Science.gov

Sample records for family cytokines implications

  1. IL-12 family cytokines: immunological playmakers.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Dario A A; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2012-07-19

    The interleukin 12 (IL-12) family is unique in having the only heterodimeric cytokines, including IL-12, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35. This feature endows these cytokines with a unique set of connections and functional interactions not shared by other cytokine families. Despite sharing many structural features and molecular partners, cytokines of the IL-12 family mediate surprisingly diverse functional effects. Here we discuss the unique and unusual structural and functional characteristics of this cytokine family. We outline how cells might interpret seemingly similar cytokine signals to give rise to the diverse functional outcomes that characterize this cytokine family. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of this complexity.

  2. IL-17 family: cytokines, receptors and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunfang; Wu, Ling; Li, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    The interleukin 17 (IL-17) family, a subset of cytokines consisting of IL-17A-F, plays crucial roles in host defense against microbial organisms and in the development of inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is the signature cytokine produced by T helper 17 (Th17) cells, IL-17A and other IL-17 family cytokines have multiple sources ranging from immune cells to non-immune cells. The IL-17 family signals via their correspondent receptors and activates downstream pathways that include NFκB, MAPKs and C/EBPs to induce the expression of anti-microbial peptides, cytokines and chemokines. The proximal adaptor Act1 is a common mediator during the signaling of all IL-17 cytokines so far and is thus involved in IL-17 mediated host defense and IL-17-driven autoimmune conditions. This review will give an overview and recent updates on the IL-17family, the activation and regulation of IL-17 signaling as well as diseases associated with this cytokine family PMID:24011563

  3. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  4. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases.

  5. The IL-2 cytokine family in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sim, Geok Choo; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    The use of cytokines from the IL-2 family (also called the common γ chain cytokine family) such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 to activate the immune system of cancer patients is one of the most important areas of current cancer immunotherapy research. The infusion of IL-2 at low or high doses for multiple cycles in patients with metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma was the first successful immunotherapy for cancer proving that the immune system could completely eradicate tumor cells under certain conditions. The initial clinical success observed in some IL-2-treated patients encouraged further efforts focused on developing and improving the application of other IL-2 family cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21) that have unique biological effects playing important roles in the development, proliferation, and function of specific subsets of lymphocytes at different stages of differentiation with some overlapping effects with IL-2. IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21, as well as mutant forms or variants of IL-2, are now also being actively pursued in the clinic with some measured early successes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of the IL-2 cytokine family focusing on IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21. We discuss the similarities and differences between the signaling pathways mediated by these cytokines and their immunomodulatory effects on different subsets of immune cells. Current clinical application of IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21 either as single agents or in combination with other biological agents and the limitation and potential drawbacks of these cytokines for cancer immunotherapy are also described. Lastly, we discuss the future direction of research on these cytokines, such as the development of new cytokine mutants and variants for improving cytokine-based immunotherapy through differential binding to specific receptor subunits.

  6. Tumor suppression in mice lacking GABARAP, an Atg8/LC3 family member implicated in autophagy, is associated with alterations in cytokine secretion and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Salah, F S; Ebbinghaus, M; Muley, V Y; Zhou, Z; Al-Saadi, K R D; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; O'Sullivan, G A; Betz, H; König, R; Wang, Z-Q; Bräuer, R; Petersen, I

    2016-01-01

    GABARAP belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene family that has a fundamental role in autophagy. There is ample evidence for a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as the immune response. However, the molecular details for these interactions are not fully characterized. Here, we report that the ablation of murine GABARAP, a member of the Atg8/LC3 family that is central to autophagosome formation, suppresses the incidence of tumor formation mediated by the carcinogen DMBA and results in an enhancement of the immune response through increased secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IFN-γ from stimulated macrophages and lymphocytes. In contrast, TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in the serum of these knockout mice. Further, DMBA treatment of these GABARAP knockout mice reduced the cellularity of the spleen and the growth of mammary glands through the induction of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of mammary glands revealed significantly elevated levels of Xaf1, an apoptotic inducer and tumor-suppressor gene, in knockout mice. Furthermore, DMBA treatment triggered the upregulation of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Apaf1, Bax), cell death (Tnfrsf10b, Ripk1) and cell cycle inhibitor (Cdkn1a, Cdkn2c) genes in the mammary glands. Finally, tumor growth of B16 melanoma cells after subcutaneous inoculation was inhibited in GABARAP-deficient mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence for the involvement of GABARAP in tumorigenesis in vivo by delaying cell death and its associated immune-related response. PMID:27124579

  7. Proteolytic Processing of Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines: Variations on a Common Theme.

    PubMed

    Afonina, Inna S; Müller, Christina; Martin, Seamus J; Beyaert, Rudi

    2015-06-16

    Members of the extended interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family, such as IL-1, IL-18, IL-33, and IL-36, play a pivotal role in the initiation and amplification of immune responses. However, deregulated production and/or activation of these cytokines can lead to the development of multiple inflammatory disorders. IL-1 family members share a broadly similar domain organization and receptor signaling pathways. Another striking similarity between IL-1 family members is the requirement for proteolytic processing in order to unlock their full biological potential. Although much emphasis has been put on the role of caspase-1, another emerging theme is the involvement of neutrophil- and mast cell-derived proteases in IL-1 family cytokine processing. Elucidating the regulation of IL-1 family members by proteolytic processing is of great interest for understanding inflammation and immunity. Here, we review the identity of the proteases involved in the proteolytic processing of IL-1 family cytokines and the therapeutic implications in inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PCTAIRE1-knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to TNF family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Teruki; Shi, Ranxin; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Reed, John C; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 is overexpressed in malignant cells and is crucial in tumorigenesis, its function in apoptosis remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PCTAIRE1 in apoptosis, especially in the extrinsic cell death pathway. Gene-knockdown of PCTAIRE1 sensitized prostate cancer PPC1 and Du145 cells, and breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells to TNF-family cytokines, including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Meanwhile, PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not sensitize non-malignant cells, including diploid fibroblasts IMR-90 and the immortalized prostate epithelial cell line 267B1. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not up-regulate death receptor expression on the cell surface or affect caspase-8, FADD and FLIP expression levels. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did promote caspase-8 cleavage and RIPK1 degradation, while RIPK1 mRNA knockdown sensitized PPC1 cells to TNF-family cytokines. Furthermore, the kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which inhibits PCTAIRE1 kinase activity, sensitized PPC1 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest that PCTAIRE1 contributes to the resistance of cancer cell lines to apoptosis induced by TNF-family cytokines, which implies that PCTAIRE1 inhibitors could have synergistic effects with TNF-family cytokines for cytodestruction of cancer cells.

  9. The novel interleukin-1 cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Madelaine; Frey, Silke; Hueber, Axel J

    2017-03-01

    This review provides an update on the new interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases with focus on recent findings concerning the family members IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 and their different expression patterns. The IL-1 cytokines are known to be involved in many different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The latest IL-1 family members, IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 have been shown to be differently regulated during course of disease. Studies of patients suffering from inflammatory diseases revealed that those cytokines are upregulated in the serum as well as in inflamed tissue. Both, epithelial cells and infiltrating peripheral mononuclear blood cells serve as source of the cytokines IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 triggering different outcomes. These results could be confirmed in different mouse models and in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 are involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus as well as Crohn's disease. Thereby IL-36 acts proinflammatory triggering further inflammatory mediators. In contrast, IL-37 and IL-38 are upregulated to counteract. Understanding the imbalance of the IL-1 family is crucial for future therapeutics.

  10. Regulation of NF-κB by TNF Family Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Matthew S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    The NF-κB family of inducible transcription factors is activated in response to a variety of stimuli. Amongst the best-characterized inducers of NF-κB are members of the TNF family of cytokines. Research on NF-κB and TNF have been tightly intertwined for more than 25 years. Perhaps the most compelling examples of the interconnectedness of NF-κB and the TNF have come from analysis of knock-out mice that are unable to activate NF-kB. Such mice die embryonically, however, deletion of TNF or TNFR1 can rescue the lethality thereby illustrating the important role of NF-κB as the key regulator of transcriptional responses to TNF. The physiological connections between NF-κB and TNF cytokines are numerous and best explored in articles focusing on a single TNF family member. Instead, in this review, we explore general mechanisms of TNF cytokine signaling, with a focus on the upstream signaling events leading to activation of the socalled canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways by TNFR1 and CD40 respectively. PMID:24958609

  11. Regulation of NF-κB by TNF family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Matthew S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2014-06-01

    The NF-κB family of inducible transcription factors is activated in response to a variety of stimuli. Amongst the best-characterized inducers of NF-κB are members of the TNF family of cytokines. Research on NF-κB and TNF have been tightly intertwined for more than 25 years. Perhaps the most compelling examples of the interconnectedness of NF-κB and the TNF have come from analysis of knock-out mice that are unable to activate NF-κB. Such mice die embryonically, however, deletion of TNF or TNFR1 can rescue the lethality thereby illustrating the important role of NF-κB as the key regulator of transcriptional responses to TNF. The physiological connections between NF-κB and TNF cytokines are numerous and best explored in articles focusing on a single TNF family member. Instead, in this review, we explore general mechanisms of TNF cytokine signaling, with a focus on the upstream signaling events leading to activation of the so-called canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways by TNFR1 and CD40, respectively.

  12. Proinflammatory cytokines and sickness behavior: implications for depression and cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jamie S

    2008-09-01

    To review the relationship between proinflammatory cytokine release and resultant sickness behavior; to explore the implications of sickness behavior related to depression and cancer-related symptoms. Published articles and book chapters. Proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) are released as part of the immune response resulting in a syndrome called sickness behavior that is an adaptive and motivational reaction to disease. Sickness behavior includes lethargy, depression, anorexia, energy conservation, fever, anhedonia, cognitive impairment, hyperalgesia, and decreased social interaction. Sickness behavior is seen in patients with depression or cancer and has been described as a symptom cluster. Sickness behavior in patients with cancer may be the result of both the disease and the treatment. The related symptoms may have a profound effect on patients' quality of life. Treatment strategies that inhibit the release or activity of proinflammatory cytokines and relieve patients from symptoms of sickness behavior are being evaluated. Further research is needed to pinpoint the exact effects of specific cytokines, identify targets for therapy, and develop viable treatment strategies for preventing or minimizing the detrimental effects of cytokine-induced inflammatory responses. Sickness behavior resulting from cytokine release may provide a framework to explain many cancer-related symptoms, including depression, cognitive impairment, cachexia, fatigue, and a component of pain perception. Oncology nurses would benefit from awareness and understanding of the relationship between proinflammatory cytokine release and tissue involvement by tumors as well as some cancer-related therapies. Knowledge about the effects of cytokine release on patient behavior and the symptom experience would enhance nurses' ability to assess patients for anticipated side effects and provide appropriate education to patients and their families.

  13. Structural features of the interleukin-10 family of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zdanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The interleukin-10 (IL-10) family of cytokines includes IL-10, a number of its viral gene homologs, and eight recently discovered cellular cytokines (IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26, IFN-lambda1, IFN-lambda2, IFN-lambda3). IL-10 is an intercalated dimer consisting of two six-helix bundle domains. Signal transduction occurs when each domain of IL-10 binds to two receptor chains, IL-10R1 and IL-10R2. Viral homologs use the same IL-10 receptor system, while cellular homologs use their own receptors: three long receptor chains (IL-20R1, IL-22R1 and IFN-lambda1R1) and two short receptor chains (IL-20R2 and IL-10R2). Most of the cellular homologs belong to the IL-19 subfamily of cytokines including IL-19, IL-20, IL-22 and IL-24. It is likely that IFN-lambda1, IFN-lambda2, and IFN-lambda3 also belong to the same subfamily. All these proteins are monomers in solution. Crystal structures of IL-19 and IL-22 show that the molecules consist of seven helices (A-G) forming a seven-helix bundle with compact hydrophobic core inside. Structures of complexes of IL-10 and CMVIL-10 with an extracellular domain of high affinity receptor IL-10R1 (sIL-10R1) showed that ligand/receptor interactions are of mostly polar nature, with two hydrophobic patches around receptor residues Tyr43 and Phe143 at the top and bottom of the interface. The location and structure of the binding site for the second receptor chain are still unknown. It has also been shown that in the case of IL-19 and IL-20, IL-20R2 rather than IL-20R1 is a high-affinity receptor chain. This review summarizes all published three-dimensional structures of the cytokines representing the IL-10 family of homologs, including the IL-19 subfamily and their interaction with appropriate receptors.

  14. IL-1 family cytokines trigger sterile inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, John R.; Gross, Jordan M.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation plays vital roles in protective responses against pathogens and tissue repair, however, improper resolution of inflammatory networks is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic diseases. Extensive advances have been made in recent years to define the inflammatory processes that are required for pathogen clearance, however, in comparison, less is known about the regulation of inflammation in sterile settings. Over the past decade non-communicable chronic diseases that are potentiated by sterile inflammation have replaced infectious diseases as the major threat to global human health. Thus, improved understanding of the sterile inflammatory process has emerged as one of the most important areas of biomedical investigation during our time. In this review we highlight the central role that interleukin-1 family cytokines play in sterile inflammatory diseases. PMID:23087690

  15. Cytokine immunoreactivity in cortical and subcortical neurons in periventricular leukomalacia: are cytokines implicated in neuronal dysfunction in cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Hazim; Tabarki, Brahim; De Prez, Carine; Sébire, Guillaume

    2003-03-01

    The major neuropathological substrate associated with cerebral palsy (CP) is a form of white matter (WM) injury known as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Proinflammatory cytokines were recently shown to be implicated in PVL pathogenesis. Many PVL patients develop cortical and deep gray neuronal dysfunctions such as epilepsy, cognitive deficits and extrapyramidal disorders. The precise nature of the relationship between the WM lesion and the subsequent neuronal disorders is unclear. Cytokines were shown to exert neurotoxicity in experimental models. This raises the need to investigate a possible noxious effect by cytokines on neuronal cortical development. In situ immunohistochemical methods were applied on 22 brains from infants both with PVL (study group) and without PVL (control group) to detect any immunoreactivity for cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) in cortical and gray matter neurons. While cortical and other neuronal structures in PVL brains did not display noticeable pathological anomalies, strong cytokine immunoreactivity was detected in many neurons in the neocortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia and thalamus. There were, however, regional differences in cytokine labeling. In addition, there was more TNF-alpha staining than IL-1beta; IL-6 was negative. In contrast, neuronal cytokine labeling in the "control" brains was negligible. In conclusion, we report and characterize, for the first time, the in situ immunoreactivity for proinflammatory cytokines in cortical and deep gray neurons in PVL. These findings might provide insights into the neuro-anatomical correlate for the intellectual deficits and the other cortical and deep gray neuronal dysfunctions associated with PVL.

  16. The family of IL-10-related cytokines and their receptors: related, but to what extent?

    PubMed

    Kotenko, Sergei V

    2002-06-01

    Five novel cytokines (IL-19, IL-20, IL-22 (IL-TIF), IL-24 (human MDA-7, mouse FISP, rat C49A/Mob-5), and IL-26 (AK155)) demonstrating limited primary sequence identity and probable structural homology to IL-10 have been identified. These cellular cytokines, as well as several cytokines encoded in viral genomes (viral cytokines), form a family of IL-10-related cytokines or the IL-10 family. These cytokines share not only homology but also receptor subunits and perhaps activities. Receptors for these cytokines belong to the class II cytokine receptor family. The receptors are IL-10R2 (CRF2-4), IL-22R1 (CRF2-9), IL-22BP (CRF2-10), IL-20R1 (CRF2-8) and IL-20R2 (CRF2-11). Biological activities of these cytokines, receptor utilization and signaling, as well as expression patterns for cytokines and their receptors are summarized. Although data indicate that these cytokines are involved in regulation of inflammatory and immune responses, their major functions remain to be discovered.

  17. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  18. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  19. Interleukin 12 (IL-12) Family Cytokines: Role in Immune Pathogenesis and Treatment of CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lin; He, Chang; Nair, Lekha; Yeung, Justine; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in coordinating the activities of innate and adaptive immune systems. In response to pathogen recognition, innate immune cells secrete cytokines that inform the adaptive immune system about the nature of the pathogen and instruct naïve T cells to differentiate into the appropriate T cell subtypes required to clear the infection. These include Interleukins, Interferons and other immune-regulatory cytokines that exhibit remarkable functional redundancy and pleiotropic effects. The focus of this review, however, is on the enigmatic Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family of cytokines. This family of cytokines plays crucial roles in shaping immune responses during antigen presentation and influence cell-fate decisions of differentiating naïve T cells. They also play essential roles in regulating functions of a variety of effector cells, making IL-12 family cytokines important therapeutic targets or agents in a number of inflammatory diseases, such as the CNS autoimmune diseases, uveitis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:25796985

  20. IL-17 family member cytokines: regulation, and function in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joseph M.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the IL-17 family member cytokines have become prominent subjects of investigation. IL-17 (IL-17A) is the best-described member of this family where its production has been mainly attributed to a specialized T helper subset of the adaptive immune response termed Th17. However, recent research on this and other Th17 cytokines has revealed new sources and functions of IL-17 family members in the innate immune response. This review will highlight recent advances in the field of IL-17 family member cytokines and will predominately focus on the innate regulation and function of IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-25. PMID:21074482

  1. Translational implications of inflammatory biomarkers and cytokine networks in psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Developments in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) need to be translated into personalized medicine to achieve better clinical outcomes. One of the most critical steps in this translational process is to identify systemic biomarkers for better diagnosis and treatment. Applications of systems biology approaches in PNI would enable the insights into the correlations among various systems and different levels for the identification of the basic elements of the psychophysiological framework. Among the potential PNI biomarkers, inflammatory markers deserve special attention as they play a pivotal role linking various health conditions and disorders. The elucidation of inflammatory markers, cytokine networks, and immune-brain-behavior interactions may help establish PNI profiles for the identification of potential targets for personalized interventions in at risk populations. The understanding of the general systemic pathways among different disorders may contribute to the transition from the disease-centered medicine to patient-centered medicine. Integrative strategies targeting these factors and pathways would be useful for the prevention and treatment of a spectrum of diseases that share the common links. Examples of the translational implications of potential PNI biomarkers and networks in diseases including depression, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and HIV are discussed in details.

  2. Inflammatory Cytokines in Depression: Neurobiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Jennifer C.; Lotrich, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines contribute to the development of depression in both medically ill and medically healthy individuals. Cytokines are important for development and normal brain function, and have the ability to influence neurocircuitry and neurotransmitter systems to produce behavioral alterations. Acutely, inflammatory cytokine administration or activation of the innate immune system produces adaptive behavioral responses that promote conservation of energy to combat infection or recovery from injury. However, chronic exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines and persistent alterations in neurotransmitter systems can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. Mechanisms of cytokine behavioral effects involve activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain that results in changes in monoamine, glutamate, and neuropeptide systems, and decreases in growth factors, e.g. brain derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines may serve as mediators of both environmental (e.g. childhood trauma, obesity, stress, and poor sleep) and genetic (functional gene polymorphisms) factors that contribute to depression’s development. This review explores the idea that specific gene polymorphisms and neurotransmitter systems can confer protection from or vulnerability to specific symptom dimensions of cytokine-related depression. Additionally, potential therapeutic strategies that target inflammatory cytokine signaling or the consequences of cytokines on neurotransmitter systems in the brain to prevent or reverse cytokine effects on behavior are discussed. PMID:23644052

  3. Dynamic interactions between plasma IL-1 family cytokines and central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter function in humans.

    PubMed

    Prossin, Alan R; Zalcman, Steven S; Heitzeg, Mary M; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phillip L; Phan, K Luan; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-02-01

    Evidence in animal models suggests IL-1 family cytokines interact with central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter systems, inducing or perpetuating pathological states such as persistent pain syndromes, depression, substance use disorders, and their comorbidity. Understanding these interactions in humans is particularly relevant to understanding pathological states wherein this neurotransmitter system is implicated (ie, persistent pain, mood disorders, substance use disorders, etc). Here, we examined relationships between IL-1β, IL-1ra, and functional measures of the endogenous opioid system in 34 healthy volunteers, in the absence and presence of a standardized sustained muscular pain challenge, a psychophysical challenge with emotionally and physically stressful components. Mu-opioid receptor availability in vivo was examined with [(11)C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Sex and neuroticism impacted IL-1 family cytokines; higher baseline IL-1β and IL-1ra was identified in females with lower neuroticism. Higher baseline IL-1β was also associated with reduced μ-opioid receptor availability (amygdala) and greater pain sensitivity. The pain challenge increased IL-1β in females with high neuroticism. Strong associations between IL-1ra (an anti-nociceptive cytokine) and μ-opioid receptor activation (VP/NAcc) were identified during the pain challenge and the resulting analgesic effect of μ-opioid receptor activation was moderated by changes in IL-1β whereby volunteers with greater pain induced increase in IL-1β experienced less endogenous opioid analgesia. This study demonstrates the presence of relationships between inflammatory factors and a specific central neurotransmitter system and circuitry, of relevance to understanding interindividual variations in regulation of responses to pain and other physical and emotional stressors.

