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Sample records for familial mediterranean fever

  1. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Familial Mediterranean fever By Mayo Clinic Staff Familial Mediterranean fever is an inflammatory disorder that causes recurrent fevers and painful inflammation of your abdomen, ...

  2. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yazaki, Masahide; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Akinori; Toma, Tomoko; Kishida, Dai; Uehara, Ritei; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Jiuchi, Yuka; Masumoto, Junya; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Terai, Chihiro; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Kawakami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Yasunami, Michio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease caused by MEditerranean FeVer gene (MEFV) mutations. In Japan, patients with FMF have been previously reported, including a mild or incomplete form. Several factors are presumed to contribute to the variable penetrance and to the phenotypic variability of FMF. We conducted the current study to investigate the correlation of variable clinical presentations and MEFV genotypic distributions in Japanese FMF patients. We analyzed demographic, clinical, and genetic data for 311 FMF patients enrolled in the study. Clinically, we classified FMF into 2 phenotypes: 1) the “typical” form of FMF, and 2) the “atypical” form of FMF according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Patients with the typical FMF phenotype had a higher frequency of febrile episodes, a shorter duration of febrile attacks, more frequent thoracic pain, abdominal pain, a family history of FMF, and MEFV exon 10 mutations. Conversely, patients with the atypical FMF phenotype had a lower frequency of fever episodes and more frequent arthritis in atypical distribution, myalgia, and MEFV exon 3 mutations. Multivariate analysis showed that the variable associated with typical FMF presentation was the presence of MEFV exon 10 mutations. Typical FMF phenotype frequencies were decreased in patients carrying 2 or a single low-penetrance mutations compared with those carrying 2 or a single high-penetrance mutations (M694I), with an opposite trend for the atypical FMF phenotype. In addition, patients having more than 2 MEFV mutations had a younger disease onset and a higher prevalence of thoracic pain than those carrying a single or no mutations. Thus, MEFV exon 10 mutations are associated with the more typical FMF phenotype. In contrast, more than half of the Japanese FMF patients without MEFV exon 10 mutations presented with an atypical FMF phenotype, indicating that Japanese FMF patients tend to be divided into 2 phenotypes by a variation

  3. [Amyloidosis and familial Mediterranean fever].

    PubMed

    Pras, M

    1986-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (F. M. F.) is an autosomal recessive disorder occurring most commonly in Sepharadi Jews and Armenians. Two phenotypic features characterize the disease: brief episodic febrile attacks of peritonitis, pleuritis or synovitis recurring from childhood or adolescence and the development of systemic amyloidosis. Attacks are accompanied by striking elevations of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A protein. The amyloidosis of Familial Mediterranean Fever is of the AA type, and manifest clinically as a nephropathy that passes through proteinuria, nephrotic and uremic stages to renal death. Although there is ethnic variation in the incidence of amyloidosis of F. M. F. in our patient population--predominantly Sepharadi Jews of North African extraction--an amyloidotic death at an early age is their genetic destiny. Since the introduction in 1972 of colchicine to prevent the febrile attacks, the drug has been proven and become the main stay of therapy. Today, colchicine has been shown to be effective in preventing amyloidosis as well as the febrile attacks in Familial Mediterranean Fever. End stage renal disease is not the end of the road for patients with F.M.F. because of improving outlook for dialysis and renal transplantation in these patients.

  4. Familial Mediterranean fever: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Özen, Seza

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, and it is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis. The disease is associated with mutations in the MEFV gene encoding pyrin, which causes exaggerated inflammatory response through uncontrolled production of interleukin 1. The major long-term complication of FMF is amyloidosis. Colchicine remains the principle therapy, and the aim of treatment is to prevent acute attacks and the consequences of chronic inflammation. With the evolution in the concepts about the etiopathogenesis and genetics of the disease, we have understood that FMF is more complicated than an ordinary autosomal recessive monogenic disorder. Recently, recommendation sets have been generated for interpretation of genetic testing and genetic diagnosis of FMF. Here, we have reviewed the current perspectives in FMF in light of recent recommendations. PMID:27051312

  5. [Sacroiliitis in familial Mediterranean fever].

    PubMed

    Connemann, B J; Steinhoff, J; Benstein, R; Sack, K

    1991-11-22

    A 15-year-old girl of Turkish descent had for one year complained of severe recurrent fever-associated deep back pains. Since she was three years of age she had suffered from repeated attacks of fever and severe abdominal pain which ceased spontaneously in 1-3 days. On physical examination the sacrum and iliosacral joints were very painful to percussion, and she limped. Radiography revealed symmetric destructive sacroiliitis. Despite the unusual location of the arthritis, the triad of fever, abdominal pain and arthritis, as well as her belonging to an ethnic "at risk" group, pointed to the diagnosis of familial mediterranean fever (FML) or recurrent hereditary polyserositis. This diagnosis was confirmed by a positive metaraminol provocation test in that infusion of metaraminol reproduced the typical pains. Collagen diseases, rheumatic disease, acute porphyria and chronic infectious processes were excluded. The sacroiliitis quickly responded to long-term administration of colchicine, 0.5 mg twice daily. The patient also has Hageman factor deficiency whose significance remains unclear.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Familial Mediterranean fever is almost always inherited in ... in an autosomal dominant pattern . An autosomal dominant inheritance pattern describes cases in which one copy of the ...

  7. Familial Mediterranean fever: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, İsmail; Birlik, Merih; Kasifoğlu, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder characterised by acute attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. FMF primarily affects Jewish, Armenian, Turkish, and Arab populations. The disease is accompanied by a marked decrease in quality of life due to the effects of attacks and subclinical inflammation in the attack-free periods. Untreated or inadequately treated patients run the risk of amyloidosis, which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, the current information available on FMF is summarised. PMID:27708867

  8. A Case of Eosinophilic Esophagitis Accompanying Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Pejman; Najafi Sani, Mehri; Ahmadi, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Background. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an inflammatory condition where there is a dense infiltration of eosinophils typically exceeding fifteen cells per high power field. Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brief, acute, and self-limited episodes of fever and polyserositis that recur at irregular intervals. Case Presentation. A three-year-and-nine-month-old Iranian girl was admitted to our center. The patient's parents complained of a history of abdominal pain, poor appetite, and poor weight gain from 1.5 years ago and episodes of food impaction after starting solid foods. Eosinophilic esophagitis was diagnosed based on histology. Because of continuing abdominal pain after treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis, the episodic nature of disease, and the presence of fever with pain, screening for familial Mediterranean fever mutation was performed and the patient was found to be heterozygote for Mediterranean fever. Conclusion. We have reported a case of eosinophilic esophagitis coexisting with familial Mediterranean fever which has not been described previously. PMID:28255474

  9. Unilateral lymphocytic pleuritis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Katsenos, Stamatis; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Psathakis, Kostas; Tsintiris, Kostas; Polychronopoulos, Vlassios; Panagou, Panagiotis; Ritis, Kostas; Light, Richard W

    2008-04-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting predominantly populations surrounding the Mediterranean basin. It is the most prevalent hereditary periodic fever syndrome characterized mainly by recurrent and short attacks of fever and serositis (pleuritis, arthritis, peritonitis). Unilateral polymorphonuclear exudative pleuritis associated with fever has been reported as the solitary manifestation of the first FMF attack, in < 10% of patients. This case study describes a 30-year-old Greek man with recurrent episodes of lymphocytic exudative pleuritis associated with fever. After a thorough workup (clinical criteria and molecular genetic testing identifying homozygosity polymorphisms of the FMF gene), the diagnosis of FMF was established. Treatment with colchicine, 2 mg/d, eliminated FMF attacks. To our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case report of a patient with FMF presenting with a lymphocytic exudative pleural effusion.

  10. Isolated recurrent pleuritis revealing familial mediterranean Fever in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lega, J C; Khouatra, C; Cottin, V; Cordier, J F

    2010-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetic autoinflammatory disease especially affecting populations of Mediterranean origin with an autosomal recessive inheritance. The cardinal manifestations consist of short febrile and painful attacks of peritonitis, arthritis and pleuritis developing during childhood. We report the case of a 26-year-old man of Tunisian descent who had febrile episodes of right-sided pleuritis without any extrathoracic complaints. Disappearance of attacks with one dose of colchicine (1 mg/day) strengthened the presumptive diagnosis of atypical FMF, which was further confirmed by genetic testing identifying the homozygous mutation M694I/M694I of the MEFV gene.

  11. Familial Mediterranean Fever with Rheumatoid Arthritis Complicated by Pulmonary Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nureki, Shin-ichi; Ishii, Koji; Fujisaki, Hideaki; Torigoe, Masataka; Maeshima, Keisuke; Shibata, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Eishi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with an intermittent fever and chest and back pain, and an abnormal chest shadow was detected. She was diagnosed with paragonimiasis caused by Paragonimus westermani. Praziquantel therapy improved the abnormal chest shadow, but did not relieve her symptoms. She was also diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and colchicine therapy resolved her symptoms. She subsequently developed arthralgia and morning stiffness in her hands. We also diagnosed the patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and corticosteroid and salazosulfapyridine therapy improved her symptoms. The existence of paragonimiasis complicated the diagnosis of FMF. The coexistence of FMF and RA is very rare, but does exist. PMID:27725555

  12. Familial Mediterranean fever presenting as fever of unknown origin in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Jong Hyun; Shim, Jung Ok; Lee, Kwang Chul; Lee, Joo Won; Chae, Jae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common Mendelian autoinflammatory disease, characterized by uncontrolled activation of the innate immune system that manifests as recurrent brief fever and polyserositis (e.g., peritonitis, pleuritic, and arthritis). FMF is caused by autosomal recessive mutations of the Mediterranean fever gene, MEFV which encodes the pyrin protein. Although FMF predominantly affects people from Mediterranean and Middle Eastern ethnic origins, 3 cases of FMF have been reported in Korea since 2012. We report another case of FMF in Korea in which the patient presented with a month-long fever without serositis. After treatment with colchicine was initiated, the patient’s symptoms quickly subsided. The response to colchicine was helpful for diagnosis. We compare the FMF genotypes in Korea with in other countries. Studying FMF cases in Korea will help establish the best MEFV exons to use for screening and diagnosis of Korean FMF. PMID:28018446

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil in a patient with colorectal cancer and Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Purim, Ofer; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy often requiring adjuvant chemotherapy. Familial Mediterranean Fever is a chronic hereditary disease which is relatively prevalent in the Middle East and is associated with recurrent episodes of serosal, synovial or cutaneous inflammations. The aim of this paper was to describe a patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever who received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. A 56-year-old man with Familial Mediterranean Fever and amyloidosis was referred for evaluation and treatment following surgery for colorectal cancer. In light of his relatively young age, good general state of health and apparently well-controlled Familial Mediterranean Fever, he was treated with chemotherapy consisting of four cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. The patient's clinical course during chemotherapy was unremarkable except for one minor attack of Familial Mediterranean Fever. The patient's follow-up was notable for periodic fluctuations in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, up to 4-fold of normal. The Familial Mediterranean Fever remained stable. Although our patient showed a good tolerability of treatment, the administration of chemotherapy to patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever raises several concerns. These include a potential deterioration in the Familial Mediterranean Fever status owing to chemotherapy-induced stress, the potential effect of Familial Mediterranean Fever or its treatment on the tolerability of chemotherapy and an overlapping toxicity of the drugs used to treat the two diseases. An increase in serum carcinoembryonic antigen in this setting may be related to the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism of Familial Mediterranean Fever but does not necessarily indicate disease recurrence. Clinicians should be aware of these issues considering the recent worldwide increase in colorectal cancer.

  14. Genetic Analysis of Southwestern Iranian Patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Mahmoud; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of self-limited fever and serosal tissues inflammation. Methods: To evaluate clinical symptoms and common genetic mutations in southwestern Iranian patients with FMF, 20 unrelated patients were enrolled in this study based on clinical criteria. A panel of 12 common MEFV gene mutations was tested Results: The most frequent clinical presentations of the patients were fever, colicky abdominal pain and arthritis. Eighteen patients responded completely to colchicine therapy. MEFV gene mutations were detected in only 40% of the patients. The most common mutation was E148Q, detected in five patients (25%). The V726A, M694V and P369S mutations were each observed in one patient. Conclusions: Although none of the 12 mutations we included in our test panel was detected in 60% of our patients, all of them had FMF symptoms and responded well to colchicine. MEFV full gene sequencing analysis in these patients may lead to finding new mutations in southwestern Iranian FMF patients which would be helpful in designing a local diagnostic kit. PMID:28367474

  15. Update on Pyrin Functions and Mechanisms of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Gayane; Aminov, Rustam

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the MEFV gene, which encodes the protein named pyrin (also called marenostrin or TRIM20), are associated with the autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Recent genetic and immunologic studies uncovered novel functions of pyrin and raised several new questions in relation to FMF pathogenesis. The disease is clinically heterogeneous reflecting the complexity and multiplicity of pyrin functions. The main functions uncovered so far include its involvement in innate immune response such as the inflammasome assemblage and, as a part of the inflammasome, sensing intracellular danger signals, activation of mediators of inflammation, and resolution of inflammation by the autophagy of regulators of innate immunity. Based on these functions, the FMF-associated versions of pyrin confer a heightened sensitivity to a variety of intracellular danger signals and postpone the resolution of innate immune responses. It remains to be demonstrated, however, what kind of selective advantage the heterozygous carriage conferred in the past to be positively selected and maintained in populations from the Mediterranean basin. PMID:27066000

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever and its implications for fertility and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mijatovic, Velja; Hompes, Peter G A; Wouters, Maurice G A J

    2003-06-10

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited disease of episodic fever in combination with severe abdominal pain, pleurisy, arthritis or erysipelas-like skin rashes. The disease is mainly prevalent in Sephardic Jews, Armenians, Turks and Arabs. The gene responsible for FMF was cloned in 1997. The gene expresses a protein called pyrin which is believed to play a role in the downregulation of mediators of inflammation. Several mutations have been identified of which the homozygous form of the M694V mutation is associated with a more severe expression of FMF. Prophylactic administration of colchicine is effective in relieving most patients from their attacks and preventing the development of amyloidosis, which usually leads to end-stage renal disease. Unfortunately, there is little awareness of the disease in gynaecological practice although a FMF full blown episode may mimic an acute abdominal calamity suggesting several possible gynaecological diagnoses. FMF is also associated with subfertility. In females, infertility was mainly related to oligomenorrhea although the causes remain unclear. In male FMF patients, progression of the disease may induce testicular impairment, consequently affecting spermatogenesis. Some controversy exists as to the adverse effects of colchicine on sperm production and function although the impression is that the occurrence of sperm pathology in FMF patients, using the recommended dosage of colchicine, is very low. In pregnant FMF patients, an increased occurrence of miscarriage has been found. However, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Although colchicine is a mitotic inhibitor and transplacental crossing of colchicine has been demonstrated, no increased risk of foetal abnormalities in colchicine-treated pregnant FMF patients has been found. Therefore, amniocentesis should not be done for reassurance alone.

  17. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOEpatents

    Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevichh, Ivona; Centola, Michael; Deng, Zuoming; Sood, Ramen; Collins, Francis S.; Blake, Trevor; Liu, P. Paul; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Richards, Robert I.; Ricke, Darrell O.; Doggett, Norman A.; Pras, Mordechai

    2003-09-30

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  18. Compound heterozygosity for three common MEFV mutations in a highly consanguineous family with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Seidel, H; Steinlein, O K

    2008-07-01

    Consanguinity is not the only factor influencing the occurrence of autosomal recessive disorders such as familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The extended, multiple consanguineous Turkish pedigree presented here demonstrates that the population frequency of certain mutations (so-called "ancient" mutations) can be at least equally important. In high-risk populations different combinations of mutations can occur within the same family, increasing not only the intrafamilial clinical variability, but also causing considerable recurrence risks even in marriages with unrelated spouses.

  19. Diagnosis and management of familial Mediterranean fever: integrating medical genetics in a dedicated interdisciplinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Neda; Getzug, Terri; Grody, Wayne W

    2011-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis, especially prevalent in individuals of Mediterranean descent. Familial Mediterranean fever can have nonspecific manifestations that mimic many common acquired disorders such as infections, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, and arthritis, which can delay diagnosis for many years and subject patients to extensive evaluations and even unnecessary surgery. Untreated familial Mediterranean fever can result in serious complications such as end-stage renal disease and malabsorption secondary to amyloid deposition in the kidneys and digestive tract, male and female infertility, and growth retardation in children. These significant sequelae, along with the episodic acute attacks, are readily preventable by treatment with oral colchicine and underscore the necessity of early detection and treatment from a medical, psychosocial, and economic standpoint. We describe our comprehensive approach to the accurate diagnosis and effective management of this disorder by means of a dedicated familial Mediterranean fever clinic that incorporates medical genetics on equal footing with general medicine. In addition to providing the clinician with the presenting features of familial Mediterranean fever, methods of diagnosis including molecular testing, and current management based on our extensive experience with hundreds of affected individuals, we also advance this approach as a model for the incorporation of medical genetics practice into the more traditional domains of general medicine.

  20. Does breast-feeding affect severity of familial Mediterranean fever?

    PubMed

    Makay, Balahan; Unsal, Erbil

    2009-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common inherited autoinflammatory disease, which is caused by an inborn error in innate immune system. It was shown that disease severity of patients of the same ethnic origin differed according to different country of residence, suggesting an influence of environment on phenotype of FMF. Different microbial milieus of the countries were accused. Breast-feeding has an important role on innate immunity and protects the infant from infections. The aim of this study is to investigate whether being breast-fed and duration of breast-feeding has an impact on disease severity of FMF. The mothers of patients were asked to fill a questionnaire about the feeding type in infancy. Mode of delivery, gestational age, and age at onset of FMF symptoms were also asked. The disease severity score of each patient was calculated according to the scoring system suggested by Pras et al. (Am J Med Genet 75:216-219, 1998). MEFV mutations were noted. The mothers of 81 FMF patients completed the questionnaire. Fifteen patients (18.5%) had mild, 49 (60.5%) had moderate, and 17 (21%) had severe disease. All the patients except four were breast-fed for some period. The duration of breast-feeding was similar between three severity groups. Time to introduce cow's milk and complementary foods also did not differ between groups. Longer duration of breast-feeding did not delay the onset of FMF symptoms. Mode of delivery and gestational age had no effect on disease severity. Patients homozygous for M694V had higher severity scores. This preliminary study suggests that breast-feeding is not an exogenous factor having an influence on phenotype of FMF. M694V genotype seems to cause more severe disease.

  1. Plasma ghrelin levels in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Göksal; Inal, Ali; Ilikçi, Rahşan; Baysal, Ozan

    2009-01-01

    Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) is a familial disease characterized by recurrent episodes of febrile serositis, peritonitis, arthritis and pleuritis. Many studies have been performed is an attempt to understand the basis of the inflammatory attacts in FMF. Ghrelin, a recently described orexigene peptide is predominantly produced by stomach. Ghrelin also exerts multiple regulatory effects on immune system. It has reported that grelin has anti-inflammatory effects. There is currently no published evidence demonstrating a role for anti-inflammatory effects of ghrelin in FMF. For this reason, we investigated the role of plasma ghrelin levels in patients with FMF. Thirty seven patients with FMF and 10 healthy controls (5 female, 5 male; mean age 35.4 +/- 5.6 years) were enrolled in this study. Twenty-one patients were in active stage (10 female, 11 male, mean age; 31.0 +/- 5.4 years, mean disease duration 7.2 +/- 3.3 years) and 16 patients were in inactive stage (7 female,9 male, mean age; 33.0 +/- 6.0 years, mean disease duration; 8.7 +/- 3.2 years). Plasma ghrelin levels were determined by EIA. The mean plasma ghrelin levels were 158.4 +/- 52.9 pg/ml in patients with FMF and 56.7 +/- 7.5 pg/ml in healthy controls. The mean plasma ghrelin levels were 190.5 +/- 49.4 pg/ml in the active patients and 116.2 +/- 11.7 pg/ml in the inactive patients. Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly high in patients with FMF compared to healthy controls (p<0.001). Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly high in the active patients compared to in the inactive patients and healthy controls (p<0.001 and p<0.001 respectively). There was significantly difference between in active and inactive patients with FMF (p<0.001). As a results; Plasma ghrelin levels were high both in active and inactive patients with FMF. It is showed that ghrelin may play significant role of the pathogenesis of FMF.

  2. Sacroiliitis and Polyarteritis Nodosa in a Patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ugan, Yunus; Doğru, Atalay; Şencan, Hüseyin; Şahin, Mehmet; Ercan Tunç, Şevket

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by recurrent fever and episodes of serositis. The condition is known to be caused by mutations in the MEFV (Mediterranean FeVer) gene, located in the short arm of chromosome 16. While more than 310 sequence variants in the MEFV gene have been described to date, the diagnosis is still established clinically. FMF may be accompanied by sacroiliitis and various forms of vasculitis. The most common forms of associated vasculitis are Henoch-Schonlein purpura and polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). We have presented here a fairly rare case of FMF, accompanied by both sacroiliitis and PAN. PMID:27143975

  3. Anakinra use during pregnancy: Report of a case with Familial Mediterranean Fever and infertility

    PubMed Central

    İlgen, Ufuk; Küçükşahin, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), affecting people of Mediterranean origin, is an endemic and sometimes problematic disease because of colchicine resistance/intolerance, with relative lack of treatment alternatives, and disease- or treatment-related issues, such as subfertility. Anakinra, being a rational and effective treatment alternative, has no conclusive human pregnancy data. Here we report a case of FMF with infertility who became pregnant with in vitro fertilization (IVF) under treatment with anakinra, along with the pregnancy outcome. PMID:28293457

  4. [Familial Mediterranean fever in Mexico City. A 20-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Halabe-Cherem, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Carolina; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko; Mercado-Atri, Moisés; Sigala-Rodríguez, Carolina; Castañón-González, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (MFF) is an autosomic recessive, inherited inflammatory disease principally seen in persons from the Mediterranean area. Clinical findings include fever, abdominal pain, and pleuritis. The most severe complication of MFF is renal amyloidosis, manifested as nephrotic syndrome, which evolves into chronic renal failure. In this study, we described clinical findings, evolution, and response to treatment in 52 patients diagnosed with MFF living in Mexico City in whom the most important clinical features were fever and abdominal pain. Differing from previous reported series of patients from the Mediterranean area, patient developed renal amyloidosis during the 20-year follow-up, which suggests that an environmental factor might have a significant influence in development of renal amyloidosis.

  5. Goats, germs, and fever: Are the pyrin mutations responsible for familial Mediterranean fever protective against Brucellosis?

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the MEFV gene are highly prevalent in the Middle East and Mediterranean basin, with carrier rates of up to 1:3 in some populations. More than 50 mutations in the MEFV gene have been described. The high prevalence, multiple mutations, and geographic localization to the Middle East suggest a positive selection advantage for the abnormal gene operating in this area over the last several thousand years. To date, no satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon has been made. Rather, many harmful effects of these mutations have been described. MEFV gene mutations cause familial Mediterranean fever in homozygotes, a disease associated with recurrent febrile inflammatory episodes, and death from renal failure and amyloidosis. Heterozygotes with MEFV mutations are predisposed to premature coronary disease, and rheumatologic conditions such as Behçet's disease. MEFV mutations do not appear to protect against tuberculosis. Brucellosis is still highly endemic in the Middle East because of the traditional reliance for meat and dairy production on goats and sheep, the major vectors for this zoonosis. Brucellosis causes a prolonged febrile illness lasting for months and even years, and it may have exacted a major toll among Bronze Age peasant populations in the Middle East. The gene product for MEFV, pyrin, normally inhibits interleukin-1beta production. Mutations in MEFV result in a pro-inflammatory state, with a Th1 polarization and high levels of interferon-gamma. This may actually be protective against intracellular pathogens such as brucellosis. The possible heterozygote advantage of MEFV mutations against brucellosis may therefore be a balanced polymorphism, analogous to the protective effect against malaria that maintains high levels of sickle cell trait in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Familial Mediterranean fever in two Bedouin families: mutation analysis and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Press, J; Shinar, Y; Langevitz, P; Livneh, A; Pras, M; Buskila, D

    2000-06-05

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease prevalent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Arabs, and Turks. The Bedouin are nomad Arab tribes residing in desert margins of the Middle East and Arabia. FMF is quite rare in Bedouins, and here we report on two Bedouin families from southern Israel suffering from this disorder. The MEFV mutations found in the Bedouin patients M694I, V726A, and E148Q are consistent with their Arab origin. The disease severity score showed a mild to moderate severity disease in six patients. The Bedouins, leading a unique nomadic life, may prove instrumental in unraveling the role of environmental factors in the course and severity of FMF.

  7. A case of familial Mediterranean fever who complained of periodic fever and abdominal pain diagnosed by MEFV gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Chie; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Kisida, Dai; Kakudou, Mariko; Yazaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Akinori; Azuma, Kouta; Tsuboi, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takeo; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tetsuya; Maruoka, Momo; Tamura, Masao; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Saito, Atsushi; Nishioka, Aki; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Kitano, Masayasu; Tsunoda, Shinichiro; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Sano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

      Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease caused by Mediterranean FeVergene (MEFV) mutations on Chromosome 16, and characterized by periodic fever of and serositis. FMF is the result of gain-of-function mutations in pyrin that lead to interleukin-1β activation. FMF can be classified as "typical" and "atypical" types based on clinical finding and genetic screening. Although MEFV genotyping has enabled FMF to be confirmed in some cases, the diagnosis remains predominantly clinical since genotyping has shown that the disease is characterized by variable manifestations in Japanese. In 1976, the first report performed on the case of Japanese FMF with periodic fever of and serositis. Since 2002, genetic analyses are performed on Japanese FMF patients by K. Shiozaki et al. and N. Tomiyama et al. In our case, she was a 25-year-old Japanese woman with at periodic fever and abdominal pain. MEFV gene analysis demonstrated a heterozygous mutation of variant M694I, leading to a diagnosis of FMF. After the increase dose (up to 3 mg/day) of colchicine, periodic fever and abdominal pain disappeared. It is the important candidate of FMF for differential diagnosis with unexplained periodic fever and serositis, such as our case.

  8. PFAPA syndrome mimicking familial Mediterranean fever: report of a Turkish child.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Bülent; Caksen, Hüseyin; Arslan, Sükrü; Tuncer, Oğuz; Kirimi, Ercan; Odabaş, Dursun

    2003-11-01

    The PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitidis) syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Herein, we present a Turkish child with PFAPA syndrome mimicking familial Mediterranean fever because of a rare presentation. A 9-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent fever, aphthous stomatitis, sore throat, headache, and general body pains, lasting 2 to 3 days since 3.5 years of age. He was completely symptom-free between the attacks. He was diagnosed as having familial Mediterranean fever according to the clinical findings when he was 6 years of age and Colchicum tablet was administrated. Despite colchicines therapy for 8 months, his attacks did not subside; therefore, the drug was discontinued. He had high fever, a painful cervical lymphadenopathy, aphthous stomatitis, and tonsillo-pharyngitis. The patient was then diagnosed as having PFAPA syndrome. He was given a single dose of prednisolone (0.35 mg/kg/dose). His complaints dramatically and completely disappeared 3 h after administration of the drug. During the 8th month of follow-up, a similar febrile attack lasting only 1 day was noted and it was controlled with a single dose of prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg/day). At this writing the patient is in the 12th month of follow-up, and there have been no symptoms after the second attack. In conclusion, our patient shows that PFAPA syndrome can be confused with familial Mediterranean fever. We also would like to emphasize that the typical PFAPA syndrome can be easily diagnosed by detailed history-taking and physical findings.

  9. Pregnancy outcome of five patients with renal amyloidosis regarding familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Turgal, Mert; Selcuk, Ilker; Ozyuncu, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting mainly patients of the Mediterranean basin and its major complication is the development of renal AA amyloidosis. On the other hand pregnancy with amyloidosis is not common; nevertheless, amyloidosis will complicate pregnancies also with the underlying disease and may cause terrible perinatal morbidities and mortalities. We report here the cases of five pregnant women and their pregnancy outcomes, who have been diagnosed with FMF complicated by renal amyloidosis. In the five cases, we observed that increased pregnancy complication such as small for gestational age, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia and preterm birth.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Familial Mediterranean Fever or Sacroiliitis Accompanied by FMF.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali; Yetişgin, Alparslan; Sahin, Mehtap

    2013-01-01

    The coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) has been rarely seen in case reports in the literature. Herein, we wanted to present a patient who had been followed up and treated as RA, but on investigation we concluded that he really had FMF and its joint complaints associated with sacroiliitis. Recovery was achieved by etanercept administered as if he was an RA patient.

  11. Psoriasis-like lesions in a patient with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Miwa; Koike, Yuta; Kuwatsuka, Sayaka; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Sano, Shigetoshi; Utani, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a rare hereditary autoinflammatory disorder that is caused by pyrin gene mutation associated with aberrance of the interleukin (IL)-1β pathway and characterized by recurrent, self-limiting attacks of fever and other inflammatory symptoms. We report a case of FMF with annular erythema and psoriasis-like lesions, the latter of which demonstrated parakeratosis with neutrophil microabscesses and mild inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltration in the upper dermis. Immunofluorescence staining showed IL-17-positive T-cells. Skin eruption with neutrophil migration in the epidermis may be provoked by T-helper 17 cell activation through the abnormal IL-1β cascade in FMF.

  12. Anakinra induces complete remission of nephrotic syndrome in a patient with familial mediterranean fever and amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sevillano, Ángel M; Hernandez, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Esther; Mateo, Isabel; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Praga, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Renal amyloidosis is one of the most severe complications of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Colchicine has reduced the incidence of this complication, which now only appears in untreated, under-treated and resistant patients, but it is usually ineffective in patients with advanced amyloidosis. Here we report a patient with FMF and biopsy-proven amyloidosis who presented with nephrotic syndrome despite colchicine treatment. Anakinra (an interleukin-1β inhibitor) was started and a dramatic complete remission of nephrotic syndrome was observed in the following months. Anakinra can be an effective treatment for FMF patients with severe secondary amyloidosis.

  13. Familial Mediterranean fever associated with optic neuritis, successfully treated with anti-interleukin 1 agents.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Özge; Kavuncu, Sevim; Güven, Alev; Uncu, Nermin; Acar-Çelikel, Banu; Çakar, Nilgün

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited periodic auto-inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever, synovitis and serositis. Ophthalmological manifestations of FMF are extremely rare. Here we described a boy who has been followed-up for FMF and attended with a loss of vision during the course of the disease. He was diagnosed with optic neuritis. As the other etiologies were excluded his optic neuritis was attributed to the underlying auto inflammatory process. After pulse steroid therapy, his symptoms improved and a complete remission occurred. Afterwards he had two more optic neuritis attacks. Thereafter anti-interleukin 1 (IL-1) drugs were introduced and he did not develop further attacks of both optic neuritis and FMF. This case presentation highlights the possible association between FMF and optic nerve involvement.

  14. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Expression of the familial Mediterranean fever gene is regulated by nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Grandemange, Sylvie; Soler, Stephan; Touitou, Isabelle

    2009-12-15

    Mutations in the MEditerranean FeVer (MEFV) gene are responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessively inherited auto-inflammatory disease. Cases of dominant inheritance and phenotype-genotype heterogeneity have been reported; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not currently understood. The FMF protein named pyrin or marenostrin (P/M) is thought to be involved in regulating innate immunity but its function remains subject to controversy. Recent studies postulate that a defect in MEFV expression regulation may play a role in FMF physiopathology. Our group, along with others, has identified several alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts in leukocytes. Since alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathways are usually coupled in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, we hypothesized that NMD could contribute to the regulation of the MEFV gene. To address this issue, we examined the effect of indirect and direct inhibition of NMD on expression of the MEFV transcripts in THP1, monocyte and neutrophil cells. We showed that MEFV is the first auto-inflammatory gene regulated by NMD in both a cell- and transcript-specific manner. These results and preliminary western-blot analyses suggest the possible translation of alternatively spliced MEFV transcripts into several P/M variants according to cell type and inflammatory state. Our results introduce the novel hypothesis that variation of NMD efficiency could play an important role in FMF physiopathology as a potent phenotypic modifier.

  16. The MEFV mutations and their clinical correlations in children with familial Mediterranean fever in southeast Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ece, Aydın; Çakmak, Erdal; Uluca, Ünal; Kelekçi, Selvi; Yolbaş, İlyas; Güneş, Ali; Yel, Servet; Tan, İlhan; Şen, Velat

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene mutations and their clinical correlations in children with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in southeast Turkey. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 147 (65 males, 82 females) consecutive children with FMF having a positive MEFV gene mutation were prospectively investigated. Patients with negative MEFV gene mutations or atypical FMF presentations and those from other regions of the country were excluded. Clinical manifestations and disease severity scores were recorded. The six most frequent MEFV mutations including M694V, V726A, R726H, P369S, E148Q and P369S were investigated by a reverse hybridization test method. The median age of study group was 9.0 years, median age at diagnosis was 7.8 years, median age at disease onset was 5.0 years, and median follow-up duration was 4.0 years. A positive family history of FMF and parent-to-offspring transmission was found in 58.5 and 42.2 % of families, respectively. The frequencies of independent alleles, with decreasing order, were E148Q (30.7 %), M694V (26.0 %), R761H (13.5 %), V726A (13.0 %), P369S (10.5 %) and M680I (6.3 %) in FMF patients. The M694V subgroup had higher mean disease severity score and longer attack duration compared with E148Q and other mutations subgroups (p < 0.05). Two patients with amyloidosis had the M694V homozygote genotype. In conclusion contrast to other regions and many other ethnicities of the world, the most frequent MEFV gene mutation was E148Q in southeast Turkey. The M694V mutation frequency was lower, and disease severity was relatively mild in FMF children of this region.

  17. Coexistence of hereditary angioedema in a case of familial Mediterranean fever with partial response to colchicine

    PubMed Central

    Bahceci, Semiha Erdem; Genel, Ferah; Gulez, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a very rare and potentially life-threatening genetic disease characterised by episodes of edema in various parts of the body, including the extremities, face, and airway. The disease is usually associated with attacks of abdominal pain. On the other hand, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited condition characterised by recurrent episodes of painful inflammation in the abdomen, chest, or joints. In this report, we present a child with FMF and undiagnosed HAE, which made him a partial responder to colchicine treatment. Consequently, HAE must be considered in differential diagnosis of cases in which a partial response is obtained from FMF treatment, particularly in countries where FMF is frequently encountered, because early diagnosis of HAE can facilitate prevention of life-threatening complications, such as upper airway obstruction. To our knowledge, our patient is the first patient reported in the literature with the diagnosis of HAE and FMF together. PMID:26155193

  18. Assessment of pyrin gene mutations in Turks with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Fischel-Ghodsian, N; Cercek, A; Hamon, M; Ogur, G; Lotan, R; Danon, Y; Shohat, M

    1998-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease clinically characterized by recurrent short self-limited attacks of fever accompanied by peritonitis, pleurisy, and arthritis and can lead to amyloidosis and renal failure in the longer term. It is prevalent mainly in non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Turks, and Arabs. Due to the lack of an accurate diagnostic test, patients often experience years of attacks and invasive diagnostic procedures before the correct diagnosis is made and adequate treatment is begun. Recently, the gene responsible for FMF, denoted pyrin, has been cloned, and three disease mutations have been described (French FMF Consortium, 1997; International FMF Consortium, 1997). In the current study we assessed the spectrum of mutations in this gene in 16 unrelated families of Turkish origin. The three previously reported missense mutations (Met-Ile at codon 680, Met-Val at codon 694, and Val-Ala at codon 726) accounted for 29 of the 34 disease alleles. In one patient in whom no disease mutation was identified, the clinical picture was atypical enough to raise questions regarding the diagnosis. These results imply that the origin of FMF in Turkey is heterogeneous, that molecular diagnosis of FMF is possible in the majority of cases and clinically helpful, and that delineation of the undiscovered disease mutation(s) in the remaining cases remains a high priority.

  19. Familial Mediterranean Fever in Iran: A Report from FMF Registration Center

    PubMed Central

    Salehzadeh, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic AR autoinflammatory disorder. This comprehensive study describes FMF in Iran as a country near Mediterranean area. Materials and Methods. From the country FMF registration center 403 patients according to Tel-Hashomer criteria enrolled this study, 239 patients had MEFV gene mutations analyses. Data, if needed, was analyzed by SPSS v20. Results. 175 patients (43.4%) were female and 228 patients (56.6%) were male. The mean age was 21.3 years. Abdominal pain was in 93.3% patients and 88.1% had fever. Abdominal pain was the main complaint of patients in (49.6%). The mean interval between attacks was 36.5 ± 29.6 days and the mean duration of every episodes was 43.3 ± 34.5 hours. 15.1% of patients had positive family history and 12.7% had previous surgery; in 52.3% of patients delay in diagnosis was more than three years. 12 common MEFV gene mutations were analyzed, 21.33% were without mutations, 39.7% had compound heterozygote, 25.52% showed heterozygous, and 13.38% showed homozygous results. The most common compound genotype was M694V-V726A (% 10.46) and in alleles M694V (% 20.9) and V726A (% 12.7) were the most frequent mutations, respectively. Conclusion. M694V was the most common mutation, and the most common compound genotype was M694V-V726A. Our genotype results are similar to Arabs and in some way to Armenians, erysipelas-like skin lesions are not common in this area, and clinical criteria are the preferred methods in diagnosis of FMF. PMID:26413094

  20. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in children with familial Mediterranean fever: Original article

    PubMed Central

    Duksal, Fatma; Alaygut, Demet; Güven, Ahmet Sami; Ekici, Mahmut; Oflaz, Mehmet Burhan; Tuncer, Rukiye; Cevit, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of present study was (a) to evaluate the relationship between the neutrophil/lymphocyte (N/L) ratio and mutation types of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in children and (b) to evaluate the relationship between the N/L ratio and age. Material and Methods Three hundred forty-three children with familial Mediterranean fever in the attack-free period and 283 healthy control children were included in the study. Patients were divided into subgroups according to mutation types. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were retrieved from medical records of patients and the N/L ratio was calculated from these parameters. Results The N/L ratio of patients was found to be significantly higher than that of controls (p<0.001). Among 343 patients, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound mutations were observed in 39, 253, and 51 patients, respectively. The differences in the N/L ratio among patients with homozygous, heterozygous, and compound mutations were not statistically significant. The most common mutations were M694V (n=126), E148Q (n=70), M680I, (n=33), and V726A (n=28). Significant differences were not observed among these mutations in terms of the N/L ratio (p>0.05). In all subjects, there was a weak but significant relationship between age and the N/L ratio (r: 0.215, p<0.001). Conclusion The N/L ratio, which can be determined by simple methods in routine blood tests, may be used for the follow-up monitoring of chronic inflammation in patients. In addition, the N/L ratio may give an idea to clinicians regarding the early initiation of treatment in patients with typical clinical findings of FMF. PMID:27708915

  1. The role of MEFV mutations in the concurrent disorders observed in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Güncan, Sabri; Bilge, N. Şule Y.; Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the frequency in which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) coexists with other diseases and determine whether Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene mutations are involved in such coexistence. Material and Methods In total, 142 consecutive patients with FMF investigated for MEFV mutation were enrolled in this study [Female: 87; Male: 55, mean age 32±12 years (11–62)]. All the patients were questioned for the presence of concurrent disorders, and the medical records of these patients were revised retrospectively. A previous diagnosis of inflammatory disorder other than FMF was considered true if it met the relevant criteria. MEFV mutations were divided into 2 groups, namely M694V and its subgroup (homozygous or heterozygous) (Group I) and others (Group II). Compound heterozygosity for M694V mutation was included in Group II to form a homogeneous group for Group I. Group I and Group II were compared according to phenotypical features. The presence of MEFV mutation was investigated in exons 2, 3, 5, and 10 by the multiplex-PCR reverse hybridization method. Results Concomitant disorders were found in 17 of 73 patients with FMF (23%) in Group I and 5 of 56 patients (8.9%) in Group II (p=0.04). Concomitant disorders in Group I were as follows: 7 cases of amyloidosis, 2 cases of Behcet’s disease (BD), 4 cases of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 1 case of antiphospholipid syndrome, 1 case of Henoch–Schonlein purpura (HSP), 1 case of combination of psoriatic arthritis, HSP, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and 1 case of AS and amyloidosis. In Group II, the following disorders were found: 1 case of amyloidosis, 1 case of BD, 1 case of AS, 1 case of ulcerative colitis, and 1 case of vitiligo. Conclusion The presence of M694V mutation may predispose patients with FMF to developing other inflammatory disorders. PMID:27733942

  2. Familial Mediterranean Fever: Recent Developments in Pathogenesis and New Recommendations for Management

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Seza; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Demir, Selcan

    2017-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common monogenic autoinflammatory disease (AID) affecting mainly the ethnic groups originating from Mediterranean basin. The disease is characterized by self-limited inflammatory attacks of fever and polyserositis along with elevated acute phase reactants. FMF is inherited autosomal recessively; however, a significant proportion of heterozygotes also express the phenotype. FMF is caused by mutations in the MEFV gene coding for pyrin, which is a component of inflammasome functioning in inflammatory response and production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Recent studies have shown that pyrin recognizes bacterial modifications in Rho GTPases, which results in inflammasome activation and increase in IL-1β. Pyrin does not directly recognize Rho modification but probably affected by Rho effector kinase, which is a downstream event in the actin cytoskeleton pathway. Recently, an international group of experts has published the recommendations for the management of FMF. Colchicine is the mainstay of FMF treatment, and its regular use prevents attacks and controls subclinical inflammation in the majority of patients. Furthermore, it decreases the long-term risk of amyloidosis. However, a minority of FMF patients fail to response or tolerate colchicine treatment. Anti-interleukin-1 drugs could be considered in these patients. One should keep in mind the possibility of non-compliance in colchicine-non-responders. Although FMF is a relatively well-described AID and almost 20 years has passed since the discovery of the MEFV gene, there are still a number of unsolved problems about it such as the exact mechanism of the disease, symptomatic heterozygotes and their treatment, and the optimal management of colchicine resistance. PMID:28386255

  3. Refined mapping of the gene causing Familial Mediterranean fever, by linkage and homozygosity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Gruberg, L.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Pras, M.; Kastner, D.L. ); Shen, Y.; Holman, K.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. ); Ramsburg, M.; Dean, M. ); Amos, C.I. )

    1993-08-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by attacks of fever and serosal inflammation; the biochemical basis is unknown. The authors recently reported linkage of the gene causing FMF (designated [open quotes]MEF[close quotes]) to two markers on chromosome 16p. To map MEF more precisely, they have now tested nine 16p markers. Two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed MEF between D16S94 and D16S80, a genetic interval of about 9 cM. They also examined rates of homozygosity for markers in this region, among offspring of consanguineous marriages. For eight of nine markers, the rate of homozygosity among 26 affected inbred individuals was higher than that among their 20 unaffected sibs. Localizing MEF more precisely on the basis of homozygosity rates alone would be difficult, for two reasons: First, the FMF carrier frequency increases the chance that inbred offspring could have the disease without being homozygous by descent at MEF. Second, several of the markers in this region are relatively nonpolymorphic, with a high rate of homozygosity, regardless of their chromosomal location. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Coexistence of two rare genetic disorders: Kartagener syndrome and familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Deniz; Genç Çetin, Beyza; Şentürk, Taşkın; Şahin Çildağ, Songül; Yılmaz Akdam, İkbal

    2015-03-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare disease, predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive, with ciliary dysfunction leading to impaired mucociliary clearance, chronic airway infection and inflammation. Situs inversus totalis occurs in ~50 % of PCD patients and it is known as Kartagener syndome. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like skin disease. FMF is caused by mutations in the MEFV gene which is located on chromosome 16p13.3. p.M680I, p.M694 V, p.M694I, p.V726A on exon 10 and p.E148Q on exon 2 are the most common mutations among FMF patients and these constitute 85 % of all. Homozygosity of R202Q polymorphism is strongly associated with FMF. We would like to present a case of Kartagener syndrome accompanied by FMF with R202Q polymorphism. Our case is the first in the literature indicating the accidental coexistence of FMF and Kartagener syndrome.

