for Short-Period Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler space mission has discovered thousands of potential planets orbiting other stars, thereby setting the stage for in-depth studies of different populations of planets. We present new multi-wavelength transit photometry of small (Rp < 6 Earth radii), short-period (P < 6 days) Kepler planet candidates acquired with the Gran Telescopio Canarias. Multi-wavelength transit photometry allows us to search for wavelength-dependent transit depths and subsequently identify eclipsing binary false positives (which are especially prevalent at the shortest orbital periods). We combine these new observations of three candidates with previous results for five other candidates (Colón & Ford 2011 and Colón, Ford, & Morehead 2012) to provide new constraints on the false positive rate for small, close-in candidates. In our full sample, we identify four candidates as viable planets and four as eclipsing binary false positives. We therefore find a higher false positive rate for small, close-in candidates compared to the lower false positive rate of ~10% determined by other studies for the full sample of Kepler planet candidates (e.g. Fressin et al. 2013). We also discuss the dearth of known planets with periods less than ~2.5 days and radii between ~3 and 11 Earth radii (the so-called 'sub-Jovian desert'), since the majority of the candidates in our study are located in or around this 'desert.' The lack of planets with these orbital and physical properties is not expected to be due to observational bias, as short-period planets are generally easier to detect (especially if they are larger or more massive than Earth). We consider the implications of our results for the other ~20 Kepler planet candidates located in this desert. Characterizing these candidates will allow us to better understand the formation processes of this apparently rare class of planets.

  15. Decisions to shoot in a weapon identification task: The influence of cultural stereotypes and perceived threat on false positive errors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kevin K; Bandy, Carole L; Kimble, Matthew O

    2010-01-01

    The decision to shoot a gun engages executive control processes that can be biased by cultural stereotypes and perceived threat. The neural locus of the decision to shoot is likely to be found in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), where cognition and affect converge. Male military cadets at Norwich University (N=37) performed a weapon identification task in which they made rapid decisions to shoot when images of guns appeared briefly on a computer screen. Reaction times, error rates, and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were recorded. Cadets reacted more quickly and accurately when guns were primed by images of Middle-Eastern males wearing traditional clothing. However, cadets also made more false positive errors when tools were primed by these images. Error-related negativity (ERN) was measured for each response. Deeper ERNs were found in the medial-frontal cortex following false positive responses. Cadets who made fewer errors also produced deeper ERNs, indicating stronger executive control. Pupil size was used to measure autonomic arousal related to perceived threat. Images of Middle-Eastern males in traditional clothing produced larger pupil sizes. An image of Osama bin Laden induced the largest pupil size, as would be predicted for the exemplar of Middle East terrorism. Cadets who showed greater increases in pupil size also made more false positive errors. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate predictions based on current models of perceived threat, stereotype activation, and cognitive control. Measures of pupil size (perceived threat) and ERN (cognitive control) explained significant proportions of the variance in false positive errors to Middle-Eastern males in traditional clothing, while measures of reaction time, signal detection response bias, and stimulus discriminability explained most of the remaining variance.

  16. Decisions to Shoot in a Weapon Identification Task: The Influence of Cultural Stereotypes and Perceived Threat on False Positive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Kevin K.; Bandy, Carole L.; Kimble, Matthew O.

    2014-01-01

    The decision to shoot engages executive control processes that can be biased by cultural stereotypes and perceived threat. The neural locus of the decision to shoot is likely to be found in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) where cognition and affect converge. Male military cadets at Norwich University (N=37) performed a weapon identification task in which they made rapid decisions to shoot when images of guns appeared briefly on a computer screen. Reaction times, error rates, and EEG activity were recorded. Cadets reacted more quickly and accurately when guns were primed by images of middle-eastern males wearing traditional clothing. However, cadets also made more false positive errors when tools were primed by these images. Error-related negativity (ERN) was measured for each response. Deeper ERN’s were found in the medial-frontal cortex following false positive responses. Cadets who made fewer errors also produced deeper ERN’s, indicating stronger executive control. Pupil size was used to measure autonomic arousal related to perceived threat. Images of middle-eastern males in traditional clothing produced larger pupil sizes. An image of Osama bin Laden induced the largest pupil size, as would be predicted for the exemplar of Middle East terrorism. Cadets who showed greater increases in pupil size also made more false positive errors. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate predictions based on current models of perceived threat, stereotype activation, and cognitive control. Measures of pupil size (perceived threat) and ERN (cognitive control) explained significant proportions of the variance in false positive errors to middle-eastern males in traditional clothing, while measures of reaction time, signal detection response bias, and stimulus discriminability explained most of the remaining variance. PMID:19813139

  17. Copy-Number Variation and False Positive Prenatal Aneuploidy Screening Results

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Matthew W.; Simmons, LaVone E.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Coe, Bradley P.; Henson, Jessica M.; Daza, Riza M.; Eichler, Evan E.; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:25830323

  18. Copy-number variation and false positive prenatal aneuploidy screening results.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew W; Simmons, LaVone E; Kitzman, Jacob O; Coe, Bradley P; Henson, Jessica M; Daza, Riza M; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay; Gammill, Hilary S

    2015-04-23

    Investigations of noninvasive prenatal screening for aneuploidy by analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have shown high sensitivity and specificity in both high-risk and low-risk cohorts. However, the overall low incidence of aneuploidy limits the positive predictive value of these tests. Currently, the causes of false positive results are poorly understood. We investigated four pregnancies with discordant prenatal test results and found in two cases that maternal duplications on chromosome 18 were the likely cause of the discordant results. Modeling based on population-level copy-number variation supports the possibility that some false positive results of noninvasive prenatal screening may be attributable to large maternal copy-number variants. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  19. The magnitude and challenge of false-positive newborn screening test results.

    PubMed

    Kwon, C; Farrell, P M

    2000-07-01

    This study examined for the first time to our knowledge the national data available from newborn screening programs in the United States and determined the salient characteristics of various screening tests for 3 hereditary metabolic disorders and 2 congenital endocrinopathies with emphasis on positive predictive values (PPVs) to delineate the magnitude of false-positive results. Reports published by the Council of Regional Networks for Genetic Services for 1990 through 1994 were examined carefully, paying particular attention to phenylketonuria, galactosemia, biotinidase deficiency, congenital hypothyroidism, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Because of recent improvements in data collecting, reporting, and tabulating, we used data from 1993 and 1994 to determine the apparent sensitivity, specificity, relative incidence rates, and PPVs for the 5 disorders. For biotinidase deficiency and CAH, we also calculated relative incidence rates and PPVs for 1991 and 1992. Our analyses revealed the following best estimates for the relative incidence rates of 5 disorders: phenylketonuria, 1:14,000; galactosemia, 1:59,000; biotinidase deficiency, 1:80,000; congenital hypothyroidism, 1:3,300; and CAH, 1:20,000. An apparent sensitivity of 100% has been reported by the various states for most of the disorders, and specificity levels are all above 99%. The PPVs, however, range from 0.5% to 6.0%. Consequently, on average, there are more than 50 false-positive results for every true-positive result identified through newborn screening in the United States. The magnitude of false-positive results generated in newborn screening programs, particularly for congenital endocrinopathies, presents a great challenge for future improvement of this important public health program. Attention must be given to improved laboratory tests, use of more specific markers, and better risk communication for families of patients with false-positive test results.

  20. Positive events protect children from causal false memories for scripted events.

    PubMed

    Melinder, Annika; Toffalini, Enrico; Geccherle, Eleonora; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-11-01

    Adults produce fewer inferential false memories for scripted events when their conclusions are emotionally charged than when they are neutral, but it is not clear whether the same effect is also found in children. In the present study, we examined this issue in a sample of 132 children aged 6-12 years (mean 9 years, 3 months). Participants encoded photographs depicting six script-like events that had a positively, negatively, or a neutral valenced ending. Subsequently, true and false recognition memory of photographs related to the observed scripts was tested as a function of emotionality. Causal errors-a type of false memory thought to stem from inferential processes-were found to be affected by valence: children made fewer causal errors for positive than for neutral or negative events. Hypotheses are proposed on why adults were found protected against inferential false memories not only by positive (as for children) but also by negative endings when administered similar versions of the same paradigm.

  1. False positive reduction in protein-protein interaction predictions using gene ontology annotations.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Mahmoud A; Lin, Yen-Han

    2007-07-23

    Many crucial cellular operations such as metabolism, signalling, and regulations are based on protein-protein interactions. However, the lack of robust protein-protein interaction information is a challenge. One reason for the lack of solid protein-protein interaction information is poor agreement between experimental findings and computational sets that, in turn, comes from huge false positive predictions in computational approaches. Reduction of false positive predictions and enhancing true positive fraction of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction datasets based on highly confident experimental results has not been adequately investigated. Gene Ontology (GO) annotations were used to reduce false positive protein-protein interactions (PPI) pairs resulting from computational predictions. Using experimentally obtained PPI pairs as a training dataset, eight top-ranking keywords were extracted from GO molecular function annotations. The sensitivity of these keywords is 64.21% in the yeast experimental dataset and 80.83% in the worm experimental dataset. The specificities, a measure of recovery power, of these keywords applied to four predicted PPI datasets for each studied organisms, are 48.32% and 46.49% (by average of four datasets) in yeast and worm, respectively. Based on eight top-ranking keywords and co-localization of interacting proteins a set of two knowledge rules were deduced and applied to remove false positive protein pairs. The 'strength', a measure of improvement provided by the rules was defined based on the signal-to-noise ratio and implemented to measure the applicability of knowledge rules applying to the predicted PPI datasets. Depending on the employed PPI-predicting methods, the strength varies between two and ten-fold of randomly removing protein pairs from the datasets. Gene Ontology annotations along with the deduced knowledge rules could be implemented to partially remove false predicted PPI pairs. Removal of false positives

  2. False-positive tests for syphilis associated with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus infection among intravenous drug abusers. Valencian Study Group on HIV Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguado, I; Bolumar, F; Moreno, R; Pardo, F J; Torres, N; Belda, J; Espacio, A

    1998-11-01

    The role of HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus infections in the production of biological false-positive reactions for syphilis was evaluated in two large samples of intravenous drug abusers and homosexual men attending AIDS prevention centers in Spain. A significantly increased odds ratio (OR) for false-positive tests for syphilis [OR 2.23, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.76-2.83] was observed for HIV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers; biological false-positive reactions were also more frequent (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.30-2.31) among intravenous drug abusers who were hepatitis B virus seropositive but not among those who were hepatitis C virus seropositive (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.48-1.69). Among homosexuals, the association between HIV and biological false-positive reactions was restricted to subjects who were also intravenous drug abusers, indicating the crucial role of intravenous drug abuse. Only 20.5% of intravenous drug abusers with a previous biological false-positive reaction yielded a false-positive result in their subsequent visit.

  3. Risk of Breast Cancer in Women with False-Positive Results according to Mammographic Features.

    PubMed

    Castells, Xavier; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Posso, Margarita; Román, Marta; Vernet-Tomas, Maria; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Domingo, Laia; Vidal, Carmen; Baré, Marisa; Ferrer, Joana; Quintana, María Jesús; Sánchez, Mar; Natal, Carmen; Espinàs, Josep A; Saladié, Francina; Sala, María

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess the risk of breast cancer in women with false-positive screening results according to radiologic classification of mammographic features. Materials and Methods Review board approval was obtained, with waiver of informed consent. This retrospective cohort study included 521 200 women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening as part of the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program between 1994 and 2010 and who were observed until December 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer and the 95% confidence interval (CI) in women with false-positive mammograms as compared with women with negative mammograms. Separate models were adjusted for screen-detected and interval cancers and for screen-film and digital mammography. Time without a breast cancer diagnosis was plotted by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results When compared with women with negative mammograms, the age-adjusted HR of cancer in women with false-positive results was 1.84 (95% CI: 1.73, 1.95; P < .001). The risk was higher in women who had calcifications, whether they were (HR, 2.73; 95% CI: 2.28, 3.28; P < .001) or were not (HR, 2.24; 95% CI: 2.02, 2.48; P < .001) associated with masses. Women in whom mammographic features showed changes in subsequent false-positive results were those who had the highest risk (HR, 9.13; 95% CI: 8.28, 10.07; P < .001). Conclusion Women with false-positive results had an increased risk of breast cancer, particularly women who had calcifications at mammography. Women who had more than one examination with false-positive findings and in whom the mammographic features changed over time had a highly increased risk of breast cancer. Previous mammographic features might yield useful information for further risk-prediction models and personalized follow-up screening protocols. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. Human papillomavirus false positive cytological diagnosis in low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Troconis, José; Delgado, Mariela; González, Julia; Velásquez, Jesvy; Mindiola, Raimy; Whitby, Denise; Conde, Betty; Munroe, David J

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the number of Human Papillomavirus false positive cytological diagnosis in low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). Three hundred and two women who assisted to an Out-Patient Gynecologic Clinic in Maracaibo, Venezuela, were recruited for this study. Each patient had the Pap smear and a cervical swab for Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2). Three cytotechnologists reviewed the Pap smears and two pathologists rescreened all of them. The cytotechnologists reported 161 (53.3%) Pap smears negatives for intraepithelial lesion (IL) or malignancy, and 141 cases (46.7%) with epithelial abnormalities. They reported 46% of 302 patients with HPV infection in Pap smear slides. The pathologists found that 241 (79.8%) Pap smears were negatives for IL or malignancy and 61 (20.2%), with abnormal Pap smears. They found 14.6% HPV infection in all Pap smears (p<0.0001; 46% vs 14.6%). The HC2 study showed that 47 samples (15.6%) were positive for HPV. The study found that 114 Pap smears (False Positive: 85%) of 134 reported by the cytotechnologists and 24 (False Positive: 43%) of 56 cytologies reported by the pathologists as LSIL, were negative for HPV infection determined by HC2 (p<0.00003). The present study suggests that the cytotechnologists overdiagnosed cellular changes associated with HPV infection in the Pap smear, increasing the FP cytological diagnosis of LSIL.

  5. Reducing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy false-positive margin rates using cyanoacrylate tissue glue.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manal; Mansour, Paul; Vesey, Sean G

    2009-10-01

    Trauma to the prostate surface from laparoscopic instruments may have a role in creating false-positive margins during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP). To determine the feasibility of using cyanoacrylate glue to repair iatrogenic lacerations and to evaluate the glue's effect on the positive surgical margin rates of LRP specimens. We used porcine kidneys as a surrogate experimental tissue to help determine the quality, robustness, and adequacy of glued repairs in experimentally created lacerations. A matched control group of unrepaired kidney specimens and kidney specimens repaired with glue were subjected to full histopathologic processing. Exposure of a nephron to surface marker ink was considered to be a "positive margin." The efficacy and impact of glue repairs on LRP specimens that had sustained iatrogenic intraoperative surface trauma were also assessed. We evaluated the success of glue repair in preventing subcapsular renal parenchymal staining. We also compared the rate of positive margins in LRP specimens with and without routine glue repair of the surface of the prostate. The glue remained effective throughout the entire laboratory process and did not interfere with histopathologic assessment. As hypothesised, cyanoacrylate glue repair of the renal lacerations prevented staining of subcapsular tissues with marker dye and therefore prevented what might otherwise be considered false-positive staining. The rate of positive margins of the 40 LRP specimens without glue repair was 35%, compared with a rate of 10% for 40 glue-repaired specimens. The limitations of the study are that follow-up was short and that the prostatectomy specimens were compared with consecutive controls rather than with matched randomised controls. Cyanoacrylate glue is a novel, inexpensive, and very effective prostate repair agent that does not interfere with histologic processing. It is possible to accurately repair iatrogenic prostate lacerations with cyanoacrylate glue and

  6. High false-positive rate of questionnaire-based restless legs syndrome diagnosis in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mery, V; Kimoff, R J; Suarez, I; Benedetti, A; Kaminska, M; Robinson, A; Lapierre, Y; Bar-Or, A; Trojan, D A

    2015-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is diagnosed by self-reported symptoms. Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have disease-related symptoms which could mimic RLS. This study assessed the: (1) false-positive rate for questionnaire-based RLS diagnosis in MS patients and (2) utility of periodic leg movements during wakefulness (PLMW) on overnight polysomnography (PSG) in identifying true-positive RLS patients. Ambulatory MS patients without known sleep disorders were recruited. Subjects completed the International RLS Study Group (IRLSG) diagnostic questionnaire (IRLDQ) and underwent full overnight PSG. IRLDQ-positive patients underwent clinical evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and completed the RLS severity scale (IRLS). Seventy-one MS patients (mean age 46.8 ± 10.4 years) were evaluated. Thirty-eight had a positive IRLDQ. RLS diagnosis was confirmed in 22, yielding a false-positive rate of 42% [95% confidence interval (CI) 26-59%], predominantly attributable to paresthesiae (n = 7), and cramps and/or muscle spasms (n = 4). IRLS scores were not significantly different between subjects with confirmed and nonconfirmed RLS. The PLMW index was significantly higher in patients with confirmed RLS (55.4 ± 41.9 vs. 29.7 ± 18.8, p = 0.03). The sensitivity of a PLMW index >70/h for true-positive IRLDQ was 8/22 = 36%, 95% CI: 17.2-59.3, and the specificity was 16/16 = 100%, 95% CI: 79.4-100. MS patients have a high false-positive rate of RLS diagnosis using a standardized questionnaire largely attributable to MS-related sensorimotor symptoms. While detailed clinical evaluation is essential for confirming RLS diagnosis, the PLMW index may provide useful adjunctive information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved diagnosis of spring viremia of carp by nested reverse-transcription PCR: development of a chimeric positive control for prevention of false-positive diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Jun

    2012-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays allow for the rapid and accurate detection of infectious agents through identification of nucleic acid sequences. However, contamination of samples with positive DNA can lead to false-positive results. In this study, positive control plasmids were developed to minimize false-positive reactions due to PCR contamination during detection of SVCV by semi-nested reverse-transcription PCR. An ampicillin resistance gene was truncated by PCR amplification, and the fragments were inserted into pGEM-T Easy vectors; the resulting plasmids were named SVCV chimeric plasmid-1 and chimeric plasmid-2, respectively. Through a series of semi-nested PCRs, the use of SVCV chimeric plasmids-1 and -2 was shown to ensure correct diagnoses, free from PCR contamination. The results of this study show that PCR positive controls can be created without use of viral nucleic acids or pathogen-infected tissues. The technique can be applied to quarantined material and can be used to detect other pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic Issues and Controversies in DSM-5: Return of the False Positives Problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2016-01-01

    The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was the most controversial in the manual's history. This review selectively surveys some of the most important changes in DSM-5, including structural/organizational changes, modifications of diagnostic criteria, and newly introduced categories. It analyzes why these changes led to such heated controversies, which included objections to the revision's process, its goals, and the content of altered criteria and new categories. The central focus is on disputes concerning the false positives problem of setting a valid boundary between disorder and normal variation. Finally, this review highlights key problems and issues that currently remain unresolved and need to be addressed in the future, including systematically identifying false positive weaknesses in criteria, distinguishing risk from disorder, including context in diagnostic criteria, clarifying how to handle fuzzy boundaries, and improving the guidelines for "other specified" diagnosis.

  9. False-positive amphetamine toxicology screen results in three pregnant women using labetalol.

    PubMed

    Yee, Lynn M; Wu, Danny

    2011-02-01

    Labetalol is commonly used for control of hypertension in pregnancy. A component of the workup for new-onset hypertension in pregnancy often includes a urine drug screen. A labetalol metabolite is structurally similar to amphetamine and methamphetamine, thus causing potential cross-reactivity in drug immunoassays. We present one case of cocaine-induced hypertensive crisis superimposed on chronic hypertension and two cases of severe preeclampsia for which patients required escalating doses of labetalol for hypertension, with subsequent false-positive amphetamine urine drug screen results. In pregnant women requiring labetalol for treatment of hypertensive disease, a urine drug screen may be falsely positive for amphetamines and methamphetamines. Providers should be cognizant of this possibility when interpreting the results of urine drug screens.

  10. KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, S. J.; Welch, D. L.; Kavelaars, J. J. E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2009-05-15

    A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

  11. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone.

    PubMed

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving.

  12. Modeling false positive detections in species occurrence data under different study designs.

    PubMed

    Chambert, Thierry; Miller, David A W; Nichols, James D

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of false positive detections in presence-absence data, even when they occur infrequently, can lead to severe bias when estimating species occupancy patterns. Building upon previous efforts to account for this source of observational error, we established a general framework to model false positives in occupancy studies and extend existing modeling approaches to encompass a broader range of sampling designs. Specifically, we identified three common sampling designs that are likely to cover most scenarios encountered by researchers. The different designs all included ambiguous detections, as well as some known-truth data, but their modeling differed in the level of the model hierarchy at which the known-truth information was incorporated (site level or observation level). For each model, we provide the likelihood, as well as R and BUGS code needed for implementation. We also establish a clear terminology and provide guidance to help choosing the most appropriate design and modeling approach.

  13. Frequency of false positive amphetamine screens due to bupropion using the Syva EMIT II immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Casey, Erica R; Scott, Mitchell G; Tang, Schirin; Mullins, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Bupropion is a commonly prescribed, monocyclic antidepressant often used as an aid for smoking cessation. Several case reports have described false positive amphetamine urine drug screens (UDS) associated with bupropion. We sought to determine whether false positive amphetamine UDS due to the use of bupropion would be a frequent occurrence. We conducted an IRB-approved, retrospective chart review of all emergency department patients who underwent UDS between 1 January 2006 and 31 July 2007. All urine samples were screened using Syva EMIT II Plus immunoassay reagents. All positive screens underwent confirmation by gas chromatography (GC). We reviewed the records of patients with positive amphetamine UDS. We documented prescription use of bupropion, other antidepressants, stimulants, antipsychotics, and anti-hypertensives. We recorded evidence of polysubstance abuse (PSA) as patients who had had a documented diagnosis or laboratory evidence of abuse of at least two substances (drugs or ethanol). Of 10,011 urine drug screens, 362 (3.6%) were positive for amphetamine. GC confirmed amphetamines in 234 (65%), but failed to confirm in 128 (35%). Among the 234 confirmed, records reflected use of bupropion in three (1.3%), other antidepressants in 38 (16%), antipsychotics in 17 (8%), and amphetamine in 50 (21%). Records indicated evidence of PSA in 55 (24%). Among the 128 which failed to confirm, records reflected prescription use of bupropion in 53 (41%). None whose drug screen failed to confirm had evidence of PSA. Therapeutic use of bupropion appears to be the most frequent cause of false positive urine drug screens for amphetamines in our population.

  14. Unusual false-positive radioiodine whole-body scans in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, M; Saletnich, I; Rufini, V; Troncone, L

    1997-06-01

    Radioiodine whole-body imaging is the most accurate method in the diagnosis of metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer. However, false-positive images rarely occur. The authors report unusual cases of thymic hyperplasia and post-traumatic skull changes mimicking mediastinal, skull, or cerebral metastases. Nonthyroidal causes were diagnosed by other radionuclide studies (bone and brain scintigraphy) and CT scans. Follow-up and undetectable thyroglobulin levels helped confirm the benign cause.

  15. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  16. "Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?: Response"

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A response to Toplak et al: Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery? BMC Genomics 2010, 11:58. Background The genomewide evaluation of genetic epistasis is a computationally demanding task, and a current challenge in Genetics. HFCC (Hypothesis-Free Clinical Cloning) is one of the methods that have been suggested for genomewide epistasis analysis. In order to perform an exhaustive search of epistasis, HFCC has implemented several tools and data filters, such as the use of multiple replication groups, and direction of effect and control filters. A recent article has claimed that the use of multiple replication groups (as implemented in HFCC) does not reduce the false positive rate, and we hereby try to clarify these issues. Results/Discussion HFCC uses, as an analysis strategy, the possibility of replicating findings in multiple replication groups, in order to select a liberal subset of preliminary results that are above a statistical criterion and consistent in direction of effect. We show that the use of replication groups and the direction filter reduces the false positive rate of a study, although at the expense of lowering the overall power of the study. A post-hoc analysis of these selected signals in the combined sample could then be performed to select the most promising results. Conclusion Replication of results in independent samples is generally used in scientific studies to establish credibility in a finding. Nonetheless, the combined analysis of several datasets is known to be a preferable and more powerful strategy for the selection of top signals. HFCC is a flexible and complete analysis tool, and one of its analysis options combines these two strategies: A preliminary multiple replication group analysis to eliminate inconsistent false positive results, and a post-hoc combined-group analysis to select the top signals. PMID:20576100

  17. Identifying false-positive ST-elevation myocardial infarction in emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Tonga; Kostopoulos, Louie; Hashim, Hani; Jan, M Fuad; Gupta, Anjan; Bajwa, Tanvir; Allaqaband, Suhail

    2012-10-01

    In a push to treat ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 90 min of door-to-balloon time, emergency cardiac catheterization laboratory activation protocols bypass routine clinical assessments, raising the possibility of more frequent catheterizations in patients with no culprit coronary lesion. To determine the incidence, predictors, and prognosis of false-positive STEMI. We followed a prospective cohort of patients diagnosed with STEMI by usual criteria receiving emergency cardiac catheterization with intention of primary PCI between January 2005 and December 2007 at a tertiary care center. False-positive STEMI was defined as absence of a clear culprit lesion on coronary angiography. Of 489 patients who received emergency cardiac catheterization indicated for STEMI, 54 (11.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.3-13.8) had no culprit lesion on coronary angiography. Independent predictors of false-positive STEMI were absence of chest pain (odds ratio [OR] 18.2, 95% CI 3.7-90.1), no reciprocal ST-segment changes (OR 11.8, 95% CI 5.14-27.3), fewer than three cardiovascular risk factors (OR 9.79, 95% CI 4.0-23.8), and symptom duration longer than 6h (OR 9.2, 95% CI 3.6-23.7); all p<0.001. Using predictors, we modeled a risk score that achieved 88% (95% CI 81-94%) accuracy in identifying patients with negative coronary angiography. Among the false-positive STEMI patients, 48.1% had other serious diagnoses related to their electrocardiographic findings. When the diagnosis of STEMI is in doubt, clinicians may use predictors to quickly reassess the likelihood of an alternative diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  19. False-positive rates in two-point parametric linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Silke; Simpson, Claire L; Cropp, Cheryl D; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    Two-point linkage analyses of whole genome sequence data are a promising approach to identify rare variants that segregate with complex diseases in large pedigrees because, in theory, the causal variants have been genotyped. We used whole genome sequence data and simulated traits provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 to evaluate the proportion of false-positive findings in a binary trait using classic two-point parametric linkage analysis. False-positive genome-wide significant log of odds (LOD) scores were identified in more than 80% of 50 replicates for a binary phenotype generated by dichotomizing a quantitative trait that was simulated with a polygenic component (that was not based on any of the provided whole genome sequence genotypes). In contrast, when the trait was truly nongenetic (created by randomly assigning affected-unaffected status), the number of false-positive results was well controlled. These results suggest that when using two-point linkage analyses on whole genome sequence data, one should carefully examine regions yielding significant two-point LOD scores with multipoint analysis and that a more stringent significance threshold may be needed.

  20. Multilevel Contextual 3-D CNNs for False Positive Reduction in Pulmonary Nodule Detection.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qi; Chen, Hao; Yu, Lequan; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2017-07-01

    False positive reduction is one of the most crucial components in an automated pulmonary nodule detection system, which plays an important role in lung cancer diagnosis and early treatment. The objective of this paper is to effectively address the challenges in this task and therefore to accurately discriminate the true nodules from a large number of candidates. We propose a novel method employing three-dimensional (3-D) convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for false positive reduction in automated pulmonary nodule detection from volumetric computed tomography (CT) scans. Compared with its 2-D counterparts, the 3-D CNNs can encode richer spatial information and extract more representative features via their hierarchical architecture trained with 3-D samples. More importantly, we further propose a simple yet effective strategy to encode multilevel contextual information to meet the challenges coming with the large variations and hard mimics of pulmonary nodules. The proposed framework has been extensively validated in the LUNA16 challenge held in conjunction with ISBI 2016, where we achieved the highest competition performance metric (CPM) score in the false positive reduction track. Experimental results demonstrated the importance and effectiveness of integrating multilevel contextual information into 3-D CNN framework for automated pulmonary nodule detection in volumetric CT data. While our method is tailored for pulmonary nodule detection, the proposed framework is general and can be easily extended to many other 3-D object detection tasks from volumetric medical images, where the targeting objects have large variations and are accompanied by a number of hard mimics.

  1. False-Positive Results in Cancer Epidemiology: A Plea for Epistemological Modesty

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joseph K.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tarone, Robert E.; Lipworth, Loren; Blot, William J.

    2008-01-01

    False-positive results are inherent in the scientific process of testing hypotheses concerning the determinants of cancer and other human illnesses. Although much of what is known about the etiology of human cancers has arisen from well-conducted epidemiological studies, epidemiology has been increasingly criticized for producing findings that are often sensationalized in the media and fail to be upheld in subsequent studies. Herein we describe examples from cancer epidemiology of likely false-positive findings and discuss conditions under which such results may occur. We suggest general guidelines or principles, including the endorsement of editorial policies requiring the prominent listing of study caveats, which may help reduce the reporting of misleading results. Increased epistemological humility regarding findings in epidemiology would go a long way to diminishing the detrimental effects of false-positive results on the allocation of limited research resources, on the advancement of knowledge of the causes and prevention of cancer, and on the scientific reputation of epidemiology and would help to prevent oversimplified interpretations of results by the media and the public. PMID:18612135

  2. Flagging False Positives Following Untargeted LC-MS Characterization of Histone Post-Translational Modification Combinations.

    PubMed

    Willems, Sander; Dhaenens, Maarten; Govaert, Elisabeth; De Clerck, Laura; Meert, Paulien; Van Neste, Christophe; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2017-02-03

    Epigenetic changes can be studied with an untargeted characterization of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). While prior information about more than 20 types of histone PTMs exists, little is known about histone PTM combinations (PTMCs). Because of the combinatorial explosion it is intrinsically impossible to consider all potential PTMCs in a database search. Consequentially, high-scoring false positives with unconsidered but correct alternative isobaric PTMCs can occur. Current quality controls can neither estimate the amount of unconsidered alternatives nor flag potential false positives. Here, we propose a conceptual workflow that provides such options. In this workflow, an in silico modeling of all candidate isoforms with known-to-exist PTMs is made. The most frequently occurring PTM sets of these candidate isoforms are determined and used in several database searches. This suppresses the combinatorial explosion while considering as many candidate isoforms as possible. Finally, annotations can be classified as unique or ambiguous, the latter implying false positives. This workflow was evaluated on an LC-MS data set containing 44 histone extracts. We were able to consider 60% of all candidate isoforms. Importantly, 40% of all annotations were classified as ambiguous. This highlights the need for a more thorough evaluation of modified peptide annotations.

  3. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  4. The trazodone metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine can cause false-positive urine amphetamine immunoassay results.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jason M; Griggs, David A; Nixon, Andrea L; Long, William H; Flood, James G

    2011-07-01

    Amphetamines and methamphetamines are part of an important class of drugs included in most urine drugs of abuse screening panels, and a common assay to detect these drugs is the Amphetamines II immunoassay (Roche Diagnostics). To demonstrate that meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), a trazodone metabolite, cross-reacts in the Amphetamines II assay, we tested reference standards of m-CPP at various concentrations (200 to 20,000 g/L). We also tested real patient urine samples containing m-CPP (detected and quantified by HPLC) with no detectable amphetamine, methamphetamine, or MDMA (demonstrated by GC MS). In both the m-CPP standards and the patient urine samples, we found a strong association between m-CPP concentration and Amphetamines II immunoreactivity (r = 0.990 for the urine samples). Further, we found that patients taking trazodone can produce urine with sufficient m-CPP to result in false-positive Amphetamines II results. At our institution, false-positive amphetamine results occur not infrequently in patients taking trazodone with at least 8 trazodone-associated false-positive results during a single 26-day period. Laboratories should remain cognizant of this interference when interpreting results of this assay.

  5. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  6. THE FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER AND THE OCCURRENCE OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Christiansen, Jessie; Jenkins, Jon M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-04-01

    The Kepler mission is uniquely suited to study the frequencies of extrasolar planets. This goal requires knowledge of the incidence of false positives such as eclipsing binaries in the background of the targets, or physically bound to them, which can mimic the photometric signal of a transiting planet. We perform numerical simulations of the Kepler targets and of physical companions or stars in the background to predict the occurrence of astrophysical false positives detectable by the mission. Using real noise level estimates, we compute the number and characteristics of detectable eclipsing pairs involving main-sequence stars and non-main-sequence stars or planets, and we quantify the fraction of those that would pass the Kepler candidate vetting procedure. By comparing their distribution with that of the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) detected during the first six quarters of operation of the spacecraft, we infer the false positive rate of Kepler and study its dependence on spectral type, candidate planet size, and orbital period. We find that the global false positive rate of Kepler is 9.4%, peaking for giant planets (6-22 R{sub Circled-Plus }) at 17.7%, reaching a low of 6.7% for small Neptunes (2-4 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and increasing again for Earth-size planets (0.8-1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus }) to 12.3%. Most importantly, we also quantify and characterize the distribution and rate of occurrence of planets down to Earth size with no prior assumptions on their frequency, by subtracting from the population of actual Kepler candidates our simulated population of astrophysical false positives. We find that 16.5% {+-} 3.6% of main-sequence FGK stars have at least one planet between 0.8 and 1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus} with orbital periods up to 85 days. This result is a significant step toward the determination of eta-earth, the occurrence of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of their parent stars. There is no significant dependence of the rates of planet

  7. Factors influencing the false positive and negative rates of BCR-ABL fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chase, A; Grand, F; Zhang, J G; Blackett, N; Goldman, J; Gordon, M

    1997-04-01

    BCR-ABL fluorescence in situ hybridization has a useful role to play in experimental and clinical investigations of chronic myeloid leukaemia. However, the interpretation of results is complicated by variability in the false positive rate (FPR) and false negative rate (FNR). We therefore examined the effects on FNR and FPR of three factors, namely, the criteria used for defining a fusion signal, nucleus size, and the genomic position of the ABL breakpoint. We established two different criteria for BCR-ABL positivity: by criterion A cells were scored as positive when BCR and ABL signals were overlapping or touching and by criterion B cells were positive if they satisfied criterion A or if the signals were separated by up to one signal diameter. We measured nucleus size and Philadelphia (Ph) positivity in 573 cells from normal persons and 787 cells from the Ph+ SD-1 cell line and related results to FNRs and FPRs. We also assessed the FNR in Ph+ CFU-GM colonies from five patients with different ABL breakpoints. We showed that each of these factors influenced the FNR and FPR. The less strict criterion (B) for Ph positivity increased the FPR but reduced the FNR, the FPR increased as the nucleus size decreased, and the FNR was greatest in CML cells with a 5' ABL breakpoint. We conclude that these factors should be considered when evaluating the results of FISH studies to detect the BCR-ABL fusion gene and that analogous factors may influence results of FISH studies directed at other fusion genes.

  8. Detection of false positive mutations in BRCA gene by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Moushumi; Kumar, Dushyant; Panigrahi, Manoj Kumar; Chowdhary, Meenakshi; Mehta, Anurag

    2016-11-15

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are implicated in 20-25% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. New age sequencing platforms have revolutionized massively parallel sequencing in clinical practice by providing cost effective, rapid, and sensitive sequencing. This study critically evaluates the false positives in multiplex panels and suggests the need for careful analysis. We employed multiplex PCR based BRCA1 and BRCA2 community Panel with ion torrent PGM machine for evaluation of these mutations. Out of all 41samples analyzed for BRCA1 and BRCA2 five were found with 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) at Chr13:32906565 position and one sample with 1032_1033 insA(Asn346fs) at Chr13:32906647, both being frame-shift mutations in BRCA2 gene. 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) mutation is reported as pathogenic allele in NCBI dbSNP. On examination of IGV for all these samples, it was seen that both mutations had 'A' nucleotide insertion at 950, and 1032 position in exon 10 of BRCA2 gene. Sanger Sequencing did not confirm these insertions. Next-generation sequencing shows great promise by allowing rapid mutational analysis of multiple genes in human cancer but our results indicate the need for careful sequence analysis to avoid false positive results.

  9. False positive tests for anti-hepatitis C antibodies and the problem of notifying blood donors.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shany, S; Green, M S; Shinar, E

    1996-06-01

    All donated blood in Israel is tested for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and donors are notified of the result. There is evidence that at low antibody titres, the percentage of false positives may be high, with consequent labelling of healthy people as being infected with HCV. In this study we examined the correlation between anti-HCV antibody titres determined by a second generation EIA test with supplemental EIA tests and evidence of abnormal liver function. Blood samples of 201 Israeli civilians who donated blood during 1992 and were repeat reactive for anti-HCV antibody based on second generation EIA, were tested by a supplemental test. Follow-up data were obtained from the donors and their family physicians. Results of anti-HCV EIA tests on two separate occasions of blood donation were highly correlated with each other (r = 0.86). Positive supplemental tests and abnormal liver function tests were found only in those subjects with high antibody titres. Furthermore low antibody titres were more prevalent during the winter months, suggesting that seasonal intercurrent infections may increase the percentage of false positives. A high proportion of blood donors labelled as anti-HCV antibody positive based on low antibody titres, may not be at increased risk of carrying HCV. Since labelling would result in creating unnecessary anxiety among blood donors, it is important to confirm such results with test such as radioimmunoblot assay (RIBA).

  10. PET-CT in presurgical lymph node staging in non-small cell lung cancer: the importance of false-negative and false-positive findings.

    PubMed

    Bustos García de Castro, A; Ferreirós Domínguez, J; Delgado Bolton, R; Fernández Pérez, C; Cabeza Martínez, B; García García-Esquinas, M; Carreras Delgado, J L

    To assess the importance of false-negative and false-positive findings in computed tomography (CT) and (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal lymph node staging in patients undergoing surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This retrospective study included 113 consecutive patients and 120 resected NSCLCs; 22 patients received neoadjuvant treatment. We compared the findings on preoperative (18)F-FDG PET-CT studies with the postoperative pathology findings. Lymph node size and primary tumor size were measured with CT, and lymph nodes and primary tumors were evaluated qualitatively and semiquantitatively (using standardized uptake values (SUVmax)) with PET. Metastatic lymph nodes were found in 26 (21.7%) of the 120 tumors and in 41 (7.7%) of the 528 lymph node stations analyzed. (18)F-FDG PET-CT yielded 53.8% sensitivity, 76.6% specificity, 38.9% positive predictive value, 85.7% negative predictive value, and 71.7% diagnostic accuracy. The false-negative rate was 14.2%. Multivariable analysis found that the factors associated with false-negative findings were a moderate degree of differentiation in the primary tumor (p = 0.005) and an SUVmax of the primary tumor >4 (p = 0.027). The false-positive rate was 61.1%, and the multivariable analysis found that lymph node size >1cm was associated with false-positive findings (p < 0.001). In mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with NSCLC, (18)F-FDG PET-CT improves the specificity and negative predictive value and helps clinicians to select the patients that will benefit from surgery. Given the high rate of false positives, histological confirmation of positive cases is recommendable. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimating False Positive Contamination in Crater Annotations from Citizen Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P. D.; Bugiolacchi, R.; Thacker, N. A.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based citizen science often involves the classification of image features by large numbers of minimally trained volunteers, such as the identification of lunar impact craters under the Moon Zoo project. Whilst such approaches facilitate the analysis of large image data sets, the inexperience of users and ambiguity in image content can lead to contamination from false positive identifications. We give an approach, using Linear Poisson Models and image template matching, that can quantify levels of false positive contamination in citizen science Moon Zoo crater annotations. Linear Poisson Models are a form of machine learning which supports predictive error modelling and goodness-of-fits, unlike most alternative machine learning methods. The proposed supervised learning system can reduce the variability in crater counts whilst providing predictive error assessments of estimated quantities of remaining true verses false annotations. In an area of research influenced by human subjectivity, the proposed method provides a level of objectivity through the utilisation of image evidence, guided by candidate crater identifications.