  4. Dynamic Interactions Between Plasma IL-1 Family Cytokines and Central Endogenous Opioid Neurotransmitter Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Alan R; Zalcman, Steven S; Heitzeg, Mary M; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phillip L; Phan, K Luan; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    Evidence in animal models suggests IL-1 family cytokines interact with central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter systems, inducing or perpetuating pathological states such as persistent pain syndromes, depression, substance use disorders, and their comorbidity. Understanding these interactions in humans is particularly relevant to understanding pathological states wherein this neurotransmitter system is implicated (ie, persistent pain, mood disorders, substance use disorders, etc). Here, we examined relationships between IL-1β, IL-1ra, and functional measures of the endogenous opioid system in 34 healthy volunteers, in the absence and presence of a standardized sustained muscular pain challenge, a psychophysical challenge with emotionally and physically stressful components. Mu-opioid receptor availability in vivo was examined with [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Sex and neuroticism impacted IL-1 family cytokines; higher baseline IL-1β and IL-1ra was identified in females with lower neuroticism. Higher baseline IL-1β was also associated with reduced μ-opioid receptor availability (amygdala) and greater pain sensitivity. The pain challenge increased IL-1β in females with high neuroticism. Strong associations between IL-1ra (an anti-nociceptive cytokine) and μ-opioid receptor activation (VP/NAcc) were identified during the pain challenge and the resulting analgesic effect of μ-opioid receptor activation was moderated by changes in IL-1β whereby volunteers with greater pain induced increase in IL-1β experienced less endogenous opioid analgesia. This study demonstrates the presence of relationships between inflammatory factors and a specific central neurotransmitter system and circuitry, of relevance to understanding interindividual variations in regulation of responses to pain and other physical and emotional stressors. PMID:25139063

  5. Expanding Diversity in Molecular Structures and Functions of the IL-6/IL-12 Heterodimeric Cytokine Family

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hideaki; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Chiba, Yukino; Ohashi, Mio; Xu, Mingli; Yoshimoto, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines have pleiotropic functions and play critical roles in multiple immune responses. This cytokine family has very unique characteristics in that they comprise two distinct subunits forming a heterodimer and each cytokine and receptor subunit shares with each other. The members of this cytokine family are increasing; currently, there are more than six cytokines, including the tentatively named cytokines IL-Y (p28/p40), IL-12 (p35/p40), IL-23 (p19/p40), IL-27 [p28/Epstein–Barr virus-induced protein 3 (EBI3)], IL-35 (p35/EBI3), and IL-39 (p19/EBI3). This family of cytokines covers a very broad range of immune responses, including pro-inflammatory responses, such as helper T (Th)1, Th2, and Th17, to anti-inflammatory responses, such as regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-10-producing Treg cells. IL-12 is the first member of this family, and IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27 are mainly produced by activated antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. IL-12 plays a critical role in the promotion of Th1 immune responses by inducing interferon-γ production to combat pathogens and malignant tumors. IL-23 induces IL-17 production and is necessary to maintain pathogenic Th17 cells that cause inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. IL-27 was initially reported to play a critical role in promotion of Th1 differentiation; however, subsequent studies revealed that IL-27 has broader stimulatory and inhibitory roles by inducing IL-10-producing Treg cells. IL-35 is produced by forkhead box P3+ Treg cells and activated B cells and has immunosuppressive functions to maintain immune tolerance. The most recently identified cytokine, IL-39, is produced by activated B cells and has pro-inflammatory functions. The cytokine tentatively named IL-Y seems to have anti-inflammatory functions by inhibiting Th1 and Th17 differentiation. In addition, individual cytokine subunits were also shown to have self-standing activities. Thus

  6. Regulation of cytokine signaling by the SOCS and Spred family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2009-06-01

    Various cytokines are involved in the regulation of the immune system and of hematopoiesis. Most cytokines utilize the so-called JAK-STAT pathway, but others activate the Ras-ERK pathway, which is more important than the STAT pathway for the proliferation of hematopoietic cells. Dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergy, inflammation, and cancer. We have identified two important regulator families involved in cytokine signaling: the SOCS proteins and the Spred proteins. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins bind to JAK and to certain receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Spred family proteins interact with Ras and Raf, thereby suppressing ERK activation. Studies have shown that SOCS and Spred proteins are key physiological regulators of immunity, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Evidence is also emerging for the involvement of these proteins in human diseases.

  7. A Broad Blockade of Signaling from the IL-20 Family of Cytokines Potently Attenuates Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Xueqin; Cui, Jingjing; Long, Tianzhen; Xu, Yang; Liu, Haipeng; Yu, Ruoxuan; Zhao, Rongchuan; Luo, Guangping; Huang, Anliang; Liang, Joshua G; Liang, Peng

    2016-10-15

    Two heterodimeric receptors consisting of either IL-20R1 or IL-22R1 in complex with a common β receptor subunit IL-20R2 are shared by three of the IL-20 family of cytokines: IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24. These proinflammatory cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. Although mAbs against IL-19 and IL-20 have each been shown to modulate disease severity of collagen-induced arthritis in animal models, and anti-IL-20 therapeutic Ab has exhibited some efficacy in the treatment of RA in clinical trials, benefits for a complete blockade of these functionally redundant cytokines remain to be explored. In this report, we show that recombinant human soluble IL-20R2-Fc fusion protein binds to IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 with similar high affinity and blocks their signaling in vitro. In DBA/1 mouse collagen-induced arthritis model, recombinant human IL-20R2-Fc exhibits comparable efficacy as TNF blocker etanercept in the treatment of established arthritis, whereas the combined use of both biologics manifests little synergistic therapeutic effects. In situ ligand-receptor functional binding analysis shows that a large amount of immune infiltrates expressing high levels of TNFR and IL-20 subfamily cytokines congregate within the inflamed disease tissues. Colocalization experiments reveal that signals from IL-20R2 and TNF transduction pathways seem to converge in macrophages and function in tandem in orchestrating the pathogenesis of RA. Elucidation of this interaction provides a better understanding of cytokine cross-talk in RA and a rationale for more effective biologic therapies that target IL-20R2 instead of individual cytokines from IL-20 family. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family of cytokines: role in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Monisha; Saxena, Madhukar

    2012-08-16

    Cytokines are small cell signaling protein molecules which encompass a large and diverse family. They consist of immunomodulating agents such as interleukins and inteferons. Virtually all nucleated cells, especially endo/epithelial cells and macrophages are potent producers of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. IL-1 family is a group of cytokines which play a central role in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been recognized as an immune mediated disease leading to impaired insulin signaling and selective destruction of insulin producing β-cells in which cytokines play an important role. Disturbance of anti-inflammatory response could be a critical component of the chronic inflammation resulting in T2D. IL-1 family of cytokines has important roles in endocrinology and in the regulation of responses associated with inflammatory stress. The IL-1 family consists of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β, and a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra or IL-1RN). This review is an insight into the different types of cytokines belonging to IL-1 family, their modes of action and association with Type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Zinc and Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokines: Implications for Cardiometabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meika; Samman, Samir

    2012-01-01

    In atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, the concomitant presence of low-grade systemic inflammation and mild zinc deficiency highlights a role for zinc nutrition in the management of chronic disease. This review aims to evaluate the literature that reports on the interactions of zinc and cytokines. In humans, inflammatory cytokines have been shown both to up- and down-regulate the expression of specific cellular zinc transporters in response to an increased demand for zinc in inflammatory conditions. The acute phase response includes a rapid decline in the plasma zinc concentration as a result of the redistribution of zinc into cellular compartments. Zinc deficiency influences the generation of cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α, and in response to zinc supplementation plasma cytokines exhibit a dose-dependent response. The mechanism of action may reflect the ability of zinc to either induce or inhibit the activation of NF-κB. Confounders in understanding the zinc-cytokine relationship on the basis of in vitro experimentation include methodological issues such as the cell type and the means of activating cells in culture. Impaired zinc homeostasis and chronic inflammation feature prominently in a number of cardiometabolic diseases. Given the high prevalence of zinc deficiency and chronic disease globally, the interplay of zinc and inflammation warrants further examination. PMID:22852057

  10. Policy implications for familial searching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joyce; Mammo, Danny; Siegel, Marni B; Katsanis, Sara H

    2011-11-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens.

  11. Policy implications for familial searching

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens. PMID:22040348

  12. Systems biology of IL-6, IL-12 family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Anna; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Schaper, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-6-type cytokines play important roles in the communication between cells of multicellular organisms. They are involved in the regulation of complex cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation and act as key player during inflammation and immune response. A major challenge is to understand how these complex non-linear processes are connected and regulated. Systems biology approaches are used to tackle this challenge in an iterative process of quantitative experimental and mathematical analyses. Here we review quantitative experimental studies and systems biology approaches dealing with the function of Interleukin-6-type cytokines in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. These approaches cover the analyses of signal transduction on a cellular level up to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies on a whole organism level.

  13. Cytokines and chemokines in neuromyelitis optica: pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Masahiro, Mori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by severe optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. The discovery of an NMO-specific autoantibody to the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel has improved knowledge of NMO pathogenesis. Many studies have focused on inflammatory and pathological biomarkers of NMO, including cytokines and chemokines. Increased concentrations of T helper (Th)17- and Th2-related cytokines and chemokines may be essential factors for developing NMO inflammatory lesions. For example, interleukin-6 could play important roles in NMO pathogenesis, as it is involved in the survival of plasmablasts that produce anti-AQP4 antibody in peripheral circulation and in the enhancement of inflammation in the central nervous system. Therefore, assessment of these useful biomarkers may become a supportive criterion for diagnosing NMO. Significant advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis will lead to the development of novel treatment strategies. This review focuses on the current advances in NMO immunological research, particularly that of cytokines and chemokines.

  14. Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family cytokines: Role in immune pathogenesis and treatment of CNS autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; He, Chang; Nair, Lekha; Yeung, Justine; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in coordinating the activities of innate and adaptive immune systems. In response to pathogen recognition, innate immune cells secrete cytokines that inform the adaptive immune system about the nature of the pathogen and instruct naïve T cells to differentiate into the appropriate T cell subtypes required to clear the infection. These include Interleukins, Interferons and other immune-regulatory cytokines that exhibit remarkable functional redundancy and pleiotropic effects. The focus of this review, however, is on the enigmatic Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family of cytokines. This family of cytokines plays crucial roles in shaping immune responses during antigen presentation and influence cell-fate decisions of differentiating naïve T cells. They also play essential roles in regulating functions of a variety of effector cells, making IL-12 family cytokines important therapeutic targets or agents in a number of inflammatory diseases, such as the CNS autoimmune diseases, uveitis and multiple sclerosis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Cbln and C1q family proteins: new transneuronal cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yuzaki, M

    2008-06-01

    The C1q family is characterized by a C-terminal conserved global C1q domain, which is structurally very similar to the tumor necrosis factor homology domain. Although some C1q family members are expressed in the central nervous system, their functions have not been well characterized. Cbln1, a member of the Cbln subfamily of the C1q family, is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. Interestingly, Cbln1 was recently shown to play two unique roles at excitatory synapses formed between cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells: the formation and stabilization of synaptic contact, and the control of functional synaptic plasticity by regulating the postsynaptic endocytosis pathway. Since other Cbln subfamily members, Cbln2-Cbln4, are expressed in various regions of developing and mature brains, Cbln subfamily proteins may generally serve as a new class of transneuronal regulators of synapse development and synaptic plasticity in various brain regions.

  16. Characteristics common to a cytokine family spanning five orders of insects.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Date-Ito, Atsuko; Ohnishi, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2012-06-01

    Growth-blocking peptide (GBP) is a member of an insect cytokine family with diverse functions including growth and immunity controls. Members of this cytokine family have been reported in 15 species of Lepidoptera, and we have recently identified GBP-like peptides in Diptera such as Lucilia cuprina and Drosophila melanogaster, indicating that this peptide family is not specific to Lepidoptera. In order to extend our knowledge of this peptide family, we purified the same family peptide from one of the tenebrionids, Zophobas atratus,(1) isolated its cDNA, and sequenced it. The Z. atratus GBP sequence together with reported sequence data of peptides from the same family enabled us to perform BLAST searches against EST and genome databases of several insect species including Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera and identify homologous peptide genes. Here we report conserved structural features in these sequence data. They consist of 19-30 amino acid residues encoded at the C terminus of a 73-152 amino acid precursor and contain the motif C-x(2)-G-x(4,6)-G-x(1,2)-C-[KR], which shares a certain similarity with the motif in the mammalian EGF peptide family. These data indicate that these small cytokines belonging to one family are present in at least five insect orders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IL-12 Family Cytokines: General Characteristics, Pathogenic Microorganisms, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Among a wide range of cytokines, the Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family has its unique structural, functional, and immunological characteristics that have made this family as important immunological playmakers. Because of the importance of IL-12 heterodimeric cytokines in microbial infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancers, the authors of this literature discuss about the general characteristics of IL-12 family members, the interactions between IL-12 cytokines and pathogenic microorganisms, the interleukins receptors and their strategies for selecting different signalling pathways. IL-12 and IL-23 are similar in p40 subunits and both are involved in proinflammatory responses while, IL-27 and IL-35 contribute to anti-inflammatory activities; however, IL-27 is also involved in pro-inflammatory responses. There are some similarities and dissimilarities among IL-12 family members which make them a unique bridge between innate and adaptive immune systems. The bioactivities of IL-12 family indicate a brilliant promise for their applications in different fields of medicine. The members of IL-12 family are candidate for several therapeutics including gene therapy, cancer therapy, tumour therapy, and vaccination. To have an accurate diagnostic technique and definite treatment regarding to infectious diseases, the playmakers of IL-12 family as effective criteria together with microarray technology are the best choices for current and future applications.

  18. Multiple Serum Cytokine Profiling to Identify Combinational Diagnostic Biomarkers in Attacks of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tomohiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Sato, Shuntaro; Umeda, Masataka; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Masumoto, Junya; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yachie, Akihiro; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The precise cytokine networks in the serum of individuals with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) that are associated with its pathogenesis have been unknown. Here, we attempted to identify specific biomarkers to diagnose or assess disease activity in FMF patients. We measured serum levels of 45 cytokines in 75 FMF patients and 40 age-matched controls by multisuspension cytokine array. FMF in “attack” or “remission” was classified by Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Cytokines were ranked by their importance by a multivariate classification algorithm. We performed a logistic regression analysis to determine specific biomarkers for discriminating FMF patients in attack. To identify specific molecular networks, we performed a cluster analysis of each cytokine. Twenty-nine of the 45 cytokines were available for further analyses. Eight cytokines’ serum levels were significantly elevated in the FMF attack versus healthy control group. Nine cytokines were increased in FMF attack compared to FMF remission. Multivariate classification algorithms followed by a logistic regression analysis revealed that the combined measurement of IL-6, IL-18, and IL-17 distinguished FMF patients in attack from the controls with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 89.2%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 95.5%). Among the FMF patients, the combined measurement of IL-6, G-CSF, IL-10, and IL-12p40 discriminated febrile attack periods from remission periods with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 75.0%, specificity 87.9%, and accuracy 84.0%). Our data identified combinational diagnostic biomarkers in FMF patients based on the measurement of multiple cytokines. These findings help to improve the diagnostic performance of FMF in daily practice and extend our understanding of the activation of the inflammasome leading to enhanced cytokine networks. PMID:27100444

  19. The interleukin (IL)-1 cytokine family--Balance between agonists and antagonists in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Jennifer; Dietrich, Damien; Martin, Praxedis; Palmer, Gaby; Gabay, Cem

    2015-11-01

    The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines comprises 11 members, including 7 pro-inflammatory agonists (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36γ) and 4 defined or putative antagonists (IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-36Ra, IL-37, and IL-38) exerting anti-inflammatory activities. Except for IL-1Ra, IL-1 cytokines do not possess a leader sequence and are secreted via an unconventional pathway. In addition, IL-1β and IL-18 are produced as biologically inert pro-peptides that require cleavage by caspase-1 in their N-terminal region to generate active proteins. N-terminal processing is also required for full activity of IL-36 cytokines. The IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) family comprises 10 members and includes cytokine-specific receptors, co-receptors and inhibitory receptors. The signaling IL-1Rs share a common structure with three extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and an intracellular Toll-like/IL-1R (TIR) domain. IL-1 cytokines bind to their specific receptor, which leads to the recruitment of a co-receptor and intracellular signaling. IL-1 cytokines induce potent inflammatory responses and their activity is tightly controlled at the level of production, protein processing and maturation, receptor binding and post-receptor signaling by naturally occurring inhibitors. Some of these inhibitors are IL-1 family antagonists, while others are IL-1R family members acting as membrane-bound or soluble decoy receptors. An imbalance between agonist and antagonist levels can lead to exaggerated inflammatory responses. Several genetic modifications or mutations associated with dysregulated IL-1 activity and autoinflammatory disorders were identified in mouse models and in patients. These findings paved the road to the successful use of IL-1 inhibitors in diseases that were previously considered as untreatable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stressor-dependent Alterations in Glycoprotein 130: Implications for Glial Cell Reactivity, Cytokine Signaling and Ganglion Cell Health in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, FD; Walker, CC; Abella, SK; Won, M; Sappington, RM

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and glial reactivity in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glaucoma-related changes in glycoprotein-130 (gp130), the common signal transducer of the IL-6 family of cytokines, as they relate to RGC health, glial reactivity and expression of IL-6 cytokine family members. Methods: For all experiments, we examined healthy retina (young C57), aged retina (aged C57), retina predisposed to glaucoma (young DBA/2) and retina with IOP-induced glaucoma (aged DBA/2). We determined retinal gene expression of gp130 and IL-6 family members, using quantitative PCR, and protein expression of gp130, using multiplex ELISA. For protein localization and cell-specific expression, we performed co-immunolabeling for gp130 and cell type-specific markers. We used quantitative microscopy to measure layer-specific expression of gp130 and its relationships to astrocyte and Müller glia reactivity and RGC axonal transport, as determined by uptake and transport of cholera toxin β-subunit (CTB). Results: Gene expression of gp130 was elevated with all glaucoma-related stressors, but only normal aging increased protein levels. In healthy retina, gp130 localized primarily to the inner retina, where it was expressed by astrocytes, Müller cells and RGCs. Layer-specific analysis of gp130 expression revealed increased expression in aging retina and decreased expression in glaucomatous retina that was eccentricity-dependent. These glaucoma-related changes in gp130 expression correlated with the level of GFAP and glutamine synthetase expression, as well as axonal transport in RGCs. The relationships between gp130, glial reactivity and RGC health could impact signaling by many IL-6 family cytokines, which exhibited overall increased expression in a stressor-dependent manner. Conclusions: Glaucoma-related stressors, including normal aging, glaucoma predisposition and IOP

  1. The expanding family of interleukin-1 cytokines and their role in destructive inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barksby, H E; Lea, S R; Preshaw, P M; Taylor, J J

    2007-01-01

    Understanding cytokine immunobiology is central to the development of rational therapies for destructive inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis. The classical interleukin-1 (IL-1) family cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β, as well as IL-18, play key roles in inflammation. Recently, other members of the IL-1 family have been identified. These include six cytokines whose genes are located downstream of the genes for IL-1α and IL-1β on chromosome 2 (IL-1F5-10) and also IL-33, which is the ligand for ST2, a member of the IL-1R/Toll-like receptor (TLR) receptor superfamily. IL-1F6, IL-1F8 and Il−1F9 are agonists and, along with their receptor IL-1Rrp2, are highly expressed in epithelial cells suggesting a role in immune defence in the skin and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract including the mouth. Synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes also express IL-1Rrp2 and respond to IL-1F8, indicating a possible role in RA. IL-33 is associated with endothelial cells in the inflamed tissues of patients with RA and Crohn's disease, where it is a nuclear factor which regulates transcription. IL-33 is also an extracellular cytokine: it induces the expression of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in vitro and in vivo as well as histopathological changes in the lungs and GI tract of mice. Therapeutic agents which modify IL-1 cytokines (e.g. recombinant IL-1Ra) have been used clinically and others are at various stages of development (e.g. anti-IL-18 antibodies). This review highlights the emerging data on these novel IL-1 cytokines and assesses their possible role in the pathogenesis and therapy of destructive inflammatory disorders such as RA and periodontitis. PMID:17590166

  2. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Šafaříková, Barbora; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined. PMID:24876678

  3. Interaction of dietary fatty acids with tumour necrosis factor family cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Safaříková, Barbora; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF- α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NF κ B activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  4. Role of the β Common (βc) Family of Cytokines in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hercus, Timothy R; Kan, Winnie L T; Broughton, Sophie E; Tvorogov, Denis; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Sandow, Jarrod J; Nero, Tracy L; Dhagat, Urmi; Thompson, Emma J; Shing, Karen S Cheung Tung; McKenzie, Duncan R; Wilson, Nicholas J; Owczarek, Catherine M; Vairo, Gino; Nash, Andrew D; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Hughes, Timothy; Ekert, Paul G; Samuel, Michael S; Bonder, Claudine S; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel F

    2017-07-17

    The β common ([βc]/CD131) family of cytokines comprises granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3, and IL-5, all of which use βc as their key signaling receptor subunit. This is a prototypic signaling subunit-sharing cytokine family that has unveiled many biological paradigms and structural principles applicable to the IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 receptor families, all of which also share one or more signaling subunits. Originally identified for their functions in the hematopoietic system, the βc cytokines are now known to be truly pleiotropic, impacting on multiple cell types, organs, and biological systems, and thereby controlling the balance between health and disease. This review will focus on the emerging biological roles for the βc cytokines, our progress toward understanding the mechanisms of receptor assembly and signaling, and the application of this knowledge to develop exciting new therapeutic approaches against human disease. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Role of interleukin-12 family cytokines in the cellular response to mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a multifunctional cytokine acting as a key regulator of cell-mediated immune responses through the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into type 1 helper T cells (Th1) producing interferon-gamma. As our knowledge of IL-12 family members is rapidly growing, it will be important to specify their involvement in the regulation of mycobacterial infection. This article is a review of the current knowledge regarding the functions of the IL-12 family cytokines in the immune host defense system against mycobacteria. Specifically, this review aims to describe recent scientific evidence concerning the protective role of some members of the IL-12 family cytokines for the control of mycobacterial infection, as well as to summarize knowledge of the potential use of the IL-12 family members as potent adjuvants in the prevention and treatment of mycobacterial infectious diseases. In addition, recent data supporting the importance of the IL-12 family members in mycobacterial diseases in relation to Th17 function are discussed. This examination will help to improve our understanding of the immune response to mycobacterial infection and also improve vaccine design and immunotherapeutic intervention against tuberculosis.