  5. Genetic and physical localization of the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Chen, X.; Levy, E.

    1994-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited disease characterized by acute attacks of fever and serositis. The gene causing FMF, designated MEF, is located on chromosome 16p13. We have genotyped a panel of 65 families (non-Ashkenazi Jewish, Armenian, and Arab) for 15 polymorphic markers from distal chromosome 16p. FMF families from all three populations show linkage to chromosome 16. Analysis of recombinants, as well as multipoint linkage data, place MEF in the interval between D16S246 (p218EP6) and D16S138 (N2), a genetic distance of 1-2 cM. We observed a total of 3 recombinants at the telomeric flanking marker D16S246, and 5 at the centromeric flanking marker D16S138. We have previously shown that a haplotype extending from D16S291 to D16S94 on the telomeric side of MEF is strongly associated with FMF among the Moroccan Jewish population, probably representing a founder effect. Here we report that the 2.5 kb allele of the closest telomeric flanking marker D16S246 (p218EP6) was associated with FMF in both Moroccan and non-Moroccan Jews, although not in Armenians and Arabs. Allelic associations for the centromeric flanking markers were much weaker in the Jewish population, suggesting that MEF may be closer to the telomeric end of the D16S246-D16S318 interval. Physical mapping indicates that this interval covers less than 1 Mb of genomic DNA. We will present data on a YAC contig covering this region.

  6. Evaluation of the mean platelet volume in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Arıca, Seçil; Ozer, Cahit; Arıca, Vefik; Karakuş, Ali; Celik, Tanju; Güneşaçar, Ramazan

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) levels in children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), during attack and attack-free periods. The records of a total of 117 children with FMF, diagnosed using the Tel-Hashomer criteria, have been scanned. The study consisted of 53 patients during an attack (group 1), 64 patients in attack-free period (group 2), and 57 healthy controls (group 3). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, platelet count, and MPV levels were retrospectively recorded. The MPV and platelet values in FMF patients during attack (group 1) and FMF patients during attack-free periods (group 2) have been found to be significantly higher than those of the health control group (group 3). Positive correlation has been found between the MPV and platelet values in Group 1 and the disease's severity score (r = 0.224, and r = 0.268, respectively). Positive correlation (r = 0.528, and r = 0.485, respectively) has been also identified between MPV and blood platelet count in patients in Group 1 and 2. No correlation was found between the Colchicine treatment period and MPV (r = -0.005). The MPV values in the complete group of FMF diagnosed children have been found to be much higher compared to those in healthy children. As a consequence, we consider the MPV value as a useful marker that demonstrates the risk of early stage atherosclerosis in children with FMF.

  7. Familial Mediterranean fever mutations lift the obligatory requirement for microtubules in Pyrin inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Van Gorp, Hanne; Saavedra, Pedro H. V.; de Vasconcelos, Nathalia M.; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Vande Walle, Lieselotte; Matusiak, Magdalena; Prencipe, Giusi; Insalaco, Antonella; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Demon, Dieter; Bogaert, Delfien J.; Dullaers, Melissa; De Baere, Elfride; Hochepied, Tino; Dehoorne, Joke; Vermaelen, Karim Y.; Haerynck, Filomeen; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common monogenic autoinflammatory disease worldwide. It is caused by mutations in the inflammasome adaptor Pyrin, but how FMF mutations alter signaling in FMF patients is unknown. Herein, we establish Clostridium difficile and its enterotoxin A (TcdA) as Pyrin-activating agents and show that wild-type and FMF Pyrin are differentially controlled by microtubules. Diverse microtubule assembly inhibitors prevented Pyrin-mediated caspase-1 activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 from mouse macrophages and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Remarkably, Pyrin inflammasome activation persisted upon microtubule disassembly in PBMCs of FMF patients but not in cells of patients afflicted with other autoinflammatory diseases. We further demonstrate that microtubules control Pyrin activation downstream of Pyrin dephosphorylation and that FMF mutations enable microtubule-independent assembly of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) micrometer-sized perinuclear structures (specks). The discovery that Pyrin mutations remove the obligatory requirement for microtubules in inflammasome activation provides a conceptual framework for understanding FMF and enables immunological screening of FMF mutations. PMID:27911804

  8. Does enthesopathy relate to M694V gene mutation in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ömer; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Ozkan, Fuat; Güven, Gülçimen; Unlü, Elif Nisa; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Onat, Ahmet Mesut

    2013-11-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a systemic hereditary autoinflammatory disorder. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship of enthesitis to FMF and to search the potential association between enthesitis and MEFV gene missense variations in patients with FMF. The study consisted of 72 FMF patients (mean age 29.12 ± 11.47 years, 32 females), 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (mean age 34.14 ± 11.73 years, 16 females), and 34 healthy volunteers (mean age 23.06 ± 6.41 years, 8 females). FMF patients were classified according to the kind of MEFV gene mutation. Doppler ultrasound was used to determine enthesitis based on the Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) scoring system. OMERACT score was significantly different between FMF patients and control group (p < 0.001 in all patients, p = 0.009 in men, and p = 0.002 in women). However, it was not significantly different between FMF and AS patients in both sexes. OMERACT score did not differ between FMF patients with and without M694V gene mutation. The best cutoff point of OMERACT score to predict enthesitis was found as ≥0.5 with sensitivity of 29 %, specificity of 100 %, positive predictive value of 100 %, and negative predictive value of 40 %.

  9. Serum Amyloid A Level in Egyptian Children with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lofty, Hala M.; Marzouk, Huda; Nabih, Mohammad; Mostafa, Noha; Salah, Ahmed; Rashed, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. SAA is an acute-phase reactant detected during an FMF attack or other inflammatory conditions. High SAA levels may increase the risk of amyloidosis. The aim of the study is to measure the serum amyloid A (SAA) level in a group of Egyptian children with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and study its various correlates, if any. Methods. The study enrolled seventy-one children with FMF. Results. SAA level was high in 78.9% of the studied patients with a mean of 81.62 ± 31.6 mg/L, and CRP was positive in 31% of patients. There was no significant releation between SAA level and any demographic or clinical manifestation. High SAA was more frequent in V726A allele (16.9%) followed by M694V allele (12.3%). Elevated SAA levels were more frequent in patients on low colchicine doses. Forty-five percent (45%) of patients have low adherence to colchicine therapy. Interpretation and Conclusion. High SAA levels were detected two weeks after last FMF attack in a large percentage of Egyptian FMF children. This indicates that subclinical inflammation continues during attack-free periods, and SAA could be used as a marker of it. PMID:28070191

  10. Frosted Branch Angiitis Secondary to Familial Mediterranean Fever Resembling Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ozdal, Pınar Çakar; Teke, Mehmet Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of unilateral frosted branch angiitis (FBA) resembling central retinal vein occlusion associated with Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF). Case Report. A 32-year-old woman presented with progressive, painless vision loss in her left eye lasting for 2 days. She was clinically diagnosed with FMF 2 months ago. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and there was light perception in the left. Ophthalmologic examination revealed severe retinal vasculitis showing clinical features of FBA in the left eye. 64 mg/day oral methylprednisolone was started. A significant improvement in retinal vasculitis was observed in two weeks. However, BCVA did not increase significantly due to subhyaloid premacular hemorrhage. Argon laser posterior hyaloidotomy was performed. One week after hyaloidotomy, visual acuity improved to 20/20 and intravitreal hemorrhage disappeared. Four months after the first attack, FBA recurred. Oral methylprednisolone dosage was increased to 64 mg/day and combined with azathioprine 150 mg. At the end of 12-month follow-up, the BCVA was 20/25 and development of epiretinal membrane was observed in the left eye. Conclusions. Frosted branch angiitis may occur with gene abnormalities as an underlying condition. Our case showed that FMF might be a causative disease. PMID:28044118

  11. The familial mediterranean fever protein interacts and colocalizes with a putative Golgi transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Bykhovskaya, Y; Tidow, N; Hamon, M; Bercovitz, Z; Spirina, O; Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    2000-05-01

    The biological function of pyrin, the protein mutated in Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), has not been elucidated. Based on sequence homology, a transcription factor activity was proposed for this neutrophil-specific protein. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, neither transcription activation activity nor any self interaction was detected for pyrin. Screening of an expression cDNA library of peripheral blood leukocytes using as bait the carboxyl portion of pyrin (amino acids 557-781), which contains most of the FMF mutations, led to the identification of P/M-IP1 (pyrin/marenostrin interacting protein 1). A splice variant of P/M-IP1, GTC-90, had previously been described as a component of the 13S hetero-oligomeric protein complex that stimulates in vitro Golgi transport. We have now shown that P/M-IP1 colocalizes with pyrin in the perinuclear cytoplasm of Cos-7 cells and that the interaction between these two proteins is impaired by FMF causing mutations in pyrin. These data suggest that, at some stage of its functional pathway, pyrin resides in the cytoplasm and might be involved in, or impacted by, cellular protein sorting by the Golgi apparatus. The data also imply that P/M-IP1 may be involved in the abnormal inflammatory response that occurs in patients with FMF.

  12. Triggers for attacks in familial Mediterranean fever: application of the case-crossover design.

    PubMed

    Yenokyan, Gayane; Armenian, Haroutune K

    2012-05-15

    The etiology of recurrent attacks of serositis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is not completely understood. Uncontrolled clinical case series have reported that factors associated with emotional, physiological, or physical stress precede and might trigger the attacks. This case-crossover study, conducted between July 2007 and May 2008, aimed to estimate the role of precipitating factors in attacks in a sample of Armenian FMF patients in Yerevan, Armenia, where 104 patients contributed 55 case and 189 control time periods. The authors used conditional logistic regression to compare frequency of exposure to stressful events, strenuous physical activity, menstrual periods, and high-fat food consumption prior to FMF attacks and on attack-free random days. Multiple stressful life events predicted FMF attacks 2 days following the event. After adjustment for treatment, an additional stressful event was associated with an estimated 70% increase in the odds of having an FMF attack on the second day (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 2.79). High levels of perceived stress were also associated with FMF attacks. Physical exertion and high-fat diet did not increase the likelihood of FMF attacks. The possibility of prevention of attacks in FMF needs to be tested through stress-reduction interventions.

  13. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 16 in offsprings of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) patients treated with colchicine

    SciTech Connect

    Korenstein, A.; Avivi, L.; Ravia, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD), an altered mode of Mendelian inheritance, may reveal expression of recessive alleles due to the loss of heterozygosity, as well as imprinted genes. The mechanism causing UPD can be best elucidated in offsprings of individuals at high risk for chromosomal non-disjunction. Such individuals are Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) patients, who are routinely treated with the antimitotic agent colchicine, and, therefore, are expected to be at an increased risk for aneuploidy. A dominant mode of inheritance was observed in four FMF offsprings having one parent exhibiting the FMF phenotype (homozygote recessive) while the other was free of the mutant allele (as assumed from his ethnic background). Out of these, two exhibited UPD of chromosome 16, which carries the FMF gene, as judged from four different RFLP markers along this chromosome. Since in both case the UPD was of maternal origin, it is suggested that the colchicine-treated FMF mothers contributed two doses of chromosome 16, presumably due to meiotic non-disjunction, followed by a somatic loss of the paternal chromosome 16 in the embryo. The somatic chromosome loss is also assumed to be caused by the antimitotic drug since the mother continued to receive it during pregnancy. Whether the UPD arises from the colchicine treatment, from the high tendency of chromosome 16 to maternal non-disjunction or from both remains to be elucidated. Our results highlighted the importance of taking UPD into account when counseling individuals who are either treated with antimitotic agents or are carriers of recessive mutant alleles which are mapped to chromosomes prone to aneuploidy.

  14. Multiple Serum Cytokine Profiling to Identify Combinational Diagnostic Biomarkers in Attacks of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tomohiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Sato, Shuntaro; Umeda, Masataka; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Masumoto, Junya; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yachie, Akihiro; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The precise cytokine networks in the serum of individuals with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) that are associated with its pathogenesis have been unknown. Here, we attempted to identify specific biomarkers to diagnose or assess disease activity in FMF patients. We measured serum levels of 45 cytokines in 75 FMF patients and 40 age-matched controls by multisuspension cytokine array. FMF in “attack” or “remission” was classified by Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Cytokines were ranked by their importance by a multivariate classification algorithm. We performed a logistic regression analysis to determine specific biomarkers for discriminating FMF patients in attack. To identify specific molecular networks, we performed a cluster analysis of each cytokine. Twenty-nine of the 45 cytokines were available for further analyses. Eight cytokines’ serum levels were significantly elevated in the FMF attack versus healthy control group. Nine cytokines were increased in FMF attack compared to FMF remission. Multivariate classification algorithms followed by a logistic regression analysis revealed that the combined measurement of IL-6, IL-18, and IL-17 distinguished FMF patients in attack from the controls with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 89.2%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 95.5%). Among the FMF patients, the combined measurement of IL-6, G-CSF, IL-10, and IL-12p40 discriminated febrile attack periods from remission periods with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 75.0%, specificity 87.9%, and accuracy 84.0%). Our data identified combinational diagnostic biomarkers in FMF patients based on the measurement of multiple cytokines. These findings help to improve the diagnostic performance of FMF in daily practice and extend our understanding of the activation of the inflammasome leading to enhanced cytokine networks. PMID:27100444

  15. Treatment of Crohn’s disease and familial Mediterranean fever by leukopheresis: Single shot for two targets

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Mahmut; Saygili, Fatih; Coskun, Orhan; Suna, Nuretdin; Kaplan, Mustafa; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Kilic, Zeki Mesut Yalin; Ozin, Yasemin Ozderin; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of Crohn's disease (CD) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a rare condition and knowledge about this clinical situation is limited with a few case reports in the literature. The treatment of both diseases depends on their individual therapies. However, it is very hard to deal with this coexistence when CD is refractory to standard therapies. Ongoing activity of CD triggers the clinical attacks of FMF and the symptoms like abdominal pain interfere with both disease presentations which can cause problems about diagnostic and therapeutic approach. The main therapeutic agent for FMF is colchicine and diarrhea is the most common side effect of this drug. This side effect also causes problems about management of these diseases when both of them are clinically active. Here we report probably the first case in the literature with coexisting CD and FMF who was successfully treated by leukopheresis since he was refractory to conventional therapies for CD. PMID:25852296

  16. Malignant Mediterranean spotted fever

    PubMed Central

    Lunge, Snehal Balvant; Patil, Vaibhav; Ambar, Sameer; Naik, Vishwas

    2015-01-01

    Fever with rash is one of the most common causes of referral to a dermatologist. A plethora of conditions need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. They may be broadly classified into infectious causes, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders. Here we present a rare case of rickettsial fever with cardiac involvement in an elderly male patient with no comorbidities. PMID:26904440

  17. Familial Mediterranean fever with P369S/R408Q exon3 variant in pyrin presenting as symptoms of PFAPA.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Keiko; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Ryota; Hanioka, Yusuke; Seki, Kaori; Chiba, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Keiko; Agematsu, Kazunaga

    2017-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) can be classified into typical and incomplete/atypical types. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome-like symptoms have been found in atypical type carrying P369S-R408Q mutations in the responsible gene MEFV. A 28-year-old female with recurrent fever and her young sisters and mother, all of whom had tonsillectomy for tonsillitis, carried heterozygous alterations involving E148Q/P369S/R408Q. A diagnosis of atypical FMF, MEFV exon3 variants with PFAPA syndrome-like symptoms, was made.

  18. Localization of the familial Mediterranean fever gene (FMF) to a 250-kb interval in non-Ashkenazi Jewish founder haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Chromosome 16p13.3 harbors a gene (MEF) associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessive disease very common in populations of Mediterranean ancestry. In the course of positional cloning of MEF, we genotyped 26 non-Ashkenazi Jewish FMF pedigrees (310 meioses) with 15 microsatellite markers, most of which were recently developed by Genethon. Identification of recombination events in the haplotypes allowed narrowing of the MEF interval to a region between D16S3124 (telomeric) and D16S475 (centromeric). Two markers, D16S3070 and D16S3275, a microsatellite marker isolated from a YAC that also contains D16S3070, showed no recombination with the disease. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis high-lighted the existence of a founder haplotype in our population. The core ancestral alleles were present in 71% of MEF-bearing chromosomes at loci D16S3070 and D16S3275. Furthermore, identification of historical crossing-over events in these pedigrees indicated that MEF is located between these two loci, which are both contained in a 250-kb genomic fragment. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A population genetics study of the familial Mediterranean fever gene: evidence of balancing selection under an overdominance regime.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, M; Cagliani, R; Pozzoli, U; Riva, S; Comi, G P; Menozzi, G; Bresolin, N; Sironi, M

    2009-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited systemic autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations in the MEFV gene. The frequency of different disease alleles is extremely high in multiple populations from the Mediterranean region, suggesting heterozygote advantage. Here, we characterize the sequence variation and haplotype structure of the MEFV 3' gene region (from exon 5 to the 3' UTR) in seven human populations. In non-African populations, we observed high levels of nucleotide variation, an excess of intermediate-frequency alleles, reduced population differentiation and a genealogy with two common haplotypes separated by deep branches. These features are suggestive of balancing selection having acted on this region to maintain one or more selected alleles. In line with this finding, an excess of heterozygotes was observed in Europeans and Asians, suggesting an overdominance regime. Our data, together with the earlier demonstration that the MEFV exon 10 has been subjected to episodic positive selection over primate evolution, provide evidence for an adaptive role of nucleotide variation in this gene region. Our data suggest that further studies aimed at clarifying the role of MEFV variants might benefit from the integration of molecular evolutionary and functional analyses.

  20. The role of neutrophil lymphocyte ratio to leverage the differential diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever attack and acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Adem; Erol, Mehmet Fatih; Senel, Soner; Eroler, Emir; Yumun, Havvanur Alparslan; Uslu, Ali Ugur; Erol, Asiye Mukaddes; Tihan, Deniz; Duman, Ugur; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Solak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by attacks of fever and diffuse abdominal pain. The primary concern with this presentation is to distinguish it from acute appendicitis promptly. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the role of neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) to leverage the differential diagnosis of acute FMF attack with histologically proven appendicitis. Methods: Twenty-three patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis and 88 patients with acute attack of FMF were included in the study. NLR, C-reactive protein and other hematologic parameters were compared between the groups. Results: Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio was significantly higher in patients with acute appendicitis compared to the FMF attack group (8.24 ± 6.31 vs. 4.16 ± 2.44, p = 0.007). The performance of NLR in diagnosing acute appendicitis with receiver operating characteristic analysis with a cut-off value of 4.03 were; 78% sensitivity, 62% specificity, and area under the curve 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.655 to 0.8655; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study showed that NLR, the simple and readily available inflammatory marker may have a useful role in distinguishing acute FMF attack from acute appendicitis. PMID:26864298

  1. Specific glycosylation of α1-acid glycoprotein characterises patients with familial Mediterranean fever and obligatory carriers of MEFV

    PubMed Central

    Poland, D; Drenth, J; Rabinovitz, E; Livneh, A; Bijzet, J; van het, Hof B; van Dijk, W

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic febrile disorder, characterised by fever and serositis. The acute phase response during attacks of FMF results from the release of cytokines, which in turn induce increased expression and changed glycosylation of acute phase proteins. A recent study indicated that attacks in FMF are accompanied by a rise of plasma concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and C reactive protein (CRP), which remain significantly raised during remission relative to healthy controls. Another study suggested that obligatory heterozygotes also display an inflammatory acute phase response.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the state of inflammation in homozygotic and heterozygotic MEFV genotypes.
METHODS—CRP and SAA were studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The glycosylation of the acute phase protein, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), was visualised with crossed affinoimmunoelectrophoresis with concanavalin A as diantennary glycan-specific component and Aleuria aurantia lectin as fucose-specific affinity component.
RESULTS—FMF attacks were associated with an increase (p<0.05) in the serum inflammation parameters CRP, SAA, and AGP. The glycosylation of AGP showed an increase (p<0.05) in fucosylated AGP glycoforms, whereas the branching of the glycans remained unaffected. The glycosylation of AGP in the MEFV carrier group, compared with that in a healthy control group, was characterised by a significant increase (p<0.05) in branching of the glycans, whereas the fucosylation remained unaffected.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggest an FMF-specific release of cytokines, resulting in a different glycosylation of AGP between a homozygotic and heterozygotic MEFV genotype.

 PMID:11454642

  2. Efficacy of anti-IL-1 treatment in familial Mediterranean fever: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van der Hilst, Jeroen CH; Moutschen, Michel; Messiaen, Peter E; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Vanderschueren, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 5%–10% of patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), colchicine is not effective in preventing inflammatory attacks. Another 5%–10% of patients are intolerant to effective doses of colchicine and experience serious side effects. Treatment with anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) drugs may be an alternative for these patients, although it is not reimbursed for this indication in many countries. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus for reports of anti-IL-1 treatment in FMF patients. Results Out of 284 potentially relevant articles, 27 eligible reports were identified and included in the data analysis. Conclusion A complete response to therapy without a single attack during treatment was reported in 76.5% of patients on anakinra treatment and in 67.5% of patients during canakinumab treatment. In patients with established type AA amyloidosis, anti-IL-1 treatment can reverse proteinuria. Anti-IL-1 therapy seems to be a safe and effective alternative for patients with FMF who do not respond to or cannot tolerate colchicine. PMID:27110096

  3. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy by Verbal Pain Scale in Patients with Abdominal Pain of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Becel, Sinan; Sezgin, Yılmaz; Akçay, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy based on Verbal Pain Scale (VPS) scores in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients admitted to the emergency department with attacks of abdominal pain. This observational study was conducted in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital between August 2014 and December 2014. Twenty patients admitted to the emergency department with FMF attacks were included in the study. Acupuncture therapy was applied to three points including LI4 (Hegu), ST25 (Tianshu), and Ren12 (Zhongwan). The VPS test was applied to the patients before and after the treatment. Average VPS scores were found to be 8.45±0.75 before the treatment and 2.10±0.85 after the treatment. The difference of the VPS scores before and after treatment was statistically significant (p=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of FMF attacks. Our results suggest that acupuncture therapy can be used as an effective treatment method in patients with FMF attacks.

  4. The report of sequence analysis on familial Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) in South-eastern Mediterranean region (Kahramanmaraş) of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Metin; Ganiyusufoglu, Eda; Sager, Hatice; Celik, Ahmet; Olgar, Seref; Cetin, Gozde Yildirim; Davutoglu, Mehmet; Altunoren, Orcun

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is defined as an inherited and autosomal recessive disease. Many researches have been done about this subject, and we believe that it should be necessary to focus on phenotype-genotype correlation, especially novel mutation types. We aim to announce the results of FMF sequence analysis in Kahramanmaras/Turkey. The number of participants is 380 males and 451 females who clinically diagnosed as FMF subjects of different age groups. Genomic sequences of exons 2 and 10 and in some cases exon 3 of the MEFV gene were scanned for mutations by sequence analyzer. The most common mutation identified in 230 (57.07 %) patients is heterozygous. The frequencies of mutation types in heterozygous subjects are R202Q (39.13 %), E148Q (18.70 %), M680I (16.52 %), M694V (13.91 %), and V726A (4.78 %), respectively. The most striking point among the compound heterozygous subjects is R202Q/M694V mutation type found at the highest rate (32 subjects). Fever and peritonitis are the most frequent signs of homozygous M694V and combine heterozygous mutations. Interestingly, the rate of homozygous mutation types (M694V/M694V+ R202Q/R202Q) is 96.70 % among all compound homozygous mutation types. The most frequent rate of homozygous patients is M680I mutation types (68.42 % in all homozygous mutation types). Two novel mutations were found in this study: N206K (p.Asn206Lys) and S208T (p.Ser208Tyr). Our findings in this study on the FMF sequence analysis are different from the results obtained from the other regions of Turkey.

  5. The MEFV gene pathogenic variants and phenotype-genotype correlation in children with familial Mediterranean fever in the Çanakkale population

    PubMed Central

    Battal, F; Silan, F; Topaloğlu, N; Aylanç, H; Köksal Binnetoğlu, F; Tekin, M; Kaymaz, N; Ozdemir, O

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene pathogenic variants in 60 children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and to compare the phenotype-genotype correlation. Genomic DNA was isolated by the spin-column method from peripheral blood samples (collected in vacutainers containing EDTA) and buccal smears. The MEFV gene profiles for the current FMF cohort were genotyped by pyrosequencing and direct Sanger sequencing techniques for the target pathogenic variants. The most prominent clinical symptoms were abdominal pain (53.4%), fever (23.4%) and arthritis (23.3%). Eighteen different pathogenic variants were identified and the most frequent were p.Met694Val (20.0%), p.Glu148Gln (13.3%), p.Met680 Ile (11.7%) and p.Arg202Gln (11.7%). Abdominal pain, fever and arthritis were the most common presenting clinical characteristics. Results showed that not only clinical characteristics, but also genotyping of the MEFV gene is needed to establish the correct diagnosis of FMF in children and other family members. PMID:28289585

  6. Systemic Concentrations of Short Chain Fatty Acids Are Elevated in Salmonellosis and Exacerbation of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna A.; Mkrtchyan, Mkhitar S.; Zakharyan, Magdalina K.; Mnatsakanyan, Armine A.; Arakelova, Karine A.; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi U.; Sedrakyan, Anahit M.; Hovhannisyan, Alvard I.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Aminov, Rustam I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota-produced short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play an important role in the normal human metabolism and physiology. Although the gradients of SCFAs from the large intestine, where they are largely produced, to the peripheral blood as well as the main routes of SCFA metabolism by different organs are known well for the healthy state, there is a paucity of information regarding how these are affected in disease. In particular, how the inflammation caused by infection or autoinflammatory disease affect the concentration of SCFAs in the peripheral venous blood. In this work, we revealed that diseases caused either by infectious agents (two Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium) or by the exacerbation of an autoinflammatory disease, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), both result in a significantly elevated systemic concentration of SCFAs. In the case of salmonellosis the concentration of SCFAs in peripheral blood was significantly and consistently higher, from 5- to 20-fold, compared to control. In the case of FMF, however, a significant increase of SCFAs in the peripheral venous blood was detected only in the acute phase of the disease, with a lesser impact in remission. It seems counterintuitive that the dysbiotic conditions, with a reduced number of gut microorganisms, produce such an effect. This phenomenon, however, must be appraised within the context of how the inflammatory diseases affect the normal physiology. We discuss a number of factors that may contribute to the “leak” and persistence of gut-produced SCFAs into the systemic circulation in infectious and autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27252692

  7. Identification of Disease-Promoting HLA Class I and Protective Class II Modifiers in Japanese Patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yasunami, Michio; Nakamura, Hitomi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Nakamura, Akinori; Yazaki, Masahide; Kishida, Dai; Yachie, Akihiro; Toma, Tomoko; Masumoto, Junya; Ida, Hiroaki; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Nakamura, Minoru; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The genotype-phenotype correlation of MEFV remains unclear for the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, especially without canonical MEFV mutations in exon 10. The risk of FMF appeared to be under the influence of other factors in this case. The contribution of HLA polymorphisms to the risk of FMF was examined as strong candidates of modifier genes. Methods Genotypes of HLA-B and -DRB1 loci were determined for 258 mutually unrelated Japanese FMF patients, who satisfied modified Tel-Hashomer criteria, and 299 healthy controls. The effects of carrier status were evaluated for the risk of FMF by odds ratio (OR). The HLA effects were also assessed for clinical forms of FMF, subsets of FMF with certain MEFV genotypes and responsiveness to colchicine treatment. Results The carriers of B*39:01 were increased in the patients (OR = 3.25, p = 0.0012), whereas those of DRB1*15:02 were decreased (OR = 0.45, p = 0.00050), satisfying Bonferroni’s correction for multiple statistical tests (n = 28, p<0.00179). The protective effect of DRB1*15:02 was completely disappeared in the co-existence of B*40:01. The HLA effects were generally augmented in the patients without a canonical MEFV variant allele M694I, in accordance with the notion that the lower penetrance of the mutations is owing to the larger contribution of modifier genes in the pathogenesis, with a few exceptions. Further, 42.9% of 14 colchicine-resistant patients and 13.5% of 156 colchicine-responders possessed B*35:01 allele, giving OR of 4.82 (p = 0.0041). Conclusions The differential effects of HLA class I and class II polymorphisms were identified for Japanese FMF even in those with high-penetrance MEFV mutations. PMID:25974247

  8. Evaluation of subclinical inflammation in familial Mediterranean fever patients: relations with mutation types and attack status: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelesoglu, Fatih Mehmet; Aygun, Erhan; Okumus, Nazli Kubra; Ersoy, Ayşenur; Karapınar, Edanur; Saglam, Nesibe; Aydın, Nur Gokce; Senay, Beyza Betul; Gonultas, Sumeyye; Sarisik, Elif; Can, Melike Zeynep; Atay, Sirin; Basbug, Dilruba; Tiryaki, Feyza Kubra; Ozer, Sena; Durmus, Rana Berru; Orem, Fatih; Atay, Tugrul; Acar, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Yasin; Kaya, Seyma; Ciftkaya, Aylin; Sarac, Zeynep; Makar, Cagri Can; Saracoglu, Basak; Dogdu, Gafur; Omeroglu, Rukiye Eker

    2016-11-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease of childhood and adulthood. Development of systemic amyloidosis and frequent attack influence quality of life and survival. There is sporadic evidence indicating subclinical inflammation in patients with FMF. We aimed to assess subclinical inflammation using neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in pediatric patients with FMF in the attack-free period. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the files of all FMF patients in our pediatric rheumatology outpatient clinic in a tertiary center and enrolled those with sufficient clinical and laboratory data. We also enrolled 73 controls. We grouped the patients according to being in attack period or attack-free period. We compared CRP, NLR, PLR, and WBC (white blood cell) levels between different mutations and polymorphisms. We also compared patients in the attack period with those in attack-free period. We enrolled 61 patients in attack period, 509 patients in attack-free period, and 73 controls. There was no difference between patients with different mutations with respect to NLR or PLR levels in the attack-free period. However, CRP levels were higher in patients with homozygous exon 10 mutations, especially those with homozygous M694V mutations compared with other mutations. However, CRP levels were mostly normal in these patients. Our data are against the reported fact that patients with FMF have higher NLR or PLR levels in attack-free periods. However, CRP levels were higher in the presence of homozygous exon 10 mutations (in particular homozygous M694V mutations).

  9. Colchicine-free remission in familial Mediterranean fever: featuring a unique subset of the disease-a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To demonstrate and clinically, genetically and demographically characterize familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, maintaining remission despite colchicine abstinence. Methods FMF patients were screened for an endurance of prolonged remission (≥ 3 years), despite refraining from colchicine. Clinical, demographic and genetic parameters were collected. Data were compared with those of consecutive control FMF subjects, coming to the clinic for their periodic follow up examination. Results Of 1000 patients screened over 5 years, 33 manifested colchicine-free remission. The mean duration of the remission period was 12.6 ± 8.1 years. Patients in the remission group had milder severity of FMF, compared to the control group (22 vs. 11 patients with mild disease, respectively, p = 0.003) and a longer diagnosis delay (21 ± 15.7 vs. 13.4 ± 13.5 years, respectively, p = 0.04). Patients experiencing remission suffered mostly of abdominal attacks, low rate of attacks in other sites and low rate of chronic and non-attack manifestations. When the disease resumed activity, it responded well to colchicine, despite using a lower dose, as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.001). None of the patients in this group was homozygous for the M694V mutation (p = 0.0008). Conclusions Prolonged colchicine-free remission defines a rare and milder form of FMF with unique clinical, demographic, and molecular characteristics. PMID:24401676

  10. The detailed assessment of left and right ventricular functions by tissue Doppler imaging in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Tavil, Yusuf; Ureten, Kemal; Oztürk, Mehmet Akif; Sen, Nihat; Kaya, Mehmet Güngör; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-02-01

    In the contrary to other rheumatologic disorders, there have been limited numbers of studies investigating the cardiac involvement in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), although the disease may carry a potential for cardiovascular disorders because of sustained inflammation during its course. In the present study, we used high usefulness tissue Doppler echocardiography for detailed analysis of cardiac changes in FMF patients. The study population included 30 patients with FMF (11 men, 19 women; mean age, 35 +/- 7 years, mean disease duration, 15.4 +/- 7.6 years) and 30 healthy subjects as controls (12 men, 18 women; mean age, 33 +/- 7 years). The diagnosis of FMF was established according to the Tell-Hashomer criteria. Left and right ventricular functions were measured using echocardiography comprising standard two-dimensional, M-mode, and conventional Doppler as well as tissue Doppler imaging. The conventional echocardiographic paratemeters were similar apart from left ventricular relaxation time was longer (107 +/- 25 vs 85 +/- 10 ms, p < 0.001, respectively) in patients with FMF. According to the tissue Doppler measurements, while systolic velocities of both ventricles were not different, diastolic filling velocities of left ventricle including E'(m) (12.6 +/- 3.4 vs 14.7 +/- 3.3 cm/s, p = 0.04), A'(m) (10.1 +/- 2.6 vs 8.6 +/- 2.0 cm/s, p = 0.015), and E'(m)/ A'(m) (1.24 +/- 0.4 vs 1.71 +/- 0.5 cm/s, p = 0.012) values were statistically different between the groups. Left ventricular myocardial performance indices and right ventricular diastolic functions were found similar between two groups. In addition, there were no significant correlations between the disease duration, clinical features, and echocardiographic parameters. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that although systolic functions were comparable in the patients and controls, left ventricular diastolic function indices were impaired in FMF patients by using tissue Doppler analysis.

  11. A high-resolution genetic map of the familial Mediterranean fever candidate region allows identification of haplotype-sharing among ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Balow, J E; Shelton, D A; Orsborn, A; Mangelsdorf, M; Aksentijevich, I; Blake, T; Sood, R; Gardner, D; Liu, R; Pras, E; Levy, E N; Centola, M; Deng, Z; Zaks, N; Wood, G; Chen, X; Richards, N; Shohat, M; Livneh, A; Pras, M; Doggett, N A; Collins, F S; Liu, P P; Rotter, J I; Kastner, D L

    1997-09-15

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessive disorder of inflammation caused by mutations in a gene (designated MEFV) on chromosome 16p13.3. We have recently constructed a 1-Mb cosmid contig that includes the FMF critical region. Here we show genotype data for 12 markers from our physical map, including 5 newly identified microsatellites, in FMF families. Intrafamilial recombinations placed MEFV in the approximately 285 kb between D16S468/D16S3070 and D16S3376. We observed significant linkage disequilibrium in the North African Jewish population, and historical recombinants in the founder haplotype placed MEFV between D16S3082 and D16S3373 (approximately 200 kb). In smaller panels of Iraqi Jewish, Arab, and Armenian families, there were significant allelic associations only for D16S3370 and D16S2617 among the Armenians. A sizable minority of Iraqi Jewish and Armenian carrier chromosomes appeared to be derived from the North African Jewish ancestral haplotype. We observed a unique FMF haplotype common to Iraqi Jews, Arabs, and Armenians and two other haplotypes restricted to either the Iraqi Jewish or the Armenian population. These data support the view that a few major mutations account for a large percentage of the cases of FMF and suggest that some of these mutations arose before the affected Middle Eastern populations diverged from one another.

  12. Secondary amyloidosis in a patient carrying mutations in the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) genes.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Cruz, Dinna N; Granata, Antonio; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Battaglia, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Secondary amyloidosis (AA) is characterized by the extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils composed of fragments of an acute-phase reactant protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), due to chronic inflammatory diseases, infections and several neoplasms. AA amyloidosis may also complicate several hereditary diseases, where genetic factors play a pivotal role in the expression of amyloidosis. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) are the most frequently involved. We describe a case of a 21-year-old Romanian woman who presented at the 35th week of gestation with acute abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The laboratory workup performed after delivery showed proteinuria in the nephrotic range and increased SAA protein. Kidney amyloid deposits were detected and genetic testing for secondary amyloidosis was performed identifying two mutations, one involving the gene of FMF (MEFV), and the other involving the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 gene (TNFRSF1A). To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature where secondary amyloidosis develops in a patient carrying mutations involving the genes of both FMF and TRAPS.

  13. The Effect of Rilonacept versus Placebo on Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Poorly Controlled Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Hashkes, Philip J.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hajj-Ali, Rula; Giannini, Edward H.; Johnson, Anne; Barron, Karyl S.; Weisman, Michael H.; Pashinian, Noune; Reiff, Andreas O.; Samuels, Jonathan; Wright, Dowain; Lovell, Daniel J.; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of rilonacept on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with poorly controlled familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Methods. As part of a randomized, double-blinded trial comparing rilonacept and placebo for the treatment of FMF, patients/parents completed the modified Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) at baseline, and at the start and end of each of 4 treatment courses, 2 each with rilonacept and placebo. Results. Fourteen subjects were randomized; mean age was 24.4 ± 11.8 years. At baseline the physical HRQoL score was significantly less (24.2 ± 49.5) but the psychosocial score was similar to the population norm (49.5 ± 10.0). There were significant improvements in most HRQoL concepts after rilonacept but not placebo. Significant differences between rilonacept and placebo were found in the physical (33.7 ± 16.4 versus 23.7 ± 14.5, P = 0.021) but not psychosocial scores (51.4 ± 10.3 versus 49.8 ± 12.4, P = 0.42). The physical HRQoL was significantly impacted by the treatment effect and patient global assessment. Conclusion. Treatment with rilonacept had a beneficial effect on the physical HRQoL in patients with poorly controlled FMF and was also significantly related to the patient global assessment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00582907. PMID:25147819

  14. The gene for familial Mediterranean fever in both Armenians and non-Ashkenzai Jews is linked to the [alpha]-globin complex on 16p: Evidence for locus homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Shohat, M.; Shohat, T.; Magal, N.; Danon, Y. ); Xiangdong Bu; Fischel-Ghodsian, N.; Schwabe, A.D.; Rotter, J.I. ); Nakamura, Yusuke ); Schlezinger, M. )

    1992-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recurrent inflammatory disorder characterized by short episodes of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis. While FMF has been shown to be inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion in both non-Ashkenazi Jews and Armenian families, clinical differences have raised the possibility of genetic heterogeneity. As its pathogenesis is unknown, mapping of the gene for FMF may provide the first objective method for early and accurate diagnosis of this disease. After excluding 45% of the entire human genome, the authors studied 14 Armenian and 9 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families with FMF and tested linkage with the [alpha]-globin locus on chromosome 16. Analysis of the PvuII length polymorphism of the 3[prime] HVR (hypervariable region) probe showed significant linkage with the FMF gene (maximum lod score [lod[sub max

  15. The M694I/M694I genotype: A genetic risk factor of AA-amyloidosis in a group of Algerian patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Ait-Idir, Djouher; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Bouldjennet, Faiza; Taha, Rowaida Z; El-Shanti, Hatem; Sari-Hamidou, Rawda; Khellaf, Ghalia; Benmansour, Mustapha; Benabadji, Mohamed; Haddoum, Farid

    2017-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, OMIM 249100) is the most common hereditary fever, resulting from mutations in MEFV. FMF is characterized by episodic febrile attacks and polyserositis. Renal AA-amyloidosis is a major complication, which often leads to end-stage renal disease in untreated patients. The data about the renal AA-amyloidosis secondary to FMF are scarce in North African countries and non-existent in Algeria. We aimed to investigate the MEFV mutations associated with this complication in an Algerian patient cohort. Molecular analysis included 28 unrelated Algerian FMF patients with ascertained amyloidosis, 23 of them were symptomatic and 5 were asymptomatic. For this study, a group of 20 FMF patients without renal amyloidosis were selected as controls according to their age, disease onset and disease duration. The mutations were detected by sequencing exon 10 of MEFV. A total of 87.5% (49/56) mutant alleles were identified in 27/28 analyzed patients; p.M694I was predominant and appeared with an allele frequency of 62.5%, followed by p.M694V (17.85%), p.M680I (5.35%) and p.I692Del (1.78%). Remarkably, only p.M694I mutation was observed among the asymptomatic patients. The M694I/M694I genotype, identified in 14/27 (52%) patients, was significantly associated with the development of amyloidosis compared to group of controls (p = 0.022). This study did not link the M694V/M694V genotype to the renal complication despite the fact that it has been observed only in the patients with amyloidosis (3/27; 11%) (p = 0.349). The association of other identified genotypes to this complication was statistically insignificant. The progression of amyloidosis led to end-stage renal disease in 14 patients with 6 deaths. This study shows that p.M694I homozygosity is a potential genetic risk factor for the development of renal AA-amyloidosis in Algerian FMF patients.

  16. Immune and inflammatory gene expressions are different in Behçet’s disease compared to those in Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Filiz Türe; Demiralp, Emel Ekşioğlu; Aydın, Sibel Z.; Atagündüz, Pamir; Ergun, Tülin; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-01-01

    Objective The immune classification of Behçet’s disease (BD) is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare the immune/inflammatory gene expressions in BD with those in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disorder with innate immune activation. Material and Methods CD4+ T cells and CD14+ monocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Behçet’s disease patients (n=10), FMF (n=6) patients, and healthy controls (n=4) with microbeads, and then, the mRNA was isolated. The expressions of 440 genes associated with immune and inflammatory responses were studied with a focused DNA microarray using a chemiluminescent tagging system. Changes above 1.5-fold and below 0.8-fold were accepted to be significant. Results In BD patients, in the CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset, interleukin 18 receptor accessory protein (1.7-fold), IL-7 receptor (1.9-fold), and prokineticin 2 (2.5-fold) were all increased compared to those in FMF patients, whereas chemokine (C-X3-C motif ) receptor-1 (CX3CR1) (0.7-fold) and endothelial cell growth factor-1 (0.6-fold) were decreased. In the CD14+ monocyte population, the V-fos FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (1.5-fold), Interleukin-8 (IL-8) (2.1-fold), and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) (1.8-fold) were all increased, whereas the chemokine (C-C motif ) ligand 5 (CCL5) (0.6-fold), C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (0.6-fold), and CX3CR1 (0.7-fold) were decreased, again when compared to those in FMF. Compared to healthy controls in the CD4+ T-lymphocyte population, in both BD and FMF patients, pro-platelet basic protein and CD27 had elevated expression. In BD and FMF patients, 24 and 19 genes, respectively, were downregulated, with 15 overlapping genes between both disorders. In the CD14+ monocytes population, chemokine (C-C motif ) receptor-1 (CCR1) was upregulated both in BD and FMF patients compared to that in the controls, whereas CCL5 was downregulated. Conclusion Immune and

  17. Pyrin binds the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 protein, defining familial Mediterranean fever and PAPA syndrome as disorders in the same pathway.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Nitza G; Centola, Michael; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Hull, Keith M; Wood, Geryl; Wise, Carol A; Kastner, Daniel L

    2003-11-11

    Pyrin, the familial Mediterranean fever protein, is found in association with the cytoskeleton in myeloid/monocytic cells and modulates IL-1beta processing, NF-kappaB activation, and apoptosis. These effects are mediated in part through cognate interactions with the adaptor protein ASC, which shares an N-terminal motif with pyrin. We sought additional upstream regulators of inflammation by using pyrin as the bait in yeast two-hybrid assays. We now show that proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein [PSTPIP1, or CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1)], a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein involved in cytoskeletal organization, also interacts with pyrin. Recently, PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations were shown to cause the syndrome of pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA), a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disorder mediated predominantly by granulocytes. Endogenous PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 and pyrin are coexpressed in monocytes and granulocytes and can be coimmunoprecipitated from THP-1 cells. The B box segment of pyrin was necessary and the B box/coiled-coil segment sufficient for this interaction, whereas the SH3 and coiled-coil domains of PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 were both necessary, but neither was sufficient, for pyrin binding. The Y344F PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation, which blocks tyrosine phosphorylation, was associated with a marked reduction in pyrin binding in pervanadate-treated cells. PAPA-associated A230T and E250Q PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutations markedly increased pyrin binding as assayed by immunoprecipitation and, relative to WT, these mutants were hyperphosphorylated when coexpressed with c-Abl kinase. Consistent with the hypothesis that these mutations exert a dominant-negative effect on the previously reported activity of pyrin, we found increased IL-1beta production by peripheral blood leukocytes from a clinically active PAPA patient with the A230T PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 mutation and in cell lines transfected with both PAPA-associated mutants.