  12. Characteristics of false positive findings in CT colonography CAD: a comparison of two fecal tagging regimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Lia; Delsanto, Silvia; Agliozzo, Silvano; Baggio, Riccardo; Belluccio, Erika; Correale, Loredana; Genova, Dario; Bert, Alberto; Regge, Daniele

    2009-02-01

    The successful application of Computer Aided Detection schemes to CT Colonography depends not only on their performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity, but also on the interaction with the radiologist, and thus ultimately on factors such as the nature of CAD prompts and the reading paradigm. Fecal tagging is emerging as a widely accepted technique for patient preparation, and patient-friendlier schemes are being proposed in an effort to increase compliance to screening programs; the interaction between CAD and FT regimens should likewise be taken into account. In this scenario, an analysis of the characteristics of CAD prompts is of paramount importance in order to guide further research, both from clinical and technical viewpoints. The CAD scheme analyzed in this paper is essentially composed of five steps: electronic cleansing, colon surface extraction, polyp candidate segmentation, pre-filtering of residual tagged stool and classification of the generated candidates in true polyps vs. false alarms. False positives were divided into six categories: untagged and tagged solid stool, haustral folds, extra-colonic candidates, ileocecal valve and cleansing artifacts. A full cathartic preparation was compared with a semi-cathartic regimen with sameday fecal tagging, which is characterized by higher patient acceptance but also higher inhomogeneity. The distribution of false positives at segmentation reflects the quality of preparation, as more inhomogeneous tagging results in a higher number of untagged solid stool and cleansing artifacts.

  13. Estimating False Positive Contamination in Crater Annotations from Citizen Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P. D.; Bugiolacchi, R.; Thacker, N. A.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Web-based citizen science often involves the classification of image features by large numbers of minimally trained volunteers, such as the identification of lunar impact craters under the Moon Zoo project. Whilst such approaches facilitate the analysis of large image data sets, the inexperience of users and ambiguity in image content can lead to contamination from false positive identifications. We give an approach, using Linear Poisson Models and image template matching, that can quantify levels of false positive contamination in citizen science Moon Zoo crater annotations. Linear Poisson Models are a form of machine learning which supports predictive error modelling and goodness-of-fits, unlike most alternative machine learning methods. The proposed supervised learning system can reduce the variability in crater counts whilst providing predictive error assessments of estimated quantities of remaining true verses false annotations. In an area of research influenced by human subjectivity, the proposed method provides a level of objectivity through the utilisation of image evidence, guided by candidate crater identifications.

  14. Factors Associated With Rates of False-Positive and False-Negative Results From Digital Mammography Screening: An Analysis of Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Heidi D; O'Meara, Ellen S; Kerlikowske, Karla; Balch, Steven; Miglioretti, Diana

    2016-02-16

    Women screened with digital mammography may receive false-positive and false-negative results and subsequent imaging and biopsies. How these outcomes vary by age, time since the last screening, and individual risk factors is unclear. To determine factors associated with false-positive and false-negative digital mammography results, additional imaging, and biopsies among a general population of women screened for breast cancer. Analysis of registry data. Participating facilities at 5 U.S. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium breast imaging registries with linkages to pathology databases and tumor registries. 405,191 women aged 40 to 89 years screened with digital mammography between 2003 and 2011. A total of 2963 were diagnosed with invasive cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ within 12 months of screening. Rates of false-positive and false-negative results and recommendations for additional imaging and biopsies from a single screening round; comparisons by age, time since the last screening, and risk factors. Rates of false-positive results (121.2 per 1000 women [95% CI, 105.6 to 138.7]) and recommendations for additional imaging (124.9 per 1000 women [CI, 109.3 to 142.3]) were highest among women aged 40 to 49 years and decreased with increasing age. Rates of false-negative results (1.0 to 1.5 per 1000 women) and recommendations for biopsy (15.6 to 17.5 per 1000 women) did not differ greatly by age. Results did not differ by time since the last screening. False-positive rates were higher for women with risk factors, particularly family history of breast cancer; previous benign breast biopsy result; high breast density; and, for younger women, low body mass index. Confounding by variation in patient-level characteristics and outcomes across registries and regions may have been present. Some factors, such as numbers of first- and second-degree relatives with breast cancer and diagnoses associated with previous benign biopsy results, were not examined. False-positive

  15. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  16. Occurrence of false-positive most probable number tests for fecal streptococci in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Buck, J D

    1969-10-01

    By the use of the most probable number technique with azide dextrose and ethyl violet azide broths for enterococci, the common occurrence of false-positive tests was noted when marine and estuarine waters were sampled. Organisms isolated included a marine bacterium, gram-positive and gram-negative nonmarine bacteria, and yeasts. All cultures were capable of growth in azide-dextrose, ethyl violet-azide, and KF broths. Representative isolates grew in media containing 0.08% NaN(3). The tentatively accepted most probable number method for fecal streptococci is thus of dubious value in assessment of sewage pollution levels in estuarine waters. All positive tubes must be examined microscopically for the presence of nonstreptococcal forms.

  17. Occurrence of False-Positive Most Probable Number Tests for Fecal Streptococci in Marine Waters1

    PubMed Central

    Buck, John D.

    1969-01-01

    By the use of the most probable number technique with azide dextrose and ethyl violet azide broths for enterococci, the common occurrence of false-positive tests was noted when marine and estuarine waters were sampled. Organisms isolated included a marine bacterium, gram-positive and gram-negative nonmarine bacteria, and yeasts. All cultures were capable of growth in azide-dextrose, ethyl violet-azide, and KF broths. Representative isolates grew in media containing 0.08% NaN3. The tentatively accepted most probable number method for fecal streptococci is thus of dubious value in assessment of sewage pollution levels in estuarine waters. All positive tubes must be examined microscopically for the presence of nonstreptococcal forms. PMID:4983956

  18. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy.

  19. AN A PRIORI INVESTIGATION OF ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES IN GROUND-BASED TRANSITING PLANET SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Tom M.; Sackett, Penny D.

    2010-03-20

    Astrophysical false positives due to stellar eclipsing binaries pose one of the greatest challenges to ground-based surveys for transiting hot Jupiters. We have used known properties of multiple star systems and hot Jupiter systems to predict, a priori, the number of such false detections and the number of genuine planet detections recovered in two hypothetical but realistic ground-based transit surveys targeting fields close to the galactic plane (b {approx} 10{sup 0}): a shallow survey covering a magnitude range 10 < V < 13 and a deep survey covering a magnitude range 15 < V < 19. Our results are consistent with the commonly reported experience of false detections outnumbering planet detections by a factor of {approx}10 in shallow surveys, while in our synthetic deep survey we find {approx}1-2 false detections for every planet detection. We characterize the eclipsing binary configurations that are most likely to cause false detections and find that they can be divided into three main types: (1) two dwarfs undergoing grazing transits, (2) two dwarfs undergoing low-latitude transits in which one component has a substantially smaller radius than the other, and (3) two eclipsing dwarfs blended with one or more physically unassociated foreground stars. We also predict that a significant fraction of hot Jupiter detections are blended with the light from other stars, showing that care must be taken to identify the presence of any unresolved neighbors in order to obtain accurate estimates of planetary radii. This issue is likely to extend to terrestrial planet candidates in the CoRoT and Kepler transit surveys, for which neighbors of much fainter relative brightness will be important.

  20. Application of artificial neural networks for reduction of false-positive detections in digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Lin, J S; Ligomenides, P A; Freedman, M T; Mun, S K

    1993-01-01

    A methodology based on the fuzzy set theory and the convolution neural network (CNN) architecture is proposed to tackle the problem of reducing false-positive rate in automatic lung nodule detection. The CNN which simulates human visual mechanism was trained by a supervised back-propagation algorithm based on fuzzy membership functions. The training and testing database consists of image blocks (each 32 x 32 pixels) of suspected lung nodule areas (nodule candidates) which were generated from our pre-scanning program [1]. A linguistic label was assigned to each nodule candidate of the training set, then the label was converted to a membership value through a pre-defined membership function and used as teaching signal (desired outputs) during the network learning. Before the nodule candidate was fed to the network input, it was pre-processed to reduce the complex background noise and the contrast discrepancy resulted from film development. During the network testing phase, a defuzzification process was applied to decipher the trained network's output triggered by the nodule candidate in the testing set. Finally, a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the CNN's performance based on the defuzzified output of the testing database. Preliminary results showed an average Az (the performance index) of 0.84 which is equivalent to 0.80 true-positive detection (sensitivity) with an average 2-3 false-positive detections per chest image.

  1. Reduction of false positives in lung nodule detection using a two-level neural classification.

    PubMed

    Lin, J S; Lo, S B; Hasegawa, A; Freedman, M T; Mun, S K

    1996-01-01

    The authors have developed a neural-digital computer-aided diagnosis system, based on a parameterized two-level convolution neural network (CNN) architecture and on a special multilabel output encoding procedure. The developed architecture was trained, tested, and evaluated specifically on the problem of diagnosis of lung cancer nodules found on digitized chest radiographs. The system performs automatic "suspect" localization, feature extraction, and diagnosis of a particular pattern-class aimed at a high degree of "true-positive fraction" detection and low "false-positive fraction" detection. In this paper, the authors aim at the presentation of the two-level neural classification method in reducing false-positives in their system. They employed receiver operating characteristics (ROC) method with the area under the ROC curve (A(z)) as the performance index to evaluate all the simulation results. The two-level CNN showed superior performance (A(z)=0.93) to the single-level CNN (A(z)=0.85). The proposed two-level CNN architecture is proven to be promising and to be extensible, problem-independent, and therefore, applicable to other medical or difficult diagnostic tasks in two-dimensional (2-D) image environments.

  2. Application of artificial neural networks for reduction of false-positive detections in digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J. S.; Ligomenides, P. A.; Freedman, M. T.; Mun, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology based on the fuzzy set theory and the convolution neural network (CNN) architecture is proposed to tackle the problem of reducing false-positive rate in automatic lung nodule detection. The CNN which simulates human visual mechanism was trained by a supervised back-propagation algorithm based on fuzzy membership functions. The training and testing database consists of image blocks (each 32 x 32 pixels) of suspected lung nodule areas (nodule candidates) which were generated from our pre-scanning program [1]. A linguistic label was assigned to each nodule candidate of the training set, then the label was converted to a membership value through a pre-defined membership function and used as teaching signal (desired outputs) during the network learning. Before the nodule candidate was fed to the network input, it was pre-processed to reduce the complex background noise and the contrast discrepancy resulted from film development. During the network testing phase, a defuzzification process was applied to decipher the trained network's output triggered by the nodule candidate in the testing set. Finally, a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the CNN's performance based on the defuzzified output of the testing database. Preliminary results showed an average Az (the performance index) of 0.84 which is equivalent to 0.80 true-positive detection (sensitivity) with an average 2-3 false-positive detections per chest image. PMID:8130511

  3. Peptizer, a tool for assessing false positive peptide identifications and manually validating selected results.

    PubMed

    Helsens, Kenny; Timmerman, Evy; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart

    2008-12-01

    False positive peptide identifications are a major concern in the field of peptidecentric, mass spectrometry-driven gel-free proteomics. They occur in regions where the score distributions of true positives and true negatives overlap. Removal of these false positive identifications necessarily involves a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity. Existing postprocessing tools typically rely on a fixed or semifixed set of assumptions in their attempts to optimize both the sensitivity and the specificity of peptide and protein identification using MS/MS spectra. Because of the expanding diversity in available proteomics technologies, however, these postprocessing tools often struggle to adapt to emerging technology-specific peculiarity. Here we present a novel tool named Peptizer that solves this adaptability issue by making use of pluggable assumptions. This research-oriented postprocessing tool also includes a graphical user interface to perform efficient manual validation of suspect identifications for optimal sensitivity recovery. Peptizer is open source software under the Apache2 license and is written in Java.

  4. Using biological data from field studies with multiple reference sites as a basis for environmental management: the risks for false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Niklas

    2011-03-01

    Field surveys of biological responses can provide valuable information about environmental status and anthropogenic stress. However, it is quite usual for biological variables to differ between sites or change between two periods of time also in the absence of an impact. This means that there is an obvious risk that natural variation will be interpreted as environmental impact, or that relevant effects will be missed due to insufficient statistical power. Furthermore, statistical methods tend to focus on the risks for Type-I error, i.e. false positives. For environmental management, the risk for false negatives is (at least) equally important. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the probabilities for false positives and negatives are affected by experimental set up (number of reference sites and samples per site), decision criteria (statistical method and α-level) and effect size. A model was constructed to simulate data from multiple reference sites, a negative control and a positive control. The negative control was taken from the same distribution as the reference sites and the positive control was just outside the normal range. Using the model, the probabilities to get false positives and false negatives were calculated when a conventional statistical test, based on a null hypothesis of no difference, was used along with alternative tests that were based on the normal range of natural variation. Here, it is tested if an investigated site is significantly inside (equivalence test) and significantly outside (interval test) the normal range. Furthermore, it was tested how the risks for false positives and false negatives are affected by changes in α-level and effect size. The results of the present study show that the strategy that best balances the risks between false positives and false negatives is to use the equivalence test. Besides tests with tabulated p-values, estimates generated using a bootstrap routine were included in the present

  5. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite: Simulations of Planet Detections and Astrophysical False Positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Peter W.; Winn, Joshua N.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Deming, Drake; Dressing, Courtney D.; Latham, David W.; Levine, Alan M.; McCullough, Peter R.; Morton, Timothy; Ricker, George R.; Vanderspek, Roland; Woods, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA-sponsored Explorer mission that will perform a wide-field survey for planets that transit bright host stars. Here, we predict the properties of the transiting planets that TESS will detect along with the EB stars that produce false-positive photometric signals. The predictions are based on Monte Carlo simulations of the nearby population of stars, occurrence rates of planets derived from Kepler, and models for the photometric performance and sky coverage of the TESS cameras. We expect that TESS will find approximately 1700 transiting planets from 2× {10}5 pre-selected target stars. This includes 556 planets smaller than twice the size of Earth, of which 419 are hosted by M dwarf stars and 137 are hosted by FGK dwarfs. Approximately 130 of the R< 2 {R}\\oplus planets will have host stars brighter than {K}s=9. Approximately 48 of the planets with R< 2 {R}\\oplus lie within or near the habitable zone (0.2< S/{S}\\oplus < 2); between 2 and 7 such planets have host stars brighter than {K}s=9. We also expect approximately 1100 detections of planets with radii 2-4 {R}\\oplus , and 67 planets larger than 4 {R}\\oplus . Additional planets larger than 2 {R}\\oplus can be detected around stars that are not among the pre-selected target stars, because TESS will also deliver full-frame images at a 30-minute cadence. The planet detections are accompanied by over 1000 astrophysical false positives. We discuss how TESS data and ground-based observations can be used to distinguish the false positives from genuine planets. We also discuss the prospects for follow-up observations to measure the masses and atmospheres of the TESS planets.

  6. Power and false-positive rate in QTL detection with near-isogenic line libraries.

    PubMed

    Falke, K C; Frisch, M

    2011-04-01

    Libraries of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection in model species and economically important crops. The experimental design and genetic architecture of the considered traits determine the statistical properties of QTL detection. The objectives of our simulation study were to (i) investigate the population sizes required to develop NIL libraries in barley and maize, (ii) compare NIL libraries with nonoverlapping and overlapping donor segments and (iii) study the number of QTLs and the size of their effects with respect to the power and the false-positive rate of QTL detection. In barley, the development of NIL libraries with target segment lengths of 10 c and marker distances of 5 cM was possible using a BC(3)S(2) backcrossing scheme and population sizes of 140. In maize, population sizes larger than 200 were required. Selection for the recipient parent genome at markers flanking the target segments with distances between 5 and 10 cM was required for an efficient control of the false-positive rate. NIL libraries with nonoverlapping donor chromosome segments had a greater power of QTL detection and a smaller false-positive rate than libraries with overlapping segments. Major genes explaining 30% of the genotypic difference between the donor and recipient were successfully detected even with low heritabilities of 0.5, whereas for minor genes explaining 5 !or 10%, high heritabilities of 0.8 or 0.9 were required. The presented results can assist geneticists and breeders in the efficient development of NIL libraries for QTL detection.

  7. Parathyroid incidentalomas detected during thyroid ultrasonography and effect of chronic thyroiditis on false positive parathyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Didem; Arpaci, Dilek; Ucler, Rifki; Cuhaci, Neslihan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of parathyroid incidentalomas in patients referred for thyroid ultrasonography (US) and investigate the role of chronic thyroiditis on false positive lesions. Patients suspected to have parathyroid lesions during thyroid US were recorded prospectively between August 2009 and January 2010. Patients referred for parathyroid US and patients with known high serum calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were excluded. Suspected parathyroid lesions were defined as hypoechoic, homogeneous, solid lesions with regular margins located outside the thyroid lobe, most commonly inferior to the thyroid gland. Thyroid US was performed in 6,528 patients. There were 78 patients (1.19 %) (73 female and 5 male) with suspected parathyroid lesion. The diagnosis of a true parathyroid adenoma was confirmed in 6 (7.69 %) patients. In patients with true adenoma, mean serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH levels were 10.57 ± 0.48 mg/dl, 3.03 ± 0.52 mg/dl, and 182.91 ± 46.62 pg/ml, respectively. Among 72 patients with false positive parathyroid lesion, antithyroid peroxidase antibody was positive in 50 (69.4 %), antithyroglobulin antibody was positive in 46 (63.9 %), and one of these antibodies were positive in 59 (81.9 %) patients. Also, 46 (63.9 %) of these patients had thyroid dysfunctions (43 hypothyroidism and 3 hyperthyroidism) and 59 (81.9 %) had chronic thyroiditis ultrasonographically. Parathyroid incidentaloma was detected in 0.09 % of patients referred for thyroid US. The presence of clinically or ultrasonographically chronic thyroiditis might cause inadvertent interpretation of a hypoechoic lesion as a parathyroid pathology during thyroid US.

  8. False-positive Trichuris suis egg counts in pigs in relation to coprophagia.

    PubMed

    Boes, J; Johansen, M V; Eriksen, L; Bøgh, H O; Nansen, P; Stephenson, L S

    1998-03-01

    Sixteen non-infected control pigs housed together with 16 pigs infected with Trichuris suis, excreted T. suis eggs in their faeces (range 20-4, 960 eggs per gram faeces (EPG)). When the control pigs were moved to clean pens, their egg counts dropped to zero EPG within five days. A significant correlation was found between T. suis egg counts of infected and control pigs penned together (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). These results suggest that false-positive faecal egg counts may be the result of coprophagia.

  9. Distinguishing True and False Positive Oxygen Signatures with Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria; Luger, Rodrigo; Barnes, Rory; Wordsworth, Robin; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    The spectral detection of oxygen (O2) or its photochemical bi-product ozone (O3) in a planetary atmosphere has been considered a robust signature of life because O2 is highly reactive and significant continuous abiotic sources were thought to be implausible. However, recent work has revealed the possibility that O2 or O3 may build up to spectrally detectable levels due to enhanced photolysis of O-bearing molecules by UV-active host stars (Domagal-Goldman et al. 2014, Tian et al. 2014) or photolysis of water and subsequent escape of hydrogen in thin (< 0.2 bar) atmospheres where the water is not cold trapped in the troposphere (Wordsworth et al. 2014). Additionally, there is the possibility that significant amounts of abiotic O2 could remain in post-runaway greenhouse atmospheres in the habitable zone of late type stars (Luger & Barnes 2014). Using photochemical and spectral models, we examine possible observing strategies that could discriminate between abiotic and biogenic oxygen scenarios. For example, false positives may be confirmed by the spectral detection of sibling molecules generated when large amounts of oxygen are photochemically produced (such as CO). False positives that result from H escape could be detected by measuring the mixing ratio of O2, which should be high (~1) when H escape causes O2 buildup. In contrast, true biosignatures could be confirmed by the simultaneous presence of a detectable reduced gas such as methane (CH4) which should not persist when O2 build up is caused by past H escape or by photochemical production of O2 in H-poor atmospheres. We use photochemical and spectral models to predict which combinations of planetary and stellar parameters will be most likely to produce conditions that would allow observational discrimination between true and false positives. We examine the spectral range, resolving power, and minimum integration times necessary to detect true and false positive indicators for a cross-section of model scenarios

  10. Brown tumor of bone: A potential source of false-positive thallium-201 localization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.J.; Seabold, J.E.; Gurll, N.J.

    1989-07-01

    Brown tumor of bone (osteitis fibrosa cystica) should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions that cause false-positive thallium-201 localization in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. We report a case of a brown tumor of the upper sternum mimicking a superior mediastinal parathyroid neoplasm in a patient with persistent hyperparathyroidism 9 years after a negative neck exploration (with subtotal thyroidectomy and thymectomy). A /sup 201/TI//sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate subtraction scintigram demonstrated complete subtraction of this /sup 201/TI focus.

  11. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE Team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  12. False positive I-131 MIBG due to dilated renal pelvis: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, R.H.; Mahmoud, S.; Ibrahim, A.; al-Gazzar, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    A case of false positive I-131 MIBG imaging for detection of pheochromocytoma is presented. There was an area of increased tracer uptake in the left renal region that showed steadily reducing activity over a period of three days. This raised the suspicion of a dilated renal pelvis, which was later confirmed by Tc-99m DTPA imaging. It is advisable in cases of ambiguous I-131 MIBG imaging to use Tc-99m DTPA rather than Tc-99m DMSA for localizing the kidneys and renal pelvis.

  13. Factors Associated with Rates of False-positive and False-negative Results from Digital Mammography Screening: An Analysis of Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Heidi D.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Balch, Steven; Miglioretti, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background Women screened with digital mammography may experience false-positive and false-negative results and subsequent additional imaging and biopsies. It is unclear how these outcomes vary by age, time since last screening, and individual risk factors. Objective To determine factors associated with false-positive and false-negative digital mammography results, additional imaging, and biopsies among a general population of women screened for breast cancer. Design Analysis of registry data. Setting Participating facilities at five U.S. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium breast imaging registries with linkages to pathology databases and tumor registries. Patients 405,191 women aged 40–89 years screened with digital mammography between 2003–2011; 2,963 were diagnosed with invasive cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ within 12 months of screening. Measurements Rates of false-positive and false-negative results and recommendations for additional imaging and biopsies from a single screening round, and comparisons by age, time since last screening, and risk factors. Results Rates of false-positive results (121.2/1,000 women; 95% CI 105.6 to 138.7) and recommendations for additional imaging (124.9/1,000; 95% CI 109.3 to 142.3) were highest among women aged 40–49 years and decreased with age; rates of false-negative results (1.0 to 1.5/1,000) and recommendations for biopsy (5.6 to 17.5/1,000) did not differ greatly by age. Results did not differ by time since last screening. All rates were higher for women with risk factors, particularly family history of breast cancer, previous benign breast biopsy, high breast density, and low body mass index for younger women. Limitations Additional factors were not examined, including numbers of first- and second-degree relatives with breast cancer and diagnoses of previous benign biopsies. Conclusions False-positive results and additional imaging are common, particularly for younger women and those with risk factors, while

  14. False positive RNA binding activities after Ni-affinity purification from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Milojevic, Tetyana; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Romeo, Alessandra; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Bläsi, Udo

    2013-06-01

    A His-tag is often added by means of recombinant DNA technology to a heterologous protein of interest, which is then over-produced in Escherchia coli and purified by one-step immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Owing to the presence of 24 histidines at the C-termini of the hexameric E. coli RNA chaperone Hfq, the protein co-purifies with His-tagged proteins of interest. As Hfq can bind to distinct RNA substrates with high affinity, its presence can obscure studies performed with (putative) RNA binding activities purified by IMAC. Here, we present results for a seemingly positive RNA-binding activity, exemplifying that false-positive results can be avoided if the protein of interest is either subjected to further purification step(s) or produced in an E. coli hfq- strain.

  15. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  16. Robust Correlation Analyses: False Positive and Power Validation Using a New Open Source Matlab Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Pernet, Cyril R.; Wilcox, Rand; Rousselet, Guillaume A.

    2012-01-01

    Pearson’s correlation measures the strength of the association between two variables. The technique is, however, restricted to linear associations and is overly sensitive to outliers. Indeed, a single outlier can result in a highly inaccurate summary of the data. Yet, it remains the most commonly used measure of association in psychology research. Here we describe a free Matlab(R) based toolbox (http://sourceforge.net/projects/robustcorrtool/) that computes robust measures of association between two or more random variables: the percentage-bend correlation and skipped-correlations. After illustrating how to use the toolbox, we show that robust methods, where outliers are down weighted or removed and accounted for in significance testing, provide better estimates of the true association with accurate false positive control and without loss of power. The different correlation methods were tested with normal data and normal data contaminated with marginal or bivariate outliers. We report estimates of effect size, false positive rate and power, and advise on which technique to use depending on the data at hand. PMID:23335907

  17. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses. PMID:26166306

  18. A high false positive rate for Kepler planetary candidates of giant stars using asterodensity profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-20

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ≅ 70% ± 30%.

  19. Compliance With Screening Mammography Guidelines After a False-Positive Mammogram.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Lara A; Lind, Kimberly E; Gutierrez, Eric J

    2016-09-01

    To assess whether women with a false-positive mammogram who do return for screening are less likely to be compliant with screening mammography guidelines than are women with a negative mammogram. This institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective cohort study includes women >40 years old who received 9,385 consecutive, nonbaseline screening mammograms between December 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013. Using linear regression, we evaluated differences in time between mammograms by prior recall status, after adjusting for location of current mammogram (outpatient office versus mobile unit) and age. Using Fisher's exact test, we evaluated the association between compliance with screening guidelines and the recall status on prior mammogram, and compared by location the proportions of noncompliant women who were recalled from prior mammogram. Time between mammograms does not differ based on prior recall status (P = .83). There is no association between compliance with screening mammography guidelines and recall status on prior mammogram (ACR guidelines P = .398, United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines P = .416). Noncompliant women recalled on prior mammogram are more likely to undergo mammography at the outpatient office rather than the mobile unit (ACR guidelines P = .0004, United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines P = .0032). A prior false-positive mammogram is not a significant deterrent to compliance with screening guidelines in those women who return for screening. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A High False Positive Rate for Kepler Planetary Candidates of Giant Stars using Asterodensity Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-01

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ~= 70% ± 30%. Based on archival data of the Kepler telescope.

  1. Allelic Dropout Can Cause False-Positive Results for Prader-Willi and Angelman Syndrome Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hussain Askree, Syed; Hjelm, Lawrence N.; Ali Pervaiz, Muhammad; Adam, Margaret; Bean, Lora J.H.; Hedge, Madhuri; Coffee, Bradford

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of many genetic disorders relies on a combination of clinical suspicion and confirmatory genetic testing. Our laboratory uses a standard methylation-sensitive PCR (MSP) to target the differentially methylated SNRPN gene to test for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome. One patient, a 27-month-old female, who lacked the classical clinical features of PWS, but had a molecular diagnosis of PWS by MSP by another laboratory, had repeat testing in our laboratory. Testing by MSP in our laboratory also identified an apparent loss of the unmethylated paternal allele, consistent with a diagnosis of PWS. Confirmatory testing using Southern blot analysis with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme showed a normal pattern of methylation, detecting both the methylated maternal and unmethylated paternal alleles. To investigate these discrepant results, we amplified and sequenced the SNRPN locus in this patient and identified a single nucleotide change within the binding site for the unmethylated DNA-specific primer. These results indicate this nucleotide change led to allelic dropout in the MSP analysis, yielding the false-positive result. Subsequently, MSP analysis using an alternate primer set that was developed by our laboratory detected both methylated and unmethylated alleles. These findings illustrate that allelic dropout due to the presence of rare polymorphisms can cause false-positive results in commonly used MSP assays and lead to molecular misdiagnosis. PMID:21227401

  2. Detection of circulating prostate tumor cells: alternative spliced variant of PSM induced false-positive result.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Hisashi; Nagao, Kumi; Kawakita, Mutsuji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Harasawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Noboru; Hikiji, Kazumasa; Tsukada, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    RT-nested PCR has been introduced as a highly specific and sensitive assay method to detect the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) mRNA in peripheral blood. However, appreciable percentages of false-positive cases have been reported. Additionally, primer sets reported previously could not discriminate between PSM and PSM', an alternatively spliced variant, mRNA. These isoforms can be produced from a single gene. Switches in alternative splicing patterns are often controlled with strict cell-type or developmental-stage specificity. Therefore, it is most important to discriminate between PSM mRNA and PSM' mRNA. Using our highly specific primer sets, PSM mRNA was detected in 3 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (12.5%) and was not detected in peripheral blood of 11 normal female volunteers. PSM' mRNA was detected in 5 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (20.8%) and in 4 of 11 of normal female volunteers (36.4%). PSM' mRNA induced false-positive results, it is important for genetic diagnosis of prostate cancer to discriminate between PSM and PSM' using our primer sets with high specificity. The advances in the uniquely designed primer sets may allow researchers to detect a real PSM mRNA without PSM' mRNA.

  3. Pulmonary Nodule Detection in CT Images: False Positive Reduction Using Multi-View Convolutional Networks.

    PubMed

    Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Litjens, Geert; Gerke, Paul; Jacobs, Colin; van Riel, Sarah J; Wille, Mathilde Marie Winkler; Naqibullah, Matiullah; Sanchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) system for pulmonary nodules using multi-view convolutional networks (ConvNets), for which discriminative features are automatically learnt from the training data. The network is fed with nodule candidates obtained by combining three candidate detectors specifically designed for solid, subsolid, and large nodules. For each candidate, a set of 2-D patches from differently oriented planes is extracted. The proposed architecture comprises multiple streams of 2-D ConvNets, for which the outputs are combined using a dedicated fusion method to get the final classification. Data augmentation and dropout are applied to avoid overfitting. On 888 scans of the publicly available LIDC-IDRI dataset, our method reaches high detection sensitivities of 85.4% and 90.1% at 1 and 4 false positives per scan, respectively. An additional evaluation on independent datasets from the ANODE09 challenge and DLCST is performed. We showed that the proposed multi-view ConvNets is highly suited to be used for false positive reduction of a CAD system.

  4. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-07-13

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses.

  5. False-Positive Results after Environmental Pinworm PCR Testing due to Rhabditid Nematodes in Corncob Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-01-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and –negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  6. False-positive results after environmental pinworm PCR testing due to Rhabditid nematodes in Corncob bedding.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and -negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding.

  7. Robust correlation analyses: false positive and power validation using a new open source matlab toolbox.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Cyril R; Wilcox, Rand; Rousselet, Guillaume A

    2012-01-01

    Pearson's correlation measures the strength of the association between two variables. The technique is, however, restricted to linear associations and is overly sensitive to outliers. Indeed, a single outlier can result in a highly inaccurate summary of the data. Yet, it remains the most commonly used measure of association in psychology research. Here we describe a free Matlab((R)) based toolbox (http://sourceforge.net/projects/robustcorrtool/) that computes robust measures of association between two or more random variables: the percentage-bend correlation and skipped-correlations. After illustrating how to use the toolbox, we show that robust methods, where outliers are down weighted or removed and accounted for in significance testing, provide better estimates of the true association with accurate false positive control and without loss of power. The different correlation methods were tested with normal data and normal data contaminated with marginal or bivariate outliers. We report estimates of effect size, false positive rate and power, and advise on which technique to use depending on the data at hand.

  8. False-positive rates associated with the use of multiple performance and symptom validity tests.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-06-01

    Performance validity test (PVT) error rates using Monte Carlo simulation reported by Berthelson and colleagues (in False positive diagnosis of malingering due to the use of multiple effort tests. Brain Injury, 27, 909-916, 2013) were compared with PVT and symptom validity test (SVT) failure rates in two nonmalingering clinical samples. At a per-test false-positive rate of 10%, Monte Carlo simulation overestimated error rates for: (i) failure of ≥2 out of 5 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (in Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003) and ACS (Pearson, Advanced clinical solutions for use with WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. San Antonio: Pearson Education, 2009) and (ii) failure of ≥2 out of 7 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003; Malingering scales for the Continuous Recognition Memory Test and Continuous Visual Memory Test. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 23, 167-180, 2009 combined). Monte Carlo overestimation is likely because PVT performances are atypical in pattern or degree for what occurs in actual neurologic, psychiatric, or developmental disorders. Consequently, PVT scores form skewed distributions with performance at ceiling and restricted range, rather than forming a standard normal distribution with mean of 0 and standard deviation of 1.0. These results support the practice of using ≥2 PVT/SVT failures as representing probable invalid clinical presentation.

  9. One Step Forward for Reducing False Positive and False Negative Compound Identifications from Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Data: New Algorithms for Constructing Extracted Ion Chromatograms and Detecting Chromatographic Peaks.

    PubMed

    Myers, Owen D; Sumner, Susan J; Li, Shuzhao; Barnes, Stephen; Du, Xiuxia

    2017-09-05

    False positive and false negative peaks detected from extracted ion chromatograms (EIC) are an urgent problem with existing software packages that preprocess untargeted liquid or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics data because they can translate downstream into spurious or missing compound identifications. We have developed new algorithms that carry out the sequential construction of EICs and detection of EIC peaks. We compare the new algorithms to two popular software packages XCMS and MZmine 2 and present evidence that these new algorithms detect significantly fewer false positives. Regarding the detection of compounds known to be present in the data, the new algorithms perform at least as well as XCMS and MZmine 2. Furthermore, we present evidence that mass tolerance in m/z should be favored rather than mass tolerance in ppm in the process of constructing EICs. The mass tolerance parameter plays a critical role in the EIC construction process and can have immense impact on the detection of EIC peaks.

  10. Essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia with false-positive serological tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R R; Pusey, C; Schifferli, J; Johnston, N A

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of serum from a patient with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis showed a mixed cryoglobulin with a monoclonal IgM kappa-antiglobulin component (6.5 mg/ml), strong rheumatoid factor activity (latex titre 1/5000), and positive serological tests for syphilis (fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay). After removal of antiglobulin activity by immunoabsorption with heat-aggregated gammaglobulin all serological test results for treponemal infection became negative. Serological tests for syphilis and rheumatoid factor on the supernatant from whole serum (minus cryoglobulin) remained positive though at a lower titre (latex 1/1250). Cryoglobulin isolated from whole serum retained rheumatoid and TPHA reactivity but was negative in the FTA-ABS test. The IgM and IgG cryoglobulin components purified by gel filtration on Sepharose showed no antitreponemal reactivity even when tested individually. Reducing the concentration of cryoglobulin to 1.5 mg/ml by plasma exchange converted the test results for syphilis to doubtful-positive or negative. These results indicated that high concentrations of antiglobulin activity may be associated with falsely positive specific antitreponemal test results and that this phenomenon depends on the concentration of cryoglobulin in the test sample. PMID:6824906

  11. Fenofibric Acid Can Cause False-Positive Urine Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Immunoassay Results.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Loreto; Gomila, Isabel; Fe, Antonia; Servera, Miguel A; Yates, Christopher; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Castanyer, Bartomeu; Barceló, Bernardino

    2015-01-01

    We present a false-positive result of ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxy-NN-methylamphetamine) screening due to the therapeutic use of fenofibrate, an antihyperlipidemic drug. Our hypothesis was that the main metabolite of fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, was responsible for this cross-reactivity on a DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay, using a cut-off of 500 ng/mL. We estimated that the addition of 225 µg/mL pure fenofibric acid to blank urine would be sufficient to result in a positive DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay. The results obtained on the urine samples analyses of the patient show that the DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay resulted negative 2 days after discontinuing fenofibrate treatment, when the urine fenofibric acid concentration corrected by creatinine and determinated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was 20.3 µg/mg creatinine. The cross-reactivity data for fenofibric acid would seem to indicate that there was insufficient concentration of measured compound to account for the positive immunochemical results for ecstasy. This apparent discrepancy can be explained in several ways, one of them is that the β-glucuronidase-resistent fenofibric acid isomers are responsible. This process could explain the low recovery of free fenofibric acid when we use the developed method for its quantification in urine samples. Positive results on immunoassay screening must be considered presumptive until confirmation with another method based on a different principle, preferably gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  12. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-06-10

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications.

  13. Acute appendicitis: clinical outcome in patients with an initial false-positive CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Joseph W; Webb, Emily M; Poder, Liina; Yeh, Benjamin M; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Coakley, Fergus V

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the clinical outcome in patients with a diagnosis of appendicitis at computed tomography (CT) in whom treatment is deemed unnecessary after clinical evaluation. After institutional review board approval, 2283 patients (856 men, 1427 women; mean age, 46 years; age range, 18-99 years) who underwent CT because they were suspected of having appendicitis between 2002 and 2007 were retrospectively identified. CT reports were reviewed, and the likelihood of appendicitis was assigned a score on a five-point scale: score 1, definitely absent; score 2, nonvisualized appendix with no secondary signs of inflammation; score 3, equivocal; score 4, probable; and score 5, definitely present. Diagnosis of appendicitis at CT was considered a false-positive result if the CT report was classified as probable or definite appendicitis but the patient was not treated within 4 days. Cases with false-positive results were reviewed by two readers blinded to patient outcome, supporting clinical data, and prospective scan interpretation, and a grade was assigned by using the same scale. Medical records were reviewed to determine outcomes. Descriptional statistics were used. Overall, 516 (23%) of 2283 patients had CT findings of probable or definite appendicitis. Thirteen (3%) of 516 patients did not receive immediate treatment for appendicitis. Of these, five (38%; 95% confidence interval: 18%, 65%) underwent later appendectomy with proved appendicitis after a mean interval of 118 days (range, 5-443 days). Seven (54%) of 13 patients never developed appendicitis across a mean follow-up of 583 days (range, 14-1460 days). One (8%) of 13 had a normal appendix at eventual surgery. Five of 13 patients with CT findings of appendicitis and reassuring clinical evaluation results in whom immediate treatment was deferred ultimately returned with appendicitis. In patients with CT results positive for appendicitis and benign or atypical clinical findings, a diagnosis of chronic or recurrent

  14. Evaluation of inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases in cytological examination for breast cancer according to histological type

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously investigated the current status of breast cytology cancer screening at seven institutes in our area of southern Fukuoka Prefecture, and found some differences in diagnostic accuracy among the institutions. In the present study, we evaluated the cases involved and noted possible reasons for their original cytological classification as inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive according to histological type. Methods We evaluated the histological findings in 5693 individuals who underwent cytological examination for breast cancer (including inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases), to determine the most common histological types and/or features in these settings and the usefulness/limitations of cytological examination for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Results Among 1152 cytologically inadequate cases, histology revealed that 75/173 (43.6%) cases were benign, including mastopathy (fibrocystic disease) in 38.6%, fibroadenoma in 24.0% and papilloma in 5.3%. Ninety-five of 173 (54.9%) cases were histologically malignant, with scirrhous growing type, invasive ductal carcinoma (SIDC) being significantly more frequent (49.5%) than papillotubular growing type (Papi-tub) (P < 0.0001), solid-tubular growing type (P = 0.0001) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (P = 0.0001). Among 458 indeterminate cases, 54/139 (38.8%) were histologically benign (mastopathy, 30.0%; fibroadenoma, 27.8%; papilloma, 26.0%) and 73/139 (52.5%) were malignant, with SIDC being the most frequent malignant tumor (37.0%). Among 52 false-negative cases, SIDC was significantly more frequent (42.3%) than DCIS (P = 0.0049) and Papi-tub (P = 0.001). There were three false-positive cases, with one each of fibroadenoma, epidermal cyst and papilloma. Conclusions The inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases showed similar histological types, notably SIDC for malignant tumors, and mastopathy

  15. Implications for the False-positive Rate in Kepler Planet Systems from Transit Duration Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Confirming transiting exoplanet candidates through traditional follow-up methods is challenging, especially for faint host stars. Most of Kepler's validated planets relied on statistical methods to separate true planets from false-positives. Multiple transiting planet systems (MTPS) have been previously shown to have low false-positive rates and over 851 planets in MTPSs have been statistically validated so far (Lissauer et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2014). We show that the period-normalized transit duration ratio (ξ) offers additional information that can be used to establish the planetary nature of these systems. We briefly discuss the observed distribution of ξ for the Q1-Q16 Kepler Candidate Search. We also utilize ξ to develop a Bayesian statistical framework combined with Monte Carlo methods to determine which pairs of planet candidates in a MTPS are consistent with the planet hypothesis for a sample of 676 MTPSs that include both candidate and confirmed planets. This analysis proves to be efficient and advantageous in that it only requires catalog-level bulk candidate properties and galactic population modeling to compute the probabilities of a myriad of stellar blend scenarios, without needing additional observational follow-up. Our results agree with the previous results of a low false-positive rate in the Kepler MTPSs. Out of our sample of 1,358 pairs of candidates, we find that about 100 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star, over 800 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star or another star blended in the photometric aperture. Further more, we find that well over a 1,000 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 to be planetary in nature, either orbiting the same star or separately orbiting two different stars in the aperture. This implies, independently of any other estimates, that most of the MTPSs detected by Kepler are very likely to be planetary in

  16. False-positive pericardial effusion due to breast attenuation on equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.