  6. Evaluating the levels of interleukin-1 family cytokines in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease leading to the death of affected individuals within years. The involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS, is increasingly recognized but still not well understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the levels of inflammation-related IL-1 family cytokines (IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-37) and their endogenous inhibitors (IL-1Ra, sIL-1R2, IL-18BP, sIL-1R4) in patients with sporadic ALS (sALS), Methods Sera were collected from 144 patients (125 patients were characterized by disease form, duration, and disability, using the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) and from 40 matched controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from 54 patients with sALS and 65 patients with other non-infectious non-oncogenic diseases as controls. Cytokines and inhibitors were measured by commercial ELISA. Results Among the IL-1 family cytokines tested total IL-18, its endogenous inhibitor IL-18BP, and the active form of the cytokine (free IL-18) were significantly higher in the sALS sera than in controls. No correlation between these soluble mediators and different clinical forms of sALS or the clinical setting of the disease was found. IL-18BP was the only mediator detectable in the CSF of patients. Conclusions Among the IL-1 family cytokines, only IL-18 correlates with this disease and may therefore have a pathological role in sALS. The increase of total IL-18 suggests the activation of IL-18-cleaving inflammasome. Whether IL-18 upregulation in circulation of sALS patients is a consequence of inflammation or one of the causes of the pathology still needs to be addressed. PMID:24884937

  7. Familial clustering of the serum cytokine profile in the relatives of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    El-Gabalawy, Hani S; Robinson, David B; Smolik, Irene; Hart, Donna; Elias, Brenda; Wong, Keng; Peschken, Christine A; Hitchon, Carol A; Li, Xuan; Bernstein, Charles N; Newkirk, Marianna M; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is prevalent in North American Native populations, with a high frequency of multicase families and seropositivity in first-degree relatives. This study was undertaken to determine whether the serum cytokine profile of first-degree relatives of North American Native patients with RA differed from that of individuals with no family history of autoimmunity and whether there was an association with RA autoantibodies. North American Native patients with RA (n = 105), their first-degree relatives (n = 273), healthy North American Native controls (n = 200), and Caucasian controls (n = 150) were studied. Serum levels of 42 cytokines were tested using a multiplex laser bead assay. Rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (anti-CCP-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-l), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HLA-DRB1 alleles by specific primers. Discriminant analysis and logistic regression classified individuals based on their cytokine profile. The prevalence of RF (cutoff level predetermined to include 5% of Caucasian controls) and anti-CCP (cutoff level of ≥40 units) was, respectively, 88% and 81% in the RA patients, 34% and 9% in first-degree relatives, and 9% and 4% in North American Native controls; the prevalence of anti-CCP was 0% in Caucasian controls. Levels of most cytokines were highest in RA patients; 17 of 40 cytokines (43%) were significantly higher in first-degree relatives than in controls, including multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Discriminant analysis showed a notable distinction between the groups, with 85% classification accuracy. First-degree relatives had markedly higher MCP-1 and hsCRP levels than North American Native controls, but there was no consistent association with RA autoantibodies. Our findings indicate that levels of multiple cytokines and hsCRP are higher in first-degree relatives of North American Native patients with RA

  8. Role of cytokines and platelet-activating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Mazuski, J E; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1996-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and cytokines, such as interleukins, tumor necrosis factor, and others, are thought to play a role in the inflammatory process involving gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, ischemic colitis, or antibiotic-associated colitis. This study was undertaken to review the latest literature on the role of PAF and cytokines in the genesis of inflammatory bowel disease and implications for therapy and management. PAF is an endogenous phospholipid involved in hypersensitivity and inflammatory reactions such as platelet and neutrophil aggregation, vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion, which have been associated with inflammatory processes. Cytokines are peptides that regulate and coordinate inflammatory and immunologic responses. Increased production of cytokines has been reported during Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis and is correlated with disease activity. Because PAF and cytokines may have an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, their inhibition by specific antagonists, mediators, or other agents such as steroids may have a potential therapeutic benefit in treatment and management of these inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  9. Immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy: implication of proinflammatory cytokines and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Hazim; Sébire, Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    Beyond the already known aetiopathogenic factors linked to periventricular leukomalacia, a major pathological substrate in cerebral palsy, immune-inflammatory mechanisms have recently been implicated. Thus proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to be involved very early in the course of this disorder. Additionally, markers of T-lymphocyte activation were upregulated. These findings provide new insight into mechanisms underlying neural cell death in this condition and might open new horizons for preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  10. Interleukin-1 family cytokines and their regulatory proteins in normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Southcombe, J H; Redman, C W G; Sargent, I L; Granne, I

    2015-01-01

    Maternal systemic inflammation is a feature of pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Pre-eclampsia is caused by the placenta; many placental factors contribute to the syndrome's progression, and proinflammatory cytokines have been identified previously as one such mediator. The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines are key regulators of the inflammatory network, and two naturally occurring regulatory molecules for IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1RA and sST2, have been found previously to be elevated in maternal blood from women with pre-eclampsia. Here we investigate more recently identified IL-1 family cytokines and regulatory molecules, IL-1RAcP, IL-37, IL-18BP, IL-36α/β/γ/Ra and IL-38 in pre-eclampsia. Pregnant women have more circulating IL-18BP and IL-36Ra than non-pregnant women, and sIL-1RAcP is elevated from women with pre-eclampsia compared to normal pregnancies. The placenta expresses all the molecules, and IL-37 and IL-18BP are up-regulated significantly in pre-eclampsia placentas compared to those from normal pregnancies. Together, these changes contribute to the required inhibition of maternal systemic cytotoxic immunity in normal pregnancy; however, in pre-eclampsia the same profile is not seen. Interestingly, the increased circulating levels of sIL-1RAcP and increased placental IL-18BP and IL-37, the latter of which we show to be induced by hypoxic damage to the placenta, are all factors which are anti-inflammatory. While the placenta is often held responsible for the damage and clinical symptoms of pre-eclampsia by the research community, here we show that the pre-eclampsia placenta is also trying to prevent inflammatory damage to the mother. PMID:25693732

  11. Interleukin-1 family cytokines and their regulatory proteins in normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Southcombe, J H; Redman, C W G; Sargent, I L; Granne, I

    2015-09-01

    Maternal systemic inflammation is a feature of pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Pre-eclampsia is caused by the placenta; many placental factors contribute to the syndrome's progression, and proinflammatory cytokines have been identified previously as one such mediator. The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines are key regulators of the inflammatory network, and two naturally occurring regulatory molecules for IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1RA and sST2, have been found previously to be elevated in maternal blood from women with pre-eclampsia. Here we investigate more recently identified IL-1 family cytokines and regulatory molecules, IL-1RAcP, IL-37, IL-18BP, IL-36α/β/γ/Ra and IL-38 in pre-eclampsia. Pregnant women have more circulating IL-18BP and IL-36Ra than non-pregnant women, and sIL-1RAcP is elevated from women with pre-eclampsia compared to normal pregnancies. The placenta expresses all the molecules, and IL-37 and IL-18BP are up-regulated significantly in pre-eclampsia placentas compared to those from normal pregnancies. Together, these changes contribute to the required inhibition of maternal systemic cytotoxic immunity in normal pregnancy; however, in pre-eclampsia the same profile is not seen. Interestingly, the increased circulating levels of sIL-1RAcP and increased placental IL-18BP and IL-37, the latter of which we show to be induced by hypoxic damage to the placenta, are all factors which are anti-inflammatory. While the placenta is often held responsible for the damage and clinical symptoms of pre-eclampsia by the research community, here we show that the pre-eclampsia placenta is also trying to prevent inflammatory damage to the mother. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  12. CYTOKINE GENE VARIATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH TRAIT AND STATE ANXIETY IN ONCOLOGY PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILY CAREGIVERS

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; West, Claudia; Dunn, Laura B.; Dhruva, Anand; Merriman, John D.; Langford, Dale J.; Kober, Kord M.; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Anxiety is common among cancer patients and their family caregivers (FCs) and is associated with poorer outcomes. Recently, associations between inflammation and anxiety were identified. However, the relationship between variations in cytokine genes and anxiety warrants investigation. Therefore, phenotypic and genotypic characteristics associated with trait and state anxiety were evaluated in a sample of 167 oncology patients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs. Methods Using multiple regression analyses, the associations between participants’ demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as variations in cytokine genes and trait and state anxiety were evaluated. Results In the bivariate analyses, a number of phenotypic characteristics were associated with both trait and state anxiety (e.g., age, functional status). However, some associations were specific only to trait anxiety (e.g., number of comorbid conditions) or state anxiety (e.g., participation with a FC). Variations in three cytokine genes (i.e., interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL1 receptor 2 (IL1R2), nuclear factor kappa beta 2 (NFKB2)) were associated with trait anxiety and variations in two genes (i.e., IL1R2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA)) were associated with state anxiety. Conclusions These findings suggest that both trait and state anxiety need to be assessed in oncology patients and their FCs. Furthermore, variations in cytokine genes may contribute to higher levels of anxiety in oncology patients and their FCs. PMID:25249351

  13. A new family of synthetic diterpenes that regulates cytokine synthesis by inhibiting IkappaBalpha phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ta-Hsiang; Lam, Thanh; Vong, Binh G; Través, Paqui G; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Chowdhury, Chinmay; Bahjat, F Rena; Lloyd, G Kenneth; Moldawer, Lyle L; Boscá, Lisardo; Palladino, Michael A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis and the biological evaluation of a new family diterpenes are presented. The synthetic studies were inspired by the structural framework of acanthoic acid (1) and yielded a family of compounds that were evaluated as anti-inflammatory agents. Among them, compounds 2, 10, 12, and 16 exhibited a very low nonspecific cytotoxicity and inhibited the synthesis of TNF-alpha with greater than 65 % efficacy at low micromolar concentrations. Cytokine-specificity studies revealed that these compounds also inhibited the synthesis of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, while inhibition of IL-1ra and IL-8 synthesis was marginal and only occurred at high concentrations. Further studies, through EMSA and Western blot analyses, indicated that these compounds decreased the extent of phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha; this suggests that they exert their anti-inflammatory profile by inhibiting NF-kappaB-mediated cytokine synthesis. These findings imply that these diterpenes represent promising leads for the development of novel anti-inflammatory agents.

  14. MIF family cytokines in cardiovascular diseases and prospects for precision-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tilstam, Pathricia V; Qi, Dake; Leng, Lin; Young, Lawrence; Bucala, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with chemokine-like functions that increasingly is being studied in different aspects of cardiovascular disease. MIF was first identified as a proinflammatory and pro-survival mediator within the immune system, and a second structurally related MIF family member, D-dopachrome tautomerase (a.k.a. MIF-2), was reported recently. Both MIF family members are released by myocardium and modulate the manifestations of cardiovascular disease, specifically in myocardial ischemia. Areas covered: A scientific overview is provided for the involvement of MIF family cytokines in the inflammatory pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. We summarize findings of experimental, human genetic and clinical studies, and suggest therapeutic opportunities for modulating the activity of MIF family proteins that potentially may be applied in a MIF allele specific manner. Expert opinion: Knowledge of MIF, MIF-2 and their receptor pathways are under active investigation in different types of cardiovascular diseases, and novel therapeutic opportunities are being identified. Clinical translation may be accelerated by accruing experience with MIF-directed therapies currently in human testing in cancer and autoimmunity.

  15. The TNF-family cytokine TL1A: from lymphocyte costimulator to disease co-conspirator

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Arianne C.; Ferdinand, John R.; Meylan, Françoise; Hayes, Erika T.; Gabay, Odile; Siegel, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 2002 as a T cell-costimulatory cytokine, the tumor necrosis factor family member TNF-like factor 1A (TL1A), encoded by the TNFSF15 gene, has since been found to affect multiple cell lineages through its receptor, death receptor 3 (DR3, encoded by TNFRSF25) with distinct cell-type effects. Genetic deficiency or blockade of TL1A-DR3 has defined a number of disease states that depend on this cytokine-receptor pair, whereas excess TL1A leads to allergic gastrointestinal inflammation through stimulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Noncoding variants in the TL1A locus are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and leprosy, predicting that the level of TL1A expression may influence host defense and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26188076

  16. The interleukin-17 cytokine family: critical players in host defence and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rajita; Ramirez-Carrozzi, Vladimir; Sambandam, Arivazhagan

    2011-01-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines, IL-17A to IL-17F, are emerging as critical players in host defence responses and inflammatory diseases. Substantial data support the role of these proteins in innate and adaptive immunity. Of these family members, IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-17E have been the best studied. Both IL-17A and IL-17F contribute to the host response to extracellular bacteria and fungi, and IL-17E has been shown to play a role in parasitic infections. In addition, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies link these proteins to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and a number of therapeutic programmes targeting these family members are in clinical development. This review will highlight the cellular sources, receptors/target cells, and role in inflammation of these and the less-characterized family members, IL-17B, IL-17C and IL-17D. PMID:21726218

  17. Molecular characterisation of four class 2 cytokine receptor family members in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Monte, Milena M; Wang, Tiehui; Collet, Bertrand; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris J

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-10 cytokine family includes IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26 and the lambda/type III interferons. They are highly pleiotropic and mediate a variety of activities, including immune suppression and antibacterial immunity. To exert their functions they signal through a heterodimeric receptor composed of a subunit with a long intracellular domain (R1 type receptors; IL-10R1, IL-20R1 or IL-22R1) and a subunit with a short intracellular domain (R2 type receptors; IL-10R2 or IL-20R2). In this study we report the identification of three R1 type receptors (named IL-10R1/CRFB7, IL-20R1a/CRFB8a and IL-20R1b/CRFB8b) and one R2 type receptor (named IL-10R2/CRFB4) in rainbow trout. The nomenclature of the receptors was supported by homology analysis, conserved motifs and phylogenetic tree analysis, confirming they belong to the piscine class 2 cytokine receptor family. For instance, they all displayed the presence of characteristic features, such as conserved fibronectin type-III domains. Expression analysis in tissues collected from healthy fish revealed different patterns of expression for each receptor, suggesting their potential involvement in different types of immune responses. When studying the modulation of the genes in cell lines and primary cultures, a greater effect was observed in the cell lines, where the expression of most receptors was affected by incubation with microbial mimics (LPS and PolyI:C) or the pro-inflammatory cytokine rIFN-γ. In addition, expression of the four receptors was modulated by viral infection, suggesting a potential involvement of such receptors and their ligands in antiviral defence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Small Molecule Inhibition of the TNF Family Cytokine CD40 Ligand Through a Subunit Fracture Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    L Silvian; J Friedman; K Strauch; T Cachero; E Day; F Qian; B Cunningham; A Fung; L Sun; et al.

    2011-12-31

    BIO8898 is one of several synthetic organic molecules that have recently been reported to inhibit receptor binding and function of the constitutively trimeric tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokine CD40 ligand (CD40L, aka CD154). Small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interfaces are relatively rare, and their discovery is often very challenging. Therefore, to understand how BIO8898 achieves this feat, we characterized its mechanism of action using biochemical assays and X-ray crystallography. BIO8898 inhibited soluble CD40L binding to CD40-Ig with a potency of IC{sub 50} = 25 {mu}M and inhibited CD40L-dependent apoptosis in a cellular assay. A co-crystal structure of BIO8898 with CD40L revealed that one inhibitor molecule binds per protein trimer. Surprisingly, the compound binds not at the surface of the protein but by intercalating deeply between two subunits of the homotrimeric cytokine, disrupting a constitutive protein-protein interface and breaking the protein's 3-fold symmetry. The compound forms several hydrogen bonds with the protein, within an otherwise hydrophobic binding pocket. In addition to the translational splitting of the trimer, binding of BIO8898 was accompanied by additional local and longer-range conformational perturbations of the protein, both in the core and in a surface loop. Binding of BIO8898 is reversible, and the resulting complex is stable and does not lead to detectable dissociation of the protein trimer. Our results suggest that a set of core aromatic residues that are conserved across a subset of TNF family cytokines might represent a generic hot-spot for the induced-fit binding of trimer-disrupting small molecules.

  19. Atopic dermatitis and cytokines: the immunoregulatory and therapeutic implications of cytokines in atopic dermatitis--part II: negative regulation and cytokine therapy in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Noh, Geunwoong; Lee, Jaeho

    2012-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an immunologic disease that results in allergic inflammations of the skin. Cytokines are involved in the negative regulation of immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Negative immune regulation is also achieved by immune cells in addition to cytokines which are subsequently regulated by a counter-regulatory mechanism. Allergen tolerance is an important aspect of the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Recently, the IL-27, IL-21, and IL-10 cytokines were found to be important components of the counter regulatory mechanism that terminates immune response, and protects the host from excessive immune responses. IL-10 and TGF-β are well-known to be involved in the immune tolerance. IL-10 and IFN-γ are promising cytokines with respect to the prevention of allergen sensitization and the induction of allergen-specific tolerance. In particular, IFN-γ has unique tolerogenic effects with respect to pre-sensitized allergens, especially in atopic dermatitis. In this review, the role of cytokines in the immune tolerance and relevant patents are reviewed, and therapeutic strategies are presented based on the immunologic architecture of AD.

  20. IL-37: a new anti-inflammatory cytokine of the IL-1 family.

    PubMed

    Boraschi, Diana; Lucchesi, Davide; Hainzl, Stefan; Leitner, Maria; Maier, Elisabeth; Mangelberger, Doris; Oostingh, Gertie J; Pfaller, Tobias; Pixner, Claudia; Posselt, Gernot; Italiani, Paola; Nold, Marcel F; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Bufler, Philip; Dinarello, Charles A

    2011-09-01

    The IL-1 family of cytokines encompasses eleven proteins that each share a similar β-barrel structure and bind to Ig-like receptors. Some of the IL-1-like cytokines have been well characterised, and play key roles in the development and regulation of inflammation. Indeed, IL-1α (IL-1F1), IL-1β (IL-1F2), and IL-18 (IL-1F4) are well-known inflammatory cytokines active in the initiation of the inflammatory reaction and in driving Th1 and Th17 inflammatory responses. In contrast, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, IL-1F3) and the receptor antagonist binding to IL-1Rrp2 (IL-36Ra, IL-1F5) reduce inflammation by blocking the binding of the agonist receptor ligands. In the case of IL-37 (IL-1F7), of which five different splice variants have been described, less is known of its function, and identification of the components of a heterodimeric receptor complex remains unclear. Some studies suggest that IL-37 binds to the α chain of the IL-18 receptor in a non-competitive fashion, and this may explain some of the disparate biological effects that have been reported for mice deficient in the IL-18R. The biological properties of IL-37 are mainly those of down-regulating inflammation, as assessed in models where human IL-37 is expressed in mice. In this review, an overview of the role of IL-37 in the regulation of inflammation is presented. The finding that IL-37 also locates to the nucleus, as do IL-1α and IL-33, for receptor-independent organ/tissue-specific regulation of inflammation is also reviewed.

  1. Fibrosis Related Inflammatory Mediators: Role of the IL-10 Cytokine Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Importance of chronic fibroproliferative diseases (FDs) including pulmonary fibrosis, chronic kidney diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and cardiovascular or liver fibrosis is rapidly increasing and they have become a major public health problem. According to some estimates about 45% of all deaths are attributed to FDs in the developed world. Independently of their etiology the common hallmark of FDs is chronic inflammation. Infiltrating immune cells, endothelial, epithelial, and other resident cells of the injured organ release an orchestra of inflammatory mediators, which stimulate the proliferation and excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production of myofibroblasts, the effector cells of organ fibrosis. Abnormal amount of ECM disturbs the original organ architecture leading to the decline of function. Although our knowledge is rapidly expanding, we still have neither a diagnostic tool to detect nor a drug to specifically target fibrosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the more comprehensive understanding of the pathomechanism of fibrosis and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In the present review we provide an overview of the common key mediators of organ fibrosis highlighting the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family members (IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, and IL-26), which recently came into focus as tissue remodeling-related inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26199463

  2. Semaphorin 7A is expressed on airway eosinophils and upregulated by IL-5 family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A; Johansson, Mats W; Liu, Lin Ying; Han, Shih-Tsung; Akhtar, Moneeb; Sandbo, Nathan; Mosher, Deane F; Denlinger, Loren C; Mathur, Sameer K; Malter, James S; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorin 7A (sema7a) plays a major role in TGF-β1-induced lung fibrosis. Based on the accumulating evidence that eosinophils contribute to fibrosis/remodeling in the airway, we hypothesized that airway eosinophils may be a significant source of sema7a. In vivo, sema7a was expressed on the surface of circulating eosinophils and upregulated on bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils obtained after segmental bronchoprovocation with allergen. Based on mRNA levels in unfractionated and isolated bronchoalveolar cells, eosinophils are the predominant source of sema7a. In vitro, among the members of the IL-5-family cytokines, sema7a protein on the surface of blood eosinophils was increased more by IL-3 than by GM-CSF or IL-5. Cytokine-induced expression of cell surface sema7a required translation of newly synthesized protein. Finally, a recombinant sema7a induced alpha-smooth muscle actin production in human bronchial fibroblasts. semaphorin 7A is a potentially important modulator of eosinophil profibrotic functions in the airway remodeling of patients with chronic asthma.

  3. Americans with Disabilities Act: Implications for Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1993-01-01

    Provides a review of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-596) and discusses its implications for family therapy. Consideration is given to the family therapist's proper form of advocacy of rights and therapeutic usage of the act for empowering the individual with a disability and his or her family. (Author)

  4. Revisiting the regulatory roles of the TGF-β family of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Keshi; Komai, Toshihiko; Inoue, Mariko; Morita, Kaoru; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kauzhiko

    2016-09-01

    TGF-β family members are multipotent cytokines that are involved in many cellular processes, including cell differentiation, organ development, wound healing and immune regulation. TGF-β has pleiotropic effects on adaptive immunity, especially in the regulation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses. Furthermore, identification of CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce TGF-β3 revealed unexpected roles of TGF-β3 in the control of adaptive immunity. In contrast to TGF-β1, which induces extensive fibrosis, TGF-β3 induces non-scarring wound healing and counteracts tissue fibrosis. Recent progress in the understanding of the activation mechanism of TGF-β may enable us to develop novel biologic therapies based on advanced protein engineering.