  18. Climatic factors in resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, E.E.; Creus, B.F.; Cueto, F.B.; Porta, F.S.

    1986-06-07

    There has been a recent resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever in areas bordering the Mediterranean Sea. This disease is caused by Rickettsia conorii, the dog tick being the vector and main reservoir. Ticks prefer warm weather and their activity increases with rising temperature. In the Valles Occidental, Spain, the incidence of the disease is correlated with hotter and drier summers in the past ten years.

  19. A Rare Case of Mediterranean Spotted Fever and Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria João; Matos Costa, João

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. It is transmitted by the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It usually presents as a benign self-limited disease characterized by a skin rash, high fever, and, sometimes, a characteristic ulcer at the tick bite site called tache noir. The course of this disease is usually benign, although severe manifestations have been previously described, mainly in adults. Neurological manifestations are very unusual. We present a case of Mediterranean spotted fever with encephalitis to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion, mainly in endemic areas, the potential severity of this disease, and the need of early initiation of therapy in order to prevent severe complications. PMID:28053795

  20. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, pilot clinical trial of ImmunoGuard--a standardized fixed combination of Andrographis paniculata Nees, with Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim, Schizandra chinensis Bail. and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. extracts in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Amaryan, G; Astvatsatryan, V; Gabrielyan, E; Panossian, A; Panosyan, V; Wikman, G

    2003-05-01

    Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled pilot study of ImmunoGuard--a standardized fixed combination of Andrographis paniculata Nees., Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim., Schizandra chinensis Bail., and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. special extracts standardized for the content of Andrographolide (4 mg/tablet), Eleuteroside E, Schisandrins and Glycyrrhizin, was carried out in two parallel groups of patients. The study was conducted in 24 (3-15 years of both genders) patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), 14 were treated with tablets of series A (verum) and 10 patients received series B product (placebo). The study medication was taken three times of four tablets daily for 1 month. Daily dose of the andrographolide--48 mg. The primary outcome measures in physician's evaluation were related to duration, frequency and severity of attacks in FMF patients (attacks characteristics score). The patient's self-evaluation was based mainly on symptoms--abdominal, chest pains, temperature, arthritis, myalgia, erysipelas-like erythema. All of 3 features (duration, frequency, severity of attacks) showed significant improvement in the verum group as compared with the placebo. In both clinical and self evaluation the severity of attacks was found to show the most significant improvement in the verum group. Both the clinical and laboratory results of the present phase II (pilot) clinical study suggest that ImmunoGuard is a safe and efficacious herbal drug for the management of patients with FMF.

  1. [Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation in Mediterranean fever with autosomal dominant form].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ferrer, F; Martinez Villar, M; Fernández Bernal, A; Martín de Lara, I; Paya Elorza, I

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease characterized by brief, recurring and self-limited episodes of fever and pain with inflammation, of one or several serous (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium, synovial or vaginal tunic of the testicle). Amyloidosis is its more important complication and the principal reason of death in the cases in which it appears. Diagnosis is based on the clinic and is confirmed by genetic tests. The treatment with Colchicine (0,02-0,03 mg/kg/day) prevents the recurrence of FMF attacks and the development of secondary (AA) amyloidosis. We report a case of a 13-year-old child in which FMF was diagnosed after several coincidental episodes with fever, pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. The genetic confirmation showed an autosomal dominant inheritance that is less frecuent than the recesive form, in this disease.

  2. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Rossio, Raffaella; Conalbi, Valeria; Castagna, Valentina; Recalcati, Sebastiano; Torri, Adriana; Coen, Massimo; Cassulini, Lucia Restano; Peyvandi, Flora

    2015-06-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is caused by Rickettsia conorii and transmitted by the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It is prevalent in southern Europe, Africa and central Asia. The disease usually has a benign course and is characterized by fever, myalgia and a characteristic papular rash with an inoculation eschar ('tache noir') at the site of the tick bite. Severe forms of disease can have cardiac, neurologic or renal involvement. Nervous system complications are unusual and may develop in the early phase of disease or as a delayed complication. Neurological symptoms include headache and alterations of the level of consciousness, and some cases of meningoenchefalitis and Guillain-Barrè syndrome have been also reported. Peripheral nerve involvement is reported only in a limited number of case reports. We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication.

  3. Ex vivo PBMC cytokine profile in familial Mediterranean fever patients: Involvement of IL-1β, IL-1α and Th17-associated cytokines and decrease of Th1 and Th2 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, José-Noel; Jounblat, Rania; Delwail, Adriana; Abou-Ghoch, Joelle; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, André; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Lecron, Jean-Claude

    2014-10-01

    In order to clarify the inflammatory mechanism underlying familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), we aimed to evaluate the ex vivo cytokine profile of FMF patients during acute attacks and attack-free periods, and compare it with that of healthy controls. The study included 34 FMF patients, of whom 9 were studied during attack and remission and 24 healthy controls. Cytokine levels were evaluated by Luminex technology in serum and supernatants of PBMC (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) cultures with and without 24h stimulation of monocytes by LPS and T lymphocytes by anti-CD3/CD28 beads. Levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were higher in unstimulated and LPS-stimulated PBMC supernatants of FMF patients in crises compared to controls. In response to LPS stimulation, higher levels of IL-1β and IL-1α were found in PBMC supernatants of patients during crises compared to those in remission and to controls. IFN-γ and IL-4 levels were the lowest in unstimulated and anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated PBMCs supernatants of patients during crises compared to remission and controls. The Th17 cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 were respectively higher in anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated PBMC supernatants of FMF patients during and between crises compared to controls. Amongst cytokines tested in serum, only IL-6 and TNFα were enhanced in FMF patients. The ex vivo study represents an interesting approach to evaluate cytokines' involvement in FMF. Our results suggest an ongoing subclinical inflammation and define an elevated inflammatory cytokine signature, distinctly for M694V homozygous patients. The absence of spontaneous IL-1β release by PBMCs reflects no constitutive activation of the inflammasome in FMF physiopathology.

  4. Quality of life in adult patients with Familial Mediterranean fever living in Germany or Turkey compared to healthy subjects: a study evaluating the effect of disease severity and country of residence.

    PubMed

    Giese, Arnd; Kurucay, Mustafa; Kilic, Levent; Örnek, Ahmet; Şendur, Süleyman Nahit; Lainka, Elke; Henning, Bernhard Ferdinand

    2013-07-01

    We assessed quality of life (QOL) and disease activity in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) of Turkish ancestry living in Germany or Turkey and conducted a correlation with FMF disease activity. 40 FMF patients in Turkey (TR), 40 FMF patients in Germany (G) and 40 healthy controls in Germany (C) were included. QOL was evaluated with the short form of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). FMF disease activity was examined with the Pras score. Mean age was TR 30.5 ± 10.6, G 35.2 ± 10.2, C 34.6 ± 10.7. Of the 120 participants, 77 were female. FMF patients in TR and G had a significantly decreased QOL physical health domain compared to controls (TR 59.7 ± 18.8, G 60.4 ± 19.4, C 76.5 ± 14.6). Turkish FMF patients had a lower QOL environment domain compared to controls (TR 62.3 ± 17.5, G 69.7 ± 16.5, C 72.3 ± 13.5). In the other QOL domains, no significant differences were found. The differences in QOL were robust to a regression analysis. No significant correlation between QOL and FMF disease activity was found. German FMF patients had longer duration of disease, younger age at onset and longer delay from disease onset to colchicine treatment. A total of 5 of 40 German FMF patients were not taking colchicine (TR:0). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was lowest in TR with significant difference between TR and G as well as G and C (TR 13.2 ± 10.3, G 27.8 ± 19.4, C 16.3 ± 12.8 mm/h). C-reactive protein did not differ between TR and G. FMF has an important impact on QOL physical health domain. No correlation between FMF disease activity and the WHOQOL-BREF could be found.

  5. [Macrolides in the treatment of children with Mediterranean spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia

    2002-09-01

    Till now there is not a gold standard therapy for Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) in children. Standard treatment for MSF is the administration of tetracycline or chloramphenicol, however both these drugs can cause significant adverse effects in children (tetracyclines can cause staining of teeth, chloramphenicol severe hematological adverse events such as aplastic anemia, gray baby syndrome and hemolytic anemia in patients with the Mediterranean form of G6PD deficiency). We conducted two randomized clinical trials; the first compared clarithromycin versus chloramphenicol: mean time to defervescence was 36.7 +/- 18.1 h in the clarithromycin group and 47.1+/- 21.9 h in the chloramphenicol group (P= 0.047). The second trial compared clarithromycin versus azithromycin and did not show any statistically significant difference: mean time to defervescence was 46.2 +/- 36.4 h in the clarithromycin group and 39.3 +/- 31.3 h in the azithromycin group (P= 0.34). On the basis of these studies we think that clarithromycin and azithromycin could constitute an acceptable alternative to chloramphenicol and to tetracyclines for the treatment of MSF in children

  6. [Mediterranean spotted fever in north Dalmatia: is there a problem?].

    PubMed

    Dzelalija, Boris; Medić, Alan; Lozancić, Toni

    2007-09-01

    We analyzed clinical and therapeutic characteristics of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) in north Dalmatia. Analysis was conducted in 93 patients hospitalized with MSF at Zadar General Hospital during the 1988-2000 period. The most frequently found signs of the disease were high fever (91; 97.8%), maculopapular rash (89; 95.7%), headaches (84; 90.3%), arthralgia (75; 80.6%), exhaustion (75; 80.6%) and nausea (65; 69.9%). Tache noire, as a pathognomonic sign of MSF, was found in 22 (23.7%) patients. The most frequently indicated diagnoses were febris cum exanthemate (43; 46.2), rickettsiosis suspecta (21; 22.6%) and exanthema maculopapulosum (15; 16.1%). Early therapeutic efficiency was achieved by doxycycline in 34/43 (79.1%), and by ciprofloxacin in 10/14 (71.4%) treated adult patients, and by azithromycin in 7/9 (77.8%) children. The identification of MSF endemic rickettsiosis in north Dalmatia, serious clinical forms of the disease and the success of early and adequate anti-rickettsial antibiotic therapy are a clear warning that our physicians must be very familiar with this disease and include this rickettsial disease in differential diagnosis of acute febrile diseases accompanied by rash.

  7. Randomized Trial of Clarithromycin for Mediterranean Spotted Fever

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Tomas; Travería, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Gemma; Font, Bernat; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    The classic antibiotic treatment for Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is based on tetracyclines or chloramphenicol, but chloramphenicol's bone marrow toxicity makes tetracyclines the treatment of choice. However, it is convenient to have alternatives available for patients who are allergic to tetracyclines, pregnant women, and children <8 years old. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to compare clarithromycin with doxycycline or josamycin in the treatment of MSF. Forty patients were evaluated (23 male; mean age, 39.87 years); 13 patients were aged <14 years. Seventeen patients received clarithromycin, and 23 received doxycycline or josamycin. The interval between the onset of symptoms and the start of treatment was 4.04 ± 1.70 days in the clarithromycin group versus 4.11 ± 1.60 days in the doxycycline/josamycin group (P = not significant [NS]). Time to the disappearance of fever after treatment was 2.67 ± 1.55 days in the clarithromycin group versus 2.22 ± 1.35 days in the doxycycline/josamycin (P = NS). The symptoms had disappeared at 4.70 ± 2.25 days in the clarithromycin group versus at 4.75 ± 3.08 days in the doxycycline/josamycin (P = NS). There were no adverse reactions to treatment or relapses in either group. In conclusion, clarithromycin is a good alternative to doxycycline or josamycin in the treatment of MSF. PMID:26711765

  8. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  9. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 360.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Calvo, V; Almazán, F; Almendral, J M; Ramírez, J C; de la Vega, I; Blasco, R; Viñuela, E

    1990-01-01

    A group of cross-hybridizing DNA segments contained within the restriction fragments RK', RL, RJ, and RD' of African swine fever virus DNA were mapped and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences revealed the presence of a family of homologous open reading frames in regions close to the DNA ends. The whole family is composed of six open reading frames with an average length of 360 coding triplets (multigene family 360), four of which are located in the left part of the genome and two of which are in the right terminal EcoRI fragment. In close proximity to the right terminal inverted repeat, we found an additional small open reading frame which was homologous to the 5'-terminal portion of the other open reading frames, suggesting that most of that open reading frame has been deleted. These repeated sequences account for the previously described inverted internal repetitions (J.M. Sogo, J.M. Almendral, A. Talavera, and E. Viñuela, Virology 133:271-275, 1984). Most of the genes of multigene family 360 are transcribed in African swine fever virus-infected cells. A comparison of the predicted protein sequences of family 360 indicated that several residues are conserved, suggesting that an overall structure is maintained for every member of the family. The transcription direction of each open reading frame, as well as the evolutionary relationships among the genes, suggests that the family originated by gene duplication and translocation of sequences between the DNA ends. Images PMID:2325203

  10. A severe autosomal-dominant periodic inflammatory disorder with renal AA amyloidosis and colchicine resistance associated to the MEFV H478Y variant in a Spanish kindred: an unusual familial Mediterranean fever phenotype or another MEFV-associated periodic inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed

    Aldea, Anna; Campistol, Josep M; Arostegui, Juan I; Rius, Josefa; Maso, Montserrat; Vives, Jordi; Yagüe, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurring short attacks of fever and serositis. Secondary AA amyloidosis is the worst complication of the disease and often determines the prognosis. The MEFV gene, on chromosome 16p13.3, is responsible for the disease and around 30 mutations have been reported to date. Colchicine is the standard FMF treatment today, and prevents both attacks and amyloid deposition in 95% of patients. Here we describe a three-generation Spanish kindred with five family members affected by a severe periodic inflammatory disorder associated with renal AA amyloidosis and colchicine unresponsiveness. Clinical diagnosis of definite FMF disease was made based on the Tel-Hashomer criteria set. Genetic analyses revealed that all subjects were heterozygous for the new H478Y MEFV variant, segregating with the disease. In addition, mutations in the TNFRSF1A and CIAS1/PYPAF1/NALP3 genes, related to the dominantly inherited autoinflammatory periodic syndromes, were ruled out. However, the dominant inheritance of the disease, the long fever episodes with a predominant joint involvement, and the resistance to colchicine in these patients raise the question of whether the periodic syndrome seen in this kindred is a true FMF disease with unusual manifestations or rather another MEFV-associated periodic syndrome. We conclude that the new H478Y MEFV mutation is the dominant pathological variant causing the inflammatory periodic syndrome in this kindred and that full-length analyses of the MEFV gene are needed to obtain an adequate diagnosis of patients with clinical suspicion of a hereditary periodic fever syndrome, especially those from non-ancestral populations.

  11. Fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia in a patient living in the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed Central

    Büyükaşik, Y.; Ileri, N. S.; Haznedaroğlu, I. C.; Demiroğlu, H.; Dündar, S.

    1998-01-01

    A 24 year old woman living in the Mediterranean region of Turkey present with a three-month history of weight loss and irregular fever that was peaking at 40 degrees C with shivering. No definite aetiology could be identified in a local hospital. A bacterial infection had been suspected, but antibiotic therapy, at first with sulbactam-ampicillin and later with azithromycin, had no influence on the fever. Physical examination revealed an emaciated patient with fever (39 degrees C), pallor, and hepatosplenomegaly (spleen 9 cm and liver 5 cm palpable below the costal margin). No peripheral lymphadenopathy was present. The laboratory examinations are summarised in the table. Notably, a prominent increase of macrophages containing intracellular micro-organisms (figures 1 and 2) was seen in the bone marrow smears. The same micro-organisms were also identified within the Kupffer cells in liver biopsy. Images Figures 1 and 2 PMID:9683980

  12. Mediterranean Spotted Fever: A Rare Non-Endemic Disease in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua Brad; LaCapra, Gina

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old Israeli male who presented with an intermittent fever associated with a gradual appearance of diffusely scattered erythematous non-pruritic maculopapular lesions, generalized body malaise, muscle aches, and distal extremity weakness. He works in the Israeli military and has been exposed to dogs that are used to search for people in tunnels and claimed that he had removed ticks from the dogs. In the hospital, he presented with fever, a diffuse maculopapular rash, and an isolated round black eschar. He was started on doxycycline based on suspected Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) in which he improved significantly with resolution of his clinical complaints. His immunoglobulin G (IgG) MSF antibody came back positive. PMID:28191378

  13. Family cluster of Mayaro fever, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Russell, Kevin L; Vasquez, Clovis; Barrera, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B; Salas, Rosalba; Watts, Douglas M

    2004-07-01

    A cluster of protracted migratory polyarthritis involving four adult family members occurred in January 2000 after a brief overnight outing in a rural area of Venezuela. Laboratory testing demonstrated Mayaro virus as the cause of the cluster. These results documented the first human cases of Mayaro virus in Venezuela.

  14. Clarithromycin versus azithromycin in the treatment of Mediterranean spotted fever in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Antinori, Spinello; Paterson, David L; Titone, Lucina

    2002-01-15

    We conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy and safety of clarithromycin (15/mg/kg/day in 2 divided doses for 7 days) with those of azithromycin (10 mg/kg/day in 1 dose for 3 days) in the treatment of children with Mediterranean spotted fever. Until now, there has not been a gold-standard therapy for this rickettsial disease in children. Eighty-seven children were randomized to receive 1 of the 2 drugs. The mean time to defervescence (+/- standard deviation) was 46.2+/-36.4 h in the clarithromycin group and 39.3+/-31.3 h in the azithromycin group. These differences were not statistically significant and both drugs were equally well-tolerated. Clarithromycin and azithromycin could be acceptable therapeutic alternatives to chloramphenicol and tetracyclines for children aged < or =8 years with Mediterranean spotted fever. Azithromycin, because it has a long half-life, offers the advantages of administration in a single daily dose and a shorter duration of therapy, which could increase compliance in children.

  15. Myocarditis in Mediterranean spotted fever: a case report and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, Lucia; Trizzino, Marcello; Gioè, Claudia; Giammanco, Anna; Cascio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is a tick-borne acute febrile disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. Most cases follow a benign course, with a case fatality rate of 3–7 % among hospitalized patients. Complications are described mainly in adult patients and include hepatic, renal, neurological and cardiac impairment. Among cardiac complications, pericarditis, myocarditis and heart rhythm disorders are uncommon complications in MSF and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Case Presentation: We describe a new case of acute myocarditis complicating MSF in an immunocompetent adult patient without risk factors for severe MSF. Conclusion: Myocarditis is an uncommon but severe complication of MSF. Clinicians should be aware of a possible cardiac involvement in patients with MSF. Close monitoring and an aggressive approach are essential to reduce mortality rates of MSF. PMID:28348768

  16. Mediterranean spotted fever: clinical and laboratory characteristics of 415 Sicilian children

    PubMed Central

    Colomba, Claudia; Saporito, Laura; Polara, Valentina Frasca; Rubino, Raffaella; Titone, Lucina

    2006-01-01

    Background Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is an acute febrile, zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii and transmitted to humans by the brown dogtick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Nearly four hundred cases are reported every year (mainly from June to September) on the Italian island of Sicily. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with MSF and the efficacy of the drugs administered. Methods Our study was carried out on 415 children with MSF, during the period January 1997 – December 2004, at the "G. Di Cristina" Children's hospital in Palermo, Sicily, Italy. On admission patients' clinical history, physical and laboratory examination and indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) for Rickettsia conorii were performed. Diagnosis was considered confirmed if the patients had an MSF diagnostic score greater than or equal to 25 according to the Raoult's scoring system. All patients were treated with chloramphenicol or with macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). Results Fever, rash and tache noire were present in 386 (93%), 392 (94.5%) and 263 (63.4%) cases respectively. Eighteen (4.6%) children showed atypical exanthema. Chloramphenicol and newer macrolides all appeared to be effective and safe therapies. Conclusion Clinical features of 415 children with MSF were similar to those reported by other authors except for a lower incidence of headache, arthralgia and myalgia and a higher frequency of epato-splenomegaly. Concerning therapy, clarithromycin can be considered a valid alternative therapy to tetracyclines or chloramphenicol especially for children aged < eight years. PMID:16553943

  17. Line blot and western blot immunoassays for diagnosis of Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed Central

    Raoult, D; Dasch, G A

    1989-01-01

    The line blot, a new immunoassay in which antigens are placed on nitrocellulose as narrow lines, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity relative to the microimmunofluorescence assay for the diagnosis of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF). The line blot assay was only slightly less sensitive and less specific than the microimmunofluorescence assay for detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) or IgG in 100 serum specimens from 42 patients with MSF. No line blot reactions were observed among 50 control serum specimens from febrile patients with other illnesses. The line blot assay was largely group reactive for spotted fever rickettsiae, but 26% of the positive serum specimens also cross-reacted by IgM with Rickettsia typhi. Western immunoblotting was used to characterize the antigenic components recognized by 19 MSF serum specimens. For both IgM and IgG, lipopolysaccharide was the cross-reactive group antigen, whereas the high-molecular-weight species-specific protein antigens (SPAs) were the only reactive proteins. Relative to the other nine rickettsiae, Rickettsia bellii was unique both in exhibiting no SPA reactions and in having a lipopolysaccharide with a predominantly high-molecular-weight distribution. Although most of the 19 MSF serum specimens examined by Western blotting exhibited preferential reactivity to SPAs of two strains of R. conorii and weaker reactions to the other rickettsiae, 2 serum specimens exhibited SPA reactions consistent with typhus infections. In comparison with other assays, the line blot and Western blot immunoassays have advantages which may permit an improvement in the general availability and commercialization of assays for the serodiagnosis of rickettsial infections. Images PMID:2506223

  18. Analysis of surveillance systems in place in European Mediterranean countries for West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever (RVF).

    PubMed

    Cito, F; Narcisi, V; Danzetta, M L; Iannetti, S; Sabatino, D D; Bruno, R; Carvelli, A; Atzeni, M; Sauro, F; Calistri, P

    2013-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) represent an important group of viral agents responsible for vector-borne zoonotic diseases constituting an emerging sanitary threat for the Mediterranean Basin and the neighbouring countries. WNV infection is present in several Mediterranean countries, whereas RVF has never been introduced into Europe, but it is considered a major threat for North African countries. Being vector-borne diseases, they cannot be prevented only through an animal trade control policy. Several approaches are used for the surveillance of WNV and RVFV. With the aim of assessing the surveillance systems in place in Mediterranean countries, two disease-specific questionnaires (WNV, RVFV) have been prepared and submitted to Public Health and Veterinary Authorities of six EU countries. This study presents the information gathered through the questionnaires and describes some critical points in the prevention and surveillance of these diseases as emerged by the answers received.

  19. The importance of serial measurements of cytokine levels for the evaluation of their role in pathogenesis in familial Mediterraean fever.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Y; Bayraktar, Y; Arslan, S; Van Thiel, D H; Zerrin, B C K; Yildiz, O

    2003-07-31

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever of unknown origin, renal amyloidosis, peritonitis, pleuritis and/or synovitis. There have been many studies to elucidate the etiopathogenesis of FMF. IL-6 is a cytokine that can induce the formation of serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein, both of which are important in development of amyloidosis. IL-6 was determined to be strongly associated in the etiopathogenesis of periodic fever in Chinese-pei dogs. The dogs with this syndrome experience periodic fever, arthritis, renal amyloidosis, a clinical picture very alike of human FMF. Here, we aimed to study mainly whether IL-6 had a similar etiopathogenetic role in human FMF as in Chinese-pei dogs syndrome. The median IL-6 blood levels were found to be higher in patients with acute (n=8) FMF attack (1.85 U/ml) compared to those (n=33) with asymptomatic ones (1.0 U/ml) (p=0.16). There are mainly two results: first; the study should be designed with a larger sample size of patients with acute attack in order to alleviate underestimation of significance, second; sampling time may give various results because of dynamic changes of cytokine levels during acute attack period.

  20. Mediterranean spotted fever in Spain, 1997-2014: Epidemiological situation based on hospitalization records

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Gomez-Barroso, Diana; León, Inmaculada; Vieira, Carmen; Muro, Antonio; Benito, Agustín

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is a zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. In Spain, deficiencies in the official reporting result in misreporting of this disease. This study aims to describe the clinical and temporal-spatial characteristics of MSF hospitalizations between 1997 and 2014. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective descriptive study using the Hospitalization Minimum Data Set (CMBD). All CMBD’s hospital discharges with ICD-9 CM code 082.1 were analyzed. Hospitalization rates were calculated and clinical characteristics were described. Spatial distribution of cases and their temporal behavior were also assessed. Results A total of 4,735 hospitalizations with MSF diagnosis were recorded during the study period, out of which 62.2% were male, mean age of 48. Diabetes mellitus, alcohol dependence syndrome, and chronic liver disease occurred in 10.8%, 2.4% and 2.8% hospitalizations, respectively. The median annual hospitalization rate showed a decreasing trend from a maximum of 12.9 in 1997 to a minimum rate of 3.1 in 2014. Most admissions occurred during the summer, showing a significant annual seasonal behavior. Important regional differences were found. Discussion Although MSF hospitalization rates have decreased considerably, it remains a public health problem due to its severity and economic impact. Therefore, it would be desirable to improve its oversight and surveillance. PMID:28355307

  1. Comparison of Western immunoblotting and microimmunofluorescence for diagnosis of Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed Central

    Teysseire, N; Raoult, D

    1992-01-01

    One-hundred serum samples from 41 patients suffering from Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) were tested by microimmunofluorescence (MIF) and Western blot (WB; immunoblot). Immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA antibody-specific responses to the high-molecular-mass species-specific protein antigens (115 kDa and 135 kDa) of Rickettsia conorii, as well as to cross-reactive lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens, were observed. The WB assay detected IgM-type antibodies earlier than did the MIF assay. These antibodies were often directed against nonspecific LPS and may have a questionable positive predictive value. In addition, an IgG reaction to a 60-kDa protein was observed in four cases of malignant forms of MSF but was never observed in cases of mild forms. This reaction could be correlated with a marker of the severity of the development of MSF. From a previous MIF survey of blood donors, 9 negative, 11 IgG-positive, and 6 IgM-positive serum samples were selected for comparison by WB. Sera negative by MIF were also negative by WB. MIF IgG-positive sera showed a specific response to R. conorii in the WB assay, but the six serum samples from this seroepidemiological study positive for IgM by MIF were almost all negative by the WB assay. One was positive for IgM against the LPS but was considered a false positive. The WB is shown to provide a new tool for serodiagnosis. Images PMID:1537916

  2. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  3. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire FeverA fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  4. Not just a spring fever... Information and advice to help families with hay fever sufferers.

    PubMed

    Emberlin, Jean; Bartle, Janette; Bryant, Celia

    2011-01-01

    Hay fever is an allergy to pollen or spores presenting as an allergic inflammatory response in all mucous membranes of the upper airway. The UK has one of the highest rates (it's estimated one in four of us have hay fever) and symptoms are often trivialised, even though the socio-economic and health costs are huge. If left treated, for example, a hay fever sufferer risks developing asthma. Also paediatric allergists now consider the combination of eczema and hay fever to be a significant marker, indicating an atopic child's propensity to develop more serious allergic disease. Unfortunately childhood hay fever is often poorly treated, but a combination of sensible allergen avoidance measures and appropriate medication or treatments is usually sufficient to control symptoms.

  5. Perinatal risk factors for hay fever--a study among 2550 Finnish twin families.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, M; Kaprio, J; Laitinen, T; Winter, T; Koskenvuo, M; Laitinen, L A

    2001-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that perinatal factors influence the risk for asthma but population studies on perinatal factors and risk for hay fever are few. We studied the effect of perinatal factors on the risk for hay fever among adolescent twins by a questionnaire study involving five consecutive nation-wide birth cohorts of 16-year-old twins and their parents. The risk for parent-reported, doctor-diagnosed hay fever in the adolescents associated with several perinatal characteristics was assessed with logistic regression analysis among individuals and by a discordant pair analysis. In the univariate analysis of the birth factors, the risk for hay fever increased with increasing birth weight (p for trend = 0.048, OR for those > or = 3000 g 1.35, 95% CI 0.91-2.02 compared to those < 2000 g) and gestational age (p for trend = 0.04, OR for those born after 40 weeks of gestation 2.24, 95% CI 1.03-4.86, compared to those born before 33 weeks of gestation) and was lower in those subjects hospitalised in the neonatal period (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.93). Because of significant interactions between parental hay fever status and birth factors (ponderal index, p = 0.03 and maternal age p = 0.04), stratified analysis were performed. The positive association between birth weight and hay fever was most obvious among adolescents with no parental history of hay fever (p for trend = 0.03). Similar, though not significant, trends were found with other birth factors among these families, whereas no such trend was found among adolescents with parental hay fever, suggesting that gestational maturity increases the risk for hay fever in the absence of genetic predisposition. However, of the perinatal factors only neonatal hospitalisation (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.96) remained a significant risk factor for the development of hay fever, when adjusted for non-perinatal factors.

  6. Current status of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region: issues, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Al-Abri, Seif S; Abaidani, Idris Al; Fazlalipour, Mehdi; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Memish, Ziad A; Hewson, Roger; Eskild Petersen, Jorgen; Mala, Peter; Nhu Nguyen, Tran Minh; Rahman Malik, Mamunur; Formenty, Pierre; Jeffries, Rosanna Lucy

    2017-03-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread, tick-borne viral disease affecting humans. The disease is endemic in many regions, such as Africa, Asia, Eastern and Southern Europe, and Central Asia. Recently, the incidence of CCHF has increased rapidly in the countries of the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (WHO EMR), with sporadic human cases and outbreaks of CCHF being reported from a number of countries in the region. Despite the rapidly growing incidence of the disease, there are currently no accurate data on the burden of the disease in the region due to the different surveillance systems used for CCHF in these countries. In an effort to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and risk factors for the transmission of the CCHF virus (CCHFV; a Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae) in the WHO EMR, and to identify the current knowledge gaps that are hindering effective control interventions, a sub-regional meeting was organized in Muscat, Oman, from December 7 to 9, 2015. This article summarizes the current knowledge of the disease in the region, identifies the knowledge gaps that present challenges for the prevention and control of CCHFV, and details a strategic framework for research and development activities that would be necessary to curb the ongoing and new threats posed by CCHFV.

  7. An outbreak of cerebrospinal fever in a 19th century British Mediterranean naval base.

    PubMed

    Savona-Ventura, C

    1994-10-01

    Epidemic Meningococcal meningitis first made its definite appearance in Europe in the beginning of the nineteenth century. The first recorded epidemic in the Maltese Islands, which straddled the sea-routes of the Mediterranean, occurred in the late nineteenth century. This paper describes a manuscript report prepared at the request of the Lieutenant Governor regarding this epidemic in the light of the contemporary knowledge about the infection.

  8. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment--EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  9. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment—EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  10. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  11. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kentaro; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After ruling out common causes of recurrent abdominal pain, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was considered as a potential diagnosis. Genetic tests revealed multiple heterozygote mutations, which may be associated with FMF. Patients with Mediterranean fever mutations may present with atypical presentations without fever, like in this case. Astute clinical suspicion is required to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:22505824

  12. Spotted fever Rickettsia species in Hyalomma and Ixodes ticks infesting migratory birds in the European Mediterranean area

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A few billion birds migrate annually between their breeding grounds in Europe and their wintering grounds in Africa. Many bird species are tick-infested, and as a result of their innate migratory behavior, they contribute significantly to the geographic distribution of pathogens, including spotted fever rickettsiae. The aim of the present study was to characterize, in samples from two consecutive years, the potential role of migrant birds captured in Europe as disseminators of Rickettsia-infected ticks. Methods Ticks were collected from a total of 14,789 birds during their seasonal migration northwards in spring 2009 and 2010 at bird observatories on two Mediterranean islands: Capri and Antikythira. All ticks were subjected to RNA extraction followed by cDNA synthesis and individually assayed with a real-time PCR targeting the citrate synthase (gltA) gene. For species identification of Rickettsia, multiple genes were sequenced. Results Three hundred and ninety-eight (2.7%) of all captured birds were tick-infested; some birds carried more than one tick. A total number of 734 ticks were analysed of which 353 ± 1 (48%) were Rickettsia-positive; 96% were infected with Rickettsia aeschlimannii and 4% with Rickettsia africae or unidentified Rickettsia species. The predominant tick taxon, Hyalomma marginatum sensu lato constituted 90% (n = 658) of the ticks collected. The remaining ticks were Ixodes frontalis, Amblyomma sp., Haemaphysalis sp., Rhipicephalus sp. and unidentified ixodids. Most ticks were nymphs (66%) followed by larvae (27%) and adult female ticks (0.5%). The majority (65%) of ticks was engorged and nearly all ticks contained visible blood. Conclusions Migratory birds appear to have a great impact on the dissemination of Rickettsia-infected ticks, some of which may originate from distant locations. The potential ecological, medical and veterinary implications of such Rickettsia infections need further examination. PMID:25011617

  13. Phylogenomic analyses of a Mediterranean earthworm family (Annelida: Hormogastridae).

    PubMed

    Novo, Marta; Fernández, Rosa; Andrade, Sónia C S; Marchán, Daniel F; Cunha, Luis; Díaz Cosín, Darío J

    2016-01-01

    Earthworm taxonomy and evolutionary biology remain a challenge because of their scarce distinct morphological characters of taxonomic value, the morphological convergence by adaptation to the uniformity of the soil where they inhabit, and their high plasticity when challenged with stressful or new environmental conditions. Here we present a phylogenomic study of the family Hormogastridae, representing also the first piece of work of this type within earthworms. We included seven transcriptomes of the group representing the main lineages as previously-described, analysed in a final matrix that includes twelve earthworms and eleven outgroups. While there is a high degree of gene conflict in the generated trees that obscure some of the internal relationships, the origin of the family is well resolved: the hormogastrid Hemigastrodrilus appears as the most ancestral group, followed by the ailoscolecid Ailoscolex, therefore rejecting the validity of the family Ailoscolecidae. Our results place the origin of hormogastrids in Southern France, as previously hypothesised.

  14. Association between sequence variations of the Mediterranean fever gene and the risk of migraine: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Coşkun, Salih; Varol, Sefer; Özdemir, Hasan H; Çelik, Sercan Bulut; Balduz, Metin; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Çim, Abdullah; Arslan, Demet; Çevik, Mehmet Uğur

    2016-01-01

    Migraine pathogenesis involves a complex interaction between hormones, neurotransmitters, and inflammatory pathways, which also influence the migraine phenotype. The Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) encodes the pyrin protein. The major role of pyrin appears to be in the regulation of inflammation activity and the processing of the cytokine pro-interleukin-1β, and this cytokine plays a part in migraine pathogenesis. This study included 220 migraine patients and 228 healthy controls. Eight common missense mutations of the MEFV gene, known as M694V, M694I, M680I, V726A, R761H, K695R, P369S, and E148Q, were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction with 5′ nuclease assays, which include sequence specific primers, and probes with a reporter dye. When mutations were evaluated separately among the patient and control groups, only the heterozygote E148Q carrier was found to be significantly higher in the control group than in the patient group (P=0.029, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.45 [0.21–0.94]). In addition, the frequency of the homozygote and the compound heterozygote genotype carrier was found to be significantly higher in patients (n=8, 3.6%) than in the control group (n=1, 0.4%) (P=0.016, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =8.57 [1.06–69.07]). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the allele frequencies of MEFV mutations between the patients and the healthy control group (P=0.964). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that biallelic mutations in the MEFV gene could be associated with a risk of migraine in the Turkish population. Moreover, MEFV mutations could be related to increased frequency and short durations of migraine attacks (P=0.043 and P=0.021, respectively). Future studies in larger groups and expression analysis of MEFV are required to clarify the role of the MEFV gene in migraine susceptibility. PMID:27621632

  15. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever: a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, J W; Vossen, J M; Radl, J; van Nieuwkoop, J A; Meyer, C J; Lobatto, S; van Furth, R

    1984-05-19

    Six patients of Dutch ancestry with a long history of recurrent attacks of fever of unknown cause were found to have a high serum IgD level and a large number of plasma cells with cytoplasmic IgD in the bone marrow. Because the clinical picture in some ways resembled that of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), sera of patients with FMF were also investigated; only one of eight such patients had a raised serum IgD.

  16. Family Cluster Analysis of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong Rae; Heo, Sang Taek; Park, Dahee; Kim, Hyemin; Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Shimojima, Masayuki; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is tick-borne viral disease that was first suspected in China in 2009. The causative virus (SFTSV) was isolated in 2009 and reported in 2011, and SFTSV expanded its geographic distribution in 2012–2013, from China to South Korea and Japan. Most SFTSV infections occur through Haemaphysalis longicornis. However, SFTSV infection can also occur between family members, and nosocomial transmission of SFTSV is also possible through close contact with a patient. In this study, we first analyzed clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory data for SFTS patients and family members of an index patient in Korea. The S segment of SFTSV was amplified from the sera of three patients, and the S segment of SFTSV and IgG specific to SFTSV were detected in the serum from one family member; although this individual had no history of exposure to H. longicornis, she frequently had close contact with the index patient. In Korea, SFTSV infection among family members does not have to be reported, and we suggest that person-to-person transmission of SFTSV among family members is possible in Korea. PMID:27928083

  17. [Periodic fever in children: keep in mind the PFAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Rossetti, G

    2008-02-27

    The autoinflammatory diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent fever in childhood. These diseases are characterized by inflammatory episodes without an evident cause. Some of these diseases, like the Familial Mediterranean Fever, have a genetic origin and need a chronic treatment to avoid severe complications on the long term. PFAPA syndrome is the most frequent cause of recurrent fever and is diagnosed based on unspecific criteria. The treatment is still controversial. One dose of Prednisone is able to interrupt the flare and tonsillectomy may induce a remission in the majority of the cases.

  18. The Frequency of Familial Mediterranean Fever Related Amyloidosis in Renal Waiting List for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Mustafa; Eyerci, Nilnur; Uyanik, Abdullah; Aydinli, Bulent; Sahin, Gonul Zisan; Cetinkaya, Ramazan; Pirim, Ibrahim; Polat, Kamil Yalcin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Our goal is to investigate the distribution of MEFV mutations in patients with renal amyloidosis who are in renal transplant waiting list which is prepared for transplantation. Materials and Methods: FMF was diagnosed in 25 of the 297 patients between the years 2004 and 2008, who were involved in the study (15 male, 10 female; age 34±7.8). 5 out of 25 patients were transplanted, remaining were waiting for Tx. Biopsy results were amyloidosis and taken from renal (n:16), rectal (n:8) and duodenal (1).All of them were carrier of mutations in both pyrin alleles.The primer cause of chronic renal failure in our group was secondary AA amyloidosis. DNA was isolated from 25 whole blood samples. The NanoChip Molecular Biology Workstation (Nanogen) uses electronic microarrays for mutation detection. Exon 2,3,5 and 10 of pyrin gene genotypes were identified in the NanoChip. Results: Genetic analysis of the patients demonstrated that each subject carries either homozygote or compound heterozygote mutations of the gene. The most common mutations were M694V, V726A, E148Q and M680I. Conclusions: The clinic manifestation and complain of our patients were febrile and painful attacks such as in the abdomen, chest and joints due to inflammation of the peritoneum, pleura and synovial membrane. The major problem in FMF is the occurrence of amyloidosis that primarily affects the kidneys causing proteinuria and renal failure. Dialysis and renal transplantation can be treatment, but it is important to diagnose FMF at earliest stages. The percentage of FMF patients in our waiting list was 8.4%. Moreover, in our region FMF incidence is highly frequent, so FMF should be chased by genetically so as to prevent chronic renal failure due to amyloidosis. PMID:25610112

  19. Serum Bone Markers Levels and Bone Mineral Density in Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Teoman; Taspınar, Ozgur; Akbal, Yildiz; Peru, Celaleddin; Guler, Mustafa; Uysal, Omer; Yakıcıer, M. Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to measure bone mineral density, serum and urinary bone turnover parameters, and to evaluate the influence of demographic and genetic factors on these parameters in FMF patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven attack-free patients who were diagnosed with FMF (in accordance with Tel Hashomer criteria) were recruited at outpatient rheumatology clinics. We investigated whether there were any differences between the FMF patients and a control group in terms of lumbar and femur bone mineral density (BMD), standard deviation scores (Z scores and T scores) and bone markers. [Results] In terms of the median values of lumbar BMD (p = 0.21), lumbar T (p = 0.098) and Z (p = 0.109) scores, femoral neck BMD, femoral T and Z scores and total femur BMD, T (p = 0.788) and Z scores, there were no significant differences. [Conclusion] In our study, no statistically significant differences were found between FMF patients and a control group in terms of osteoporosis. The 25-OH vitamin D was found to be significantly lower in FMF patients than in the control group. PMID:25276036

  20. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  1. Life history of the deep-sea cephalopod family Histioteuthidae in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quetglas, Antoni; de Mesa, Aina; Ordines, Francesc; Grau, Amàlia

    2010-08-01

    The life cycle of the two species of the deep-sea family Histioteuthidae inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea ( Histioteuthis reversa and Histioteuthis bonnellii) was studied from monthly samples taken throughout the year during daytime hours by bottom trawl gears. A small sample of individuals found floating dead on the sea surface was also analyzed. Both species were caught exclusively on the upper slope at depths greater than 300 m. Their frequency of occurrence increased with depth and showed two different peaks, at 500-600 m and 600-700 m depth in H. bonnellii and H. reversa, respectively, which might indicate spatial segregation. Maturity stages were assigned using macroscopic determination and confirmed with histological analyses. Although mature males were caught all year round, no mature females were found, which suggests that their sexual maturation in the western Mediterranean takes place deeper than the maximum depth sampled (800 m). In fact, the increase in mean squid size with increasing depth in H. reversa indicates an ontogenetic migration to deeper waters. The individuals of both species found floating dead on the sea surface were spent females which had a relatively large cluster of small atresic eggs and a small number of remaining mature eggs scattered in the ovary and mantle cavity. The sizes of these females were clearly larger than the largest individuals caught with bottom trawls. A total of 12 and 7 different types of prey, belonging to three major taxonomic groups (crustaceans, osteichthyes and cephalopods), were identified in the stomach contents of H. reversa and H. bonnellii, respectively. In both species fishes were by far the main prey followed by crustaceans, whereas cephalopods were found only occasionally. The preys identified, mainly myctophids and natantian crustaceans, indicate that both histioteuthids base their diet on pelagic nictemeral migrators.

  2. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Virus Families Arenaviruses Old World/New World ...

  3. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part I

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed. PMID:25793039

  4. Periodic Fever: a review on clinical, management and guideline for Iranian patients - part I.

    PubMed

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-02-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed.

  5. A common pathway in periodic fever syndromes.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Michael F

    2004-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in pyrin, which normally inhibits pro-interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) cytokine processing to the active form. A novel role for pyrin has been proposed by Shoham et al., who studied patients with an autosomal dominant disease called pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. They demonstrated an interaction between pyrin and proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1), the protein involved in PAPA, and thus revealed a biochemical pathway common to both FMF and PAPA.