    PubMed

    Mar, Martha V; Kim, E Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) scans are used to evaluate left ventricular function and pericardial anatomy. A photopenic "U-halo" around the cardiac blood pool in the left anterior oblique (LAO) view is commonly seen with pericardial effusion. We describe findings of false-positive pericardial effusion due to breast attenuation in cancer patients. Several cases that demonstrated the photopenic U-halo in the LAO view did not have true pericardial effusion. The patients' breast size and how far the breast sagged in reference to the heart silhouette were visually observed in topograms. The oblique tilt position was evaluated to determine the effect it may have in creating the photopenic U-halo. A unique ERNA case demonstrating collateral vessels bilaterally in the breasts was used as a reference marker image to determine the effect of a slightly more anterior versus left lateral oblique tilt in the LAO view. Large breasts can overlie the heart in the LAO projection. The overlying breast can cause the appearance of pericardial effusion in the resulting image by attenuating tissues surrounding the heart. The positioning of the breast also affected the appearance of the photopenic halo. A patient with breast implants who had more upright breasts demonstrated a photopenic area anterior to the left ventricle, whereas a large breast that sagged more laterally demonstrated no photopenic area. Patients with large breasts may show a photopenic U-halo in the LAO view dependent on how far the breast sags in reference to the heart silhouette and on the positioning of the oblique tilt. The anterior image should be used to distinguish breast attenuation from a photopenic area surrounding the heart. If both the anterior view and the LAO view demonstrate the U-halo, acquiring another view with a slightly more anterior or lateral oblique position will demonstrate any inconsistency in the photopenic area, thereby excluding a diagnosis of pericardial effusion.

  17. OIE white spot syndrome virus PCR gives false-positive results in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Kerry; Cullen, Bradford; Owens, Leigh

    2004-12-13

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an intranuclear bacilliform virus (IBV) that is a serious, notifiable crustacean pathogen. The Office International des Epizooties (OIE) PCR protocol for WSSV uses primer sets initially developed by Lo et al. (1996). It yields a first-step PCR amplicon of 1441 bp and a nested PCR amplicon of 941 bp. An amplicon (941 bp) purported to specifically detect WSSV was obtained when using template DNA extracted from Cherax quadricarinatus in a WSSV PCR detection protocol recommended by the OIE. Sequencing and analysis of the 941 bp amplicon and an occasional 550 bp amplicon from C. quadricarinatus revealed no phylogenetic relationship with WSSV, and suggested a possible lack of sufficient primer specificity for WSSV in the OIE test. This suggestion was supported by the fact that the OIE outer primer sequence (146F1) was present in both the forward and reverse position of the 941 bp and the forward position of the 550 bp nested amplicons from C. quadricarinatus. As WSSV is a notifiable pathogen, the consequences of false-positive results are harsh in WSSV-free zones and can lead to incorrect quarantine and unnecessary destruction of animals. Therefore, urgent attention and revision is necessary for the current OIE PCR protocol for WSSV detection.

  18. Rapid LC-MS Based High-Throughput Screening Method, Affording No False Positives or False Negatives, Identifies a New Inhibitor for Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Lakbub, Jude; Go, Eden P; Desaire, Heather

    2017-09-04

    Developing effective high-throughput screening (HTS) methods is of paramount importance in the early stage of drug discovery. While rugged and robust assays may be easily developed for certain enzymes, HTS assays designed to identify ligands that block protein binding are much more challenging to develop; attenuating the number of false positives and false negatives under high-throughput screening conditions is particularly difficult. We describe an MS-based HTS workflow that addresses these challenges. The assay mitigates false positives by selectively identifying positive hits exclusively when a ligand at the binding site of interest is displaced; it mitigates false negatives by detecting a reporter compound that ionizes well, not by detecting the ligand binder, which may not ionize. The method was validated by detecting known binders of three proteins, pepsin, maltose binding protein (MBP), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the presence of hundreds of non-binders. We also identified a novel CA binder, pifithrin-µ, which could not have been identified by any other MS-based assay because of its poor ionization efficiency. This new method addresses many of the challenges that are currently encountered during high-throughput screening.

  19. False Positive STEMI Activations in a Regional Network: Comprehensive Analysis and Clinical Impact. Results From the Catalonian Codi Infart Network.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Ander; Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Freixa, Xavier; Bosch, Xavier; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Roqué, Mercè; Sabaté, Manel; Masotti, Mónica

    2017-07-12

    ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) network activation by a noncardiologist reduces delay times but may increase the rate of false-positive STEMI diagnoses. We aimed to determine the prevalence, predictors, and clinical impact of false-positive activations within the Catalonian STEMI network (Codi Infart). From January 2010 through December 2011, all consecutive patients treated within the Codi Infart network were included. Code activations were classified as appropriate if they satisfied both electrocardiogram and clinical STEMI criteria. Appropriate activations were classified as false positives using 2 nonexclusive definitions: a) "angiographic" if a culprit coronary artery was not identified, and b) "clinical" if the discharge diagnosis was other than STEMI. In total, 5701 activations were included. Appropriate activation was performed in 87.8% of the episodes. The rate of angiographic false positives was 14.6%, while the rate of clinical false positives was 11.6%. Irrespective of the definition, female sex, left bundle branch block, and previous myocardial infarction were independent predictors of false-positive STEMI diagnoses. Using the clinical definition, hospitals without percutaneous coronary intervention and patients with complications during the first medical contact also had a false-positive STEMI diagnoses rate higher than the mean. In-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were similar for false-positive and true-positive STEMI patients after adjustment for possible confounders. False-positive STEMI diagnoses were frequent. Outcomes were similar for patients with a true-positive or false-positive STEMI diagnosis treated within a STEMI network. The presence of any modifiable predictors of a false-positive STEMI diagnosis warrants careful assessment to optimize the use of STEMI networks. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. False-positive pH aspirates after nasogastric tube insertion in head and neck tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Claudia Kate

    2012-01-01

    Nasogastric (NG) feeding tubes are commonly inserted to supplement enteral nutrition in certain patient groups, including those with head and neck cancers where swallowing may be compromised. An NHS National Patient Safety Alert was released in 2011 detailing ongoing cases of significant morbidity and mortality attached to the incorrect placement of NG feeding tubes in hospital inpatients. Since 2005, there were 21 deaths and 79 cases of harm nationally due to feeding into the lung through misplaced tubes. pH testing remains the first-line method of placement confirmation, with chest x-ray used when no aspirate is gained or where pH testing fails to confirm suitable acidity. We present a case report describing false-positive NG tube placement confirmation tests in a patient with head and neck cancer, who was administered feed into lung parenchyma with significant morbidity. We discuss the case for specific NG tube placement protocols in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:22927281

  1. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  2. False positive reduction for pulmonary nodule detection using two-dimensional principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wook-Jin; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary nodule detection is a binary classification problem. The main objective is to classify nodule from the lung computed tomography (CT) images. The intra class variability is mainly due to the grey-level variance, texture differences and shape. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel nodule detection method which is based on Two-dimensional Principal Component Analysis (2DPCA). We extract the futures using 2DPCA from nodule candidate images. Nodule candidates are classified using threshold. The proposed method reduces False Positive (FP) rate. We tested the proposed algorithm by using Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC) database of National Cancer Institute (NCI). The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. The proposed method achieved 85.11% detection rate with 1.13 FPs per scan.

  3. PRE-SPECTROSCOPIC FALSE-POSITIVE ELIMINATION OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Jenkins, Jon J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Howell, Steve B.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Prsa, Andrej

    2010-04-20

    Ten days of commissioning data (Quarter 0) and 33 days of science data (Quarter 1) yield instrumental flux time series of {approx}150,000 stars that were combed for transit events, termed threshold crossing events(TCE), each having a total detection statistic above 7.1{sigma}. TCE light curves are modeled as star+planet systems. Those returning a companion radius smaller than 2R{sub J} are assigned a Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) number. The raw flux, pixel flux, and flux-weighted centroids of every KOI are scrutinized to assess the likelihood of being an astrophysical false positive versus the likelihood of being a planetary companion. This vetting using Kepler data is referred to as data validation (DV). Herein, we describe the DV metrics and graphics used to identify viable planet candidates amongst the KOIs. Light curve modeling tests for (1) the difference in depth of the odd- versus even-numbered transits, (2) evidence of ellipsoidal variations, and (3) evidence of a secondary eclipse event at phase = 0.5. Flux-weighted centroids are used to test for signals correlated with transit events with a magnitude and direction indicative of a background eclipsing binary. Centroid time series are complimented by analysis of images taken in-transit versus out-of-transit, the difference often revealing the pixel contributing the most to the flux change during transit. Examples are shown to illustrate each test. Candidates passing DV are submitted to ground-based observers for further false-positive elimination or confirmation/characterization.

  4. A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Voigt, Aiko

    2012-06-10

    Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ('glint'), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected light curves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: (1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice; and (2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this 'latitude-albedo effect' will operate even for large obliquities: in that case the equator receives less orbit-averaged flux than the poles, and the equator is preferentially sampled at crescent phase. Using rotational and orbital color variations to map the surfaces of directly imaged planets and estimate their obliquity will therefore be a necessary pre-condition for properly interpreting their reflected phase variations. The latitude-albedo effect is a particularly convincing glint false positive for zero-obliquity planets, and such worlds are not amenable to latitudinal mapping. This effect severely limits the utility of specular reflection for detecting oceans on exoplanets.

  5. Eliminating false positive C4 sugar tests on New Zealand Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karyne M; Somerton, Kerry; Rogers, Pamela; Cox, Julie

    2010-08-30

    Carbon isotope analyses (delta(13)C) of some New Zealand Manuka honeys show that they often fail the internationally recognised Association of Official Analytical Chemists sugar test (AOAC method 998.12) which detects added C(4) sugar, although these honeys are from unadulterated sources. Failure of these high value products is detrimental to the New Zealand honey industry, not only in lost export revenue, but also in brand and market reputation damage. The standard AOAC test compares the carbon isotope value of the whole honey and corresponding protein isolated from the same honey. Differences between whole honey and protein delta(13)C values should not be greater than +1.0 per thousand, as it indicates the possibility of adulteration with syrups or sugars from C(4) plants such as high fructose corn syrup or cane sugar.We have determined that during the standard AOAC method, pollen and other insoluble components are isolated with the flocculated protein. These non-protein components have isotope values which are considerably different from those of the pure protein, and can shift the apparent delta(13)C value of protein further away from the delta(13)C value of the whole honey, giving a false positive result for added C(4) sugar. To eliminate a false positive C(4) sugar test for Manuka honey, prior removal of pollen and other insoluble material from the honey is necessary to ensure that only the pure protein is isolated. This will enable a true comparison between whole honey and protein delta(13)C isotopes. Furthermore, we strongly suggest this modification to the AOAC method be universally adopted for all honey C(4) sugar tests.

  6. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT: false positive reduction by combining multiple classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Cuenca, Jorge Juan; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of various classifier combination methods for improving the performance of a CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in CT. We employed CT cases in the publicly available lung image database consortium (LIDC) dataset, which included 85 CT cases with 110 nodules. We first used six individual classifiers for nodule detection in CT, including linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), artificial neural network (ANN), and three types of support vector machines (SVM). Five informationfusion methods were then employed to combine the classifiers' outputs for improving detection performance. The five combination methods included two supervised (likelihood ratio method and neural network) and three unsupervised ones (the mean, the product, and the majority-vote of the output scores from the six individual classifiers). Leave-one-caseout was employed to train and test individual classifiers and supervised combination methods. At a sensitivity of 80 %, the numbers of false positives per case for the six individual classifiers were 6.1 for LDA, 19.9 for QDA, 8.6 for ANN, 23.7 for SVM-dot, 17.0 for SVM-poly, and 23.35 for SVM-ANOVA; the numbers of false positives per case for the five combination methods were 3.4 for the majority-vote rule, 6.2 for the mean, 5.7 for the product, 9.7 for the neural network, and 28.1 for the likelihood ratio method. The majority-vote rule achieved higher performance levels than other combination methods. It also achieved higher performance than the best individual classifier, which is not the case for other combination methods.

  7. The patterns of false positive lesions for chest radiography observer performance: insights into errors and locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John W.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2014-03-01

    To examine the lobar distribution of false positives on a set of nodule-free and nodule-containing chest radiographs when radiologists are requested to perform an unframed task (oral report) compared to a framed task (nodule/s identification). A set of 40 chest images, 21 nodule-free (NF) and 19 nodule-containing (NC), was used. Ten radiologists participated in the study; first an oral clinical report was performed (unframed task, UFT) naming any abnormality seen, a confidence score and the location of reported abnormalities. The second (framed task, FT) had the same images randomly presented and radiologists were asked to locate any lung nodule/s and record their confidence and location of nodules. There was no statistical difference between the mean number of false positives (FPs) per lobe per case type (UFT or FT) with the exception of the right lower lobe (RLL) P=0.021. When the comparison of FPs for tasks and case types was carried out there were significant changes. For the NF cases there are significant differences for right upper lobe (RUL) P=0.0003, left upper lobe (LUL) P=0.0412; for NC cases there are significant differences for RUL P=0.009, RLL P=0.0112, LUL P=0.0337 and left lower lobe (LLL) P=0.0209. There was no significant correlation between the presence of a nodule in a given lobe and the occurrence of a FP in that lobe. The number and lobar location of FPs identified on a chest image by a radiologist is influenced by the task and case type.

  8. Reducing false positives of small bowel segmentation on CT scans by localizing colon regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Automated small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of small bowel pathology, such as tumor detection and pre-operative planning. We previously proposed a method to segment the small bowel using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. The method performed well on small bowel segmentation but produced many false positives, most of which were located on the colon. To improve the accuracy of small bowel segmentation, we propose a semi-automated method with minimum interaction to distinguish the colon from the small bowel. The method utilizes anatomic knowledge about the mesenteric vasculature and a statistical method of colon detection. First, anatomic labeling of the mesenteric arteries is used to identify the arteries supplying the colon. Second, a statistical detector is created by combining two colon probability maps. One probability map is of the colon location and is generated from colon centerlines generated from CT colonography (CTC) data. Another probability map is of 3D colon texture using Haralick features and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. The two probability maps are combined to localize colon regions, i.e., voxels having high probabilities on both maps were labeled as colon. Third, colon regions identified by anatomical labeling and the statistical detector are removed from the original results of small bowel segmentation. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors. The reference standard consisted of manually-labeled small bowel segmentation. The method reduced the voxel-based false positive rate of small bowel segmentation from 19.7%±3.9% to 5.9%±2.3%, with two-tailed P-value < 0.0001.

  9. Influence of population prevalences on numbers of false positives: an overlooked entity.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Paul; Kelly, Aine Marie

    2011-09-01

    Disease prevalence alters the number of true positives (TP), true negatives (TN), false negatives (FN), and false positives (FP), even if the sensitivity and specificity of a test stays the same. We illustrate this using data for the detection of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II (PIOPED II). We chose PE because of the clinical significance of the disease, the low prevalence of PE in the patient population being tested with CTPA with the widespread adoption of CTPA, and the serious clinical consequences of anticoagulation therapy in FP patients. Based on PIOPED II data (sensitivity 83%, specificity 96%), at a disease prevalence of approximately 5%, the number of FP patients is greater than the number of TP patients. Scaled to the US population, at a disease prevalence of 5%, there would be 139,800 FPs and 3,356,200 TNs. Assuming a mortality rate of 0.5% and a 3.0% rate of major bleeding secondary to anticoagulation therapy for well-controlled patients, if all FP patients received anticoagulation, there would be 699 deaths and 4194 major bleeding complications. At a prevalence of approximately 5% for PE, the number of FPs approaches or is greater than the number of TPs for CTPA for the detection of suspected acute PE. Patients with FP results may receive unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment with anticoagulation therapy. Population prevalence of disease needs to be taken into account along with the diagnostic accuracy of a test, because this may significantly affect downstream patient outcomes. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  11. False-positive PCR results linked to administration of seasonal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Curran, T; McCaughey, C; Ellis, J; Mitchell, S J; Feeney, S A; Watt, A P; Mitchell, F; Fairley, D; Crawford, L; McKenna, J; Coyle, P V

    2012-03-01

    False-positive PCR results usually occur as a consequence of specimen-to-specimen or amplicon-to-specimen contamination within the laboratory. Evidence of contamination at time of specimen collection linked to influenza vaccine administration in the same location as influenza sampling is described. Clinical, circumstantial and laboratory evidence was gathered for each of five cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) with unusual patterns of PCR reactivity for seasonal H1N1, H3N2, H1N1 (2009) and influenza B viruses. Two 2010 trivalent influenza vaccines and environmental swabs of a hospital influenza vaccination room were also tested for influenza RNA. Sequencing of influenza A matrix (M) gene amplicons from the five cases and vaccines was undertaken. Four 2009 general practitioner (GP) specimens were seasonal H1N1, H3N2 and influenza B PCR positive. One 2010 GP specimen was H1N1 (2009), H3N2 and influenza B positive. PCR of 2010 trivalent vaccines showed high loads of detectable influenza A and B RNA. Sequencing of the five specimens and vaccines showed greatest homology with the M gene sequence of Influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1 virus (used in generation of influenza vaccine strains). Environmental swabs had detectable influenza A and B RNA. RNA detection studies demonstrated vaccine RNA still detectable for at least 66 days. Administration of influenza vaccines and clinical sampling in the same room resulted in the contamination with vaccine strains of surveillance swabs collected from patients with ILI. Vaccine contamination should therefore be considered, particularly where multiple influenza virus RNA PCR positive signals (e.g. H1N1, H3N2 and influenza B) are detected in the same specimen.

  12. Understanding the cause of false negative beta-D-glucuronidase reactions in culture media containing fermentable carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fricker, C R; Warden, P S; Eldred, B J

    2010-06-01

    To explain the basis for false negative beta-glucuronidase reactions seen with culture media containing lactose as a carbon and energy source. Escherichia coli strains were assessed for their reactions in culture media containing a beta-d-glucuronidase substrate either with or without lactose. An assay was developed to test for the expression of beta-D-glucuronidase at pH 5.0 and pH 7.2. Strains of E. coli that gave false negative glucuronidase reactions on media containing lactose generally expressed lower concentrations of the enzyme beta-D-glucuronidase than strains that gave positive results, although the difference was by no means consistent. Most strains that were negative on lactose-containing media expressed virtually no beta-D-glucuronidase activity at pH 5.0. Examination of colonies on Membrane lactose glucuronide agar (MLGA) from lightly polluted water showed that c. 10% of the E. coli present failed to yield green colonies on MLGA. E. coli that failed to produce green colonies on MLGA produced lower levels of beta-D-glucuronidase than did strains that formed green colonies, the difference being greater at pH 5.0 than pH 7.2. The false negative rate for E. coli 10% which is similar to that experienced in the study that originally described MLGA. Strains of E. coli that fail to produce typical colonies on MLGA might produce lower concentrations of the enzyme beta-D-glucuronidase. Whilst the enzyme activity is sufficient to be detected at pH 7.2, fermentation of lactose significantly lowers the pH of the medium and can result in reduced enzyme activity and therefore lack of detection. The false negative rate of c. 10% would be difficult to detect in routine laboratories as it would represent 1% or less of yellow colonies being identified as E. coli (assuming E. coli accounts for 10% of the total coliform population in drinking water).

  13. A new method with flexible and balanced control of false negatives and false positives for hit selection in RNA interference high-throughput screening assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2007-08-01

    The z-score method and its variants for testing mean difference are commonly used for hit selection in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) offers a way to measure and classify the short interfering RNA (siRNA) effects. In this article, based on SSMD, the authors propose a new testing method for hit selection in RNA interference (RNAi) HTS assays. This SSMD-based method allows the differentiation between siRNAs with large and small effects on the assay output and maintains flexible and balanced control of both the false-negative rate, in which the siRNAs with strong effects are not selected as hits, and the restricted false-positive rate, in which the siRNAs with weak or no effects are selected as hits. This method directly addresses the size of siRNA effects represented by the strength of difference between an siRNA and a negative reference, whereas the classic z-score method and t-test of testing no mean difference address whether the mean of an siRNA is exactly the same as the mean of a negative reference. This method can readily control the false-negative rate, whereas it is nontrivial for the classic z-score method and t-test to control the false-negative rate. Therefore, theoretically, the SSMD-based method offers better control of the sizes of siRNA effects and the associated false-positive and false-negative rates than the commonly used z-score method and t-test for hit selection in HTS assays. The SSMD-based method should generally be applicable to any assay in which the end point is a difference in signal compared to a reference sample, including those for RNAi, receptor, enzyme, and cellular function.

  14. Commercial reverse transcriptase as source of false-positive strand-specific RNA detection in human cells.

    PubMed

    Moison, Celine; Arimondo, Paola B; Guieysse-Peugeot, Anne-Laure

    2011-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies describe the existence of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in gene expression modulation. Since the observation that antisense ncRNAs are implicated in human disorders, there is more and more interest in ncRNAs. A commonly used technique to investigate the expression of an antisense ncRNAs is strand-specific reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The advantage of this accurate technique is that it does not require any special equipment or expertise. The disadvantage is that it can lead easily to false-positive results. We applied strand-specific RT-PCR to investigate the presence of antisense ncRNA associated to Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta 2 (RARβ2) in different human tumoral cell lines. By performing this technique, we observed false-positive detection of ncRNA. For accurate interpretation of the results in RT-PCR experiments, we introduced a «No primer» control that reveals non-specific cDNA synthesis. Moreover, we report the presence of non-specific cDNA amplification with five of the most frequently used reverse transcriptase in absence of added primers. We found that the choice of the reverse transcriptase as well as the conditions of the reaction (RT temperature and PCR cycle number) are important parameters to choose as the different reverse transcriptases do not display the same cDNA synthesis background. This previously observed phenomenon was reported to originate from the «self-priming» of RNA template. Here, we report rather the presence of RNA contaminants associated with one of the reverse transcriptase studied that might contribute to non-specific cDNA synthesis.

  15. Case Report: Direct Access Genetic Testing and A False-Positive Result For Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Predham, Sarah; Hamilton, Sara; Elliott, Alison M; T Gibson, William

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a woman who pursued direct access genetic testing and then presented with concerns regarding a positive test result for Long-QT syndrome. Although the result ultimately proved to be a false positive, this case illustrates that costs associated with follow-up of direct access genetic testing results can be non-trivial for both the patient and for health care systems. Here we raise policy questions regarding the appropriate distribution of these costs. We also discuss the possibility that, when confronted by a direct access genetic test result that reports high risk for one or more actionable diseases, a family physician might feel compelled to act out of a desire to avoid liability, even when information regarding the accuracy and validity of the testing were not easily accessible. This case outlines lessons that can easily be translated into clinical practice, not only by genetic counselors, but also by family physicians, medical specialists and members of the public.

  16. A self-paced brain computer interface system with a low false positive rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatourechi, M.; Ward, R. K.; Birch, G. E.

    2008-03-01

    The performance of current EEG-based self-paced brain-computer interface (SBCI) systems is not suitable for most practical applications. In this paper, an improved SBCI that uses features extracted from three neurological phenomena (movement-related potentials, changes in the power of Mu rhythms and changes in the power of Beta rhythms) to detect an intentional control command in noisy EEG signals is proposed. The proposed system achieves a high true positive (TP) to false positive (FP) ratio. To extract features for each neurological phenomenon in every EEG signal, a method that consists of a stationary wavelet transform followed by matched filtering is developed. For each neurological phenomenon in every EEG channel, features are classified using a support vector machine classifier (SVM). For each neurological phenomenon, a multiple classifier system (MCS) then combines the outputs of the SVMs. Another MCS combines the outputs of MCSs designed for the three neurological phenomena. Various configurations for combining the outputs of these MCSs are considered. A hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) is proposed to simultaneously select the features, the values of the classifiers' parameters and the configuration for combining MCSs that yield the near optimal performance. Analysis of the data recorded from four able-bodied subjects shows a significant performance improvement over previous SBCIs.

  17. Are Hemorrhoids Associated with False-Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il; Choi, Kyuyong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose False-positive (FP) results of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) conducted in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening could lead to performing unnecessary colonoscopies. Hemorrhoids are a possible cause of FP FIT results; however, studies on this topic are extremely rare. We investigated whether hemorrhoids are associated with FP FIT results. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted at a university hospital in Korea from June 2013 to May 2015. Of the 34547 individuals who underwent FITs, 3946 aged ≥50 years who underwent colonoscopies were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with FP FIT results. Results Among 3946 participants, 704 (17.8%) showed positive FIT results and 1303 (33.0%) had hemorrhoids. Of the 704 participants with positive FIT results, 165 had advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN) and 539 had no ACRN (FP results). Of the 1303 participants with hemorrhoids, 291 showed FP results, of whom 81 showed FP results because of hemorrhoids only. Participants with hemorrhoids had a higher rate of FP results than those without hemorrhoids (291/1176, 24.7% vs. 248/2361, 10.5%; p<0.001). Additionally, the participants with hemorrhoids as the only abnormality had a higher rate of FP results than those experiencing no such abnormalities (81/531, 15.3% vs. 38/1173, 3.2%; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the presence of hemorrhoids was identified as an independent predictor of FP results (adjusted odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 2.24–3.40; p<0.001). Conclusion Hemorrhoids are significantly associated with FP FIT results. Their presence seemed to be a non-negligible contributor of FP results in FIT-based CRC screening programs. PMID:27873508

  18. Are Hemorrhoids Associated with False-Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test Results?

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il; Choi, Kyuyong; Jung, Yoon Suk

    2017-01-01

    False-positive (FP) results of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) conducted in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening could lead to performing unnecessary colonoscopies. Hemorrhoids are a possible cause of FP FIT results; however, studies on this topic are extremely rare. We investigated whether hemorrhoids are associated with FP FIT results. A retrospective study was conducted at a university hospital in Korea from June 2013 to May 2015. Of the 34547 individuals who underwent FITs, 3946 aged ≥50 years who underwent colonoscopies were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with FP FIT results. Among 3946 participants, 704 (17.8%) showed positive FIT results and 1303 (33.0%) had hemorrhoids. Of the 704 participants with positive FIT results, 165 had advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN) and 539 had no ACRN (FP results). Of the 1303 participants with hemorrhoids, 291 showed FP results, of whom 81 showed FP results because of hemorrhoids only. Participants with hemorrhoids had a higher rate of FP results than those without hemorrhoids (291/1176, 24.7% vs. 248/2361, 10.5%; p<0.001). Additionally, the participants with hemorrhoids as the only abnormality had a higher rate of FP results than those experiencing no such abnormalities (81/531, 15.3% vs. 38/1173, 3.2%; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the presence of hemorrhoids was identified as an independent predictor of FP results (adjusted odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 2.24-3.40; p<0.001). Hemorrhoids are significantly associated with FP FIT results. Their presence seemed to be a non-negligible contributor of FP results in FIT-based CRC screening programs.

  19. Searching for Long-Period Companions and False Positives within the APOGEE Catalog of Companion Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy; Troup, Nicholas William; Majewski, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a large-scale, high-resolution, H-band, spectroscopic survey that has acquired high S/N spectra of 146,000 stars distributed across the Galactic bulge, disk, and halo with a radial velocity (RV) precision of ~100 m/s. We follow up stellar companion detections from the APOGEE DR12 catalog of 382 total APOGEE-identified companions, of which 376 are previously unknown companion candidates. The APOGEE team strives not only to continue expanding the census of extrasolar companions, but also to confirm and characterize our RV detections through a variety of means.We present findings from our investigation of the Kozai mechanism, which explains the development of close-orbiting binaries through an ejected third companion. To do so, we are undertaking a targeted search for long-period companions with hopes to provide further evidence for the Kozai mechanism. This hunt for longer period companions begins with a search for long-term RV trends within the APOGEE data. We have also obtained diffraction-limited imaging using speckle interferometry at WIYN and Gemini North Observatories, as well as AO LMIRcam images from the LBT, to make direct searches for long-period stellar companions.It is critical to purge our companion candidate detections of false positives, and we discuss several methods we are pursuing to do this. For example, highly active stars have been observed to mimic RV measurements. We have obtained optical high-resolution spectral follow-ups from the ARC 3.5m, the HET, and MMT to analyze potential stellar activity indicators such as Calcium H and K. Emission detected in these well-known stellar activity indicators suggests a false radial velocity measurement.

  20. False positive detection of peanut residue in liquid caramel coloring using commercial ELISA kits.

    PubMed

    Stelk, T; Niemann, L; Lambrecht, D M; Baumert, J L; Taylor, S L

    2013-07-01

    Initial food industry testing in our laboratory using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods indicated that the darkest caramel color (class IV) unexpectedly contained traces of peanut protein, a potential undeclared allergen issue. Caramel production centers on the heating of sugars, often glucose, under controlled heat and chemical processing conditions with other ingredients including ammonia, sulfite, and/or alkali salts. These ingredients should not contain any traces of peanut residue. We sought to determine the reliability of commercially available peanut allergen ELISA methods for detection of apparent peanut residue in caramel coloring. Caramel color samples of classes I, II, III, and IV were obtained from 2 commercial suppliers and tested using 6 commercially available quantitative and qualitative peanut ELISA kits. Five lots of class IV caramel color were spiked with a known concentration of peanut protein from light roasted peanut flour to assess recovery of peanut residue using a spike and recovery protocol with either 15 ppm or 100 ppm peanut protein on a kit-specific basis. A false positive detection of peanut protein was found in class IV caramel colors with a range of 1.2 to 17.6 parts per million recovered in both spiked and unspiked liquid caramel color samples. ELISA kit spike/recovery results indicate that false negative results might also be obtained if peanut contamination were ever to actually exist in class IV caramel color. Manufacturers of peanut-free products often test all ingredients for peanut allergen residues using commercial ELISA kits. ELISA methods are not reliable for the detection of peanut in class IV caramel ingredients and their use is not recommended with this matrix. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Computer-aided detection in digital mammography: false-positive marks and their reproducibility in negative mammograms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung; Seong, Min Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min

    2009-11-01

    There are relatively few studies reporting the frequency of false-positive computer-aided detection (CAD) marks and their reproducibility in normal cases. To evaluate retrospectively the false-positive mark rate of a CAD system and the reproducibility of false-positive marks in two sets of negative digital mammograms. Two sets of negative digital mammograms were obtained in 360 women (mean age 57 years, range 30-76 years) with an approximate interval of 1 year (mean time 343.7 days), and a CAD system was applied. False-positive CAD marks and the reproducibility were determined. Of the 360 patients, 252 (70.0%) and 240 (66.7%) patients had 1-7 CAD marks on the initial and second mammograms, respectively. The false-positive CAD mark rate was 1.5 (1.1 for masses and 0.4 for calcifications) and 1.4 (1.0 for masses and 0.4 for calcifications) per examination in the initial and second mammograms, respectively. The reproducibility of the false-positive CAD marks was 12.0% for both mass (81/680) and microcalcification (33/278) marks. False-positive CAD marks were seen in approximately 70% of normal cases. However, the reproducibility was very low. Radiologists must be familiar with the findings of false-positive CAD marks, since they are very common and can increase the recall rate in screening.

  2. Multiple myeloma as a major cause of false-positive galactomannan tests in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Kim, Kihyun; Kang, Eun-Suk; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    The galactomannan (GM) test is a useful method for early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. Recently, multiple myeloma has newly been suggested to be related to false-positive results of GM. We performed a case-control study to validate this finding. Electronic medical records were reviewed for patients admitted March through June 2014. Patients with false-positive GM results were selected as cases and those with negatives as controls. To verify the results of the four-month analysis, additional analysis was performed in multiple myeloma patients over a three-year period. There were 30 false-positive and 316 negative cases during the four-month period. Among the factors evaluated, multiple myeloma was the only significant factor in the adjusted analysis (OR = 3.59, CI 1.28-10.04). In the three-year analysis of 145 multiple myeloma patients, 25.5% showed false-positive results, which was 3 times higher than overall. GM false-positivity was not related to serum monoclonal protein level or type of immunoglobulin. GM optical density indexes (ODIs) in all false positives were lower than 3.0. Multiple myeloma was a major cause of GM false-positivity in adult cancer patients. GM was false-positive in 25.5% of multiple myeloma patients with GM ODIs lower than 3.0. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting and avoiding likely false-positive findings - a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Parker, Timothy H

    2017-11-01

    Recently there has been a growing concern that many published research findings do not hold up in attempts to replicate them. We argue that this problem may originate from a culture of 'you can publish if you found a significant effect'. This culture creates a systematic bias against the null hypothesis which renders meta-analyses questionable and may even lead to a situation where hypotheses become difficult to falsify. In order to pinpoint the sources of error and possible solutions, we review current scientific practices with regard to their effect on the probability of drawing a false-positive conclusion. We explain why the proportion of published false-positive findings is expected to increase with (i) decreasing sample size, (ii) increasing pursuit of novelty, (iii) various forms of multiple testing and researcher flexibility, and (iv) incorrect P-values, especially due to unaccounted pseudoreplication, i.e. the non-independence of data points (clustered data). We provide examples showing how statistical pitfalls and psychological traps lead to conclusions that are biased and unreliable, and we show how these mistakes can be avoided. Ultimately, we hope to contribute to a culture of 'you can publish if your study is rigorous'. To this end, we highlight promising strategies towards making science more objective. Specifically, we enthusiastically encourage scientists to preregister their studies (including a priori hypotheses and complete analysis plans), to blind observers to treatment groups during data collection and analysis, and unconditionally to report all results. Also, we advocate reallocating some efforts away from seeking novelty and discovery and towards replicating important research findings of one's own and of others for the benefit of the scientific community as a whole. We believe these efforts will be aided by a shift in evaluation criteria away from the current system which values metrics of 'impact' almost exclusively and towards a system

  4. Astrophysical false positives in direct imaging for exoplanets: a white dwarf close to a rejuvenated star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Hagelberg, J.; Desidera, S.; Chauvin, G.; Almenara, J. M.; Biazzo, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Carson, J. C.; Covino, E.; Delorme, P.; D'Orazi, V.; Gratton, R.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Moutou, C.; Segransan, D.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Wildi, F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. As is the case for all techniques involved in the research for exoplanets, direct imaging has to take into account the probability of so-called astrophysical false positives, which are phenomena that mimic the signature of the objects we are seeking. Aims: In this work we present the case of a false positive found during a direct-imaging survey conducted with VLT/NACO. A promising exoplanet candidate was detected around the K2-type star HD 8049 in July 2010. Its contrast of ΔH = 7.05 at 1.57 arcsec allowed us to assume a 35 MJup companion at 50 projected AU, for the nominal system age and heliocentric distance. Methods: To check whether it was gravitationally bound to the host star, as opposed to an unrelated background object, we re-observed the system one year later and concluded a high probability of a bound system. We also used radial velocity measurements of the host star, spanning a time range of ~30 yr, to constrain the companion's mass and orbital properties, as well as to probe the host star's spectral age indicators and general spectral energy distribution. We also obtained U-band imaging with EFOSC and near-infrared spectroscopy for the companion. Results: Combining all these information we conclude that the companion of HD 8049 is a white dwarf (WD) with temperature Teff = 18 800 ± 2100 K and mass MWD = 0.56 ± 0.08 M⊙. The significant radial velocity trend combined with the imaging data indicates that the most probable orbit has a semi-major axis of about 50 AU. The discrepancy between the age indicators speaks against a bona-fide young star. The moderately high level of chromospheric activity and fast rotation, mimicking the properties of a young star, might be induced by the exchange of mass with the progenitor of the WD. This example demonstrates some of the challenges in determining accurate age estimates and identifications of faint companions. Based on observations collected at La Silla and Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile): Programs

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler Mission. VIII. 285 false positives (Abdul-Masih+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, M.; Prsa, A.; Conroy, K.; Bloemen, S.; Boyajian, T.; Doyle, L. R.; Johnston, C.; Kostov, V.; Latham, D. W.; Matijevic, G.; Shporer, A.; Southworth, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Kepler mission was launched in 2009 and provided photometric data for ~200000 objects in the 105deg2 contained in the Kepler field of view (FOV; Batalha et al. 2013, Cat. J/ApJS/204/24). Each of the 95 million Kepler pixels cover 3.98*3.98'' and are designed to maximize the number of resolvable stars with magnitudes brighter than 15. There are approximately 500000 objects in the Kepler FOV that are brighter than V=16; however, only ~200000 were assigned as targets for observation, leaving many bright objects in the field unobserved. Since the main goal of Kepler is to find Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, the targets that were chosen for observation were those with the highest potential for terrestrial planet detection. Thus, many objects in the Kepler FOV have not been observed. Due to the proximity of some of these unobserved objects to the identified targets, the possibility of contaminated signals arises. Of the observed targets, 2772 eclipsing binaries have been found and cataloged in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (http://keplerebs.villanova.edu/; see also Kirk et al. 2016, Cat. J/AJ/151/68). A false positive is a case where the signal from a binary object in close proximity to a target contaminates the aperture pixels, causing the target light curve to show a binary signal. This means that the incorrect object is being identified as the source of the binary signal. Once the source of the binary signal is identified, a new light curve can be extracted. The re-extraction process is comprised of several automated steps and results in three new light curves generated for the true source of the binary signal for each quarter of available data. These light curves are generated by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N light curve), percent eclipse depth (PED light curve), and flux eclipse depth (FED light curve). Before re-extracting the new light curves, we obtain the S/N, the PED, and the FED for the original false

  6. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. I. Choice of cell type.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan; Carmichael, Paul

    2012-02-18

    Current in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity assays show a high rate of positive results, many of which are misleading when compared with in vivo genotoxicity or rodent carcinogenicity data. P53-deficiency in many of the rodent cell lines may be a key factor in this poor predictivity. As part of an European Cosmetics Industry Association initiative for improvement of in vitro mammalian cell assays, we have compared several rodent cell lines (V79, CHL, CHO) with p53-competent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, and the human liver cell line, HepG2. We have compared in vitro micronucleus (MN) induction following treatment with 19 compounds that were accepted as producing misleading or "false" positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays [6]. Of these, six chemicals (2-ethyl-1,3-hexandiol, benzyl alcohol, urea, sodium saccharin, sulfisoxazole and isobutyraldehyde) were not toxic and did not induce any MN at concentrations up to 10mM. d,l-Menthol and ethionamide induced cytotoxicity, but did not induce MN. o-Anthranilic acid was not toxic and did not induce MN in V79, CHL, CHO, HuLy and HepG2 cells up to 10mM. Toxicity was induced in TK6 cells, although there were no increases in MN frequency up to and above the 55% toxicity level. The other 10 chemicals (1,3-dihydroxybenzene, curcumin, propyl gallate, p-nitrophenol, ethyl acrylate, eugenol, tert-butylhydroquinone, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sodium xylene sulfonate and phthalic anhydride) produced cytotoxicity in at least one cell type, and were evaluated further for MN induction in most or all of the cell types listed above. All these chemicals induced MN at concentrations <10mM, with levels of cytotoxicity below 60% (measured as the replication index) in at least one cell type. The rodent cell lines (V79, CHO and CHL) were consistently more susceptible to cytotoxicity and MN induction than p53-competent cells, and are therefore more susceptible to giving misleading positive

  7. False-positive diatom test: a real challenge? A post-mortem study using standardized protocols.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Philippe; Miettinen, Arto; Spilling, Kristian; Sajantila, Antti

    2013-09-01

    The main criticism of the validity of the diatom test for the diagnosis of drowning is based on the potential ante- and post-mortem penetration of diatoms and the finding of diatoms in bodies of non-drowned human beings. However, qualitative and quantitative studies on diatoms in organs of the non-drowned have yielded both conflicting and contradictory results. In the present study, we have analysed under standardised methods the diatom content in several organs of 14 non-drowned human bodies. Overall, only 9 diatoms (6 entire, 3 fragmented) were disclosed in 6 of the 14 non-drowned bodies. Each of these 6 cadavers had only a single "positive" organ. Six diatoms were found in the bone marrow, 2 in the lung, and one in the pleural liquid. No diatoms were recovered from the brain, liver, kidney, or blood samples of any of these 14 bodies. Moreover, in five additional cadavers, whose lungs were injected, prior autopsy, with a 3.5L solution containing a bi-cellulate diatom culture (Thalassiosira baltica, Thalassiosira levanderi) via tracheostomy, a few diatoms appeared in the pleural cavity and in the blood from the left heart chamber, but none in any other internal organs investigated. The results of the presented study demonstrate that the issue of the false-positive diatom test should not be a logical impediment to the performance of the diatom method. However, strict and standardized protocols aimed at avoiding contamination during sample preparation must be used, appropriate separation values set and taxonomic analysis of all diatoms performed.