  5. Family Structure and Dynamics in Neglectful Families: Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudin, James M., Jr.

    To identify remedial and preventive interventions that target dysfunctional processes in the family, this study compared the structure and processes of neglectful and non-neglectful families. A sample of 102 neglectful families was identified and recruited from the caseloads of protective service workers in Georgia. A comparison group of 103…

  6. Family Systems Theory: Background and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavelas, Janet Beavin; Segal, Lynn

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical context of a systems approach to the family; defines basic systems concepts with emphasis on their application to the family; and describes some axioms of human communication theory and the role they play in understanding family communication from a systems viewpoint. (PD)

  7. D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT or MIF-2): doubling the MIF cytokine family.

    PubMed

    Merk, Melanie; Mitchell, Robert A; Endres, Stefan; Bucala, Richard

    2012-07-01

    D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT) is a newly described cytokine and a member of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) protein superfamily. MIF is a broadly expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates both the innate and the adaptive immune response. MIF activates the MAP kinase cascade, modulates cell migration, and counter-acts the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids. For many cell types, MIF also acts as an important survival or anti-apoptotic factor. Circulating MIF levels are elevated in the serum in different infectious and autoimmune diseases, and neutralization of the MIF protein via antibodies or small molecule antagonists improves the outcome in numerous animal models of human disease. Recently, a detailed investigation of the biological role of the closely homologous protein D-DT, which is encoded by a gene adjacent to MIF, revealed an overlapping functional spectrum with MIF. The D-DT protein also is present in most tissues and circulates in serum at similar concentrations as MIF. D-DT binds the MIF cell surface receptor complex, CD74/CD44, with high affinity and induces similar cell signaling and effector functions. Furthermore, an analysis of the signaling properties of the two proteins showed that they work cooperatively, and that neutralization of D-DT in vivo significantly decreases inflammation. In this review, we highlight the similarities and differences between MIF and D-DT, which we propose to designate "MIF-2", and discuss the implication of D-DT/MIF-2 expression for MIF-based therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Military Families under Stress: Implications for Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummet, Amy Reinkober; Coleman, Marilyn; Cable, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a summary of the limited research on three uniquely stressful experiences of military families: relocation, separation, and reunion. Using the insights derived from this literature, identifies and discusses interventions to assist and guide military families through these unique events. (Contains 64 references.) (GCP)

  9. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. Inhibiting cytokines of the interleukin-12 family: recent advances and novel challenges.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroeck, Koen; Alloza, Iraide; Gadina, Massimo; Matthys, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) and the more recently discovered IL-23 and IL-27 constitute a unique family of structurally related, heterodimeric cytokines that regulate cell-mediated immune responses and T helper 1 (Th1)-type inflammatory reactions. Not surprisingly, the potentiality of treating conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through pharmacological interference with IL-12 pathways has received widespread attention. In this review we have examined over 50 substances with reported IL-12 inhibitory effects. We demonstrate that a majority of these belong to a limited number of major functional classes, each of which targets discrete events in the IL-12 biological pathway. Thus, most IL-12 inhibitory substances appear to work either through inhibition of transcription factor NF-kappa B activation, up-regulation of intracellular cAMP, blockage of posttranslational processing or interference with signal transduction pathways. In addition, cyclophilin-binding drugs, and generic inhibitors of nuclear histone deacetylases, and of ion channels, pumps and antiporters are emerging as potential leads to novel targets for interference with IL-12 production. Many inhibitors of NF-kappa B and of IL-12 signal transduction have been proven effective in limiting or preventing disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of MS. The sharing of the p40 subunit, the IL-12R beta 1 and components of the signal transduction pathways between IL-12 and IL-23 raises the question as to whether the beneficial effects of various drugs previously ascribed to inhibition of IL-12 may, in fact, have been due to concurrent blockage of both cytokines, or of IL-23, rather than IL-12. Moreover, the homodimeric beta(2)-form of IL-12, though originally considered to display only antagonistic effects, is now emerging as a pronounced agonist in a variety of inflammatory processes. Reassessment of IL-12 inhibitory compounds is therefore needed to

  11. Ex vivo PBMC cytokine profile in familial Mediterranean fever patients: Involvement of IL-1β, IL-1α and Th17-associated cytokines and decrease of Th1 and Th2 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, José-Noel; Jounblat, Rania; Delwail, Adriana; Abou-Ghoch, Joelle; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, André; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Lecron, Jean-Claude

    2014-10-01

    In order to clarify the inflammatory mechanism underlying familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), we aimed to evaluate the ex vivo cytokine profile of FMF patients during acute attacks and attack-free periods, and compare it with that of healthy controls. The study included 34 FMF patients, of whom 9 were studied during attack and remission and 24 healthy controls. Cytokine levels were evaluated by Luminex technology in serum and supernatants of PBMC (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) cultures with and without 24h stimulation of monocytes by LPS and T lymphocytes by anti-CD3/CD28 beads. Levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were higher in unstimulated and LPS-stimulated PBMC supernatants of FMF patients in crises compared to controls. In response to LPS stimulation, higher levels of IL-1β and IL-1α were found in PBMC supernatants of patients during crises compared to those in remission and to controls. IFN-γ and IL-4 levels were the lowest in unstimulated and anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated PBMCs supernatants of patients during crises compared to remission and controls. The Th17 cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 were respectively higher in anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated PBMC supernatants of FMF patients during and between crises compared to controls. Amongst cytokines tested in serum, only IL-6 and TNFα were enhanced in FMF patients. The ex vivo study represents an interesting approach to evaluate cytokines' involvement in FMF. Our results suggest an ongoing subclinical inflammation and define an elevated inflammatory cytokine signature, distinctly for M694V homozygous patients. The absence of spontaneous IL-1β release by PBMCs reflects no constitutive activation of the inflammasome in FMF physiopathology.

  12. Detection of the novel IL-1 family cytokines by QAH-IL1F-1 assay in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, B; Ma, Z; Sun, X; Tang, Y; Li, X; Wu, X

    2016-04-30

    The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines comprises 11 members, including 7 pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β,IL-36γ) and 4 anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-36Ra, IL-37 and IL-38), and play central roles in mediating immune responses. In this study, we detected serum levels of IL-36 subfamily cytokines (including IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36γ, IL-36Ra and IL-38), IL-37, IL-33 and aimed to investigate the roles of these cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) preliminarily. A total of 10 RA patients and 10 healthy controls (HCs) were involved in this study, we measured IL-36 subfamily cytokines, IL-37 and IL-33 levels in the serum of the experiment subjects by QAH-IL1F-1 assay. Clinical and laboratory data of the subjects were collected and analyzed by Spearman's rank test. Compared to that of HCs, IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36Ra, IL-38 and IL-33 levels were significantly increased in RA patients. We also found RA patients with elevated IL-36Ra had a higher ESR and RF-IgM, and there was a positive correlation between increased IL-36α and CRP. Our study suggests that parts of the novel members of IL-1 family cytokines were involved in the pathogenesis of RA, and may provide a novel target for therapies of RA.

  13. Work/Family Conflicts: Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Maureen

    In the past 20 years, the percentage of married women in the Canadian labor force has risen dramatically. Despite women's increased participation in the labor force, child care and housework are still largely done by women. While the difficulty of combining work and family responsibilities can result in work/family conflicts, a variety of…

  14. Affirmative Action Implications for Worldwide Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Lora

    This paper views the interrelatedness of political, economic, and family systems as they are being affected by the growing awareness of sex discrimination. The reduction in sex inequalities throughout the world, regardless of political or economic orientation, will necessitate a new perception of the woman's role in the family unit. The hypothesis…

  15. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by a soluble factor of Propionibacterium acnes: implications for chronic inflammatory acne.

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, B R; Yang, S; Leyden, J J

    1995-01-01

    Although many cytokines have been implicated in the development and persistence of inflammatory immune responses, it is unknown if any of these are important in inflammatory acne. This study investigated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by human monocytic cell lines, ThP-1 and U937, and by freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acne patients. Both Propionibacterium acnes and supernatants obtained from 72-h P. acnes cultures could induce significant concentrations of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 by both cell lines and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between acne and non-acne subjects. Endotoxin quantification and addition of polymyxin B to assays indicated no lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. P. acnes supernatant was fractionated into components with molecular weights of < 3,000, < 10,000, and < 30,000 and assayed for the ability to induce IL-8 and TNF production in ThP-1 cells. Nearly 90% of the original activity was found in the < 30,000-molecular-weight fraction, 50% was in the < 10,000-molecular-weight fraction, and only 15% remained in the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction. The effluent from the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction contained about 70% activity, indicating that the inducing factor was not retained in the membrane. Incubation of P. acnes supernatant with various concentrations of mutanolysin or lysozyme resulted in a loss of 60% of the original activity. The addition of jimson lectin, which binds peptidoglycan, resulted in a loss of 70% of the activity in a dose-response manner, whereas peanut lectin had little or no effect on the activity. Heating of the P. acnes supernatant to 65 degrees C also had no effect on the activity. Blocking of CD14, a receptor for both LPS and peptidoglycan, reduced cytokine production by > 50%, suggesting that

  16. Cytokine cascade and networks among MSM HIV seroconverters: implications for early immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xinchao; Meyers, Kathrine; Liu, Lihong; Su, Bin; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Zhen; Li, Lan; Zhang, Tong; Li, Ning; Chen, Hui; Li, Haiying; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The timing, intensity and duration of the cytokine cascade and reorganized interrelations in cytokine networks are not fully understood during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). Using sequential plasma samples collected over three years post-infection in a cohort of MSM HIV-1 seroconvertors, we determined the early kinetics of cytokine levels during FiebigI-IV stages using Luminex-based multiplex assays. Cytokines were quantified and relationships between cytokines were assessed by Spearman correlation. Compared with HIV-negative MSM, HIV-infected individuals had significantly increased multiple plasma cytokines, including GM-CSF, IFN-α2, IL-12p70, IP-10 and VEGF, during both acute and chronic stages of infection. Furthermore, rapid disease progressors (RDPs) had earlier and more robust cytokine storms, compared with slow disease progressors (SDPs) (49.6 days vs. 74.9 days, respectively; 6.7-fold vs. 3.7-fold change of cytokines, respectively), suggesting the faster and stronger cytokine storm during AHI could promote disease progression. On the other hand, HIV-1 infection induced more interlocked cytokines network, establishing new strong correlations and imposing a higher rigidity. There were, respectively, 146 (44.9%) statistically significant correlations of cytokines in RDPs and 241 (74.2%) in SDPs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that immunomodulatory interventions aimed at controlling cytokine storm in AHI may be beneficial to slow eventual disease progression. PMID:27830756

  17. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Influences the Transcription of Chicken γc and γc Family Cytokines during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lu; Sun, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Yongping; Zhou, Jiyong

    2014-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection causes immunodeficiency in chickens. To understand cell-mediated immunity during IBDV infection, this study perform a detailed analysis of chicken γc chain (chCD132) and γc family cytokines, including interleukins 2, 4, 7, 9, and 15. The mouse anti-chCD132 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was first generated by the E.coli-expressed γc protein. Immunofluorescence assay further showed that γc was a protein located with the anti-chCD132 mAb on the surface of chicken's splenic mononuclear cells. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the chCD132 mRNA transcript was persistently downregulated in embryo fibroblasts, spleen and thymus of chickens infected with IBDV. Correspondingly during IBDV infection, the transcription of five γc family cytokines was downregulated in the thymus and presented an imbalance in the spleen. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses also indicated that the percentage of CD132+CD8+ T cells linearly decreased in the bursa of IBDV-infected chickens. These results confirmed that IBDV infection disturbed the in vivo balance of CD132 and γc family cytokine expression and that IBDV-induced immunodeficiency involved cellular networks related to the γc family. PMID:24416239

  18. Regulation of NK Cell Activation and Effector Functions by the IL-12 Family of Cytokines: The Case of IL-27.

    PubMed

    Zwirner, Norberto Walter; Ziblat, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by their ability to detect and induce apoptosis of susceptible target cells and by secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. Activation of these effector functions is triggered upon recognition of tumor and pathogen (mostly virus)-infected cells and because of a bidirectional cross talk that NK cells establish with other cells of myeloid origin such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. A common characteristic of these myeloid cells is their ability to secrete different members of the IL-12 family of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27 and cytokines such as IL-15 and IL-18. Although the effect of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 has been characterized, the effect of IL-23 and IL-27 on NK cells (especially human) remains ill-defined. Particularly, IL-27 is a cytokine with dual functions as it has been described as pro- and as anti-inflammatory in different experimental settings. Recent evidence indicates that this cytokine indeed promotes human NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, NKp46-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody (Ab)-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against monoclonal Ab-coated tumor cells. Remarkably, IL-27 also primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness, enhancing these functional responses. Consequently, IL-27 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that, in concert with other DC-derived cytokines, hierarchically contributes to NK cells activation and effector functions, which likely contributes to foster the adaptive immune response in different physiopathological conditions.

  19. Regulation of NK Cell Activation and Effector Functions by the IL-12 Family of Cytokines: The Case of IL-27

    PubMed Central

    Zwirner, Norberto Walter; Ziblat, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by their ability to detect and induce apoptosis of susceptible target cells and by secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. Activation of these effector functions is triggered upon recognition of tumor and pathogen (mostly virus)-infected cells and because of a bidirectional cross talk that NK cells establish with other cells of myeloid origin such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. A common characteristic of these myeloid cells is their ability to secrete different members of the IL-12 family of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27 and cytokines such as IL-15 and IL-18. Although the effect of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 has been characterized, the effect of IL-23 and IL-27 on NK cells (especially human) remains ill-defined. Particularly, IL-27 is a cytokine with dual functions as it has been described as pro- and as anti-inflammatory in different experimental settings. Recent evidence indicates that this cytokine indeed promotes human NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, NKp46-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody (Ab)-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against monoclonal Ab-coated tumor cells. Remarkably, IL-27 also primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness, enhancing these functional responses. Consequently, IL-27 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that, in concert with other DC-derived cytokines, hierarchically contributes to NK cells activation and effector functions, which likely contributes to foster the adaptive immune response in different physiopathological conditions. PMID:28154569

  20. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  1. Transferring the Family Farm: Process and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Norah C.; Munro, Brenda

    1989-01-01

    Examined the process of exit from farm businesses of a group of older farmers (N=315) and determined the relationship between goals of family succession and behaviors in the exit phase. Found a sequence of exit from work, management, and ownership with farmers who valued continuity being most likely to involve sons in management of the operation.…

  2. Cancer Cytokines and the Relevance of 3D Cultures for Studying those Implicated in Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Maddaly, Ravi; Subramaniyan, Aishwarya; Balasubramanian, Harini

    2017-03-06

    Cancers are complex conditions and involving several factors for oncogenesis and progression. Of the various factors influencing the physiology of cancers, cytokines are known to play significant roles as mediators of functions. Intricate cytokine networks have been identified in cancers and interest in cytokines associated with cancers has been gaining ground. Of late, some of these cytokines are even identified as potential targets for cancer therapy apart from a few others such as IL-6 being identified as markers for disease prognosis. Of the major contributors to cancer research, cancer cell lines occupy the top slot as the most widely used material in vitro. In vitro cell cultures have seen significant evolution by the introduction of 3 dimensional (3D) culture systems. 3D cell cultures are now widely accepted as excellent material for cancer research which surpasses the traditional monolayer cultures. Cancer research has benefitted from 3D cell cultures for understanding the various hallmarks of cancers. However, the potential of these culture systems are still unexploited for cancer cytokine research compared to the other aspects of cancers such as gene expression changes, drug-induced toxicity, morphology, angiogenesis and invasion. Considering the importance of cancer cytokines, 3D cell cultures can be better utilized in understanding their roles and functions. Some of the possibilities where 3D cell cultures can contribute to cancer cytokine research arise from the distinct morphology of the tumor spheroids, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the spontaneous occurrence of nutrient and oxygen gradients. Also, the 3D culture models enable one to co-culture different types of cells as a simulation of in vivo conditions, enhancing their utility to study cancer cytokines. We review here the cancer associated cytokines the contributions of 3D cancer cell cultures for studying cancer cytokines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Marital and Family Therapy Research: Outcomes and Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia; Huggins, Don

    1998-01-01

    A review of marriage-and-family therapy-outcome studies from the past 10 years is discussed. Results indicate success over a broad scope of practices, including problems traditionally treated with individual psychotherapy, and when used in collaboration with other treatment modalities. Implications for the field are presented. (Author/EMK)

  4. Schizophrenia as a Brain Disease: Implications for Psychologists and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dale L.

    1989-01-01

    The belief that schizophrenia is a brain disease is the consensus among families of persons with mental illness and is supported by the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. This article summarizes implications for psychologists from the following standpoints: (1) etiology; (2) vulnerability; (3) treatment; (4) rehabilitation; (5) assessment;…

  5. Early Intervention with Latino Families: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Rebecca L.

    2008-01-01

    Counselors and early interventionists increasingly serve Spanish-speaking families. Yet, often, cultural accommodations merely imply use of interpreters or bilingual providers. Cultural competence requires self-awareness and understanding the client's community and specific risk and resiliency factors. Implications for serving clients of Latino…

  6. Association between the serotonin transporter and cytokines: Implications for the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Hsieh, Wen-Chi; Chen, Li-Chi; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2016-02-01

    Reduced brain serotonin transporter (SERT) has been demonstrated in bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study was to explore the potential role of cytokines on reduced SERT in BD. Twenty-eight BD type I patients and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. Single photon emission computed tomography with the radiotracer 123I ADAM was used for SERT imaging. Regions of interest included the midbrain, thalamus, putamen and caudate. Seven cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10, were measured using an enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay. SERT availability in the midbrain and caudate was significantly lower in BD compared to HCs. IL-1β was significantly lower, whereas IL-10 was significantly higher in BD compared to HCs. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that there were associations between cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and SERT availability in the midbrain but not in the thalamus, putamen and caudate. Furthermore, linear mixed effect analyses demonstrated that these associations were not different between HCs and BD. While many cytokines have been proposed to be important in the pathophysiology of BD, our results demonstrated that significant associations between cytokines and SERT availability may explain the role of cytokines in mood regulation. However, these associations were not different between HCs and BD, which imply the role of these cytokines is not specific for BD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytokine and chemokine responses after exposure to ionizing radiation: Implications for the astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Baulch, Janet E.; Morgan, William F.

    For individuals traveling in space, exposure to space radiation is unavoidable. Since adequate shielding against radiation exposure is not practical, other strategies for protecting the astronauts must be developed. Radiation is also an important therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and evidence from the clinical and experimental settings now shows a firm connection between radiation exposure and changes in cytokine and chemokine levels. These small proteins can be pro- or anti-inflammatory in nature and the balance between those two effects can be altered easily because of exogenous stresses such as radiation. The challenge to identify a common perpetrator, however, lies in the fact that the cytokines that are produced vary based on radiation dose, type of radiation, and the cell types that are exposed. Based on current knowledge, special treatments have successfully been designed by implementing administration of proteins, antibodies, and drugs that counteract some of the harmful effects of radiation. Although these treatments show promising results in animal studies, it has been difficult to transfer those practices to the human situation. Further understanding of the mechanisms by which cytokines are triggered through radiation exposure and how those proteins interact with one another may permit the generation of novel strategies for radiation protection from the damaging effects of radiation. Here, we review evidence for the connection between cytokines and the radiation response and speculate on strategies by which modulating cytokine responses may protect astronauts against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiations.

  8. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  9. Targeting the Binding Interface on a Shared Receptor Subunit of a Cytokine Family Enables the Inhibition of Multiple Member Cytokines with Selectable Target Spectrum*

    PubMed Central

    Nata, Toshie; Basheer, Asjad; Cocchi, Fiorenza; van Besien, Richard; Massoud, Raya; Jacobson, Steven; Azimi, Nazli; Tagaya, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The common γ molecule (γc) is a shared signaling receptor subunit used by six γc-cytokines. These cytokines play crucial roles in the differentiation of the mature immune system and are involved in many human diseases. Moreover, recent studies suggest that multiple γc-cytokines are pathogenically involved in a single disease, thus making the shared γc-molecule a logical target for therapeutic intervention. However, the current therapeutic strategies seem to lack options to treat such cases, partly because of the lack of appropriate neutralizing antibodies recognizing the γc and, more importantly, because of the inherent and practical limitations in the use of monoclonal antibodies. By targeting the binding interface of the γc and cytokines, we successfully designed peptides that not only inhibit multiple γc-cytokines but with a selectable target spectrum. Notably, the lead peptide inhibited three γc-cytokines without affecting the other three or non-γc-cytokines. Biological and mutational analyses of our peptide provide new insights to our current understanding on the structural aspect of the binding of γc-cytokines the γc-molecule. Furthermore, we provide evidence that our peptide, when conjugated to polyethylene glycol to gain stability in vivo, efficiently blocks the action of one of the target cytokines in animal models. Collectively, our technology can be expanded to target various combinations of γc-cytokines and thereby will provide a novel strategy to the current anti-cytokine therapies against immune, inflammatory, and malignant diseases. PMID:26183780

  10. Targeting the binding interface on a shared receptor subunit of a cytokine family enables the inhibition of multiple member cytokines with selectable target spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nata, Toshie; Basheer, Asjad; Cocchi, Fiorenza; van Besien, Richard; Massoud, Raya; Jacobson, Steven; Azimi, Nazli; Tagaya, Yutaka

    2015-09-11

    The common γ molecule (γc) is a shared signaling receptor subunit used by six γc-cytokines. These cytokines play crucial roles in the differentiation of the mature immune system and are involved in many human diseases. Moreover, recent studies suggest that multiple γc-cytokines are pathogenically involved in a single disease, thus making the shared γc-molecule a logical target for therapeutic intervention. However, the current therapeutic strategies seem to lack options to treat such cases, partly because of the lack of appropriate neutralizing antibodies recognizing the γc and, more importantly, because of the inherent and practical limitations in the use of monoclonal antibodies. By targeting the binding interface of the γc and cytokines, we successfully designed peptides that not only inhibit multiple γc-cytokines but with a selectable target spectrum. Notably, the lead peptide inhibited three γc-cytokines without affecting the other three or non-γc-cytokines. Biological and mutational analyses of our peptide provide new insights to our current understanding on the structural aspect of the binding of γc-cytokines the γc-molecule. Furthermore, we provide evidence that our peptide, when conjugated to polyethylene glycol to gain stability in vivo, efficiently blocks the action of one of the target cytokines in animal models. Collectively, our technology can be expanded to target various combinations of γc-cytokines and thereby will provide a novel strategy to the current anti-cytokine therapies against immune, inflammatory, and malignant diseases.