  6. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome in Iranian Children First Report of Iranian Periodic Fever and Autoinflammatory Registry (IPFAIR)

    PubMed Central

    Mehregan, Fatemeh Fereshteh; Ziaee, Vahid; Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Tahghighi, Fatemeh; Sabouni, Farah; Moradinejad, Mohamad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is a nonhereditary idiopathic febrile syndrome belonging to the group of autoinflammatory diseases. No longtime sequel was reported in this disease. Early diagnosis can lead physicians to treatment of this disorder with a short course steroid application and provide satisfaction of the patient’s family. Methods: This study is a prospective review of patients diagnosed with PFAPA syndrome who were registered in Iranian Periodic Fever and Autoinflammatory Registry (IPFAIR) through periodic fever clinic in the Children's Medical Center, Pediatric Center of Excellence in Tehran, Iran from January 2013 to March 2014. Findings: One hundred thirty patients were registered in our databases. Twenty-one (16.1%) patients including 15 males and 6 females had PFAPA. Normal growth was seen in all patients. The median age at onset was 18 months. The mean duration of fever was 4 days and the mean duration of intervals between fever episodes 21 days. Along with fever, all patients had characteristic symptoms. All patients were asymptomatic between fever episodes. Steroid was used in all patients and causing immediate reduction by 84.61%. Two patients received both steroid and colchicine because of their clinical feature and positive laboratory tests for PFAPA and familial Mediterranean fever. No patient received biological therapy or a tonsillectomy. Conclusion: The long diagnostic delay of PFAPA gives cause to concern indicating a need for greater awareness of the disease so that the diagnosis may be made timely. PMID:25793068

  7. [Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome].

    PubMed

    Agbo-kpati, K-P; Condor, R; Hollenberg, H; Chalvon Demersay, A; Cuisset, L; Quartier, P

    2014-07-01

    We report the cases of two sisters born of parents who were first-degree cousins, who started recurrent fever with lymph node and digestive tract involvement at the age of 2 years. There was no mutation of the familial Mediterranean fever gene and a diagnosis of partial mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency was made. However, immunoglobulin (Ig) D and A levels were normal. Elevated mevalonic acid in the patients' urine during an episode and MVK gene analysis provided the diagnosis. Clinical remission was obtained under anti-TNF-alpha treatment with etanercept. These observations and those of several previously reported patients, particularly in French and Dutch series, illustrate the importance of considering the diagnosis in a child with early-onset auto-inflammatory syndrome even in the absence of hyper-IgD or -IgA.

  8. Travelers' Health: Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... VHFs) are caused by several families of enveloped RNA viruses: filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), arenaviruses ( ... in hemorrhagic fever with high death rates. Old World (Eastern Hemisphere) and New World (Western Hemisphere) viruses ...

  9. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Dengue Fever KidsHealth > For Parents > Dengue Fever Print A ... can help lower the chances of infection. About Dengue Fever Dengue (DEN-gee) fever is caused by ...

  10. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  11. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II.

    PubMed

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-06-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet's and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry.

  12. Periodic fevers and autoinflammatory syndromes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ostring, Genevieve T; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent fever is a common presentation in paediatric practice and can be caused by a wide variety of diseases including autoinflammatory conditions. The innate immune system plays an essential role in the 'first line' response to infection through mediation of inflammatory responses. Inflammasomes are part of the regulatory process for this system and result in the production of the powerful pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1B. Dysregulation of inflammasomes, and Interleukin 1 production, contributes to the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory diseases. This review focuses on described periodic fever syndromes (PFS) which are now collectively referred to as autoinflammatory syndromes. Conditions discussed include periodic fever aphthous stomatitis pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy, familial Mediterranean fever, tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndromes, hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. Presenting features, complications, diagnostic and treatment approaches for these conditions are discussed. Nonetheless, as most of these conditions are rare and may have significant long-term complications, it is recommended that they be managed in consultations with a physician experienced in managing PFS.

  13. Q fever.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G

    1993-01-01

    Q fever is an acute febrile illness first described in 1935 and now seen in many parts of the world. Human infection follows exposure to animals, especially domestic livestock. Recent outbreaks in metropolitan areas have implicated cats as the carrier of disease to humans. The etiologic agent, Coxiella burnetti, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae, although it has distinct genetic characteristics and modes of transmission. Most recent attention has been focused on a number of large outbreaks of Q fever associated with medical research involving pregnant sheep. Although most infections are self-limited, some patients require prolonged treatment. Recent vaccines have had encouraging success in the prevention of disease in individuals at high risk of exposure. PMID:8358703

  14. The significance of urinary beta-2 microglobulin level for differential diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever and acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ugan, Yunus; Korkmaz, Hakan; Dogru, Atalay; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Balkarlı, Ayse; Aylak, Firdevs; Tunc, Sevket Ercan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical and laboratory parameters widely used are not specific to discriminate the abdominal pain due to FMF attack from that of acute appendicitis. The present study aims to investigate the urinary beta-2 microglobulin (U-β2M) level as a potential parameter to identify these two diseases mimicking each other. A total of 51 patients with established FMF diagnosis due to Tel Hashomer criteria on colchicine treatment (1-1.5 mg/day), 15 patients with acute appendicitis who had appropriate clinical picture and were also supported pathologically after the surgery, and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Of the 51 patients with FMF, 25 were at an attack period, while remaining 26 were not. For the diagnosis of acute attack, as well as physical examination, laboratory tests including white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were performed. From urine specimens U-β2M, microalbumin, and N-acetyl glucosaminidase (U-NAG) were measured. U-β2M levels were significantly higher in acute appendicitis group compared to FMF attack, FMF non-attack, and control groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). U-NAG and microalbuminuria were significantly higher in acute appendicitis, FMF attack, and FMF non-attack groups compared to controls (U-NAG p < 0.001, p = 0.016, p = 0.004, microalbuminuria p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Microalbuminuria was significantly higher in acute appendicitis group compared to the FMF attack group (p = 0.004). Determination of U-β2M levels may be helpful for differential diagnosis of peritonitis attacks of FMF patients on colchicine treatment and acute appendicitis. However, this finding should be substantiated with other studies.

  15. Travelers' Health: Rickettsial (Spotted and Typhus Fevers) and Related Infections (Anaplasmosis and Ehrlichiosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mediterranean spotted fever), R. rickettsii (known as both Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Brazilian spotted fever), O. tsutsugamushi (scrub typhus), ... and lymphadenopathy R. raoultii Tick Unknown Europe, Asia ... Mountain spotted fever, Brazilian spotted fever, febre maculosa, São Paulo exanthematic ...

  16. Characterization of the oxysterol-binding protein gene family in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Lynn-Miller, Ace; Lan, Que

    2011-01-01

    The oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and related proteins (ORPs) are sterol-binding proteins that may be involved in cellular sterol transportation, sterol metabolism and signal transduction pathways. Four ORP genes were cloned from Aedes aegypti. Based on amino acid sequence homology to human proteins, they are AeOSBP, AeORP1, AeORP8 and AeORP9. Splicing variants of AeOSBP and AeORP8 were identified. The temporal and spatial transcription patterns of members of the AeOSBP gene family through developmental stages and the gonotrophic cycle were profiled. AeORP1 transcription seemed to be head tissue-specific, whereas AeOSBP and AeORP9 expressions were induced by a blood meal. Furthermore, over-expression of AeORPs facilitated [3H]-cholesterol uptake in Aedes aegypti cultured Aag-2 cells. PMID:21699592

  17. Big defensins and mytimacins, new AMP families of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; De Moro, Gianluca; Manfrin, Chiara; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play a fundamental role in the innate immunity of invertebrates, preventing the invasion of potential pathogens. Mussels can express a surprising abundance of cysteine-rich AMPs pertaining to the defensin, myticin, mytilin and mytimycin families, particularly in the circulating hemocytes. Based on deep RNA sequencing of Mytilus galloprovincialis, we describe the identification, molecular diversity and constitutive expression in different tissues of five novel transcripts pertaining to the macin family (named mytimacins) and eight novel transcripts pertaining to the big defensins family (named MgBDs). The predicted antimicrobial peptides exhibit a N-terminal signal peptide, a positive net charge and a high content in cysteines, allegedly organized in intra-molecular disulfide bridges. Mytimacins and big defensins therefore represent two novel AMP families of M. galloprovincialis which extend the repertoire of cysteine-rich AMPs in this bivalve mollusk.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean Family and Its Sublineages in the Light of Robust Evolutionary Markers

    PubMed Central

    Vyazovaya, Anna; Narvskaya, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a clonal population structure, and the Latin American-Mediterranean (LAM) family is one of the largest and most widespread within this species, showing evidence for remarkable pathobiology and a confusing phylogeny. Here, we applied robust phylogenetic markers to study the evolution of the LAM family and its major sublineages circulating in Russia and neighboring countries. A total of 250 M. tuberculosis isolates were confirmed to belong to the LAM family based on the analysis of the LAM-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Rv3062 and Rv0129c genes. At this stage, the family status was rectified for 121 isolates misleadingly assigned by CRISPR spoligotyping to non-LAM families (T1- or T5-RUS1). Consequently, the reestimated LAM prevalence rate increased 2-fold in Russia and Kazakhstan and 4-fold in Belarus. The majority (91.8 to 98.7%) of the LAM isolates from all three countries belonged to the LAM-RUS sublineage. In contrast, the Ibero-American LAM RD-Rio sublineage was identified in only 7 Russian isolates. Taken together, our findings and further analyses suggest a monophyletic origin of LAM-RUS: at a historically distant time, in Russia, in a small founding bacterial/human population. Its dissemination pattern and high prevalence rate in Northern Eurasia may indicate a long-term coexistence of the LAM-RUS sublineage and local human populations hypothetically leading to coadaptation and reduced pathogenicity of the relatively more ancient clones, such as spoligotype international type 254 (SIT254), compared to the more recent SIT252 and SIT266 clones. In contrast, rare LAM RD-Rio isolates were likely brought to Russia through occasional human contact. The spread of RD-Rio strains is not as global as commonly claimed and is determined largely by human migration flows (rather than by pathobiological properties of these strains). Consequently, a host population factor appears to play a major role in shaping the in

  19. Chikungunya fever. Rheumatic manifestations of an emerging disease in Europe.

    PubMed

    Horcada, M Loreto; Díaz-Calderón, Carlos; Garrido, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by several species of Aedes mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (A. albopictus). It is endemic in Africa and Asia with recurrent outbreaks. It is an emerging disease and cases in Europe transmitted by A. albopictus have been established in Mediterranean areas. The first autochthonous cases detected on the Caribbean islands suppose a serious threat of spreading disease to America, which so far has been disease free. Clinical symptoms begin abruptly with fever, skin rash and polyarthritis. Although mortality is low, a high percentage of patients develop a chronic phase defined by persistent arthritis for months or even years. A severe immune response is responsible for joint inflammation. The absence of specific treatment and lack of vaccine requires detailed studies about its immunopathogenesis in order to determine the most appropriate target.

  20. Rift Valley fever vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases, whereas ruminants experience abortions during outbreak. Effective vaccination of both humans and ruminants is the best approach to control Rift Valley fever. This article summarizes the development of inactivated RVFV vaccine, live attenuated vaccine, and other new generation vaccines. PMID:19837291

  1. Shell-vial culture, coupled with real-time PCR, applied to Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia massiliae-Bar29 detection, improving the diagnosis of the Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Segura, Ferran; Pons, Immaculada; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Nogueras, María-Mercedes

    2016-04-01

    Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia massiliae-Bar29 are related to Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF). They are intracellular microorganisms. The Shell-vial culture assay (SV) improved Rickettsia culture but it still has some limitations: blood usually contains low amount of microorganisms and the samples that contain the highest amount of them are non-sterile. The objectives of this study were to optimize SV culture conditions and monitoring methods and to establish antibiotic concentrations useful for non-sterile samples. 12 SVs were inoculated with each microorganism, incubated at different temperatures and monitored by classical methods and real-time PCR. R. conorii was detected by all methods at all temperatures since 7th day of incubation. R. massiliae-Bar29 was firstly observed at 28°C. Real-time PCR allowed to detected it 2-7 days earlier (depend on temperature) than classical methods. Antibiotics concentration needed for the isolation of these Rickettsia species from non-sterile samples was determined inoculating SV with R. conorii, R. massiliae-Bar29, biopsy or tick, incubating them with different dilutions of antibiotics and monitoring them weekly. To sum up, if a MSF diagnosis is suspected, SV should be incubated at both 28°C and 32°C for 1-3 weeks and monitored by a sensitive real-time PCR. If the sample is non-sterile the panel of antibiotics tested can be added.

  2. Dynamics of the marine planktonic diatom family Chaetocerotaceae in a Mediterranean coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Sunčica; Godrijan, Jelena; Šilović, Tina

    2016-10-01

    The planktonic diatoms belonging to two genera Chaetoceros and Bacteriastrum, included within the family Chaetocerotaceae, are ecologically important as they represent an important component of the phytoplankton in the coastal regions and are often among bloom-forming taxa. We analysed the chaetocerotacean species composition and abundances in the coastal area of northeastern Adriatic in a biweekly study conducted from September 2008 to October 2009 with the aim of investigating seasonal dynamics and species succession on a fine temporal scale and determining the most important ecological factors influencing their distribution. The study identified seven Chaetoceros and three Bacteriastrum species as major phytoplankton components showing the clear annual succession and two types of blooms (one species/multi species) governed by differing ecological conditions. Autumn bloom was composed of 20 chaetocerotacean species with Chaetoceros contortus and Chaetoceros vixvisibilis alternating in dominance. The summer period was characterized by spreading of freshwater from the Po River up to the eastern coast increasing availability of phosphate which triggered the monospecific Chaetoceros vixvisibilis bloom. We explained the chaetocerotacean dominant species succession pattern by the environmental parameters, with the temperature, salinity and phosphate availability as most important factors driving the species seasonality.

  3. Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever. Symptoms can include Sneezing, often with a runny ... the eyes Your health care provider may diagnose hay fever based on a physical exam and your symptoms. ...

  4. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... on symptoms, physical findings, laboratory testing, and travel history, including the possibility of exposure to infected mosquitoes. There is no specific treatment for yellow fever; care is based on symptoms. Steps to prevent yellow fever virus infection ... and ...

  5. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana ... Transfusions Cholera West Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect ...

  6. [Family planning and reproductive behavior in Islamic countries in the Mediterranean area].

    PubMed

    Angeli, A; Salvini, S

    1990-01-01

    Recently, in countries like Egypt, Tunisia, and Turkey, reproductive behavior has modified. Yet, according the World Fertility Survey (WFS), the number of children wanted is still rather high, ranging between 5.5 and 6.4, especially in countries of the near ear like Syria and Jordan. In Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia, where government-sponsored family planning (FP) programs have been instituted, the number is 4. FP affects socioeconomic transformation. There has been a global reduction of fertility and improvement in the status of women as a result of the modification of the model of nuptiality and the increase of education. Intermediate variables include contraceptive behavior and postpartum infertility, as proposed by the Bongaarts model examining the effects of marriage, postpartum infertility, and contraception. Jordan, Syria, and Morocco showed high values on these indices because low age at marriage and meager access to contraceptives elevated fertility. Tunisia, Lebanon, and Algeria evinced very low indices and reduced potential fertility. Syria and Jordan had a very high postpartum infertility index. These values depend in part on less prolonged breast feeding. According to the Bongaarts model, Egypt (1980) had total fertility rate (TFR) of 5.21, Morocco (1979-80) had 5.82, Tunisia (1978) had 5.83, Syria (1978) had 7.46, Lebanon (1976) had 4,72, Jordan (1976) had 7,63, and Algeria (1986) had 5,41. During the decade of 1965-75, as a result of modification of the marriage model and contraceptive behavior in Morocco and Tunisia, there was a decrease in births. In Egypt, no significant difference occurred in the rate of decline. In Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan, the intervention policy appeared feeble, and the access to services was unsatisfactory. In Turkey, Egypt, Algeria, and Morocco, the individual approach to intervention and the organization of services and assistance was clearer. FP showed a decreasing trend during the 1970s. During 1980-85, TFR was: Algeria 6

  7. Autoinflammatory syndromes behind the scenes of recurrent fevers in children.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato

    2009-08-01

    Many children experience recurrent fevers with no easily identifiable source and only a careful follow-up helps in the early identification of other presenting symptoms of other defined conditions which require medical intervention. Autoinflammatory syndromes are rare childhood-onset disorders of the innate immunity in which recurrent flares of fever and inflammation affecting skin, joints, the gastrointestinal tube, or serous membranes are the most striking signs, without any evidence of autoantibody production or underlying infections. Among the pediatric conditions belonging to this group we can consider hereditary recurrent fevers (familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes), pyogenic disorders (PAPA syndrome, CRMO syndrome, Majeed syndrome), immune-mediated granulomatous diseases (Blau syndrome, Crohn's disease), and idiopathic febrile syndromes (systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, PFAPA syndrome, Behçet syndrome). Their genetic background has only been partially elucidated and advances in their molecular pathogenesis are shedding new light on the innate immune system, whilst more and more diseases are being reconsidered at a pathogenetic level and included in this new chapter of postgenomic medicine. The diagnosis of most autoinflammatory syndromes relies on clinical history, demonstration of an increased acute-phase response during inflammatory attacks, and, possibly, genetic confirmation, which is still elusive especially for idiopathic febrile syndromes. This astonishing progress in the awareness and knowledge of autoinflammatory syndromes has anticipated the actual possibilities of medical intervention and rationalized treatment with targeted biologic agents.

  8. [The Alkhurma virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus): an emerging pathogen responsible for hemorrhage fever in the Middle East].

    PubMed

    Charrel, R N; de Lamballerie, X

    2003-01-01

    To date tick-borne flaviviruses causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans have been isolated in Siberia (Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus), India (Kyasanur Forest disease virus), and Saudi Arabia (Akhurma virus). Because of their potential use as biological weapons for bioterrorism, these 3 viruses require level 4 biosafety handling facilities and have been listed as hypervirulent pathogens by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Alkhurma virus was isolated in 1995 from patients with hemorrhagic fever in Saudi Arabia. Current evidence suggests that transmission to humans can occur either transcutaneously either by contamination of a skin wound with the blood of an infected vertebrate or bites of an infected tick or orally by drinking unpasteurized contaminated milk. To date a total of 24 symptomatic human cases have been recorded with a mortality rate at 25% (6/24). Pauci-symptomatic or asymptomatic cases are likely but epidemiologic data are currently unavailable. The complete coding sequence of the prototype strain of Alkhurma virus was determined and published in 2001 based on international research project involving investigators from France, Great Britain, and Saudi Arabia. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that closest known relative of Alkhurma virus is Kyasanur Forest disease virus and that both viruses share a common ancestor. Genetic analysis of several human strains sequentially isolated over a 5-year period showed a very low diversity. This finding has important potential implications for diagnosis and vaccination.

  9. Yellow fever.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus disease occurs in tropical areas of South America and Africa. It is a disease of major historical importance, but remains a threat to travelers to and residents of endemic areas despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 70 years. An important aspect is the receptivity of many non-endemic areas to introduction and spread of yellow fever. This paper reviews the clinical aspects, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of yellow fever, with an emphasis on recent changes in the distribution and incidence of the disease. Recent knowledge about yellow fever 17D vaccine mechanism of action and safety are discussed.

  10. Rheumatic fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... to trigger rheumatic fever. Symptoms Rheumatic fever mainly affects children ages 5 to 15 who have had strep ... of this condition are: Loss of control of emotions, with bouts of unusual crying or laughing Quick, jerky movements that mainly affect the face, feet, and hands Exams and Tests ...

  11. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  12. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  13. Recurrent Fever in Children

    PubMed Central

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  14. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  15. Enteric Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Kumar, Ruchika

    2017-03-01

    Enteric fever is an important public-health problem in India. The clinical presentation of typhoid fever is very variable, ranging from fever with little other morbidities to marked toxemia and associated multisystem complications. Fever is present in majority of patients (>90 %) irrespective of their age group. Mortality is higher in younger children. Blood culture remains gold standard for diagnosis. Widal test has low sensitivity and specificity but may be used in second week to support the diagnosis. Emerging resistance to several antibiotics should be kept in mind when selecting antibiotics or revising the treatment. The key preventive strategies are safe water, safe food, personal hygiene, and appropriate sanitation. Vaccination is an additional effective tool for prevention.

  16. Yellow fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver, and kidney. Bleeding disorders, seizures, coma, and delirium may also occur. Symptoms may include: Fever, headache, ... tongue Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice) Decreased urination Delirium Irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) Bleeding (may progress to hemorrhage) ...

  17. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  18. Typhoid fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly caused due to a bacteria called Salmonella typhi ( S typhi ). Causes S typhi is spread through contaminated ... as food handlers. Alternative Names Enteric fever Images Salmonella typhi organism Fly Digestive system organs References Harris ...

  19. Q fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteria can infect: Sheep Goats Cattle Dogs Cats Birds Rodents Ticks Infected animals shed these bacteria in: ... from becoming chronic. Alternative Names Query fever Images Temperature measurement References Marrie TJ, Raoult D. Coxiella burnetii ( ...

  20. Q Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... infects some animals, such as goats, sheep and cattle. C. burnetii bacteria are found in the birth ... your physician... Diagnosis and Testing Recommended tests… Treatment Antibiotics to treat Q fever... Prevention Avoid getting infected... ...

  1. Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M.; Raoult, D.

    1999-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment. However, in females intermittent high-level shedding occurs at the time of parturition, with millions of bacteria being released per gram of placenta. Humans are usually infected by contaminated aerosols from domestic animals, particularly after contact with parturient females and their birth products. Although often asymptomatic, Q fever may manifest in humans as an acute disease (mainly as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic disease (mainly endocarditis), especially in patients with previous valvulopathy and to a lesser extent in immunocompromised hosts and in pregnant women. Specific diagnosis of Q fever remains based upon serology. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antiphase II antibodies are detected 2 to 3 weeks after infection with C. burnetii, whereas the presence of IgG antiphase I C. burnetii antibodies at titers of ≥1:800 by microimmunofluorescence is indicative of chronic Q fever. The tetracyclines are still considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy of acute Q fever, whereas antibiotic combinations administered over prolonged periods are necessary to prevent relapses in Q fever endocarditis patients. Although the protective role of Q fever vaccination with whole-cell extracts has been established, the population which should be primarily vaccinated remains to be clearly identified. Vaccination should probably be considered in the population at high risk for Q fever endocarditis. PMID:10515901

  2. Assessment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder among children in families and schools in Mediterranean and continental Croatian towns.

    PubMed

    Karlović, Dalibor; Martinac, Marko; Gale, Ruza; Markić, Josko; Marcinko, Darko

    2005-06-01

    Among one of the biggest difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) is firstly the involvement of different persons, especially parents and teachers, who, together with experts, make the unavoidable subjects in the process of detecting and treating children with AD/HD. Adding to that the standards of living environment, the process becomes even more complex. The aim of this research is to detect if there is a difference in the assessment of AD/HD, given by the parents and teachers in two urban areas, which have culturally and geographically different characteristics (Middle European and Mediterranean). The assessments of children's behavior were conducted in two randomly selected schools; one in Zadar (Mediterranean town on the Adriatic coast) and the other in Zagreb (Middle European city). The children were evaluated by the experts using DSM IV as a gold standard, and by the parents and teachers using Conners rating scales. Analysis of results showed that there were differences in assessment of AD/HD among experts and parents/teachers, and among parents from two towns. Different results given by parents in Zadar and Zagreb, we reasoned, were obtained because of different sensitivity to the problems of hyperactive/impulsive/attention deficiency children's behavior.

  3. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers.

  4. [Zika fever].

    PubMed

    Eftekhari-Hassanlouie, S; Le Guern, A; Oehler, E

    2017-02-08

    Zika virus infection is an emerging arboviral disease which presented as a mild flu-like or algo-eruptive syndrome with fever, arthralgia, myalgia and a maculopapulous eruption. Severe neurological and fetal complications have recently been highlighted. Diagnosis is established by detection of viral RNA by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Many publications report on the progress of knowledge on zika and its complications. Treatment is symptomatic, mainly with analgesics. Prevention is essential through individual and collective vector control. Faced with this emerging arbovirus, health authorities of many countries have implemented significant resources to accelerate research efforts including on diagnostic tests and on the development of vaccines. In Europe, the presence of Aedes albopictus, a mosquito vector of the virus zika, runs the risk of autochthonous cases as well as autochthonous dengue or chikungunya fever. Hence, autochthonous zika fever is not excluded to appear during the warmest months in metropolitan French departments colonized by A. albopictus.

  5. [Viral haemorrhagic fevers--evolution of the epidemic potential].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Markov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this review modern data on dangerous and particularly dangerous viral haemorrhagic fevers caused by a group of viruses belonging to the families of phylo-, arena-, flavi-, bunya- and togaviruses are presented. Morbidity rates and epidemics caused by Marburg virus, Ebola fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Argentinian and Bolivian haemorrhagic fever viruses, dengue haemorrhagic fever virus, Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus, Hantaviruses are analyzed. Mechanisms of the evolution of the epidemic manifestation of these infections are considered. The importance of the development of tools and methods of diagnosis, rapid prevention and treatment of exotic haemorrhagic fevers is emphasized.

  6. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePlus

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  7. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  8. Dengue Fever Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... linkedin Dengue Fever Treatment Dengue Fever Dengue Fever Biology and Transmission Prevention Diagnosis Treatment Featured Research NIAID- ... last reviewed on February 8, 2011 Dengue Fever Biology and Transmission Prevention Diagnosis Treatment Featured Research ^ Return ...

  9. [Endemic zoonosis in Mediterranean area].

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina; Pugliese, Michela

    2013-01-01

    The Mediterranean is historically considered an area of high concentration of zoonoses. Mediterranean countries socio-economic features have favoured, over time, the onset of different types of zoonosis. Many of these may affect many occupational categories, first of all farmers, people working in abattoirs and processing products of animal origin. New farming activities and technologies have generated new occupational and zoonotic risks. These changes have influenced zoonosis epidemiology and have led to a gradual decrease in the number of diseases and to a reduction of some biological risks. However, brucellosis, Q fever, bovine tuberculosis cystic echinococcosis remain a strong example of zoonosis and a real risk, in the Mediterranean area especially. Therefore, an interdisciplinary collaboration between Veterinary Service, Public Health and Occupational medicine is necessary in order to plan territorial prevention.

  10. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa ... How can I prevent yellow fever?Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. ... only at designated vaccination centers. After getting the vaccine, you ...

  11. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results.

  12. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  13. Typhoid Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    pediatric ward for gram negative bacteremia. After several days, urine and fecal cultures showed no growth, but both blood cultures grew Salmonella typhi . DISCUSSION...Typhoid fever is caused by ingesting food or water contaminated with feces or urine containing the bacterium Salmonella typhi . While common

  14. Dengue fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... to occur and you have symptoms of the disease. Prevention Clothing, mosquito repellent, and netting can help reduce the risk of mosquito bites that can spread dengue fever and other infections. Limit outdoor activity during mosquito season, especially when they are most active, at ... Mosquito, adult feeding on the ...

  15. AaCAT1 of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti: a novel histidine-specific amino acid transporter from the SLC7 family.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Immo A; Boudko, Dmitri Y; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Voronov, Dmitri A; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Drake, Lisa L; Aguirre, Sarah E; Fox, Jeffrey M; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2011-03-25

    Insect yolk protein precursor gene expression is regulated by nutritional and endocrine signals. A surge of amino acids in the hemolymph of blood-fed female mosquitoes activates a nutrient signaling system in the fat bodies, which subsequently derepresses yolk protein precursor genes and makes them responsive to activation by steroid hormones. Orphan transporters of the SLC7 family were identified as essential upstream components of the nutrient signaling system in the fat body of fruit flies and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. However, the transport function of these proteins was unknown. We report expression and functional characterization of AaCAT1, cloned from the fat body of A. aegypti. Expression of AaCAT1 transcript and protein undergoes dynamic changes during postembryonic development of the mosquito. Transcript expression was especially high in the third and fourth larval stages; however, the AaCAT1 protein was detected only in pupa and adult stages. Functional expression and analysis of AaCAT1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that it acts as a sodium-independent cationic amino acid transporter, with unique selectivity to L-histidine at neutral pH (K(0.5)(L-His) = 0.34 ± 0.07 mM, pH 7.2). Acidification to pH 6.2 dramatically increases AaCAT1-specific His(+)-induced current. RNAi-mediated silencing of AaCAT1 reduces egg yield of subsequent ovipositions. Our data show that AaCAT1 has notable differences in its transport mechanism when compared with related mammalian cationic amino acid transporters. It may execute histidine-specific transport and signaling in mosquito tissues.

  16. Typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S; Mikoleit, Matthew L; Keddy, Karen H; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-03-21

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas, especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow surveillance and to implement control measures.

  17. Mediterranean diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you should take a calcium supplement. Wine is a common part of a Mediterranean eating ... but some people should not drink alcohol. Avoid wine if you are prone to alcohol abuse, pregnant, ...

  18. Prevention of lassa Fever in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inegbenebor, Ute; Okosun, John; Inegbenebor, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Although specific treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in most Nigerian primary and secondary health centers. This study was carried out to compare the case-fatality rates of Lassa fever and other medical diseases commonly seen in adult medical wards, to determine the community habits that make Lassa fever endemic in Edo Central District of Nigeria, with the aim of prescribing preventive measures for its control in Nigeria. The records of 908 inpatients in the adult medical wards of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua and responses from respondents interviewed by trained interviewers on their knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to Lassa fever were used for this study. The case-fatality rate of Lassa fever in this center was 28%. Cultural factors and habits were found to favor endemicity of Lassa fever in Edo Central District of Nigeria. Preventive measures were prescribed for families and communities.

  19. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety for the Whole Family Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Hey! A Tick Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  20. Allergies and Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Allergies and Hay Fever Allergies and Hay Fever Patient Health Information News media interested in covering ... Americans suffer from nasal allergies, commonly known as hay fever. An ear, nose, and throat specialist can help ...

  1. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy.

  2. Psychogenic fever, functional fever, or psychogenic hyperthermia?

    PubMed

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic fever reflects a phenomenon where core body temperature is high (up to 41°C) or low-grade high (37-38°C) during either acute or chronic stress. Underlying mechanisms are distinct from infection-induced fever and involve the central and sympathetic nervous systems. Psychogenic fever appears a complex psychological, physiological and endocrinological phenomenon.

  3. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Racsa, Lori D.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Olinger, Gene G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  4. Fundus Findings in Dengue Fever: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Şahan, Berna; Tatlıpınar, Sinan; Marangoz, Deniz; Çiftçi, Ferda

    2015-10-01

    Dengue fever is a flavivirus infection transmitted through infected mosquitoes, and is endemic in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, the Pacific, Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean region. A 41-year-old male patient had visual impairment after travelling to Thailand, which is one of the endemic areas. Cotton wool spots were observed on fundus examination. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed minimal vascular leakage from areas near the cotton wool spots and dot hemorrhages in the macula. Dengue fever should be considered in patients with visual complaints who traveled to endemic areas of dengue fever.

  5. [Viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Kager, P A

    1998-02-28

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers, such as Lassa fever and yellow fever, cause tens of thousands of deaths annually outside the Netherlands. The viruses are mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks or via excreta of rodents. Important to travellers are yellow fever, dengue and Lassa and Ebola fever. For yellow fever there is an efficacious vaccine. Dengue is frequently observed in travellers; prevention consists in avoiding mosquito bites, the treatment is symptomatic. Lassa and Ebola fever are extremely rare among travellers; a management protocol can be obtained from the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. Diagnostics of a patient from the tropics with fever and haemorrhagic diathesis should be aimed at treatable disorders such as malaria, typhoid fever, rickettsiosis or bacterial sepsis, because the probability of such a disease is much higher than that of Lassa or Ebola fever.

  6. Rheumatic Fever.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan; Manjarez; Zabriskie

    1999-10-01

    There have been numerous reports stating that treatment of acute rheumatic fever with either aspirin or corticosteroids does not alter the long-term outcome of rheumatic heart disease. Yet, it should be emphasized that most of these studies were carried out with the first generic corticosteroids before the advent of the more active and more potent corticosteroid agents. In spite of this caveat, there is no question that all the clinical and laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) return to normal much more rapidly with corticosteroids than with aspirin alone. It is therefore our belief that steroids should be used when clinical and laboratory evidence of carditis exists, and aspirin should be reserved for cases of acute rheumatic arthritis with no evidence of carditis. The incidence of long-term valvular disease in active carditis may be decreased with steroid therapy. For example, the number of valve replacements differs markedly in centers that do use steroids and in those that do not. In Capetown, South Africa, where steroids are routinely used for carditis, valve replacement is quite rare. In contrast, in Johannesburg, where steroids are rarely used, the rate of valve replacement is quite high. The racial backgrounds of both groups of patients are similar, thus eliminating the question of racial differences. Concerning secondary prophylaxis, there is also controversy concerning the best second-line therapy. It is now well known that monthly intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin are really effective for only 20 days. Thus, there is a window in which penicillin coverage is not adequate. To circumvent this problem, some investigators give benzathine penicillin every 3 weeks. These injections are quite painful, however, and it has been our "rule" that compliance with this treatment is inversely proportional to the ratio of the size of the child to the mother. In our own experience over 30 years with the

  7. [Rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment.

  8. Heat Shock Protein 70 Family Members Interact with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Hazara Virus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Perform a Functional Role in the Nairovirus Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Surtees, Rebecca; Dowall, Stuart D.; Shaw, Amelia; Armstrong, Stuart; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.; Mankouri, Jamel; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family contains serious human and animal pathogens classified within multiple serogroups and species. Of these serogroups, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) serogroup comprises sole members CCHFV and Hazara virus (HAZV). CCHFV is an emerging zoonotic virus that causes often-fatal hemorrhagic fever in infected humans for which preventative or therapeutic strategies are not available. In contrast, HAZV is nonpathogenic to humans and thus represents an excellent model to study aspects of CCHFV biology under conditions of more-accessible biological containment. The three RNA segments that form the nairovirus genome are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that are substrates for RNA synthesis and packaging into virus particles. We used quantitative proteomics to identify cellular interaction partners of CCHFV N and identified robust interactions with cellular chaperones. These interactions were validated using immunological methods, and the specific interaction between native CCHFV N and cellular chaperones of the HSP70 family was confirmed during live CCHFV infection. Using infectious HAZV, we showed for the first time that the nairovirus N-HSP70 association was maintained within both infected cells and virus particles, where N is assembled as RNPs. Reduction of active HSP70 levels in cells by the use of small-molecule inhibitors significantly reduced HAZV titers, and a model for chaperone function in the context of high genetic variability is proposed. These results suggest that chaperones of the HSP70 family are required for nairovirus replication and thus represent a genetically stable cellular therapeutic target for preventing nairovirus-mediated disease. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses compose a group of human and animal viruses that are transmitted by ticks and associated with serious or fatal disease. One member is Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

  9. Postfire chaparral regeneration under mediterranean and non-mediterranean climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Fotheringham, Connie J.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares postfire regeneration and diversity patterns in fire-prone chaparral shrublands from mediterranean (California) and non-mediterranean-type climates (Arizona). Vegetation sampling was conducted in tenth hectare plots with nested subplots for the first two years after fire. Floras in the two regions were compared with Jaccard's Index and importance of families and genera compared with dominance-diversity curves. Although there were 44 families in common between the two regions, the dominant families differed; Poaceae and Fabaceae in Arizona and Hydrophyllaceae and Rosaceae in California. Dominance diversity curves indicated in the first year a more equable distribution of families in Arizona than in California. Woody plants were much more dominant in the mediterranean climate and herbaceous plants more dominant in the bimodal rainfall climate. Species diversity was comparable in both regions at the lowest spatial scales but not at the tenth hectare scale. Due to the double growing season in the non-mediterranean region, the diversity for the first year comprised two different herbaceous floras in the fall and spring growing seasons. The Mediterranean climate in California, in contrast, had only a spring growing season and thus the total diversity for the first year was significantly greater in Arizona than in California for both annuals and herbaceous perennials. Chaparral in these two climate regimes share many dominant shrub species but the postfire communities are very different. Arizona chaparral has both a spring and fall growing season and these produce two very different postfire floras. When combined, the total annual diversity was substantially greater in Arizona chaparral.

  10. Imported Lassa Fever - Reexamining the Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-18

    result of aerosol trans- mission to patients and family members on an open ward from a patient with pneumonia and th, protean manifestations of Lassa ...tems, equipment, and procedures to protect against aerosol transmission of the disease. Aerosols contain- ing the virus proved infectious in animals...have dealt with cases of both en- demic and imported Lassa fever have shed light on the TWENTY years ago the arenavirus Lassa fever virus features of

  11. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ... Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > From Insects or Animals > Rat Bite Fever Health Issues Listen ...

  12. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of ...

  14. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  15. Beyond Intuition: Patient Fever Symptom Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.; Peng, Claudia; Powers, John H.; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Rosenberg, Alice; VanRaden, Mark; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    Context Fever is an important sign of inflammation recognized by health care practitioners and family caregivers. However, few empirical data obtained directly from patients exist to support many of the long-standing assumptions about the symptoms of fever. Many of the literature-cited symptoms, including chills, diaphoresis, and malaise, have limited scientific bases, yet they often represent a major justification for antipyretic administration. Objectives To describe the patient experience of fever symptoms for the preliminary development of a fever assessment questionnaire. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 inpatients, the majority (86%) with cancer diagnoses, who had a recorded temperature of ≥38°C within approximately 12 hours before the interview. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit patient fever experiences. Thematic analyses were conducted by three independent research team members, and the data were verified through two rounds of consensus building. Results Eleven themes emerged. The participants reported experiences of feeling cold, weakness, warmth, sweating, nonspecific bodily sensations, gastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, emotional changes, achiness, respiratory symptoms, and vivid dreams/hallucinations. Conclusion Our data not only confirm long-standing symptoms of fever but also suggest new symptoms and a level of variability and complexity not captured by the existing fever literature. Greater knowledge of patients’ fever experiences will guide more accurate assessment of symptoms associated with fever and the impact of antipyretic treatments on patient symptoms in this common condition. Results from this study are contributing to the content validity of a future instrument that will evaluate patient outcomes related to fever interventions. PMID:23742739

  16. Fever: is it beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Blatteis, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained in lizards infected with live bacteria suggest that fever may be beneficial to their survival. An adaptive value of fever has also been inferred in mammals, but the results are equivocal. Findings that certain leukocyte functions are enhanced in vitro at high temperatures have provided a possible explanation for the alleged benefits of fever. However, serious questions exist as to whether results from experiments in ectotherms and in vitro can properly be extrapolated to in vivo endothermic conditions. Indeed, various studies have yielded results inconsistent with the survival benefits attributed to fever, and fever is not an obligatory feature of all infections under all conditions. Certainly, the widespread use of antipyretics, without apparent adverse effects on the course of disease, argues against fever having great benefit to the host. In sum, although fever is a cardinal manifestation of infection, conclusive evidence that it has survival value in mammals is still lacking. PMID:3090790

  17. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Sara; Bokaean, Mohammad; Shahrivar, Mona Ranjvar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. The viral genome consists of 3 RNA segments of 12 kb (L), 6.8 kb (M), and 3 kb (S). Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread tickborne viral infection worldwide: it has been reported in many regions of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The geographical distribution of CCHFV corresponds most closely with the distribution of members of the tick genera, and Hyalomma ticks are the principal source of human infection. In contrast to human infection, CCHFV infection is asymptomatic in all species. Treatment options for CCHF are limited; immunotherapy and ribavirin are effective in the treatment of CCHF; the efficacy of ribavirin in the treatment of CCHF has not yet been proven. This article reviews the history, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CCHFV, as well as the development of a vaccine against it.

  18. Experimental therapies for yellow fever

    PubMed Central

    Julander, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  19. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    the period 246 Lassa Fever Immune Plasma (LFIP) units were obtained by plasmapheresis , 106 were forwarded to USAMRIID. During the whole life of the...Fever in Plasmapheresis #20 - the inception of the Contract LV has been isolated from 139 of 213 LF patients and another 71 presumptive LF cases have...During the year plasmapheresis at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) resulted in the collection of 246 units of Lassa Fever

  20. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . Clinical... Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. W.H.O. 52: 593-598 (1975). 5. Clayton, A.J. Lassa immune serum. Bull. W.H.O. 55: 435-439...1977). 6. Leifer, E., Gocke, D.J., & Bourne, H. Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . II. Report of a laboratory acquired

  1. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  2. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Salas, R; de Manzione, N; Tesh, R B; Rico-Hesse, R; Shope, R E; Betancourt, A; Godoy, O; Bruzual, R; Pacheco, M E; Ramos, B

    1991-10-26

    An outbreak of severe haemorrhagic illness began in the municipality of Guanarito, Portuguesa State, Venezuela, in September, 1989. Subsequent detailed study of 15 cases confirmed the presence of a new viral disease, designated Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever. Characteristic features are fever, toxicity, headache, arthralgia, diarrhoea, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and haemorrhagic manifestations. Other features include facial oedema, cervical lymphadenopathy, nausea/vomiting, cough, chest or abdominal pain, and convulsions. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 54 years; all were residents of rural areas in central Venezuela, and 9 died. Infection with Guanarito virus, a newly recognised arenavirus, was shown by direct culture or by serological confirmation in all cases. Epidemiological studies suggest that the disease is endemic in some rural areas of central Venezuela and that it is rodent-borne. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever has many similarities to Lassa fever and to the arenavirus haemorrhagic fevers that occur in Argentina and Bolivia.

  3. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N; Kalantri, S; Peter, J V; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M; Chugh, T D; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-02-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a 'syndromic approach' to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes.

  4. The Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging zoonotic disease distributed in sub-Saharan African countries and the Arabian Peninsula. The disease is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes, and virus replication in domestic ruminant results in high rates of mortality and abortion. RVFV infection in humans usually causes a self-limiting, acute and febrile illness; however, a small number of cases progress to neurological disorders, partial or complete blindness, hemorrhagic fever, or thrombosis. This review describes the pathology of RVF in human patients and several animal models, and summarizes the role of viral virulence factors and host factors that affect RVFV pathogenesis. PMID:21666766

  5. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  6. The pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2011-05-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging zoonotic disease distributed in sub-Saharan African countries and the Arabian Peninsula. The disease is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes, and virus replication in domestic ruminant results in high rates of mortality and abortion. RVFV infection in humans usually causes a self-limiting, acute and febrile illness; however, a small number of cases progress to neurological disorders, partial or complete blindness, hemorrhagic fever, or thrombosis. This review describes the pathology of RVF in human patients and several animal models, and summarizes the role of viral virulence factors and host factors that affect RVFV pathogenesis.

  7. Fatal Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Mafra, Cláudio Lísias; Calic, Simone Berger; Chamone, Chequer Buffe; Filho, Gracco Cesarino; Olano, Juan Pablo; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence and reemergence of a serious infectious disease are often associated with a high case-fatality rate because of misdiagnosis and inappropriate or delayed treatment. The current reemergence of spotted fever rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in Brazil has resulted in a high proportion of fatal cases. We describe two familial clusters of Brazilian spotted fever in the state of Minas Gerais, involving six children 9 months to 15 years of age; five died. Immunohistochemical investigation of tissues obtained at necropsy of a child in each location, Novo Cruzeiro and Coronel Fabriciano municipalities, established the diagnosis by demonstration of disseminated endothelial infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae. The diagnosis in the two fatal cases from Coronel Fabriciano and the surviving patient from Novo Cruzeiro was further supported by immunofluorescence serologic tests. PMID:14718082

  8. Immunological Features Underlying Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. PMID:26163194

  9. Hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Pigott, David C

    2005-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral hemorrhagic fever infection. The focus is on clinical management based on case series from naturally occuring outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever infection as well as imported cases of viral hemorrhagic fever encountered in industrialized nations. The potential risk of bioterrorism involving these agents is discussed as well as emergency department and critical care management of isolated cases or larger outbreaks. Important aspects of management, including recognition of infected patients, isolation and decontamination procedures, as well as available vaccines and therapies are emphasized.