  8. THE POSSIBLE MOON OF KEPLER-90g IS A FALSE POSITIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Huang, X.; Bakos, G. Á.; Nesvorný, D.; Schmitt, A. R.

    2015-01-20

    The discovery of an exomoon would provide deep insights into planet formation and the habitability of planetary systems, with transiting examples being particularly sought after. Of the hundreds of Kepler planets now discovered, the seven-planet system Kepler-90 is unusual for exhibiting an unidentified transit-like signal in close proximity to one of the transits of the long-period gas-giant Kepler-90g, as noted by Cabrera et al. As part of the ''Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler'' project, we investigate this possible exomoon signal and find it passes all conventional photometric, dynamical, and centroid diagnostic tests. However, pixel-level light curves indicate that the moon-like signal occurs on nearly all of the target's pixels, which we confirm using a novel way of examining pixel-level data which we dub the ''transit centroid''. This test reveals that the possible exomoon to Kepler-90g is likely a false positive, perhaps due to a cosmic ray induced sudden pixel sensitivity dropout. This work highlights the extreme care required for seeking non-periodic low-amplitude transit signals, such as exomoons.

  9. False positive reduction for wall thickness-based detection of colonic flat polyps via CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, Marc; Li, Lihong C.; Han, Hao; Wei, Xinzhou; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Liang, Zhengrong

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) of flat polyps, in contrast to other polyp types, is challenging due to their lack of projections from the colonic surface and limited geometrical features that can be extracted from such polyps. In this paper, we present a new approach for CAD of flat polyps via colon wall thickness mapping, texture feature extraction and analysis. First, we integrated our previous work of detecting flat polyp candidates via colon wall thickness mapping into this study for automated detection of initial polyp candidates (IPCs). The colon wall segmentation is established on a coupled level-set method after the lumen is electronically cleansed by a sophisticated statistical algorithm, which considers the partial volume effect to preserve the mucosa layer details. The IPC detection was performed based on the wall thickness local pattern. From each IPC volume, we extracted the 14 Haralick texture features and 16 additional features that were previously demonstrated to improve polyp classification performance. Then, we adopted the Rpackage "randomForest" to classify the features for false positive (FP) reduction. We evaluated our method via 16 patient datasets. The proposed scheme achieved a high capacity in terms of the well-known area under the curve value of 0.930. The FPs was reduced to less than 3 FPs/per polyp. The experiment results demonstrate the feasibility of our method in achieving computer aided detection of flat polyps, therefore, improving the screening capability of computed tomography cololongraphy.

  10. Rates of False-Positive Classification Resulting From the Analysis of Additional Embedded Performance Validity Measures.

    PubMed

    Silk-Eglit, Graham M; Stenclik, Jessica H; Miele, Andrea S; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented improvements in the classification accuracy of performance validity tests (PVTs) when they are combined to form aggregated models. Fewer studies have evaluated the impact of aggregating additional PVTs and changing the classification threshold within these models. A recent Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that to maintain a false-positive rate (FPR) of ≤.10, only 1, 4, 8, 10, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. The current study sought to evaluate these findings with embedded PVTs in a sample of real-life litigants and to highlight a potential danger in analytic flexibility with embedded PVTs. Results demonstrated that to maintain an FPR of ≤.10, only 3, 7, 10, 14, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. Analyzing more than these numbers of PVTs resulted in a dramatic increase in the FPR. In addition, in the most extreme case, flexibility in analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs increased the FPR by 67%. Given these findings, a more objective approach to analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs should be introduced.

  11. Computer-aided detection of breast masses on mammograms: bilateral analysis for false positive reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2006-03-01

    In this study, our purpose was to develop a false positive (FP) reduction method for computerized mass detection systems based on the analysis of bilateral mammograms. We first detect the mass candidates on each view by utilizing our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, the regional registration technique is used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is "symmetrical" to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Spatial gray level dependence matrices (SGLD) texture features and morphological features are extracted from both the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features are then generated from the extracted unilateral features and a final bilateral score is formed as a new feature to differentiate symmetric from asymmetric ROIs. By incorporating the unilateral features of the mass candidates and their bilateral scores, a bilateral classifier was trained to reduce the FPs. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at 0.52, 0.83, and 1.05 FPs/image on the test data set. In comparison to the FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.67, 1.11, and 1.69, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 22%, 25%, and 37% with the bilateral symmetry information.

  12. Controlling false positive rates in mass-multivariate tests for electromagnetic responses.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Gareth R; Litvak, Vladimir; Brookes, Matt J; Friston, Karl J

    2011-06-01

    We address the problem of controlling false positive rates in mass-multivariate tests for electromagnetic responses in compact regions of source space. We show that mass-univariate thresholds based on sensor level multivariate thresholds (approximated using Roy's union-intersection principle) are unduly conservative. We then consider a Bonferroni correction for source level tests based on the number of unique lead-field extrema. For a given source space, the sensor indices corresponding to the maxima and minima (for each dipolar lead field) are listed, and the number of unique extrema is given by the number of unique pairs in this list. Using a multivariate beamformer formulation, we validate this heuristic against empirical permutation thresholds for mass-univariate and mass-multivariate tests (of induced and evoked responses) for a variety of source spaces, using simulated and real data. We also show that the same approximations hold when dealing with a cortical manifold (rather than a volume) and for mass-multivariate minimum norm solutions. We demonstrate that the mass-multivariate framework is not restricted to tests on a single contrast of effects (cf, Roy's maximum root) but also accommodates multivariate effects (cf, Wilk's lambda). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The uterine blush. A potential false-positive in Meckel's scan interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.

    1982-10-01

    To determine the presence, prevalence, and clinical importance of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate uterine uptake, this retrospective analysis of 71 Meckel's scans was undertaken. Specifically, each study was evaluated for the presence of a focal accumulation of radiotracer cephalad to the bladder. Patients received an intravenous dose of 150 microCi/kg of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. Each study consisted of 15 one minute anterior serial gamma camera images, and a 15, 30, and 60 minute anterior, right lateral and posterior scintiscan. Menstrual histories were obtained from all patients except two. No males (33/33), nor premenstrual (13/13), menopausal (4/4) or posthysterectomy (2/2) patients revealed a uterine blush. Eleven of 15 patients (73%) with regular menses demonstrated a uterine blush. They were in the menstrual or secretory phases of their cycle. Four demonstrated no uterine uptake, had regular periods, but were in the proliferative phase of their cycle. Two with irregular periods, and one with no recorded menstrual history, manifested the blush. Radiotracer should be expected in the uterus during the menstrual and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle. It is a manifestation of a normal physiologic phenomenon, and must be recognized to prevent false-positive Meckel's scan interpretations.

  14. Computerized detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images: reduction of false positives using anatomical location features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Gao, Xin; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Asano, Takahiko; Kato, Hiroki; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    The detection of unruptured aneurysms is a major subject in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). However, their accurate detection is often difficult because of the overlapping between the aneurysm and the adjacent vessels on maximum intensity projection images. The purpose of this study is to develop a computerized method for the detection of unruptured aneurysms in order to assist radiologists in image interpretation. The vessel regions were first segmented using gray-level thresholding and a region growing technique. The gradient concentration (GC) filter was then employed for the enhancement of the aneurysms. The initial candidates were identified in the GC image using a gray-level threshold. For the elimination of false positives (FPs), we determined shape features and an anatomical location feature. Finally, rule-based schemes and quadratic discriminant analysis were employed along with these features for distinguishing between the aneurysms and the FPs. The sensitivity for the detection of unruptured aneurysms was 90.0% with 1.52 FPs per patient. Our computerized scheme can be useful in assisting the radiologists in the detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images.

  15. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B Pablo

    2015-11-10

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804-12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious-reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results.

  16. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B. Pablo

    2015-01-01

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804–12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious—reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results. PMID:26504202

  17. Risk of false positive genetic associations in complex traits with underlying population structure: a case study.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Aleman, Monica; Higgins, Robert J; Madigan, John E; Bannasch, Danika L

    2014-12-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are widely used to investigate the genetic etiology of diseases in domestic animals. In the horse, GWA studies using 40-50,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sample sizes of 30-40 individuals, consisting of only 6-14 affected horses, have led to the discovery of genetic mutations for simple monogenic traits. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy is a common inherited neurological disorder characterized by symmetric ataxia. A case-control GWA study was performed using genotypes from 42,819 SNP marker loci distributed across the genome in 99 clinically phenotyped Quarter horses (37 affected, 62 unaffected). A significant GWA was not achieved although a suggestive association was uncovered when only the most stringently phenotyped NAD-affected horses (n = 10) were included (chromosome 8:62130605 and 62134644 [log(1/P) = 5.56]). Candidate genes (PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4) within the associated region were excluded through sequencing, association testing of uncovered variants and quantitative RT-PCR. It was concluded that variants in PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4 are not responsible for equine neuroaxonal dystrophy. This study demonstrates the risk of false positive associations when performing GWA studies on complex traits and underlying population structure when using 40-50,000 SNP markers and small sample size.

  18. False positives in multiplex PCR-based next-generation sequencing have unique signatures.

    PubMed

    McCall, Chad M; Mosier, Stacy; Thiess, Michele; Debeljak, Marija; Pallavajjala, Aparna; Beierl, Katie; Deak, Kristen L; Datto, Michael B; Gocke, Christopher D; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Eshleman, James R

    2014-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing shows great promise by allowing rapid mutational analysis of multiple genes in human cancers. Recently, we implemented the multiplex PCR-based Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel (>200 amplicons in 50 genes) to evaluate EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF in lung and colorectal adenocarcinomas. In 10% of samples, automated analysis identified a novel G873R substitution mutation in EGFR. By examining reads individually, we found this mutation in >5% of reads in 50 of 291 samples and also found similar events in 18 additional amplicons. These apparent mutations are present only in short reads and within 10 bases of either end of the read. We therefore hypothesized that these were from panel primers promiscuously binding to nearly complementary sequences of nontargeted amplicons. Sequences around the mutations matched primer binding sites in the panel in 18 of 19 cases, thus likely corresponding to panel primers. Furthermore, because most primers did not show this effect, we demonstrated that next-generation sequencing may be used to better design multiplex PCR primers through iterative elimination of offending primers to minimize mispriming. Our results indicate the need for careful sequence analysis to avoid false-positive mutations that can arise in multiplex PCR panels. The AmpliSeq Cancer panel is a valuable tool for clinical diagnostics, provided awareness of potential artifacts.

  19. Controlling false positive rates in mass-multivariate tests for electromagnetic responses

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Gareth R.; Litvak, Vladimir; Brookes, Matt J.; Friston, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of controlling false positive rates in mass-multivariate tests for electromagnetic responses in compact regions of source space. We show that mass-univariate thresholds based on sensor level multivariate thresholds (approximated using Roy's union–intersection principle) are unduly conservative. We then consider a Bonferroni correction for source level tests based on the number of unique lead-field extrema. For a given source space, the sensor indices corresponding to the maxima and minima (for each dipolar lead field) are listed, and the number of unique extrema is given by the number of unique pairs in this list. Using a multivariate beamformer formulation, we validate this heuristic against empirical permutation thresholds for mass-univariate and mass-multivariate tests (of induced and evoked responses) for a variety of source spaces, using simulated and real data. We also show that the same approximations hold when dealing with a cortical manifold (rather than a volume) and for mass-multivariate minimum norm solutions. We demonstrate that the mass-multivariate framework is not restricted to tests on a single contrast of effects (cf, Roy's maximum root) but also accommodates multivariate effects (cf, Wilk's lambda). PMID:21396458

  20. From Docking False-Positive to Active Anti-HIV Agent

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T.; Guimarães, Cristiano R. W.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70,000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and MM-GB/SA post-processing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Though known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential “near-miss” with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to evolve efficiently a false positive into a true active. In addition, the need for adequate structure validation was confirmed by the apparent misrepresentation of a purchased compound elsewhere as the present oxadiazole core compound, 16. PMID:17918923

  1. Reduction of false positives by extracting fuzzy rules from data for polyp detection in CTC scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Musib M.; Zheng, Yalin; Yang, Xiaoyun; Beddoe, Gareth

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neural network based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) to reduce the false positive (FP) rate of detected colonic polyps in Computed Tomography Colonography (CTC) scans. Extracted fuzzy rules establish linguistically interpretable relationships in the data that are easy to understand, validate, and extend. The system takes several features identified from regions extracted by a segmentation algorithm and decides whether the regions are true polyps. In the training phase, subtractive clustering is used to down-sample the negative regions in order to get balanced data. The rule extraction method is based on estimating clusters in the data using the subtractive clustering algorithm; each cluster obtained corresponds to a fuzzy rule that maps a region in the input space to an output class. After the number of rules and initial rule parameters are obtained by cluster estimation, the rule parameters are optimized using a hybrid learning algorithm which is a combination of least-squares estimation with back propagation. The evolved Sugeno-type FIS has been tested on a total of 129 scans with 99 polyps of sizes 5-15 mm by experienced radiologists. The results indicate that for 93% detection sensitivity (on polyps), the evolved FIS method is able to remove 88% of FPs generated by the segmentation algorithm leaving 7.5 FP per scan. The high sensitivity rate of our results show the promise of neuro-fuzzy classifiers as an aid for interpreting CTC examinations.

  2. False positive morphologic diagnoses at the anomaly scan: marginal or real problem, a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Debost-Legrand, Anne; Laurichesse-Delmas, Hélène; Francannet, Christine; Perthus, Isabelle; Lémery, Didier; Gallot, Denis; Vendittelli, Françoise

    2014-03-24

    Congenital malformations occur in 3-4% of live births. Their prenatal detection is performed by ultrasound screening. Any announcement about a suspected malformation is a source of stress for the parents, and misdiagnosis during ultrasound screening can lead to expensive and sometimes iatrogenic medical interventions. In this study, we aim to determine the false-positive rate, first overall and then by anatomical system, of ultrasound screening for congenital malformations in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Our sample includes all children born between 1 January, 2006, and 31 December, 2009, in the French region of Auvergne, whose mother had a prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of a congenital malformation during the second or third trimester of pregnancy confirmed by a follow-up ultrasound examination by an expert consultant ultrasonographer. The study included 526 fetuses, divided in 3 groups: false positives, diagnostic misclassifications, and true positives. The rates of false positives and diagnostic misclassifications were calculated for the sample as a whole and then by anatomical system. Overall, the false-positive rate was 8.8% and the rate of diagnostic misclassification 9.2%. The highest false-positive rates were found for renal and gastrointestinal tract malformations, and the highest diagnostic misclassification rates for cerebral and cardiac malformations. The diagnostic misclassification rate was significantly higher than the false-positive rate for cardiac malformations. The false-positive rate during prenatal ultrasound is not insignificant; these misdiagnoses cause psychological stress for the parents and overmedicalisation of the pregnancy and the child.

  3. Xpert MTB/RIF Results in Patients With Previous Tuberculosis: Can We Distinguish True From False Positive Results?

    PubMed

    Theron, Grant; Venter, Rouxjeane; Calligaro, Greg; Smith, Liezel; Limberis, Jason; Meldau, Richard; Chanda, Duncan; Esmail, Aliasgar; Peter, Jonny; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-04-15

    Patients with previous tuberculosis may have residual DNA in sputum that confounds nucleic acid amplification tests such as Xpert MTB/RIF. Little is known about the frequency of Xpert-positive, culture-negative ("false positive") results in retreatment patients, whether these are distinguishable from true positives, and whether Xpert's automated filter-based wash step reduces false positivity by removing residual DNA associated with nonintact cells. Pretreatment patients (n = 2889) with symptoms of tuberculosis from Cape Town, South Africa, underwent a sputum-based liquid culture and Xpert. We also compared Xpert results from dilutions of intact or heat-lysed and mechanically lysed bacilli. Retreatment cases were more likely to be Xpert false-positive (45/321 Xpert-positive retreatment cases were false-positive) than new cases (40/461) (14% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 10%-18%] vs 8% [95% CI, 6%-12%];P= .018). Fewer years since treatment completion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.85 [95% CI, .73-.99]), less mycobacterial DNA (aOR, 1.14 [95% CI, 1.03-1.27] per cycle threshold [CT]), and a chest radiograph not suggestive of active tuberculosis (aOR, 0.22 [95% CI, .06-.82]) were associated with false positivity. CThad suboptimal accuracy for false positivity: 46% of Xpert-positives with CT> 30 would be false positive, although 70% of false positives would be missed. CT's predictive ability (area under the curve, 0.83 [95% CI, .76-.90]) was not improved by additional variables. Xpert detected nonviable, nonintact bacilli without a change in CTvs controls. One in 7 Xpert-positive retreatment patients were culture negative and potentially false positive. False positivity was associated with recent previous tuberculosis, high CT, and a chest radiograph not suggestive of active tuberculosis. Clinicians may consider awaiting confirmatory testing in retreatment patients with CT> 30; however, most false positives fall below this cut-point. Xpert can detect DNA from nonviable

  4. Limited Agreement of Independent RNAi Screens for Virus-Required Host Genes Owes More to False-Negative than False-Positive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishi; Craven, Mark; Newton, Michael A.; Ahlquist, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Systematic, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) analysis is a powerful approach to identify gene functions that support or modulate selected biological processes. An emerging challenge shared with some other genome-wide approaches is that independent RNAi studies often show limited agreement in their lists of implicated genes. To better understand this, we analyzed four genome-wide RNAi studies that identified host genes involved in influenza virus replication. These studies collectively identified and validated the roles of 614 cell genes, but pair-wise overlap among the four gene lists was only 3% to 15% (average 6.7%). However, a number of functional categories were overrepresented in multiple studies. The pair-wise overlap of these enriched-category lists was high, ∼19%, implying more agreement among studies than apparent at the gene level. Probing this further, we found that the gene lists implicated by independent studies were highly connected in interacting networks by independent functional measures such as protein-protein interactions, at rates significantly higher than predicted by chance. We also developed a general, model-based approach to gauge the effects of false-positive and false-negative factors and to estimate, from a limited number of studies, the total number of genes involved in a process. For influenza virus replication, this novel statistical approach estimates the total number of cell genes involved to be ∼2,800. This and multiple other aspects of our experimental and computational results imply that, when following good quality control practices, the low overlap between studies is primarily due to false negatives rather than false-positive gene identifications. These results and methods have implications for and applications to multiple forms of genome-wide analysis. PMID:24068911

  5. Xpert MTB/RIF Results in Patients With Previous Tuberculosis: Can We Distinguish True From False Positive Results?

    PubMed Central

    Theron, Grant; Venter, Rouxjeane; Calligaro, Greg; Smith, Liezel; Limberis, Jason; Meldau, Richard; Chanda, Duncan; Esmail, Aliasgar; Peter, Jonny; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with previous tuberculosis may have residual DNA in sputum that confounds nucleic acid amplification tests such as Xpert MTB/RIF. Little is known about the frequency of Xpert-positive, culture-negative (“false positive”) results in retreatment patients, whether these are distinguishable from true positives, and whether Xpert's automated filter-based wash step reduces false positivity by removing residual DNA associated with nonintact cells. Methods. Pretreatment patients (n = 2889) with symptoms of tuberculosis from Cape Town, South Africa, underwent a sputum-based liquid culture and Xpert. We also compared Xpert results from dilutions of intact or heat-lysed and mechanically lysed bacilli. Results. Retreatment cases were more likely to be Xpert false-positive (45/321 Xpert-positive retreatment cases were false-positive) than new cases (40/461) (14% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 10%-18%] vs 8% [95% CI, 6%–12%]; P = .018). Fewer years since treatment completion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.85 [95% CI, .73–.99]), less mycobacterial DNA (aOR, 1.14 [95% CI, 1.03–1.27] per cycle threshold [CT]), and a chest radiograph not suggestive of active tuberculosis (aOR, 0.22 [95% CI, .06–.82]) were associated with false positivity. CT had suboptimal accuracy for false positivity: 46% of Xpert-positives with CT > 30 would be false positive, although 70% of false positives would be missed. CT's predictive ability (area under the curve, 0.83 [95% CI, .76–.90]) was not improved by additional variables. Xpert detected nonviable, nonintact bacilli without a change in CT vs controls. Conclusions. One in 7 Xpert-positive retreatment patients were culture negative and potentially false positive. False positivity was associated with recent previous tuberculosis, high CT, and a chest radiograph not suggestive of active tuberculosis. Clinicians may consider awaiting confirmatory testing in retreatment patients with CT > 30; however, most false

  6. Factors influencing accuracy of referral and the likelihood of false positive referral by optometrists in Bradford, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Davey, Christopher James; Scally, Andrew J; Green, Clare; Mitchell, Edwin S; Elliott, David B

    2016-01-01

    Levels of false positive referral to ophthalmology departments can be high. This study aimed to evaluate commonality between false positive referrals in order to find the factors which may influence referral accuracy. In 2007/08, a sample of 431 new Ophthalmology referrals from the catchment area of Bradford Royal Infirmary were retrospectively analysed. The proportion of false positive referrals generated by optometrists decreases with experience at a rate of 6.2% per year since registration (p<0.0001). Community services which involved further investigation done by the optometrist before directly referring to the hospital were 2.7 times less likely to refer false positively than other referral formats (p=0.007). Male optometrists were about half as likely to generate a false positive referral than females (OR=0.51, p=0.008) and as multiple/corporate practices in the Bradford area employ less experienced and more female staff, independent practices generate about half the number of false positive referrals (OR=0.52, p=0.005). Clinician experience has the greatest effect on referral accuracy although there is also a significant effect of gender with women tending to refer more false positives. This may be due to a different approach to patient care and possibly a greater sensitivity to litigation. The improved accuracy of community services (which often refer directly after further investigation) supports further growth of these schemes. Copyright © 2015 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. A human immunodeficiency virus screening algorithm to address the high rate of false-positive results in pregnant women in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shima-Sano, Takako; Yamada, Rika; Sekita, Kazuyo; Hankins, Raleigh W; Hori, Hiromasa; Seto, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Kondo, Makiko; Kawahara, Kazuo; Tsukahara, Yuki; Inaba, Noriyuki; Kato, Shingo; Imai, Mitsunobu

    2010-02-23

    Prenatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing is essential for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission. However, false-positive results of screening testing are a concern as they may cause unnecessary emotional stress to pregnant women waiting for confirmatory test results. In regions with an extremely low prevalence, the positive predictive values of screening are unacceptably low rate. Here, we propose a HIV screening algorithm consisting of serial two fourth-generation enzyme immunoassays to reduce the number of false-positive screening results. When 6461 pregnant women presenting to two maternity hospitals located in the Tokyo metropolitan area of Japan from September, 2004 to January, 2006 were tested using Enzygnost HIV Integral as a first screening test, 27 showed positive reactions. When these positive reaction samples were tested using VIDAS HIV DUO Quick as a second screening test, only one of them had a positive reaction, and the remaining 26 were nonreactive. Confirmatory Western blots and nucleic acid amplification test also showed that one was positive and the remaining 26 were negative; the subject who was positive with the confirmatory tests was identical to the subject who was positive with the second screening test. Thus, by adding the second screening test, the false-positive rate was improved from 0.4% to 0%, and the positive predictive value from 3.7% to 100%, compared with the single screening test. By applying our serial screening algorithm to HIV testing in maternity hospitals, many uninfected pregnant women would not need to receive confirmatory tests and be subjected to emotional turmoil while waiting for their confirmatory test results. This algorithm would be suitable for HIV testing of pregnant women living in low prevalence regions such as Japan.

  8. Multilevel analysis quantifies variation in the experimental effect while optimizing power and preventing false positives.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Emmeke; Dolan, Conor V; Verhage, Matthijs; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2015-12-19

    In neuroscience, experimental designs in which multiple measurements are collected in the same research object or treatment facility are common. Such designs result in clustered or nested data. When clusters include measurements from different experimental conditions, both the mean of the dependent variable and the effect of the experimental manipulation may vary over clusters. In practice, this type of cluster-related variation is often overlooked. Not accommodating cluster-related variation can result in inferential errors concerning the overall experimental effect. The exact effect of ignoring the clustered nature of the data depends on the effect of clustering. Using simulation studies we show that cluster-related variation in the experimental effect, if ignored, results in a false positive rate (i.e., Type I error rate) that is appreciably higher (up to ~20-~50 %) than the chosen [Formula: see text]-level (e.g., [Formula: see text] = 0.05). If the effect of clustering is limited to the intercept, the failure to accommodate clustering can result in a loss of statistical power to detect the overall experimental effect. This effect is most pronounced when both the magnitude of the experimental effect and the sample size are small (e.g., ~25 % less power given an experimental effect with effect size d of 0.20, and a sample size of 10 clusters and 5 observations per experimental condition per cluster). When data is collected from a research design in which observations from the same cluster are obtained in different experimental conditions, multilevel analysis should be used to analyze the data. The use of multilevel analysis not only ensures correct statistical interpretation of the overall experimental effect, but also provides a valuable test of the generalizability of the experimental effect over (intrinsically) varying settings, and a means to reveal the cause of cluster-related variation in experimental effect.

  9. Perspectives on mammography after receipt of secondary screening owing to a false positive.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Maria D; Siminoff, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    The utility of mammography screening as an efficacious tool for early detection is being contested owing to the risk of potential harms, including psychological distress and exposure to unnecessary procedures associated with false-positive (FPs) results and overdiagnosis. However, there is little research regarding women's experiences, values, or preferences for participating in mammography programs. Our aim was to explore women's actual experiences of a FP mammography screen and their perceptions of the value, risks and benefits given their recent experience. We conducted semistructured interviews with 40 women who experienced a recent FP mammogram. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. A directed content analysis was used to identify and explore primary themes. Knowledge of breast cancer risk was also assessed. Receiving a FP mammography screen generated significant worry among 60% (n=24) of women. Yet 70% maintained that mammography screening was necessary despite the worry incurred. Women also described the experience as stimulating greater interest in additional cancer prevention activities (32.5%; n=13) and one-third discussed needing more information about the risks and benefits of mammography screening. Less than one-quarter of women (22.5%; n=9) correctly identified a women's lifetime risk of developing breast cancer; 20% (n=8) overestimated, and 57.5% (n=23) underestimated this risk. Women reported needing more information about the risks and benefits of mammography screening, but also considered FP results an acceptable risk. Further, our results suggest that breast cancer screening programs may provide a unique opportunity to deliver additional breast cancer prevention interventions. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is the false-positive rate in mammography in North America too high?

    PubMed Central

    Mothersill, Carmel E; Seymour, Colin B; McNeill, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    The practice of investigating pathological abnormalities in the breasts of females who are asymptomatic is primarily employed using X-ray mammography. The importance of breast screening is reflected in the mortality-based benefits observed among females who are found to possess invasive breast carcinoma prior to the manifestation of clinical symptoms. It is estimated that population-based screening constitutes a 17% reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate among females affected by invasive breast carcinoma. In spite of the significant utility that screening confers in those affected by invasive cancer, limitations associated with screening manifest as potential harms affecting individuals who are free of invasive disease. Disease-free and benign tumour-bearing individuals who are subjected to diagnostic work-up following a screening examination constitute a population of cases referred to as false positives (FPs). This article discusses factors contributing to the FP rate in mammography and extends the discussion to an assessment of the consequences associated with FP reporting. We conclude that the mammography FP rate in North America is in excess based upon the observation of overtreatment of in situ lesions and the disproportionate distribution of detriment and benefit among the population of individuals recalled for diagnostic work-up subsequent to screening. To address the excessive incidence of FPs in mammography, we investigate solutions that may be employed to remediate the current status of the FP rate. Subsequently, it can be suggested that improvements in the breast-screening protocol, medical litigation risk, image interpretation software and the implementation of image acquisition modalities that overcome superimposition effects are promising solutions. PMID:27187600

  11. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  12. Automatic detection of lung nodules: false positive reduction using convolution neural networks and handcrafted features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ling; Ma, Jingchen; Ren, Yacheng; Han, Youn Seon; Zhao, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis is critical in increasing the 5-year survival rate of lung cancer, so the efficient and accurate detection of lung nodules, potential precursors to lung cancer, is evermore important. In this paper, a computer-aided lung nodule detection system using convolution neural networks (CNN) and handcrafted features for false positive reduction is developed. The CNNs were trained with three types of images: lung CT images, their nodule-enhanced images, and their blood vessel-enhanced images. For each nodule candidate, nine 2D patches from differently oriented planes were extracted from each type of images. Patches of the same orientation from the same type of image across different candidates were used to train the CNNs independently, which were used to extract 864 features. 88 handcrafted features including intensity, shape, and texture features were also obtained from the lung CT images. The CNN features and handcrafted features were then combined to train a classifier, and a support vector machine was adopted to achieve the final classification results. The proposed method was evaluated on 1004 CT scans from the LIDC-IDRI database using 10-fold cross-validation. Compared with the traditional CNN method using only lung CT images, the proposed method boosted the sensitivity of nodule detection from 89.0% to 90.9% at 4 FPs/scan and from 71.6% to 78.2% at 1 FP/scan. This indicates that a combination of handcrafted features and CNN features from both lung CT images and enhanced images is a promising method for lung nodule detection.

  13. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  14. Is the false-positive rate in mammography in North America too high?

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle T; Mothersill, Carmel E; Seymour, Colin B; McNeill, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    The practice of investigating pathological abnormalities in the breasts of females who are asymptomatic is primarily employed using X-ray mammography. The importance of breast screening is reflected in the mortality-based benefits observed among females who are found to possess invasive breast carcinoma prior to the manifestation of clinical symptoms. It is estimated that population-based screening constitutes a 17% reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate among females affected by invasive breast carcinoma. In spite of the significant utility that screening confers in those affected by invasive cancer, limitations associated with screening manifest as potential harms affecting individuals who are free of invasive disease. Disease-free and benign tumour-bearing individuals who are subjected to diagnostic work-up following a screening examination constitute a population of cases referred to as false positives (FPs). This article discusses factors contributing to the FP rate in mammography and extends the discussion to an assessment of the consequences associated with FP reporting. We conclude that the mammography FP rate in North America is in excess based upon the observation of overtreatment of in situ lesions and the disproportionate distribution of detriment and benefit among the population of individuals recalled for diagnostic work-up subsequent to screening. To address the excessive incidence of FPs in mammography, we investigate solutions that may be employed to remediate the current status of the FP rate. Subsequently, it can be suggested that improvements in the breast-screening protocol, medical litigation risk, image interpretation software and the implementation of image acquisition modalities that overcome superimposition effects are promising solutions.

  15. High frequency of false-positive signals in a real-time PCR-based "Plus/Minus" assay.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzian, Forough L; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular biological methods using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of bacterial and viral genes in different environments have been developed into assays from different commercial sources. Applied Biosystems include and support two applications with their TaqMan instrument: the "Plus/Minus" and the "Allelic Discrimination" assays. These approaches are RT-PCR based, use short primers and fluorescent-labeled TaqMan probes and include three processes: a pre-read run, a PCR-amplification run, and a post-read run. In the "Plus/Minus" assay, samples and controls (distilled water) are loaded into the instrument, which calculates a positive or a negative outcome based on differences in signals between samples and the controls. When testing the "Plus/Minus" assay for detection of usp genes encoding a uropathogenic specific protein in Escherichia coli, an inordinately high proportion of false-positive signals was observed. This was shown to be due to a serious methodological deficiency. Our observations indicate that an adequate no-template control closely matching the target samples in all aspects, including amount of DNA, is required to establish a correct threshold in the pre-read run that forms the basis for further calculations in the post-read run of the "Plus/Minus" assay.

  16. Prescription drugs associated with false-positive results when using faecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Garcia, Montse; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Binefa, Gemma; Gómez-Matas, Javier; Domènech, Xènia; Vidal, Carmen; Soriano, Antonio; Moreno, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The most common side effect in population screening programmes is a false-positive result which leads to unnecessary risks and costs. To identify factors associated with false-positive results in a colorectal cancer screening programme with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Cross-sectional study of 472 participants with a positive FIT who underwent colonoscopy for confirmation of diagnosis between 2013 and 2014. A false-positive result was defined as having a positive FIT (≥20μg haemoglobin per gram of faeces) and follow-up colonoscopy without intermediate/high-risk lesions or cancer. Women showed a two-fold increased likelihood of a false-positive result compared with men (adjusted OR, 2.3; 95%CI, 1.5-3.4), but no female-specific factor was identified. The other variables associated with a false-positive result were successive screening (adjusted OR, 1.5; 95%CI, 1.0-2.2), anal disorders (adjusted OR, 3.1; 95%CI, 2.1-4.5) and the use of proton pump inhibitors (adjusted OR, 1.8; 95%CI, 1.1-2.9). Successive screening and proton pump inhibitor use were associated with FP in men. None of the other drugs were related to a false-positive FIT. Concurrent use of proton pump inhibitors at the time of FIT might increase the likelihood of a false-positive result. Further investigation is needed to determine whether discontinuing them could decrease the false-positive rate. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On minimizing assignment errors and the trade-off between false positives and negatives in parentage analysis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Hugo B; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Planes, Serge; Jones, Geoffrey P; Berumen, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    Genetic parentage analyses provide a practical means with which to identify parent-offspring relationships in the wild. In Harrison et al.'s study (2013a), we compare three methods of parentage analysis and showed that the number and diversity of microsatellite loci were the most important factors defining the accuracy of assignments. Our simulations revealed that an exclusion-Bayes theorem method was more susceptible to false-positive and false-negative assignments than other methods tested. Here, we analyse and discuss the trade-off between type I and type II errors in parentage analyses. We show that controlling for false-positive assignments, without reporting type II errors, can be misleading. Our findings illustrate the need to estimate and report both the rate of false-positive and false-negative assignments in parentage analyses.

  18. False-positive fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results after chemotherapy in patients with metastatic seminoma.