  11. Cloning and characterization of IL-17B and IL-17C, two new members of the IL-17 cytokine family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhong; Chen, Jian; Huang, Arthur; Stinson, Jeremy; Heldens, Sherry; Foster, Jessica; Dowd, Patrick; Gurney, Austin L.; Wood, William I.

    2000-01-01

    IL-17 is a T cell-derived cytokine that may play an important role in the initiation or maintenance of the proinflammatory response. Whereas expression of IL-17 is restricted to activated T cells, the IL-17 receptor is found to be widely expressed, a finding consistent with the pleiotropic activities of IL-17. We have cloned and expressed two novel human cytokines, IL-17B and IL-17C, that are related to IL-17 (≈27% amino acid identity). IL-17B mRNA is expressed in adult pancreas, small intestine, and stomach, whereas IL-17C mRNA is not detected by RNA blot hybridization of several adult tissues. No expression of IL-17B or IL-17C mRNA is found in activated T cells. In a survey of cytokine induction, IL-17B and IL-17C stimulate the release of tumor necrosis factor α and IL-1β from the monocytic cell line, THP-1, whereas IL-17 has only a weak effect in this system. No induction of IL-1α, IL-6, IFN-γ, or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is found in THP-1 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis shows that IL-17B and IL-17C bind to THP-1 cells. Conversely, IL-17B and IL-17C are not active in an IL-17 assay or the stimulation of IL-6 release from human fibroblasts and do not bind to the human IL-17 receptor extracellular domain. These data show that there is a family of IL-17-related cytokines differing in patterns of expression and proinflammatory responses that may be transduced through a cognate set of cell surface receptors. PMID:10639155

  12. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: implications for faculty development.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kent J; Quirk, Mark E; Davis, Ardis K

    2007-01-01

    Faculty development implications related to implementing the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) Project provide an opportunity to look at the recommendations of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's federally funded Faculty Futures Initiative (FFI) and the recent Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project. Implications for faculty development include the importance of the clerkship setting, originally defined in 1991, with new features added in today's practice environment as outlined by the FFM and the changing assumptions in approaching faculty development. Previously, faculty development focused on teaching learners to master current knowledge. Now, faculty must teach learners how to master new competencies throughout their lives; learners need to learn how they and others learn now. Teaching must focus on how to learn in the future as well as what to learn for the present. Competence ("what individuals know or are able to do in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes") has become the focus of curriculum development efforts over the last few years and most appropriately serves as the focus of curriculum development in the FMCR Project. Implications for developing teachers and preceptors focus on the skills and circumstances required to teach and evaluate all types (cognitive, metacognitive, and affective) of competence. In the new culture, novel teaching methods will serve as the focus of faculty development in teaching and of educational ("best practices") research.

  13. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  14. Family ties after divorce: long-term implications for children.

    PubMed

    Ahrons, Constance R

    2007-03-01

    Drawing on the data from the longitudinal Binuclear Family Study, 173 grown children were interviewed 20 years after their parents' divorce. This article addresses two basic questions: (1) What impact does the relationship between parents have on their children 20 years after the divorce? and (2) When a parent remarries or cohabits, how does it impact a child's sense of family? The findings show that the parental subsystem continues to impact the binuclear family 20 years after marital disruption by exerting a strong influence on the quality of relationships within the family system. Children who reported that their parents were cooperative also reported better relationships with their parents, grandparents, stepparents, and siblings. Over the course of 20 years, most of the children experienced the remarriage of one or both parents, and one third of this sample remembered the remarriage as more stressful than the divorce. Of those who experienced the remarriage of both of their parents, two thirds reported that their father's remarriage was more stressful than their mother's. When children's relationships with their fathers deteriorated after divorce, their relationships with their paternal grandparents, stepmother, and stepsiblings were distant, negative, or nonexistent. Whether family relationships remain stable, improve, or get worse is dependent on a complex interweaving of many factors. Considering the long-term implications of divorce, the need to emphasize life course and family system perspectives is underscored.

  15. Pancreatic stellate cells are activated by proinflammatory cytokines: implications for pancreatic fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Apte, M; Haber, P; Darby, S; Rodgers, S; McCaughan, G; Korsten, M; Pirola, R; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is unknown. In the liver, stellate cells play a major role in fibrogenesis by synthesising increased amounts of collagen and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when activated by profibrogenic mediators such as cytokines and oxidant stress. 
AIMS—To determine whether cultured rat pancreatic stellate cells produce collagen and other ECM proteins, and exhibit signs of activation when exposed to the cytokines platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). 
METHODS—Cultured pancreatic stellate cells were immunostained for the ECM proteins procollagen III, collagen I, laminin, and fibronectin using specific polyclonal antibodies. For cytokine studies, triplicate wells of cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of PDGF or TGF-β. 
RESULTS—Cultured pancreatic stellate cells stained strongly positive for all ECM proteins tested. Incubation of cells with 1, 5, and 10 ng/ml PDGF led to a significant dose related increase in cell counts as well as in the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA. Stellate cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5, and 1 ng/ml TGF-β showed a dose dependent increase in α smooth muscle actin expression and increased collagen synthesis. In addition, TGF-β increased the expression of PDGF receptors on stellate cells. 
CONCLUSIONS—Pancreatic stellate cells produce collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins, and respond to the cytokines PDGF and TGF-β by increased proliferation and increased collagen synthesis. These results suggest an important role for stellate cells in pancreatic fibrogenesis. 

 Keywords: pancreatic fibrosis; stellate cell activation; cytokines PMID:10075961

  16. Identification of a fourth ancient member of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF cytokine family, KK34, in many mammals.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takuya; Schares, Susann; Fischer, Uwe; Dijkstra, Johannes M

    2016-12-01

    The related cytokine genes IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF map to the (extended) TH2 cytokine locus of the mammalian genome. For chicken an additional related cytokine gene, KK34, was reported downstream of the IL-3 plus GM-CSF cluster, but hitherto it was believed that mammalian genomes lack this gene. However, the present study identifies an intact orthologue of chicken KK34 gene in many mammals like cattle and pig, while remnants of KK34 can be found in human and mouse. Bovine KK34 was found to be transcribed, and its recombinant protein could induce STAT5 phosphorylation and proliferation of lymphocytes upon incubation with bovine PBMCs. This concludes that KK34 is a fourth functional cytokine of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF/KK34-family (alias IL-5 family) in mammals. While analyzing KK34, the present study also made new identifications of cytokine genes in the extended TH2 cytokine loci for reptiles, birds and marsupials. This includes a hitherto unknown cytokine gene in birds and reptiles which we designated "IL-5famE". Other newly identified genes are KK34, GM-CSF(-like), IL-5, and IL-13 in reptiles, and IL-3 in marsupials.

  17. Glia as a source of cytokines: implications for neuronal excitability and survival.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Ravizza, Teresa; Balosso, Silvia; Aronica, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, preclinical studies have provided a better characterization of the homeostatic and maladaptive mechanisms occurring either during the process of epileptogenesis or after the permanent epileptic state has emerged. Experimental evidence supported by clinical observations highlighted the possibility that brain inflammation is a common factor contributing, or predisposing, to the occurrence of seizures and cell death, in various forms of epilepsy of different etiologies. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, as a hallmark of brain inflammation, has been demonstrated in glia in various experimental models of seizures and in human epilepsies. Experimental studies in rodents with perturbed cytokine systems indicate that these inflammatory mediators can alter neuronal excitability and affect cell survival by activating transcriptional and posttranslational intracellular pathways. This paper will provide an overview on the current knowledge in this field to discuss mechanistic hypotheses into the study of pathogenesis of epilepsy and recognize new potential therapeutic options.

  18. Inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Bulati, Matteo; Caruso, Calogero; Castiglia, Laura; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Di Bona, Danilo; Duro, Giovanni; Lio, Domenico; Matranga, Domenica; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; Rizzo, Claudia; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Vasto, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and progressive neurodegenerative disease, which in Western society mainly accounts for senile dementia. Today many countries have rising aging populations and are facing an increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as AD, with increasing health-care costs. Understanding the pathophysiology process of AD plays a prominent role in new strategies for extending the health of the elderly population. Considering the future epidemic of AD, prevention and treatment are important goals of ongoing research. However, a better understanding of AD pathophysiology must be accomplished to make this objective feasible. In this paper, we review some hot topics concerning AD pathophysiology that have an important impact on therapeutic perspectives. Hence, we have focused our attention on inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E (APOE), cholesterol, oxidative stress, as well as exploring the related therapeutic possibilities, i.e., nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, cytokine blocking antibodies, immunotherapy, diet, and curcumin.

  19. Interleukins (ILs), a fascinating family of cytokines. Part II: ILs from IL-20 to IL-38.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Pieranna; Costa, Elvira; Delsante, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Every nucleated cell can produce and respond to cytokines, extracellular proteic/glycoproteic mediators that constitute a complex, interconnected, and flexible signaling network, addressed to modulate cell behavior and homeostasis through the interaction with high-affinity surface receptors. These messenger molecules, whose main characteristics are potency, pleiotropism, and redundancy, primarily act in autocrine, paracrine, and juxtacrine way, but can also display systemic activity in endocrine-like modality. They are generally classified according to their cellular sources, three-dimensional structure, or biological functions. Among cytokines, interleukins (ILs) represent a fascinating and multifunctional group of immunomodulators that primarily mediate the leukocyte cross-talk (hence the name), and mainly regulate the immune cell proliferation, differentiation, growth, survival, activation, and functions. Up to 38 ILs have been so far identified, numbered according to the order of discovery, and grouped in different subsets, based on distinguishing structural/functional features. Due to their crucial role in regulating inflammation and immune response, ILs are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. Therefore, they have increasingly attracted great interest as effective or promising therapeutic targets. The biology and functions of the hitherto identified human ILs are reviewed and discussed: herein, ILs from IL-20 to IL-38 are presented.

  20. Interleukins (ILs), a fascinating family of cytokines. Part I: ILs from IL-1 to IL-19.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Pieranna; Costa, Elvira; Delsante, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Every nucleated cell can produce and respond to cytokines, extracellular proteic/glycoproteic mediators that constitute a complex, interconnected, and flexible signaling network, addressed to modulate cell behavior and homeostasis through the interaction with high-affinity surface receptors. These messenger molecules, whose main characteristics are potency, pleiotropism, and redundancy, primarily act in autocrine, paracrine, and juxtacrine way, but can also display systemic activity in endocrine-like modality. They are generally classified according to their cellular sources, three-dimensional structure, or biological functions. Among cytokines, interleukins (ILs) represent a fascinating and multifunctional group of immunomodulators that primarily mediate the leukocyte cross-talk (hence the name), and mainly regulate the immune cell proliferation, differentiation, growth, survival, activation, and functions. Up to 38 ILs have been so far identified, numbered according to the order of discovery, and grouped in different subsets, based on distinguishing structural/functional features. Due to their crucial role in regulating inflammation and immune response, ILs are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. Therefore, they have increasingly attracted great interest as effective or promising therapeutic targets. The biology and functions of the hitherto identified human ILs are reviewed and discussed: in this first section of the article, ILs from IL-1 to IL-19 are presented.

  1. Th9 cytokines response and its possible implications in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; Pagliari, Carla; de Almeida, Dandara Simone Maia; Barros, Luiz Fernando Lima; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; Dias, Leonidas Braga; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2017-06-01

    Leprosy is an infectious-contagious disease whose clinical evolution depends on the interaction of the infectious agent with the immune response of the host, leading to a clinical spectrum that ranges from lepromatous leprosy (susceptibility, LL) to tuberculoid leprosy (resistance, TT). The immune response profile will depend on the pattern of cytokine production and on the activity of macrophages during infection. Classically, the clinical evolution of leprosy has been associated with Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, but the role of new cytokine profiles such as T helper 9 (Th9) remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the tissue expression profile of these cytokines, a cross-sectional study was conducted using a sample of 30 leprosy skin lesion biopsies obtained from patients with leprosy, 16 TT and 14 lepromatous LL. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant difference in interleukin (IL)-9, IL-4 transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-10 levels between the two groups. IL-9 was more expressed in TT lesions compared with LL lesions. Higher expression of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β was observed in LL compared with TT. IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β tended to be negatively correlated with the expression of IL-9, indicating a possible antagonistic activity in tissue. The results suggest that Th9 lymphocytes may be involved in the response to Mycobacterium leprae, positively or negatively regulating microbicidal activity of the local immune system in the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Infant mortality and family welfare: policy implications for Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Poerwanto, S; Stevenson, M; de Klerk, N

    2003-01-01

    Design: A population based multistage stratified clustered survey. Setting: Women of reproductive age in Indonesia between 1983–1997. Data sources: The 1997 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey. Main results: Infant mortality was associated with FWI and maternal education. Relative to families of high FWI, the risk of infant death was almost twice among families of low FWI (aOR=1.7, 95%CI=0.9 to 3.3), and three times for families of medium FWI (aOR=3.3 ,95%CI=1.7 to 6.5). Also, the risk of infant death was threefold higher (aOR=3.4, 95% CI=1.6 to 7.1) among mothers who had fewer than seven years of formal education compared with mothers with more than seven years of education. Fertility related indicators such as young maternal age, absence from contraception, birth intervals, and prenatal care, seem to exert significant effect on the increased probability of infant death. Conclusions: The increased probability of infant mortality attributable to family income inequality and low maternal education seems to work through pathways of material deprivation and chronic psychological stress that affect a person's health damaging behaviours. The policies that are likely to significantly reduce the family's socioeconomic inequality in infant mortality are implicated. PMID:12821691

  3. Treatment implications of the altered cytokine-insulin axis in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ian A; Vissel, Bryce

    2013-10-01

    The disappointments of a series of large anti-amyloid trials have brought home the point that until the driving force behind Alzheimer's disease, and the way it causes harm, are firmly established and accepted, researchers will remain ill-equipped to find a way to treat patients successfully. The origin of inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases is still an open question. We champion and expand the argument that a shift in intracellular location of α-synuclein, thereby moving a key methylation enzyme from the nucleus, provides global hypomethylation of patients' cerebral DNA that, through being sensed by TLR9, initiates production of the cytokines that drive these cerebral inflammatory states. After providing a background on the relevant inflammatory cytokines, this commentary then discusses many of the known alternatives to the primary amyloid argument of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and the treatment approaches they provide. A key point to appreciate is the weight of evidence that inflammatory cytokines, largely through increasing insulin resistance and thereby reducing the strength of the ubiquitously important signaling mediated by insulin, bring together most of these treatments under development for neurodegenerative disease under the one roof. Moreover, the principles involved apply to a wide range of inflammatory diseases on both sides of the blood brain barrier. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field and wound healing: implication of cytokines as biological mediators.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Mirko; Patruno, Antonia; Speranza, Lorenza; Reale, Marcella

    2013-03-01

    Wound healing is a highly coordinated and complex process involving various cell types, chemical mediators and the surrounding extracellular matrix, resulting in a tightly orchestrated re-establishment of tissue integrity by specific cytokines. It consists of various dynamic processes including a series of overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, re-epithelialization and remodeling. One of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disturbances in wound healing is an out-of-control inflammatory response that can cause pathological consequences, such as hypertrophic scars, keloids or chronic wounds and ulcers. Recently, several reports have evaluated the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on tissue repair. In particular, the data analysis supports an anti-inflammatory effect of EMFs by the modulation of cytokine profiles that drive the transition from a chronic pro-inflammatory state to an anti-inflammatory state of the healing process. In this review, we focus on the effect of EMFs on skin wound healing showing emerging details of the anti-inflammatory effects of EMFs, with a view to cytokines as candidate biomarkers. Molecular clarification of the mechanisms involved in the modulation of inflammatory factors following exposure to EMFs will provide a better understanding of the cellular responses induced by EMFs and a potential, additional treatment in non-responding, chronic wounds.

  5. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  6. The importance of serial measurements of cytokine levels for the evaluation of their role in pathogenesis in familial Mediterraean fever.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Y; Bayraktar, Y; Arslan, S; Van Thiel, D H; Zerrin, B C K; Yildiz, O

    2003-07-31

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever of unknown origin, renal amyloidosis, peritonitis, pleuritis and/or synovitis. There have been many studies to elucidate the etiopathogenesis of FMF. IL-6 is a cytokine that can induce the formation of serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein, both of which are important in development of amyloidosis. IL-6 was determined to be strongly associated in the etiopathogenesis of periodic fever in Chinese-pei dogs. The dogs with this syndrome experience periodic fever, arthritis, renal amyloidosis, a clinical picture very alike of human FMF. Here, we aimed to study mainly whether IL-6 had a similar etiopathogenetic role in human FMF as in Chinese-pei dogs syndrome. The median IL-6 blood levels were found to be higher in patients with acute (n=8) FMF attack (1.85 U/ml) compared to those (n=33) with asymptomatic ones (1.0 U/ml) (p=0.16). There are mainly two results: first; the study should be designed with a larger sample size of patients with acute attack in order to alleviate underestimation of significance, second; sampling time may give various results because of dynamic changes of cytokine levels during acute attack period.

  7. The TNF-Family Cytokine TL1A Promotes Allergic Immunopathology through Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meylan, Françoise; Hawley, Eric T.; Barron, Luke; Barlow, Jillian L.; Penumetcha, Pallavi; Pelletier, Martin; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Richard, Arianne C.; Hayes, Erika T.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Chen, Xi; Paul, William E.; Wynn, Thomas A.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The TNF-family cytokine TL1A (TNFSF15) costimulates T cells and promotes diverse T-cell dependent models of autoimmune disease through its receptor DR3. TL1A polymorphisms also confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Here we find that allergic pathology driven by constitutive TL1A expression depends on IL-13, but not T, NKT, mast cells or commensal intestinal flora. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) express surface DR3 and produce IL-13 and other type 2 cytokines in response to TL1A. DR3 is required for ILC2 expansion and function in the setting of T cell dependent and independent models of allergic disease. By contrast, DR3 deficient ILC2 can still differentiate, expand and produce IL-13 when stimulated by IL-25 or IL-33, and mediate expulsion of intestinal helminths. These data identify costimulation of ILC2 as a novel function of TL1A important for allergic lung disease, and suggest that TL1A may be a therapeutic target in these settings. PMID:24368564

  8. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    PubMed Central

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  9. Evidence of associations between cytokine gene polymorphisms and quality of life in patients with cancer and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kimberly; Cooper, Bruce; Paul, Steven M; West, Claudia; Yates, Patsy; Kober, Kord M; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-09-01

    To identify latent classes of individuals with distinct quality-of-life (QOL) trajectories, to evaluate for differences in demographic characteristics between the latent classes, and to evaluate for variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between the latent classes. Descriptive, longitudinal study. Two radiation therapy departments located in a comprehensive cancer center and a community-based oncology program in northern California. 168 outpatients with prostate, breast, brain, or lung cancer and 85 of their family caregivers (FCs). Growth mixture modeling (GMM) was employed to identify latent classes of individuals based on QOL scores measured prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in 16 candidate cytokine genes were tested between the latent classes. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationships among genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and QOL GMM group membership. QOL latent class membership and variations in cytokine genes. Two latent QOL classes were found: higher and lower. Patients and FCs who were younger, identified with an ethnic minority group, had poorer functional status, or had children living at home were more likely to belong to the lower QOL class. After controlling for significant covariates, between-group differences were found in SNPs in interleukin 1 receptor 2 (IL1R2) and nuclear factor kappa beta 2 (NFKB2). For IL1R2, carrying one or two doses of the rare C allele was associated with decreased odds of belonging to the lower QOL class. For NFKB2, carriers with two doses of the rare G allele were more likely to belong to the lower QOL class. Unique genetic markers in cytokine genes may partially explain interindividual variability in QOL. Determination of high-risk characteristics and unique genetic markers would allow for earlier identification of patients with cancer and FCs at higher risk for poorer QOL

  10. Cytokine modulation by endothelin-1 and possible therapeutic implications in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Giordano, N; Papakostas, P; Pecetti, G; Nuti, R

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), also known as scleroderma, is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a progressive fibrosis which involves skin and internal organs, caused by microvascular damage. The earliest clinical sign of the disease is Raynauds Phenomenon, a vasospastic response to cold or stress stimuli, followed by the skin and organ involvement over time. This kind of vascular manifestation originates from the microvascular structural alteration, characterized by an abnormal myocyte cell proliferation, intima cell proliferation and adventitia fibrosis. The microvascular damage seems to be the consequence of the autoimmune attack to the endothelium, followed by inflammatory cascade and massive deposition of collagen. From the beginning of the disorder, serum Endothelin-1 (ET- 1) is found in very high concentration: this protein, today, is considered one of the most important mediators of scleroderma vascular alterations. Furthermore, many recent studies have shown that ET-1 is involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic processes, increasing the concentration of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this review is to clarify the ET-1 role in SSc, in particular the relationship between ET-1 and cytokine expression, adding another element to the understanding of scleroderma disease.