  10. Is fever beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Fever, the regulation of body temperature at an elevated level, is a common response to infection throughout the vertebrates, as well as in many species of invertebrate animals. It is probable that fever evolved as an adaptive response to infection hundreds of millions of years ago. Many components of the nonspecific and specific host response to infection are enhanced by small elevations in temperature. Perhaps more important, studies of bacterial- and viral-infected animals have shown that, in general, moderate fevers decrease morbidity and increase survival rate. PMID:3488621

  11. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  12. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1974. 5. Frame, J. D. Surveillance of Lassa Fever amohg missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. WVHO 52: 593-59a, 1975 6. Monath, T.- P. Lassa ...A883 049 COLUMBIA UNIV NEW YORK DIV OF TROPIAL MEDIC.NE F/S 6/5 LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA U) AUG 79 J D FRAME DAMD17-79-C-9024 UNCLASSIFIED...NL’mmmEmmEmmEE.inuuuuwi LLVIL j~~AD’ LEVEL REPORT NO. 1I 0) LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA Annual Summary Report John 0. Frame, M.D. i Division of Tropical

  13. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    extension. *References 1. Frame, J.D., Baldwin, J.M., Jr., Gocke, J. and Troup, J.M. Lassa * fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . 1...missionaries stationed In West Africa . Bull. WHO 52: 593-598, 1975. 6. Monath, T.P. Lassa fever : review of epidemiology. Bull. WHO S2: 577-592, 1975. 7...A .2~ .!. . .~ *~ - ~ ~-~**~ 7 -7 - M~L - . Statement of the Problem: Investigations of Lassa fever , a recently discovered viral disease of West

  14. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-31

    5. Frame, JD. Surveillance of Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. W. H. 0. 52: 593-598 (1979). 6. Leifer, E, Gocke, D J...man from Africa . I. Clinical description and pathological findings. Am. J. TroD. Med. Hva. 19: 670-675. 2. White, HA Lassa fever . A study of 23...Bourne, H. Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from Africa . II. Report of a laboratory acquired infection treated with plasma from a person recently

  15. Woodlands Grazing Issues in Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, P.

    2009-04-01

    In Mediterranean basin, woodlands grazing still continue to be important commercial owners' benefits. These owners manage woodlands vegetations as if they were not at risk of degradation and declining. Frequently, no temporally grazing set-aside is taken into account to avoid overgrazing of annual and perennial vegetations. Although less common, in the northern shore of Mediterranean basin undergrazing might increase the frequency and the number of catastrophic forest fires. This under/over grazing regime occurs in the Mediterranean basin woodlands with contrasted differences on land property rights, local economies and government livestock policy incentives. Spain and Tunisia are examples of these Mediterranean livestock contrasts. Most of Spanish Mediterranean woodlands and livestock herds are large private ownerships and owners could maintain their lands and livestock herds properties on the basis of moderate cash-income compensation against land revaluation and exclusive amenity self-consumption. The later is less tangible benefit and it could include family land legacy, nature enjoyment, country stile of life development, social status and so on. In public woodlands, social and environmental goals -as they are cultural heritage, biodiversity loss mitigation, soil conservation and employment- could maintain market unprofitable woodlands operations. Last three decades Spanish Mediterranean woodlands owners have increased the livestock herds incentivized by government subsidies. As result, grazing rent is pending on the level of European Union and Spanish government livestock subsidies. In this context, Spanish Mediterranean woodlands maintain a high extensive livestock stoking population, which economy could be called fragile and environmentally unsustainable because forest degradation and over/under grazing practices. Tunisian Mediterranean woodlands are state properties and livestock grazing is practice as a free private regimen. Livestock herds are small herd

  16. Kid's Guide to Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerned when you have a fever. Shiver, Then Sweat Once your hypothalamus sets a new temperature for ... heat that's been in your body. You may sweat and decide to change into some lighter-weight ...

  17. Fever: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... care strategies as listed for children. When to seek medical advice Get medical help for a fever ... or lasts longer than three days When to seek emergency care Seek emergency medical care if your ...

  18. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the throat may be covered with a whitish coating, or appear red, swollen, and dotted with whitish ... the tongue may have a whitish or yellowish coating. A child with scarlet fever also may have ...

  19. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  20. Travelers' Health: Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... to-human) transmission occurring. There are 3 transmission cycles for yellow fever: sylvatic (jungle), intermediate (savannah), and urban. The sylvatic (jungle) cycle involves transmission of the virus between nonhuman primates ...

  1. Hay fever in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wiseberg, Max

    2014-05-01

    Spring and summer can bring misery to millions who suffer from allergic reactions to pollen. Hay fever can cause runny noses, streaming eyes and sore throats. Sadly, many treatments for this distressing condition are not recommended during pregnancy because of fears surrounding the effect on the unborn child. This article presents the causes and treatments of hay fever and explores the alternatives for use during pregnancy which may be able to relieve or minimise the unpleasant symptoms without harming the baby.

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  3. Emergence of Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Angelakis, E; Raoult, D

    2011-01-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis with many acute and chronic manifestations caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection, and transmission to human beings is mainly accomplished through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Persons at greatest risk are those in contact with farm animals and include farmers, abattoir workers, and veterinarians. The organs most commonly affected during Q fever are the heart, the arteries, the bones and the liver. The most common clinical presentation is an influenza-like illness with varying degrees of pneumonia and hepatitis. Although acute disease is usually self-limiting, people do occasionally die from this condition. Endocarditis is the most serious and most frequent clinical presentation of chronic Q fever. Vascular infection is the second most frequent presentation of Q fever. The diagnosis of Q fever is based on a significant increase in serum antibody titers. The treatment is effective and well tolerated, but must be adapted to the acute or chronic pattern with the tetracyclines to be considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy. For the treatment of Q fever during pregnancy the use of long-term cotrimoxazole therapy is proposed. PMID:23113081

  4. Evaluation and treatment of fever in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Fever is a common complaint in hospitalized patients, with estimates that more than 30% of ward patients and as much as 90% of critically ill patients will experience fever. Much of the treatment of fever, however, is based on tradition and the belief the fever is harmful to the patient rather than on scientific evidence. There is a need to determine via analysis of the literature the best evidence-based approach to the identification and treatment of fever with attention to appropriate measurement of body temperature, diagnostic evaluation, changing of indwelling catheters, administration of antipyretics, and alteration in antimicrobial therapy. The advanced practice nurse is uniquely capable of gathering this evidence and implementing a plan of care that meets the individual needs of the patient, family, nursing staff, and healthcare system.

  5. Ebola hemorrhagic fever in the era of bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Polesky, Andrea; Bhatia, Gulshan

    2003-09-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are among a small group of infectious diseases considered potential candidates for use as agents of bioterrorism. Ebola hemorrhagic fever, the focus of this article, has the highest mortality rate of the viral hemorrhagic fevers and has no effective treatment. It is transmitted easily to family members and health care professionals not following universal precautions. The history of this infection, its clinical presentation, and epidemiology are discussed. Attention is paid to the immunopathogenesis of the disease with a focus on pulmonary involvement. Recommendations for infection control and Ebola virus' potential as a bioterrorism agent are addressed.

  6. Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever

    PubMed Central

    Lamelas, Pablo; Labadet, Carlos; Spernanzoni, Fernando; Saubidet, Cristian Lopez; Alvarez, Paulino A

    2012-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a major cause of sudden death in young adults. Fever has been described to induce a Brugada-type electrocardiogram in asymptomatic patients with a negative family history, to disclose Brugada syndrome and to increase the risk of death and induce T wave alternans in patients with diagnosed Brugada syndrome. Risk stratification is challenging and demands a careful evaluation. Here we present 2 case reports and review the literature. PMID:22451857

  7. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recent Zaire ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses--Filoviridae, Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Flaviviridae--we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective.

  8. Vaccines against typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Pearman, Jon; Collioud, Andre; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2006-05-01

    Because of high infectivity and significant disease burden, typhoid fever constitutes a major global health problem. Implementation of adequate food handling practices and establishment of safe water supplies are the cornerstone for the development of an effective prevention program. However, vaccination against typhoid fever remains an essential tool for the effective management of this disease. Currently, there are two well tolerated and effective licensed vaccines. One is based on defined subunit virulence (Vi) polysaccharide antigen and can be administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously and the other is based on the use of live attenuated bacteria for oral administration. The advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches taken in the development of a vaccine against typhoid fever are discussed, along with the potential for future vaccine candidates.

  9. [Fever after travel return].

    PubMed

    Schedel, I

    2004-06-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Approximately 3 percent of people traveling internationally for short periods (<2 weeks) report fever even after travel. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status use or nonuse of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, and degree of compliance with a chemoprophylactic regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particular helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Specific examinations targeting the individual infection, assumed to be responsible for the development of febrile disease may ascertain diagnosis and lead to effective treatment.

  10. Fever in honeybee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, P. T.; Blackie, Caroline A.; Seeley, Thomas D.

    Honeybees, Apis spp., maintain elevated temperatures inside their nests to accelerate brood development and to facilitate defense against predators. We present an additional defensive function of elevating nest temperature: honeybees generate a brood-comb fever in response to colonial infection by the heat-sensitive pathogen Ascosphaera apis. This response occurs before larvae are killed, suggesting that either honeybee workers detect the infection before symptoms are visible, or that larvae communicate the ingestion of the pathogen. This response is a striking example of convergent evolution between this "superorganism" and other fever-producing animals.

  11. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    AD-A<m 761 KOREA UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE KOREAN HEM0RRHA6IC FEVER.(U) MAR 80 H W LEE UNCLASSIFIED ICFI F/6 6/5 DAM017-79-6-9<*55 NL...I» > I,,iu. •Uli ••-. SUMMARY There were 364 hospitalized cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in 1979 in Korea . Lee et al...STANDARDS-1963-A ?H "LEVEtf® AD <o KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC F EVER A D A 09 47 Final Report HO WANG LEE, M. D. March 1980 i MIL. IIB«I . Mm k iw

  12. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  13. Typhus fever: an overlooked diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Ramendra N; Pietroni, Mark A C; Mosabbir, Nadira; Salam, M A

    2009-06-01

    A case of typhus fever is presented. On admission, the clinical diagnosis was typhoid fever. Forty-eight hours after admission, the presence of subconjunctival haemorrhage, malena, and jaundice raised the possibility of a different aetiology, the two most likely differentials being dengue and typhus. Finally, a co-infection of typhoid and typhus was discovered. This uncommon clinical scenario should be taken into account in the management of patients with high fever on admission being treated as a case of typhoid fever.

  14. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    RD-RI55 255 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL 11 SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H U LEE RUG 83 DRMDi...the first time in Korea (4,13). WHO has recently adapted to call Korean hemorrhagic fever and clinically similar diseases with a different name, HFRS...AD_______ I •. KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER • (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME (HFRS)) I Final Report 0 In HO WANG LEE, M.D. August 1983 Supported by U.S

  15. Mild typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Topley, J M

    1986-01-01

    A series of 100 Zimbabwean children aged between 5 months and 13 years with culture positive typhoid fever is presented. The disease was found to be fairly mild with a low prevalence of complications, and no patient in the series died. Possible explanations for the relative mildness of typhoid in this paediatric population are discussed. PMID:3954441

  16. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth > For Parents > Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... en español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  17. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Scarlet ... > For Parents > Scarlet Fever Print A A A What's in ...

  18. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  19. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 400 cases have been being reportee every year

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  1. Periodic fevers with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA).

    PubMed

    Vigo, Giulia; Zulian, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    PFAPA syndrome (acronym of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) is the most common cause of periodic fever in childhood. Nowadays, it is considered part of the wide family of the autoinflammatory diseases, but a genetic or molecular marker hasn't been identified yet, therefore, its etiology is still unknown. Diagnosis is essentially based on clinical criteria but, especially in younger children, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate it from other hereditary periodic fever syndromes. Fever attacks in PFAPA have a spontaneous resolution and in a high rate of patients the syndrome ends spontaneously over time. Treatment is still a matter of debate. Usually a single administration of oral corticosteroids aborts attacks. Tonsillectomy may be an alternative option but its role remains to be clarified.

  2. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nora S; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic disorder of childhood, presents with the cardinal symptoms of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis typically before age 5. This review presents the recent literature on PFAPA and summarizes key findings in the pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of the disease. Theories surrounding the pathogenesis of PFAPA include a faulty innate immunologic response in conjunction with dysregulated T-cell activation. A potential genetic link is also under consideration. Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene variants have been implicated and appear to modify disease severity. In individuals with the heterozygous variant, PFAPA episodes are milder and shorter in duration. Diagnostic criteria include the traditional clinical signs, in addition to the following biomarkers: elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of elevated procalcitonin, vitamin D, CD64, mean corpuscular volume, and other nonspecific inflammatory mediators in the absence of an infectious explanation for fever. Treatment of PFAPA includes tonsillectomy, a single dose of corticosteroids, and, most recently, interleukin 1 blockers such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab. Tonsillectomy remains the only permanent treatment modality.

  3. Classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Moennig, V; Becher, P; Beer, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious and economically important transboundary disease threatening pig production globally. The infection may occur in backyard pigs, feral pig populations and domestic pigs. Whereas there are proven control strategies for the latter pig population, control in backyard pigs with poor biosecurity settings or in wild boar populations of high density still poses a problem in some parts of the world. Laboratory diagnostic methods, efficacious vaccines and contingency plans are in place in most industrialised countries. So far modified live vaccines (MLV) are still the first choice for rapid and reliable immune protection. Since antibodies elicited by conventional MLV cannot be distinguished from antibodies after natural infection, considerable efforts are put into the development of a live marker vaccine accompanied by a serological test. Nevertheless, some remaining gaps with respect to the diagnosis of and vaccination against classical swine fever have been identified.

  4. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  5. Relapsing fever in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Babudieri, B.

    1957-01-01

    The author reports on a survey carried out by him in 1954 on relapsing fever in Jordan. In that country the disease is largely tick-borne, the main vector being Ornithodoros tholozani. Some of the frequent cases in the town of Nablus and the village of Marda in West Jordan may, however, be caused by O. coniceps. The centres of infection are some of the numerous caves scattered throughout the hilly areas and certain houses in which chickens are kept. It is believed that the vector ticks could be successfully exterminated by the use of insecticides and by the adoption of certain procedures outlined by the author. Arsenobenzol compounds and penicillin have been shown not to be very effective for the treatment of relapsing fever, but good results have been obtained with Aureomycin and Terramycin. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:13472437

  6. Relevance of Rift Valley fever to public health in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, V

    2013-08-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF), a vector-borne zoonotic disease caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), is considered to be one of the most important viral zoonoses in Africa. It is also a potential bioterrorism agent. Transmitted by mosquitoes or by direct contact with viraemic products, RVF affects both livestock and humans, causing abortion storms in pregnant ruminants and sudden death in newborns. The disease provokes flu syndrome in most human cases, but also severe encephalitic or haemorrhagic forms and death. There is neither a treatment nor a vaccine for humans. The disease, historically confined to the African continent, recently spread to the Arabian Peninsula and Indian Ocean. Animal movements, legal or illegal, strongly contribute to viral spread, threatening the Mediterranean basin and Europe, where competent vectors are present. Given the unpredictability of virus introduction and uncertainties about RVF epidemiology, there is an urgent need to fill the scientific gaps by developing large regional research programmes, to build predictive models, and to implement early warning systems and surveillance designs adapted to northern African and European countries.

  7. [Rift valley fever].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Pantiukhov, V B; Markov, V I; Bondarev, V P

    2012-01-01

    In the last quarter of century virus of Rift valley fever (RVF) sharply extended its distribution by moving from Africa to Asia and evolving from low- to high pathogenic for humans causing severe hemorrhagic disease, practically equaling in this respect with some members ofa group of extremely dangerous pathogens. Morbidity and epidemics of RVF are analyzed. Evolution of epidemic development of the infection is examined. Necessity of development of means and methods for diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy of RVF is underlined.

  8. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    to perform the indirect fluorescent antibody test. He is also able to conduct surveys, and to supervise plasmapheresis . Recently a Clinical...Miscellaneous 44 Total 3,902 2. Plasmapheresis The primary objective of the program was the collection of units of plasma from convalescents from...Lassa fever. Details regarding the criteria means and results of plasmapheresis are given in Chapter 2. One hundred twenty two plasma units were collected

  9. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-31

    E. Yalley-Ogunro, was engaged in visits to the field stations at CLH and PH for plasmapheresis , in testing patients for indirect fluorescent... Plasmapheresis yielded 358 plasma units, of which 180 were forwarded to USAMRIID. They are to be tested there for the concentratrion of neutralizing...Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 9 Map - Northern Liberia 10 Appendix - Tables 1. Lassa

  10. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    both plasmapheresis and serodiagnosis were limited. 153Plasmapheresis at the Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) yielded 153 plasma...Page Summary 1 Foreward 2 Narrative 4 Introduction 4 Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 8...education of the Field Investigator, Mr. J.E. Yalley- Ogunro, in diagnostic techniques which will be used in therapeutic investigations, continued

  11. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions.

  12. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Medicine Seoul, Korea * S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SUM ARY Urban rats captured in Seoul and four nearby Korean cities were found to have...rattus, urban Korean cities, 1980. . . . 15 Table 2. Isolation of Hantaan virus from antigen-positive wild house rats, Korea , 1980 .... ........... .. 16...Figures Figure 1. Map of Seoul City, South Korea and metropolitan area showing locations of urban Korean hemorrhagic fever cases, andRattu s positive

  13. [Rift Valley fever].

    PubMed

    Pépin, M

    2011-06-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a zoonotic arbovirosis. Among animals, it mainly affects ruminants, causing abortions in gravid females and mortality among young animals. In humans, RVF virus infection is usually asymptomatic or characterized by a moderate fever. However, in 1 to 3% of cases, more severe forms of the disease (hepatitis, encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever) can lead to the death of infected individuals or to major sequels. The RVF virus (Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) was identified for the first time in the 1930s in Kenya. It then spread over almost all African countries, sometimes causing major epizootics/epidemics. In 2000, the virus was carried out of Africa, in the Middle East Arabian Peninsula. In 2007-2008, Eastern-African countries, including Madagascar, reported significant episodes of RVF virus, this was also the case for the Comoros archipelago and the French island of Mayotte. This ability to spread associated with many vectors, including in Europe, and high viral loads in infected animals led the health authorities worldwide to warn about the potential emergence of RVF virus in areas with a temperate climate. The awareness has increased in recent years with climate changes, which may possibly modify the vector distribution and competence, and prompted many RVF virus-free countries to better prepare for a potential implantation of RVF.

  14. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    53 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea devel6ped a rare hemorrhagic fever which attracted...patients in the Republic of Korea . Year Korean Korean US Total civilian soldiers soldiers 1951 ...... 627 827 1952 .... 833 833 1953 ... ... 455 455...0 RI m HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME ( KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER) ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT HO WANG LEE, M.D. June 30, 1988 Door., Supported by U.S

  15. Q fever — a review

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Q or “query” fever is a zoonosis caused by the organism Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common reservoirs of this organism. The placenta of infected animals contains high numbers (up to 109/g) of C. burnetii. Aerosols occur at the time of parturition and man becomes infected following inhalation of the microorganism. The spectrum of illness in man is wide and consists of acute and chronic forms. Acute Q fever is most often a self-limited flu-like illness but may include pneumonia, hepatitis, or meningoencephalitis. Chronic Q fever almost always means endocarditis and rarely osteomyelitis. Chronic Q fever is not known to occur in animals other than man. An increased abortion and stillbirth rate are seen in infected domestic ungulates. Four provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta) reported cases of Q fever in 1989. A vaccine for Q fever has recently been licensed in Australia. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17423643

  16. Chikungunya fever presenting with protracted severe pruritus.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Leonichev, Victoria B; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Travelers returning from the tropics often present with rash/fever. Those with rash/fever and myalgias/arthralgias are most likely due to chikungunya fever, dengue fever, or Zika virus. In these arthropod viral transmitted infections, the rash may be pruritic. The case presented here is that of chikungunya fever remarkable for the intensity and duration of her pruritis.

  17. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except “rose spots”, skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not routinely performed in typhoid fever. We describe scrotal ulcers as the presenting symptom of typhoid fever, which subsided with appropriate therapy. PMID:26894114

  18. [Marseille fever imported from Spain].

    PubMed

    Freibergerová, Michaela; Parízková, Radana; Husa, Petr; Burget, Ivo; Chalupa, Pavel

    2004-08-01

    The authors are presenting a case of young female with Marseille fever contracted in Spain. The clinical manifestation of the illness was characterized by fevers, exanthema, headache and a typical skin rash ("the black spot") and prompted the authors to strongly consider the diagnosis of Marseille fever and to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed later by serology. The article introduces new taxonomy of Rickettsial species and presents an overview and epidemiological aspects of specific diseases caused by them. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of Marseille fever are discussed in greater detail.

  19. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zoonosis Diseases Anaplasmosis Ehrlichiosis Other Spotted ... fever is caused by infection with the bacteria C. burnetii . Cattle, sheep, and goats are commonly infected and people often become exposed ...

  20. Biogeography of Mediterranean Invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, R. H.; di Castri, F.

    The Mediterranean basin, California, Chile, the western Cape of South Africa, and southern Australia share a Mediterranean climate characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. These five regions have differing patterns of human settlement, but similarities in natural vegetation and some faunal assemblages. These likenesses are enhanced with time by an increasing level of biotic exchange among the regions. An initiative of a subcommittee of SCOPE (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment), which realized that the integrity of many natural ecosystems is being threatened by the ingress of invasive species, this book uniquely documents the introduced floras and faunas, especially plants, buds, and mammals, in these five regions of Mediterranean climate, and aims to increase our understanding of the ecology of biological invasions. In doing so, it points a way to more effectively manage the biota of these regions.

  1. Treatment of hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S F

    1989-01-01

    The range of treatments for hay fever available to the general practitioner has changed considerably in recent years. New antihistamines have addressed the problem of sedation and moved towards one daily dose; nasally applied corticosteroids avoid the need for systemic steroid therapy and its potential adverse effect; and regulatory decisions have set a trend away from immunotherapy in general practice. However, knowledge about the mechanism of action of immunotherapy is increasing and new developments with improved safety profiles include allergen polymers, allergoids, oral immunotherapy and nasal immunotherapy. Choice of treatment depends, as always, on the individual circumstances of the patient and his or her disease. PMID:2556545

  2. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-31

    10606 Lassa fever nfi 1 6 1 1 Lassa virus I9.AU TRACT (C *ont~u 0’mYO er~~~n of aeguM*# 4wvv &I muinw) Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran...Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRTID), and ultimately, therapeutic trials of the plasma and comparison of its...effectiveness with ribavirin, an antiviral agent. Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH), and increasingly at Phebe Hospital (PH) with 255

  3. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 300 cases have been reported every year. The aims...but in 1971 affected the middle districts and in 1972 invaded the southern parts of South Korea . The number of patients and the areas of KHF in 1972

  4. What about My Child and Rheumatic Fever?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What About My Child and Rheumatic Fever? Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction that can occur after ... strep throat infections don’t lead to rheumatic fever. When they do, the time between the strep ...

  5. Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rougeron, V; Feldmann, H; Grard, G; Becker, S; Leroy, E M

    2015-03-01

    Ebolaviruses and Marburgviruses (family Filoviridae) are among the most virulent pathogens for humans and great apes causing severe haemorrhagic fever and death within a matter of days. This group of viruses is characterized by a linear, non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome of negative polarity. The overall burden of filovirus infections is minimal and negligible compared to the devastation caused by malnutrition and other infectious diseases prevalent in Africa such as malaria, dengue or tuberculosis. In this paper, we review the knowledge gained on the eco/epidemiology, the pathogenesis and the disease control measures for Marburg and Ebola viruses developed over the last 15 years. The overall progress is promising given the little attention that these pathogen have achieved in the past; however, more is to come over the next decade given the more recent interest in these pathogens as potential public and animal health concerns. Licensing of therapeutic and prophylactic options may be achievable over the next 5-10 years.

  6. Argentine hemorrhagic fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Ana; Saavedra, Maria; Mariani, Mauricio; Gamboa, Graciela; Maiza, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), an acute disease caused by Junin virus (JUNV, Arenaviridae), has been an important issue to public health in Argentina since the early 1950s. The field rodent Calomys musculinus is JUNV natural reservoir and human disease is a consequence of contact with infected rodents. A steady extention of AHF endemic area is being observed since the first reports of the disease. Important achievements have been made in: (a) improvement of methods for the etiological diagnosis; (b) implementation and validation of therapeutical measures; (c) development of vaccines to protect against AHF. Reference is made to different research strategies used to obtain anti-AHF vaccines in the past and anti-arenaviral diseases in the present. Information is updated on features and field performance of Candid #1 vaccine, a live attenuted vaccine currently used to prevent AHF. This vaccine was developed through a joint international effort that envisioned it as an orphan drug. With transferred technology, Argentine government was committed to be Candid #1 manufacturer and to register this vaccine as a novel medical product under the Argentine regulatory authority. Candid #1 vaccine is the first one used to control an arenaviral hemorrhagic fever, the first live viral vaccine to be manufactured and registered in Argentina, reaching its target population through governmental effort.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  8. Mayaro fever virus, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Raimunda S S; Silva, Eliana V P; Carvalho, Valéria L; Rodrigues, Sueli G; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P; Monteiro, Hamilton; Peixoto, Victor S; Chiang, Jannifer O; Nunes, Márcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2009-11-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D.

  9. Possibilities for Relapsing Fever Reemergence

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Relapsing fever Borrelia infections have attracted little attention in recent years; however, where endemic, these infections still result in considerable illness and death. Despite the marked antimicrobial drug susceptibility of these organisms, therapy is often delayed through lack of clinical suspicion. With increasing travel, infections may be imported, through exotic relapsing fever infection or through resurgence of infected disease vectors. Although louseborne relapsing fever is now geographically limited, it was once of global importance. The possibility for reemergence was recently highlighted by the probable reemergence of louseborne relapsing fever in homeless persons from France. Host limitations enforced through louseborne transmission are less applicable for the tickborne forms of relapsing fever. Although the latter have reduced potential for epidemic spread, they have the ability to infect diverse hosts, thus establishing reservoirs of infection and presenting greater challenges for their control. PMID:16704771

  10. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... www. immunize. org/ vis 1 What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the ... serious cases) 2 How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow ...

  11. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AD-Ai55 228 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL in. SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H W LEE JUL 84...INTRODUCTION During the Korean War, more than 2,400 United Nations troops stationed in the 38th Parallel in Korea developed a rare disease which had not... Korean hemorrhagic fever patients in urban areas of Seoul. Korean J. Virol. 10: 1-6, 1980. 8. Lee, H. W. New epidemiological findings of HFRS in Korea . J

  12. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  13. Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Paweska, J T

    2015-08-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic viral disease affecting domestic and wild ruminants, camels and humans. The causative agent of RVF, the RVF virus (RVFV), has the capacity to cause large and severe outbreaks in animal and human populations and to cross significant natural geographic barriers. Rift Valley fever is usually inapparent in non-pregnant adult animals, but pregnant animals and newborns can be severely affected; outbreaks are characterised by a sudden onset of abortions and high neonatal mortality. The majority of human infections are subclinical or associated with moderate to severe, non-fatal, febrile illness, but some patients may develop a haemorrhagic syndrome and/or ocular and neurological lesions. In both animals and humans, the primary site of RVFV replication and tissue pathology is the liver. Outbreaks of RVF are associated with persistent high rainfalls leading to massive flooding and the emergence of large numbers of competent mosquito vectors that transmit the virus to a wide range of susceptible vertebrate species. Outbreaks of RVF have devastating economic effects on countries for which animal trade constitutes the main source of national revenue. The propensity of the virus to spread into new territories and re-emerge in traditionally endemic regions, where it causes large outbreaks in human and animal populations, presents a formidable challenge for public and veterinary health authorities. The presence of competent mosquito vectors in RVF-free countries, the wide range of mammals susceptible to the virus, altering land use, the global changes in climate, and increased animal trade and travel are some of the factors which might contribute to international spread of RVF.

  14. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems.

  15. A Phylogenetic Perspective on the Evolution of Mediterranean Teleost Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Meynard, Christine N.; Mouillot, David; Mouquet, Nicolas; Douzery, Emmanuel J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a highly diverse, highly studied, and highly impacted biogeographic region, yet no phylogenetic reconstruction of fish diversity in this area has been published to date. Here, we infer the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank. We assembled a DNA supermatrix composed of four mitochondrial genes (12S ribosomal DNA, 16S ribosomal DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome b) and two nuclear genes (rhodopsin and recombination activating gene I), including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus 9 outgroups. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil constraints. An additional 124 species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity, checking for the effects of taxonomic coverage in subsequent diversification analyses. We then interpreted the time-line of teleost diversification in light of Mediterranean historical biogeography, distinguishing non-endemic natives, endemics and exotic species. Results show that the major Mediterranean orders are of Cretaceous origin, specifically ∼100–80 Mya, and most Perciformes families originated 80–50 Mya. Two important clade origin events were detected. The first at 100–80 Mya, affected native and exotic species, and reflects a global diversification period at a time when the Mediterranean Sea did not yet exist. The second occurred during the last 50 Mya, and is noticeable among endemic and native species, but not among exotic species. This period corresponds to isolation of the Mediterranean from Indo-Pacific waters before the Messinian salinity crisis. The Mediterranean fish fauna illustrates well the assembly of regional faunas through origination and immigration, where dispersal and isolation have shaped the emergence of a biodiversity hotspot. PMID:22590545

  16. Novel approaches to develop Rift Valley fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Indran, Sabarish V; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, and has spread into Madagascar, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus causes hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and high rate abortion and fetal malformation in ruminants. RVFV is classified as a Category A Priority pathogen and overlap select agent by CDC/USDA due to its potential impact on public health and agriculture. There is a gap in the safety and immunogenicity in traditional RVF vaccines; the formalin-inactivated RVFV vaccine TSI-GSD-200 requires three doses for protection, and the live-attenuated Smithburn vaccine has a risk to cause abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants. In this review, problems of traditional vaccines and the safety and efficacy of recently reported novel RVF candidate vaccines including subunit vaccines, virus vector, and replicons are discussed.

  17. Novel approaches to develop Rift Valley fever vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Indran, Sabarish V.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, and has spread into Madagascar, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus causes hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and high rate abortion and fetal malformation in ruminants. RVFV is classified as a Category A Priority pathogen and overlap select agent by CDC/USDA due to its potential impact on public health and agriculture. There is a gap in the safety and immunogenicity in traditional RVF vaccines; the formalin-inactivated RVFV vaccine TSI-GSD-200 requires three doses for protection, and the live-attenuated Smithburn vaccine has a risk to cause abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants. In this review, problems of traditional vaccines and the safety and efficacy of recently reported novel RVF candidate vaccines including subunit vaccines, virus vector, and replicons are discussed. PMID:23112960

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama: a cluster description.

    PubMed

    Tribaldos, Maribel; Zaldivar, Yamitzel; Bermudez, Sergio; Samudio, Franklyn; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Martinez, Alexander A; Villalobos, Rodrigo; Eremeeva, Marina E; Paddock, Christopher D; Page, Kathleen; Smith, Rebecca E; Pascale, Juan Miguel

    2011-10-13

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii. We report a cluster of fatal cases of RMSF in 2007 in Panama, involving a pregnant woman and two children from the same family.  The woman presented with a fever followed by respiratory distress, maculopapular rash, and an eschar at the site from which a tick had been removed.  She died four days after disease onset.  This is the second published report of an eschar in a patient confirmed by PCR to be infected with R. rickettsii.  One month later, the children presented within days of one another with fever and rash and died three and four days after disease onset. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, PCR and sequencing of the genes of R. rickettsii in tissues obtained at autopsy. 

  19. Rhombencephalitis associated with Dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Bharti, Kavita; Mehta, Mannan; Bansod, Amrit

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection is gradually disseminating throughout the world in alarming proportions. It is a arbovirus infection,transmitted by aedes mosquitoes. It is a multi-systemic disorder associated with varied neurological complications. There is increased trend of development of neurological complications in dengue fever. The neurological complications arising due to dengue infection can be categorized into central and neuromuscular complications. The central nervous system disorders reported with dengue fever are encephalopathy,encephalitis and myelitis.Here we report a case of rhombencephalitis associated with dengue fever. The literature does not mention rhombencephalitis occurring with dengue illness.

  20. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    36 DISTRIBUTION LIST. .................... 40 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea developed a rare...hemorrhagic fever, a situa- tion that attracted worldwide attention (1). Since then it has been known as Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in Korea . This...Kyunggido and Kangwondo, northern parts of South Korea . All of the 97 HFRS patients among Korean soldiers occurred in Kyunggido, Kangwondo and Seoul

  1. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-29

    DISTRIBUTION LIST .............. .................... 47 5 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea developed a...rare hemorrhagic fever, a situa- tion that attracted worldwide attention (1). Since then it has been known as Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in Korea ...Chungchoongnsmdo, and Kangwendo, norLhern parts of South Korea . Almost all HFRS patients among Korean soldiers occurred in Kyunggido aind Ksngwmndo where

  2. [Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers--pathogens, epidemiology and therapy].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are severe, systemic viral diseases affecting humans and non-human primates. They are characterized by multiple symptoms such as hemorrhages, fever, headache, muscle and abdominal pain, chills, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Elevated liver-associated enzyme levels and coagulopathy are also associated with these diseases. Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are caused by (Lake victoria) Marburg virus and different species of Ebola viruses, respectively. They are enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses and belong to the family of filoviridae. Case fatality rates of filovirus disease outbreaks are among the highest reported for any human pathogen, ranging from 25 to 90% or more. Outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fever occur in certain regions of equatorial Africa at irregular intervals. Since 2000, the number of outbreaks has increased. In 2014, the biggest outbreak of a filovirus-induced hemorrhagic fever that has been documented so far occurred from March to July 2014 in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. The outbreak was caused by a new variant of Zaire Ebola-Virus, affected more than 2600 people (stated 20 August) and was associated with case-fatality rates of up to 67% (Guinea). Treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers is symptomatic and supportive, licensed antiviral agents are currently not available. Recently, BCX4430, a promising synthetic adenosine analogue with high in vitro and in vivo activity against filoviruses and other RNA viruses, has been described. BCX4430 inhibits viral RNA polymerase activity and protects cynomolgus macaques from Marburg virus infection when administered as late as 48 hours after infection. Nucleic acid-based products, recombinant vaccines and antibodies appear to be less suitable for the treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers.

  3. [Periodic fever: a description of twelve patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA)].

    PubMed

    De Cunto, Carmen; Britos, María; Eymann, Alfredo; Deltetto, Noelia; Liberatore, Diana

    2010-10-01

    PFAPA is a periodic fever syndrome characterized by: fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. It is one of the autoinflammatory syndromes, but yet of unknown etiology. Our aim is to report our experience, describe clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, relapses occurrence and response to treatment. We present 12 PFAPA patients. Median age at onset: 1.15 years, mean duration of febrile episodes: 4 days, and relapses at regular intervals. All children received prednisone (1-2 mg/kg/dose) one to two doses, 9 patients responded immediately after the first dose and all experienced a lower periodicity of attacks. PFAPA is the most frequent periodic fever syndrome. To our knowledge, there are no other local series of PFAPA patients published. Recognizing this syndrome will prevent from ordering unnecessary studies and will favor family coping.

  4. Southeastern Mediterranean Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This oblique northwestward looking panorama view shows the southeastern Mediterranean (29.0N, 33.0E) in great detail. The Sinai Peninsula, the eastern Arabian Desert, the Nile River Valley and Delta as well as the Qatara Depression in Egypt are all prominently portrayed. Even Mt. Sinai is visible in the lower left center of the view. The dusty atmosphere of the region can be seen as a general haziness in the atmosphere.

  5. [Dengue fever--not just a tropical infectious disease].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Dengue fever is a viral disease that is transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitoes, i. e., A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Other species are rarely involved. The disease is caused by dengue virus, an enveloped RNA virus which belongs to the family of flaviviridae. Although most infections are asymptomatic, in 20 to 30 percentages all cases infections are accompanied with high fever and other influenza-like signs of illness. Serious medical conditions with lethal complications also occur. During the last decades, the incidence of dengue fever rose sharply in many tropical and subtropical countries. In some of these regions, dengue is one of the leading causes of death in children. In Europe, since a few years a strong clustering of dengue fever cases has been registered in travelers returning from certain tropical or subtropical regions. Recently, autochthonous outbreaks have been observed on the Atlantic island of Madeira and in a few other regions of South Europe. Treatment of dengue fever is supportive and symptomatic, a specific therapy does not exist. For prevention of disease, vector control is of crucial importance.

  6. The Mediterranean salinity crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, K.J.

    1988-08-01

    That the Mediterranean Sea underwent a salinity crisis during the Miocene (Messinian) is proven by the 1970 JOIDES deep sea drilling expedition. Subsequent work by ocean drilling and by studies on land have recorded the history of this crisis. Based upon the deep desiccated-basin model, the use of event-stratigraphy, calibrated by strontium-isotope dating and magnetostratigraphy, has enabled them to decipher the following events between 6.0 and 5.1 Ma: (1) deposition of marine diatom-rich sediments in a partially restricted basin, (2) first desiccation of the Mediterranean when Calcare di base was deposited at a time of isolation from the Atlantic because of a glacial eustatic drop of sea level, (3) influx of marine waters through southern Spanish basins to furnish brines for the deposition of the main salt, (4) Intra-Messinian desiccation, as evidenced by the erosional unconformity above the lower evaporite, (5) Intra-Messinian denudation, when reefs grew on Cyprus and marine sediments were deposited in basins, (6) frequency isolations due to oscillating sea level, when the upper evaporite was deposited, (7) Lago mare, formation of freshwater and brackish lakes due to influx of Paratethys water, (8) opening of the Gibraltar and Pliocene inundation of the Mediterranean.

  7. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... vector. The Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in animals and ticks The hosts of the CCHF virus ... be effective. Prevention and control Controlling CCHF in animals and ticks Ticks of the genus Hyalomma are ...

  8. Humidifier fever 1

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    MRC Symposium (1977).Thorax, 32, 653-663. Humidifier fever. In enclosed environments, it may be necessary to regulate temperature, ventilation, and humidity to maintain comfortable working conditions. Several systems can be used although in terms of installation and running costs a simple radiator system is far more economical than air conditioning with complete temperature and humidity control. Humidity control requires the introduction of water into a moving current of air, and in such a system baffle plates are often used to eliminate large droplets; also any unused water is usually recirculated. Organic dust drawn into the system and settling on the baffle plates and in the mixing chamber may be utilised by micro-organisms introduced from the atmosphere and from the water supply, and a biomass builds up. Microbial material is then voided into the working atmosphere by the ventilation system. Under appropriate exposure conditions susceptible individuals may succumb to an episode of humidifier fever, an influenza-like illness with pyrexia and malaise as the main symptoms, but cough, chest tightness, dyspnoea and weight loss may also be seen. The episodes usually occur after absence from work for a few days and have been termed `Monday sickness'. Individuals are often able to return to work the next day and appear refractory to further exposure. The disease is of the winter months probably due to the larger amount (up to 90%) of fresh air drawn into the humidifier during the summer. In the blood of exposed subjects precipitins are usually present to extracts of baffle plate material and recirculating water although they are not necessarily indicative of disease. Skin tests may be positive and inhalation challenge has reproduced the disease in susceptible individuals. Many organisms may be isolated from baffle plates and recirculating water but only amoeba extracts have produced consistently positive reactions with sera from affected individuals. Remedial actions

  9. Imported chikungunya fever in Madrid.

    PubMed

    Richi Alberti, Patricia; Steiner, Martina; Illera Martín, Óscar; Alcocer Amores, Patricia; Cobo Ibáñez, Tatiana; Muñoz Fernández, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya Fever is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that causes fever, rash and musculoskeletal complaints. The latest may persist for several months, or even years or developed a relapsing course, that deserve an adequate treatment. Due to the large outbreak declared in the Caribbean in 2013, imported cases of Chikungunya as well as the risk of autochthonous transmission in case of available vectors have increased in non-endemic countries, like Spain. We described four cases of Chikungunya treated in our clinic.

  10. Determination of the cytokine expression profile after infection of (PK-15) Porcine cells with classical swine fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is caused by the Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. A highly contagious disease of domestic pigs and wild boars worldwide it causes serious losses to the pig industry. The virulence of CSF viruses is strai...

  11. [The fever of international travel].

    PubMed

    Hristea, Adriana; Luka, A I; Aramă, Victoria; Moroti, Ruxandra

    2008-01-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Although most illness reported by travellers are mild, 20-70% of travellers become ill enough to seek medical attention, either during or immediately after travel. The full spectrum of health complaints is unknown. Nevertheless the usual presentation of a returned traveller is a particular syndrome-fever, respiratory infection, diarrhoea, eosinophilia, or skin and soft tissue infection- or screening for asymptomatic infection. The most common diseases diagnosed in returning travellers are more often of cosmopolitan than exotic origin. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. Therefore, fever in a returned traveller requires prompt investigation focused on infections that are life-threatening, treatable or transmissible. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status, use or non-use of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and degree of compliance with the prescribed regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particularly helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Malaria is the most important cause of fever in the returned traveller. While most travel-related infections present within 6 months of return, some infections with long latent periods or potential for lifetime persistence might be seen in those who have lived abroad.

  12. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  13. Fever in Children and Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Agarwal, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    Fever is the most common symptom in children and can be classified as fever with or without focus. Fever without focus can be less than 7 d and is subclassified as fever without localizing signs and fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO is defined as a temperature greater than 38.3 °C, for more than 3 wk or failure to reach a diagnosis after 1 wk of inpatient investigations. The most common causes of FUO in children are infections, connective tissue disorders and neoplasms. Infectious diseases most commonly implicated in children with FUO are salmonellosis, tuberculosis, malaria and rickettsial diseases. Juvenile rheumatic arthritis is the connective tissue disease frequently associated with FUO. Malignancy is the third largest group responsible for FUO in children. Diagnostic approach of FUO includes detailed history and examination supported with investigations. Age, history of contact, exposure to wild animals and medications should be noted. Examination should include, apart from general appearance, presence of sweating, rashes, tonsillitis, sinusitis and lymph node enlargement. Other signs such as abdominal tenderness and hepatosplenomegly should be looked for. The muscles and bones should be carefully examined for connective tissue disorders. Complete blood count, blood smear examination and level of acute phase reactants should be part of initial investigations. Radiological imaging is useful aid in diagnosing FUO. Trials of antimicrobial agents should not be given as they can obscure the diagnosis of the disease in FUO.

  14. Is fever a predictive factor in the autism spectrum disorders?

    PubMed

    Megremi, Amalia S F

    2013-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display such a marked increase in recent decades that researchers speak of "epidemic outbreak" of the disease. Although the diagnostic framework has been expanded and thus more disorders now fall within the autistic spectrum, no one disputes the increased incidence of autism in modern societies, making it a major public health problem. On the other hand, heterogeneity is a major feature of the disorder, both in terms of the etiopathogenesis as well as to the phenotypic expression, natural history and evolution. Consequently, there is considerable research interest in determining factors which are etiopathogenetically, prognostically, preventively or/and therapeutically associated with the disorder. Literature data indicate that probably there are differences in susceptibility to various infections between normal and autistic children. In addition, some autistic children show improvement in the characteristics of their autistic behavior during febrile incident and repression of fever (through antipyretics) might be associated with the onset of autistic disorder. Since fever has been associated with mental illness since the time of Hippocrates already and the presence of fever is associated with a favorable outcome in various pathologic conditions, it is assumed that there are probably two subgroups of autistic children: those who have the possibility to develop acute febrile incidents and those who develop acute incidents without fever. If this is the case, it is important to know whether there are differences between the two subgroups in various biological markers (cytokines/chemokines, autoantibodies), neuroimaging findings, personal and family history of these children (use of drugs, vaccinations, history of autoimmunity, etc.) and, if the first subgroup consists of autistic people of higher functionality and better outcome, or not. If such a classification is real, is there a possibility for the fever to be used as a predictor of

  15. Hematologic dysfunction in Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S; McCormick, J B; Sasso, D; Craven, R B

    1988-10-01

    Lassa fever is widespread in West Africa, where the case fatality is about 16% in hospitalized adult patients. The clinical course is highly variable, with a few patients developing severe disease with bleeding, adult respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy and hypovolemic shock. We studied 70 patients admitted with suspected Lassa fever to a hospital in Sierra Leone, West Africa. Fourteen patients classified as having severe Lassa fever on the basis of serum aspartate amino transferase (AST) greater than 150 IU/L or viremia of greater than 10(3.6) tissue culture infective dose (TCID) 50/ml were found to have statistically significantly depressed lymphocyte counts when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever (AST less than 150 IU/L or viremia, less than 10(3.6)TCID50/ml), (P less than 0.0001) and with febrile control patients, in whom Lassa infection had been excluded by laboratory criteria (P less than 0.0008). Maximum depression occurred a mean of 10.9 days post onset. Patients with severe Lassa fever also had moderate thrombocytopenia, which was statistically significant when compared with febrile control patients (P less than 0.0003) and this occurred a mean of 10.8 days postonset. The most significant changes were in platelet function, which was markedly depressed in patients with severe Lassa fever (P less than 0.0035 in response to ADP and P = 0.0081 for collagen) when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever, and when compared with febrile controls, (P = 0.0013 for ADP and P less than 0.00001 for collagen). This abnormality was usually maximal on admission to hospital, and probably is an early event, preceding hospitalization in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Reviving the Mediterranean Olive Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a collaborative investigation by six nongovernment organisations (NGOs) from five European-Mediterranean countries to identify a framework for reversing rural marginalisation in Mediterranean communities through sustainable forms of community-based agricultural development. The project brought together…

  17. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control.