    PubMed

    Decoene, Jasper; Winter, Christian; Albers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of residual masses after chemotherapy in seminomas remains a controversial topic. Postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) in all patients would lead to severe overtreatment with a high rate of complications and additional procedures. For this reason, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was introduced. FDG-PET has an accuracy of 88%. In 15% of cases, FDG-PET findings are false positive (FP) with unclear consequences. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated the rate of unnecessary procedures due to FP results on FDG-PET. Between July 2003 and September 2013 we performed 305 PC-RPLNDs in 277 patients, 22 because of metastatic seminoma. Of them, 11 patients had a preoperative FDG-PET at least 6 weeks after chemotherapy. Indication for surgery was a marker-negative progression of the lesion in 7 patients who did not undergo FDG-PET, a marker-negative progression with a negative result on FDG-PET in 2 patients, and a positive result on FDG-PET with normal markers in 9 patients. Furthermore, PC-RPLND was indicated in 3 patients because of ureteral compression/infiltration with ureteral stents or nephrostomies. In 1 patient, there was uncertainty whether the initial retroperitoneal tumor contained choriocarcinoma elements. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were recorded for all patients undergoing FDG-PET. The FDG-PET findings were FP in 7 of 11 (64%) patients. The median age of the patients was 45.4 years (39-49). The median SUV in the patients was 6.6 (3.1-11.6), and the median diameter of the residual mass was 6.8 cm (2.9-11). In 4 of 7 patients, intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred (polar artery ligation with functional loss, bilateral non-nerve-sparing technique with retrograde ejaculation, ureteral replacement with an ileal segment, and pulmonary embolism). In patients with metastatic seminoma who received chemotherapy, FDG-PET is a valuable tool to evaluate whether the residual mass

  19. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  20. Ruling out False-Positive Urinary Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae Antigen Test Results by Heating Urine

    PubMed Central

    Pontoizeau, C.; Dangers, L.; Jarlier, V.; Luyt, C. E.; Guiller, E.; Fievet, M. H.; Lecsö-Bornet, M.; Aubry, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report here false-positive urinary Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen test results due to rabbit antilymphocyte serum treatment and provide a simple and fast solution to rule them out by heating urine. PMID:25253788

  1. Bilateral analysis based false positive reduction for computer-aided mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou Chuan; Ge Jun; Shi Jiazheng; Zhang Yiheng; Chan Heangping

    2007-08-15

    We have developed a false positive (FP) reduction method based on analysis of bilateral mammograms for computerized mass detection systems. The mass candidates on each view were first detected by our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, a regional registration technique was used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is ''symmetrical'' to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Texture features derived from the spatial gray level dependence matrices and morphological features were extracted from the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features were then generated from corresponding pairs of unilateral features for each object. Two linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers were trained from the unilateral and the bilateral feature spaces, respectively. Finally, the scores from the unilateral LDA classifier and the bilateral LDA asymmetry classifier were fused with a third LDA whose output score was used to distinguish true mass from FPs. A data set of 341 cases of bilateral two-view mammograms was used in this study, of which 276 cases with 552 bilateral pairs contained 110 malignant and 166 benign biopsy-proven masses and 65 cases with 130 bilateral pairs were normal. The mass data set was divided into two subsets for twofold cross-validation training and testing. The normal data set was used for estimation of FP rates. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at average FP rates of 0.35, 0.75, and 0.95 FPs/image, respectively, on the test data sets with malignant masses. In comparison to the average FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.58, 1.33, and 1.63, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 40%, 44%, and 42% with the bilateral symmetry information. The improvement was statistically significance (p<0.05) as estimated by

  2. Bilateral analysis based false positive reduction for computer-aided mass detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Shi, Jiazheng; Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a false positive (FP) reduction method based on analysis of bilateral mammograms for computerized mass detection systems. The mass candidates on each view were first detected by our unilateral computer-aided detection (CAD) system. For each detected object, a regional registration technique was used to define a region of interest (ROI) that is "symmetrical" to the object location on the contralateral mammogram. Texture features derived from the spatial gray level dependence matrices and morphological features were extracted from the ROI containing the detected object on a mammogram and its corresponding ROI on the contralateral mammogram. Bilateral features were then generated from corresponding pairs of unilateral features for each object. Two linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifiers were trained from the unilateral and the bilateral feature spaces, respectively. Finally, the scores from the unilateral LDA classifier and the bilateral LDA asymmetry classifier were fused with a third LDA whose output score was used to distinguish true mass from FPs. A data set of 341 cases of bilateral two-view mammograms was used in this study, of which 276 cases with 552 bilateral pairs contained 110 malignant and 166 benign biopsy-proven masses and 65 cases with 130 bilateral pairs were normal. The mass data set was divided into two subsets for twofold cross-validation training and testing. The normal data set was used for estimation of FP rates. It was found that our bilateral CAD system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 70%, 80%, and 85% at average FP rates of 0.35, 0.75, and 0.95 FPs/image, respectively, on the test data sets with malignant masses. In comparison to the average FP rates for the unilateral CAD system of 0.58, 1.33, and 1.63, respectively, at the corresponding sensitivities, the FP rates were reduced by 40%, 44%, and 42% with the bilateral symmetry information. The improvement was statistically significance (p < 0.05) as estimated by

  3. Do false positive alerts in naïve clinical decision support system lead to false adoption by physicians? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-You; Wang, Shi-Heng; Hsu, Min-Huei; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack

    2016-08-01

    False positive alerts in patient-safety-related clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are defined as alerts which incorrectly prompt when no-risk patients are encountered. It is an unfavorable condition which may potentially mislead physicians. The aim is to investigate physician responses toward false positive (FP) and true positive (TP) alerts in CDSS for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). A two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in university hospitals. Eligible physicians were randomized to receive alert intervention or no intervention (groups 1 and 2, respectively). The alert system was embedded with a deliberately non-specific risk detection tool in order to generate TP and FP alerts. The naïve alert system would alert the physician to cancel the order regardless of the patient being at-risk or not at-risk. CIN risk was stratified as at-risk and no-risk according to a patient's pre-existing renal function. Contrast imaging order-cancellation rate was measured as primary outcome. 3802 contrast-enhanced examination orders from 66 physicians were analyzed. Demographic data and risk distributions of patients were similar and well-balanced between two groups. In the intervention group, a total of 1892 alerts were generated (332 TP alerts and 1560 FP alerts). Order-cancellation rates were 5.1% versus 1.4% in groups 1 and 2 for at-risk patients (relative risk [RR] = 3.69) from TP alerts, and 1.0% versus 1.4% for no-risk patients (RR = 0.71) from FP alerts. Using generalized linear model with generalized estimating equation, the FP alerts had no order-cancellation effect when compared to the control arm (adjusted RR = 0.69; 95%CI, 0.36-1.32). The TP alerts had a larger order-cancellation effect than that of the control arm (adjusted RR = 2.95; 95%CI, 0.94-9.27), which revealed a marginal trend toward significance. However, the effect was not statistically significant (adjusted RR = 1.24; 95%CI, 0

  4. Consensus-based identification of factors related to false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kei; Narita, Akihiro; Ogasawara, Michihiro; Ohno, Shigeru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsushita, Isao; Suzuki, Takeshi; Misaki, Kenta; Ogura, Takehisa; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Seto, Yohei; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kaneko, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Henmi, Mihoko; Fukae, Jun; Nishida, Keiichiro; Sumida, Takayuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify causes of false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovial/tenosynovial/bursal inflammation and provide corresponding imaging examples. We first performed systematic literature review to identify previously reported causes of false-positives. We next determined causes of false-positives and corresponding example images for educational material through Delphi exercises and discussion by 15 experts who were an instructor and/or a lecturer in the 2013 advanced course for musculoskeletal ultrasound organized by Japan College of Rheumatology Committee for the Standardization of Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography. Systematic literature review identified 11 articles relevant to sonographic false-positives of synovial/tenosynovial inflammation. Based on these studies, 21 candidate causes of false-positives were identified in the consensus meeting. Of these items, 11 achieved a predefined consensus (≥ 80%) in Delphi exercise and were classified as follows: (I) Gray-scale assessment [(A) non-specific synovial findings and (B) normal anatomical structures which can mimic synovial lesions due to either their low echogenicity or anisotropy]; (II) Doppler assessment [(A) Intra-articular normal vessels and (B) reverberation)]. Twenty-four corresponding examples with 49 still and 23 video images also achieved consensus. Our study provides a set of representative images that can help sonographers to understand false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

  5. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men.

  6. Background parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging: normal patterns, diagnostic challenges, and potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretation.

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Yeh, Eren D; Raza, Sughra; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2014-01-01

    At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, both normal and abnormal breast tissue enhances after contrast material administration. The morphology and temporal degree of enhancement of pathologic breast tissue relative to normal breast tissue form the basis of MR imaging's diagnostic accuracy in the detection and diagnosis of breast disease. Normal parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging is termed background parenchymal enhancement (BPE). BPE may vary in degree and distribution in different patients as well as in the same patient over time. Typically BPE is minimal or mild in overall degree, with a bilateral, symmetric, diffuse distribution and slow early and persistent delayed kinetic features. However, BPE may sometimes be moderate or marked in degree, with an asymmetric or nondiffuse distribution and rapid early and plateau or washout delayed kinetic features. These patterns cause diagnostic difficulty because these features can be seen with malignancy. This article reviews typical and atypical patterns of BPE seen at breast MR imaging. The anatomic and physiologic influences on BPE in women undergoing diagnostic and screening breast MR imaging are reviewed. The potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretations due to BPE are discussed. Radiologists can improve their interpretive accuracy by increasing their understanding of various BPE patterns, influences on BPE, and the potential effects of BPE on MR imaging interpretation.

  7. Exploring Habitability Markers, Biosignatures, and Their False Positives Using Spectral Models of Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.

    )2 feature in a variety of simulated atmospheres with different N2 abundances with both synthetic direct-imaging and transit transmission spectra. Third, I investigate observational indicators of planetary mechanisms that may generate abiotic oxygen (O2 or O3) on exoplanets, leading to potential "false positives" for life. Abiotic production of O2 from CO2 photolysis potentially leads to detectable amounts of CO as a byproduct. Oxygen build up from massive H-loss during a runaway greenhouse could leave behind more O2 than could be plausibly produced by biology. In this case density dependent O4 features would be strong and potentially indicative of this process. I investigate the strength and detectability of CO (at 2.35 and 4.6 mum) and O4 (at 0.345, 0.36, 0.38, 0.445, 0.475, 0.53, 0.57, 0.63, 1.06, and 1.27 mum) absorption for these abiotic oxygen scenarios in both transmission and direct-imaging spectroscopy. Finally, I present an interdisciplinary study of nonphotosynthetic pigments as alternative surface reflectance biosignatures, in contrast to direct photosynthetic signatures like the vegetation red edge. This study includes reflectance measurements of a variety of pigmented organisms in the laboratory, illustrating a wide range of spectral diversity. I also model the spectra of hypothetical planets containing nonphotosynthetic pigment biosignatures including the confounding spectral effects of the atmosphere. I find that these signatures could potentially be observable in disk-averaged spectra depending on the fraction of the planet containing the signature. Organisms with nonphotosynthetic pigments will produce reflectance signatures different than that of the commonly referenced vegetation red edge, and push us to broaden our understanding of what surface biosignatures might look like on Earth-like exoplanets once remote characterization of these worlds becomes possible.

  8. False positive dengue NS1 antigen test in a traveller with an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gyurech, Danielle; Schilling, Julian; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Cassinotti, Pascal; Kaeppeli, Franz; Dobec, Marinko

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of an acute Zika virus infection imported into Switzerland by a traveller returning from Canoa Quebrada, Ceará state, in the north-eastern part of Brazil. Due to a false positive dengue virus NS1 antigen test, IgG antibody seroconversion and a suggestive clinical picture,an acute dengue fever was initially considered. However, because of lack of specific IgM-antibodies, stationary IgG antibody titre and a negative dengue virus PCR test result, a dengue virus infection was excluded and a cross-reaction with other, causative flaviviruses was postulated. Based on recent reports of Zika fever cases in the north-eastern parts of Brazil, an acute Zika virus infection was suspected. Because of a lack of commercially available Zika virus diagnostic tests, the case was confirmed in the WHO reference laboratory. As the clinical presentation of Zika virus infection can be confused with dengue fever and chikungunya fever, and because of possible public health implications, all patients returning from affected areas should be additionally tested for Zika virus. This case illustrates the urgent medical need for a broadly available assay capable of differentiating Zika from Dengue infections.

  9. High prevalence of false-positive plateau phenomena during VO2max testing in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Fernando G; Wong, Del P; Noakes, Timothy D

    2014-09-01

    It is believed that a plateau in oxygen consumption (VO2) at the end of an incremental exercise test identifies the upper limits of cardiovascular capacity. We investigated how different criteria influence the frequency with which the "plateau phenomenon" is detected and the prevalence at which "false" plateau phenomena occurs during sub-maximal exercise. Cross-sectional. Six different criteria with 3 different sampling intervals each were used to identify the "plateau phenomenon" from a single data set comprising 63 incremental exercise tests along with secondary criteria based on target heart rate (HR) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER). A single criterion from the original 18 (HALF) was also used to detect the incidence of any plateau phenomena during each test. The plateau phenomenon was detected in 16-82% of the tests depending on the criteria used, mostly as a result of the different sampling intervals. HALF identified 103 "plateau phenomena" but 73 (70.9%) of these occurred during sub-maximal exercise and so were "false". "False" plateaus were verified by at least one secondary criterion in 27% of cases. Participants reached the HR and RER targets after 83.6 ± 11.7% and 81.9 ± 18.1% of total test duration, respectively. The wide range in the percentage of plateau phenomena detected by different criteria plus the high rate (71%) of "false" plateau during sub-maximal exercise could indicate that this phenomenon is a calculation artifact rather than an indicator of true physiological events. Secondary criteria can be reached early in exercise and often identify "false" plateau phenomena as "true". Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of false-positives among total and fecal coliform counts by factorial analysis of correspondence.

    PubMed Central

    Joncas, M; Michaud, S; Carmichael, J P; Lavoie, M C

    1985-01-01

    Application of an analysis of correspondence to the biochemical characteristics of total and fecal coliforms isolated in the Ivory Coast permitted us to separate two small clusters of isolates different from the main clusters, which included isolates from human and animal feces. The isolates grouped in the small clusters were from water samples. An analysis of the biochemical characteristics which permitted the segregation of the "water-specific" isolates from the main clusters indicates that water-specific total coliforms were citrate positive, indole negative, and amygdaline positive. Water-specific fecal coliforms were either citrate positive, indole negative, amygdaline positive, and inositol negative or indole negative, amygdaline positive, and inositol positive. Any isolates not fitting the above patterns could be considered of fecal origin. If this observation is confirmed under temperate climates and for a greater number of isolates, these simple tests could be used to confirm the fecal origin of coliforms. PMID:2983607

  11. All That Glisters Is Not Gold: Sampling-Process Uncertainty in Disease-Vector Surveys with False-Negative and False-Positive Detections

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Sarquis, Otília; Lima, Marli M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases are major public health concerns worldwide. For many of them, vector control is still key to primary prevention, with control actions planned and evaluated using vector occurrence records. Yet vectors can be difficult to detect, and vector occurrence indices will be biased whenever spurious detection/non-detection records arise during surveys. Here, we investigate the process of Chagas disease vector detection, assessing the performance of the surveillance method used in most control programs – active triatomine-bug searches by trained health agents. Methodology/Principal Findings Control agents conducted triplicate vector searches in 414 man-made ecotopes of two rural localities. Ecotope-specific ‘detection histories’ (vectors or their traces detected or not in each individual search) were analyzed using ordinary methods that disregard detection failures and multiple detection-state site-occupancy models that accommodate false-negative and false-positive detections. Mean (±SE) vector-search sensitivity was ∼0.283±0.057. Vector-detection odds increased as bug colonies grew denser, and were lower in houses than in most peridomestic structures, particularly woodpiles. False-positive detections (non-vector fecal streaks misidentified as signs of vector presence) occurred with probability ∼0.011±0.008. The model-averaged estimate of infestation (44.5±6.4%) was ∼2.4–3.9 times higher than naïve indices computed assuming perfect detection after single vector searches (11.4–18.8%); about 106–137 infestation foci went undetected during such standard searches. Conclusions/Significance We illustrate a relatively straightforward approach to addressing vector detection uncertainty under realistic field survey conditions. Standard vector searches had low sensitivity except in certain singular circumstances. Our findings suggest that many infestation foci may go undetected during routine surveys, especially when vector

  12. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

  13. A False Positive Dengue Fever Rapid Diagnostic Test Result in a Case of Acute Parvovirus B19 Infection.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Toshihide; Sakata, Hidenao; Nakamura, Masahiko; Hayashibara, Yumiko; Inasaki, Noriko; Inahata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Sumiyo; Takizawa, Takenori; Kaya, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever occurred in Japan in August 2014. We herein report the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a persistent fever in September 2014. Acute parvovirus B19 infection led to a false positive finding of dengue fever on a rapid diagnostic test (Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette(TM)). To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of a false positive result for dengue IgM with the dengue rapid diagnostic test. We believe that epidemiological information on the prevalence of parvovirus B19 is useful for guiding the interpretation of a positive result with the dengue rapid diagnostic test.

  14. Positive Psychology and Adolescent Mental Health: False Promise or True Breakthrough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness…

  15. Positive Psychology and Adolescent Mental Health: False Promise or True Breakthrough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness…

  16. National expenditure for false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses estimated at $4 billion a year.

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Sing; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    Populationwide mammography screening has been associated with a substantial rise in false-positive mammography findings and breast cancer overdiagnosis. However, there is a lack of current data on the associated costs in the United States. We present costs due to false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses among women ages 40-59, based on expenditure data from a major US health care insurance plan for 702,154 women in the years 2011-13. The average expenditures for each false-positive mammogram, invasive breast cancer, and ductal carcinoma in situ in the twelve months following diagnosis were $852, $51,837 and $12,369, respectively. This translates to a national cost of $4 billion each year. The costs associated with false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses appear to be much higher than previously documented. Screening has the potential to save lives. However, the economic impact of false-positive mammography results and breast cancer overdiagnoses must be considered in the debate about the appropriate populations for screening. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and <0.8 % are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  18. False-positive rate determination of protein target discovery using a covalent modification- and mass spectrometry-based proteomics platform.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Erin C; Geer, M Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  19. False Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False positive rates of 1.2–2.2% and <0.8% are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed. PMID:24114261

  20. False positives and false negatives measure less than 0.001% in labeling ssDNA with osmium tetroxide 2,2’-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Osmium tetroxide 2,2’-bipyridine (OsBp) is known to react with pyrimidines in ssDNA and preferentially label deoxythymine (T) over deoxycytosine (C). The product, osmylated DNA, was proposed as a surrogate for nanopore-based DNA sequencing due to OsBp’s “perfect” label attributes. Osmylated deoxyoligos translocate unassisted and measurably slow via sub-2 nm SiN solid-state nanopores, as well as via the alpha-hemolysin (α-HL) pore. Both nanopores discriminate clearly between osmylated and intact nucleobase; α-HL was also shown to discriminate between osmylated T and osmylated C. Experiments presented here confirm that the kinetics of osmylation are comparable for short oligos and long ssDNA and show that pyrimidine osmylation is practically complete in two hours at room temperature with less than 15 mM OsBp. Under the proposed labeling conditions: deoxyoligo backbone degradation measures less than 1/1,000,000; false positives such as osmylated deoxyadenine (A) and osmylated deoxyguanine (G) measure less than 1/100,000; false negatives, i.e., unosmylated C measure less than 1/10,000; and unosmylated T must measure substantially lower than 1/10,000 due to the 27-fold higher reactivity of T compared to C. However, osmylated C undergoes degradation that amounts to about 1–2% for the duration of the labeling protocol. This degradation may be further characterized, possibly suppressed, and the properties of the degradation products via nanopore translocation can be evaluated to assure base calling quality in a DNA sequencing effort. PMID:27826518

  1. Efficient information theoretic strategies for classifier combination, feature extraction and performance evaluation in improving false positives and false negatives for spam e-mail filtering.

    PubMed

    Zorkadis, V; Karras, D A; Panayotou, M

    2005-01-01

    Spam emails are considered as a serious privacy-related violation, besides being a costly, unsolicited communication. Various spam filtering techniques have been so far proposed, mainly based on Naïve Bayesian algorithms. Other Machine Learning algorithms like Boosting trees, or Support Vector Machines (SVM) have already been used with success. However, the number of False Positives (FP) and False Negatives (FN) resulting through applying various spam e-mail filters still remains too high and the problem of spam e-mail categorization cannot be solved completely from a practical viewpoint. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for spam e-mail filtering based on efficient information theoretic techniques for integrating classifiers, for extracting improved features and for properly evaluating categorization accuracy in terms of FP and FN. The goal of the presented methodology is to empirically but explicitly minimize these FP and FN numbers by combining high-performance FP filters with high-performance FN filters emerging from a previous work of the authors [Zorkadis, V., Panayotou, M., & Karras, D. A. (2005). Improved spam e-mail filtering based on committee machines and information theoretic feature extraction. Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, July 31-August 4, 2005, Montreal, Canada]. To this end, Random Committee-based filters along with ADTree-based ones are efficiently combined through information theory, respectively. The experiments conducted are of the most extensive ones so far in the literature, exploiting widely accepted benchmarking e-mail data sets and comparing the proposed methodology with the Naive Bayes spam filter as well as with the Boosting tree methodology, the classification via regression and other machine learning models. It is illustrated by means of novel information theoretic measures of FP & FN filtering performance that the proposed approach is very favorably compared to the other rival methods

  2. Cumulative probability of false-positive recall or biopsy recommendation after 10 years of screening mammography: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Rebecca A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Flowers, Chris I; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Zhu, Weiwei; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2011-10-18

    False-positive mammography results are common. Biennial screening may decrease the cumulative probability of false-positive results across many years of repeated screening but could also delay cancer diagnosis. To compare the cumulative probability of false-positive results and the stage distribution of incident breast cancer after 10 years of annual or biennial screening mammography. Prospective cohort study. 7 mammography registries in the National Cancer Institute-funded Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. 169,456 women who underwent first screening mammography at age 40 to 59 years between 1994 and 2006 and 4492 women with incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1996 and 2006. False-positive recalls and biopsy recommendations stage distribution of incident breast cancer. False-positive recall probability was 16.3% at first and 9.6% at subsequent mammography. Probability of false-positive biopsy recommendation was 2.5% at first and 1.0% at subsequent examinations. Availability of comparison mammograms halved the odds of a false-positive recall (adjusted odds ratio, 0.50 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.56]). When screening began at age 40 years, the cumulative probability of a woman receiving at least 1 false-positive recall after 10 years was 61.3% (CI, 59.4% to 63.1%) with annual and 41.6% (CI, 40.6% to 42.5%) with biennial screening. Cumulative probability of false-positive biopsy recommendation was 7.0% (CI, 6.1% to 7.8%) with annual and 4.8% (CI, 4.4% to 5.2%) with biennial screening. Estimates were similar when screening began at age 50 years. A non-statistically significant increase in the proportion of late-stage cancers was observed with biennial compared with annual screening (absolute increases, 3.3 percentage points [CI, -1.1 to 7.8 percentage points] for women age 40 to 49 years and 2.3 percentage points [CI, -1.0 to 5.7 percentage points] for women age 50 to 59 years) among women with incident breast cancer. Few women underwent screening over the

  3. A False-Positive Detection Bias as a Function of State and Trait Schizotypy in Interaction with Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Phillip; Balser, Mona; Munk, Aisha Judith Leila; Linder, Jens; Hennig, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Hallucinatory experiences are by far not limited to patients with clinical psychosis. A number of internal and external factors may bring about such experiences in healthy individuals, whereby the personality trait of (positive) schizotypy is a major mediator of individual differences. Psychotic experiences are defined as associating abnormal meaning to real but objectively irrelevant perceptions. Especially, the ambiguity of a stimulus correlates positively with the likelihood of abnormal interpretation, and intelligence is believed to have an important influence and act as protective against clinical psychosis in highly schizotypic individuals. In this study, we presented 131 healthy participants with 216 15-letter strings containing either a word, a non-word, or only random letters and asked them to report, whether or not they believed to have seen a word. The aim was to replicate findings that participants with high values in positive schizotypy on the trait-level make more false-positive errors and assess the role of stimulus-ambiguity and verbal intelligence. Additionally, we wanted to examine whether the same effect could be shown for indices of state schizotypy. Our results support findings that both state and trait positive schizotypy explain significant variance in “seeing things that are not there” and that the properties of individual stimuli have additional strong effects on the false-positive hit rates. Finally, we found that verbal intelligence and positive schizotypy interact with stimulus-ambiguity in the production of false-positive perceptions. PMID:25309464

  4. Way forward in case of a false positive in vitro genotoxicity result for a cosmetic substance?

    PubMed

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Ates, Gamze; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-02-01

    The currently used regulatory in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity test battery has a high sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants, but it suffers from a large number of irrelevant positive results (i.e. low specificity) thereby imposing the need for additional follow-up by in vitro and/or in vivo genotoxicity tests. This could have a major impact on the cosmetic industry in Europe, seen the imposed animal testing and marketing bans on cosmetics and their ingredients. Afflicted, but safe substances could therefore be lost. Using the example of triclosan, a cosmetic preservative, we describe here the potential applicability of a human toxicogenomics-based in vitro assay as a potential mechanistically based follow-up test for positive in vitro genotoxicity results. Triclosan shows a positive in vitro chromosomal aberration test, but is negative during in vivo follow-up tests. Toxicogenomics analysis unequivocally shows that triclosan is identified as a compound acting through non-DNA reactive mechanisms. This proof-of-principle study illustrates the potential of genome-wide transcriptomics data in combination with in vitro experimentation as a possible weight-of-evidence follow-up approach for de-risking a positive outcome in a standard mutagenicity/genotoxicity battery. As such a substantial number of cosmetic compounds wrongly identified as genotoxicants could be saved for the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. False-positive technetium 99m depreotide scintigraphy resulting from round atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Linda P; Balingit, Antonio G; Morison, David S; Gilman, Matthew D

    2003-04-01

    The authors report two cases of round atelectasis that showed increased accumulation of technetium (Tc) 99m depreotide on planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy. It should be considered that round atelectasis is a potential nonmalignant cause for positive 99mTc depreotide scintigraphy.

  6. DNA typing by microbead arrays and PCR-SSP: apparent false-negative or -positive hybridization or amplification signals disclose new HLA-B and -DRB1 alleles.

    PubMed

    Rahal, M; Kervaire, B; Villard, J; Tiercy, J-M

    2008-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) hybridization on solid phase (microbead assay) or polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) requires interpretation softwares to detect all possible allele combinations. These programs propose allele calls by taking into account false-positive or false-negative signal(s). The laboratory has the option to validate typing results in the presence of strongly cross-reacting or apparent false-negative signals. Alternatively, these seemingly aberrant signals may disclose novel variants. We report here four new HLA-B (B*5620 and B*5716) and HLA-DRB1 alleles (DRB1*110107 and DRB1*1474) that were detected by apparent false-negative or -positive hybridization or amplification patterns, and ultimately resolved by sequencing. To avoid allele misassignments, a comprehensive evaluation of acquired data as documented in a quality assurance system is therefore required to confirm unambiguous typing interpretation.

  7. MR-Guided Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Reducing Breast Cancer False Positives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    simultaneously within a breast coil in a 3T MRI (Discovery MR750, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI). The optical instrument used three wavelengths...limitations in the bore of the MRI and the different shapes of breast coils , coupling optical fibers to the breast tissue can be difficult. To improve fiber...attachment 504 for an 8- channel breast coil (USA Instruments). Slots in the optical fiber holder allowed 505 for vertical positioning of the

  8. False-Positive Rate of AKI Using Consensus Creatinine–Based Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jennie; Fernandez, Hilda; Shashaty, Michael G.S.; Negoianu, Dan; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Use of small changes in serum creatinine to diagnose AKI allows for earlier detection but may increase diagnostic false–positive rates because of inherent laboratory and biologic variabilities of creatinine. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We examined serum creatinine measurement characteristics in a prospective observational clinical reference cohort of 2267 adult patients with AKI by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes creatinine criteria and used these data to create a simulation cohort to model AKI false–positive rates. We simulated up to seven successive blood draws on an equal population of hypothetical patients with unchanging true serum creatinine values. Error terms generated from laboratory and biologic variabilities were added to each simulated patient’s true serum creatinine value to obtain the simulated measured serum creatinine for each blood draw. We determined the proportion of patients who would be erroneously diagnosed with AKI by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes creatinine criteria. Results Within the clinical cohort, 75.0% of patients received four serum creatinine draws within at least one 48-hour period during hospitalization. After four simulated creatinine measurements that accounted for laboratory variability calculated from assay characteristics and 4.4% of biologic variability determined from the clinical cohort and publicly available data, the overall false–positive rate for AKI diagnosis was 8.0% (interquartile range =7.9%–8.1%), whereas patients with true serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dl (representing 21% of the clinical cohort) had a false–positive AKI diagnosis rate of 30.5% (interquartile range =30.1%–30.9%) versus 2.0% (interquartile range =1.9%–2.1%) in patients with true serum creatinine values <1.5 mg/dl (P<0.001). Conclusions Use of small serum creatinine changes to diagnose AKI is limited by high false–positive rates caused by inherent variability of serum

  9. Use of propidium monoazide and increased amplicon length reduce false-positive signals in quantitative PCR for bioburden analysis.

    PubMed

    Schnetzinger, Franz; Pan, Youwen; Nocker, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Rapid microbiological methods (RMMs) as an alternative to conventional cultivation-based bioburden analysis are receiving increasing attention although no single technology is currently able to satisfy the needs of the health care industry. Among the RMMs, quantitative PCR (qPCR) seems particularly suited. Its implementation is, however, hampered by false-positive signals originating from free DNA in PCR reagents or from dead cells in the samples to be analysed. In this study, we assessed the capability of propidium monoazide (PMA) to inactivate exogenous DNA in PCR reagents and thus to minimise its impact in bioburden analysis. PMA is a membrane-impermeant dye that intercalates into DNA and covalently binds to it upon photoactivation leading to strong inhibition of PCR amplification. PMA is currently used mainly for treatment of microbiological samples to exclude signals from membrane-compromised cells, but is also very useful for suppression of exogenous DNA signals. In addition to testing the effect of different PMA concentrations on non-template controls and target DNA, we demonstrate the effect of amplicon length on the exclusion of background amplification. Targeting a 1,108-bp 16S rRNA gene fragment using universal bacterial primers and PCR reagents treated with 5 μM PMA resulted in complete suppression of signals from exogenous DNA within 50 cycles of amplification, while a limit of detection of 10 copies of Escherichia coli genomic DNA per PCR reaction was achieved. A combined PMA treatment of sample and PCR reagents furthermore improved the selective detection of live cells making this method appear a highly attractive RMM.

  10. False-Positive Serum Botulism Bioassay in Miller-Fisher Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeylikman, Yuriy; Shah, Vishal; Shah, Umang; Mirsen, Thomas R; Campellone, Joseph V

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with acute progressive weakness and areflexia. Both botulism and Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome were initial diagnostic considerations, and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and botulinum antitoxin. A mouse bioassay was positive for botulinum toxin A, although her clinical course, electrodiagnostic studies, and cerebrospinal fluid findings supported Miller-Fisher syndrome. This patient's atypical features offer points of discussion regarding the evaluation of patients with acute neuromuscular weakness and emphasize the limitations of the botulism bioassay.

  11. Sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia: apparent false positive MIBG scan and expected MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Yung, B C; Loke, T K; Tse, T W; Tsang, M W; Chan, J C

    2000-10-01

    Adrenal medullary hyperplasia is a rare cause of clinical symptoms and biochemical findings identical to pheochromocytoma occurring mostly in multiple endocrine neoplasia patients. The scenario of positive MIBG scan, but no focal lesion found on CT and MRI led to diagnostic and management difficulties. Like pheochromocytoma, surgical excision can lead to clinical and biochemical recovery. We report this unusual case of sporadic bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia, with hypertension and biochemical abnormalities alleviated after surgical adrenalectomy. Based on T2 values reported in literature, high signal focal lesions may not appear on T2-weighted MRI images until development of frank pheochromocytoma. MIBG scan remains the most sensitive imaging modality for this condition.

  12. Pathways to false positive diagnoses using molecular genetic detection methods; Phytophthora cinnamomi a case study.

    PubMed

    Kunadiya, Manisha; White, Diane; Dunstan, William A; St, Giles E; Hardy, J; Andjic, Vera; Burgess, Treena I

    2017-01-12

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is one of the world's most invasive plant pathogens affecting ornamental plants, horticultural crops and natural ecosystems. Accurate diagnosis is very important to determine the presence or absence of this pathogen in diseased and asymptomatic plants. In previous studies, P. cinnamomi species-specific primers were designed and tested using various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques including conventional PCR, nested PCR, and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). In all cases, the primers were stated to be highly specific and sensitive to P. cinnamomi However, few of these studies tested their primers against closely related Phytophthora species (Phytophthora clade 7). In this study, we tested these purported P. cinnamomi specific primer sets with eleven other species from clade 7 and determined their specificity; of the eight tested primer sets only three were specific to P. cinnamomi This study demonstrated the importance of testing primers against closely related species within the same clade, and not just other species within the same genus. The findings of this study are relevant to all species-specific microbial diagnosis.

  13. False-positive cryptococcal antigen test associated with use of BBL Port-a-Cul transport vials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah A; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2011-02-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed.

  14. Hyperchylomicronaemia due to lipoprotein lipase deficiency as a cause of false-positive newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Santer, R; Gokçay, G; Demirkol, M; Gal, A; Lukacs, Z

    2005-01-01

    Two cases of molecular genetically proven lipoprotein lipase deficiency are reported. Both patients were detected owing to a false-positive neonatal screening test for biotinidase deficiency. We conclude that both the fluorimetric and the colorimetric screening tests for biotinidase deficiency used with dried blood samples are affected by severe hyperchylomicronaemia and that, most probably, severe plasma turbidity interferes with the assay.

  15. False-Positive Cryptococcal Antigen Test Associated with Use of BBL Port-A-Cul Transport Vials▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Deborah A.; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S.; Procop, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed. PMID:21159939

  16. Determining Occurrence Dynamics when False Positives Occur: Estimating the Range Dynamics of Wolves from Public Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David A. W.; Nichols, James D.; Gude, Justin A.; Rich, Lindsey N.; Podruzny, Kevin M.; Hines, James E.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale presence-absence monitoring programs have great promise for many conservation applications. Their value can be limited by potential incorrect inferences owing to observational errors, especially when data are collected by the public. To combat this, previous analytical methods have focused on addressing non-detection from public survey data. Misclassification errors have received less attention but are also likely to be a common component of public surveys, as well as many other data types. We derive estimators for dynamic occupancy parameters (extinction and colonization), focusing on the case where certainty can be assumed for a subset of detections. We demonstrate how to simultaneously account for non-detection (false negatives) and misclassification (false positives) when estimating occurrence parameters for gray wolves in northern Montana from 2007–2010. Our primary data source for the analysis was observations by deer and elk hunters, reported as part of the state’s annual hunter survey. This data was supplemented with data from known locations of radio-collared wolves. We found that occupancy was relatively stable during the years of the study and wolves were largely restricted to the highest quality habitats in the study area. Transitions in the occupancy status of sites were rare, as occupied sites almost always remained occupied and unoccupied sites remained unoccupied. Failing to account for false positives led to over estimation of both the area inhabited by wolves and the frequency of turnover. The ability to properly account for both false negatives and false positives is an important step to improve inferences for conservation from large-scale public surveys. The approach we propose will improve our understanding of the status of wolf populations and is relevant to many other data types where false positives are a component of observations. PMID:23840372

  17. Determining Occurrence Dynamics when False Positives Occur: Estimating the Range Dynamics of Wolves from Public Survey Data.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A W; Nichols, James D; Gude, Justin A; Rich, Lindsey N; Podruzny, Kevin M; Hines, James E; Mitchell, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale presence-absence monitoring programs have great promise for many conservation applications. Their value can be limited by potential incorrect inferences owing to observational errors, especially when data are collected by the public. To combat this, previous analytical methods have focused on addressing non-detection from public survey data. Misclassification errors have received less attention but are also likely to be a common component of public surveys, as well as many other data types. We derive estimators for dynamic occupancy parameters (extinction and colonization), focusing on the case where certainty can be assumed for a subset of detections. We demonstrate how to simultaneously account for non-detection (false negatives) and misclassification (false positives) when estimating occurrence parameters for gray wolves in northern Montana from 2007-2010. Our primary data source for the analysis was observations by deer and elk hunters, reported as part of the state's annual hunter survey. This data was supplemented with data from known locations of radio-collared wolves. We found that occupancy was relatively stable during the years of the study and wolves were largely restricted to the highest quality habitats in the study area. Transitions in the occupancy status of sites were rare, as occupied sites almost always remained occupied and unoccupied sites remained unoccupied. Failing to account for false positives led to over estimation of both the area inhabited by wolves and the frequency of turnover. The ability to properly account for both false negatives and false positives is an important step to improve inferences for conservation from large-scale public surveys. The approach we propose will improve our understanding of the status of wolf populations and is relevant to many other data types where false positives are a component of observations.

  18. The possibility of a false positive arising from sperm DNA in genetic diagnosis of bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Hiroki; Kageyama, Soichi; Moriyasu, Satoru; Sawai, Ken; Onoe, Sadao; Minamihashi, Akira

    2010-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of accessory sperm cells that adhered to the zona pellucida or blastomeres on the accuracy of genetic diagnosis of preimplantation embryos. The properties of sperm cells as a template for DNA amplification were examined using bovine sperm cells frozen-thawed or incubated in PBS after thawing for 7 days at 39 C. Sexing by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and claudin-16 genotyping by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed using 10, 50 and 100 sperm cells. When sexing based on LAMP was performed, no amplified DNA was detected in 10 sperm-derived samples, whereas male-specific (10-60%) and gender-natural DNA (30-100%) sequences were detected in 50 and 100 sperm-derived samples. The detection rates for gender-natural DNA sequences were higher in incubated sperm samples than in sperm samples immediately after freeze-thawing. The detection rates for claudin-16 were low (7-13%) regardless of the concentration of sperm cells and the period of incubation after thawing. The present results showed that male-specific DNA, gender-natural DNA and claudin-16 sequences were not usually amplified from a small number of sperm cells (< or =10 cells). However, when a large number of sperm cells (> or =50 cells) were present, male-specific and gender-natural DNA sequences were amplified at a high rate, and claudin-16 DNA sequences were also occasionally detected. These results raise the possibility that accessory sperm cells may reduce the accuracy of the genetic diagnosis of bovine embryos. Therefore, steps to prevent the contamination of sperm cells, such as removal of the zona pellucida and washing of sample blastomeres, are necessary to obtain an accurate result.

  19. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Zaid; Sengupta, Ruchira; Johnson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis. PMID:27895946

  20. High numbers of false-positive stress tests are the result of inappropriate testing.

    PubMed

    Foy, Andrew; Rier, Jeremy; Kozak, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Patients who underwent coronary angiography preceded by stress testing during the period January 2009 through March 2012 were evaluated using the CathPCI database. The predictive accuracy of stress echocardiography (SE) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were determined and used to back calculate the pretest probability of the population being tested. In total, 2662 catheterizations were performed, 866 (33%) of which were preceded by stress imaging. Overall, the positive predictive values of SE and SPECT did not differ significantly (61% and 66%, P = .15) and were much lower in certain subgroups. The overall pretest probabilities of patients without a documented history of coronary artery disease undergoing SE and SPECT in the study population were estimated to be 18% and 27%, respectively. This study shows that stress testing is performed too often in low-risk patients in whom it is unlikely to improve clinical decision making.

  1. Distinguishing Binders from False Positives by Free Energy Calculations: Fragment Screening Against the Flap Site of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand–receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein–ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets. PMID:25189630

  2. Distinguishing binders from false positives by free energy calculations: fragment screening against the flap site of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nanjie; Forli, Stefano; He, Peng; Perryman, Alex; Wickstrom, Lauren; Vijayan, R S K; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, David; Gallicchio, Emilio; Olson, Arthur J; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-01-22

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand-receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein-ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets.

  3. Suture Granuloma With False-Positive Findings on FDG-PET/CT Resected via Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Tohma, Takayuki; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Nishimori, Takanori; Ohira, Gaku; Narushima, Kazuo; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Toyozumi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman who had undergone total hysterectomy 16 years previously exhibited a pelvic tumor on computed tomography (CT). F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) combined positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging revealed a solitary small focus of increased FDG activity in the pelvis. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor originating in the small intestine or another type of tumor originating in the mesentery (desmoid, schwannoma, or foreign body granuloma) was suspected; therefore, laparoscopic resection was conducted. A white, hard tumor was found to originate from the mesentery of the sigmoid colon and adhered slightly to the small intestine. The tumor was resected with a negative margin, and the pathologic diagnosis was suture granuloma. The possibility of suture granuloma should be kept in mind in cases of tumors with positive PET findings and a history of surgery close to the lesion. However, it is difficult to preoperatively diagnose pelvic tumors using a biopsy. Therefore, considering the possibility of malignancy, it is necessary to achieve complete resection without exposing the tumor.

  4. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test.

  5. Predicting residue contacts using pragmatic correlated mutations method: reducing the false positives.

    PubMed

    Kundrotas, Petras J; Alexov, Emil G

    2006-11-16

    Predicting residues' contacts using primary amino acid sequence alone is an important task that can guide 3D structure modeling and can verify the quality of the predicted 3D structures. The correlated mutations (CM) method serves as the most promising approach and it has been used to predict amino acids pairs that are distant in the primary sequence but form contacts in the native 3D structure of homologous proteins. Here we report a new implementation of the CM method with an added set of selection rules (filters). The parameters of the algorithm were optimized against fifteen high resolution crystal structures with optimization criterion that maximized the confidentiality of the predictions. The optimization resulted in a true positive ratio (TPR) of 0.08 for the CM without filters and a TPR of 0.14 for the CM with filters. The protocol was further benchmarked against 65 high resolution structures that were not included in the optimization test. The benchmarking resulted in a TPR of 0.07 for the CM without filters and to a TPR of 0.09 for the CM with filters. Thus, the inclusion of selection rules resulted to an overall improvement of 30%. In addition, the pair-wise comparison of TPR for each protein without and with filters resulted in an average improvement of 1.7. The methodology was implemented into a web server http://www.ces.clemson.edu/compbio/recon that is freely available to the public. The purpose of this implementation is to provide the 3D structure predictors with a tool that can help with ranking alternative models by satisfying the largest number of predicted contacts, as well as it can provide a confidence score for contacts in cases where structure is known.