  11. Cytokines, macrophage lipid metabolism and foam cells: implications for cardiovascular disease therapy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James E; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer globally and the principal contributing factor to the pathology is atherosclerosis; a chronic, inflammatory disorder characterized by lipid and cholesterol accumulation and the development of fibrotic plaques within the walls of large and medium arteries. Macrophages are fundamental to the immune response directed to the site of inflammation and their normal, protective function is harnessed, detrimentally, in atherosclerosis. Macrophages contribute to plaque development by internalizing native and modified lipoproteins to convert them into cholesterol-rich foam cells. Foam cells not only help to bridge the innate and adaptive immune response to atherosclerosis but also accumulate to create fatty streaks, which help shape the architecture of advanced plaques. Foam cell formation involves the disruption of normal macrophage cholesterol metabolism, which is governed by a homeostatic mechanism that controls the uptake, intracellular metabolism, and efflux of cholesterol. It has emerged over the last 20 years that an array of cytokines, including interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10, are able to manipulate these processes. Foam cell targeting, anti-inflammatory therapies, such as agonists of nuclear receptors and statins, are known to regulate the actions of pro- and anti-atherogenic cytokines indirectly of their primary pharmacological function. A clear understanding of macrophage foam cell biology will hopefully enable novel foam cell targeting therapies to be developed for use in the clinical intervention of atherosclerosis.

  12. Proinflammatory cytokines induce bronchial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia in smokers: implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Hubert, Pascale; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Vandevenne, Patricia; Renoux, Virginie; Habraken, Yvette; Cataldo, Didier; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia is common in smokers, and is associated with both airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and increased risk of lung cancer. Although this reversible epithelial replacement is almost always observed in association with chronic inflammation, the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of squamous metaplasia remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the implication of cigarette smoke-mediated proinflammatory cytokine up-regulation in the development and treatment of tracheobronchial epithelial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia. Using immunohistological techniques, we showed a higher epithelial expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as an activation of NF-κB and activator protein-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the respiratory tract of smoking patients, compared with the normal ciliated epithelium of nonsmoking patients. In addition, we demonstrated that these signaling pathways strongly influence the proliferation and differentiation state of in vitro-generated normal human airway epithelial basal cells. Finally, we exposed mice to cigarette smoke for 16 weeks, and demonstrated that anti-TNF-α (etanercept), anti-IL-1β (anakinra), and/or anti-IL-6R (tocilizumab) therapies significantly reduced epithelial hyperplasia and the development of squamous metaplasia. These data highlight the importance of soluble inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia. Therefore, the administration of proinflammatory cytokine antagonists may have clinical applications in the management of patients with COPD.

  13. Characterization of a transneuronal cytokine family Cbln--regulation of secretion by heteromeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Miura, Eriko; Matsuda, Keiko; Kamekawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2007-02-01

    Cbln1, a member of the C1q and tumor necrosis factor superfamily, plays crucial roles as a cerebellar granule cell-derived transneuronal regulator of synapse integrity and plasticity in Purkinje cells. Although other Cbln family members, Cbln2-Cbln4, have distinct spatial and temporal patterns of expression throughout the CNS, their biochemical and biological properties have remained largely uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrated that in mammalian heterologous cells, Cbln2 and Cbln4 were secreted as N-linked glycoproteins, like Cbln1. In contrast, despite the presence of a functional signal sequence, Cbln3 was not secreted when expressed alone but was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or cis-Golgi because of its N-terminal domain. All members of the Cbln family formed not only homomeric but also heteromeric complexes with each other in vitro. Accordingly, when Cbln1 and Cbln3 were co-expressed in heterologous cells, a proportion of the Cbln1 proteins was retained in the ER or cis-Golgi; conversely, some Cbln3 proteins were secreted together with Cbln1. Similarly, in wild-type granule cells expressing Cbln1 and Cbln3, Cbln3 proteins were partially secreted and reached postsynaptic sites on Purkinje cell dendrites, while Cbln3 was almost completely degraded in cbln1-null granule cells. These results indicate that like Cbln1, Cbln2 and Cbln4 may also serve as transneuronal regulators of synaptic functions in various brain regions. Furthermore, heteromer formation between Cbln1 and Cbln3 in cerebellar granule cells may modulate each other's trafficking and signaling pathways; similarly, heteromerization of other Cbln family proteins may also have biological significance in other neurons.

  14. Detection of cytokines at the cartilage/pannus junction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: implications for the role of cytokines in cartilage destruction and repair.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Q; Field, M; Allard, S; Abney, E; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1992-10-01

    Cytokine release at the cartilage/pannus junction (CPJ) may be involved in cartilage destruction and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tissue samples of CPJ from 12 RA patients were examined for the presence of cytokines using immunohistochemical techniques with immunoaffinity purified F(ab')2 antibodies raised against recombinant human cytokines. Twenty-four areas of distinct CPJ at which a discrete junction between cartilage and overlying pannus exists were observed. In all specimens, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 were detected in cells in pannus particularly along the surface of cartilage and at the site of cartilage erosion. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that most cytokine containing cells also labelled with a macrophage marker (CD68). About 50% of blood vessel endothelial cells stained for GM-CSF. Twelve areas of diffuse fibroblastic CPJ, at which an indistinct margin is seen between cartilage and pannus were examined. At this site, TGF-beta 1 was the only cytokine detected in fibroblast-like cells. None of these cytokines were detected in synovial tissue at the normal synovium/cartilage junction. Chondrocytes from all 11 normal specimens as well as those from RA patients stained for IL-1 alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-6, GM-CSF and TGF-beta 1, especially those close to subchondral bone. However, IL-1 beta, interferon-gamma and lymphotoxin were not detected in either the normal synovium/cartilage junction or rheumatoid CPJ.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Increased Expression of Interleukin-36, a Member of the Interleukin-1 Cytokine Family, in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Atsushi; Hidaka, Kentaro; Kanda, Toshihiro; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Shioya, Makoto; Inatomi, Osamu; Bamba, Shigeki; Kitoh, Katsuyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Andoh, Akira

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36 (IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ) is a recently reported member of the IL-1 cytokine family. In this study, we investigated IL-36 expression in the inflamed mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and characterized the proinflammatory actions of IL-36 cytokines in human colonic epithelial cells. IL-36 mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time PCR. IL-36 protein expression was analyzed using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical technique. Intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated by immunoblotting and by specific siRNA-transfected cells. The mRNA expression of IL-36α and IL-36γ, but not of IL-36β, was enhanced in the inflamed mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, in particular, in ulcerative colitis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that T cells, monocytes, and plasma cells are the source of IL-36α and IL-36γ in colonic mucosa. DNA microarray analysis indicated that IL-36α induces the mRNA expression of CXC chemokines and acute phase proteins in intestinal epithelial cell line, HT-29 cells. IL-36α and IL-36γ dose-dependently and time-dependently induced the mRNA and protein expression of CXC chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3 etc.) in HT-29 and Widr cells. Stimulation with IL-36α and IL-36γ assembled MyD88 adaptor proteins (MyD88, TRAF6, IRAK1, and TAK1) into a complex and induced the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 and also the phosphorylation of MAPKs. MAPK inhibitors and siRNAs specific for NF-κB and c-Jun AP-1 significantly reduced IL-36-induced CXC chemokine expression. IL-36α and IL-36γ may play a proinflammatory role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease through induction of CXC chemokines and acute phase proteins.

  16. Crystal structure of designed PX domain from cytokine-independent survival kinase and implications on evolution-based protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Shultis, David; Dodge, Gregory; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The Phox homology domain (PX domain) is a phosphoinositide-binding structural domain that is critical in mediating protein and cell membrane association and has been found in more than 100 eukaryotic proteins. The abundance of PX domains in nature offers an opportunity to redesign the protein using EvoDesign, a computational approach to design new sequences based on structure profiles of multiple evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we report the X-ray crystallographic structure of a designed PX domain from the cytokine-independent survival kinase (CISK), which has been implicated as functioning in parallel with PKB/Akt in cell survival and insulin responses. Detailed data analysis of the designed CISK-PX protein demonstrates positive impacts of knowledge-based secondary structure and solvation predictions and structure-based sequence profiles on the efficiency of the evolutionary-based protein design method. The structure of the designed CISK-PX domain is close to the wild-type (1.54 Å in Cα RMSD), which was accurately predicted by I-TASSER based fragment assembly simulations (1.32 Å in Cα RMSD). This study represents the first successfully designed conditional peripheral membrane protein fold and has important implications in the examination and experimental validation of the evolution-based protein design approaches.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus UL7, a homologue of the SLAM-family receptor CD229, impairs cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Albà, M Mar; Robertson, Kevin; Ghazal, Peter; Angulo, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the β-herpesvirus prototype, has evolved a wide spectrum of mechanisms to counteract host immunity. Among them, HCMV uses cellular captured genes encoding molecules capable of interfering with the original host function or of fulfilling new immunomodulatory tasks. Here, we report on UL7, a novel HCMV heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein, containing an Ig-like domain that exhibits remarkable amino acid similarity to CD229, a cell-surface molecule of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family involved in leukocyte activation. The UL7 Ig-like domain, which is well-preserved in all HCMV strains, structurally resembles the SLAM-family N-terminal Ig-variable domain responsible for the homophilic and heterophilic interactions that trigger signalling. UL7 is transcribed with early-late kinetics during the lytic infectious cycle. Using a mAb generated against the viral protein, we show that it is constitutively shed, through its mucine-like stalk, from the cell-surface. Production of soluble UL7 is enhanced by PMA and reduced by a broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor. Although UL7 does not hold the ability to interact with CD229 or other SLAM-family members, it shares with them the capacity to mediate adhesion to leukocytes, specifically to monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UL7 expression attenuates the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-8 and IL-6 in DCs and myeloid cell lines. Thus, the ability of UL7 to interfere with cellular proinflammatory responses may contribute to viral persistence. These results enhance our understanding of those HCMV-encoded molecules involved in sustaining the balance between HCMV and the host immune system.

  18. Transcriptome Changes Affecting Hedgehog and Cytokine Signalling in the Umbilical Cord: Implications for Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Stünkel, Walter; Tng, Emilia; Tan, Jun Hao; Chen, Li; Joseph, Roy; Cheong, Clara Y.; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Lee, Yung Seng; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang Mei; Meaney, Michael J.; Kwek, Kenneth; Sheppard, Allan M.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Holbrook, Joanna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Babies born at lower gestational ages or smaller birthweights have a greater risk of poorer health in later life. Both the causes of these sub-optimal birth outcomes and the mechanism by which the effects are transmitted over decades are the subject of extensive study. We investigated whether a transcriptomic signature of either birthweight or gestational age could be detected in umbilical cord RNA. Methods The gene expression patterns of 32 umbilical cords from Singaporean babies of Chinese ethnicity across a range of birthweights (1698–4151 g) and gestational ages (35–41 weeks) were determined. We confirmed the differential expression pattern by gestational age for 12 genes in a series of 127 umbilical cords of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity. Results We found that the transcriptome is substantially influenced by gestational age; but less so by birthweight. We show that some of the expression changes dependent on gestational age are enriched in signal transduction pathways, such as Hedgehog and in genes with roles in cytokine signalling and angiogenesis. We show that some of the gene expression changes we report are reflected in the epigenome. Conclusions We studied the umbilical cord which is peripheral to disease susceptible tissues. The results suggest that soma-wide transcriptome changes, preserved at the epigenetic level, may be a mechanism whereby birth outcomes are linked to the risk of adult metabolic and arthritic disease and suggest that greater attention be given to the association between premature birth and later disease risk. PMID:22808055

  19. Analysis of leucocyte antibodies, cytokines, lysophospholipids and cell microparticles in blood components implicated in post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, K; Uhrynowska, M; Łopacz, P; Wróbel, A; Smoleńska-Sym, G; Guz, K; Lachert, E; Ostas, A; Brojer, E

    2015-01-01

    Post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea (PTR) are major causes of morbidity and death after blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are most dangerous, while transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a milder respiratory distress. We investigated blood components for immune and non-immune factors implicated in PTR. We analysed 464 blood components (RBCs, PLTs, L-PLTs, FFP) transfused to 271 patients with PTR. Blood components were evaluated for 1/antileucocyte antibodies, 2/cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, sCD40L, 3/lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), 4/microparticles (MPs) shed from plateletes (PMPs), erythrocytes (EMPs) and leucocytes (LMPs). Anti-HLA class I/II antibodies or granulocyte-reactive anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 18.2% of blood components (RBC and FFP) transfused to TRALI and in 0.5% of FFP transfused to TAD cases. Cytokines and LysoPCs concentrations in blood components transfused to PTR patients did not exceed those in blood components transfused to patients with no PTR. Only EMPs percentage in RBCs transfused to patients with TRALI was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in RBCs transfused to patients with no PTR. Immune character of PTR was confirmed mainly in 1/5 TRALI cases. Among non-immune factors, only MPs released from stored RBCs are suggested as potential mediators of TRALI. Our results require further observations in a more numerous and better defined group of patients. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Semaphorin 4D Contributes to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine Production: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuji; Kang, Sujin; Ebina, Kousuke; Shi, Kenrin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tomita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Toshio; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 has pleiotropic roles in immune activation, angiogenesis, bone metabolism, and neural development. We undertook this study to investigate the role of Sema4D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Soluble Sema4D (sSema4D) levels in serum and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Cell surface expression and transcripts of Sema4D were analyzed in peripheral blood cells from RA patients, and immunohistochemical staining of Sema4D was performed in RA synovium. Generation of sSema4D was evaluated in an ADAMTS‐4–treated monocytic cell line (THP‐1 cells). The efficacy of anti‐Sema4D antibody was evaluated in mice with collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA). Results Levels of sSema4D were elevated in both serum and synovial fluid from RA patients, and disease activity markers were correlated with serum sSema4D levels. Sema4D‐expressing cells also accumulated in RA synovium. Cell surface levels of Sema4D on CD3+ and CD14+ cells from RA patients were reduced, although levels of Sema4D transcripts were unchanged. In addition, ADAMTS‐4 cleaved cell surface Sema4D to generate sSema4D in THP‐1 cells. Soluble Sema4D induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) production from CD14+ monocytes. IL‐6 and TNFα induced ADAMTS‐4 expression in synovial cells. Treatment with an anti‐Sema4D antibody suppressed arthritis and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in CIA. Conclusion A positive feedback loop involving sSema4D/IL‐6 and TNFα/ADAMTS‐4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. The inhibition of arthritis by anti‐Sema4D antibody suggests that Sema4D represents a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25707877

  1. Pretransplant Levels of CRP and Interleukin-6 Family Cytokines; Effects on Outcome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tvedt, Tor Henrik; Lie, Stein Atle; Reikvam, Håkon; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Lindås, Roald; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Several pretransplant factors, including CRP (C-reactive protein) levels, reflect the risk of complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. IL-6 induces CRP increase, and we therefore investigated the effects of pretransplant IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptors, IL-6 family cytokines and CRP serum levels on outcome for 100 consecutive allotransplant recipients. All patients had related donors, none had active infections and 99 patients were in complete remission before conditioning. The incidence of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) requiring treatment was 40%, survival at Day +100 82%, and overall survival 48%. Despite a significant correlation between pretransplant CRP and IL-6 levels, only CRP levels significantly influenced transplant-related mortality (TRM). However, CRP did not influence overall survival (OS). Pretransplant IL-31 influenced late TRM. Finally, there was a significant association between pretransplant IL-6 and early postconditioning weight gain (i.e., fluid retention), and this fluid retention was a risk factor for aGVHD, TRM and OS. To conclude, pretransplant CRP, IL-31 and early posttransplant fluid retention were independent risk factors for TRM and survival after allotransplantation. PMID:27809289

  2. Personal values of exemplary family physicians: implications for professional satisfaction in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Eliason, B C; Schubot, D B

    1995-09-01

    Personal social values have been identified as important determinants of generalists' specialty choice. However, the personal values or "guiding principles" of generalist physicians have not been identified scientifically. To establish a benchmark, we measured the personal values of exemplary family physicians because they serve as role models for current and future physicians. We also explored the relationship between personal values and practice satisfaction. We obtained a list of 330 family physicians nominated for the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP) Family Doctor of the Year award for the years 1988 through 1993. We asked them to complete the Schwartz Values Questionnaire, a 56-item instrument for measuring personal values. They also answered three questions concerning practice satisfaction. The return rate was 83%. The physicians' mean age was 63 years. They had been in practice an average of 34 years, 93% were male, and 52% practiced in rural areas. Honesty was rated as the most important of the 56 values, and social power as the least important. Of the 10 value types (groups of common values), the responding physicians rated "Benevolence" as most important and "Power" as least important. Practice satisfaction correlated positively with the Benevolence value type (r = .21, P = .001) and negatively with the Power value type (r = -.15, P = .023). Of the 10 value types, Benevolence was rated the most important and Power the least important by exemplary family physicians, and both value types also correlated, positively and negatively, respectively, with their practice satisfaction. These results have implications for the selection, training, and career satisfaction of generalist physicians.

  3. Role of Interleukin-1/Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Family of Cytokines in Long-Term Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Antar, Omar; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-sensor-induced tissue reactions (e.g., inflammation and wound healing) are known to negatively impact sensor function in vivo. The roles of cytokine networks in controlling these tissue reactions (i.e., sensor biofouling) is not understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a key anti-inflammatory antagonist of the proinflammatory interleukin-1 cytokines [i.e. interleukin-1 (IL-1) alpha and IL-1 beta] in controlling continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods To investigate the role of IL-1Ra in long-term CGM in vivo, we compared CGM in transgenic mice that overexpress IL-1Ra [interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpresser (IL-1Ra~OE), B6.Cg-Tg(IL1rn)1Dih/J] or are deficient in IL-1Ra [interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1Ra~KO), B6.129S-IL1rntm1Dih/J] with mice that have normal levels of IL-1Ra (C57BL/6) over a 28-day time period. Results Mean absolute relative difference (MARD) analysis of CGM results among the mice of varying IL-1Ra levels demonstrated that during the first 21 days, IL-1~KO mice had the greatest tissue inflammation and the poorest sensor performance (i.e., higher MARD values) when compared with normal or IL-1Ra~OE mice. By 28 days post-sensor implantation, the inflammatory reactions had subsided and were replaced by varying degrees of fibrosis. Conclusions These data support our hypothesis on the importance of the IL-1 family of agonists and antagonists in controlling tissue reactions and sensor function in vivo. These data also suggest that local delivery of IL-1Ra genes or recombinant proteins (anakinra) or other IL-1 antagonists such as antibodies or soluble IL-1 receptors would suppress sensor-induced tissue reactions and likely enhance glucose sensor function by inhibiting inflammation and wound healing at sensor implantation sites. PMID:24351180

  4. Cytokines and feeding.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    2001-12-01

    Various categories of cytokines participate in the control of feeding, including interleukin-1 and -6 and other activators of gp 130, leptin (ob protein), interleukin-8 and other chemokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-alpha. These feeding-inhibitory cytokines may play a role in the regulation of food intake during physiological (eg a role proposed for leptin) and pathophysiological (eg proinflammatory cytokines) conditions. Data show that various cytokines participate in acute and chronic disease-associated anorexia such as during infection, inflammation or malignancy. Food intake suppression (reported as anorexia) is also a common central manifestation observed during cytokine immunotherapy in humans. The concept of local production of various cytokines within specific brain regions in response to peripheral challenges and pathophysiological processes has broad implications for the interpretation of brain cytokines as mediators or participants in CNS modulation of feeding and anorexia.

  5. Cytokines and skeletal physiology.

    PubMed

    Goldring, S R; Goldring, M B

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines are soluble factors that play a critical role in mediating cell to cell interactions within skeletal tissues. These effects are mediated by paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine mechanisms. There are also examples in which the cytokines can function in an endocrine fashion. The regulatory functions of the cytokines are performed throughout life, beginning with bone growth and development and continuing in the mature organism, in which bone remodeling is regulated. The cytokines can be grouped into distinct families based on their principal biologic activity and cell target. However, the activities of the cytokines are pleiotropic, and they exhibit considerable overlap and redundancy in their actions. The molecular cloning of the cytokines and their receptors and elucidation of their common structural features have aided in the understanding of the molecular basis for the redundancy and pleiotropy of cytokine effects. Examination of most physiologic processes in which cytokines play an important regulatory role reveals that cytokines rarely exert their biologic activities in isolation. Instead, these soluble factors usually are produced locally in concert with many other cytokines. The interaction of these structurally and functionally distinct factors in a highly ordered temporal and spatial sequence creates a cytokine network that ultimately determines a given tissue's response. Continued investigation into the molecular and biologic mechanisms by which cytokines regulate bone cell function will provide additional insights into normal bone physiology and permit more effective and specific use of these factors in the treatment of skeletal disorders.