  18. Animal models of viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darci R; Holbrook, Michael R; Gowen, Brian B

    2014-12-01

    The term "viral hemorrhagic fever" (VHF) designates a syndrome of acute febrile illness, increased vascular permeability and coagulation defects which often progresses to bleeding and shock and may be fatal in a significant percentage of cases. The causative agents are some 20 different RNA viruses in the families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae and Flaviviridae, which are maintained in a variety of animal species and are transferred to humans through direct or indirect contact or by an arthropod vector. Except for dengue, which is transmitted among humans by mosquitoes, the geographic distribution of each type of VHF is determined by the range of its animal reservoir. Treatments are available for Argentine HF and Lassa fever, but no approved countermeasures have been developed against other types of VHF. The development of effective interventions is hindered by the sporadic nature of most infections and their occurrence in geographic regions with limited medical resources. Laboratory animal models that faithfully reproduce human disease are therefore essential for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. The goal of this review is to highlight the current status of animal models that can be used to study the pathogenesis of VHF and test new countermeasures.

  19. Heritability and shared genetic effects of asthma and hay fever: an Italian study of young twins.

    PubMed

    Fagnani, Corrado; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Brescianini, Sonia; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Medda, Emanuela; Nisticò, Lorenza; Patriarca, Valeria; Rotondi, Daniela; Toccaceli, Virgilia; Stazi, Maria Antonietta

    2008-04-01

    A number of studies have provided evidence of a significant familial aggregation for both asthma and hay fever, and have reported a substantial comorbidity between the two conditions. However, far fewer, especially in Italy, have aimed at clarifying the origins of such comorbidity. The main aims of the present study were (a) to estimate heritability of asthma and hay fever, (b) to measure the association between asthma and hay fever at the individual level, and (c) to assess the extent to which genetic and environmental factors, shared by the two conditions, mediate this association. The twin method was used. The study sample was derived from the Italian Twin Registry, and included 392 twin pairs aged 8 to 17 years. Data collection was performed through parent self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate structural equation twin modeling was applied to asthma and hay fever. Genetic factors accounted for 92% and 78% of the variance in liability to asthma and hay fever, respectively, with the remaining contributions due to unique environmental influences. The within-individual association between asthma and hay fever was substantial. The genetic correlation between the two conditions was .58, whereas no evidence of overlapping unique environmental effects was found. In conclusion, this study showed a high heritability of asthma and hay fever in the Italian child and adolescent population. It also indicated that asthma and hay fever share, to a large extent, a common genetic background, and environmental factors are not relevant to explain the comorbidity.

  20. A retrospective survey of dengue fever among Japanese individuals staying in Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Atsuo; Tada, Yuki; Fukushima, Shinji; Murata, Hidemi; Kikuchi, Hirohisa

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a serious concern for Japanese people staying in Southeast Asia. In order to implement necessary prophylactic measures for dengue fever in this population, we investigated the characteristics of dengue fever among Japanese nationals living in Manila, Philippines. From 2012 to 2015, 175 Japanese expatriates were diagnosed with dengue fever at the medical clinic of the Japanese Association Manila, Inc. Most of the patients were employees of Japanese companies and their families and were long-term residents of Manila. Most patients were either <10 years or in their 30s to 40s. Two patients (1.1 %) were diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. No deaths due to dengue fever were reported. The reported number of patients with dengue fever has shown a decreasing trend: from 55 cases in 2012 to 53 in 2013, 31 in 2014, and 36 in 2015. The results of this survey could be useful for the development of effective dengue fever preventive measures such as health education and provision of information among not only Japanese but also other foreigners residing in endemic areas.

  1. Cotton Fever: Does the Patient Know Best?

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingda; Pope, Bailey A; Hunter, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    Fever and leukocytosis have many possible etiologies in injection drug users. We present a case of a 22-year-old woman with fever and leukocytosis that were presumed secondary to cotton fever, a rarely recognized complication of injection drug use, after an extensive workup. Cotton fever is a benign, self-limited febrile syndrome characterized by fevers, leukocytosis, myalgias, nausea and vomiting, occurring in injection drug users who filter their drug suspensions through cotton balls. While this syndrome is commonly recognized amongst the injection drug user population, there is a paucity of data in the medical literature. We review the case presentation and available literature related to cotton fever.

  2. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  3. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice.

  4. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  5. Current trends in typhoid Fever.

    PubMed

    Crum, Nancy F

    2003-08-01

    Typhoid fever, a systemic infection caused by Salmonella enterica serotype typhi, remains an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. Endemic cases in the United States are unusual, with most following foreign travel to the Indian subcontinent, Africa, Asia, or Latin America. The classic findings of typhoid fever include rose spots, relative bradycardia, and stepwise fevers, but unfortunately these signs are frequently absent. Gastrointestinal manifestations may include diffuse abdominal pain, bleeding, perforation, cholecystitis, and cholangitis. The diagnosis should be suspected after collection of the appropriate clinical and travel history with confirmation by blood or bone marrow culture. Novel methods are in development to establish the diagnosis when cultures are negative or unavailable. Multidrug resistance has increased worldwide, and decisions on antimicrobial therapy must take such resistance into account. The empiric treatment of choice is a fluoroquinolone drug; ceftriaxone and azithromycin are alternatives. Preventive strategies include good sanitation and food handling practices along with vaccination of selected groups.

  6. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  7. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  8. Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Viali, Satupaitea; Saena, Puleiala; Futi, Vailogoua

    2011-02-11

    Rheumatic fever is very common in Samoa. The following paper describes the Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa and looks at the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of ARF has decreased to 30 per 100,000 in 2005, 12.8 per 100,000 in 2007, 7.3 per 100,000 in 2008, and 9.5 per 100,000 in 2009. The incidence of RHD has decreased to 40.2 per 100,000 in 2007, 34 per 100,000 in 2008, and 31.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Cardiac surgery in New Zealand is expensive, but is cheaper to perform in Samoa. RHD screening with echocardiogram at schools may be the best way to reduce the burden and suffering from RHD.

  9. Sadfly fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Özkale, Yasemin; Özkale, Murat; Kiper, Pinar; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Erol, İlknur

    2016-01-01

    Sandfly fever, also known as ‘three-day fever’ or ‘pappataci fever’ or ‘Phlebotomus fever’ is a viral infection that causes self-limited influenza-like symptoms and characterized by a rapid onset. The disease occurs commonly in endemic areas in summer months and especially in August during which sandflies are active. In this article, two siblings who presented with high fever, redness in the eyes, headache, weakness, malaise and inability to walk, who were found to have increased liver function tests and creatine kinase levels and who were diagnosed with sadfly fever with positive sadfly IgM and IgG antibodies are reported because of the rarity of this disease. PMID:27489469

  10. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Haemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFECTIOUS DISEASES, KENYA, LABORATORIES, MORTALITY RATES, PUBLIC HEALTH, RATS, RIFT VALLEY FEVER , SURVIVAL(PERSONNEL), THREATS, VETERINARY MEDICINE, WEST AFRICA , YEASTS, YELLOW FEVER , ZAIRE...EPIDEMIOLOGY, *VIRUSES, *VIRUS DISEASES, AFRICA , CONVALESCENCE, DISEASES, ECOLOGY, EQUATORIAL REGIONS, FEVERS , HEMORRHAGIC FEVERS , HUMANS, ILLNESS

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  12. Ebola and marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-03-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses cause a severe viral hemorrhagic fever disease mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Although outbreaks are sporadic, there is the potential for filoviruses to spread to other continents unintentionally because of air travel or intentionally because of bioterrorism. This article discusses the natural history, epidemiology, and clinical presentation of patients infected with Ebola and Marburg viruses. Clinicians in the United States should be aware of the symptoms of these viral infections in humans and know the appropriate procedures for contacting local, state, and national reference laboratories in the event of a suspected case of filoviral hemorrhagic fever.

  13. Rhinitis (Hay Fever): Tips to Remember

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Rhinitis TTR Share | Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Do you suffer from frequent sneezing, congestion or ... Rhinitis Triggers Seasonal allergic rhinitis, commonly known as hay fever, is triggered by outdoor allergens such as pollen ...

  14. FastStats: Allergies/Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Allergies and Hay Fever Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... aged 18 years and over) Number with diagnosed hay fever in the past 12 months: 20.0 million ...

  15. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  16. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each year in the United States, approximately 300 culture-confirmed cases of typhoid fever and 100 cases ... results in a low-grade septicemia. Although blood culture is the mainstay of diagnosis in typhoid fever, ...

  17. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  18. A timely reminder--rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lilic, Nikola; Kumar, Priyanka

    2013-04-19

    Rheumatic fever is a disease diagnosed using the Jones criteria. The Jones criteria were designed using data from areas with a low prevalence of rheumatic fever. In New Zealand there is a high prevalence of rheumatic fever amongst Maori and Pacific peoples. A case is presented where a child of Samoan ethnicity is diagnosed and treated for rheumatic fever without fulfilling the Jones criteria. Evidence supporting the broadening of the diagnostic criteria in high prevalence areas is highlighted.

  19. A Case of Olanzapine-Induced Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cho-Hsiang; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Olanzapine, a frequently used second-generation antipsychotic, has rarely been implicated as a cause of drug-induced fever in the absence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who developed isolated fever following olanzapine monotherapy, which subsided after discontinuation of olanzapine. Blockade of dopaminergic receptors and elevated cytokines concentration are possible mechanisms of fever development during treatment with olanzapine. This case calls for attention to olanzapine-induced fever in clinical practice. PMID:28138204

  20. Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease, a suspicious case.

    PubMed

    Beirão, Pedro; Pereira, Patrícia; Nunes, Andreia; Antunes, Pedro

    2017-03-02

    A 70-year-old man with known cardiovascular risk factors, presented with acute onset expression aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, right-left disorientation and finger agnosia, without fever or meningeal signs. Stroke was thought to be the cause, but cerebrovascular disease investigation was negative. Interviewing the family revealed he had undergone yellow fever vaccination 18 days before. Lumbar puncture revealed mild protein elevation. Cultural examinations, Coxiella burnetti, and neurotropic virus serologies were negative. Regarding the yellow fever virus, IgG was identified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with negative IgM and virus PCR in CSF. EEG showed an encephalopathic pattern. The patient improved gradually and a week after discharge was his usual self. Only criteria for suspect neurotropic disease were met, but it's possible the time spent between symptom onset and lumbar puncture prevented a definite diagnosis of yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease. This gap would have been smaller if the vaccination history had been collected earlier.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Mediterranean Mugilids by allozymes and 16S mt-rRNA genes investigation: are the Mediterranean species of Liza monophyletic?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Ungaro, Andrea; De Innocentiis, Sabina; Crosetti, Donatella; Sola, Luciana

    2004-10-01

    The family Mugilidae (Pisces, Mugiliformes) includes species which are present in all tropical and temperate regions. Six species, Chelon labrosus, Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens, Oedalechilus labeo, are commonly found in the Mediterranean. These species have been widely studied through morphological, biochemical, and molecular markers. However, their phylogenetic relationships, and therefore the assumed monophyly of Liza species, still remain unclear: To further investigate this topic, gene-enzyme systems and sequences of the partial 16S rRNA mitochondrial gene were analyzed in Italian samples of all six Mediterranean species. The phylogenetic reconstructions indicated M. cephalus as being the most divergent species and the existence of a main cluster including all the Mediterranean species of Liza and C. labrosus. The parametric bootstrap approach adopted to test alternative phylogenetic hypotheses indicated that the Mediterranean species of Liza do not form a monophyletic group exclusive of Chelon.

  2. Qibla in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rius-Piniés, Mònica

    Orientation toward Mecca has been compulsory for Muslims in all time periods and in all places. In fact, mosques were built in such a way as to help believers to pray toward the right direction. Nevertheless, the alignment of the sacred buildings was not always exact, and many did not actually face the Kaaba. There are many reasons for this "mistake", the main one being that at the time of the construction of the most important mosques, the astronomical and geographical knowledge needed to make accurate calculations was lacking. In the Mediterranean area, the scholars who were most involved in this task were the fuqahā' (experts in Islamic jurisprudence) who were sometimes well versed in astronomical knowledge or, at least, were skilled in the practice of popular astronomy. The combination of astronomy and religion, mixed with the political and topographical conditions, produces a unique area of study which remains controversial today.

  3. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  4. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Nguyen, William; Mori, Simone; Moroncini, Gianluca; Viader, Andreu; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Conti, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL), through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  5. Q fever in maritime Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T. J.; Haldane, E. V.; Noble, M. A.; Faulkner, R. S.; Lee, S. H.; Gough, D.; Meyers, S.; Stewart, J.

    1982-01-01

    Only nine cases of Q fever were recorded in Canada in the 20 years prior to 1978. In the 18 months from August 1979 to January 1981 the disease was diagnosed serologically in six patients from the Maritime provinces. All were epidemiologically unrelated and none had been exposed to animals. Five had pneumonia and one had chronic Q fever with probable prosthetic valve endocarditis. Three of the five pneumonia patients presented with signs and symptoms of an acute lower respiratory tract infection and were indistinguishable clinically from other patients with atypical pneumonias. The other two with pneumonia presented with nonresolving pulmonary infiltrates and complained of decreased energy. Four of the five pneumonia patients responded well to treatment with erythromycin; the fifth required two courses of tetracycline. The patient with chronic Q fever had a large amount of cryoglobulins in his serum and evidence of immune complex disease. These cases indicate that Q fever should be considered as a possible cause of atypical pneumonia in Canada. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:7074457

  6. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  7. Orthodontics in the Mediterranean Area.

    PubMed

    Calò, Claudia; Garino, Francesco; Cozzani, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    The article describes on the results of the first Workshop that SIDO organized in December 2005 in Cairo getting together twenty Countries who discussed Orthodontics in the Mediterranean Area. The aim was to take a picture, for the first time, of the state of Orthodontics in the different Mediterranean Countries using it as basis for a further co-operation. Progress in Orthodontics (published in English, indexed in Medline, free of charge website and downloading) was offered by SIDO as the means for a scientific and organizational sharing, and to spread a Mediterranean Orthodontic culture all over the world. The first step toward mutual understanding was completed and for the first time we collected data and the Mediterranean Orthodontic Integration Project (MOIP), on which we can base a coming meeting and debate, was introduced.

  8. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  9. Fever of unknown origin: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Lortholary, Olivier; Cunha, Cheston B

    2015-10-01

    Fevers of unknown origin remain one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges in medicine. Because fever of unknown origin may be caused by over 200 malignant/neoplastic, infectious, rheumatic/inflammatory, and miscellaneous disorders, clinicians often order non-clue-based imaging and specific testing early in the fever of unknown origin work-up, which may be inefficient/misleading. Unlike most other fever-of-unknown-origin reviews, this article presents a clinical approach. Characteristic history and physical examination findings together with key nonspecific test abnormalities are the basis for a focused clue-directed fever of unknown origin work-up.

  10. Cancer and Mediterranean dietary traditions.

    PubMed

    Trichopoulou, A; Lagiou, P; Kuper, H; Trichopoulos, D

    2000-09-01

    The incidence of cancer overall in Mediterranean countries is lower than in Scandinavian countries, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This is mostly accounted for by the lower incidence among Mediterranean countries of cancer of the large bowel, breast, endometrium, and prostate. These forms of cancer have been linked to dietary factors, particularly low consumption of vegetables and fruit, and to a certain extent, high consumption of meat. The traditional Mediterranean diet is characterized by high consumption of foods of plant origin, relatively low consumption of red meat, and high consumption of olive oil, which in several studies has been reported to be more beneficial against cancer than other forms of added lipids. By taking into account the established or presumed nutritional causation of major forms of cancer and the composition of the traditional Mediterranean diet, estimates can be derived concerning the fraction of cancer occurrence in highly developed Western countries that could be attributed to their diets in comparison with the healthy traditional Mediterranean diet. Although estimates can only be crude, it can be calculated that up to 25% of the incidence of colorectal cancer, approximately 15% of the incidence of breast cancer, and approximately 10% of the incidence of prostate, pancreas, and endometrial cancer could be prevented if the populations of highly developed Western countries could shift to the traditional healthy Mediterranean diet.

  11. Marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea: a sponge biodiversity reservoir within a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Gerovasileiou, Vasilis; Voultsiadou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Marine caves are widely acknowledged for their unique biodiversity and constitute a typical feature of the Mediterranean coastline. Herein an attempt was made to evaluate the ecological significance of this particular ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea, which is considered a biodiversity hotspot. This was accomplished by using Porifera, which dominate the rocky sublittoral substrata, as a reference group in a meta-analytical approach, combining primary research data from the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean) with data derived from the literature. In total 311 species from all poriferan classes were recorded, representing 45.7% of the Mediterranean Porifera. Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha are highly represented in marine caves at the family (88%), generic (70%), and species level (47.5%), the latter being the most favored group along with Dictyoceratida and Lithistida. Several rare and cave-exclusive species were reported from only one or few caves, indicating the fragmentation and peculiarity of this unique ecosystem. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity varied among Mediterranean areas; the former was positively correlated with research effort, being higher in the northern Mediterranean, while the latter was generally higher in caves than in the overall sponge assemblages of each area. Resemblance analysis among areas revealed that cavernicolous sponge assemblages followed a pattern quite similar to that of the overall Mediterranean assemblages. The same pattern was exhibited by the zoogeographic affinities of cave sponges: species with Atlanto-Mediterranean distribution and Mediterranean endemics prevailed (more than 40% each), 70% of them having warm-water affinities, since most caves were studied in shallow waters. According to our findings, Mediterranean marine caves appear to be important sponge biodiversity reservoirs of high representativeness and great scientific interest, deserving further detailed study and protection.

  12. Marine Caves of the Mediterranean Sea: A Sponge Biodiversity Reservoir within a Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Gerovasileiou, Vasilis; Voultsiadou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Marine caves are widely acknowledged for their unique biodiversity and constitute a typical feature of the Mediterranean coastline. Herein an attempt was made to evaluate the ecological significance of this particular ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea, which is considered a biodiversity hotspot. This was accomplished by using Porifera, which dominate the rocky sublittoral substrata, as a reference group in a meta-analytical approach, combining primary research data from the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean) with data derived from the literature. In total 311 species from all poriferan classes were recorded, representing 45.7% of the Mediterranean Porifera. Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha are highly represented in marine caves at the family (88%), generic (70%), and species level (47.5%), the latter being the most favored group along with Dictyoceratida and Lithistida. Several rare and cave-exclusive species were reported from only one or few caves, indicating the fragmentation and peculiarity of this unique ecosystem. Species richness and phylogenetic diversity varied among Mediterranean areas; the former was positively correlated with research effort, being higher in the northern Mediterranean, while the latter was generally higher in caves than in the overall sponge assemblages of each area. Resemblance analysis among areas revealed that cavernicolous sponge assemblages followed a pattern quite similar to that of the overall Mediterranean assemblages. The same pattern was exhibited by the zoogeographic affinities of cave sponges: species with Atlanto-Mediterranean distribution and Mediterranean endemics prevailed (more than 40% each), 70% of them having warm-water affinities, since most caves were studied in shallow waters. According to our findings, Mediterranean marine caves appear to be important sponge biodiversity reservoirs of high representativeness and great scientific interest, deserving further detailed study and protection. PMID:22808070

  13. [Clinical aspects of viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) is defined as virus infections that usually cause pyrexia and hemorrhagic symptoms with multiple organ failure. VHF includes following viral infections: Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and Lassa fever. In particular, the causative agents of EHF, MHF, CCHF, and Lassa fever are Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, Lassa viruses, respectively, and regarded as biosafety level-4 pathogens because of their high virulence to humans. Recently, relatively large outbreaks of EHF and MHF have occurred in Africa, and areas of EHF- and MHF-outbreaks seem to be expanding. Although outbreaks of VHF have not been reported in Japan, there is a possibility that the deadly hemorrhagic fever viruses would be introduced to Japan in future. Therefore, preparedness for possible future outbreaks of VHF is necessary in areas without VHF outbreaks.

  14. Contrasting Biogeographic and Diversification Patterns in Two Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shrirang R.; Goldblatt, Peter; Manning, John C.; Forest, Félix

    2012-01-01

    The five Mediterranean regions of the world comprise almost 50,000 plant species (ca 20% of the known vascular plants) despite accounting for less than 5% of the world’s land surface. The ecology and evolutionary history of two of these regions, the Cape Floristic Region and the Mediterranean Basin, have been extensively investigated, but there have been few studies aimed at understanding the historical relationships between them. Here, we examine the biogeographic and diversification processes that shaped the evolution of plant diversity in the Cape and the Mediterranean Basin using a large plastid data set for the geophyte family Hyacinthaceae (comprising ca. 25% of the total diversity of the group), a group found mainly throughout Africa and Eurasia. Hyacinthaceae is a predominant group in the Cape and the Mediterranean Basin both in terms of number of species and their morphological and ecological variability. Using state-of-the-art methods in biogeography and diversification, we found that the Old World members of the family originated in sub-Saharan Africa at the Paleocene–Eocene boundary and that the two Mediterranean regions both have high diversification rates, but contrasting biogeographic histories. While the Cape diversity has been greatly influenced by its relationship with sub-Saharan Africa throughout the history of the family, the Mediterranean Basin had no connection with the latter after the onset of the Mediterranean climate in the region and the aridification of the Sahara. The Mediterranean Basin subsequently contributed significantly to the diversity of neighbouring areas, especially Northern Europe and the Middle East, whereas the Cape can be seen as a biogeographical cul-de-sac, with only a few dispersals toward sub-Saharan Africa. The understanding of the evolutionary history of these two important repositories of biodiversity would benefit from the application of the framework developed here to other groups of plants present in the two

  15. Serological studies of the epidemiology of sandfly fever in the Old World

    PubMed Central

    Tesh, R. B.; Saidi, S.; Gajdamovič, S. Ja.; Rodhain, F.; Vesenjak-Hirjan, J.

    1976-01-01

    Selected human sera from 59 different localities in Africa, the Mediterranean littoral, eastern Europe and Asia were examined by plaque reduction neutralization test against eight sandfly (Phlebotomus) fever virus serotypes (Sicilian, Naples, Arumowot, SudAn 754-61, Karimabad, Salehabad, Gordil and Saint Floris) known to occur in the Old World. Results of these studies provide new information on the geographic distribution and prevalence of human infection with each of the viruses. Specific neutralizing antibodies were detected against all of the agents except Salehabad. Naples and Sicilian antibodies were encountered most frequently and had the widest geographic range; moreover they were found only in areas where Phlebotomus papatasi occurs. Age-specific antibody rates for several of the viruses are presented. These data and the epidemiology of sandfly fever are discussed. PMID:829416

  16. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-23

    13 Table 5. Monthly incidence of HFRS among Korean in the Republic of Korea , 1966-1985 . . . . . . . 14 A Table 6. Incidence of HFRS by...GRANT SUPPORT .. ........ 57.... 5 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,000 United Nations .00 troops in Korea developed a rare hemorrhagic...8217;.-.* * S.’ . " 10 ... Table 1. Hospitalized cases of Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients in the Republic of Korea Year US Korean Korean

  17. West Nile fever--a reemerging mosquito-borne viral disease in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Hubálek, Z.; Halouzka, J.

    1999-01-01

    West Nile virus causes sporadic cases and outbreaks of human and equine disease in Europe (western Mediterranean and southern Russia in 1962-64, Belarus and Ukraine in the 1970s and 1980s, Romania in 1996-97, Czechland in 1997, and Italy in 1998). Environmental factors, including human activities, that enhance population densities of vector mosquitoes (heavy rains followed by floods, irrigation, higher than usual temperature, or formation of ecologic niches that enable mass breeding of mosquitoes) could increase the incidence of West Nile fever. PMID:10511520

  18. High Variability of Fabry Disease Manifestations in an Extended Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Cammarata, Giuseppe; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Rodolico, Margherita Stefania; Colomba, Paolo; Sicurella, Luigi; Iemolo, Francesco; Zizzo, Carmela; Bartolotta, Caterina; Duro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by partial or full inactivation of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-GAL). The impairment of α-GAL results in the accumulation of undegraded glycosphingolipids in lysosomes and subsequent cell and microvascular dysfunctions. This study reports the clinical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of 15 members of the same family. Eight members showed the exonic mutation M51I in the GLA gene, a disease-causing mutation associated with the atypical phenotype. The clinical history of this family highlights a wide phenotypic variability, in terms of involved organs and severity. The phenotypic variability of two male patients is not related to differences in α-GAL enzymatic activity: though both have no enzymatic activity, the youngest shows severe symptoms, while the eldest is asymptomatic. It is noticeable that for two female patients with the M51I mutation the initial clinical diagnosis was different from FD. One of them was diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever, the other with Multiple Sclerosis. Overall, this study confirms that the extreme variability of the clinical manifestations of FD is not entirely attributable to different mutations in the GLA gene and emphasizes the need to consider other factors or mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of Fabry Disease. PMID:25977923

  19. Human Antibody Neutralizes Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus, an Emerging Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiling; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wenshuai; Chi, Ying; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Li, Xian; Qi, Xian; Jin, Qiu; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Mingming; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yin; Bao, Changjun; Hu, Jianli; Liang, Shuyi; Bao, Lin; Wu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), a newly discovered member of the Bunyaviridae family, is the causative agent of an emerging hemorrhagic fever, SFTS, in China. Currently, there are no vaccines or effective therapies against SFTS. In this study, a combinatorial human antibody library was constructed from the peripheral lymphocytes of 5 patients who had recovered from SFTS. The library was screened against purified virions for the production of single-chain variable-region fragments (ScFv). Of the 6 positive clones, one clone (monoclonal antibody [MAb] 4-5) showed neutralizing activity against SFTSV infection in Vero cells. MAb 4-5 was found to effectively neutralize all of the clinical isolates of SFTSV tested, which were isolated from patients in China from 2010 to 2012. MAb 4-5 was found to bind a linear epitope in the ectodomain of glycoprotein Gn. Its neutralizing activity is attributed to blockage of the interactions between the Gn protein and the cellular receptor, indicating that inhibition of virus-cell attachment is its main mechanism. These data suggest that MAb 4-5 can be used as a promising candidate molecule for immunotherapy against SFTSV infection. PMID:23863504

  20. Genetic variability and distribution of Classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Beer, Martin; Goller, Katja V; Staubach, Christoph; Blome, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease that affects domestic and wild pigs worldwide. The causative agent of the disease is Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which belongs to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. On the genome level, CSFV can be divided into three genotypes with three to four sub-genotypes. Those genotypes can be assigned to distinct geographical regions. Knowledge about CSFV diversity and distribution is important for the understanding of disease dynamics and evolution, and can thus help to design optimized control strategies. For this reason, the geographical pattern of CSFV diversity and distribution are outlined in the presented review. Moreover, current knowledge with regard to genetic virulence markers or determinants and the role of the quasispecies composition is discussed.

  1. [Severe hemorrhagic forms of Rift Valley fever: about 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed Lemine Ould; Baba, Sidi El Wafi Ould; Fall-Malick, Fatimetou Zahra; Boushab, Boushab Mohamed; Ghaber, Sidi Mohamed; Mokhtar, Abdelwedoud

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arbovirus caused by an RNA virus belonging to family Bunyaviridae (genus phlebovirus). It is a zoonosis that primarily affects animals but it also has the capacity to infect humans, either by handling meat, runts of sick animals or, indirectly, by the bite of infected mosquitoes (Aedes sp, Anopheles sp, Culex sp). In most cases, RVF infection in humans is asymptomatic, but it can also manifest as moderate febrile syndrome with a favorable outcome. However, some patients may develop hemorrhagic syndrome and/or neurological damages with a fatal evolution. We present a case study of the development of 5 patients with RVF associated with hemorrhagic fever syndrome admitted to the internal medicine department at National Hospital Center in Nouakchott (Mauritania), in October 2015. The outcome was favorable for two of the five patients. The other 3 died, two of hemorrhagic shock and one of septic shock.

  2. Yellow fever in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S; Moss, Sandra W; Kahn, Richard J

    2004-06-01

    Dutch slave traders brought yellow fever to the Americas from Africa during the mid-seventeenth century. For the next two and a half centuries, the disease terrorized seaports throughout the Americas. Proof of the mosquito hypothesis was delayed because of two aspects of the disease: patients are viremic only during the first several days of clinical illness, and most mosquitoes require about 2 weeks of viral incubation before becoming infectious. Control of Aedes aegypti in urban centers failed to eliminate the disease because of its transmission by tree-hole-breeding mosquitoes that spend their winged lives mainly in forest canopies. Yellow fever continues to be a significant public health problem in parts of South America and Africa.

  3. Typhoid fever in Malaysian children.

    PubMed

    Malik, A S; Malik, R H

    2001-12-01

    A prospective study of 102 children with bacteriologically confirmed typhoid fever, admitted to Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia over 5 years was conducted. The average age at presentation was 91.3 (range 6 - 159) months. Fever (900%), abdominal pain (56%) and diarrhoea (44%) were common symptoms. Findings included: hepatomegaly (85.3%), splenomegaly (27.5%), anaemia (31%), leukopenia (15%). thrombocytopenia (26%), positive Widal (62.5%) and Typhidot test (96%). Patients were treated with ampicillin (n = 54) or chloramphenicol (n = 49) and 1/3 developed complications like hepatitis (n = 19), bone marrow suppression (n = 8) and paralytic ileus (n = 7). A patient with splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia or leukopenia was at higher risk of developing complications.

  4. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  5. MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CF) is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF. PMID:20418982

  6. Inhalation challenge in humidifier fever.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J H; Cockcroft, A

    1981-05-01

    When exposed to an amount of contaminated humidifier water roughly equivalent to that inhaled over an 8-hour period at their work place, four out of six subjects developed symptoms of humidifier fever. Two non-exposed subjects failed to react to the same challenge. Characteristic lung function, temperature and leucocyte changes were recorded; however, a fall in gas transfer previously reported was not seen. That the reaction was immunologically mediated and not due to endotoxin activity was shown by a negative pyrogen response in rabbits inoculated intravenously with concentrated humidifier water. The nature of the immune response has not as yet been evaluated but it does not reside with the ability of humidifier fever antigens to activate complement. Skin testing produced an immediate weal and flare in the four subjects with precipitins and may reflect the presence of short-term anaphylactic IgG antibody.

  7. Behavioural fever in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Rey, Sonia; Moiche, Visila; Boltaña, Sebastian; Teles, Mariana; MacKenzie, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Behavioural fever has been reported in different species of mobile ectotherms including the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in response to exogenous pyrogens. In this study we report, to our knowledge for the first time, upon the ontogenic onset of behavioural fever in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. For this, zebrafish larvae (from first feeding to juveniles) were placed in a continuous thermal gradient providing the opportunity to select their preferred temperature. The novel thermal preference aquarium was based upon a continuous vertical column system and allows for non-invasive observation of larvae vertical distribution under isothermal (TR at 28 °C) and thermal gradient conditions (TCH: 28-32 °C). Larval thermal preference was assessed under both conditions with or without an immersion challenge, in order to detect the onset of the behavioural fever response. Our results defined the onset of the dsRNA induced behavioural fever at 18-20 days post fertilization (dpf). Significant differences were observed in dsRNA challenged larvae, which prefer higher temperatures (1-4 °C increase) throughout the experimental period as compared to non-challenged larvae. In parallel we measured the abundance of antiviral transcripts; viperin, gig2, irf7, trim25 and Mxb mRNAs in dsRNA challenged larvae under both thermal regimes: TR and TCh. Significant increases in the abundance of all measured transcripts were recorded under thermal choice conditions signifying that thermo-coupling and the resultant enhancement of the immune response to dsRNA challenge occurs from 18 dpf onwards in the zebrafish. The results are of importance as they identify a key developmental stage where the neuro-immune interface matures in the zebrafish likely providing increased resistance to viral infection.

  8. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    In mid-September 2009, a 22-year-old critically ill Soldier was medically evacuated from a treatment facility in southern Afghanistan to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. Despite the efforts of the team at Landstuhl, this patient died and became the US military's first known victim of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). CCHF is caused by a virus, which bears the same name. Because a vaccine is lacking, as well as an effective antiviral treatment, prevention is key.

  9. Adaptive evolution of Mediterranean pines.

    PubMed

    Grivet, Delphine; Climent, José; Zabal-Aguirre, Mario; Neale, David B; Vendramin, Giovanni G; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2013-09-01

    Mediterranean pines represent an extremely heterogeneous assembly. Although they have evolved under similar environmental conditions, they diversified long ago, ca. 10 Mya, and present distinct biogeographic and demographic histories. Therefore, it is of special interest to understand whether and to what extent they have developed specific strategies of adaptive evolution through time and space. To explore evolutionary patterns, the Mediterranean pines' phylogeny was first reconstructed analyzing a new set of 21 low-copy nuclear genes with multilocus Bayesian tree reconstruction methods. Secondly, a phylogenetic approach was used to search for footprints of natural selection and to examine the evolution of multiple phenotypic traits. We identified two genes (involved in pines' defense and stress responses) that have likely played a role in the adaptation of Mediterranean pines to their environment. Moreover, few life-history traits showed historical or evolutionary adaptive convergence in Mediterranean lineages, while patterns of character evolution revealed various evolutionary trade-offs linking growth-development, reproduction and fire-related traits. Assessing the evolutionary path of important life-history traits, as well as the genomic basis of adaptive variation is central to understanding the past evolutionary success of Mediterranean pines and their future response to environmental changes.

  10. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  12. Managing hay fever during the exam period.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda

    Hay-fever symptoms are common and debilitating and can have a detrimental effect on students' examination results. It is important to provide effective treatment using medication that optimises symptom control while ensuring drug side-effects are minimised. Research has confirmed that uncontrolled hay fever or medication side-effects can have a detrimental outcome on exam results. Ideally treatment should commence shortly before the start of the hay-fever season.

  13. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  14. Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    tlll AD111 CONTRACT NO: DAMDI7-91-C-1006 TITLE: SIMIAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (SHF) VIRUS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus DAMD17-91-C-1006 6. AUTHOR(S) Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus -specific hybridoma cultures, expand two clones from each clone as well as 50 ml of supernatant fluid from

  15. Predicting the Eastern Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royden, L.

    2011-12-01

    From ~30 Ma onwards, the evolution of the Mediterranean region has been dominated by the rapid migration of thin-skinned thrust-belts. Thrust belt migration has been accommodated by the opening of "back arc type" basins within the upper plate of the thrust belts. Migration of these thrust belts is associated with the migration of subduction systems where subduction and thrusting are driven largely by negative slab buoyancy. Where the subducting slab has large negative buoyancy, thrust belt migration is commonly rapid. Where buoyant continental lithosphere enters the subduction system, subduction ceases quickly. Hence the large-scale tectonic evolution of the Mediterranean basin is largely pre-conditioned by its paleogeography. This can be quantitatively illustrated for the Hellenic subduction system where the post Eocene evolution of the Hellenic thrust belt can be ascribed to the buoyancy of the lithosphere subducted. Entry of the Ionian oceanic lithosphere into a slow-moving trench at 10-15 Ma explains the increase in subduction rate along the central part of the trench, to ~35 mm/yr at present, while subduction rates along strike to the northeast, where continental/transitional crust is subducted, remain less than ~10 mm/yr. Using quantitative modeling of the Hellenic subduction system in post Eocene time, it is possible to approximate how this thrust belt, and the active subduction belt of the eastern Mediterranean, will evolve over the next 10 m.y. This exercise suggests that the large-scale evolution of the eastern Mediterranean basin will be strikingly similar to that of the western Mediterranean basin from 20-0 Ma. This highlights the common dynamic mechanism that shapes the large scale deformation and morphology of the Mediterranean basin.

  16. TRAINING PROGRAM FOR NURSING STAFF REGARDING VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC FEVERS IN A MILITARY HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Saleh, Halla Ahmed Abdullah; Abdelfattah, Magda Abdelhamid; Morsy, Tosson Aly

    2015-08-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) refer to a group of illnesses caused by several distinct families of viruses. In general, the term "viral hemorrhagic fever" is used to describe a severe multisystem syndrome (multisystem in that multiple organ systems in the bpdy are affected). Characteristically, the overall vascular system is damaged, and the body's ability to regulate itself is impaired. These symptoms are often accompanied by hemorrhage (bleeding); however, the bleeding is it rarely life-threatening. While some types of hemorrhagic fever viruses can cause relatively mild illnesses, many of these viruses cause severe, life-threatening disease. The selected disaster diseases for this study included: 1-Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic Fever, 2-Dengue Fever, 3-Ebola Fever, 4-Hem-orrhagic Fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), 5-Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, 6-Lassa Fever, 7-Marburg Fever, 8-Rift Valley Fever and 9-Yellow Fever. The educational training program was given over ten sessions to a group of Staff Nurses. The results showed that the program succeeded in enhancing nurse' knowledge, awareness, responsibility, and obligations toward patients with the Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers The results showed a significant impact of training sessions illuminated in the follow-up test on the knowledge score of nurses in all types of diseases except for the Congo hemorrhagic fever, while, statistical significance varied in some diseases in the study when it comes to the comparison between pretest and post-test. All results confirmed on the positive impact of the training program in enhancing the knowledge of nurses toward VHFs patients and their relevant. There was a significant positive impact of the training sessions on changing the attitude of nurses toward patients with VHFs. This result was confirmed on the collective level since the total scores on tests revealed significant positive impact of the study on changing the attitude of nurses toward relevant patients. The relationship

  17. THE EXPERIMENTAL TRANSMISSION OF COLORADO TICK FEVER.

    PubMed

    Florio, L; Stewart, M O; Mugrage, E R

    1944-09-01

    1. The symptoms, history of tick bite, characteristic fever curve, and white blood cell picture should enable the physician to make a diagnosis of Colorado tick fever in nearly every case. 2. The typical white blood cell picture is a depression of the total leucocytes with a shift to the left of the granulocytes. Basophilic cytoplasmic bodies appear occasionally in lymphocytes 3 to 4 days after clinical recovery. 3. The disease can be transmitted serially in human beings by parenteral injection of blood or serum. Such transfers have not resulted in decreased or increased virulence. 4. The naturally acquired and experimental cases of Colorado tick fever are identical in their manifestations. 5. An attack of Colorado tick fever confers a degree of definite immunity to the disease. 6. Colorado tick fever is not a mild form of Rocky Mountain spotted fever since individuals immunized with ground tick vaccine against Rocky Mountain spotted fever are still susceptible to Colorado tick fever. 7. Adult Dermacentor andersoni ticks allowed to feed on typical cases, then carried through to a new generation and fed on susceptible adults, failed to transmit the disease. 8. Colorado tick fever has been successfully transmitted to an experimental animal, the golden hamster.

  18. Fever Phobia as a Reason for Pediatric Emergency Department Visits: Does the Primary Care Physician Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Elkon-Tamir, Erella; Rimon, Ayelet; Scolnik, Dennis; Glatstein, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Background Fever is a source of considerable parental anxiety. Numerous studies have also confirmed similar anxiety among health care workers. This study analyzed caregiver knowledge of fever, and beliefs concerning children with a febrile illness, with an emphasis on the referring physician. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 100 caregivers of children 3 months to 12 years old, treated at an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department for fever. Caregiver knowledge was assessed with a questionnaire. Results Most caregivers correctly defined the threshold for fever as >38.0–38.3°C. Caregivers commonly believed that fever can cause brain damage and epilepsy; the frequency of this belief was not affected by whether they were referred to the emergency department by their pediatrician/family physician or by another physician or arrived without a referral. For a comfortable-appearing child with a temperature not above 38.0°C, both groups reported that they would give antipyretics in similar proportions (mean 31%). The majority of parents in both groups believed that teething could cause fever (mean 74%). Conclusion Caregivers in this study had limited knowledge of fever and its management in children, even if referred by their primary care physician. We suggest that there is a need for aggressive educational interventions to reduce parents’ fever phobia, in clinics as well as in pediatric emergency departments, and that this need may extend to the education of medical personnel as well. PMID:28178434

  19. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-11-01

    During 2013-2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

  20. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During 2013–2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. PMID:27767921

  1. Identification of an NTPase motif in classical swine fever virus NS4B protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine caused by CSF virus (CSFV), a positive sense single-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. Here, we have identified, within CSFV non-structural (NS) protein NS4B, conserved sequence el...

  2. Development of a Rift Valley fever virus viremia challenge model in sheep and goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, causes severe to fatal disease in newborn ruminants, as well as abortions in pregnant animals; both preventable by vaccination. Availability of a challenge model is a pre-requisite for vaccine efficacy trials. Several modes of ino...

  3. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the...

  4. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  5. Recurrent arthralgias in a patient with previous Mayaro fever infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shawn F; Patel, Paresh R; Herold, Thomas J S

    2005-04-01

    Mayaro fever is an acute, self-limited, febrile, mosquito-borne viral disease manifested by fever, chills, headache, myalgias, and arthralgias. The virus belongs to the family Togaviridae and the genus Alphavirus. Five other mosquito-borne viruses have been described as causing a similar dengue-like illness. The virus was first isolated in 1954, and the first epidemics were described in 1955 in Brazil and Bolivia. Other cases have been reported in Suriname, Brazil, Peru, French Guiana, and Trinidad. Up to 10 to 15% of febrile illnesses in endemic areas have been attributed to Mayaro virus. The exact pathogenesis and pathophysiology among humans is unknown. Animal models have demonstrated necrosis of skeletal muscle, periosteum, perichondrial tissues, and evidence of meningitis and encephalitis. All previous cases of Mayaro fever describe a self-limited illness. No reports of recurrent symptoms exist in the literature. This report describes a case of recurrent arthralgias in a military service member presenting to the emergency department.

  6. Emerging Infections: Lessons from the Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J

    2006-01-01

    Two Institute of Medicine reports since 1992 have emphasized the dangerous and continuing threat to the world from emerging infectious diseases. Working with viral hemorrhagic fevers provides a number of lessons related to the processes that control emergence, the pattern of disease after emergence, and how to cope with these incidents. This short paper uses two arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers to illustrate some of these principles. Argentine and Bolivian hemorrhagic fevers first came to medical attention in the 1950’s. The forces that underlie the emergence of disease in Argentina are not understood, but the Bolivian episode has a reasonably understandable train of events behind it. The Argentine disease had serious impact on the large agricultural economy, and the ecology of the rodent reservoir did not lend itself to control; a vaccine was developed by Argentina and the U.S. with the latter motivated largely by biodefense. The Bolivian disease was controlled in large part by eliminating rodents that invaded towns, and the impact was subsequently below the level needed to trigger drug or vaccine development. These two viruses were important in the recognition of a new family of viruses (Arenaviridae), and this finding of new taxons during the investigation of emerging infectious diseases continues. PMID:18528473

  7. [First case of chikungunya fever in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Miguel Ángel; Cañedo-Dorame, Ismael Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The Chikungunya is an arbovirus first described during a 1952 outbreak of febrile exantematic disease in southern Tanganyika (now Tanzania). It is a virus within the alphavirus genus of the Togaviridae family, it is usually transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. Typically, the disease manifests as acute onset of fever and joint pains. This study describes the clinical characteristics the first imported case infected with chikungunya fever (CHIK) in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. We report the case of a 30 years old man seen in our emergency department due to fever, polyarthralgia, rash and headache. This patient has been in Tapachula, Chiapas, a jungle area in southern México, and he returned from a 45 days trip before the onset his symptoms. The chikungunya viral infection (CHIK) was diagnosed by RT-PCR procedure. Paracetamol therapy was administered and his clinical course was self-limited. We concluded that with the increase of mosquito´s habitat by global warming and frequent traveling, CHIK reemerged and showed global distribution recently. This disease must be suspected in patients with compatible clinical symptoms returning from epidemic/endemic areas. CHIK must be diagnosed on the basis of clinical, epidemiological and laboratory criteria.