  6. False-positive pregnancy test after transfusion of solvent/detergent-treated plasma.

    PubMed

    Jilma-Stohlawetz, Petra; Wreford-Bush, Tim; Mills, Francesca; Davidson, Fiona; Kursten, Friedrich W; Jilma, Bernd; Birchall, Janet

    2017-09-14

    The transmission of pathogens, antibodies, and proteins is a possible consequence of blood product transfusion. A female patient had an unexpected positive serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin result, indicative of pregnancy, after she had received a transfusion with 1 unit of platelet concentrate, 4 units of red blood cells, and 4 units of pooled solvent/detergent-treated plasma (Octaplas). To investigate the possibility of passive transfusion of β-human chorionic gonadotropin from the plasma transfusion, one additional unit from the same batch was thawed and analyzed. To validate the β-human chorionic gonadotropin assay for use in solvent/detergent-treated plasma and to investigate any interference in the assay, dilution experiments were performed using the implicated plasma batch diluted with male and non-pregnant female sera. Also, plasma from a known pregnant woman was diluted with Octaplas (tested negative for β-human chorionic gonadotropin) and with a male serum to validate the assay for use in solvent/detergent-treated plasma. The implicated solvent/detergent-treated plasma had a mean β-human chorionic gonadotropin level of 91.5 mIU/mL. Results from the dilution experiments revealed an excellent correlation (r > 0.99) between β-human chorionic gonadotropin measurement in solvent/detergent-treated plasma and male serum and no over or under recovery of the expected results. Further measurements of β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels in the female recipient revealed an estimated half-life of 6 hours. This case demonstrates the importance of considering the possibility of passive transmission of analytes to a patient from the transfusion of blood products. Furthermore, the measurement of β-human chorionic gonadotropin is valid in solvent/detergent-treated plasma using a Roche Cobas analyzer. © 2017 AABB.

  7. Concurrent combined verification: reducing false positives in automated NMR structure verification through the evaluation of multiple challenge control structures.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Pol, Rostislav; Sasaki, Ryan R; Nikitina, Asya; Keyes, Philip

    2012-06-01

    Automated structure verification using (1)H NMR data or a combination of (1)H and heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) data is gaining more interest as a routine application for qualitative evaluation of large compound libraries produced by synthetic chemistry. The goal of this automated software method is to identify a manageable subset of compounds and data that require human review. In practice, the automated method will flag structure and data combinations that exhibit some inconsistency (i.e. strange chemical shifts, conflicts in multiplicity, or overestimated and underestimated integration values) and validate those that appear consistent. One drawback of this approach is that no automated system can guarantee that all passing structures are indeed correct structures. The major reason for this is that approaches using only (1)H or even (1)H and HSQC spectra often do not provide sufficient information to properly distinguish between similar structures. Therefore, current implementations of automated structure verification systems allow, in principle, false positive results. Presented in this work is a method that greatly reduces the probability of an automated validation system passing incorrect structures (i.e. false positives). This novel method was applied to automatically validate 127 non-proprietary compounds from several commercial sources. Presented also is the impact of this approach on false positive and false negative results. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A new yield simulator for transiting planets and false positives: application to the Next Generation Transit Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Maximilian N.; Queloz, Didier; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Bouchy, Francois

    2017-03-01

    We present a yield simulator to predict the number and characteristics of planets, false positives and false alarms in transit surveys. The simulator is based on a galactic model and the planet occurrence rates measured by the Kepler mission. It takes into account the observation window function and measured noise levels of the investigated survey. Additionally, it includes vetting criteria to identify false positives. We apply this simulator to the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), a wide-field survey designed to detect transiting Neptune-sized exoplanets. We find that red noise is the main limitation of NGTS up to 14 mag, and that its obtained level determines the expected yield. Assuming a red noise level of 1 mmag, the simulation predicts the following for a 4-yr survey: 4 ± 3 Super-Earths, 19 ± 5 Small Neptunes, 16 ± 4 Large Neptunes, 55 ± 8 Saturn-sized planets and 150 ± 10 Jupiter-sized planets, along with 4688 ± 45 eclipsing binaries and 843 ± 75 background eclipsing binaries. We characterize the properties of these objects to enhance the early identification of false positives and discuss follow-up strategies for transiting candidates.

  9. Primers determine the sensitivity of PCR-mediated hepatitis B virus DNA detection and pretreatment of PCR mixture with 8-methoxypsoralen eliminates false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Keum, W K; Park, C E; Lee, J H; Khil, L Y; Kang, I; Kim, S S; Jung, J C; Oh, S M; Woo, H J; Lee, J H; Kim, Y C; Yoon, Y; Choi, J W; Ha, J

    1997-04-30

    Most methods for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection largely depend on viral DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or radioimmunological assay of viral antigens or antibodies. The quality assurance program recently established in Europe reported that PCR-mediated HBV DNA detection methods used in many laboratories produced a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results. Thus, we attempted to improve the conditions of current PCR methods for detection of HBV DNA. In the present study, we applied a recently developed method of releasing HBV DNA from virion by NaOH treatment of patient serum. Using four different primer sets specific to the HBV core region, we found that the sensitivity of first-round PCR can be improved by more than two orders of magnitude depending on the primers. The second round of PCR using nested primers was sensitive enough to detect up to 10(-6) pg of the HBV DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 3 copies of the HBV genome. Among the approximately 800 HBV-infected patient sera investigated in our laboratory, more than 60% of the tested samples gave positive results in the first-round PCR. The rate of positive results obtained using our experimental conditions is very high in comparison with other reports. The reamplification of the first-round PCR reaction mixture with the nested primers produced practically 100% positive results. For diagnosis of HBV infection, we routinely used 1 microliter of patient serum, which was found to be optimum in our laboratory. Surprisingly, from 20% of our positive results, even serum diluted to 1/100 (0.01 microliter) produced a stronger signal than 1 microliter. This observation suggests that direct PCR amplification of HBV DNA released from serum by NaOH treatment has to be compensated by other DNA detection methods for correct quantitation. In order to eliminate the false positive signal resulting from the carry-over due to massive screening of a large number of

  10. Probing indiscretions: contamination of cardiac troponin reagent by very high patient samples causes false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Gould, Michael J; Wilgen, Urs; Pretorius, Carel J; Ungerer, Jacobus P J

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) has become the standard biomarker for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes. False-positive cTnI results have previously been reported on the Beckman Coulter analysers, which were shown to be random, not reproducible and occurred more commonly than expected. Our investigation ensued after a patient sample with an inordinately elevated cTnI was analysed, followed by a series of false-positive results being reported. The implications of falsely elevated cTnI results on patient care could be considerable. Multiple experiments with patient sample pools with concentrations below the 99th percentile to extremely high (0.025, 15, 175 and 884 μg/L) were conducted in varying sequences of high and low samples on the Beckman Coulter Access2, UniCel DxI600 and UniCel DxI800 analysers. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in cTnI concentrations in the negative pool after analysis of high pool samples in various sequences. This increase is sufficient to cause elevations above the 99th percentile cut-off and false-positive cTnI results. These findings were reproducible on all three analysers. Our study is highly suggestive of carryover and cTnI reagent pack contamination by the pipettors on the Access2, DxI600 and DxI800 analysers when patient samples with extremely high cTnI concentrations are analysed, leading to potential false-positive cTnI results on subsequent samples.

  11. The Effect of False-Positive Results on Subsequent Participation in Chest X-ray Screening for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Hamada, Shota; Urashima, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiro; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background High attendance rates and regular participation in disease screening programs are important contributors to program effectiveness. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an initial false-positive result in chest X-ray screening for lung cancer on subsequent screening participation. Methods This historical cohort study analyzed individuals who first participated in a lung cancer screening program conducted by Yokohama City between April 2007 and March 2011, and these participants were retrospectively tracked until March 2013. Subsequent screening participation was compared between participants with false-positive results and those with negative results in evaluation periods between 365 (for the primary outcome) and 730 days. The association of screening results with subsequent participation was evaluated using a generalized linear regression model, with adjustment for characteristics of patients and screening. Results The proportions of subsequent screening participation within 365 days were 12.9% in 3132 participants with false-positive results and 6.7% in 15 737 participants with negative results. Although the differences in attendance rates were reduced with longer cutoffs, participants with false-positive results were consistently more likely to attend subsequent screening than patients with negative results (P < 0.01). The predictors of subsequent screening participation were false-positive results (risk ratio [RR] 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.92), older age (RR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11–1.23), male sex (RR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.29–1.64), being a current smoker (RR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69–0.93), current employment (RR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70–0.90), and being screened at a hospital cancer center (vs public health centers; RR 1.36; 95% CI, 1.15–1.60). Conclusions Our findings indicated that subsequent participation in lung cancer screening was more likely among participants with false-positive results in an initial screening than

  12. Blood stained cerebrospinal fluid responsible for false positive reactions of latex particle agglutination tests.

    PubMed Central

    Camargos, P A; Almeida, M S; Filho, G L; Batista, K W; Carvalho, A G; Pereira, C L

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of the latex particle agglutination test (LPAT) was assessed in blood stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 166 paediatric patients, aged from three months to 13 years. A commercial LPAT kit was used to detect Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis A, B, and C soluble antigens. Culture of CSF specimens was used as the standard and all laboratory procedures were performed blind. The mean CSF erythrocyte count was 66,406 cells/mm3 in the cases and 11,560 cells/mm3 in the controls. The sensitivity and the specificity of LPAT were 83.8 and 94.0%, respectively, suggesting that LPAT is a useful diagnostic tool even in blood stained CSF specimens. PMID:7876387

  13. Using the minimum description length principle to reduce the rate of false positives of best-fit algorithms.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Ouyang, Hongjia; Shen, Liangzhong; Dougherty, Edward R; Liu, Wenbin

    2014-12-01

    The inference of gene regulatory networks is a core problem in systems biology. Many inference algorithms have been proposed and all suffer from false positives. In this paper, we use the minimum description length (MDL) principle to reduce the rate of false positives for best-fit algorithms. The performance of these algorithms is evaluated via two metrics: the normalized-edge Hamming distance and the steady-state distribution distance. Results for synthetic networks and a well-studied budding-yeast cell cycle network show that MDL-based filtering is more effective than filtering based on conditional mutual information (CMI). In addition, MDL-based filtering provides better inference than the MDL algorithm itself.

  14. Restricted Boltzmann machines based oversampling and semi-supervised learning for false positive reduction in breast CAD.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Liu, Xiaoli; Bao, Hang; Yang, Jinzhu; Zhao, Dazhe

    2015-01-01

    The false-positive reduction (FPR) is a crucial step in the computer aided detection system for the breast. The issues of imbalanced data distribution and the limitation of labeled samples complicate the classification procedure. To overcome these challenges, we propose oversampling and semi-supervised learning methods based on the restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) to solve the classification of imbalanced data with a few labeled samples. To evaluate the proposed method, we conducted a comprehensive performance study and compared its results with the commonly used techniques. Experiments on benchmark dataset of DDSM demonstrate the effectiveness of the RBMs based oversampling and semi-supervised learning method in terms of geometric mean (G-mean) for false positive reduction in Breast CAD.

  15. Identification of false positive exercise tests with use of electrocardiographic criteria: A possible role for atrial repolarization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sapin, P.M.; Koch, G.; Blauwet, M.B.; McCarthy, J.J.; Hinds, S.W.; Gettes, L.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Atrial repolarization waves are opposite in direction to P waves, may have a magnitude of 100 to 200 mu V and may extend into the ST segment and T wave. It was postulated that exaggerated atrial repolarization waves during exercise could produce ST segment depression mimicking myocardial ischemia. The P waves, PR segments and ST segments were studied in leads II, III, aVF and V4 to V6 in 69 patients whose exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) suggested ischemia (100 mu V horizontal or 150 mu V upsloping ST depression 80 ms after the J point). All had a normal ECG at rest. The exercise test in 25 patients (52% male, mean age 53 years) was deemed false positive because of normal coronary arteriograms and left ventricular function (5 patients) or normal stress single photon emission computed tomographic thallium or gated blood pool scans (16 patients), or both (4 patients). Forty-four patients with a similar age and gender distribution, anginal chest pain and at least one coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 80% served as a true positive control group. The false positive group was characterized by (1) markedly downsloping PR segments at peak exercise, (2) longer exercise time and more rapid peak exercise heart rate than those of the true positive group, and (3) absence of exercise-induced chest pain. The false positive group also displayed significantly greater absolute P wave amplitudes at peak exercise and greater augmentation of P wave amplitude by exercise in all six ECG leads than were observed in the true positive group.

  16. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  17. Do one-time intracompartmental pressure measurements have a high false-positive rate in diagnosing compartment syndrome?

    PubMed

    Whitney, Augusta; O'Toole, Robert V; Hui, Emily; Sciadini, Marcus F; Pollak, Andrew N; Manson, Theodore T; Eglseder, W Andrew; Andersen, Romney C; Lebrun, Christopher; Doro, Christopher; Nascone, Jason W

    2014-02-01

    Intracompartmental pressure measurements are frequently used in the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, particularly in patients with equivocal or limited physical examination findings. Little clinical work has been done to validate the clinical use of intracompartmental pressures or identify associated false-positive rates. We hypothesized that diagnosis of compartment syndrome based on one-time pressure measurements alone is associated with a high false-positive rate. Forty-eight consecutive patients with tibial shaft fractures who were not suspected of having compartment syndrome based on physical examinations were prospectively enrolled. Pressure measurements were obtained in all four compartments at a single point in time immediately after induction of anesthesia using a pressure-monitoring device. Preoperative and intraoperative blood pressure measurements were recorded. The same standardized examination was performed by the attending surgeon preoperatively, postoperatively, and during clinical follow-up for 6 months to assess clinical evidence of acute or late compartment syndrome. No clinical evidence of compartment syndrome was observed postoperatively or during follow-up until 6 months after injury. Using the accepted criteria of delta P of 30 mm Hg from preoperative diastolic blood pressure, 35% of cases (n = 16; 95% confidence interval, 21.5-48.5%) met criteria for compartment syndrome. Raising the threshold to delta P of 20 mm Hg reduced the false-positive rate to 24% (n = 11; 95% confidence interval, 11.1-34.9%). Twenty-two percent (n = 10; 95% confidence interval, 9.5-32.5%) exceeded absolute pressure of 45 mm Hg. A 35% false-positive rate was found for the diagnosis of compartment syndrome in patients with tibial shaft fractures who were not thought to have compartment syndrome by using currently accepted criteria for diagnosis based solely on one-time compartment pressure measurements. Our data suggest that reliance on one-time intracompartmental

  18. Differential gene expression segregates cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ailam; Steibel, Juan P; Coussens, Paul M; Grooms, Daniel L; Bolin, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Antemortem tests for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) currently used in the US measure cell-mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium bovis. Postmortem tests for bTB rely on observation of gross and histologic lesions of bTB, followed by bacterial isolation or molecular diagnostics. Cumulative data from the state of Michigan indicates that 98 to 99% of cattle that react positively in antemortem tests are not confirmed positive for bTB at postmortem examination. Understanding the fundamental differences in gene regulation between antemortem test-false positive cattle and cattle that have bTB may allow identification of molecular markers that can be exploited to better separate infected from noninfected cattle. An immunospecific cDNA microarray was used to identify altered gene expression (P ≤ 0.01) of 122 gene features between antemortem test-false positive cattle and bTB-infected cattle following a 4-hour stimulation of whole blood with tuberculin. Further analysis using quantitative real-time PCR assays validated altered expression of 8 genes that had differential power (adj  P ≤ 0.05) to segregate cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis.

  19. Differential Gene Expression Segregates Cattle Confirmed Positive for Bovine Tuberculosis from Antemortem Tuberculosis Test-False Positive Cattle Originating from Herds Free of Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ailam; Steibel, Juan P.; Coussens, Paul M.; Grooms, Daniel L.; Bolin, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Antemortem tests for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) currently used in the US measure cell-mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium bovis. Postmortem tests for bTB rely on observation of gross and histologic lesions of bTB, followed by bacterial isolation or molecular diagnostics. Cumulative data from the state of Michigan indicates that 98 to 99% of cattle that react positively in antemortem tests are not confirmed positive for bTB at postmortem examination. Understanding the fundamental differences in gene regulation between antemortem test-false positive cattle and cattle that have bTB may allow identification of molecular markers that can be exploited to better separate infected from noninfected cattle. An immunospecific cDNA microarray was used to identify altered gene expression (P ≤ 0.01) of 122 gene features between antemortem test-false positive cattle and bTB-infected cattle following a 4-hour stimulation of whole blood with tuberculin. Further analysis using quantitative real-time PCR assays validated altered expression of 8 genes that had differential power (adj  P ≤ 0.05) to segregate cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22701814

  20. Understanding false positives in reporter gene assays: in silico chemogenomics approaches to prioritize cell-based HTS data.

    PubMed

    Crisman, Thomas J; Parker, Christian N; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Scheiber, Josef; Thoma, Mathis; Kang, Zhao Bin; Kim, Richard; Bender, Andreas; Nettles, James H; Davies, John W; Glick, Meir

    2007-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) data is often noisy, containing both false positives and negatives. Thus, careful triaging and prioritization of the primary hit list can save time and money by identifying potential false positives before incurring the expense of followup. Of particular concern are cell-based reporter gene assays (RGAs) where the number of hits may be prohibitively high to be scrutinized manually for weeding out erroneous data. Based on statistical models built from chemical structures of 650 000 compounds tested in RGAs, we created "frequent hitter" models that make it possible to prioritize potential false positives. Furthermore, we followed up the frequent hitter evaluation with chemical structure based in silico target predictions to hypothesize a mechanism for the observed "off target" response. It was observed that the predicted cellular targets for the frequent hitters were known to be associated with undesirable effects such as cytotoxicity. More specifically, the most frequently predicted targets relate to apoptosis and cell differentiation, including kinases, topoisomerases, and protein phosphatases. The mechanism-based frequent hitter hypothesis was tested using 160 additional druglike compounds predicted by the model to be nonspecific actives in RGAs. This validation was successful (showing a 50% hit rate compared to a normal hit rate as low as 2%), and it demonstrates the power of computational models toward understanding complex relations between chemical structure and biological function.

  1. Factors associated with false-positive results from fingerstick OraQuick ADVANCE rapid HIV 1/2 antibody test.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Samara B; Owens, Lauren E; Greenwald, Jeffrey L

    2012-01-01

    Identify factors associated with false-positive rapid HIV antibody tests. This retrospective cohort study with nested case-controls involved patients tested for HIV by Boston Medical Center (BMC) affiliates. Cases had a reactive fingerstick OraQuick ADVANCE rapid HIV 1/2 antibody test and a negative Western blot. Controls had nonreactive rapid tests. We compared the prevalence of HIV risk factors between cases and the total nonreactive population and the prevalence of other clinical factors between cases and controls. Of the 15 094 tests, 14 937 (98.9%) were negative and 11 (0.07%) were false positives (specificity of 99.9%). Cases were more likely to have had an HIV-infected sex partner and to be tested at certain sites compared to true negatives. More cases than controls had O-negative blood type. O-negative blood type and sex with an HIV-infected person may increase false-positive HIV fingerstick results. More targeted studies should examine these risk factors.

  2. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Stephanie J.; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L.

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs. PMID:26342055

  3. [False positive result in mammography and its association with the presence of obesity: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Castro-Ibarra, Marisela; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Cabrales-Ruvalcaba, J Jesús; Luna-V Gómez, Rosa Alicia

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the association between a false positive result in mammography and obesity, inside the breast cancer early detection program in women affiliated to the Institute of Security and Social Services for Government and Municipality workers of the State of Baja California (ISSSTECALI). A case-control, retrospective study was done in women affiliated to ISSSTECALI to whom a mammography was performed between 2009 and 2012. Women with a false positive result in mammography were included as cases. Controls were women with a true negative result in mammography. Three controls were randomly selected for each case. Obesity was established with the body mass index (BMI) consigned in the woman's clinical file. Age and estrogen replacement therapy were included as co-variables. Seventy nine cases were identified and 237 controls were included. Obesity was observed in 54.4% of cases and in 41.3% of controls (odds ratio: 1.69; 95% confidence interval for odds ratio: 1.01-2.82; p value: 0.043). A logistic regression model including covariables maintained the observed association (p = 0.044). No association was found with analyzed co-variables. A false positive result in mammography was associated with the presence of obesity.

  4. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs.

  5. Long-term serological follow-up of blood donors with an HTLV-indeterminate western blot: antibody profile of seroconverters and individuals with false reactions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marina Lobato; Santos, Ana Carolina da Silva; Namen-Lopes, Maria Sueli; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Utsch, Denise Gonçalves; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara de F

    2010-10-01

    The high proportion of indeterminate results of the screening test for human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection has been a challenge worldwide. In this study, 60 persons with seroindeterminate results for HTLV were followed until their serological status was defined. At least two independent serological tests (EIA and WB) from sequential samples were performed at an average interval of 4.4 years, totaling 141 serum samples tested. Seroconversion occurred in 12 individuals (reactive by EIA, positive by WB and PCR), and 48 were classified as false reactions (non-reactive EIA and negative PCR, but indeterminate WB). The seroconverter group had epidemiological features similar to those seen in HTLV-1 carriers, and the average time of follow-up for seroconversion was 4 years. In the group with false reactions, the most frequent indeterminate WB pattern in the samples was the presence of p24 alone. This pattern was absent in the seroconverter group, suggesting that p24 alone is an indicator of false reactivity. In contrast, the presence of p19 and p24 seems to be an indicator of true reactivity, since this pattern was frequent (66.7%) among the seroconverters and much less common (10.4% of the first samples) among the individuals with false reactions (P = 0.0001). Thus, HTLV infection may be suspected when reactivity to p19 and p24 is observed. Individuals with an indeterminate WB pattern should be followed-up and retested. The improvement of the HTLV algorithm screening of blood donors has been necessary to reduce inconclusive results and to avoid unnecessary follow-up to define the status of infection.

  6. A false positive fluorodeoxyglucose lymphadenopathy in a patient with pulmonary carcinoid tumor and previous breast reconstruction after bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Girelli, Lara; Leo, Francesco; Pastorino, Ugo

    2014-03-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a positive fluorodeoxyglucose integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/TC) mammary chain lymphadenopathy and carcinoid tumor of the left lower lobe who had a previous bilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer. She underwent a right muscle sparing mini-thoracotomy and mammary chain lymphadenectomy; the final histopathology showed granulomatous reaction to silicone.

  7. The clinical impact of a false-positive urine cocaine screening result on a patient's pain management.

    PubMed

    Kim, James A; Ptolemy, Adam S; Melanson, Stacy E F; Janfaza, David R; Ross, Edgar L

    2015-06-01

    The urine of a patient admitted for chest and epigastric pain tested positive for cocaine using an immunoassay-based drug screening method (positive/negative cutoff concentration 150 ng/mL). Despite the patient's denial of recent cocaine use, this positive cocaine screening result in conjunction with a remote history of drug misuse impacted the patient's recommended pain therapy. Specifically, these factors prompted the clinical team to question the appropriateness of opioids and other potentially addictive therapeutics during the treatment of cancer pain from previously undetected advanced pancreatic carcinoma. After pain management and clinical pathology consultation, it was decided that the positive cocaine screening result should be confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing. This more sensitive and specific analytical technique revealed that both cocaine and its primary metabolite benzoylecgonine were undetectable (i.e., less than the assay detection limit of 50 ng/mL), thus indicating that the positive urine screening result was falsely positive. With this confirmation, the pain management service team was reassured in offering intrathecal pump (ITP) therapy for pain control. ITP implantation was well tolerated, and the patient eventually achieved excellent pain relief. However, ITP therapy most likely would not have been utilized without the GC-MS confirmation testing unless alternative options failed and extensive vigilant monitoring was initiated. As exemplified in this case, confirmatory drug testing should be performed on specimens with unexpected immunoassay-based drug screening results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a false-positive urine cocaine screening result and its impact on patient management. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  9. Evaluation of false positive rate based on exposure-response analyses for two compounds in fixed-dose combination products.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wang, Yaning

    2011-12-01

    We explored the type I error rate (false positive rate) associated with exposure-response (ER) analyses for two compounds in a fixed-dose combination product through simulations. In the simulations, at least one compound was assumed to be inactive, whereas the active compound followed E(max) model at different concentration ranges. The simulated data were independently evaluated by pre-specified univariate or multivariate linear, log-linear models, and mixed linear log-linear models. The type I error rate was evaluated by comparing the total number of falsely identified significant slope estimates with the total number of models with successful convergence. We demonstrated that ER analyses results based on data from fixed-dose combination products at various dose levels should be interpreted with caution. A univariate analysis, even though is appropriate to guide dose selection, is inadequate to identify the active compound. Multivariate analyses can be applied to determine the active compound only when the underlying ER relationship for each compound (especially for the active compound) has been adequately defined or approximated. The false positive rate in determining a significant ER relationship is elevated, when the underlying ER relationship (especially for the active compound) is erroneously or inadequately defined. Without the assurance of the correct structural models, the identified significant ER relationship does not necessarily indicate that the compound associated with the significant slope estimate is pharmacologically active.

  10. Prospective slice-by-slice motion correction reduces false positive activations in fMRI with task-correlated motion.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Siegert, T; Bazin, P-L; Maclaren, J; Herbst, M; Zaitsev, M; Turner, R

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test the hypothesis that slice-by-slice prospective motion correction at 7T using an optical tracking system reduces the rate of false positive activations in an fMRI group study with a paradigm that involves task-correlated motion. Brain activation during right leg movement was measured using a block design on 15 volunteers, with and without prospective motion correction. Clearly erroneous activations were compared between both cases, at the individual level. Additionally, conventional group analysis was performed. The number of falsely activated voxels with T-values higher than 5 was reduced by 48% using prospective motion correction alone, without additional retrospective realignment. In the group analysis, the statistical power was increased - the peak T-value was 26% greater, and the number of voxels in the cluster representing the right leg was increased by a factor of 9.3. Slice-by-slice prospective motion correction in fMRI studies with task-correlated motion can substantially reduce false positive activations and increase statistical power. © 2013.

  11. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. II. Importance of accurate toxicity measurement.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Robert; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan; Carmichael, Paul

    2012-08-30

    In a previous publication, Fowler et al. [4] demonstrated that the seemingly high rate of false or misleading positive results obtained in in vitro cytogenesis assays for genotoxicity - when compared with in vivo genotoxicity or rodent carcinogenicity data - was greater when rodent cell lines were used that were also reported to have mutant or non-functional p53. As part of a larger project for improvement of in vitro mammalian cell assays, we have investigated the impact of different toxicity measures, commonly used in in vitro cytogenetic assays, on the occurrence of misleading positive results. From a list of 19 chemicals that produce "false" positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays [10], six substances that had given positive responses in CHO, CHL and TK6 cells [4], were evaluated for micronucleus induction in vitro, with different measures of toxicity for selection of the top concentration. The data show that estimating toxicity by relative cell count (RCC) or replication index (RI) consistently underestimates the toxicity observed by other measures (Relative Population Doubling, RPD, or Relative Increase in Cell Count, RICC). RCC and RI are more likely to lead to selection of concentrations for micronucleus scoring that are highly cytotoxic and thus could potentially lead to artefacts of toxicity being scored (elevated levels of apoptosis and necrosis), generating misleading positive results. These results suggest that a further reduction in the frequency of misleading positive results in in vitro cytogenetic assays can be achieved with this set of chemicals, by avoiding the use of toxicity measures that underestimate the level of toxicity induced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pokorny's complaint: the insoluble problem of the overwhelming number of false positives generated by suicide risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nielssen, Olav; Wallace, Duncan; Large, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Alex Pokorny's 1983 prospective study of suicide found that 96.3% of high-risk predictions were false positives, and that more than half of the suicides occurred in the low-risk group and were hence false negatives. All subsequent prospective studies, including the recent US Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (STARRS), have reported similar results. We argue that since risk assessment cannot be a practical basis for interventions aimed at reducing suicide, the alternative is for mental health services to carefully consider what amounts to an adequate standard of care, and to adopt the universal precaution of attempting to provide that to all of our patients. PMID:28184312

  13. Six consecutive false positive cases from cell-free fetal DNA testing in a single referring centre

    PubMed Central

    Dugo, Nella; Padula, Francesco; Mobili, Luisa; Brizzi, Cristiana; D’Emidio, Laura; Cignini, Pietro; Mesoraca, Alvaro; Bizzoco, Domenico; Cima, Antonella; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction recent studies have proposed the introduction of cell-free fetal DNA testing (NIPT-Non Invasive Prenatal Testing) in routine clinical practice emphasizing its high sensibility and specificity. In any case, false positive and false negative findings may result from placental mosaicism, because cell-free fetal DNA originates mainly from placenta. Case we report six cases of women who underwent chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis to confirm the results from NIPT: two Turner syndromes, two Triple X, one Patau syndrome, one Edward syndrome. Results using classic cytogenetic analysis and, also, Array - Comparative Genomic Hybridization (Array CGH) the karyotype of all 5 fetuses was found to be normal. Conclusion results from NIPT must always be confirmed by invasive prenatal diagnosis. It is mandatory to inform the patient that the CVS and amniocentesis still represent the only form of prenatal diagnostic test available. PMID:25332757

  14. False-positive laboratory tests for Cryptosporidium involving an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay--United States, November 1997-March 1998.

    PubMed

    1999-01-15

    From November 1997 through March 1998, the number of positive tests for Cryptosporidium increased in several locations in the United States. Several laboratories (e.g., the New York state laboratory and the Medical Science Laboratories in Wisconsin) retested original stool specimens and could not confirm the original positive test result. Following reports to the manufacturer by the Massachusetts, New York, and Wisconsin state health departments about possibly inaccurate test results, Alexon-Trend (Ramsey, Minnesota) notified its laboratory customers in a March 25, 1998, letter that three lots of its enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) 24 well (catalog number 540-24) ProSpecT Cryptosporidium Microplate Assay (lot numbers 970717,975011, and 980401) and seven lots of its ELISA 96 well (catalog number 540-96) ProSpect Cryptosporidium Microplate Assay (lot numbers 970696, 970775, 970883, 975006, 980402, 980808, and 980809) were subject to a "non-specific reaction between some stool specimens and the microplate assay" (i.e., a false-positive test result) (K. Hood, Alexon-Trend, personal communication, March 25, 1998). Alexon-Trend directed laboratories to discontinue using kits with implicated lot numbers. This report summarizes an analysis of reports of false-positive tests and describes identification of apparent clusters in three states.

  15. Deblocking reaction of chemically amplified ArF positive resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, Mitsuharu; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Tanabe, Hiroyoshi; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1998-06-01

    Deblocking reaction mechanisms and lithographic performance in chemically amplified positive ArF resists were investigated by analyzing acid concentration and blocking level. The resists consisted of triphenylsulfonium triflate as a acid generator and either the copolymer, poly(carboxy- tetracyclododecyl methacrylate70-co- tetrahydropyranylcarboxy-tetracyclododecyl methacrylate30) or the terpolymer, poly(tricyclodecylacrylate60- co-tetrahydropyranylmethacrylate20-co-methacrylic acid20). The deblocking reaction mechanisms were evaluated from Arrhenius plots of the deblocking reaction rate constant. It was found that the deblocking reaction of both resists is ruled by two rate-determining steps, i.e., reaction-controlled in the low-temperature region and acid- diffusion-controlled in the high-temperature region. Furthermore, the copolymer resist had better post-exposure- delay (PED) stability. To clarify this result, acid loss caused by air-born contamination effect on deblocking reaction was investigated. The change of amount of blocking group by acid loss was small for the copolymer. Therefore the copolymer resist had better PED stability. Furthermore, the post-exposure bake (PEB) sensitivity of linewidth of the copolymer resist was smaller than that of the terpolymer resist. Both deblocking reaction rate constant and reverse reaction rate constant of the copolymer resist increased with PEB temperature. As a result, equilibrium constant of the copolymer was not valuable with temperature. This is the reason why the copolymer resist has low PEB sensitivity. It is concluded that small acid loss effect on deblocking reaction induces better PED stability. A resist with reverse reaction has an advantage for PEB temperature sensitivity.

  16. High sensitivity to aligner and high rate of false positives in the estimates of positive selection in the 12 Drosophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    Markova-Raina, Penka; Petrov, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of aligner choice on inferences of positive selection using site-specific models of molecular evolution. We find that independently of the choice of aligner, the rate of false positives is unacceptably high. Our study is a whole-genome analysis of all protein-coding genes in 12 Drosophila genomes annotated in either all 12 species (∼6690 genes) or in the six melanogaster group species. We compare six popular aligners: PRANK, T-Coffee, ClustalW, ProbCons, AMAP, and MUSCLE, and find that the aligner choice strongly influences the estimates of positive selection. Differences persist when we use (1) different stringency cutoffs, (2) different selection inference models, (3) alignments with or without gaps, and/or additional masking, (4) per-site versus per-gene statistics, (5) closely related melanogaster group species versus more distant 12 Drosophila genomes. Furthermore, we find that these differences are consequential for downstream analyses such as determination of over/under-represented GO terms associated with positive selection. Visual analysis indicates that most sites inferred as positively selected are, in fact, misaligned at the codon level, resulting in false positive rates of 48%–82%. PRANK, which has been reported to outperform other aligners in simulations, performed best in our empirical study as well. Unfortunately, PRANK still had a high, and unacceptable for most applications, false positives rate of 50%–55%. We identify misannotations and indels, many of which appear to be located in disordered protein regions, as primary culprits for the high misalignment-related error levels and discuss possible workaround approaches to this apparently pervasive problem in genome-wide evolutionary analyses. PMID:21393387

  17. Positional isotope exchange analysis of the pantothenate synthetase reaction.

    PubMed

    Williams, LaKenya; Zheng, Renjian; Blanchard, John S; Raushel, Frank M

    2003-05-06

    Pantothenate synthetase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the formation of pantothenate from ATP, D-pantoate, and beta-alanine. The formation of a kinetically competent pantoyl-adenylate intermediate was established by the observation of a positional isotope exchange (PIX) reaction within (18)O-labeled ATP in the presence of d-pantoate. When [betagamma-(18)O(6)]-ATP was incubated with pantothenate synthetase in the presence of d-pantoate, an (18)O label gradually appeared in the alphabeta-bridge position from both the beta- and the gamma-nonbridge positions. The rates of these two PIX reactions were followed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and found to be identical. These results are consistent with the formation of enzyme-bound pantoyl-adenylate and pyrophosphate upon the mixing of ATP, D-pantoate, and enzyme. In addition, these results require the complete torsional scrambling of the two phosphoryl groups of the labeled pyrophosphate product. The rate of the PIX reaction increased as the D-pantoate concentration was elevated and then decreased to zero at saturating levels of D-pantoate. These inhibition results support the ordered binding of ATP and D-pantoate to the enzyme active site. The PIX reaction was abolished with the addition of pyrophosphatase; thus, PP(i) must be free to dissociate from the active site upon formation of the pantoyl-adenylate intermediate. The PIX reaction rate diminished when the concentrations of ATP and D-pantoate were held constant and the concentration of the third substrate, beta-alanine, was increased. This observation is consistent with a kinetic mechanism that requires the binding of beta-alanine after the release of pyrophosphate from the active site of pantothenate synthetase. Positional isotope exchange reactions have therefore demonstrated that pantothenate synthetase catalyzes the formation of a pantoyl-adenylate intermediate upon the ordered addition of ATP and pantoate.

  18. Improving screening recall services for women with false-positive mammograms: a comparison of qualitative evidence with UK guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bond, Mary; Garside, Ruth; Hyde, Christopher

    2015-01-23

    To gain an understanding of the views of women with false-positive screening mammograms of screening recall services, their ideas for service improvements and how these compare with current UK guidelines. Inductive qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews of 21 women who had false-positive screening mammograms. These were then compared with UK National Health Service (NHS) guidelines. Participants' concerns about mammography screening recall services focused on issues of communication and choice. Many of the issues raised indicated that the 1998 NHS Breast Screening Programme guidelines on improving the quality of written information sent to women who are recalled, had not been fully implemented. This included being told a clear reason for recall, who may attend with them, the length of appointment, who they will see and what tests will be carried out. Additionally women voiced a need for: reassurance that a swift appointment did not imply they had cancer; choice about invasive assessment or watchful waiting; the offer of a follow-up mammogram for those uncertain about the validity of their all-clear and an extension of the role of the clinical nurse specialist, outlined in the 2012 NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) guidelines, to include availability at the clinic after the all-clear for women with false-positive mammograms. It is time the NHSBSP 1998 recall information guidelines were fully implemented. Additionally, the further suggestions from this research, including extending the role of the clinical nurses from the 2012 NHSBSP guidelines, should be considered. These actions have the potential to reduce the anxiety of being recalled. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    PubMed

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique.

  20. Effect of prehospital cardiac catheterization lab activation on door-to-balloon time, mortality, and false-positive activation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Benjamin T; Tamayo-Sarver, Joshua H; Rashi, Paula; Koenig, William; Niemann, James T

    2014-01-01

    Reperfusion of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is most effective when performed early. Notification of the cardiac catheterization laboratory (cath lab) prior to hospital arrival based on paramedic-performed ECGs has been proposed as a strategy to decrease time to reperfusion and mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of cath lab activation prior to patient arrival versus activation after arrival at the emergency department (ED). We performed a retrospective cohort study (n = 1933 cases) using Los Angeles County STEMI database from May 1, 2008 through August 31, 2009. The database includes patients arriving at a STEMI Receiving Center (SRC) by ambulance who were diagnosed with STEMI either before or after hospital arrival. We compared the cohort of patients with prehospital cath lab activation to those activated from the ED within 5 minutes of first ED ECG. Outcomes measured were mortality, door-to-balloon time, percent door-to-balloon time <90 min, and percentage of false-positive activations. Prehospital cath lab activations had mean door-to-balloon times 14 minutes shorter (95% CI 11-17), in-hospital mortality 1.5% higher (95% CI -1.0-5.2), and false-positive activation 7.8%, (95% CI 2.7-13.3) higher than ED activation. For prehospital activation, 93% (95% CI 91-94%) met a door-to-balloon target of 90 minutes versus 85% (95% CI 80-88%) for ED activations. Prehospital cath lab activation based on the prehospital ECG was associated with decreased door-to-balloon times but did not affect hospital mortality. False-positive activation was common and occurred more often with prehospital STEMI diagnosis.