  6. Child Abuse and Neglect in Cambodian Refugee Families: Characteristics and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S. Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services…

  7. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J.; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Family-Centered Care Family-centered care is a model of healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers’ knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Clinical Relevance and Conclusion Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. PMID:25648522

  8. Cytokines in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  9. Cytokines in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H.; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25585875

  10. Synergy between Common γ Chain Family Cytokines and IL-18 Potentiates Innate and Adaptive Pathways of NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Carolyn M.; Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Goodier, Martin R.; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies to develop cell-based therapies for cancer and other diseases have consistently shown that purified human natural killer (NK) cells secrete cytokines and kill target cells after in vitro culture with high concentrations of cytokines. However, these assays poorly reflect the conditions that are likely to prevail in vivo in the early stages of an infection and have been carried out in a wide variety of experimental systems, which has led to contradictions within the literature. We have conducted a detailed kinetic and dose–response analysis of human NK cell responses to low concentrations of IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21, and IFN-α, alone and in combination, and their potential to synergize with IL-2. We find that very low concentrations of both innate and adaptive common γ chain cytokines synergize with equally low concentrations of IL-18 to drive rapid and potent NK cell CD25 and IFN-γ expression; IL-18 and IL-2 reciprocally sustain CD25 and IL-18Rα expression in a positive feedback loop; and IL-18 synergizes with FcγRIII (CD16) signaling to augment antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These data indicate that NK cells can be rapidly activated by very low doses of innate cytokines and that the common γ chain cytokines have overlapping but distinct functions in combination with IL-18. Importantly, synergy between multiple signaling pathways leading to rapid NK cell activation at very low cytokine concentrations has been overlooked in prior studies focusing on single cytokines or simple combinations. Moreover, although the precise common γ chain cytokines available during primary and secondary infections may differ, their synergy with both IL-18 and antigen–antibody immune complexes underscores their contribution to NK cell activation during innate and adaptive responses. IL-18 signaling potentiates NK cell effector function during innate and adaptive immune responses by synergy with IL-2, IL-15, and IL-21 and immune complexes. PMID:27047490

  11. Synergy between Common γ Chain Family Cytokines and IL-18 Potentiates Innate and Adaptive Pathways of NK Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carolyn M; Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Goodier, Martin R; Riley, Eleanor M

    2016-01-01

    Studies to develop cell-based therapies for cancer and other diseases have consistently shown that purified human natural killer (NK) cells secrete cytokines and kill target cells after in vitro culture with high concentrations of cytokines. However, these assays poorly reflect the conditions that are likely to prevail in vivo in the early stages of an infection and have been carried out in a wide variety of experimental systems, which has led to contradictions within the literature. We have conducted a detailed kinetic and dose-response analysis of human NK cell responses to low concentrations of IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21, and IFN-α, alone and in combination, and their potential to synergize with IL-2. We find that very low concentrations of both innate and adaptive common γ chain cytokines synergize with equally low concentrations of IL-18 to drive rapid and potent NK cell CD25 and IFN-γ expression; IL-18 and IL-2 reciprocally sustain CD25 and IL-18Rα expression in a positive feedback loop; and IL-18 synergizes with FcγRIII (CD16) signaling to augment antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These data indicate that NK cells can be rapidly activated by very low doses of innate cytokines and that the common γ chain cytokines have overlapping but distinct functions in combination with IL-18. Importantly, synergy between multiple signaling pathways leading to rapid NK cell activation at very low cytokine concentrations has been overlooked in prior studies focusing on single cytokines or simple combinations. Moreover, although the precise common γ chain cytokines available during primary and secondary infections may differ, their synergy with both IL-18 and antigen-antibody immune complexes underscores their contribution to NK cell activation during innate and adaptive responses. IL-18 signaling potentiates NK cell effector function during innate and adaptive immune responses by synergy with IL-2, IL-15, and IL-21 and immune complexes.

  12. CIKS/Act1-mediated signaling by IL-17 cytokines in context: Implications for how a CIKS gene variant may predispose to psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik; Paun, Andrea; Ha, Hye-Lin; Johnson, Peter F.; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a relapsing skin disease characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation and by an influx of inflammatory immune cells. Recently IL-17 cytokines have been strongly implicated as critical for the pathogenesis of this disease. IL-17A (a.k.a. IL-17) and IL-17F are the signature cytokine of Th17 cells, but are also produced by innate cells, including γδ T cells present in skin, while epithelial cells, including keratinocytes, may produce IL-17C. IL-17 cytokines signal via the adaptor protein CIKS/Act1. Psoriasis is a disease with a strong genetic predisposition and the gene encoding CIKS has recently been identified as a susceptibility locus. Unexpectedly, one predisposing gene variant features a mutation that impairs rather than enhances CIKS-mediated IL-17 cytokine signaling, counter to the predicted role for IL-17 cytokines in psoriatic inflammation. Here we demonstrate, however, that this mutant adaptor does not impair the IL-17-specific contributions to the genetic response if combined with TNFα, a cytokine also prominent in psoriatic inflammation. Interestingly, TNFα signals compensate IL-17 signaling defects imposed by this mutant adaptor even for genes that are not induced by TNFα alone, including the transcription factors C/EBPδ and IκBζ, which help regulate secondary gene expression in response to IL-17. Based on these findings we discuss a scenario in which the mutant adaptor may interfere with homeostatic maintenance of epithelial barriers, thereby potentially enabling the initiation of inflammatory responses to insults, while this same mutant adaptor would still be able to mediate IL-17-specific contributions to inflammation once TNFα is present. PMID:22581863

  13. Clinical implications of the novel cytokine IL-38 expressed in lung adenocarcinoma: Possible association with PD-L1 expression.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazuki; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Tominaga, Masaki; Teraishi, Koji; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Toyokawa, Gouji; Shoji, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Masaki; Oda, Yoshinao; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38, a novel member of the IL-1 cytokine family, is homologous to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36Ra, and has been reported to act as an antagonist. IL-38 expression is found in tonsil, placenta, and spleen, and recent studies suggest an association between IL-38 and autoimmune diseases. However, whether IL-38 plays a role in carcinogenesis or cancer growth is unclear. In the present study, we identified increases in IL-38 expression by immunohistochemistry in multiple types of cancer cells. In the examination of 417 surgically resected primary lung adenocarcinomas, Fisher's exact tests showed significant associations between high IL-38 expression and high tumor grades, an advanced T status, advanced N status, advanced stage, and the presence of pleural and vessel invasions. Survival analyses by the Kaplan-Meier method showed that patients with high expression of IL-38 had significantly shorter disease-free survival and shorter overall survival after surgery than patients with low expression of IL-38 (log-rank test: P = 0.0021 and P = 0.0035, respectively). Moreover, programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive cases showed higher expression of IL-38 than PD-L1-negative cases (Wilcoxon rank-sum test: P < 0.0001). In conclusion, IL-38 was expressed in tumor cells of various cancers, and IL-38 expression was associated with poor survival of lung adenocarcinoma patients. IL-38 may affect host immunity or the tumor microenvironment, and contribute to the progression of lung adenocarcinoma.

  14. Marital and Family Therapy: Implications of Research for Alcoholism Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.

    This synopsis of the outcome literature on marital and family treatment (MFT) drew three conclusions. First, intervening at the marital/family level with nonalcoholic family members can motivate an initial commitment to change in the alcoholic who is unwilling to seek help. Second, MFT alone, or with individual alcoholism treatment, produces…

  15. Family Obligations in Micronesian Cultures: Implications for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliffe, Katherine T.

    2010-01-01

    Micronesian people, a new group of immigrants to the USA, have a strong system of responsibilities to family members that guides their priorities and actions. When family obligations clash with school priorities, conflicts can occur. I interviewed 26 adults to learn about the relationships and responsibilities of family members to each other in…

  16. Analysis of Family Metaphor: Methodological and Theoretical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tricia S.

    A family's metaphor, the frame of reference or perspective that is created and reflected through a family's use of figurative language, is a key to understanding the underlying values and realities of families. Constructivist theories of language view metaphor as essential to the creation of meaning. From this perspective, using metaphor as a…

  17. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R

    2015-01-01

    Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Concept Analysis. Synthesis of literature on family-centered care and its application in for rehabilitation nurses. Family-centered care is a model of collaborative healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers' knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  18. How Families Experience the Phenomenon of Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Implications for Family Therapists and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Glenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how family members experience the phenomenon of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the family unit, over time, and to examine the meanings family members attach to the experience. The participants were six nuclear families (20 individuals) of six adolescent mothers who had previously…

  19. How Families Experience the Phenomenon of Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Implications for Family Therapists and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Glenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how family members experience the phenomenon of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the family unit, over time, and to examine the meanings family members attach to the experience. The participants were six nuclear families (20 individuals) of six adolescent mothers who had previously…

  20. Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

  1. The Family Policy Implications of a New Social Program: The New Zealand Accident Compensation Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosburgh, Miriam G.; Kronick, Jane C.

    1980-01-01

    Innovations in the New Zealand Accident Compensation Scheme include defining the family unit in terms of past economic support and adapting common law principles to social provision. Accidents are considered a community responsibility. Family implications of this program are discussed. (Author/BEF)

  2. Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

  3. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  4. Characteristics and Needs of Navy Families: Policy Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Pressure to Leave the Navy a 0 0 0 0 0 18 Anxiety and Depresion . . . . . o . o . . . . . . ... . o . . o . 19 RECOMMENDATIONS . . . . . . . . 0 a...My family wants me to leave the Navy because its demands interfere with family life. (I 1) .62 All in all, I am satisfied with the way the Navy treats

  5. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  6. Influence of Familial Spirituality: Implications for School Counseling Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith M.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Ieva, Kara P.

    2011-01-01

    This article (a) addresses the importance of familial spirituality on students' holistic development; (b) explores professional ethical codes, standards, and counseling competencies relating to students' familial spirituality; (c) introduces educational activities to assist school counselors in increasing their understanding and appreciation of…

  7. A discussion of HIV/AIDS family interventions: implications for family-focused nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Eustace, Rosemary W

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a discussion on the role of family interventions in HIV/AIDS disease prevention and care. Although HIV/AIDS epidemic and its impact on the society traditionally has been measured in terms of individual risk behaviours and individual-level HIV prevention, HIV/AIDS family-focused prevention and management strategies are increasingly becoming a priority. However, little is known as to what constitutes a HIV/AIDS family intervention. The search was limited to English and published literature starting in the year 1983 to date. CINAHL and PubMed were emphasized using a combination of text words and subject headings. Cochrane Library, PsycInfo, Scopus, and the ISI Web of Science databases were also searched using keywords and in the case of PsycInfo, subject headings were used. The main keywords were 'nurse', or 'nursing', 'HIV/AIDS', 'family interventions', 'family support' and 'family education', and/or 'family subsystems'. The process of theorizing about 'family interventions' and 'HIV/AIDS-family interventions' is critical for putting forth essential components unique for designing culturally specific HIV/AIDS family interventions. In addition, any proposed design of HIV/AIDS family intervention should consider the impact of HIV/AIDS on the family across the family life span, disease trajectory, and from an interdisciplinary perspective. Training needs of family nurses should be met when designing multidisciplinary HIV/AIDS-FIs. Furthermore, nurses should be proactive in advocating for HIV/AIDS family intervention and HIV/AIDS family policies to improve outcomes in family functioning, processes, and relationships. More needs to be done in regard to research on families, family interventions, effectiveness, and cost of family-focused approaches. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Evidence of Associations between Cytokine Genes and Subjective Reports of Sleep Disturbance in Oncology Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dhruva, Anand; Dunn, Laura B.; Langford, Dale J.; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; Merriman, John D.; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify distinct latent classes of individuals based on subjective reports of sleep disturbance; to examine differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics between the latent classes; and to evaluate for variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between the latent classes. Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS) obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two latent classes. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effect of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on GSDS group membership. Two latent classes were identified: lower sleep disturbance (88.5%) and higher sleep disturbance (11.5%). Participants who were younger and had a lower Karnofsky Performance status score were more likely to be in the higher sleep disturbance class. Variation in two cytokine genes (i.e., IL6, NFKB) predicted latent class membership. Evidence was found for latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance trajectories. Unique genetic markers in cytokine genes may partially explain the interindividual heterogeneity characterizing these trajectories. PMID:22844404

  9. Expression profile of IL-1 family cytokines in aqueous humor and sera of patients with HLA-B27 associated anterior uveitis and idiopathic anterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binbin; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Rui; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gordon, Lynn; Chen, Ling

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytokine expression profile of specific IL-1 family members in the aqueous humor and sera of patients with HLA-B27 associated acute anterior uveitis (AAU) and idiopathic AAU. Following informed consent, a total of 13 patients with HLA-B27 associated AAU, 12 patients with idiopathic AAU and 9 controls were recruited to this study from May 2013 to July 2014. Each individual received a complete ophthalmologic examination. Aqueous humor and sera samples were collected and 11 inflammation-related cytokines of the IL-1 family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist [IL-1Ra], IL-18, IL-36 receptor antagonist [IL-36Ra], IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, IL-36γ, IL-37, IL-38) were quantitatively measured and analyzed for statistical significance between groups. The degree of inflammation, anterior chamber cell or flare, correlated with expression of IL-1β, IL-1Ra, and IL-18. The highest levels of IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-18, and IL-36Ra were seen in the aqueous of patients with HLA-B27 associated AAU and this was statically significant when compared to the controls, but not to idiopathic AAU. Expression of IL-18 was statistically higher in the aqueous of patients with HLA-B27 associated AAU in comparison to either idiopathic AAU or controls, but this may reflect greater inflammation in this patient group. In the sera only IL-1α was statistically higher in the HLA-B27 associated AAU in comparison to the control. Cytokine analysis reveals elevation of multiple IL-1 family members in the aqueous humor of patients with AAU as compared to controls. The specific signature of inflammation may potentially be useful in developing new future therapies for AAU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  11. Interindividual and intra-articular variation of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: potential implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ulfgren, A.; Grondal, L.; Lindblad, S.; Khademi, M.; Johnell, O.; Klareskog, L.; Andersson, U.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Assessment of the numbers and spatial distribution of cells producing interleukin 1α (IL1α), interleukin 1β (IL1β), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL6) in the synovial membranes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Synovial tissue specimens from 40 patients with RA and eight patients with non-rheumatic disease were obtained by arthroscopy guided biopsy techniques or during joint surgery. A modified immunohistochemical method detecting cytokine producing rather than cytokine binding cells was applied to determine cytokine synthesis in fixed cryopreserved sections. Computerised image analysis methods provided comparative quantitative assessments.
RESULTS—A wide variation between subjects was recorded for both quantities and profiles of expressed cytokines, despite similar macroscopic and histopathological features of inflammation. IL1α and IL1β were the most abundant monokines identified, though produced at different sites. IL1α was predominantly seen in vascular endothelial cells, whereas IL1β staining was mainly shown in macrophages and fibroblasts. Concordant results for the detection of TNFα at protein and mRNA levels were obtained with an unexpectedly low number of TNFα producing cells compared with IL1 expressing cells in many patients with RA. Specimens acquired arthroscopically from areas with maximum signs of macroscopic inflammation showed an increased number of TNFα producing cells in pannus tissue compared with that occurring in synovial villi of a given joint. This clustered distribution was not found for cells expressing any of the other studied cytokines.
CONCLUSION—The recorded heterogeneous profile of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in the synovial membrane among patients with RA may provide a clue for an understanding of the wide variation in responsiveness to different modes of antirheumatic treatment between patients.

 PMID:10834861

  12. Interleukin-11 is the dominant IL-6 family cytokine during gastrointestinal tumorigenesis and can be targeted therapeutically.

    PubMed

    Putoczki, Tracy L; Thiem, Stefan; Loving, Andrea; Busuttil, Rita A; Wilson, Nicholas J; Ziegler, Paul K; Nguyen, Paul M; Preaudet, Adele; Farid, Ryan; Edwards, Kirsten M; Boglev, Yeliz; Luwor, Rodney B; Jarnicki, Andrew; Horst, David; Boussioutas, Alex; Heath, Joan K; Sieber, Oliver M; Pleines, Irina; Kile, Benjamin T; Nash, Andrew; Greten, Florian R; McKenzie, Brent S; Ernst, Matthias

    2013-08-12

    Among the cytokines linked to inflammation-associated cancer, interleukin (IL)-6 drives many of the cancer "hallmarks" through downstream activation of the gp130/STAT3 signaling pathway. However, we show that the related cytokine IL-11 has a stronger correlation with elevated STAT3 activation in human gastrointestinal cancers. Using genetic mouse models, we reveal that IL-11 has a more prominent role compared to IL-6 during the progression of sporadic and inflammation-associated colon and gastric cancers. Accordingly, in these models and in human tumor cell line xenograft models, pharmacologic inhibition of IL-11 signaling alleviated STAT3 activation, suppressed tumor cell proliferation, and reduced the invasive capacity and growth of tumors. Our results identify IL-11 signaling as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  13. Family Health Program professionals' view on family structures and health implications.

    PubMed

    Gabardo, Roseclér Machado; Junges, José Roque; Selli, Lucilda

    2009-02-01

    To describe perception of family structures and understanding of a healthy family by Programa Saúde da Família (Family Health Program) team members. Research with a qualitative approach, employing the focus group technique, and involving the Program professionals from the city of Campo Bom, Southern Brazil, between June and August 2005. Sample was comprised of 12 professionals, including doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and community health agents. The following issues were investigated: the meaning of family; the meaning of the role of family; type of family most frequently cared for by professionals; the meaning of a healthy family; and types of family causing more difficulties of care. The methodological instrument used was content analysis. Two main categories were observed: family structures, where a great diversity of arrangements was found; and healthy family, where the predominance of speech is consistent with a multifaceted view on health, involving political, social, economic and cultural aspects. Professionals identify and respect distinct family structures and adapt medical treatment accordingly. Findings reveal that professionals are willing to deal with the different family structures present in their routine.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    Lutfalla, Georges; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Stange-thomann, Nicole; Jaillon, Olivier; Mogensen, Knud; Monneron, Danièle

    2003-01-01

    Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII) including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26) and their receptors (HCRII). Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF). Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish. PMID:12869211

  15. The Budget Enforcement Act: Implications for Children and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehler, Karen

    This analysis of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (BEA) and its implications for public financing of education and other children's services notes that voters want more and better education and related services, and at the same time want to pay less in taxes and balance budgets at every governmental level. The first section details recent…

  16. Experiences of Families Transmitting Values in a Rapidly Changing Society: Implications for Family Therapists.

    PubMed

    Akyil, Yudum; Prouty, Anne; Blanchard, Amy; Lyness, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Intergenerational value transmission affects parent-child relationships and necessitates constant negotiation in families. Families with adolescents from rapidly changing societies face unique challenges in balancing the traditional collectivistic family values that promote harmony with emerging values that promote autonomy. Using modern Turkey as an example of such a culture, the authors examine the transmission process in families that hold more traditional and collectivistic values than their adolescent children. Special consideration is given to generational and cultural differences in the autonomy and relatedness dimensions. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  17. Successful implementation of Thai Family Matters: strategies and implications.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Michael J; Cupp, Pamela K; Chookhare, Warunee; Miller, Brenda A; Byrnes, Hilary F; Fongkaew, Warunee; Vanderhoff, Jude; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Rhucharoenpornpanich, Orratai; Atwood, Katharine A

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses the successful process used to assess the feasibility of implementing the Family Matters program in Bangkok, Thailand. This is important work since adopting and adapting evidence-based programs is a strategy currently endorsed by leading prevention funding sources, particularly in the United States. The original Family Matters consists of four booklets designed to increase parental communication with their adolescent children in order to delay onset of or decrease alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use. As part of the program, health educators contact parents by telephone to support them in the adoption of the program. Each booklet addresses a key aspect of strengthening families and protecting young people from unhealthy behaviors related to alcohol and other drug use. Adaptation of the program for Bangkok focused on cultural relevance and the addition of a unit targeting adolescent dating and sexual behavior. A total of 170 families entered the program, with the majority (85.3%) completing all five booklets. On average, the program took 16 weeks to complete, with families reporting high satisfaction with the program. This article provides greater detail about the implementation process and what was learned from this feasibility trial.

  18. Family transitions during the adolescent transition: implications for parenting.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Harry S; Newland, Lisa A

    2002-01-01

    This study explored how family transitions affect parenting practices in a sample of 7,000 ethnically diverse students in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade over a period of 2 years. Adolescent perceptions of parental control and parental responsiveness were assessed in three groups: (1) adolescents moving into mother-custody households following a marital separation or divorce, (2) adolescents from stable never-divorced households, and (3) adolescents from stable mother-custody households. The study examined pre- and posttransition data to determine whether adolescents in newly formed single-parent families experienced a larger drop in parental control and responsiveness than did adolescents in stable nondivorced and stable mother-custody households. Adolescents from all family types reported significant declines in behavioral control, but not parental responsiveness. However, the lack of family-type differences contrasts sharply with findings from the childhood-divorce literature. Findings suggest that adolescent individuation may overshadow family-type differences during middle adolescence. As expected, boys reported lower parental control than did girls. Ethnic differences revealed that European American adolescents reported the highest levels of parental responsiveness, and African American adolescents reported the highest levels of parental control. Contextual and individual pathways in adolescence are discussed.

  19. Cytokine networks that mediate epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk in the mammary gland: implications for development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic interactions between the hormone responsive mammary gland epithelium and surrounding stromal macrophage populations are critical for normal development and function of the mammary gland. Macrophages are versatile cells capable of diverse roles in mammary gland development and maintenance of homeostasis, and their function is highly dependent on signals within the local cytokine microenvironment. The mammary epithelium secretes a number of cytokines, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) that affect the abundance, phenotype and function of macrophages. However, aberrations in these interactions have been found to increase the risk of tumour formation, and utilisation of stromal macrophage support by tumours can increase the invasive and metastatic potential of the cancer. Studies utilising genetically modified mouse models have shed light on the significance of epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk, and the cytokines that mediate this communication, in mammary gland development and tumourigenesis. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines in mammary gland development and cancer, with a focus on the crosstalk between epithelial cells and the local macrophage population.