  8. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  9. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Binaya Raman; Gitler, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever. PMID:26425637

  10. Controlling Hay Fever Symptoms with Accurate Pollen Counts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Hay fever and pollen counts Share | Controlling Hay Fever Symptoms with Accurate Pollen Counts This article has ... Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Seasonal allergic rhinitis known as hay fever is caused by pollen carried in the air ...

  11. Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Georgoulis, Michael; Kontogianni, Meropi D.; Yiannakouris, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. PMID:24714352

  12. Emerging intracellular receptors for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Jae, Lucas T; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus and Lassa virus belong to different virus families that can cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening disease in humans with limited treatment options. To infect a target cell, Ebola and Lassa viruses engage receptors at the cell surface and are subsequently shuttled into the endosomal compartment. Upon arrival in late endosomes/lysosomes, the viruses trigger membrane fusion to release their genome into the cytoplasm. Although contact sites at the cell surface were recognized for Ebola virus and Lassa virus, it was postulated that Ebola virus requires a critical receptor inside the cell. Recent screens for host factors identified such internal receptors for both viruses: Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) for Ebola virus and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) for Lassa virus. A cellular trigger is needed to permit binding of the viral envelope protein to these intracellular receptors. This 'receptor switch' represents a previously unnoticed step in virus entry with implications for host-pathogen interactions and viral tropism.

  13. Classical swine fever in the pygmy hog.

    PubMed

    Barman, N N; Bora, D P; Tiwari, A K; Kataria, R S; Desai, G S; Deka, P J

    2012-12-01

    The pygmy hog is a rare, small and highly endangered mammal belonging to the Suidae family, and it is presently found only in the Assam state of India. While investigating the cause of death of pygmy hogs housed at a conservation centre for captive breeding and research at Basistha, Assam, it was confirmed that they were susceptible to and died as a result of contracting classical swine fever (CSF), caused by CSF virus (CSFV), which is a highly infectious endemic disease of domestic pigs in India. The post-mortem findings and serum CSFV-specific antibody titres, along with the isolation of CSFV from two pygmy hogs, and further confirmation by CSFV genomic E2 and 5' untranslated region (UTR) gene amplification in PCR (polymerase chain reaction), clearly established the cause of death of the pygmy hogs. Further, on phylogenetic analysis, the pygmy hog CSFV 5' UTR sequences were grouped in the genotype 1.1 cluster of Indian CSFVs, and hence the strains causing infection were closely related to CSFV isolates circulating in domestic pigs. Therefore, the occurrence of CSF in this endangered species may pose a potent threat to their existence unless properly controlled, and thus it needs urgent attention. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report on CSF in pygmy hogs.

  14. [Mediterranean diet: not only food].

    PubMed

    da Vico, Letizia; Agostini, Susanna; Brazzo, Silvia; Biffi, Barbara; Masini, Maria Luisa

    2012-09-01

    The proposal of a Mediterranean way of life is much more than advise how to eat. The Mediterranean Diet, a model of Sustainable Diet, is an example of how to combine personal choices, economic, social and cultural rights, protective of human health and the ecosystem. There is in fact fundamental interdependence between dietary requirements, nutritional recommendations, production and consumption of food. In literature studies and nutritional and epidemiological monitoring activities at national and international level have found a lack of adherence to this lifestyle, due to the spread of the economy, lifestyles of the Western type and globalization of the production and consumption. To encourage the spread of a culture and a constant practice of the Mediterranean Diet, there are some tools that are presented in this article. The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid in addition to the recommendations on the frequency and portions of food, focuses on the choice of how to cook and eat food. The "Double Food Pyramid" encourages conscious food choices based on "healthy eating and sustainability. All the nutrition professionals and dietitians in particular should be constantly striving to encourage the adoption of a sustainable and balanced nutrition.

  15. PON1 and Mediterranean Diet.

    PubMed

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M; Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Navarro, María A; Osada, Jesús

    2015-05-27

    The Mediterranean diet has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been implicated in the development of those conditions, especially atherosclerosis. The present work describes a systematic review of current evidence supporting the influence of Mediterranean diet and its constituents on this enzyme. Despite the differential response of some genetic polymorphisms, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to exert a protective action on this enzyme. Extra virgin olive oil, the main source of fat, has been particularly effective in increasing PON1 activity, an action that could be due to low saturated fatty acid intake, oleic acid enrichment of phospholipids present in high-density lipoproteins that favor the activity, and increasing hepatic PON1 mRNA and protein expressions induced by minor components present in this oil. Other Mediterranean diet constituents, such as nuts, fruits and vegetables, have been effective in modulating the activity of the enzyme, pomegranate and its compounds being the best characterized items. Ongoing research on compounds isolated from all these natural products, mainly phenolic compounds and carotenoids, indicates that some of them are particularly effective, and this may enhance the use of nutraceuticals and functional foods capable of potentiating PON1 activity.

  16. PON1 and Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M.; Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Navarro, María A.; Osada, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been implicated in the development of those conditions, especially atherosclerosis. The present work describes a systematic review of current evidence supporting the influence of Mediterranean diet and its constituents on this enzyme. Despite the differential response of some genetic polymorphisms, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to exert a protective action on this enzyme. Extra virgin olive oil, the main source of fat, has been particularly effective in increasing PON1 activity, an action that could be due to low saturated fatty acid intake, oleic acid enrichment of phospholipids present in high-density lipoproteins that favor the activity, and increasing hepatic PON1 mRNA and protein expressions induced by minor components present in this oil. Other Mediterranean diet constituents, such as nuts, fruits and vegetables, have been effective in modulating the activity of the enzyme, pomegranate and its compounds being the best characterized items. Ongoing research on compounds isolated from all these natural products, mainly phenolic compounds and carotenoids, indicates that some of them are particularly effective, and this may enhance the use of nutraceuticals and functional foods capable of potentiating PON1 activity. PMID:26024295

  17. Policymakers' views on dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever and the need for dengue vaccines in four southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    DeRoeck, Denise; Deen, Jacqueline; Clemens, John D

    2003-12-08

    A survey of policymakers and other influential professionals in four southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam) was conducted to determine policymakers' views on the public health importance of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), the need for a vaccine and the determinants influencing its potential introduction. The survey, which involved face-to-face interviews with policymakers, health programme managers, researchers, opinion leaders and other key informants, revealed an almost uniformly high level of concern about dengue fever/DHF and a high perceived need for a dengue vaccine. Several characteristics of the disease contribute to this high sense of priority, including its geographic spread, occurrence in outbreaks, the recurrent risk of infection each dengue season, its severity and the difficulty in diagnosis and management, its urban predominance, its burden on hospitals, and its economic toll on governments and families. Research felt to be key to future decision-making regarding dengue vaccine introduction include: disease surveillance studies, in-country vaccine trials or pilot projects, and studies on the economic burden of dengue and the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccines. The results suggest favourable conditions for public and private sector markets for dengue vaccines and the need for creative financing strategies to ensure their accessibility to poor children in dengue-endemic countries.

  18. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... 38.9 C) taken rectally Give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). If your child is age 6 months ... If your child seems uncomfortable, give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others). Read ...

  19. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. Show your children how to ...

  20. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... by 1 degree or more. Physical activity, strong emotion, eating, heavy clothing, medicines, high room temperature, and ... and smiling at you Has a normal skin color Looks well when their temperature comes down Take ...

  1. [Yellow fever epidemiology in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mondet, B

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out a meticulous time-space-analysis of the incidence of yellow fever in humans in Brazil from 1954 to 1972 and especially from 1973 to 1999. This study has added to our knowledge of the epidemiology of yellow fever and enabled us to redefine epidemiological zones and determine their geographical limits. The endemic area is located within the Amazon basin; here cases are scattered and generally limited in number. However, there are also "foci of endemic emergence" within this area, where cases are less rare, although occurrence remains irregular. The epidemic area is for the most part situated outside the Amazon basin, to the north east and particularly to the south. It has been divided into two parts according to whether the occurrence of yellow fever is cyclic or sporadic. The epidemics, which are all sylvatic, follow either a circular path (in the forest area) or a linear path (in forest-galleries of the savannah area). The study of the development of the 3 main epidemics (1972-74; 1979-82; 1986-92) in the cyclic emergence area showed that, on each occasion, the yellow fever virus appeared at a particularly active outbreak site located in the "serra dos Carajás", and from there, it followed the courses of the Tocantins and Araguaia rivers upstream, moving southwards during the "pre-epidemic phase" which may be visible due to the occurrence of a few cases, or may remain invisible. Subsequently the virus reached the emergence area, where it appeared in the form of epidemics. In this zone, it also followed privileged south-western pathways, moving from one hydraulic basin to another along the upstream courses of the rivers. Almost exactly the same pathways have been identified for each of the 3 epidemics studied. The distances travelled by the virus over a period of one year--when it goes rapidly--can reach several hundred kilometers. On the other hand, it may be stationary for a period of one or two consecutive years, occasionally three, remaining

  2. Leptospirosis presenting as honeymoon fever.

    PubMed

    de Sainte Marie, B; Delord, M; Dubourg, G; Gautret, P; Parola, P; Brouqui, P; Lagier, J C

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of travelers from western countries visit tropical regions, questioning western physicians on the prophylaxis, the diagnosis and the therapeutic management of patients with travel-associated infection. In July 2014, a French couple stayed for an adventure-travel in Columbia without malaria prophylaxis. A week after their return the woman presented with fever, myalgia, and retro-orbital pain. Three days later, her husband presented similar symptoms. In both patients, testing for malaria, arboviruses and blood cultures remained negative. An empirical treatment with doxycycline and ceftriaxone was initiated for both patients. Serum collected from the female patient yielded positive IgM for leptospirosis but was negative for her husband. Positive Real-Time PCR were observed in blood and urine from both patients, confirming leptospirosis. Three lessons are noteworthy from this case report. First, after exclusion of malaria, as enteric fever, leptospirosis and rickettsial infection are the most prevalent travel-associated infections, empirical treatment with doxycycline and third generation cephalosporin should be considered. In addition, the diagnosis of leptospirosis requires both serology and PCR performed in both urine and blood samples. Finally, prophylaxis using doxycycline, also effective against leptospirosis, rickettsial infections or travellers' diarrhea should be recommended for adventure travelers in malaria endemic areas.

  3. Rheumatic fever in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webb, Rachel; Wilson, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequel rheumatic heart disease remain major unsolved problems in New Zealand, causing significant morbidity and premature death. The disease burden affects predominantly indigenous Māori and Pacific Island children and young adults. In the past decade these ethnic disparities are even widening. Secondary prophylaxis using 28-day intramuscular penicillin has been the mainstay of disease control. In the greater Auckland region, audit shows community nurse-led penicillin delivery rates of 95% and recurrence rates of less than 5%. The true penicillin failure rate of 0.07 per 100 patient years supports 4 weekly penicillin rather than more frequent dose regimens. Landmark primary prevention research has been undertaken supporting sore throat primary prevention programmes in regions with very high rheumatic fever rates. Echocardiographic screening found 2.4% previously undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease in socially disadvantaged children. Combined with secondary prevention, echocardiography screening has the potential to reduce the prevalence of severe rheumatic heart disease.

  4. Rift Valley Fever in Namibia, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    During May–July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009–2010. PMID:24274469

  5. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever…

  6. Ask Dr. Sue: "Children and Fevers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1989-01-01

    Considers aspects of children's fevers. Answers questions concerning: (1) the temperature at which a fever is infectious; (2) the point at which a feverish child in care should be sent home; (3) the length of time a parent should wait before returning the child to day care; and (4) the way to take a child's temperature. (RJC)

  7. Rift Valley fever outbreak, southern Mauritania, 2012.

    PubMed

    Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-02-01

    After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September-November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas.

  8. Rift Valley fever in Namibia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-12-01

    During May-July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009-2010.

  9. Detection and Response for Rift Valley fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever is a viral disease that impacts domestic livestock and humans in Africa and the Middle East, and poses a threat to military operations in these areas. We describe a Rift Valley fever Risk Monitoring website, and its ability to predict risk of disease temporally and spatially. We al...

  10. Q Fever Chronic Osteomyelitis in Two Children.

    PubMed

    Costa, Beatriz; Morais, Andreia; Santos, Ana Sofia; Tavares, Delfin; Seves, Graça; Gouveia, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of chronic Q fever osteomyelitis in 10- and 5-year-old girls who presented with distal right femoral and left parasternal granulomatous osteomyelitis, respectively. Both were treated with ciprofloxacin and rifampin with good response. Q fever osteomyelitis is a challenging diagnosis in children, and the choice of antimicrobial treatment is difficult because of limited available data.

  11. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  12. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  14. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics and Epidemiology ...

  15. Seroprevalence of Sandfly‐Borne Phleboviruses Belonging to Three Serocomplexes (Sandfly fever Naples, Sandfly fever Sicilian and Salehabad) in Dogs from Greece and Cyprus Using Neutralization Test

    PubMed Central

    Alwassouf, Sulaf; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Bichaud, Laurence; Ntais, Pantelis; Mazeris, Apostolos; Antoniou, Maria; Charrel, Remi N.

    2016-01-01

    Phleboviruses transmitted by sandflies are endemic in the Mediterranean area. The last decade has witnessed the description of an accumulating number of novel viruses. Although, the risk of exposure of vertebrates is globally assessed, detailed geographic knowledge is poor even in Greece and Cyprus where sandfly fever has been recognized for a long time and repeatedly. A total of 1,250 dogs from mainland Greece and Greek archipelago on one hand and 422 dogs from Cyprus on the other hand have been sampled and tested for neutralising antibodies against Toscana virus (TOSV), Sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV), Arbia virus, and Adana virus i.e. four viruses belonging to the 3 sandfly-borne serocomplexes known to circulate actively in the Mediterranean area. Our results showed that (i) SFSV is highly prevalent with 71.9% (50.7–84.9% depending on the region) in Greece and 60.2% (40.0–72.6%) in Cyprus; (ii) TOSV ranked second with 4.4% (0–15.4%) in Greece and 8.4% (0–11.4%) in Cyprus; (iii) Salehabad viruses (Arbia and Adana) displayed also substantial prevalence rates in both countries with values ranging from 0–22.6% depending on the region and on the virus strain used in the test. These results demonstrate that circulation of viruses transmitted by sand flies can be estimated qualitatively using dog sera. As reported in other regions of the Mediterranean, these results indicate that it is time to shift these viruses from the "neglected" status to the "priority" status in order to stimulate studies aiming at defining and quantifying their medical and veterinary importance and possible public health impact. Specifically, viruses belonging to the Sandfly fever Sicilian complex should be given careful consideration. This calls for implementation of direct and indirect diagnosis in National reference centers and in hospital microbiology laboratories and systematic testing of unelucidated febrile illness and central and peripheral nervous system febrile

  16. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review.

    PubMed

    Heilman, James M; De Wolff, Jacob; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treatment of acute dengue fever is supportive, with either oral or intravenous rehydration for mild or moderate disease and use of intravenous fluids and blood transfusion for more severe cases. Along with attempts to eliminate the mosquito vector, work is ongoing to develop a vaccine and medications targeted directly at the virus.

  17. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Ftika, L; Maltezou, H C

    2013-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound haemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. VHFs that have the potential for human-to-human transmission and onset of large nosocomial outbreaks include Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever. Nosocomial outbreaks of VHFs are increasingly reported nowadays, which likely reflects the dynamics of emergence of VHFs. Such outbreaks are associated with an enormous impact in terms of human lives and costs for the management of cases, contact tracing and containment. Surveillance, diagnostic capacity, infection control and the overall preparedness level for management of a hospital-based VHF event are very limited in most endemic countries. Diagnostic capacities for VHFs should increase in the field and become affordable. Availability of appropriate protective equipment and education of healthcare workers about safe clinical practices and infection control is the mainstay for the prevention of nosocomial spread of VHFs.

  18. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  19. Fatal Israeli spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Yagupsky, P; Wolach, B

    1993-11-01

    We describe three Israeli children with fatal spotted fever. Clinical disease was characterized by irreversible shock, encephalopathy, renal failure, bleeding tendency, and death within 24 hours of admission. None of the patients had a history of tick bite, and no tache noire was noted. One child presented without rash, and the other two did not have antibodies to spotted-fever-group rickettsiae. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Rickettsia conorii from the patients' blood and tissues in cell cultures or from susceptible laboratory animals inoculated with human specimens. The present cases demonstrate the existence of a severe form of Israeli spotted fever in this population that resembles Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Because Israeli spotted fever may follow a quick, unpredictable, rapidly fatal clinical course, specific antimicrobial therapy should be promptly administered whenever the diagnosis is suspected.

  20. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens.

  1. Countermeasure development for Rift Valley fever: deletion, modification or targeting of major virulence factor NSs.

    PubMed

    Lihoradova, Olga; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants, and febrile illness, hemorrhagic fever, retinitis and encephalitis in humans. RVF is caused by the RVF virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. RVFV encodes a major virulence factor, NSs, which is dispensable for viral replication, yet required for evasion of host innate immune responses. RVFV NSs inhibits host gene upregulation at the transcriptional level, while promoting viral translation in the cytoplasm. In this article, we summarize the virology and pathology of RVF, and countermeasure development for RVF, with emphasis on NSs function and applications.

  2. Countermeasure development for Rift Valley fever: deletion, modification or targeting of major virulence factor NSs

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants, and febrile illness, hemorrhagic fever, retinitis and encephalitis in humans. RVF is caused by the RVF virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. RVFV encodes a major virulence factor, NSs, which is dispensable for viral replication, yet required for evasion of host innate immune responses. RVFV NSs inhibits host gene upregulation at the transcriptional level, while promoting viral translation in the cytoplasm. In this article, we summarize the virology and pathology of RVF, and countermeasure development for RVF, with emphasis on NSs function and applications. PMID:24910709

  3. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of burnt areas time series in Mediterranean regions suggests that ecosystems characterising this area consist primarily of species highly vulnerable to the fire but highly resilient, as characterized by a significant regenerative capacity after the fire spreading. In a few years the area burnt may once again be covered by the same vegetation present before the fire. Similarly, Mediterranean conifer forests, which often refers to plantations made in order to reforest the areas most severely degraded with high erosion risk, regenerate from seed after the fire resulting in high resilience to the fire as well. Only rarely, and usually with negligible damages, fire affects the areas covered by climax species in relation with altitude and soil types (i.e, quercus, fagus, abies). On the basis of these results, this paper shows how the simple Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model is able to reproduce the forest fire regime in terms of number of fires and burned area, describing whit good accuracy the actual fire perimeters. The original Drossel-Schwabl model has been slightly modified in this work by introducing two parameters (probability of propagation and regrowth) specific for each different class of vegetation cover. Using model selection methods based on AIC, the model with the optimal number of classes with different fire behaviour was selected. Two different case studies are presented in this work: Regione Liguria and Regione Sardegna (Italy). Both regions are situated in the center of the Mediterranean and are characterized by a high number of fires and burned area. However, the two regions have very different fire regimes. Sardinia is affected by the fire phenomenon only in summer whilst Liguria is affected by fires also in winter, with higher number of fires and larger burned area. In addition, the two region are very different in vegetation cover. The presence of Mediterranean conifers, (Pinus Pinaster, Pinus Nigra, Pinus halepensis) is quite spread in

  4. Adherence to and Invasion of Host Cells by Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia Species

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne Gar-Yun; Riley, Sean Phillip; Martinez, Juan Jose

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenic lifecycle of obligate intracellular bacteria presents a superb opportunity to develop understanding of the interaction between the bacteria and host under the pretext that disruption of these processes will likely lead to death of the pathogen and prevention of associated disease. Species of the genus Rickettsia contain some of the most hazardous of the obligate intracellular bacteria, including Rickettsia rickettsii and R. conorii the causative agents of Rocky Mountain and Mediterranean spotted fevers, respectively. Spotted fever group Rickettsia species commonly invade and thrive within cells of the host circulatory system whereby the endothelial cells are severely perturbed. The subsequent disruption of circulatory continuity results in much of the severe morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases, including macropapular dermal rash, interstitial pneumonia, acute renal failure, pulmonary edema, and other multisystem manifestations. This review describes current knowledge of the essential pathogenic processes of adherence to and invasion of host cells, efforts to disrupt these processes, and potential for disease prevention through vaccination with recently identified bacterial adherence and invasion proteins. A more complete understanding of these bacterial proteins will provide an opportunity for prevention and treatment of spotted fever group Rickettsia infections. PMID:21687751

  5. Antimicrobial therapies for Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii and has both acute and chronic forms. The acute disease is a febrile illness often with headache and myalgia that can be self-limiting whereas the chronic disease typically presents as endocarditis and can be life threatening. The normal therapy for the acute disease is a two week course of doxycycline, whereas chronic disease requires 18-24 months of doxycycline in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative treatments are used for pregnant women, young children, and those who cannot tolerate doxycycline. Doxycycline resistance is rare but has been reported. Co-trimoxazole is a currently recommended alternative treatment, but quinolones, rifampin, and newer macrolides may also provide some benefit. PMID:24073941

  6. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  7. Brugada syndrome unmasked by fever.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Scott P; Cube, Regino P; Edwards, John A

    2011-08-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS) is a cardiac rhythm disturbance that predisposes patients to sudden cardiac death. Brugada is classically described with specific electrocardiographic (EKG) findings of ST elevation and right bundle branch block in precordial leads and is an often unrecognized contributor to sudden cardiac death. We present a case of BS with cyclic EKG findings in a febrile 20-year-old active duty, Vietnamese male who presented following a witnessed syncopal event. His classic findings of Brugada pattern on EKG demonstrated reversibility with clinical defervescence. In patients with a suggestive history, a normal EKG cannot definitively rule out BS as the Brugada pattern can be unmasked by stress, which in this case was represented by a pneumonia-induced fever.

  8. Effective vaccine for lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S P; Hutwagner, L; Brown, B; McCormick, J B

    2000-08-01

    Lassa fever has been estimated to cause 5,000 deaths annually in West Africa. Recently, war in the zone where Lassa fever is hyperendemic has severely impeded control and treatment. Vaccination is the most viable control measure. There is no correlation between antibody levels and outcome in human patients, and inactivated vaccines produce high titers of antibodies to all viral proteins but do not prevent virus replication and death in nonhuman primates. Accordingly, we vaccinated 44 macaques with vaccinia virus-expressed Lassa virus structural proteins separately and in combination, with the object of inducing a predominantly TH1-type immune response. Following Lassa virus challenge, all unvaccinated animals died (0% survival). Nine of 10 animals vaccinated with all proteins survived (90% survival). Although no animals that received full-length glycoprotein alone had a high titer of antibody, 17 of 19 survived challenge (88%). In contrast, all animals vaccinated with nucleoprotein developed high titers of antibody but 12 of 15 died (20% survival). All animals vaccinated with single glycoproteins, G1 or G2, died, but all those that received both single glycoproteins (G1 plus G2) at separate sites survived, showing that both glycoproteins are independently important in protection. Neither group had demonstrable antibody levels prior to challenge. We demonstrate that in primates, immune responses to epitopes on both glycoproteins are required to protect against lethal challenge with Lassa virus without having untoward side effects and that this protection is likely to be primarily cell mediated. We show that an effective, safe vaccine against Lassa virus can and should be made and that its evaluation for human populations is a matter of humanitarian priority.

  9. Handbook for Forecasters in the Mediterranean. Part 2. Regional Forecasting Aids for the Mediterranean Basin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Occurrences.....................11-7 3. Forecasting Rules.........................11-11 III. TYRRHENIAN SEA - CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN AREA...the Tyrrhenian Sea -Central Mediterranean Area addressed in Section II1. A complex coastal topography characterizes the north and the south coasts of...is only 3 n mi. 11-25 III. TYRRHENIAN SEA - CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN AREA 1. OVERVIEW 1.1 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY The Tyrrhenian Sea -Central Mediterranean

  10. Mediterranean outflow mixing and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Price, J F; Baringer, M O; Lueck, R G; Johnson, G C; Ambar, I; Parrilla, G; Cantos, A; Kennelly, M A; Sanford, T B

    1993-02-26

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass.

  11. Diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Burke, Rebecca J; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory sequela of Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis that affects multiple organ systems. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever has been declining even before the use of antibiotics became widespread, however the disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, particularly in developing countries and has been estimated to affect 19 per 100,000 children worldwide. Acute rheumatic fever is a clinical diagnosis, and therefore subject to the judgment of the clinician. Because of the variable presentation, the Jones criteria were first developed in 1944 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. The Jones criteria have been modified throughout the years, most recently in 1992 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of initial attacks of acute rheumatic fever and to minimize overdiagnosis of the disease. Diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is based on the presence of documented preceding Group A Streptococcal infection, in addition to the presence of two major manifestations or one major and two minor manifestations of the Jones criteria. Without documentation of antecedent Group A Streptococcal infection, the diagnosis is much less likely except in a few rare scenarios. Carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea are the most common major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever. However, despite the predominance of these major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever, there can be significant overlap with other disorders such as Lyme disease, serum sickness, drug reactions, and post-Streptococcal reactive arthritis. This overlap between disease processes has led to continued investigation of the pathophysiology as well as development of new biomarkers and laboratory studies to aid in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever and distinction from other disease processes.

  12. Treatment of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Gradoni, L.; Bryceson, A.; Desjeux, P.

    1995-01-01

    Up-to-date information is given on the epidemiological situation of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) in nine Mediterranean countries, and on drug regimens adopted in the management of ZVL patients in each country. Results of experimental and clinical trials on the efficacy and tolerability of liposomal amphotericin B in laboratory animals and in patients with ZVL are presented, as well as conclusions and recommendations on drug regimens to be used in the treatment of ZVL. PMID:7743590

  13. Lassa fever: another threat from West Africa.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever, a zoonotic viral infection, is endemic in West Africa. The disease causes annual wide spread morbidity and mortality in Africa, and can be imported by travelers. Possible importation of Lassa fever and the potential for the use of Lassa virus as an agent of bioterrorism mandate clinicians in Israel and other countries to be vigilant and familiar with the basic characteristics of this disease. The article reviews the basis of this infection and the clinical management of patients with Lassa fever. Special emphasis is given to antiviral treatment and infection control.

  14. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  15. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever. PMID:27843231

  16. Clinical and molecular aspects of malaria fever.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Miranda S; Gerald, Noel; McCutchan, Thomas F; Aravind, L; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-10-01

    Although clinically benign, malaria fever is thought to have significant relevance in terms of parasite growth and survival and its virulence which in turn may alter the clinical course of illness. In this article, the historical literature is reviewed, providing some evolutionary perspective on the genesis and biological relevance of malaria fever, and the available molecular data on the febrile-temperature-inducible parasite factors that may contribute towards the regulation of parasite density and alteration of virulence in the host is also discussed. The potential molecular mechanisms that could be responsible for the induction and regulation of cyclical malaria fevers caused by different species of Plasmodium are also discussed.

  17. Antiviral treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, D A; Maiztegui, J I

    1994-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever is a systemic viral disease caused by Junin virus, with a mortality of 15-30% in untreated individuals. Current specific therapy is highly effective in reducing mortality, and consists of the early administration of immune plasma in defined doses of specific neutralizing antibodies per kg of body weight. However, several reasons suggest the need to investigate alternative therapies. Ribavirin, a broad spectrum antiviral agent, is effective in the treatment of other viral hemorrhagic fevers, and the studies done with Junin virus infections to date indicate that this drug may also have a beneficial effect in Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

  18. Clara Maass, yellow fever and human experimentation.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Carballo, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Clara Louise Maass, a 25-year-old American nurse, died of yellow fever on August 24, 1901, following experimental inoculation by infected mosquitoes in Havana, Cuba. The human yellow fever experiments were initially conducted by MAJ Walter Reed, who first used written informed consent and proved the validity of Finlay's mosquito-vector hypothesis. Despite informed consent form and an incentive of $100 in U.S. gold, human subjects were exposed to a deadly virus. The deaths of Clara Maass and two Spanish immigrants resulted in a public outcry and the immediate cessation of yellow fever human experiments in Cuba.

  19. Mantle dynamics in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean offers a unique avenue to study the driving forces of tectonic deformation within a complex mobile belt. Lithospheric dynamics are affected by slab rollback and collision of two large, slowly moving plates, forcing fragments of continental and oceanic lithosphere to interact. Here, we review the rich and growing set of constraints from geological reconstructions, geodetic data, and crustal and upper mantle heterogeneity imaged by structural seismology. We discuss a conceptual and quantitative framework for the causes of surface deformations. Exploring existing and newly developed tectonic and numerical geodynamic models, we illustrate the role of mantle convection on surface geology. A coherent picture emerges which can be outlined by two, almost symmetric, upper mantle convection cells. The down-wellings are found in the centre of the Mediterranean, and are associated with the descent of the Tyrrhenian and the Hellenic slabs. During plate convergence, these slabs migrated, driving return flow of the asthenosphere from the backarc regions. These currents can be found at large distance from the subduction zones, and are at present expressed in two upwellings beneath Anatolia and eastern Iberia. This convection system provides an explanation for the general pattern of seismic anisotropy in the Mediterranean, the first-order Anatolia and Adria microplate kinematics, and the positive dynamic topography of Anatolia and Eastern Iberia. More generally, it is an illustration of upper mantle, small-scale convection leading to intraplate deformation and complex plate boundary reconfiguration at the westernmost terminus of the Tethyan collision.

  20. Immunogenicity of Combination DNA Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus, Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus, Hantaan Virus, and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-22

    genus of the family Bunyaviridae and is one of four hantaviruses known to cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). HFRS caused by HTNV...infection is found exclusively in Asia, with most cases occurring in China (reviewed in [2]). Hantaviruses are transmitted to humans by exposure to...before in our studies of antavirus DNA vaccines. We showed that although DNA accines for two hantaviruses , HTNV and Seoul virus, are ighly immunogenic

  1. Seroepidemiological survey of Q fever and brucellosis in Kurdistan Province, western Iran.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Saber; Pourhossein, Behzad; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi; Amiri, Fahimeh Bagheri; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Given that the there is little information about the current status of brucellosis and Q fever in most parts of Iran, the aim of this study was to assay the seroprevalence of these two diseases in high-risk populations of Kurdistan Province in western Iran. Two hundred fifty sera samples were collected from hunters and their families, butchers, health care workers, and those referred to medical diagnostic laboratories in the southwestern regions of Kurdistan Province. Sera were tested to detect specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against brucellosis and Coxiella burnetii (phase I and II). The seroprevalence of brucellosis and Q fever (C. burnetii IgG phase I and II) was 6.4% and 27.83% (20% and 14.52%), respectively. The highest seroprevalence of Q fever (38%) and brucellosis (12%) was seen in butchers, who handled cattle, sheep, and goats during their work. Age had a significant positive association with Q fever seropositivity (p=0.04). The seroprevalence of Q fever was higher in those people who had been in employment for more than 10 years (21.88%) compared to others (7.79%) (p=0.02). The keeping of animals (p=0.03), hunting and eating the meat of wild animals (p=0.02), and not disinfecting hands and faces after working (for health care workers and butchers) (p=0.02) were risk factors for Q fever seropositivity. This study showed a relatively high seroprevalence of brucellosis and Q fever in high-risk populations of Kurdistan Province. It is suggested that complementary studies be carried out in other parts of western Iran to clarify the epidemiological aspects of these diseases.

  2. Mediterranean Ocean Colour Chlorophyll trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    rinaldi, eleonora; colella, simone; santoleri, rosalia

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) concentration, seen as a proxy for phytoplankton biomass, is an efficient tool in order to understand the response of marine ecosystem to human pressures. This is particularly important along the coastal regions, in which the strong anthropization and the irrational exploitation of resources represent a persistent threat to the biodiversity. The aim of this work is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of using Ocean Color (OC) data to monitor the environmental changes in Mediterranean Sea and to develop a method for detecting trend from OC data that can constitute a new indicator of the water quality within the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive implementation. In this study the Mediterranean merged Case1-Case2 chlorophyll product, produced by CNR-ISAC and distributed in the framework of MyOcean, is analyzed. This product is obtained by using two different bio-optical algorithms for open ocean (Case1) and coastal turbid (Case2) waters; this improves the quality of the Chl satellite estimates, especially near the coast. In order to verify the real capability of the this product for estimating Chl trend and for selecting the most appropriated statistical test to detect trend in the Mediterranean Sea, a comparison between OC and in situ data are carried out. In-situ Chl data are part of the European Environment Information and Observation Network (Eionet) of the European Environmental Agency (EEA). Four different statistical approaches to estimate trend have been selected and used to compare trend values obtained with in-situ and OC data. Results show that the best agreement between in-situ and OC trend is achieved using the Mann- Kendall test. The Mediterranean trend map obtained applying this test to the de-seasonalized OC time series shows that, in accordance with the results of many authors, the case 1 waters of Mediterranean sea are characterized by a negative trend. However, the most intense trend signals, both negative

  3. [Malignant catarrhal fever in zoo ruminants].

    PubMed

    Hänichen, T; Reid, H W; Wiesner, H; Hermanns, W

    1998-09-01

    An outbreak of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in Indian gauer (Bos gaurus gaurus) and Javan banteng (Bos javanicus javanicus) occurred in the year 1964 and killed almost all animals of the groups of these species kept at the Munich zoo at that time. In the consecutive years at highly irregular intervals cases of the head-and-eye-form of MCF occurred sporadically at the zoo in European and American bison (Bison bonasus, B. bison' bison, B. bison athabascae), elk (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus), Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and again in gaur and banteng. The clinical and pathomorphological observations, including those of prophylactic and tentative treatment are reported. The subspecies of caprinae and alcelaphinae potentionally latently infected with viral agents of MCF kept at the zoo over the reported period are listed. Some details concerning housing, taking care of the animals etc. of the latently infected carriers of the family caprinae and the susceptible species of bovidae and cervidae are also given as far as they are of epidemiological interest. The results of the retrospective analysis and the results of testing paraffin-embedded tissue samples for the presence of ovine herpesvirus-2 (OHV-2)-specific DNA and alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AHV-1)-specific DNA from 1964 up to 1997 are discussed. The negative results for OHV-2-specific DNA suggest that MCF at Munich zoo until 1979 could have been "wildebeest-associated", also because until 1974 blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus taurinus) and until 1983 white-tailed gnu (Connochaetes gnou) were kept. However, positive results for OHV-2-specific DNA in the tissues collected from 1985 onwards, strongly suggest the "sheep-associated" MCF.

  4. Case—control study to identify risk factors for paediatric endemic typhoid fever in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Black, Robert E.; Cisneros, Luis; Levine, Myron M.; Banfi, Antonio; Lobos, Hernan; Rodriguez, Hector

    1985-01-01

    Typhoid fever is an important endemic health problem in Santiago, Chile. Its incidence has more than doubled in recent years, during which access to potable water and sewage disposal in the home became almost universal in the city. A matched case—control study was carried out to identify risk factors and vehicles of transmission of paediatric typhoid fever; 81 children in the 3-14-years age group with typhoid fever were compared with controls, matched with respect to age, sex, and neighbourhood. It was found that case children more frequently bought lunch at school and shared food with classmates. Also, case children more often consumed flavoured ices bought outside the home; none of 41 other food items considered in the study was associated with a higher risk of typhoid fever. Only two food handlers for cases and one for controls were positive for Salmonella typhi, indicating that persons preparing food solely for their own family were not the main source of S. typhi infection. Rather, the risk factors identified in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that paediatric endemic typhoid fever in Santiago is largely spread by consumption of food-stuffs that are prepared outside the individual's home and are shared with or sold to children. PMID:3879201

  5. Fever and rash in a 3-year-old girl: Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Julie M; Zaenglein, Andrea L; Kaul, Aditya; Chang, Mary Wu

    2002-09-01

    Initial symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a tick-borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, are nonspecific and include headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, malaise, and myalgias, followed by fever and rash. The classic triad of fever, rash, and history of tick exposure is uncommon at presentation. Clinical manifestations of RMSF range from virtually asymptomatic to severe. Because of the potentially fatal outcome of RMSF, presumptive clinical diagnosis and empiric antimicrobial therapy can be critical. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl from New York State who presented with fever and rash.

  6. Causes of Fever in Rural Southern Laos

    PubMed Central

    Mayxay, Mayfong; Sengvilaipaseuth, Onanong; Chanthongthip, Anisone; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Parola, Philippe; Craig, Scott B.; Tulsiani, Suhella; Burns, Mary-Anne; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Keola, Siamphay; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Raoult, Didier; Dittrich, Sabine; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of fever in rural Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) has remained obscure until recently owing to the lack of laboratory facilities. We conducted a study to determine the causes of fever among 229 patients without malaria in Savannakhet Province, southern Laos; 52% had evidence of at least one diagnosis (45% with single and 7% with apparent multiple infections). Among patients with only one diagnosis, dengue (30.1%) was the most common, followed by leptospirosis (7.0%), Japanese encephalitis virus infection (3.5%), scrub typhus (2.6%), spotted fever group infection (0.9%), unspecified flavivirus infection (0.9%), and murine typhus (0.4%). We discuss the empirical treatment of fever in relation to these findings. PMID:26149859

  7. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  8. Causes of Fever in Rural Southern Laos.

    PubMed

    Mayxay, Mayfong; Sengvilaipaseuth, Onanong; Chanthongthip, Anisone; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Parola, Philippe; Craig, Scott B; Tulsiani, Suhella; Burns, Mary-Anne; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Keola, Siamphay; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Raoult, Didier; Dittrich, Sabine; Newton, Paul N

    2015-09-01

    The etiology of fever in rural Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) has remained obscure until recently owing to the lack of laboratory facilities. We conducted a study to determine the causes of fever among 229 patients without malaria in Savannakhet Province, southern Laos; 52% had evidence of at least one diagnosis (45% with single and 7% with apparent multiple infections). Among patients with only one diagnosis, dengue (30.1%) was the most common, followed by leptospirosis (7.0%), Japanese encephalitis virus infection (3.5%), scrub typhus (2.6%), spotted fever group infection (0.9%), unspecified flavivirus infection (0.9%), and murine typhus (0.4%). We discuss the empirical treatment of fever in relation to these findings.

  9. A case of ADEM following Chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Maity, Pranab; Roy, Pinaki; Basu, Arindam; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2014-05-01

    Chikungunya most often is a self-limiting febrile illness with polyarthritis and the virus is not known to be neurotropic. We are reporting a case of chikugunya fever presenting as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis(ADEM) which is very rare.

  10. Osteolysis in cat-scratch fever

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.F.; Lehman, R.M.; Shiels, W.E.; Blaney, S.M.

    1985-08-01

    The osteolysis associated with cat-scratch fever resembles more ominous conditions. The combination of osteolysis and unilateral regional adenopathy in a child or adolescent should suggest cat-scratch disease. Bone scans and CT verified the diagnosis.

  11. Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fever comes down. previous continue Types of Thermometers Whatever thermometer you choose, be sure you know how to ... Keep and follow the manufacturer's directions for any thermometer. Digital thermometers usually give the quickest, most accurate ...

  12. A Physician's Nightmare: Fever of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains to be a challenge despite advancement in diagnostic technologies and procedures. FUO is considered when fever presents intermittently without an explanation. It has been linked to various etiologies, which makes it difficult to diagnose. We present the case of 18-month-old female with recurrent fever, splenomegaly, abdominal pain, and constipation. The workup for her symptoms revealed wandering spleen. Wandering spleen is a result from excessive laxity or absence of splenic ligaments. The patient underwent splenectomy and was advised to continue on Senna, Miralax, and high fiber diet. Her mother reported that the fever is no longer present and there is marked improvement in her constipation and abdominal pain after splenectomy. PMID:27433363

  13. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  14. [Mediterranean Spotted Fever: Retrospective Review of Hospitalized Cases and Predictive Factors of Severe Disease].

    PubMed

    Meireles, Mariana; Magalhães, Rui; Guimas, Arlindo

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Febre escaro-nodular, uma zoonose antiga a levantar questões actuais. Este estudo pretende reavaliar a imagem clínica da doença e identificar factores prognósticos de doença severa. Material e Métodos: Foram avaliados os casos admitidos num hospital central no período de 12 anos. Os fatores de risco foram determinados por análise uni e multivariada, comparando os indivíduos internados em enfermaria geral versus admitidos em unidades de cuidados intermédios/intensivos ou em caso de morte. Resultados: Foram revistos 71 casos de febre escaro-nodular. A média de idades foi 63,3 ± 16,7 anos e 52,1% eram homens. A escara de inoculação foi identificada em 62,0% dos casos. Febre e exantema foram os achados clínicos mais frequentes. Quarenta e cinco por cento dos doentes desenvolveram complicações e 22,5% foram internados em unidades de cuidados intermédios e/ou intensivos. Apirexia, dispneia, insuficiência renal e níveis de lactato desidrogenase elevados à admissão foram preditores de desenvolvimentode doença severa (p < 0,034). O alcoolismo associou-se a um tempo de internamento prolongado (p = 0,020). Ausênciade febre (p = 0,019) e níveis elevados de creatinina (p = 0,028) constituíram fatores independentes de mau prognóstico. A taxa de mortalidade foi 2,8%.Discussão: Apesar da evolução da febre escaro-nodular ser, geralmente, assumida como benigna, casos graves têm surgido. Quase metade dos doentes hospitalizados desenvolveu complicações. Apirexia e lesão renal predispõem a pior prognóstico. Conclusão: A identificação precoce da infeção e a vigilância contínua dos doentes são determinantes, particularmente naqueles com maior risco de desenvolverem doença severa ou fatal.

  15. Serological Evidence of Dengue Fever Among Refugees, Hargeysa, Somalia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    fever, Sindbis, Chikungunya, yellow HISTORY OF THE DISEASE IN THE fever, and Zika viruses . However, antibody reac- DAM CAMP tive to dengue 2 virus was...fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Sindbis, Chikungunya, yellow fever, and Zika viruses . However, antibody reactive to dengue 2 virus was detected... ZIKA ) viruses . Further testing of sera for evidence of dengue S Barbera S , MOGAISCIO . viral infection was done by the enzyme immunoassay " (EIA

  16. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  17. Viral haemorrhagic fevers: current status, future threats.

    PubMed

    Speed, B R; Gerrard, M P; Kennett, M L; Catton, M G; Harvey, B M

    1996-01-15

    In developing countries, the major outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Marburg, Ebola and Lassa fever viruses have been nosocomially spread. The high mortality and absence of specific treatment have had a devastating effect. Epidemics of this highly contagious disease remain a constant threat to Australia and, as a result, carefully planned laboratory and public health strategies and clinical infection control measures have been instituted for the management of suspected cases.

  18. Infectious causes of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alastair C; Moore, David A

    2015-06-01

    The causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO) are changing because advances in clinical practice and diagnostics have facilitated the identification of some infections. A variety of bacterial infections can cause FUO, and these can be divided into those that are easy to identify using culture and those that require serological or molecular tests for identification. A number of viral, parasitic and fungal infections can also cause prolonged fever. This article summarises the clinical features and diagnostic strategy of these infections.

  19. [Q fever. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Peña-Irún, Á; González Santamaría, A R; Munguía Rozadilla, F; Herrero González, J L

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis of global distribution with an incidence of 3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year. A variety of animals can be the coxiella reservoir which always must be taken into account when faced with a fever process in a compatible context. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve the prognosis, and prevent the development of chronic infection or other potential complications associated with the coxelliosis.