  1. Avoiding False Positive Antigen Detection by Flow Cytometry on Blood Cell Derived Microparticles: The Importance of an Appropriate Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Crompot, Emerence; Van Damme, Michael; Duvillier, Hugues; Pieters, Karlien; Vermeesch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Meuleman, Nathalie; Mineur, Philippe; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence; Stamatopoulos, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs), also called microvesicles (MVs) are plasma membrane-derived fragments with sizes ranging from 0.1 to 1μm. Characterization of these MPs is often performed by flow cytometry but there is no consensus on the appropriate negative control to use that can lead to false positive results. Materials and Methods We analyzed MPs from platelets, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, monocytes, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells. Cells were purified by positive magnetic-separation and cultured for 48h. Cells and MPs were characterized using the following monoclonal antibodies (CD19,20 for B-cells, CD3,8,5,27 for T-cells, CD16,56 for NK-cells, CD14,11c for monocytes, CD41,61 for platelets). Isolated MPs were stained with annexin-V-FITC and gated between 300nm and 900nm. The latex bead technique was then performed for easy detection of MPs. Samples were analyzed by Transmission (TEM) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). Results Annexin-V positive events within a gate of 300-900nm were detected and defined as MPs. Our results confirmed that the characteristic antigens CD41/CD61 were found on platelet-derived-MPs validating our technique. However, for MPs derived from other cell types, we were unable to detect any antigen, although they were clearly expressed on the MP-producing cells in the contrary of several data published in the literature. Using the latex bead technique, we confirmed detection of CD41,61. However, the apparent expression of other antigens (already deemed positive in several studies) was determined to be false positive, indicated by negative controls (same labeling was used on MPs from different origins). Conclusion We observed that mother cell antigens were not always detected on corresponding MPs by direct flow cytometry or latex bead cytometry. Our data highlighted that false positive results could be generated due to antibody aspecificity and that phenotypic characterization of MPs is a difficult field requiring the

  2. Overall false positive rates in tests for linear trend in tumor incidence in animal carcinogenicity studies of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Lin, K K; Rahman, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on results of simulation and empirical studies conducted within the Divisions of Biometrics, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, and in collaboration with the National Toxicology Program, the Center has recently changed the significance levels for testing positive linear trend in incidence rate for common and rare tumors, respectively, from 0.01 and 0.05 to 0.005 and 0.025. The overall false positive rate resulting from the use of this new rule in the tests for linear trend in a two-species-two-sex study is about 10%, the rate that is judged as the most appropriate in a regulatory setting by the Center. This paper describes two of the studies.

  3. Facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain: an evaluation of prevalence and false-positive rate of diagnostic blocks.

    PubMed

    Manchukonda, Rajeev; Manchikanti, Kavita N; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2007-10-01

    A retrospective review. Evaluation of the prevalence of facet or zygapophysial joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar origin by using controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks and evaluation of false-positive rates of single blocks in the diagnosis of chronic spinal pain of facet joint origin. Facet or zygapophysial joints are clinically important sources of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The previous studies have demonstrated the value and validity of controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks in the diagnosis of facet joint pain, with a prevalence of 15% to 67% variable in lumbar, thoracic, and cervical regions. False-positive rates of single diagnostic blocks also varied from 17% to 63%. Five hundred consecutive patients receiving controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks of medial branches for the diagnosis of facet or zygapophysial joint pain were included. Patients were investigated with diagnostic blocks using 0.5 mL of 1% lidocaine per nerve. Patients with lidocaine-positive results were further studied using 0.5 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine per nerve on a separate occasion. Medial branch blocks were performed with intermittent fluoroscopic visualization, at 2 levels to block a single joint. A positive response was considered as one with at least 80% pain relief from a block of at least 2 hours duration when lidocaine was used, and at least 3 hours or longer than the duration of relief with lidocaine when bupivacaine was used, and also the ability to perform prior painful movements. A total of 438 patients met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of facet joint pain was 39% in the cervical spine [95% confidence interval (CI), 32%-45%]; 34% (95% CI, 22%-47%) in the thoracic pain; and 27% (95% CI, 22%-33%) in the lumbar spine. The false-positive rate with a single block in the cervical region was 45%, in the thoracic region was 42%, and in the lumbar region 45%. This retrospective review once again

  4. Low biotinidase activity in plasma of some preterm infants: possible source of false-positive screening results.

    PubMed

    Suormala, T; Wick, H; Baumgartner, E R

    1988-06-01

    Screening for biotinidase deficiency has been added recently to some national screening programmes. To clarify the problem of false-positive screening tests in premature infants, we have studied biotinidase activities in the plasma of this population in more detail. In 64 newborns (premature and term babies) biotinidase activities correlated positively with gestational age from the 2nd to the 30th day of life. During the 1st-3rd day the activities were below the normal adult range in all 64 infants. In 56 infants the activities subsequently increased gradually and reached the normal adult range during the 4th-40th day of life. In contrast, the biotinidase activities in eight preterm infants dropped during the 3rd-7th day of life. Impaired liver function as a possible cause for this finding could be ruled out in these infants. The lowest activities in these infants were measured during the 4th-6th day of life, i.e. unfortunately at a time when samples for the screening are normally taken. According to our data, 4-8 out of 48 preterm or small-for-date infants with biotinidase activities ranging from 4.7%-26% of the mean adult value would have given false-positive screening tests. A positive screening test was also obtained in a newborn and in an older unrelated child with a partial biotinidase deficiency. In these children the biotinidase activity did not rise but remained slightly below or at the lower range for heterozygotes (at 31% and 38% of the mean adult value). Currently we do not know whether such individuals are heterozygotes, or whether they have a variant of biotinidase deficiency. However, these children have developed normally without biotin therapy.

  5. Psychological effects of false-positive results in cystic fibrosis newborn screening: a two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Beucher, Julie; Leray, Emmanuelle; Deneuville, Eric; Roblin, Monique; Pin, Isabelle; Bremont, François; Turck, Dominique; Giniès, Jean-Louis; Foucaud, Pascal; Rault, Gilles; Derelle, Jocelyne; David, Valérie; Journel, Hubert; Marchand, Sophie; Veillard, David; Roussey, Michel

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate parental stress after a false-positive result at the time of the cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening (NBS), attributable to heterozygotism or persistent hypertrypsinemia. A prospective study was conducted in 86 French families at 3, 12, and 24 months after NBS. A psychologist conducted interviews with a questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Vulnerable Child Scale. Overall, 96.5% of parents said they had been anxious at the time of the sweat test. However, 86% felt entirely reassured 3 months after the test. The mean Perceived Stress Scale score did not differ from that observed in the French population. Mean Vulnerable Child Scale scores were high, associated with a low Parental Perception of Child Vulnerability. These results did not differ significantly at 1 and 2 years. In total, 86% to 100% of families no longer worried about CF. All parents stated that they would have the test performed again for another child. CF NBS can lead to false-positive results, causing parental anxiety, which quickly decreases after a sweat test performed soon after the phone call.

  6. False Positive Findings on I-131 WBS and SPECT/CT in Patients with History of Thyroid Cancer: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Palacios, Juan D.; Kuker, Russ A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Although whole body scan (WBS) with I-131 is a highly sensitive tool for detecting normal thyroid tissue and metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), it is not specific. Additional information, provided by single photon emission computed tomography combined with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and by the serum thyroglobulin level, is extremely useful for the interpretation of findings. Case Presentation. We report four cases of false positive WBS in patients with DTC: ovarian uptake corresponding to an endometrioma, scrotal uptake due to a spermatocele, rib-cage uptake due to an old fracture, and hepatic and renal uptake secondary to a granuloma and simple cyst, respectively. Conclusions. Trapping, organification, and storage of iodine are more prominent in thyroid tissue but not specific. Physiologic sodium-iodine symporter expression in other tissues explains some, but not all, of the WBS false positive cases. Other proposed etiologies are accumulation of radioiodine in inflamed organs, metabolism of radiodinated thyroid hormone, presence of radioiodine in body fluids, and contamination. In our cases nonthyroidal pathologies were suspected since the imaging findings were not corroborated by an elevated thyroglobulin level, which is considered a reliable tumor marker for most well-differentiated thyroid cancers. Clinicians should be aware of the potential pitfalls of WBS in DTC to avoid incorrect management. PMID:28246564

  7. [False positive results or what's the probability that a significant P-value indicates a true effect?

    PubMed

    Cucherat, Michel; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-05-08

    The use of statistical test is central in the clinical trial. At the statistical level, obtaining a P<0.05 allows to claim the effectiveness of the new studied treatment. However, given its underlying mathematical logic the concept of "P value" is often misinterpreted. It is often assimilated, mistakenly, to the likelihood that treatment is ineffective. Actually the "P value" gives an indirect information about the plausibility of the existence of treatment effect. With "P<0.05", the probability that the treatment is effective may vary depending on other statistical parameters which are the alpha level of risk, the power of the study and especially the a priori probability of the existence of treatment effect. A "P<0.05" does not always produce the same degree of certainty. Thus there exist situations where the risk of a result "P<0.05" is in reality a false positive is very high. This is the case if the power is low, if there is an inflation of the alpha risk or if the result is exploratory or chance discoveries. This possibility is important to take into consideration when interpreting the results of clinical trials in order to avoid pushing ahead significant results in appearance, but which are likely to be actually false positive results. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel spherical shell filter for reducing false positives in automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leemput, Sil; Dorssers, Frank; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of pulmonary nodules is crucial for improving prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans has a great potential to enhance the performance of the radiologist in detecting nodules. In this paper we present a computer-aided lung nodule detection system for computed tomography (CT) scans that works in three steps. The system first segments the lung using thresholding and hole filling. From this segmentation the system extracts candidate nodules using Laplacian of Gaussian. To reject false positives among the detected candidate nodules, multiple established features are calculated. We propose a novel feature based on a spherical shell filter, which is specifically designed to distinguish between vascular structures and nodular structures. The performance of the proposed CAD system was evaluated by partaking in the ANODE09 challenge, which presents a platform for comparing automatic nodule detection programs. The results from the challenge show that our CAD system ranks third among the submitted works, demonstrating the efficacy of our proposed CAD system. The results also show that our proposed spherical shell filter in combination with conventional features can significantly reduce the number of false positives from the detected candidate nodules.

  9. Balancing the false negative and positive rates in suspect screening with high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry using multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof

    2015-02-17

    Modern high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enables full-spectrum trace level analysis of emerging environmental organic contaminants. This raises the opportunity for post-acquisition suspect screening when no reference standards are a priori available. When setting up a conventional screening identification train based on successively different identification criteria including mass error and isotope fit, the false negative rate typically accumulates upon advancing through the decision tree. The challenge is thus to elaborate a well-balanced screening, in which the different criteria are equally stringent, leading to a controllable number of false negatives. Presented is a novel suspect screening approach using liquid-chromatography Orbitrap HRMS. Based on a multivariate statistical model, the screening takes into account the accurate mass error of the mono isotopic ion and up to three isotopes, isotope ratios, and a peak/noise filter. As such, for the first time, controlling the overall false negative rate of the screening algorithm to a desired level (5% in this study) is achieved. Simultaneously, a well-balanced identification decision is guaranteed taking the different identification criteria as a whole in a holistic statistical approach. Taking into account 1, 2, and 3 isotopes decreases the false positive rate from 22, 2.8 to <0.3%, but the cost of increasing the median limits of identification from 200, 2000 to 2062 ng L(-1), respectively, should also be considered. As proof of concept, 7 biologically treated wastewaters were screened toward 77 suspect pharmaceuticals resulting in the indicative identification of 25 suspects. Subsequently obtained reference standards allowed confirmation for 19 out of these 25 pharmaceutical contaminants.

  10. False-positive F-18 FDG uptake in PET/CT studies in pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Riad, Raef; Omar, Walid; Sidhom, Iman; Zamzam, Manal; Zaky, Iman; Hafez, Magdy; Abdel-Dayem, Hussein M

    2010-03-01

    In pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma, the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and abdominal lymph nodes are the main presenting feature of the disease. Chemotherapy is the main treatment modality and could be preceded by surgical excision of the abdominal masses. To achieve cure or long-term disease-free survival a balance has to be struck between aggressive chemotherapy and the probability of tumor necrosis secondary to treatment complicated by acute infections, perforation or intestinal bleeding. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) has been recommended over conventional imaging modalities for the follow-up of these patients and for monitoring treatment response. As the incidences of postchemotherapy complications are high, the positive predictive value of PET/CT studies in these patients is very low and the false-positive rate is high from acute infections and tumor necrosis. Accordingly, histopathological confirmation of positive lesions on F-18 FDG-PET/CT studies is essential. This is especially important as post-therapy complications might present with nonspecific and nonurgent symptoms. At the same time initiating a second course of salvage chemotherapy is risky. Retrospectively reviewed F-18 FDG-PET/CT studies for 28 pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after their treatment with chemotherapy or surgery. Four positive studies were found. All had pathological verification and were because of acute inflammation and tumor necrosis and there was no evidence of viable tumor cells. One patient had multiple recurrent lesions in the abdomen after the initial surgical excision and before starting chemotherapy. The incidence of acute complications in this series is 10.7%. This study confirms the high incidence of tumor necrosis and inflammation after chemotherapy for the abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma and consequently, the incidence of true-positive

  11. Clinical significance of a false positive glucose challenge test in patients with a high body mass index.

    PubMed

    Borja, Anne; Moretti, Michael; Lakhi, Nisha

    2017-04-01

    To determine if there is an increased maternal or neonatal morbidity in overweight and obese patients with a false positive glucose challenge test (GCT). Patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25.0 at registration were included in this prospective 36-month study. The study cohort consisted of patients with a false positive (FP) GCT, with two comparison cohorts: those with a (1) screen negative (SN) GCT result and (2) true positive (TP) GCT result. Risks were reported as odd ratios with 95% confidence intervals, with a P<0.05 considered as significant. There were 60 patients in the FP cohort, 106 in the SN cohort, and 64 in the TP cohort. When the BMI of the FP cohort was compared with either the SN cohort or TP cohort, differences were non-significant (SN 32.3 vs. FP 33.3 kg/m2, P=0.067) and (FP 33.3 vs. TP 34.4 kg/m2, P=0.303). When comparing the FP cohort to the SN cohort, patients in the FP group had significantly more gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. There was a trend towards delivering large for gestational weight infants and an infant ≥4000 g in the FP cohort, but this fell short of reaching statistical significance. When comparing the FP to TP cohorts, rates of gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and infants ≥4000 g were similar; however, neonatal morbidity was increased in the TP group. Overweight and obese patients with a FP glucose challenge screen are more likely to have adverse maternal outcomes. Neonatal morbidity was not increased.

  12. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  13. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  14. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  15. Experimental Null Method to Guide the Development of Technical Procedures and to Control False-Positive Discovery in Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jianmin; Qu, Jun

    2015-10-02

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation of data quality and false-positive biomarker discovery is critical to direct the method development/optimization for quantitative proteomics, which nonetheless remains challenging largely due to the high complexity and unique features of proteomic data. Here we describe an experimental null (EN) method to address this need. Because the method experimentally measures the null distribution (either technical or biological replicates) using the same proteomic samples, the same procedures and the same batch as the case-vs-contol experiment, it correctly reflects the collective effects of technical variability (e.g., variation/bias in sample preparation, LC-MS analysis, and data processing) and project-specific features (e.g., characteristics of the proteome and biological variation) on the performances of quantitative analysis. To show a proof of concept, we employed the EN method to assess the quantitative accuracy and precision and the ability to quantify subtle ratio changes between groups using different experimental and data-processing approaches and in various cellular and tissue proteomes. It was found that choices of quantitative features, sample size, experimental design, data-processing strategies, and quality of chromatographic separation can profoundly affect quantitative precision and accuracy of label-free quantification. The EN method was also demonstrated as a practical tool to determine the optimal experimental parameters and rational ratio cutoff for reliable protein quantification in specific proteomic experiments, for example, to identify the necessary number of technical/biological replicates per group that affords sufficient power for discovery. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of EN method to estimate levels of false-positives in the discovery of altered proteins, using two concocted sample sets mimicking proteomic profiling using technical and biological replicates, respectively, where the true-positives

  16. Can elevated lactate and LDH produce a false positive enzymatic ethanol result in live patients presenting to the emergency department?

    PubMed

    Nacca, Nicholas; Hodgman, Michael J; Lao, Kirselle; Elkins, Matthew; Holland, Michael G

    2017-08-16

    There have been allegations in the courtroom that elevated serum lactic acid in trauma victims can yield a falsely elevated serum ethanol assay. Most hospitals utilize an indirect method of ethanol measurement where a serum sample is added to a mix of alcohol dehydrogenase and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). This allows any ethanol in the patient's serum to be metabolized to acetaldehyde, and in the process results in the reduction of NAD + to NADH. NADH is then measured using spectrophotometry. The courtroom allegation stems from the concept that oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) results in the same molar-for-molar reduction of NAD + to NADH, and could therefore theoretically cause patients with elevated lactate and LDH to have a falsely elevated ethanol concentration. Patients with elevated lactic acid and LDH concentrations who presented to a university hospital from 20 April 2015 to 13 December 2015 were identified to provide possible test specimens. If a sufficient amount of serum was available, the sample was used to re-run the lactate and LDH concentration simultaneously with an enzymatic ethanol assay. Any samples that had elevated lactic acid and LDH concentrations on this retesting, and also yielded a positive ethanol concentration, were sent for confirmatory gas chromatography testing of ethanol concentrations. A control group of 20 samples with normal lactate and LDH were included. A total of 37 samples were included in the final analysis. Only 4 patients had an elevated enzymatic ethanol concentration, and all 4 also had a measurable GC ethanol concentration. The lactate in this dataset ranged from 2.4 to 24.2 mmol/L, with a mean of 6.53 mmol/L (normal value 0.5-2.2). The LDH ranged from 242 to 8838 U/L with a mean of 1695 U/L (normal value 122-225 U/L). Twenty control samples were run on patients with normal lactate and LDH, none of which yielded a positive enzymatic ethanol result

  17. Blank-comparison matching-to-sample reveals a false positive symmetry test in a capuchin monkey

    PubMed Central

    de Faria Brino, Ana Leda; da Silva Campos, Rodolfo; de Faria Galvão, Olavo; McIlvane, William Jay

    2014-01-01

    A positive symmetry test result was obtained with a capuchin monkey that had previously exhibited virtually errorless AB and BA arbitrary matching-to-sample (MTS) with different stimuli. The symmetry test (BA) followed the acquisition of a new AB relation. It seemed possible, however, that the positive result could have occurred through the exclusion of previously defined comparison stimuli and not because the new AB and BA relations had the property of symmetry. To assess this possibility, a blank-comparison MTS procedure was implemented that permitted the separate assessment of select and reject (i.e., exclusion) control with both baseline and BA matching relations. In this assessment, the monkey did not exhibit reliable BA matching when exclusion was not possible, thus showing that the symmetry result was a false positive. However, the study demonstrated the feasibility of using a blank comparison MTS procedure with capuchins. The present results may set the stage for more successful methodology for establishing desired forms of relational stimulus control in capuchins and ultimately improving the assessment of relational learning capacity in that species, other nonhuman species, and nonverbal humans. PMID:25383161

  18. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jerwen

    2008-05-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be in the descending order of memory strength. The dual-retrieval process theory postulates two phases in a free recall, a first direct access phase in which items are output verbatim in the weakest-to-strongest order (cognitive triage) and a second reconstructive phase in which reconstructed items are output in the strongest-to-weakest order. In three experiments, all three indicators of memory strength (latency, accuracy, and confidence) consistently showed a descending-strength order of recall both for true and false memories. Additionally, false memory was found to be output in two phases and subjects' confidence judgment of their own memory to be unaccountable by retrieval fluency (recall latency).

  19. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Jerwen

    2012-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be in the descending order of memory strength. The dual-retrieval process theory postulates two phases in a free recall, a first direct access phase in which items are output verbatim in the weakest-to-strongest order (cognitive triage) and a second reconstructive phase in which reconstructed items are output in the strongest-to-weakest order. In three experiments, all three indicators of memory strength (latency, accuracy, and confidence) consistently showed a descending-strength order of recall both for true and false memories. Additionally, false memory was found to be output in two phases and subjects’ confidence judgment of their own memory to be unaccountable by retrieval fluency (recall latency). PMID:22582008

  20. False-positive liver scans due to portal hypertension: correlation with percutaneous transhepatic portograms in 33 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Takayasu, K.; Moriyama, N.; Suzuki, M.; Yamada, T.; Fukutake, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, C.; Musha, H.; Okuda, K.

    1983-04-01

    Tc-99m-phytate scanning of the liver and percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein were performed in 33 patients--26 with cirrhosis, 3 with chronic active hepatitis, 2 with idiopathic portal hypertension, and 2 with unresolved acute hepatitis. A discrete defect in the porta hepatis area was seen in 6 of 28 patients who had portal vein pressure above 200 mm H2O. In 5 of the 6 patients with a false-positive scan, the umbilical portion of the left portal vein branch was dilated (larger than 25 x 20 mm) on the portogram, with or without a patent paraumbilical vein. The anatomical basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and it is suggested that this area be given special attention.

  1. On the occurrence of false positives in tests of migration under an isolation-with-migration model.

    PubMed

    Hey, Jody; Chung, Yujin; Sethuraman, Arun

    2015-10-01

    The population genetic study of divergence is often carried out using a Bayesian genealogy sampler, like those implemented in ima2 and related programs, and these analyses frequently include a likelihood ratio test of the null hypothesis of no migration between populations. Cruickshank and Hahn (2014, Molecular Ecology, 23, 3133-3157) recently reported a high rate of false-positive test results with ima2 for data simulated with small numbers of loci under models with no migration and recent splitting times. We confirm these findings and discover that they are caused by a failure of the assumptions underlying likelihood ratio tests that arises when using marginal likelihoods for a subset of model parameters. We also show that for small data sets, with little divergence between samples from two populations, an excellent fit can often be found by a model with a low migration rate and recent splitting time and a model with a high migration rate and a deep splitting time.

  2. Automated detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on fundus images: false positive reduction based on vessel likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Ishida, Kyoko; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of glaucoma is important to slow down or cease progression of the disease and for preventing total blindness. We have previously proposed an automated scheme for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD), which is one of the early signs of glaucoma observed on retinal fundus images. In this study, a new multi-step detection scheme was included to improve detection of subtle and narrow NFLDs. In addition, new features were added to distinguish between NFLDs and blood vessels, which are frequent sites of false positives (FPs). The result was evaluated with a new test dataset consisted of 261 cases, including 130 cases with NFLDs. Using the proposed method, the initial detection rate was improved from 82% to 98%. At the sensitivity of 80%, the number of FPs per image was reduced from 4.25 to 1.36. The result indicates the potential usefulness of the proposed method for early detection of glaucoma.

  3. Validation of Candidate Multiple-Transiting Planet Systems and Assessing Possible False Positives based on Photometric Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert; Ford, E. B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Planetary systems with multiple planets that transit their host star are of great interest for studying the architecture of planetary systems (Steffen et al. 2010; Holman et al. 2010). Even space-based exoplanet transit surveys, such as CoRoT and Kepler, must be careful to exclude astrophysical false positives that can mimic the photometric signature of multiple-transiting planet system (MTPS). Due to large point spread functions, a putative MTPS might actually be: 1) a true MTPS, 2) a blend of an eclipsing binary and a star with a single transiting planet, 3) a blend of two eclipsing binaries, or 4) two stars each with a single transiting planet. Assessing the relative probability for each of these possibilities is important both for validating potential planets and for prioritizing the limited follow-up resources that can contribute to validation or confirmation of such systems. We introduce new observable parameters based on ratios of the measured transit durations in MTPSs, as well as the measured orbital periods and (when available) impact parameters. We explore the utility of these parameters for validating candidate MTPSs and/or rejecting false positives. For multiple planets around the same star, these parameters have values near one. The distribution of these parameters for certain blend scenarios can be markedly different. We investigate these distributions through Monte Carlo simulations of three different types of blends; planet-binary, binary-binary, and planet-planet and compare these to the distribution for true MTPSs. We present results based on previously released Kepler data and simulations using multiple distributions for the orbital inclinations, eccentricities, and binary star population. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate

  4. A Nested PCR Assay to Avoid False Positive Detection of the Microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) in Environmental Samples in Shrimp Farms

    PubMed Central

    Jaroenlak, Pattana; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Williams, Bryony A. P.; Stentiford, Grant D.; Flegel, Timothy W.; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2016-01-01

    Hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is an important disease of cultivated shrimp. Heavy infections may lead to retarded growth and unprofitable harvests. Existing PCR detection methods target the EHP small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene (SSU-PCR). However, we discovered that they can give false positive test results due to cross reactivity of the SSU-PCR primers with DNA from closely related microsporidia that infect other aquatic organisms. This is problematic for investigating and monitoring EHP infection pathways. To overcome this problem, a sensitive and specific nested PCR method was developed for detection of the spore wall protein (SWP) gene of EHP (SWP-PCR). The new SWP-PCR method did not produce false positive results from closely related microsporidia. The first PCR step of the SWP-PCR method was 100 times (104 plasmid copies per reaction vial) more sensitive than that of the existing SSU-PCR method (106 copies) but sensitivity was equal for both in the nested step (10 copies). Since the hepatopancreas of cultivated shrimp is not currently known to be infected with microsporidia other than EHP, the SSU-PCR methods are still valid for analyzing hepatopancreatic samples despite the lower sensitivity than the SWP-PCR method. However, due to its greater specificity and sensitivity, we recommend that the SWP-PCR method be used to screen for EHP in feces, feed and environmental samples for potential EHP carriers. PMID:27832178

  5. A Nested PCR Assay to Avoid False Positive Detection of the Microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) in Environmental Samples in Shrimp Farms.

    PubMed

    Jaroenlak, Pattana; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Williams, Bryony A P; Stentiford, Grant D; Flegel, Timothy W; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Itsathitphaisarn, Ornchuma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is an important disease of cultivated shrimp. Heavy infections may lead to retarded growth and unprofitable harvests. Existing PCR detection methods target the EHP small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene (SSU-PCR). However, we discovered that they can give false positive test results due to cross reactivity of the SSU-PCR primers with DNA from closely related microsporidia that infect other aquatic organisms. This is problematic for investigating and monitoring EHP infection pathways. To overcome this problem, a sensitive and specific nested PCR method was developed for detection of the spore wall protein (SWP) gene of EHP (SWP-PCR). The new SWP-PCR method did not produce false positive results from closely related microsporidia. The first PCR step of the SWP-PCR method was 100 times (104 plasmid copies per reaction vial) more sensitive than that of the existing SSU-PCR method (106 copies) but sensitivity was equal for both in the nested step (10 copies). Since the hepatopancreas of cultivated shrimp is not currently known to be infected with microsporidia other than EHP, the SSU-PCR methods are still valid for analyzing hepatopancreatic samples despite the lower sensitivity than the SWP-PCR method. However, due to its greater specificity and sensitivity, we recommend that the SWP-PCR method be used to screen for EHP in feces, feed and environmental samples for potential EHP carriers.

  6. False-negative post-18-month confirmatory HIV tests in HIV DNA PCR-positive children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Draper, Heather R; Sanders, Jill E; Agrawal, Anurag K; Mohapi, Edith Q; Schutze, Gordon E

    2012-09-24

    The WHO guidelines for children less than 18 months old diagnosed with HIV based on presumptive clinical diagnosis or one virologic test recommend confirmatory HIV antibody testing after 18 months of age. This study describes post-18-month HIV test results following this WHO-recommended confirmatory testing strategy. Case series and retrospective review of routine program data. Children enrolled at the Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence, a pediatric and family HIV clinic in Maseru, Lesotho from December 2005 through January 2009 with a positive HIV DNA PCR at less than 18 months of age and HIV rapid test results after 18 months of age were included. Post-18-month confirmatory HIV test results are described. Factors associated with non-positive confirmatory rapid tests were determined using binary logistic regression. Of the 109 children meeting inclusion criteria, 22 (20.2%) had negative and 27 (24.8%) discordant confirmatory rapid tests. Forty-six of these 49 were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Among these 49, 11 of 24 post-18-month HIV DNA PCRs were negative, whereas nine of 10 post-18-month HIV ELISAs were positive; 29 were definitively and 17 probably HIV-infected, two were uninfected, and one had undetermined status. Only age less than 9 months at ART initiation (odds ratio 4.25, P = 0.002) was associated with non-positive rapid tests. False-negative post-18-month confirmatory rapid tests and HIV DNA PCRs in children on ART are common, associated with early ART initiation, and may lead to inappropriate ART discontinuation and discharge from care of truly HIV-infected children.

  7. Automated detection of masses on whole breast volume ultrasound scanner: false positive reduction using deep convolutional neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Yuya; Muramatsu, Chisako; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer screening with mammography and ultrasonography is expected to improve sensitivity compared with mammography alone, especially for women with dense breast. An automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) provides the operator-independent whole breast data which facilitate double reading and comparison with past exams, contralateral breast, and multimodality images. However, large volumetric data in screening practice increase radiologists' workload. Therefore, our goal is to develop a computer-aided detection scheme of breast masses in ABVS data for assisting radiologists' diagnosis and comparison with mammographic findings. In this study, false positive (FP) reduction scheme using deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) was investigated. For training DCNN, true positive and FP samples were obtained from the result of our initial mass detection scheme using the vector convergence filter. Regions of interest including the detected regions were extracted from the multiplanar reconstraction slices. We investigated methods to select effective FP samples for training the DCNN. Based on the free response receiver operating characteristic analysis, simple random sampling from the entire candidates was most effective in this study. Using DCNN, the number of FPs could be reduced by 60%, while retaining 90% of true masses. The result indicates the potential usefulness of DCNN for FP reduction in automated mass detection on ABVS images.

  8. True and false positive peaks in genomewide scans: applications of length-biased sampling to linkage mapping.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, J D; Shannon, W D; Lathrop, G M; Nolan, J P; Goldin, L R; Chase, G A; Weeks, D E

    1997-08-01

    Disease-susceptibility loci are now being mapped via genomewide scans in which a linkage statistic is computed at each of a large number of markers. Such disease-susceptibility loci may be identified via a peak in the test statistic when the latter is plotted against the genetic map. In this paper we establish, by appealing to renewal theory, that true positive peaks are expected to be longer than false positive peaks. These results are verified by a realistic simulation of a genomewide linkage study based on the affected-sib-pair design. Since longer peaks are more likely to contain a gene of interest than are shorter peaks, these differences may aid in linkage mapping, justifying assignment of lower priority to shorter peaks. However, since these differences are generally small, statistics based on both peak length and height may not be much more powerful than those based on height alone. The results presented here also provide a theoretical framework for methods that use the length of shared haplotypes in populations to map disease genes.

  9. Resolution, target density and labeling effects in colocalization studies - suppression of false positives by nanoscopy and modified algorithms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Rönnlund, Daniel; Aspenström, Pontus; Braun, Laura J; Gad, Annica K B; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-03-01

    Colocalization analyses of fluorescence images are extensively used to quantify molecular interactions in cells. In recent years, fluorescence nanoscopy has approached resolutions close to molecular dimensions. However, the extent to which image resolution influences different colocalization estimates has not been systematically investigated. In this work, we applied simulations and resolution-tunable stimulated emission depletion microscopy to evaluate how the resolution, molecular density and label size of targeted molecules influence estimates of the most commonly used colocalization algorithms (Pearson correlation coefficient, Manders' M1 and M2 coefficients), as well as estimates by the image cross-correlation spectroscopy method. We investigated the practically measureable extents of colocalization for stimulated emission depletion microscopy with positive and negative control samples with an aim to identifying the strengths and weaknesses of nanoscopic techniques for colocalization studies. At a typical optical resolution of a confocal microscope (200-300 nm), our results indicate that the extent of colocalization is typically overestimated by the tested algorithms, especially at high molecular densities. Only minor effects of this kind were observed at higher resolutions (< 60 nm). By contrast, underestimation of colocalization may occur if the resolution is close to the size of the label/affinity molecules themselves. To suppress false positives at confocal resolutions and high molecular densities, we introduce a statistical variant of Costes' threshold searching algorithm, used in combination with correlation-based methods like the Pearson coefficient and the image cross-correlation spectroscopy approach, to set intensity thresholds separating background noise from signals.

  10. Manufacturer's recall of rapid assay kits based on false positive Cryptosporidium antigen tests--Wisconsin, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    2002-03-08

    The Wisconsin Division of Public Health and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene (WSLH) reported that a recent cluster of cryptosporidiosis cases in a three-county area in southeastern Wisconsin was the result of false-positive tests. During December 1, 2001-February 1, 2002, approximately 30 cases of cryptosporidiosis were diagnosed at a laboratory in southeastern Wisconsin using the Becton, Dickinson, and Company (Franklin Lakes, New Jersey) ColorPAC Cryptosporidium/Giardia rapid assay (lot number 219370, expiration date 2002-06-05). Seventeen stool specimens, which were collected from 11 patients and tested positive by the rapid assay, were re-evaluated at WSLH. Six of these stool specimens were in EcoFix (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), eight were in Cary-Blair transport media, and three were formalin fixed. All 17 specimens tested negative for Cryptosporidium at WSLH using the hot safranin stain and MeriFluor (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) Cryptosporidium/Giardia direct fluorescent antibody kit with concentrated specimens.

  11. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Grace Y; Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D'Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P; Muggia, Victoria A

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation.

  12. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules: false positive reduction using a 3D gradient field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhanyu; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan

    2004-05-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection system to aid radiologists in diagnosing lung cancer in thoracic computed tomographic (CT) images. The purpose of this study was to improve the false-positive (FP) reduction stage of our algorithm by developing and incorporating a gradient field technique. This technique extracts 3D shape information from the gray-scale values within a volume of interest. The gradient field feature values are higher for spherical objects, and lower for elongated and irregularly-shaped objects. A data set of 55 thin CT scans from 40 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the gradient field technique. After initial nodule candidate detection and rule-based first stage FP reduction, there were 3487 FP and 65 true positive (TP) objects in our data set. Linear discriminant classifiers with and without the gradient field feature were designed for the second stage FP reduction. The accuracy of these classifiers was evaluated using the area Az under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Az values were 0.93 and 0.91 with and without the gradient field feature, respectively. The improvement with the gradient field feature was statistically significant (p=0.01).

  13. False positive hepatitis C antibody test results in left ventricular assist device recipients: increased risk with age and transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doreen; Colovai, Adriana; Levy, Dana; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Roach, Keith W.; Shuter, Jonathan; Goldstein, Daniel; D’Alessandro, David; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Muggia, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been successfully used in patients with heart failure. However, LVADs may trigger immune activation, leading to higher frequencies of autoantibodies. We describe the clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of LVAD recipients with false positive hepatitis C (FPHC) serology among 39 consecutive adult LVAD recipients who bridged to heart transplantation from January 2007 to January 2013 at Montefiore Medical Center. FPHC patients were identified as those with post-LVAD positive hepatitis C ELISA antibody tests and negative confirmatory testing with hepatitis C RNA PCR and/or radioimmunoblot assay. Ten (26%) patients previously seronegative for hepatitis C were found to have FPHC after device placement. Of the 39 patients, 32 had HeartMate II devices. The mean age at LVAD placement was 55 years. FPHC correlated with older age at the time of LVAD implantation and with receipt of packed red blood cell transfusions, but not with gender, fresh frozen plasma transfusions, panel reactive antibodies, globulin fraction, rheumatoid factor, or anticardiolipin antibodies. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk of FPHC in older LVAD patients and those more heavily transfused in order to avoid unnecessary apprehension and possible delay in transplantation. Further studies should be done to evaluate the possible relationship between transfused blood products and immunomodulation. PMID:28203425

  14. True and false positive peaks in genomewide scans: applications of length-biased sampling to linkage mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, J D; Shannon, W D; Lathrop, G M; Nolan, J P; Goldin, L R; Chase, G A; Weeks, D E

    1997-01-01

    Disease-susceptibility loci are now being mapped via genomewide scans in which a linkage statistic is computed at each of a large number of markers. Such disease-susceptibility loci may be identified via a peak in the test statistic when the latter is plotted against the genetic map. In this paper we establish, by appealing to renewal theory, that true positive peaks are expected to be longer than false positive peaks. These results are verified by a realistic simulation of a genomewide linkage study based on the affected-sib-pair design. Since longer peaks are more likely to contain a gene of interest than are shorter peaks, these differences may aid in linkage mapping, justifying assignment of lower priority to shorter peaks. However, since these differences are generally small, statistics based on both peak length and height may not be much more powerful than those based on height alone. The results presented here also provide a theoretical framework for methods that use the length of shared haplotypes in populations to map disease genes. PMID:9311749

  15. Specific chemoluminescence and immunoasdorption tests for anti-DFS70 antibodies avoid false positive results by indirect immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Tonutti, Elio; Tampoia, Marilina; Infantino, Maria; Cucchiaro, Francesco; Pesente, Fiorenza; Morozzi, Gabriella; Fabris, Martina; Villalta, Danilo

    2015-12-07

    To evaluate two new diagnostic methods for the identification of anti-DFS70 antibodies in samples showing a DFS70-staining pattern by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). We studied 731 patients: 576 were collected consecutively among those that in the ANA test on HEp-2 cells had produced a DFS70 fluorescence pattern and 155 were a consecutive series of patients sent by referring physicians for routine ANA testing. As controls we studied 50 patients with autoimmune diseases and 120 patients with active infectious disease. All 731 sera were assayed for anti-DFS70 antibodies by a specific chemoluminescence assay (CLIA); 70 randomly selected IIF-positive sera and 35 samples from patients with autoimmune diseases were studied by inhibition tests using the HEp-2 Select method. Assays performed with the CLIA-DFS70 method were positive in 30.4% of the samples presenting a DFS70 pattern by IIF, in 1.3% of the routine ANA sera, in 1.6% of the infectious sera and in none of the 50 autoimmune controls. However, as the IIF-DFS70 positive group included 106 patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD), 11 of which were DFS70 positive by CLIA, the prevalence of DFS70 antibodies in SARD was 7.5%. The ANA test performed after the use of HEp-2 Select showed an inhibition in 95.7% of the sera. No change in fluorescence intensity and pattern morphology between the native sera and the same sera tested with the solution containing the DFS70 antigen was observed in the 35 samples from patients with autoimmune diseases. To avoid misinterpretation of ANA pattern and consequent diagnostic errors, confirmation of the DFS70-IIF pattern by CLIA or other specific methods is mandatory before reporting the presence of anti-DFS70 antibodies. The HEp-2 Select test in most cases eliminates the interference by anti-DFS70 antibodies and avoids the possible reporting of false positive results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  17. False-positive rapid plasma reagin testing in patients with acute Plasmodium vivax malaria: A case control study✩, ✩✩

    PubMed Central

    Maves, Ryan C.; Dean, Katherine; Gadea, Nilda; Halsey, Eric S.; Graf, Paul C.F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Non-treponemal tests such as the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay are mainstays of syphilis diagnosis, but false-positive tests are common. We identified false-positive RPR titers in 8.2% of patients with malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in northern Peru. Similar rates were not detected in patients with other acute febrile illnesses. PMID:24201039

  18. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  19. Predicting radiologists' true and false positive decisions in reading mammograms by using gaze parameters and image-based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Ryder, Will; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists' gaze-related parameters combined with image-based features were utilized to classify suspicious mammographic areas ultimately scored as True Positives (TP) and False Positives (FP). Eight breast radiologists read 120 two-view digital mammograms of which 59 had biopsy proven cancer. Eye tracking data was collected and nearby fixations were clustered together. Suspicious areas on mammograms were independently identified based on thresholding an intensity saliency map followed by automatic segmentation and pruning steps. For each radiologist reported area, radiologist's fixation clusters in the area, as well as neighboring suspicious areas within 2.5° of the center of fixation, were found. A 45-dimensional feature vector containing gaze parameters of the corresponding cluster along with image-based characteristics was constructed. Gaze parameters included total number of fixations in the cluster, dwell time, time to hit the cluster for the first time, maximum number of consecutive fixations, and saccade magnitude of the first fixation in the cluster. Image-based features consisted of intensity, shape, and texture descriptors extracted from the region around the suspicious area, its surrounding tissue, and the entire breast. For each radiologist, a userspecific Support Vector Machine (SVM) model was built to classify the reported areas as TPs or FPs. Leave-one-out cross validation was utilized to avoid over-fitting. A feature selection step was embedded in the SVM training procedure by allowing radial basis function kernels to have 45 scaling factors. The proposed method was compared with the radiologists' performance using the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC). The JAFROC figure of merit increased significantly for six radiologists.

  20. A unified methodology based on sparse field level sets and boosting algorithms for false positives reduction in lung nodules detection.

    PubMed

    Saien, Soudeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Abrishami; Fathian, Mohsen

    2017-08-09

    This work aims to develop a unified methodology for the false positives reduction in lung nodules computer-aided detection schemes. The 3D region of each detected nodule candidate is first reconstructed using the sparse field method for accurately segmenting the objects. This technique enhances the level set modeling by restricting the computations to a narrow band near the evolving curve. Then, a set of 2D and 3D relevant features are extracted for each segmented candidate. Subsequently, a hybrid undersampling/boosting algorithm called RUSBoost is applied to analyze the features and discriminate real nodules from non-nodules. The performance of the proposed scheme was evaluated by using 70 CT images, randomly selected from the Lung Image Database Consortium and containing 198 nodules. Applying RUSBoost classifier exhibited a better performance than some commonly used classifiers. It effectively reduced the average number of FPs to only 3.9 per scan based on a fivefold cross-validation. The practical implementation, applicability for different nodule types and adaptability in handling the imbalanced data classification insure the improvement in lung nodules detection by utilizing this new approach.

  1. Microarray analysis of cytoplasmic versus whole cell RNA reveals a considerable number of missed and false positive mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Trask, Heidi W; Cowper-Sal-lari, Richard; Sartor, Maureen A; Gui, Jiang; Heath, Catherine V; Renuka, Janhavi; Higgins, Azara-Jane; Andrews, Peter; Korc, Murray; Moore, Jason H; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2009-10-01

    With no known exceptions, every published microarray study to determine differential mRNA levels in eukaryotes used RNA extracted from whole cells. It is assumed that the use of whole cell RNA in microarray gene expression analysis provides a legitimate profile of steady-state mRNA. Standard labeling methods and the prevailing dogma that mRNA resides almost exclusively in the cytoplasm has led to the long-standing belief that the nuclear RNA contribution is negligible. We report that unadulterated cytoplasmic RNA uncovers differentially expressed mRNAs that otherwise would not have been detected when using whole cell RNA and that the inclusion of nuclear RNA has a large impact on whole cell gene expression microarray results by distorting the mRNA profile to the extent that a substantial number of false positives are generated. We conclude that to produce a valid profile of the steady-state mRNA population, the nuclear component must be excluded, and to arrive at a more realistic view of a cell's gene expression profile, the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions should be analyzed separately.

  2. Power and false-positive rates for the restricted partition method (RPM) in a large candidate gene data set.

    PubMed

    Culverhouse, Robert; Jin, Wu; Jin, Carol H; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Suarez, Brian K

    2009-12-15

    Many phenotypes of public health importance (e.g., diabetes, coronary artery disease, major depression, obesity, and addictions to alcohol and nicotine) involve complex pathways of action. Interactions between genetic variants or between genetic variants and environmental factors likely play important roles in the functioning of these pathways. Unfortunately, complex interacting systems are likely to have important interacting factors that may not readily reveal themselves to univariate analyses. Instead, detecting the role of some of these factors may require analyses that are sensitive to interaction effects.In this study, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the restricted partition method (RPM) to detect signals related to coronary artery disease in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Problem 3 data using the 50,000 k candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphism set. Power and false-positive rates were evaluated using the first 100 replicate datasets. This included an exploration of the utility of using of all genotyped family members compared with selecting one member per family.

  3. False-positive reduction using Hessian features in computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules on thoracic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Ge, Zhanyu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2005-04-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung nodules in thoracic CT volumes. During false positive (FP) reduction, the image structures around the identified nodule candidates play an important role in differentiating nodules from vessels. In our previous work, we exploited shape and first-order derivative information of the images by extracting ellipsoid and gradient field features. The purpose of this study was to explore the object shape information using second-order derivatives and the Hessian matrix to further improve the performance of our detection system. Eight features related to the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix were extracted from a volume of interest containing the object, and were combined with ellipsoid and gradient field features to discriminate nodules from FPs. A data set of 82 CT scans from 56 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the FP reduction technique. The classification accuracy was assessed using the area Az under the receiving operating characteristic curve and the number of FPs per section at 80% sensitivity. In the combined feature space, we obtained a test Az of 0.97 +/- 0.01, and 0.27 FPs/section at 80% sensitivity. Our results indicate that combining the Hessian, ellipsoid and gradient field features can significantly improve the performance of our FP reduction stage.

  4. Computerized lung nodule detection on thoracic CT images: combined rule-based and statistical classifier for false-positive reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for lung nodule detection on thoracic helical computed tomography (CT) images. In the first stage of this CAD system, lung regions are identified and suspicious structures are segmented. These structures may include true lung nodules or normal structures that consist mainly of vascular structures. We have designed rule-based classifiers to distinguish nodules and normal structures using 2D and 3D features. After rule-based classification, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to further reduce the number of false positive (FP) objects. We have performed a preliminary study using CT images from 17 patients with 31 lung nodules. When only LDA classification was applied to the segmented objects, the sensitivity was 84% (26/31) with 2.53 (1549/612) FP objects per slice. When the LDA followed the rule-based classifier, the number of FP objects per slice decreased to 1.75 (1072/612) at the same sensitivity. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of our approach for nodule detection and FP reduction on CT images. The inclusion of rule-based classification leads to an improvement in detection accuracy for the CAD system.

  5. Simplified false-positive reduction in computer-aided detection scheme of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sooyeul; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook

    2015-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes was suggested. The system consisted of prescreening, MC detecting, clustering, and falsepositive reduction steps. In the prescreening stage, the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale-based 3D calcification response function. A connected component segmentation method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were considered as potential clustering centers of MCs. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a cluster candidate was formed by including nearby MC candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object satisfying the clustering criteria during the clustering step. The size and number of the clustered MCs in a cluster seed candidate were used to reduce the number of FPs. A bounding cube for each MCC was generated for each accepted seed candidates. Then, the overlapping cubes were combined and examined according to the FP reduction criteria. After FP reduction step, we obtained the average number of FPs of 2.47 per DBT volume with sensitivity of 83.3%. Our study indicates the simplified false-positive reduction approach applied to the detection of clustered MCs in DBT is promising as an efficient CADe system.

  6. Factors affecting recall rate and false positive fraction in breast cancer screening with breast tomosynthesis - A statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Aldana; Lång, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigate which factors affect the false positive fraction (FPF) for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to digital mammography (DM) in a screening population by using classification and regression trees (C&RT) and binary marginal generalized linear models. The data was obtained from the Malmö Breast Tomosynthesis Screening Trial, which aimed to compare the performance of DBT to DM in breast cancer screening. By using data from the first half of the study population (7500 women), a tree with the recall probability for different groups was calculated. The effect of age and breast density on the FPF was estimated using a binary marginal generalized linear model. Our results show that breast density and breast cancer were the main factors influencing recall. The FPF is mainly affected by breast density and increases with breast density for DBT and DM. In conclusion, the results obtained with C&RT are easy to interpret and similar to those obtained using binary marginal generalized linear models. The FPF is approximately 40% higher for DBT compared to DM for all breast density categories.

  7. Automated segmentation of 3-D spectral OCT retinal blood vessels by neural canal opening false positive suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoft, Michael D; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for automatically segmenting the blood vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes, with a focus on the ability to segment the vessels in the region near the neural canal opening (NCO). The algorithm first pre-segments the NCO using a graph-theoretic approach. Oriented Gabor wavelets rotated around the center of the NCO are applied to extract features in a 2-D vessel-aimed projection image. Corresponding oriented NCO-based templates are utilized to help suppress the false positive tendency near the NCO boundary. The vessels are identified in a vessel-aimed projection image using a pixel classification algorithm. Based on the 2-D vessel profiles, 3-D vessel segmentation is performed by a triangular-mesh-based graph search approach in the SD-OCT volume. The segmentation method is trained on 5 and is tested on 10 randomly chosen independent ONH-centered SD-OCT volumes from 15 subjects with glaucoma. Using ROC analysis, for the 2-D vessel segmentation, we demonstrate an improvement over the closest previous work with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81 (0.72 for previously reported approach) for the region around the NCO and 0.84 for the region outside the NCO (0.81 for previously reported approach).

  8. Cell Shaving and False-Positive Control Strategies Coupled to Novel Statistical Tools to Profile Gram-Positive Bacterial Surface Proteomes.

    PubMed

    Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    A powerful start to the discovery and design of novel vaccines, and for better understanding of host-pathogen interactions, is to profile bacterial surfaces using the proteolytic digestion of surface-exposed proteins under mild conditions. This "cell shaving" approach has the benefit of both identifying surface proteins and their surface-exposed epitopes, which are those most likely to interact with host cells and/or the immune system, providing a comprehensive overview of bacterial cell topography. An essential requirement for successful cell shaving is to account for (or minimize) cellular lysis that can occur during the shaving procedure and thus generate data that is biased towards non-surface (e.g., cytoplasmic) proteins. This is further complicated by the presence of "moonlighting" proteins, which are proteins predicted to be intracellular but with validated surface or extracellular functions. Here, we describe an optimized cell shaving protocol for Gram-positive bacteria that uses proteolytic digestion and a "false-positive" control to reduce the number of intracellular contaminants in these datasets. Released surface-exposed peptides are analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Additionally, the probabilities of proteins being surface exposed can be further calculated by applying novel statistical tools.

  9. Level of visual acuity necessary to avoid false-positives on the HRR and Ishihara color vision tests.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jason S; Shih, Brian

    2017-05-11

    Minimizing false-positives (FPs) when evaluating color vision is important in eye care. Identification of plate 1 (demonstration plate) is often considered a way to avoid FPs. However, few studies have quantified the minimum level of visual acuity (VA) that would minimize FPs for the Ishihara and HRR color tests. Threshold levels of optical defocus were obtained from 25 color normal subjects. Blur levels were obtained for Ishihara (38 plate) plates 1, 10, and 15 and 4th edition HRR plates 1, 7, 10, and 20 using the method of limits. Corresponding VAs were measured through these blur levels at 40 centimeters after adjusting for the dioptric distance difference. Analysis of variance testing was used to analyze the data. Mean optical defocus values in diopters (mean ± SD) for HRR plates 1, 7, 10, and 20 were 6.23 ± 1.61, 1.23 ± 1.16, 2.41 ± 1.31, and 7.96 ± 2.03, respectively, and for Ishihara plates 1, 10, and 15 were 5.70 ± 1.52, 3.68 ± 1.71, and 4.62 ± 1.56, respectively. There was a significant difference between the screening and demonstration plates for both tests (p<0.001). Based on the plate in each test that was found to be the least tolerant to blur, the average minimum VAs needed to identify the screening plates were approximately 20/180 for the Ishihara test and 20/50 for the HRR test. Identifying the demonstration plate in the Ishihara and HRR tests does not ensure FPs will be avoided.

  10. Mixture of expert artificial neural networks with ensemble training for reduction of various sources of false positives in CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; He, Lifeng; Khankari, Shweta; Ge, Liang; Verceles, Joel; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose was to reduce false-positive (FP) detections generated by a computerized lesion detection scheme by using a "mixture of expert" massive-training artificial neural networks (MTANNs). Multiple MTANNs were trained with "ensemble training" for reduction of diverse types of non-lesions. We started from a seed MTANN trained with lesions and non-lesions of a seed type. We applied the trained seed MTANN to lesions and various types of non-lesions to analyze the weakness of the seed MTANN. We arranged the output scores of the MTANN for lesions and non-lesions in an ascending order to form the score scale representing the degree of difficulty in distinction between lesions and non-lesions by the seed MTANN. The score scale was divided into several segments, and ten non-lesions were sampled from the center of each segment so that sets of non-lesion samples covered diverse difficulties. We trained several MTANNs with several sets of non-lesions so that each MTANN became an expert for the non-lesions at a certain level of difficulty. We then combined expert MTANNs with a mixing ANN to form a "mixture of expert" MTANNs. Our database consisted of CT colonography datasets acquired from 100 patients, including 26 polyps. We applied our initial CAD scheme to this CTC database. FP sources included haustral folds, stool, colonic walls, the ileocecal valves, and rectal tubes. The mixture of expert MTANNs distinguished all polyps correctly from more than 50% of the non-polyps. Thus, the mixture of expert MTANNs was able reduce one half of the FPs generated by a computerized polyp detection scheme while the original sensitivity was maintained. We compare the effectiveness of ensemble training with that of training with manually selected cases. The performance of the MTANNs with ensemble training was superior to that of the MTANNs trained with manually selected cases.

  11. Impact of a False-Positive Screening Mammogram on Subsequent Screening Behavior and Stage at Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dabbous, Firas M; Dolecek, Therese A; Berbaum, Michael L; Friedewald, Sarah M; Summerfelt, Wm Thomas; Hoskins, Kent; Rauscher, Garth H

    2017-03-01

    Background: Experiencing a false positive (FP) screening mammogram is economically, physically, and emotionally burdensome, which may affect future screening behavior by delaying the next scheduled mammogram or by avoiding screening altogether. We sought to examine the impact of a FP screening mammogram on the subsequent screening mammography behavior.Methods: Delay in obtaining subsequent screening was defined as any mammogram performed more than 12 months from index mammogram. The Kaplan-Meier (product limit) estimator and Cox proportional hazards model were used to estimate the unadjusted delay and the hazard ratio (HR) of delay of the subsequent screening mammogram within the next 36 months from the index mammogram date.Results: A total of 650,232 true negative (TN) and 90,918 FP mammograms from 261,767 women were included. The likelihood of a subsequent mammogram was higher in women experiencing a TN result than women experiencing a FP result (85.0% vs. 77.9%, P < 0.001). The median delay in returning to screening was higher for FP versus TN (13 months vs. 3 months, P < 0.001). Women with TN result were 36% more likely to return to screening in the next 36 months compared with women with a FP result HR = 1.36 (95% CI, 1.35-1.37). Experiencing a FP mammogram increases the risk of late stage at diagnosis compared with prior TN mammogram (P < 0.001).Conclusions: Women with a FP mammogram were more likely to delay their subsequent screening compared with women with a TN mammogram.Impact: A prior FP experience may subsequently increase the 4-year cumulative risk of late stage at diagnosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 397-403. ©2017 AACR.

  12. Selective Activation Around the Left Occipito-Temporal Sulcus for Words Relative to Pictures: Individual Variability or False Positives?

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nicholas D; Mechelli, Andrea; Noppeney, Uta; Veltman, Dick J; Rombouts, Serge ARB; Glensman, Janice; Haynes, John-Dylan; Price, Cathy J

    2008-01-01

    We used high-resolution fMRI to investigate claims that learning to read results in greater left occipito-temporal (OT) activation for written words relative to pictures of objects. In the first experiment, 9/16 subjects performing a one-back task showed activation in ≥1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures (P < 0.05 uncorrected). In a second experiment, another 9/15 subjects performing a semantic decision task activated ≥1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures. However, at this low statistical threshold false positives need to be excluded. The semantic decision paradigm was therefore repeated, within subject, in two different scanners (1.5 and 3 T). Both scanners consistently localised left OT activation for words relative to fixation and pictures relative to words, but there were no consistent effects for words relative to pictures. Finally, in a third experiment, we minimised the voxel size (1.5 × 1.5 × 1.5 mm3) and demonstrated a striking concordance between the voxels activated for words and pictures, irrespective of task (naming vs. one-back) or script (English vs. Hebrew). In summary, although we detected differential activation for words relative to pictures, these effects: (i) do not withstand statistical rigour; (ii) do not replicate within or between subjects; and (iii) are observed in voxels that also respond to pictures of objects. Our findings have implications for the role of left OT activation during reading. More generally, they show that studies using low statistical thresholds in single subject analyses should correct the statistical threshold for the number of comparisons made or replicate effects within subject. Hum Brain Mapp 2008. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:17712786

  13. Selective activation around the left occipito-temporal sulcus for words relative to pictures: individual variability or false positives?

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicholas D; Mechelli, Andrea; Noppeney, Uta; Veltman, Dick J; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Glensman, Janice; Haynes, John-Dylan; Price, Cathy J

    2008-08-01

    We used high-resolution fMRI to investigate claims that learning to read results in greater left occipito-temporal (OT) activation for written words relative to pictures of objects. In the first experiment, 9/16 subjects performing a one-back task showed activation in > or =1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures (P < 0.05 uncorrected). In a second experiment, another 9/15 subjects performing a semantic decision task activated > or =1 left OT voxel for words relative to pictures. However, at this low statistical threshold false positives need to be excluded. The semantic decision paradigm was therefore repeated, within subject, in two different scanners (1.5 and 3 T). Both scanners consistently localised left OT activation for words relative to fixation and pictures relative to words, but there were no consistent effects for words relative to pictures. Finally, in a third experiment, we minimised the voxel size (1.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 mm(3)) and demonstrated a striking concordance between the voxels activated for words and pictures, irrespective of task (naming vs. one-back) or script (English vs. Hebrew). In summary, although we detected differential activation for words relative to pictures, these effects: (i) do not withstand statistical rigour; (ii) do not replicate within or between subjects; and (iii) are observed in voxels that also respond to pictures of objects. Our findings have implications for the role of left OT activation during reading. More generally, they show that studies using low statistical thresholds in single subject analyses should correct the statistical threshold for the number of comparisons made or replicate effects within subject. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Influence of analytical bias and imprecision on the number of false positive results using Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits.

    PubMed

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Klee, George G

    2014-03-20

    Diagnostic decisions based on decision limits according to medical guidelines are different from the majority of clinical decisions due to the strict dichotomization of patients into diseased and non-diseased. Consequently, the influence of analytical performance is more critical than for other diagnostic decisions where much other information is included. The aim of this opinion paper is to investigate consequences of analytical quality and other circumstances for the outcome of "Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits". Effects of analytical bias and imprecision should be investigated separately and analytical quality specifications should be estimated accordingly. Use of sharp decision limits doesn't consider biological variation and effects of this variation are closely connected with the effects of analytical performance. Such relationships are investigated for the guidelines for HbA1c in diagnosis of diabetes and in risk of coronary heart disease based on serum cholesterol. The effects of a second sampling in diagnosis give dramatic reduction in the effects of analytical quality showing minimal influence of imprecision up to 3 to 5% for two independent samplings, whereas the reduction in bias is more moderate and a 2% increase in concentration doubles the percentage of false positive diagnoses, both for HbA1c and cholesterol. An alternative approach comes from the current application of guidelines for follow-up laboratory tests according to clinical procedure orders, e.g. frequency of parathyroid hormone requests as a function of serum calcium concentrations. Here, the specifications for bias can be evaluated from the functional increase in requests for increasing serum calcium concentrations. In consequence of the difficulties with biological variation and the practical utilization of concentration dependence of frequency of follow-up laboratory tests already in use, a kind of probability function for diagnosis as function of the key-analyte is proposed

  15. Serum Thyroglobulin (Tg) Monitoring of Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Using Sensitive (Second-Generation) Immunometric Assays Can Be Disrupted by False-Negative and False-Positive Serum Thyroglobulin Autoantibody Misclassifications

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Ivana; Fatemi, Shireen; LoPresti, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reliable thyroglobulin (Tg) autoantibody (TgAb) detection before Tg testing for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is critical when TgAb status (positive/negative) is used to authenticate sensitive second-generation immunometric assay (2GIMA) measurements as free from TgAb interference and when reflexing “TgAb-positive” sera to TgAb-resistant, but less sensitive, Tg methodologies (radioimmunoassay [RIA] or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry [LC-MS/MS]). Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess how different Kronus (K) vs Roche (R) TgAb method cutoffs for “positivity” influence false-negative vs false-positive serum TgAb misclassifications that may reduce the clinical utility of reflex Tg testing. Methods: Serum Tg2GIMA, TgRIA, and TgLC-MS/MS measurements for 52 TgAb-positive and 37 TgAb-negative patients with persistent/recurrent DTC were compared. A total of 1426 DTC sera with TgRIA of ≥1.0 μg/L had false-negative and false-positive TgAb frequencies determined using low Tg2GIMA/TgRIA ratios (<75%) to indicate TgAb interference. Results: TgAb-negative patients with disease displayed Tg2GIMA, TgRIA, and TgLC-MS/MS serum discordances (% coefficient of variation = 24 ± 20%, range, 0%–100%). Of the TgAb-positive patients with disease, 98% had undetectable/lower Tg2GIMA vs either TgRIA or TgLC-MS/MS (P < .01), whereas 8 of 52 (15%) had undetectable Tg2GIMA + TgLC-MS/MS associated with TgRIA of ≥1.0 μg/L. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis reported more sensitivity for TgAb method K vs R (81.9% vs 69.1%, P < .001), but receiver operating characteristic curve cutoffs (>0.6 kIU/L [K] vs >40 kIU/L [R]) had unacceptably high false-negative frequencies (22%–32%), whereas false positives approximated 12%. Functional sensitivity cutoffs minimized false negatives (13.5% [K] vs 21.3% [R], P < .01) and severe interferences (Tg2GIMA, <0.10 μg/L) (0.7% [K] vs 2.4% [R], P < .05) but false positives approximated 23

  16. False-positive alarms for bacterial screening of platelet concentrates with BacT/ALERT new-generation plastic bottles: a multicenter pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hundhausen, T; Müller, T H

    2005-08-01

    The microbial detection system BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux) is widely used to monitor bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs). Recently, the manufacturer introduced polycarbonate culture bottles and a modified pH-sensitive liquid emulsion sensor as microbial growth indicator. This reconfigured assay was investigated in a routine setting. In each of eight transfusion centers, samples from 500 consecutive PCs were monitored for 1 week. For all PCs with a positive BacT/ALERT signal, retained samples and, if available, original PC containers and concomitant red blood cell concentrates were analyzed independently. Initially BacT/ALERT-positive PCs without bacterial identification in any sample were defined as false-positive. BacT/ALERT-positive PCs with bacteria in the first sample only were called potentially positive. PCs with bacteria in the first sample and the same strain in at least one additional sample were accepted as positive. Five PCs (0.13%) were positive, 9 PCs (0.23%) were potentially positive, and 35 PCs (0.9%) were false-positive. The rate of false-positive BacT/ALERT results varied substantially between centers (<0.2%-3.2%). Tracings from false-positive cultures lacked an exponential increase of the signal during incubation. Most of these false-positives were due to malfunctioning cells in various BacT/ALERT incubation units. Careful assessment of individual tracings of samples with positive signals helps to identify malfunctioning incubation units. Their early shutdown or replacement minimizes the high rate of unrectifiable product rejects attributed to false-positive alarms and avoids unnecessary concern of doctors and patients after conversion to a reconfigured BacT/ALERT assay.

  17. Survey of False-positive Reactivity of Latex Agglutination Test for Kala-azar (Katex) without Urine Sample Boiling Process in Autoimmune Patients

    PubMed Central

    GHATEE, Mohammad Amin; KANANNEJAD, Zahra; SHARIFI, Iraj; ASKARI, Asma; BAMOROVAT, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Latex agglutination test for Kala-azar (KAtex) is an easy, inexpensive, and field-applicable antigen detection test. However, the main drawback of this method is the boiling step applied to remove false positivity of the test. This study was conducted to survey false positivity results of latex agglutination test for KAtex without boiling process in urine of some autoimmune patients. Methods: Ninety-two urine samples from autoimmune patients including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma, autoimmune vasculitis, vitiligo, pemphigus and Wagner cases and 20 urine samples from healthy individuals were collected from Kerman Province in Southeastern Iran in 2010–2011. All urine samples were checked by KAtex after boiling for 5 min false positivity rate of the test was surveyed in different healthy and patients groups while boiling process was removed. Rheumatoid factor (RF) then was checked in sera of all cases to evaluate the relationship between RF and KAtex false positivity. Results: All samples represented negative results with KAtex when boiling was performed (100% specificity). Then, 20% positivity was evident in healthy cases. False-positive reactivity was more prominent observed in patient groups than healthy individuals, except in vitiligo. However, a significant difference was only observed in RA group (P<0.05). RF was related to KAtex false positivity. Conclusion: RA was described as the autoimmune disease in which KAtex false positivity was higher than normal population. RF or its metabolic products may have role in false positivity of KAtex but this finding needs to be confirmed by more reliable and improved experiments. Overall, immune system products should be considered in attempts for modification of KAtex for boiling process removal. PMID:28828323

  18. False-positive reduction in computer-aided diagnostic scheme for detecting nodules in chest radiographs by means of massive training artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shiraishi, Junji; Abe, Hiroyuki; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2005-02-01

    We developed a technique that uses a multiple massive-training artificial neural network (multi-MTANN) to reduce the number of false-positive results in a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detecting nodules in chest radiographs. Our database consisted of 91 solitary pulmonary nodules, including 64 malignant nodules and 27 benign nodules, in 91 chest radiographs. With our current CAD scheme based on a difference-image technique and linear discriminant analysis, we achieved a sensitivity of 82.4%, with 4.5 false positives per image. We developed the multi-MTANN for further reduction of the false positive rate. An MTANN is a highly nonlinear filter that can be trained with input images and corresponding teaching images. To reduce the effects of background levels in chest radiographs, we applied a background-trend-correction technique, followed by contrast normalization, to the input images for the MTANN. For enhancement of nodules, the teaching image was designed to contain the distribution for a "likelihood of being a nodule." Six MTANNs in the multi-MTANN were trained by using typical nodules and six different types of non-nodules (false positives). Use of the trained multi-MTANN eliminated 68.3% of false-positive findings with a reduction of one true-positive result. The false-positive rate of our original CAD scheme was improved from 4.5 to 1.4 false positives per image, at an overall sensitivity of 81.3%. Use of a multi-MTANN substantially reduced the false-positive rate of our CAD scheme for lung nodule detection on chest radiographs, while maintaining a level of sensitivity.

  19. The ability of human nuclear DNA to cause false positive low-abundance heteroplasmy calls varies across the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Levent; Khanipov, Kamil; Pimenova, Maria; Golovko, George; Rojas, Mark; Pavlidis, Ioannis; Chumakov, Sergei; Aguilar, Gerardo; Chávez, Arturo; Widger, William R; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2016-12-12

    Low-abundance mutations in mitochondrial populations (mutations with minor allele frequency ≤ 1%), are associated with cancer, aging, and neurodegenerative disorders. While recent progress in high-throughput sequencing technology has significantly improved the heteroplasmy identification process, the ability of this technology to detect low-abundance mutations can be affected by the presence of similar sequences originating from nuclear DNA (nDNA). To determine to what extent nDNA can cause false positive low-abundance heteroplasmy calls, we have identified mitochondrial locations of all subsequences that are common or similar (one mismatch allowed) between nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Performed analysis revealed up to a 25-fold variation in the lengths of longest common and longest similar (one mismatch allowed) subsequences across the mitochondrial genome. The size of the longest subsequences shared between nDNA and mtDNA in several regions of the mitochondrial genome were found to be as low as 11 bases, which not only allows using these regions to design new, very specific PCR primers, but also supports the hypothesis of the non-random introduction of mtDNA into the human nuclear DNA. Analysis of the mitochondrial locations of the subsequences shared between nDNA and mtDNA suggested that even very short (36 bases) single-end sequencing reads can be used to identify low-abundance variation in 20.4% of the mitochondrial genome. For longer (76 and 150 bases) reads, the proportion of the mitochondrial genome where nDNA presence will not interfere found to be 44.5 and 67.9%, when low-abundance mutations at 100% of locations can be identified using 417 bases long single reads. This observation suggests that the analysis of low-abundance variations in mitochondria population can be extended to a variety of large data collections such as NCBI Sequence Read Archive, European Nucleotide Archive, The Cancer Genome Atlas, and International Cancer Genome

  20. A roller coaster of emotions and sense--coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Bolejko, Anetta; Zackrisson, Sophia; Hagell, Peter; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2014-07-01

    To explore coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography. Mammographic screening has been found effective to decrease breast cancer (BC) mortality, yet there are adverse effects. Psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammographic screening have mainly been investigated from a population-based perspective. A call for qualitative studies to further explore these consequences has thus been postulated. To date, qualitative studies have elucidated women's experiences following their recall breast examinations, but their coping with perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography has not yet been explored. An explorative qualitative study. Face-to-face interviews were held with a purposive heterogeneous sample of 13 Swedish-speaking women with a false-positive screening mammography. The transcripts were analysed by the use of an inductive content analysis. Coping with the perceived psychosocial consequences of a false-positive screening mammography implied a roller coaster of emotion and sense. Women described how they imagined the worst and were in a state of uncertainty feeling threatened by a fatal disease. Conversely, they felt protected, surrounded by their families and being professionally taken care of, which together with perceived sisterhood and self-empowerment evoked strength and hope. Being aware of family responsibility became a crucial matter. Experiencing false-positive screening raised thoughts of thankfulness and reappraisal of life, although an ounce of BC anxiety remained. Consequently, gained awareness about BC screening and values in life surfaced. Experiencing a false-positive screening mammography triggers agonising experiences evoking a variety of coping strategies. Provision of screening raises the issue of responsibility for an impact on psychosocial well-being among healthy women. Gained knowledge might provide a basis for interventions to prevent psychosocial

  1. A semi-parametric censoring bias model for estimating the cumulative risk of a false-positive screening test under dependent censoring

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary False-positive test results are among the most common harms of screening tests and may lead to more invasive and expensive diagnostic testing procedures. Estimating the cumulative risk of a false-positive screening test result after repeat screening rounds is therefore important for evaluating potential screening regimens. Existing estimators of the cumulative false-positive risk are limited by strong assumptions about censoring mechanisms and parametric assumptions about variation in risk across screening rounds. To address these limitations, we propose a semi-parametric censoring bias model for cumulative false-positive risk that allows for dependent censoring without specifying a fixed functional form for variation in risk across screening rounds. Simulation studies demonstrated that the censoring bias model performs similarly to existing models under independent censoring and can largely eliminate bias under dependent censoring. We used the existing and newly proposed models to estimate the cumulative false-positive risk and variation in risk as a function of baseline age and family history of breast cancer after 10 years of annual screening mammography using data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. Ignoring potential dependent censoring in this context leads to underestimation of the cumulative risk of false-positive results. Models that provide accurate estimates under dependent censoring are critical for providing appropriate information for evaluating screening tests. PMID:23383717

  2. False positive circumsporozoite protein ELISA: a challenge for the estimation of the entomological inoculation rate of malaria and for vector incrimination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The entomological inoculation rate (EIR) is an important indicator in estimating malaria transmission and the impact of vector control. To assess the EIR, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is increasingly used. However, several studies have reported false positive results in this ELISA. The false positive results could lead to an overestimation of the EIR. The aim of present study was to estimate the level of false positivity among different anopheline species in Cambodia and Vietnam and to check for the presence of other parasites that might interact with the anti-CSP monoclonal antibodies. Methods Mosquitoes collected in Cambodia and Vietnam were identified and tested for the presence of sporozoites in head and thorax by using CSP-ELISA. ELISA positive samples were confirmed by a Plasmodium specific PCR. False positive mosquitoes were checked by PCR for the presence of parasites belonging to the Haemosporidia, Trypanosomatidae, Piroplasmida, and Haemogregarines. The heat-stability and the presence of the cross-reacting antigen in the abdomen of the mosquitoes were also checked. Results Specimens (N = 16,160) of seven anopheline species were tested by CSP-ELISA for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax (Pv210 and Pv247). Two new vector species were identified for the region: Anopheles pampanai (P. vivax) and Anopheles barbirostris (Plasmodium malariae). In 88% (155/176) of the mosquitoes found positive with the P. falciparum CSP-ELISA, the presence of Plasmodium sporozoites could not be confirmed by PCR. This percentage was much lower (28% or 5/18) for P. vivax CSP-ELISAs. False positive CSP-ELISA results were associated with zoophilic mosquito species. None of the targeted parasites could be detected in these CSP-ELISA false positive mosquitoes. The ELISA reacting antigen of P. falciparum was heat-stable in CSP-ELISA true positive specimens, but not in the false positives. The heat

  3. Utility of TL-201 SPECT in clarifying false-positive FDG-PET findings due to osteoradionecrosis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsiu; Liang, Ji-An; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Yang, Shih-Neng; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Sun, Shung-Shung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether Tl-201 single photon emission CT (SPECT) is potentially useful in differentiating false-positive fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings caused by osteoradionecrosis (ORN) from recurrent head and neck cancer after radiotherapy. Five patients were recruited. Dual-phase FDG-PET and dual-phase Tl-201 SPECT were performed for each patient. All 5 patients proved to have ORN without recurrent cancer. By visual interpretation, the results were 4 positive versus 1 negative for PET, and 4 negative versus 1 positive for Tl-201 SPECT. The Tl-201 SPECT clarified 3 of the 4 false-positive PETs to be ORN. Dual-phase semiquantitative studies showed decreased standardized uptake value (SUV) over time in 3 of the 4 false-positive PETs and decreased lesion/background ratio over time in the false-positive Tl-201 SPECT. The Tl-201 SPECT may help clarify suspected false-positive FDG uptake caused by ORN. Dual-phase FDG-PET and dual-phase Tl-201 SPECT may also have some value.

  4. Investigating Initial Disclosures and Reactions to Unexpected, Positive HPV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Hernandez, Rachael; Catona, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Initial disclosures of health conditions are critical communication moments. Existing research focuses on disclosers; integrating confidants into studies of initial disclosures is needed. Guided by the disclosure decision-making model (DD-MM; Greene, 2009), this study examined what diagnosed persons and confidants may say when faced with unexpected test results and unexpected disclosures, respectively. Participants (N = 151) recorded an audio-visual message for another person, after imagining that they or the other person had just received unexpected, positive HPV test results. The qualitative analysis revealed four themes: (1) impression management and social distance, (2) invisible symptoms and advice regarding future disclosures, (3) expressing and acknowledging emotional reactions, and (4) misunderstandings and lacking knowledge about HPV. These findings suggested that DD-MM may be a relevant framework for understanding not only when disclosers share, but what disclosers and confidants say in early conversations about new diagnoses. While disclosers’ and confidants’ messages showed marked similarities, important differences appeared. For example, confidants focused on assuaging disclosers’ fear about the consequences, whereas disclosers expressed distress related to their uncertainty about the prognosis of an HPV infection and how to prepare for next steps. The discussion highlighted implications for the DD-MM, HPV disclosures, and future interventions. PMID:25642121

  5. Reaction Time Variability in HIV-Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ettenhofer, Mark L.; Foley, Jessica; Behdin, Nina; Levine, Andrew J.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of HIV/AIDS is frequently associated with frontal/subcortical dysfunction and mean reaction time (RT) slowing. Beyond group means, within-subject variability of RT has been found to be particularly sensitive to frontal/subcortical dysfunction in other populations. However, the possible relevance of RT variability to HIV/AIDS patients remains unknown. This study evaluated the relationships between RT variability and indicators such as neurocognitive, behavioral, and immunological status. A total of 46 HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral medication regimens were included in this study. Overall performance of this sample was poorer than normative means on measures of RT latency, RT variability, and traditional neurocognitive domains. Results demonstrated that the measures of RT variability were associated with global cognition, medication adherence rates, and peak immunological dysfunction, above and beyond the effects of RT latency. These preliminary findings suggest that measures of RT variability may provide enhanced sensitivity to neurocognitive disease burden in HIV/AIDS relative to more traditional measures of mean RT or cognitive function. PMID:20798183

  6. Studies on a radioassay for intrinsic factor antibody: comparison of methods and false positive results due to elevated serum B12 levels.

    PubMed

    Muckerheide, M M; Wolfman, J A; Rohde, D A; McManamy, G E

    1984-09-01

    Availability of a kit method (Corning Immo Phase IFAB) for intrinsic factor antibody (IFAB) has made it possible for a routine radioimmunoassay (RIA) laboratory to test for the antibody, thereby providing another aid in diagnosing pernicious anemia. Comparison of data from a charcoal method with the kit method was favorable, each method detecting 35 (74%) positives and 12 (26%) negatives of 47 pernicious anemia patients. Compared with a charcoal method study the kit method had fewer false positives due to elevated serum B12. False positive results occurred for only 24 hours after a 1-mg injection of B12, and results remained negative the following seven days. The authors' studies supported the manufacturer's statement that results are unreliable when the serum B12 level exceeds 3,500 pg/ml. Clinical experience with the Corning Immo Phase IFAB test and false positive results is summarized.

  7. Retroperitoneal Endometriosis: A Possible Cause of False Positive Finding at 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maffione, Anna Margherita; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Lisato, Laura Camilla; Ballotta, Maria; D'Isanto, Mariangela Zanforlini; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a frequent and clinically relevant problem in young women. Laparoscopy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of endometriosis, but frequently both morphologic and functional imaging techniques are involved in the diagnostic course before achieving a conclusive diagnosis. We present a case of a patient affected by infiltrating retroperitoneal endometriosis falsely interpreted as a malignant mass by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. PMID:26097425

  8. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  9. Development of a sensitive and false-positive free PMA-qPCR viability assay to quantify VBNC Escherichia coli and evaluate disinfection performance in wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Kibbee, Richard J; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-01-01

    The detection and quantification of viable Escherichia coli cells in wastewater treatment plant effluent is very important as it is the main disinfection efficacy parameter for assessing its public health risk and environmental impact. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and false-positive free propidium monoazide-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) assay to quantify the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) E. coli present in secondary wastewater effluent after chlorine disinfection. The qPCR target was the E. coli uidA gene, and native Taq was used to eliminate false positives caused by the presence of contaminant E. coli DNA in recombinant Taq polymerase reagents. Due to issues with qPCR inhibitors in wastewater, this study explored several pre-DNA extraction treatment methods for qPCR inhibitor removal. PMA-qPCR validation was done using salmon testes DNA (Sketa DNA) as an exogenous control added directly to the wastewater samples and amplified using a separate qPCR assay. After disinfection of secondary effluent with 2ppm chlorine at the plant, the mean Log10 CFU reduction in E. coli was 2.85 from a mean CFU of 3.48/10mL compared to 0.21 Log10 CCE mean reduction of the uidA gene from a mean CCE of 3.16/10mL. The VBNC cell concentrations were calculated as 2.32 Log10/10mL by subtracting the colony forming units (CFU) obtained from membrane filtration from the calculated CFU equivalent (CCE) values obtained from PMA-qPCR. These results demonstrate the effective use of a PMA-qPCR method for the quantification of the E. coli uidA gene and indicate there are high numbers (2.01×10(3)CCE/100mL) of VBNC E. coli cells leaving the wastewater treatment plant in the final effluent after chlorine treatment. VBNC bacterial cells are of concern as they have the potential to resuscitate and grow, regain virulence, affect natural microbiome in the discharge sites, and pass on antimicrobial resistant genes to other microorganisms. Copyright © 2016

  10. Production of 2-Aminophenoxazin-3-one by Staphylococcus aureus Causes False-Positive Results in β-Galactosidase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Herman; Chan, Elaine; Lam, Ching-Wan; Leung, Ka-Fai; Chow, Pat; Lee, Kim-Chung; Sze,