  20. Mechanism of fever induction in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, R; Philipp-Dormston, W K; Radsak, K; Menzel, H

    1976-01-01

    Three exogenous pyrogens (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, synthetic double-stranded ribonucleic acid. Newcastle disease virus) were compared with respect to their mechanisms of fever induction in rabbits. All inducers stimulated the production of an endogenous pyrogen demonstrated in the blood as well as prostaglandins of the E group, and of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the cerebrospinal fluid. The concentrations of these compounds were elevated approximately twofold as compared to the controls. Independently of the mode of induction, the fever reaction could be prevented by pretreatment with 5 mg of cycloheximide per kg, although the three fever mediators were induced as in febrile animals. Consequently, at least one additional fever mediator that is sensitive to a 30 to 50% inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide has to be postulated. The comparable reactions of the rabbits after administration of different pyrogens argues for a similar fever mechanism. In contrast to fever induction there was no stimulation of endogenous pyrogen, prostaglandins of the E group, and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in hyperthermia as a consequence of exposure of the animals to exogenous overheating. Furthermore, hyperthermia could not be prevented by cycloheximide. PMID:185148

  1. [Present status of an arbovirus infection: yellow fever, its natural history of hemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever].

    PubMed

    Digoutte, J P

    1999-12-01

    In the early 20th century, when it was discovered that the yellow fever virus was transmitted in its urban cycle by Aedes aegypti, measures of control were introduced leading to its disappearance. Progressive neglect of the disease, however, led to a new outbreak in 1927 during which the etiological agent was isolated; some years later a vaccine was discovered and yellow fever disappeared again. In the 1960s, rare cases of encephalitis were observed in young children after vaccination and the administration of the vaccine was forbidden for children under 10 years. Five years later, a new outbreak of yellow fever in Diourbel, Senegal, was linked to the presence of Aedes aegypti. In the late 1970s, the idea of a selvatic cycle for yellow fever arose. Thanks to new investigative techniques in Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire, the yellow fever virus was isolated from the reservoir of virus and vectors. The isolated virus was identified in monkeys and several vectors: Aedes furcifer, Aedes taylori, Aedes luteocephalus. Most importantly, the virus was isolated in male mosquitoes. Until recently, the only known cycle had been that of Haddow in East Africa. The virus circulate in the canopea between monkeys and Aedes africanus. These monkeys infect Aedes bromeliae when they come to eat in banana plantations. This cycle does not occur in West Africa. Vertical transmission is the main method of maintenance of the virus through the dry season. "Reservoirs of virus" are often mentioned in medical literature, monkeys having a short viremia whereas mosquitoes remain infected throughout their life cycle. In such a selvatic cycle, circulation can reach very high levels and no child would be able to escape an infecting bite and yet no clinical cases of yellow fever have been reported. The virulence--as it affects man--of the yellow fever virus in its wild cycle is very low. In areas where the virus can circulate in epidemic form, two types of circulation can be distinguished

  2. Treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, Delia A; Briggiler, Ana M; Sánchez, Zaida

    2008-04-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a rodent-borne illness caused by the arenavirus Junin that is endemic to the humid pampas of Argentina. AHF has had significant morbidity since its emergence in the 1950s, with a case-fatality rate of the illness without treatment between 15% and 30%. The use of a live attenuated vaccine has markedly reduced the incidence of AHF. Present specific therapy involves the transfusion of immune plasma in defined doses of neutralizing antibodies during the prodromal phase of illness. However, alternative forms of treatment are called for due to current difficulties in early detection of AHF, related to its decrease in incidence, troubles in maintaining adequate stocks of immune plasma, and the absence of effective therapies for severely ill patients that progress to a neurologic-hemorrhagic phase. Ribavirin might be a substitute for immune plasma, provided that the supply is guaranteed. Immune immunoglobulin or monoclonal antibodies should also be considered. New therapeutic options such as those being developed for systemic inflammatory syndromes should also be valuated in severe forms of AHF.

  3. Plate tectonics of the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D P

    1970-04-18

    The seismicity and fault plane solutions in the Mediterranean area show that two small rapidly moving plates exist in the Eastern Mediterranean, and such plates may be a common feature of contracting ocean basins. The results show that the concepts of plate tectonics apply to instantaneous motions across continental plate boundaries.

  4. Increased Prevalence of Anellovirus in Pediatric Patients with Fever

    PubMed Central

    McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Wylie, Kristine M.; Deych, Elena; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George; Storch, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    The Anelloviridae family consists of non-enveloped, circular, single-stranded DNA viruses. Three genera of anellovirus are known to infect humans, named TTV, TTMDV, and TTMV. Although anelloviruses were initially thought to cause non-A-G viral hepatitis, continued research has shown no definitive associations between anellovirus and human disease to date. Using high-throughput sequencing, we investigated the association between anelloviruses and fever in pediatric patients 2–36 months of age. We determined that although anelloviruses were present in a large number of specimens from both febrile and afebrile patients, they were more prevalent in the plasma and nasopharyngeal (NP) specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. Using PCR to detect each of the three species of anellovirus that infect humans, we found that anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV were more prevalent in the plasma and NP specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. This was not the case for species TTMV which was found in similar percentages of febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Analysis of patient age showed that the percentage of plasma and NP specimens containing anellovirus increased with age until patients were 19–24 months of age, after which the percentage of anellovirus positive patient specimens dropped. This trend was striking for TTV and TTMDV and very modest for TTMV in both plasma and NP specimens. Finally, as the temperature of febrile patients increased, so too did the frequency of TTV and TTMDV detection. Again, TTMV was equally present in both febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Taken together these data indicate that the human anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV are associated with fever in children, while the highly related human anellovirus TTMV has no association with fever. PMID:23226428

  5. The Mediterranean Plastic Soup: synthetic polymers in Mediterranean surface waters.

    PubMed

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Avio, Carlo G; Mineo, Annabella; Lattin, Gwendolyn L; Magaldi, Marcello G; Belmonte, Genuario; Moore, Charles J; Regoli, Francesco; Aliani, Stefano

    2016-11-23

    The Mediterranean Sea has been recently proposed as one of the most impacted regions of the world with regards to microplastics, however the polymeric composition of these floating particles is still largely unknown. Here we present the results of a large-scale survey of neustonic micro- and meso-plastics floating in Mediterranean waters, providing the first extensive characterization of their chemical identity as well as detailed information on their abundance and geographical distribution. All particles >700 μm collected in our samples were identified through FT-IR analysis (n = 4050 particles), shedding for the first time light on the polymeric diversity of this emerging pollutant. Sixteen different classes of synthetic materials were identified. Low-density polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene were the most abundant compounds, followed by polyamides, plastic-based paints, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol. Less frequent polymers included polyethylene terephthalate, polyisoprene, poly(vinyl stearate), ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyepoxide, paraffin wax and polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester reported for the first time floating in off-shore waters. Geographical differences in sample composition were also observed, demonstrating sub-basin scale heterogeneity in plastics distribution and likely reflecting a complex interplay between pollution sources, sinks and residence times of different polymers at sea.

  6. The Mediterranean Plastic Soup: synthetic polymers in Mediterranean surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Avio, Carlo G.; Mineo, Annabella; Lattin, Gwendolyn L.; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Belmonte, Genuario; Moore, Charles J.; Regoli, Francesco; Aliani, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has been recently proposed as one of the most impacted regions of the world with regards to microplastics, however the polymeric composition of these floating particles is still largely unknown. Here we present the results of a large-scale survey of neustonic micro- and meso-plastics floating in Mediterranean waters, providing the first extensive characterization of their chemical identity as well as detailed information on their abundance and geographical distribution. All particles >700 μm collected in our samples were identified through FT-IR analysis (n = 4050 particles), shedding for the first time light on the polymeric diversity of this emerging pollutant. Sixteen different classes of synthetic materials were identified. Low-density polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene were the most abundant compounds, followed by polyamides, plastic-based paints, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol. Less frequent polymers included polyethylene terephthalate, polyisoprene, poly(vinyl stearate), ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyepoxide, paraffin wax and polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester reported for the first time floating in off-shore waters. Geographical differences in sample composition were also observed, demonstrating sub-basin scale heterogeneity in plastics distribution and likely reflecting a complex interplay between pollution sources, sinks and residence times of different polymers at sea. PMID:27876837

  7. The Mediterranean Plastic Soup: synthetic polymers in Mediterranean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Avio, Carlo G.; Mineo, Annabella; Lattin, Gwendolyn L.; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Belmonte, Genuario; Moore, Charles J.; Regoli, Francesco; Aliani, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has been recently proposed as one of the most impacted regions of the world with regards to microplastics, however the polymeric composition of these floating particles is still largely unknown. Here we present the results of a large-scale survey of neustonic micro- and meso-plastics floating in Mediterranean waters, providing the first extensive characterization of their chemical identity as well as detailed information on their abundance and geographical distribution. All particles >700 μm collected in our samples were identified through FT-IR analysis (n = 4050 particles), shedding for the first time light on the polymeric diversity of this emerging pollutant. Sixteen different classes of synthetic materials were identified. Low-density polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene were the most abundant compounds, followed by polyamides, plastic-based paints, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol. Less frequent polymers included polyethylene terephthalate, polyisoprene, poly(vinyl stearate), ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyepoxide, paraffin wax and polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester reported for the first time floating in off-shore waters. Geographical differences in sample composition were also observed, demonstrating sub-basin scale heterogeneity in plastics distribution and likely reflecting a complex interplay between pollution sources, sinks and residence times of different polymers at sea.

  8. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  9. Context dependency and generality of fever in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahlschmidt, Z. R.; Adamo, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Fever can reduce mortality in infected animals. Yet, despite its fitness-enhancing qualities, fever often varies among animals. We used several approaches to examine this variation in insects. Texas field crickets ( Gryllus texensis) exhibited a modest fever (1 °C increase in preferred body temperature, T pref) after injection of prostaglandin, which putatively mediates fever in both vertebrates and invertebrates, but they did not exhibit fever during chronic exposure to heat-killed bacteria. Further, chronic food limitation and mating status did not affect T pref or the expression of behavioural fever, suggesting limited context dependency of fever in G. texensis. Our meta-analysis of behavioural fever studies indicated that behavioural fever occurs in many insects, but it is not ubiquitous. Thus, both empirical and meta-analytical results suggest that the fever response in insects `is widespread, although certainly not inevitable' (Moore 2002). We highlight the need for future work focusing on standardizing an experimental protocol to measure behavioural fever, understanding the specific mechanism(s) underlying fever in insects, and examining whether ecological or physiological costs often outweigh the benefits of fever and can explain the sporadic nature of fever in insects.

  10. Yellow fever vaccination in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in recent years in the Americas have prompted concern about the possible urbanization of jungle fever. Vaccination, using the 17D strain of yellow fever virus, provides an effective, practical method of large scale protection against the disease. Because yellow fever can reappear in certain areas after a 2-year dormancy period, some countries maintain routine vaccination programs in areas where jungle yellow fever is endemic. The size of the endemic area (approximately half of South America), transportation and communication difficulties, and the inability to ensure a reliable cold chain are problems facing these programs. In addition, the problem of reaching dispersed and isolated populations has been addressed by the use of mobile teams, radio monitoring, and educational methods. During yellow fever outbreaks, many countries institute massive vaccination campaigns, targeted at temporary workers and migrants. Because epidemics in South America may involve extensive areas, these campaigns may not effectively address the problem. The ped-o-jet injector method, used in Brazil and Colombia, should be used in outbreak situations, as it is effective for large-scale vaccination. Vaccine by needle, suggested for maintenance programs, should be administered to those above 1 year of age. An efficient monitoring method to avoid revaccination, and to assess immunity, should be developed. The 17D strain produces seroconversion in 95% of recipients, and most is prepared in Brazil and Colombia. But, problems with storage methods, instability in seed lots, and difficulties in large-scale production were identified in 1981 by the Pan American Health Organization and WHO. The group recommended modernization of current production techniques and further research to develop a vaccine that could be produced in cell cultures. Brazil and Colombia have acted on these recommendations, modernizing vaccine production and researching thermostabilizing media for

  11. Role of fever in infection: has induced fever any therapeutic potential in HIV infection?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S; Rashid, S

    1997-01-01

    Ancient societies had no rational understanding of fever. The Greeks were the first to recognise that it may be part of nature's method of effecting cure in some diseases. How best to assist nature went through many trials and errors. Appreciation of the prognostic value of fever and how it may be controlled was slow to appear. That there was a place in the therapeutic arsenal for induced fever came only with the 20th century. Finding a suitable, safe, and satisfactory means came slowly. The curative power of well controlled and reproducible levels of fever was proved by the arrest of one deadly and incurable complication of a sexually transmitted disease in the first half of this century. The purpose of this review is to promote discussion and, hopefully, well ordered laboratory and clinical trials aimed at learning whether or not induced fevers have a place in the care of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images PMID:9306904

  12. [Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever viruses: update on filoviruses].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Baize, S; Gonzalez, J P

    2011-04-01

    The Ebola and Marburg viruses are the sole members of the Filoviridae family of viruses. They are characterized by a long filamentous form that is unique in the viral world. Filoviruses are among the most virulent pathogens currently known to infect humans. They cause fulminating disease characterized by acute fever followed by generalized hemorrhagic syndrome that is associated with 90% mortality in the most severe forms. Epidemic outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola viruses have taken a heavy toll on human life in Central Africa and devastated large ape populations in Gabon and Republic of Congo. Since their discovery in 1967 (Marburg) and 1976 (Ebola), more than 2,300 cases and 1,670 deaths have been reported. These numbers pale in comparison with the burden caused by malnutrition or other infectious disease scourges in Africa such as malaria, cholera, AIDS, dengue or tuberculosis. However, due to their extremely high lethality, association with multifocal hemorrhaging and specificity to the African continent, these hemorrhagic fever viruses have given rise to great interest on the part not only of the international scientific community but also of the general public because of their perceived potential as biological weapons. Much research has been performed on these viruses and major progress has been made in knowledge of their ecology, epidemiology and physiopathology and in development of vaccine candidates and therapeutic schemes. The purpose of this review is to present the main developments in these particular fields in the last decade.

  13. Imported case of Marburg hemorrhagic fever - Colorado, 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-12-18

    Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) is a rare, viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF); the causative agent is an RNA virus in the family Filoviridae, and growing evidence demonstrates that fruit bats are the natural reservoir of Marburg virus (MARV). On January 9, 2008, an infectious disease physician notified the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) of a case of unexplained febrile illness requiring hospitalization in a woman who had returned from travel in Uganda. Testing of early convalescent serum demonstrated no evidence of infection with agents that cause tropical febrile illnesses, including VHF. Six months later, in July 2008, the patient requested repeat testing after she learned of the death from MHF of a Dutch tourist who had visited the same bat-roosting cave as the patient, the Python Cave in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. The convalescent serologic testing revealed evidence of prior infection with MARV, and MARV RNA was detected in the archived early convalescent serum. A public health investigation did not identify illness consistent with secondary MHF transmission among her contacts, and no serologic evidence of infection was detected among the six tested of her eight tour companions. The patient might have acquired MARV infection through exposure to bat secretions or excretions while visiting the Python Cave. Travelers should be aware of the risk for acquiring MHF in caves or mines inhabited by bats in endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Health-care providers should consider VHF among travelers returning from endemic areas who experience unexplained febrile illness.

  14. Rift Valley Fever: Recent Insights into Pathogenesis and Prevention▿

    PubMed Central

    Boshra, Hani; Lorenzo, Gema; Busquets, Núria; Brun, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic pathogen that primarily affects ruminants but can also be lethal in humans. A negative-stranded RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae, this pathogen is transmitted mainly via mosquito vectors. RVFV has shown the ability to inflict significant damage to livestock and is also a threat to public health. While outbreaks have traditionally occurred in sub-Saharan Africa, recent outbreaks in the Middle East have raised awareness of the potential of this virus to spread to Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Although the virus was initially characterized almost 80 years ago, the only vaccine approved for widespread veterinary use is an attenuated strain that has been associated with significant pathogenic side effects. However, increased understanding of the molecular biology of the virus over the last few years has led to recent advances in vaccine design and has enabled the development of more-potent prophylactic measures to combat infection. In this review, we discuss several aspects of RVFV, with particular emphasis on the molecular components of the virus and their respective roles in pathogenesis and an overview of current vaccine candidates. Progress in understanding the epidemiology of Rift Valley fever has also enabled prediction of potential outbreaks well in advance, thus providing another tool to combat the physical and economic impact of this disease. PMID:21450816

  15. Rift valley fever: recent insights into pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Lorenzo, Gema; Busquets, Núria; Brun, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic pathogen that primarily affects ruminants but can also be lethal in humans. A negative-stranded RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae, this pathogen is transmitted mainly via mosquito vectors. RVFV has shown the ability to inflict significant damage to livestock and is also a threat to public health. While outbreaks have traditionally occurred in sub-Saharan Africa, recent outbreaks in the Middle East have raised awareness of the potential of this virus to spread to Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Although the virus was initially characterized almost 80 years ago, the only vaccine approved for widespread veterinary use is an attenuated strain that has been associated with significant pathogenic side effects. However, increased understanding of the molecular biology of the virus over the last few years has led to recent advances in vaccine design and has enabled the development of more-potent prophylactic measures to combat infection. In this review, we discuss several aspects of RVFV, with particular emphasis on the molecular components of the virus and their respective roles in pathogenesis and an overview of current vaccine candidates. Progress in understanding the epidemiology of Rift Valley fever has also enabled prediction of potential outbreaks well in advance, thus providing another tool to combat the physical and economic impact of this disease.

  16. [Technical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of chikungunya fever].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Cruz, Antonio; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Dávila-Torres, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is an emerging disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by the bite of Aedes genus species: Aedesaegypti and Aedesalbopictus. In 2013, PAHO/WHO received confirmation of the first cases of indigenous transmission of chikungunya in the Americas. This disease may be acute, subacute and chronic, affecting all age groups. Following an incubation period from three to seven days, the patient usually begins with a high fever (greater than 39 °C), arthralgia, back pain, headache, nausea, vomiting, arthritis, rash, and conjunctivitis (acute phase: 3-10 days). Most patients recover fully, but in some cases, joint involvement may persist chronically and cause discapacity and affect life quality. Serious complications are rare, however, attention must be focused on vulnerable populations (the elderly, children and pregnant women). So far, there is no specific antiviral treatment or effective vaccine, so it is giving priority symptomatic and supportive treatment for the acute phase and make an early diagnosis of atypical and severe forms, and to implement effective prevention and control measures. Given the eco-epidemiological conditions and distribution of vectors in the region of the Americas, the spread of the virus to other countries is likely, so that health professionals should be aware of and identify risk factors and major clinical manifestations, allow timely prevention and safe and effective treatment of this disease.

  17. Importance of United States Naval Forward Presence in Mediterranean Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Mediterranean Region, and beyond. 24 This theme is developed by Fernand Braudel , The Mediterranean and...Relations,” Janes Intelligence Review, v. 13, no. 2, February 2000. Braudel , Fernand , “The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of

  18. Acute infectious purpura fulminans due to probable spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kundavaram, A; Francis, N R; Jude, A P J; Varghese, G N

    2014-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is associated with several infections, most notably with meningococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus infections. However, there are few reports of association of this entity with spotted fever from India. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with fever, headache, and myalgia. On the seventh day of fever he developed nonblanching purple hemorrhagic purpura on the trunk and most prominently on the extremities consistent with purpura fulminans. Immunofluorescent assay confirmed the diagnosis of spotted fever. PF though common with rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is rarely seen in association with Indian tick typhus, the usual cause of spotted fever in India.

  19. Milk fever control in the United States.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Horst, R L

    2003-01-01

    Strategies for the prevention of milk fever in the United States have made several 180 degree changes over the last several decades. During the 1950's and 1960's evidence suggested that low calcium diets could be utilized to stimulate the parathyroid prior to calving to initiate calcium homeostasis prior to the onset of lactation. High calcium diets were avoided and the strategy worked--for a while, until more concentrated farming practices changed the cation composition of the forages. Although Norwegian scientists presented evidence of a role for cations and anions in milk fever during the late 1960's, recent studies have more precisely defined the physiological link between high diet potassium and tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone as a leading cause of milk fever. Manipulation of dietary cation-anion balance has been growing rapidly as a means of controlling not only milk fever but sub-clinical hypocalcemia as well. A recent United States survey found that 45% of dairy operations feed dry cows a "low potassium diet" to reduce milk fever. In addition some use anionic salts. About 27% of dairy farms feed dry cows a diet with added anions to induce a compensated metabolic acidosis which has proved effective in reducing subclinical hypocalcemia. These diets are often high in calcium.

  20. Immunity and immune response, pathology and pathologic changes: progress and challenges in the immunopathology of yellow fever.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Pagliari, Carla; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Duarte, Maria I S; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2013-09-01

    Yellow fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever, which affects people living in Africa and South America and is caused by the yellow fever virus, the prototype species in the Flavivirus genus (Flaviviridae family). Yellow fever virus infection can produce a wide spectrum of symptoms, ranging from asymptomatic infection or oligosymptomatic illness to severe disease with a high fatality rate. In this review, we focus in the mechanisms associated with the physiopathology of yellow fever in humans and animal models. It has been demonstrated that several factors play a role in the pathological outcome of the severe form of the disease including direct viral cytopathic effect, necrosis and apoptosis of hepatocyte cells in the midzone, and a minimal inflammatory response as well as low-flow hypoxia and cytokine overproduction. New information has filled several gaps in the understanding of yellow fever pathogenesis and helped comprehend the course of illness. Finally, we discuss prospects for an immune therapy in the light of new immunologic, viral, and pathologic tools.

  1. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory...

  2. Gene Gun-Delivered DNA Vaccines for Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome: Advancement to Clinical Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    bioterrorism pathogens that threaten troops. 1. INTRODUCTION Hantaviruses are RNA viruses belonging to the family Bunyaviridae, and are...the etiologic agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the New World. The...viruses are carried by persistently infected rodents and are found worldwide. There are no licensed vaccines for hantaviruses ; thus, they continue to

  3. Syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) in siblings.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Majerson, Daniela; Tapia, Jose L; Talesnik, Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by episodes of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. PFAPA syndrome usually begins in children under 5 years old and normally has self-resolution. The etiology of PFAPA syndrome remains unknown. In this paper, we report the cases of two different families with siblings with PFAPA syndrome: two sisters and two brothers. To our knowledge, this is the first report of siblings with PFAPA syndrome.

  4. An overview of the Mediterranean cave-dwelling horny sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae)

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Renata; Cadeddu, Barbara; Ledda, Fabio; Pronzato, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The present synthesis focuses on the so called ‘horny sponges’ recorded from marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea. The main aim is to provide a list of all recorded species, diagnostic keys to their identification up to family and genus level, and exhaustive, formally uniform descriptions at the species level contributing to sharing of information on the faunistics and taxonomy of Mediterranean cave-dwelling species, including habitat preferences. The majority of species was recorded in 105 Mediterranean marine caves hosting four orders of horny sponges belonging to 9 families, 19 genera and 40 species. Species endemic to the Mediterranean Sea harboured in marine caves are 14 with an endemicity value of 35%. For each species morphological descriptions are supported by illustrations both original and from the literature, including the diagnostic traits of the skeleton by light and scanning electron microscopy giving further characterization at the specific level. A detailed map together with a list of all caves harbouring horny sponges is also provided with geographic coordinates. PMID:23794833

  5. Zika virus and Zika fever.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Peigang; An, Jing

    2016-04-01

    An emerging mosquito-borne arbovirus named Zika virus (ZIKV), of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus, is becoming a global health threat. ZIKV infection was long neglected due to its sporadic nature and mild symptoms. However, recently, with its rapid spread from Asia to the Americas, affecting more than 30 countries, accumulating evidences have demonstrated a close association between infant microcephaly and Zika infection in pregnant women. Here, we reviewed the virological, epidemiological, and clinical essentials of ZIKV infection.

  6. Analysis of the parasitic copepod species richness among Mediterranean fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raibaut, André; Combes, Claude; Benoit, Françoise

    1998-06-01

    The Mediterranean ichthyofauna is composed of 652 species belonging to 405 genera and 117 families. Among these, 182 were studied for their parasitic copepods. The analysis of all the works conducted on these crustacea yielded 226 species distributed in 88 genera and 20 families. For each fish species we have established a file providing the species name of the fish, its family, its geographical distribution within the Mediterranean and some of its bio-ecological characteristics. Within each file, all the parasitic copepod species reported on each host species were listed. This allowed to know the species richness (SR) of these hosts. We thus produced 182 files within which 226 copepod species are distributed. A program was created under the Hypercard software, in order to analyse our data. Two parameters were studied. The first one is the mean species richness (MSR), which corresponds to the mean of the different SR found on the different host species. The second is the parasite-host ratio (P/H), which is the ratio of the number of copepod species by the number of host species. These parameters are calculated by our program for all the 182 species of Mediterranean fishes retained in our investigation, on the first hand, and, on the second hand, for one particular group of fish species. We used the following variables to investigate their correlations with copepod species richness: taxonomy—fish families, genera and species; biometry—maximal size of the adult fish; eco-ethology—mode of life (benthic, pelagic or nectonic), displacements (sedentary, migratory with environmental change, or migratory without environmental change), behaviour (solitary or gregarious). Other variables (colour, food, reproduction, abundance, distribution area) were also analysed but did not reveal any clear correlation. Providing that our study does not rely on quantitative (prevalence, intensity) but qualitative basis our aim was only to reveal some tendencies. These tendencies are

  7. Characterization of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain encoding NSs of Punta Toro virus or sandfly fever Sicilian virus.

    PubMed

    Lihoradova, Olga A; Indran, Sabarish V; Kalveram, Birte; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A; Gong, Bin; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry L; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1) induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2) inhibits interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation, and 3) promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs) or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs) in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which are

  8. Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Strain Encoding NSs of Punta Toro Virus or Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga A.; Indran, Sabarish V.; Kalveram, Birte; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A.; Gong, Bin; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry L.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1) induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2) inhibits interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation, and 3) promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs) or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs) in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which are

  9. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity.

  10. Rift Valley fever: the Nigerian story.

    PubMed

    Adeyeye, Adewale A; Ekong, Pius S; Pilau, Nicholas N

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne zoonotic disease of livestock. It is characterised by fever, salivation, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, mucopurulent to bloody nasal discharge, abortion, rapid decrease in milk production and death in animals. Infected humans experience an influenza-like illness that is characterised by fever, malaise, headaches, nausea and epigastric pain followed by recovery, although mortality can occur. RVF was thought to be a disease of sub-Saharan Africa but with the outbreaks in Egypt and the Arabian Peninsula, it may be extending its range further afield. Virological and serological evidence indicates that the virus exists in Nigeria and, with the warning signal sent by international organisations to countries in Africa about an impending outbreak, co-ordinated research between veterinarians and physicians in Nigeria is advocated.

  11. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously.

  12. The lessons of Walcheren Fever, 1809.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2009-03-01

    The British landed on Walcheren Island on July 30, 1809 in an attempt to form another front against Napoleon. The British objectives were to destroy a French fleet based in Holland, to destroy the arsenals at Antwerp, and to deny navigation of the Scheldt to the French. Over 300 ships and 42,000 soldiers took part in the expedition. In less than a month the British expeditionary force, bogged on the island, went on the defensive because of Walcheren fever incapacitating their regiments. The British eventually suffered over 8,000 dead and tens of thousands sickened; recovery was prolonged and many of the sick were invalided out of the service. Walcheren fever was likely a combination of malaria, typhus, and typhoid fever. Today we can still draw valid public health, medical, military, and political lessons from this 19th century expedition.

  13. A Curious Case of Fever and Hyperpigmentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Megaloblastic anaemia as a cause of pyrexia is a rare entity. Similarly, hyperpigmentation of skin has rarely been reported as the presenting manifestation of folate and/or vitamin B12 deficiency. The author reports the case of a patient who presented with fever and hyperpigmentation and was diagnosed to have megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency after other infective, inflammatory/autoimmune, endocrine causes of pyrexia and hyperpigmentation were excluded by appropriate investigations. The patient responded remarkably well to the treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation. Although presentation of megaloblastic anaemia as isolated fever or hyperpigmentation are noted in literature, simultaneous fever and hyperpigmentation as its initial presentation is exceedingly rare. PMID:25738019

  14. Lost Trust: A Yellow Fever Patient Response

    PubMed Central

    Runge, John S.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  15. Lost trust: a yellow fever patient response.

    PubMed

    Runge, John S

    2013-12-13

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care.

  16. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Brazil].

    PubMed

    del Sá DelFiol, Fernando; Junqueira, Fábio Miranda; da Rocha, Maria Carolina Pereira; de Toledo, Maria Inês; Filho, Silvio Barberato

    2010-06-01

    Although the number of confirmed cases of spotted fever has been declining in Brazil since 2005, the mortality rate (20% to 30%) is still high in comparison to other countries. This high mortality rate is closely related to the difficulty in making the diagnosis and starting the correct treatment. Only two groups of antibiotics have proven clinical effectiveness against spotted fever: chloramphenicol and tetracyclines. Until recently, the use of tetracyclines was restricted to adults because of the associated bone and tooth changes in children. Recently, however, the American Academy of Pediatrics and various researchers have recommended the use of doxycycline in children. In more severe cases, chloramphenicol injections are often preferred in Brazil because of the lack of experience with injectable tetracycline. Since early diagnosis and the adequate drug treatment are key to a good prognosis, health care professionals must be better prepared to recognize and treat spotted fever.

  17. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

  18. Hemophagocytic syndrome in classic dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sayantan; Kundu, Supratip; Saha, Manjari; Chakrabarti, Prantar

    2011-10-01

    A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

  19. Effect of (social) media on the political figure fever model: Jokowi-fever model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Benny; Samat, Nor Azah

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, political figures begin to utilize social media as one of alternative to engage in communication with their supporters. Publics referred to Jokowi, one of the candidates in Indonesia presidential election in 2014, as the first politician in Indonesia to truly understand the power of social media. Social media is very important in shaping public opinion. In this paper, effect of social media on the Jokowi-fever model in a closed population will be discussed. Supporter population is divided into three class sub-population, i.e susceptible supporters, Jokowi infected supporters, and recovered supporters. For case no positive media, there are two equilibrium points; the Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio less than one and the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio greater than one. For case no negative media, there is only the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if the condition is satisfied. Generally, for case positive media proportion is positive, there is no Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point. The numerical result shows that social media gives significantly effect on Jokowi-fever model, a sharp increase or a sharp decrease in the number of Jokowi infected supporters. It is also shown that the boredom rate is one of the sensitive parameters in the Jokowi-fever model; it affects the number of Jokowi infected supporters.

  20. [The fourth horseman: The yellow fever].

    PubMed

    Vallejos-Parás, Alfonso; Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus three, Chikunguya and Zika have entered the national territory through the south of the country. Cases and outbreaks of yellow fever have now been identified in the Americas where it threatens to expand. Although Mexico has a robust epidemiological surveillance system for vector-borne diseases, our country must be alert in case of its possible introduction into the national territory. This paper presents theoretical assumptions based on factual data on the behavior of yellow fever in the Americas, as well as reflections on the epidemiological surveillance of vector-borne diseases.

  1. [Children and adults with fever and exanthema].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Patients with fever and rash/exanthema generally are "small emergencies", rarely needing emergency transport or intensive care in a hospital. Low experience of most parents and doctors (who never have seen Measles, Rubella or Varicella) result in non-necessary extensive laboratory tests (e.g. PCR in Meales), while looking for Koplik-Sport is even not mentioned in official guidelines. "Red flags" such as Petechia, Erysipela, necrotizing faszilitis or severe allergic reaction warrant, that "fever and exanthema" remains a permanent challenge for doctors on duty.

  2. Management of Lassa fever in European countries.

    PubMed

    Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2002-03-01

    The UK Public Health Laboratory Service hosted a meeting in London during November 2000 to discuss the management of Lassa fever following the four cases which had occurred in 1999/2000. Participants were invited because they had recent clinical or laboratory experience of managing cases of Lassa fever or had been involved in public health aspects of a case of this infection. The meeting was closed to enable free and frank discussion of confidential matters. This is a report of the general issues and recommendations which arose from the discussion.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Leman, Patricia A; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz T; Swanepoel, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 198 Rift Valley fever virus isolates and 5 derived strains obtained from various sources in Saudi Arabia and 16 countries in Africa during a 67-year period (1944-2010). A maximum-likelihood tree prepared with sequence data for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene showed that 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages. A 2010 isolate from a patient in South Africa potentially exposed to co-infection with live animal vaccine and wild virus was a reassortant. The potential influence of large-scale use of live animal vaccine on evolution of Rift Valley fever virus is discussed.

  4. Classical swine fever in China: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Li, Su; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-08-06

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is an OIE-listed, highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine worldwide. Currently, the disease is controlled by prophylactic vaccination in China and many other countries using the modified live vaccines derived from C-strain, which was developed in China in the mid-1950s. This minireview summarizes the epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control and challenges of CSF in China. Though CSF is essentially under control, complete eradication of CSF in China remains a challenging task and needs long-term, joint efforts of stakeholders.

  5. Roentgenographic abnormalities in Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    McCook, T A; Briley, C; Ravin, C E

    1982-02-01

    Rock Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne rickettsial disease which produces a widespread vasculitis. A mortality of 7% to 13% has been reported in the United States which is due at least in part to delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The classic features of this disease include a history of tick bite with the clinical presentation of skin rash and fever in association with thrombocytopenia. Few reports have emphasized the radiologic chest abnormalities in this disease or their relationship to thrombocytopenia. We review 70 cases of RMSF with abnormal roentgenographic features and their pathologic correlation.

  6. Studies on Typhus and Spotted Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    by block ntmber) Rickettsia , R. prowazekii, R. mooseri, typhus, R. rickettsii , Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Rochalimaea guintana, trench fever, DNA...which appear to be the major target cells for the obligate intracellular parasitic bacteria of the genus Rickettsia . This would constitute a unique...Yes e Rickettsia rickettsii Sheila Smith Human GP2/E6/TC3/E2/TC4/E6 Yes f Ripley Human GP1/CE1/E1 Yes g Rickettsia tsutsugamushi Gilliam E141/M2/E2 No h

  7. Milk Fever Control Principles: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Three main preventive principles against milk fever were evaluated in this literature review, and the efficacy of each principle was estimated from the results of controlled investigations. Oral calcium drenching around calving apparently has a mean efficacy of 50%–60% in terms of milk fever prevention as well as prevention of milk fever relapse after intravenous treatment with calcium solutions. However, some drenches have been shown to cause lesions in the forestomacs. When using the DCAD (dietary cation-anion difference) principle, feeding rations with a negative DCAD (measured as (Na + K) – (Cl + S)) significantly reduce the milk fever incidence. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a mean RR between 0.19 and 0.35 when rations with a negative versus positive DCAD are compared. The main drawback from the DCAD principle is a palatability problem. The principle of feeding rations low in calcium is highly efficient in milk fever prevention provided the calcium intake in the dry period is kept below 20 g per day. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a very low mean RR (between 0 and 0.20) (daily calcium intake below versus above 20 g/d). The main problem in implementing the low-Ca principle is difficulties in formulating rations sufficiently low in calcium when using commonly available feeds. The use of large doses of vitamin D metabolites and analogues for milk fever prevention is controversial. Due to toxicity problems and an almost total lack of recent studies on the subject this principle is not described in detail. A few management related issues were discussed briefly, and the following conclusions were made: It is important to supply the periparturient cow with sufficient magnesium to fulfil its needs, and to prevent the dry cows from being too fat. Available information on the influence of carbohydrate intake, and on the effect of

  8. Mayaro fever in an HIV-infected patient suspected of having Chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Estofolete, Cássia Fernanda; Mota, Mânlio Tasso Oliveira; Vedovello, Danila; Góngora, Delzi Vinha Nunes de; Maia, Irineu Luiz; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses impose a serious threat to public health services. We report a case of a patient returning from a work trip to the Amazon basin with myalgia, arthralgia, fever, and headache. During this travel, the patient visited riverside communities. Both dengue and Chikungunya fevers were first suspected, tested for, and excluded. Mayaro fever was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction. The increased awareness of physicians and consequent detection of Mayaro virus in this case was only possible due a previous surveillance program with specific health personnel training about these neglected arboviruses.

  9. Metagenomes of Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rohit; Hernandez, Claudia Mella; Picazo, Antonio; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ininbergs, Karolina; Díez, Beatriz; Valas, Ruben; DuPont, Christopher L; McMahon, Katherine D; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Coastal lagoons, both hypersaline and freshwater, are common, but still understudied ecosystems. We describe, for the first time, using high throughput sequencing, the extant microbiota of two large and representative Mediterranean coastal lagoons, the hypersaline Mar Menor, and the freshwater Albufera de Valencia, both located on the south eastern coast of Spain. We show there are considerable differences in the microbiota of both lagoons, in comparison to other marine and freshwater habitats. Importantly, a novel uncultured sulfur oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria was found to dominate bacterioplankton in the hypersaline Mar Menor. Also, in the latter prokaryotic cyanobacteria were almost exclusively comprised by Synechococcus and no Prochlorococcus was found. Remarkably, the microbial community in the freshwaters of the hypertrophic Albufera was completely in contrast to known freshwater systems, in that there was a near absence of well known and cosmopolitan groups of ultramicrobacteria namely Low GC Actinobacteria and the LD12 lineage of Alphaproteobacteria.

  10. Metagenomes of Mediterranean Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rohit; Hernandez, Claudia Mella; Picazo, Antonio; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ininbergs, Karolina; Díez, Beatriz; Valas, Ruben; DuPont, Christopher L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Coastal lagoons, both hypersaline and freshwater, are common, but still understudied ecosystems. We describe, for the first time, using high throughput sequencing, the extant microbiota of two large and representative Mediterranean coastal lagoons, the hypersaline Mar Menor, and the freshwater Albufera de Valencia, both located on the south eastern coast of Spain. We show there are considerable differences in the microbiota of both lagoons, in comparison to other marine and freshwater habitats. Importantly, a novel uncultured sulfur oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria was found to dominate bacterioplankton in the hypersaline Mar Menor. Also, in the latter prokaryotic cyanobacteria were almost exclusively comprised by Synechococcus and no Prochlorococcus was found. Remarkably, the microbial community in the freshwaters of the hypertrophic Albufera was completely in contrast to known freshwater systems, in that there was a near absence of well known and cosmopolitan groups of ultramicrobacteria namely Low GC Actinobacteria and the LD12 lineage of Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:22778901

  11. Mediterranean Ocean Colour Chlorophyll Trends

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Simone; Falcini, Federico; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Sammartino, Michela; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-01-01

    In being at the base of the marine food web, phytoplankton is particularly important for marine ecosystem functioning (e.g., biodiversity). Strong anthropization, over-exploitation of natural resources, and climate change affect the natural amount of phytoplankton and, therefore, represent a continuous threat to the biodiversity in marine waters. In particular, a concerning risks for coastal waters is the increase in nutrient inputs of terrestrial/anthropogenic origin that can lead to undesirable modifications of phytoplankton concentration (i.e., eutrophication). Monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) concentration, which is a proxy of phytoplankton biomass, is an efficient tool for recording and understanding the response of the marine ecosystem to human pressures and thus for detecting eutrophication. Here, we compute Chl trends over the Mediterranean Sea by using satellite data, also highlighting the fact that remote sensing may represent an efficient and reliable solution to synoptically control the “good environmental status” (i.e., the Marine Directive to achieve Good Environmental Status of EU marine waters by 2020) and to assess the application of international regulations and environmental directives. Our methodology includes the use of an ad hoc regional (i.e., Mediterranean) algorithm for Chl concentration retrieval, also accounting for the difference between offshore (i.e., Case I) and coastal (i.e., Case II) waters. We apply the Mann-Kendall test and the Sens’s method for trend estimation to the Chl concentration de-seasonalized monthly time series, as obtained from the X-11 technique. We also provide a preliminary analysis of some particular trends by evaluating their associated inter-annual variability. The high spatial resolution of our approach allows a clear identification of intense trends in those coastal waters that are affected by river outflows. We do not attempt to attribute the observed trends to specific anthropogenic events. However, the

  12. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Family therapy By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  13. Family Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  14. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    vertebrates and/or invertebrates as reservoirs of Haemorrhagic fever viruses particularly Marburg virus . The final results of this particular investigation...Research work done in Kenya has shown that three haemorrhagic fever viruses occur in the country. These are Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVF), Crimean...members for serology and or virus isolation. 2. Virus Isolation Attempts in VRC Haemorrhagic fever viruses are hazardous to culture and handle in

  15. Ribavirin Prophylaxis and Therapy for Experimental Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    cessation, values began to patients with Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. where mortality increase, progressively returning toward the base line. The reductions...similar to Bo- Virus isolation and serology. Virus was recovered from all livian hemorrhagic fever than to Lassa fever in humans (18). placebo-treated...clinical re- pti- d for use in Lassa fever patient%. Trisicol. Appi. Phama- spofl5c. J Infect. Dis. 152:218-221. cl 41519 16. McKee, K. T., Jr., IL. G

  16. Family Planning Legislation. Report on a Survey. EURO Reports and Studies 85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Barbara

    This study reviews and analyzes family planning legislation in seven countries of the Mediterranean region: Greece, Italy, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, and Turkey. Part 1, a general review, specifically focuses on the role of religion in the development of family planning programs, laws with an indirect effect on family planning (minumum age…

  17. Night Views Over the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over the Mediterranean Sea was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken on Oct. 6, 2011, from 22:58:09 to 23:13:15 GMT,...

  18. New hexactinellid sponges from deep Mediterranean canyons.

    PubMed

    Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Vacelet, Jean; Dubois, Maude; Goujard, Adrien; Fourt, Maïa; Pérez, Thierry; Chevaldonné, Pierre

    2017-02-21

    During the exploration of the NW Mediterranean deep-sea canyons (MedSeaCan and CorSeaCan cruises), several hexactinellid sponges were observed and collected by ROV and manned submersible. Two of them appeared to be new species of Farrea and Tretodictyum. The genus Farrea had so far been reported with doubt from the Mediterranean and was listed as "taxa inquirenda" for two undescribed species. We here provide a proper description for the specimens encountered and sampled. The genus Tretodictyum had been recorded several times in the Mediterranean and in the near Atlantic as T. tubulosum Schulze, 1866, again with doubt, since the type locality is the Japan Sea. We here confirm that the Mediterranean specimens are a distinct new species which we describe. We also provide18S rDNA sequences of the two new species and include them in a phylogenetic tree of related hexactinellids.

  19. Detection of novel sequences related to african Swine Fever virus in human serum and sewage.

    PubMed

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel M; Holtz, Lori R; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Droit, Lindsay; Villasana, Zoilmar; Todd, Collin; Pipas, James M; Calgua, Byron; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W

    2009-12-01

    The family Asfarviridae contains only a single virus species, African swine fever virus (ASFV). ASFV is a viral agent with significant economic impact due to its devastating effects on populations of domesticated pigs during outbreaks but has not been reported to infect humans. We report here the discovery of novel viral sequences in human serum and sewage which are clearly related to the asfarvirus family but highly divergent from ASFV. Detection of these sequences suggests that greater genetic diversity may exist among asfarviruses than previously thought and raises the possibility that human infection by asfarviruses may occur.

  20. Ribavirin, Interferon, and Antibody Approaches to Prophylaxis and Therapy for Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Arenavirus Lassa fever virus Lassa fever High Junin virus Argentine hemorrhagic fever High Machupo virus Bolivian hemorrhagic fever High Bunyaviridae...assumes aerosol against respiratory syncytial virus was demon- its greatest importance in the case of Lassa fever (dis- strated in experimentally...hemorrhagic fevers and efficacy of various therapeutic approaches Arenavirus infections Bunyavirus infections Argentine