  20. Th1/Th17-Related Cytokines and Chemokines and Their Implications in the Pathogenesis of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Timoteo, Rodolfo Pessato; Silva, Djalma Alexandre Alves; Catarino, Jonatas Da Silva; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes

    2017-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of IgG autoantibodies against desmoglein-3. Despite the variety of findings, the chemokine and cytokine profiles that characterize the immune response in the disease are still poorly explored. Thus, 20 PV patients and 20 controls were grouped according to gender, ethnicity, place of residence, and clinical parameters of the disease. Then, the levels of chemokines and of Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg/Th9/Th22-related cytokines were assessed in the serum. PV patients had higher levels of inflammatory Th1/Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-23), as well as higher levels of CXCL8 and reduced levels of Th1/Th2-related chemokines (IP-10 and CCL11). However, no differences in the levels of IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-9, IL-12, TGF-β, IL-33, MCP-1, RANTES, and MIP-1α were found between PV patients and their control counterparts. Furthermore, PV patients with skin lesions had higher serum levels of IL-6 and CXCL8 when compared to PV patients without lesions. Taken together, our findings describe the role of cytokines and chemokines associated with Th1/Th17 immune response in PV patients. Finally, these data are important for better understanding of the immune aspects that control disease outcome, and they may also provide important information about why patients develop autoantibodies against desmogleins. PMID:28321152

  1. Custodial evaluations of Native American families: implications for forensic psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Wills, Cheryl D; Norris, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Native American children in the United States have been adopted by non-Indian families at rates that threaten the preservation of their Indian history, traditions, and culture. The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), which established restrictive parameters that govern the placement of Native American children into foster care and adoptive homes, was ratified in an effort to keep American Indian families intact. This article addresses matters of importance to psychiatrists who conduct custody evaluations of Native American children and families. A summary of events that preceded enactment of the ICWA is given, along with guidelines for forensic psychiatrists who conduct foster and adoptive care evaluations of Native American children. We use clinical vignettes to illustrate how the ICWA informs the custody evaluation process as well as approaches to cultural concerns, including biases that forensic evaluators may encounter during these evaluations.

  2. Cytokines and growth factors influence hair growth in vitro. Possible implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Eicheler, W; Huth, A; Wenzel, E; Happle, R

    1996-03-01

    Factors that influence the growth of the anagen hair follicle or initiate the switch to a catagen growth pattern have so far not been definitely determined, but there is increasing evidence that cytokines and growth factors play an important role during these processes. Recently we detected an aberrant in situ expression pattern of cytokines of the Th1 type (IFN gamma, IL-2) plus IL-1 beta expression in untreated alopecia areata (AA), and a switch to high levels of IL-10 TGF-beta 1 expression after successful treatment with the contact allergen diphenylcyclopropenone (DCP). Hence the question arose as to whether cytokines are able to arrest hair growth and whether IL-10 or TGF beta 1 have the capacity to antagonize this process. Using whole-organ cultures of microdissected human hair follicles we studied the effect of a panel of cytokines and growth factors on hair growth and on the gross morphology of the hair follicles in vitro. IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-gamma had no effect in this regard, whereas TGF beta 1 partially inhibited hair growth and EGF, TNF alpha and IL-1 beta completely abrogated it. EGF and TNF alpha induced the formation of a club-like hair follicle, similar to catagen morphology of the hair bulb, whereas hair follicles grown in the presence of IL-1 beta or TGF beta 1 showed no particular morphological changes. We conclude that cytokines and growth factors are pivotal regulators of hair growth at least in vitro. IL-1 is suggested as playing an important role during the pathogenesis of AA. Possible mediators of therapeutic contact dermatitis (IL-10, TGF beta 1, TNF alpha, PGE2) are, at least in vitro, not able to antagonize the IL-1 beta-triggered hair growth inhibition. Therefore, we infer that these mediators rather "modulate' the immune response in AA.

  3. Cytokine expression pattern in the genital tract of Chlamydia trachomatis positive infertile women - implication for T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B S; Rastogi, S; Das, B; Salhan, S; Verma, S; Mittal, A

    2004-09-01

    Human genital infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis is thought to be immunologically mediated, resulting in local recruitment of lymphocyte subsets and inducing the production of cytokines. Little information is available about the role of lymphocyte recruitment and the regulation of cytokine production in the genital tract of C. trachomatis positive infertile women. We have evaluated the recruitment of lymphocyte subsets in the genital tract and production of Th1/Th2 cytokines in cervical secretions and laparoscopic specimens from the fallopian tubes of C. trachomatis positive infertile women (n = 17) and compared them with controls, viz. C. trachomatis negative infertile women (n = 20) using ELISA and flow cytometry. None of these patients were found to be infected either with Candida sps., bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis or Ureaplasma urealyticum in the cervix. Flow cytometric analysis of cervical secretions in Chlamydia positive women revealed recruitment of both CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes to the genital tract was up-regulated and a variation in the production rates of different cytokines in cervical secretions and fallopian tube was observed. We found that the immune responses in cervical secretions were of Th0 type, since all the analysed cytokines, viz. IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-12 were up-regulated. As, both CD4 and CD8 cells contribute to the production of IFN-gamma and IL-10, these results suggest that along with CD4 cells, CD8 lymphocytes also may be important for local regulation of Th1/Th2 responses in the genital tract during C. trachomatis infection.

  4. Variants in interleukin family of cytokines genes influence clearance of high risk HPV in HIV-1 coinfected African-American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sudenga, Staci L; Wiener, Howard W; Shendre, Aditi; Wilson, Craig M; Tang, Jianming; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2013-12-01

    Our work aimed to examine the potential influence of variants in interleukin/interleukin receptors genes on high-risk (HR-HPV) HPV clearance. Clearance of genital HR-HPV infection was evaluated for 134 HIV-1 seropositive African-American female adolescents from the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health (REACH) cohort. Genotyping targeted 225 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the exons, 5' untranslated region (UTR) and 3' UTR sequences of 27 immune-related candidate genes encoding interleukin family of cytokines. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine the association of type-specific HPV clearance adjusting for time-varying CD4+ T-cell count and low-risk (LR-HPV) HPV co-infections. HR-HPV clearance rates were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with five SNPs (rs228942, rs419598, rs315950, rs7737000, and rs9292618) mapped to coding and regulatory regions in three genes (IL2RB, IL1RN, and IL7R). These data suggest that the analyzed genetic variants in interleukin family of cytokines modulate HR-HPV clearance in HIV-1 seropositive African-Americans that warrants replication.

  5. Deletion of Slam locus in mice reveals inhibitory role of SLAM family in NK cell responses regulated by cytokines and LFA-1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huaijian; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Shaohua; Chen, Jun; Wu, Ning; Davidson, Dominique; Waggoner, Stephen N.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family receptors (SFRs) can mediate either activating or inhibitory effects during natural killer cell (NK cell) activation. In this study, we addressed the global role, regulation, and mechanism of action of the SLAM family in NK cells by analyzing a mouse lacking the entire ∼400-kilobase Slam locus, which encodes all six SFRs and CD48, the ligand of SFR 2B4. This mouse displayed enhanced NK cell activation responses toward hematopoietic target cells. Analyses of mice lacking individual SFRs showed that the inhibitory function of the Slam locus was due solely to 2B4 and was not influenced positively or negatively by other SFRs. Differences in NK cell responses between recognition of targets expressing or lacking ligands for SFRs were enhanced by IL-12 but suppressed by type I interferon. Cytokines also changed the levels of SLAM-associated protein adaptors, which prevent the inhibitory function of SFRs. The enhanced activation responses of SFR-deficient NK cells were dependent on integrin LFA-1 but not on DNAM-1 or NKG2D. SFR-mediated inhibition prevented the generation of activated forms of LFA-1. Hence, the Slam locus has an overall inhibitory role during NK cell activation that is solely dependent on 2B4. This effect is influenced by cytokines and leads to suppression of LFA-1 activity. PMID:27573813

  6. Hispanic Families and Their Culture: Implications for FCS Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Barbara N.; Bencomo, Angelina

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic children constitute the largest population of racial/ethnic minority students in the nation's public schools. By the year 2023, the Hispanic enrollment is expected to increase to 30% of the total school population (pre-K through 12) in the United States. Because cultural background affects student learning, family and consumer sciences…

  7. The Distributional and Cost Implications of Negative Expected Family Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelchen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Eligibility for many federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs is determined by the expected family contribution (EFC) from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which functions as a tool to ration scarce aid dollars. The lowest possible EFC under current rules is zero, but this obscures a wider distribution of…

  8. Family Background of Beginning Education Students: Implications for Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Roger A.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education has not historically focused on the social and emotional development of teachers even though there is evidence that such variables influence student success (Jennings & Greenberg, 2009). We believe such a focus is important and we explored variables in teacher education students' families of origin that underpin social and…

  9. Family Background of Beginning Education Students: Implications for Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Roger A.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education has not historically focused on the social and emotional development of teachers even though there is evidence that such variables influence student success (Jennings & Greenberg, 2009). We believe such a focus is important and we explored variables in teacher education students' families of origin that underpin social and…

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology: update on emerging cytokine and cytokine-associated cell targets.

    PubMed

    Furst, Daniel E; Emery, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Biologic therapies that target pathogenic cytokines such as TNF, IL-1β or IL-6 have greatly improved the treatment of RA. Unfortunately, not all RA patients respond to current biologic therapies and responses are not always maintained, suggesting that there are alternative drivers of RA pathogenesis that might serve as promising therapeutic targets. Discovery of the new Th17 subset of Th cells, and their role in autoimmune disease development, has implicated the proinflammatory IL-12 and IL-17 families of cytokines in RA disease pathogenesis. Members of these cytokine families are elevated in the blood and joints of RA patients and have been shown to remain elevated in patients who do not respond to current biologics. In addition, these cytokines have been shown to play roles in joint destruction and erosion. A new subclass of biologics that target the IL-12 and/or IL-17 signalling pathways are under development. Here we review evidence for a role of Th17 cells as well as IL-12 and IL-17 cytokines in RA pathogenesis as the rationale for a subsequent discussion of the ongoing and completed clinical trials of newly emerging biologic therapies directed at IL-12 or IL-17 pathway inhibition.

  11. A new mechanism for growth hormone receptor activation of JAK2, and implications for related cytokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Michael J; Brooks, Andrew J; Chhabra, Yash

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor was the first cytokine receptor to be cloned and crystallized, and provides a valuable exemplar for activation of its cognate kinase, JAK2. We review progress in understanding its activation mechanism, in particular the molecular movements made by this constitutively dimerized receptor in response to ligand binding, and how these lead to a separation of JAK-binding Box1 motifs. Such a separation leads to removal of the pseudokinase inhibitory domain from the kinase domain of a partner JAK2 bound to the receptor, and vice versa, leading to apposition of the kinase domains and transactivation. This may be a general mechanism for class I cytokine receptor action. PMID:25101218

  12. Two cytosolic protein families implicated in lipid-binding: main structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Schoentgen, F; Bucquoy, S; Seddiqi, N; Jollès, P

    1993-12-01

    1. According to the important biological role of fatty acids and phospholipids in cell membranes, two cytosolic proteins implicated in their binding and transport in brain were considered, namely: Fatty Acid-Binding Protein and basic 21 kDa protein. 2. They were reviewed as well as their related protein families. 3. Although the two protein groups do not present significant sequence homologies, they share several similar properties and might thus be implicated in common physiological functions.

  13. Cytokine production in nickel-sensitized individuals analysed with enzyme-linked immunospot assay: possible implication for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, E; Masjedi, K; Ahlborg, N; Lundeberg, L; Karlberg, A-T; Scheynius, A

    2002-09-01

    Patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis still have to undergo patch testing for a correct diagnosis. As this has several disadvantages there is a need for additional methods, preferentially those that can be performed in vitro. Objectives To investigate the possibility of diagnosing contact allergy to nickel (Ni2+) using the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay that allows the analysis of cytokines at a single-cell level in ex vivo activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Eleven female patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers participated in the study. All patients had a history of nickel allergy and a positive patch test reaction to NiSO4, while the controls' test was negative. PBMC were cultured in the presence or absence of NiCl2. Cell proliferation was measured with [3H]thymidine incorporation, and the number of cytokine-producing cells analysed with the ELISpot assay. The proliferative response of PBMC to Ni2+, expressed as stimulation index, was significantly higher in the nickel-allergic patients than in the control group. Using the ELISpot assay, we found that PBMC from nickel-allergic individuals responded to Ni2+ with significantly greater production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and interferon-gamma, but not IL-12, compared with the healthy controls. The number of IL-4- and IL-5-producing cells correlated with the number of IL-13-producing cells in the nickel-allergic patients, but Ni2+-induced PBMC proliferation did not correlate with the number of cytokine-producing cells for any of the cytokines tested. Our results indicate that the ELISpot assay could be a tool in the discrimination between nickel-allergic and non-allergic individuals.

  14. The future supply of family physicians: implications for rural America.

    PubMed

    Colwill, Jack M; Cultice, James M

    2003-01-01

    Throughout the past century rural health care has been dependent upon general practitioners (GPs) and their successors, family physicians (FPs). Only FPs and GPs have practiced in rural areas in proportion to the population, then and now. As specialization occurred, numbers of GPs declined and physician shortages developed in rural areas. The creation of family practice residencies in the 1970s halted this decline, but rural shortages persist today. During the 1990s the number of allopathic and osteopathic FP residency graduates rose 54 percent. At the same time, the percentage of women enrolled in these residencies increased to 46 percent, and women have been less likely than men to select rural practice. We project that if current numbers of graduates continue, the nonmetropolitan FP/GP-to-population ratio will increase 17 percent by the year 2020. However, today, medical students' interest in primary care residencies (including family practice) is declining precipitously. If numbers of FP graduates return to 1993 levels, the density of FPs in rural America and in the nation as a whole will decline after 2010.

  15. WASP Family Proteins: Their Evolution and Its Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Veltman, Douwe M.

    2010-01-01

    WASP family proteins control actin polymerization by activating the Arp2/3 complex. Several subfamilies exist, but their regulation and physiological roles are not well understood, nor is it even known if all subfamilies have been identified. Our extensive search reveals few novel WASP family proteins. The WASP, WASH, and SCAR/WAVE subfamilies are evolutionarily ancient, with WASH the most universally present, whereas WHAMM/JMY first appears in invertebrates. An unusual Dictyostelium WASP homologue that has lost the WH1 domain has retained its function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, demonstrating that WASPs can function with a remarkably diverse domain topology. The WASH and SCAR/WAVE regulatory complexes are much more rigidly maintained; their domain topology is highly conserved, and all subunits are present or lost together, showing that the complexes are ancient and functionally interdependent. Finally, each subfamily has a distinctive C motif, indicating that this motif plays a specific role in each subfamily's function, unlike the generic V and A motifs. Our analysis identifies which features are universally conserved, and thus essential, and which are branch-specific modifications. It also shows the WASP family is more widespread and diverse than currently appreciated and unexpectedly biases the physiological role of the Arp2/3 complex toward vesicle traffic. PMID:20573979

  16. Multi-Family Groups for Multi-Stressed Families: Initial Outcomes and Future Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of caregiver stress on attendance among urban families involved in a multiple family group (MFG) intervention, as well as pre/post changes in childhood behavioral difficulties, caregiver stress, caregiver depressive symptoms, caregiver coping by substance use, and caregiver motivation to change. Methods:…

  17. Multi-Family Groups for Multi-Stressed Families: Initial Outcomes and Future Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of caregiver stress on attendance among urban families involved in a multiple family group (MFG) intervention, as well as pre/post changes in childhood behavioral difficulties, caregiver stress, caregiver depressive symptoms, caregiver coping by substance use, and caregiver motivation to change. Methods:…

  18. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  19. Bipolar II disorder family history using the family history screen: findings and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2004-01-01

    Psychiatric family history of bipolar II disorder is understudied. The aims of the current study were to find the psychiatric family history of bipolar II patients using a new structured interview, the Family History Screen by Weissman et al (2000), and to find bipolar disorders family history predicting power for the diagnosis of bipolar II. One hundred sixty-four consecutive unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) and 241 consecutive bipolar II major depressive episode (MDE) outpatients were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). The Family History Screen was used. Sensitivity and specificity of predictors of the diagnosis of bipolar II (bipolar [type I and II] family history, bipolar II family history, atypical depression, depressive mixed state, many MDE recurrences, early onset) were studied. Bipolar II subjects had significantly more bipolar I, more bipolar II (50.7%), more MDE, and more social phobia in first-degree relatives than did unipolar subjects. Bipolar II subjects had many more first-degree relatives with bipolar II than with bipolar I. Among the predictors of the diagnosis of bipolar II, bipolar II family history had the highest specificity (82.8%), while early onset had the highest sensitivity. Discriminant analysis of predictor variables found that bipolar II family history and early onset were highly significant predictors. In conclusion, bipolar II family history was common in bipolar II patients, and it had high specificity for predicting bipolar II. If detected, it could reduce bipolar II misdiagnosis by inducing careful probing for a history of hypomania.

  20. Role of the Interleukin 10 Family of Cytokines in Patients With Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Associated With HIV Infection and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tadokera, Rebecca; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Meintjes, Graeme A.; Skolimowska, Keira H.; Matthews, Kerryn; Seldon, Ronnett; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Maartens, Gary; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background.  The interleukin 10 (IL-10) family comprises cytokines structurally related to IL-10 that share signaling receptors that have conserved signaling cascades. The immunopathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that a deficiency of IL-10 and its homologs may contribute to the immunopathology of IRIS in these patients. Methods. We performed a case-control analysis involving patients with HIV infection and tuberculosis who had IRIS at clinical presentation (tuberculosis-IRIS) and similar patients with HIV infection and tuberculosis who did not develop tuberculosis-IRIS (non-IRIS). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in the presence or absence of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 and 24 hours. Messenger RNA was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Cytokine concentrations in serum were also determined. Results. Cultures of PBMCs stimulated with M. tuberculosis for 24 hours yielded higher IL-10 and interleukin 22 (IL-22) transcript levels for tuberculosis-IRIS patients, compared with non-IRIS patients. Analysis of corresponding serum samples showed significantly higher concentrations of IL-10 and IL-22 in tuberculosis-IRIS patients, compared with non-IRIS patients. Conclusions. IL-10 and IL-22 were differentially induced in PBMCs from tuberculosis-IRIS patients after in vitro stimulation, and higher concentrations of their corresponding proteins were detected in serum (in vivo). The higher levels of IL-10 observed in this study may represent a compensatory antiinflammatory response during tuberculosis-IRIS. The elevated levels of IL-22 suggest an association between this cytokine and immunopathology during tuberculosis-IRIS. PMID:23303806

  1. Toll-like receptor and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression during prolonged hyperinsulinaemia in horses: implications for laminitis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, M A; Clement, C K; McGowan, C M; Sillence, M N; Pollitt, C C; Lacombe, V A

    2014-01-15

    Equine laminitis, a disease of the lamellar structure of the horse's hoof, can be incited by numerous factors that include inflammatory and metabolic aetiologies. However, the role of inflammation in hyperinsulinaemic laminitis has not been adequately defined. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation results in up-regulation of inflammatory pathways and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and may be a pathogenic factor in laminitis. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLR4 expression and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production is increased in lamellae and skeletal muscle during equine hyperinsulinaemia. Standardbred horses were treated with either a prolonged, euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (p-EHC) or a prolonged, glucose infusion (p-GI), which induced marked and moderate hyperinsulinaemia, respectively. Age-matched control horses were treated simultaneously with a balanced electrolyte solution. Treated horses developed clinical (p-EHC) or subclinical (p-GI) laminitis, whereas controls did not. Skeletal muscle and lamellar protein extracts were analysed by Western blotting for TLR4, IL-6, TNF-α and suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression. Lamellar protein expression of TLR4 and TNF-α, but not IL-6, was increased by the p-EHC, compared to control horses. A significant positive correlation was found between lamellar TLR4 and SOCS3. Skeletal muscle protein expression of TLR4 signalling parameters did not differ between control and p-EHC-treated horses. Similarly, the p-GI did not result in up-regulation of lamellar protein expression of any parameter. The results suggest that insulin-sensitive tissues may not accurately reflect lamellar pathology during hyperinsulinaemia. While TLR4 is present in the lamellae, its activation appears unlikely to contribute significantly to the developmental pathogenesis of hyperinsulinaemic laminitis. However

  2. Concerted action of Nrf2-ARE pathway, MRN complex, HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines - implication in modification of radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Anuranjani; Bala, Madhu

    2014-01-01

    Whole body exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiations (IRs) damages vital intracellular bio-molecules leading to multiple cellular and tissue injuries as well as pathophysiologies such as inflammation, immunosuppression etc. Nearly 70% of damage is caused indirectly by radiolysis of intracellular water leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals and producing a state of oxidative stress. The damage is also caused by direct ionization of biomolecules. The type of radiation injuries is dependent on the absorbed radiation dose. Sub-lethal IR dose produces more of DNA base damages, whereas higher doses produce more DNA single strand break (SSBs), and double strand breaks (DSBs). The Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important oxidative stress regulating pathway. The DNA DSBs repair regulated by MRN complex, immunomodulation and inflammation regulated by HMGB1 and various types of cytokines are some of the key pathways which interact with each other in a complex manner and modify the radiation response. Because the majority of radiation damage is via oxidative stress, it is essential to gain in depth understanding of the mechanisms of Nrf2-ARE pathway and understand its interactions with MRN complex, HMGB1 and cytokines to increase our understanding on the radiation responses. Such information is of tremendous help in development of medical radiation countermeasures, radioprotective drugs and therapeutics. Till date no approved and safe countermeasure is available for human use. This study reviews the Nrf2-ARE pathway and its crosstalk with MRN-complex, HMGB1 and cytokines (TNF-a, IL-6, IFN-? etc.). An attempt is also made to review the modification of some of these pathways in presence of selected antioxidant radioprotective compounds or herbal extracts.

  3. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  4. The Extended Granin Family: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Possenti, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Loh, Y. Peng

    2011-01-01

    The chromogranins (chromogranin A and chromogranin B), secretogranins (secretogranin II and secretogranin III), and additional related proteins (7B2, NESP55, proSAAS, and VGF) that together comprise the granin family subserve essential roles in the regulated secretory pathway that is responsible for controlled delivery of peptides, hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Here we review the structure and function of granins and granin-derived peptides and expansive new genetic evidence, including recent single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping, genomic sequence comparisons, and analysis of transgenic and knockout mice, which together support an important and evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in large dense-core vesicle biogenesis and regulated secretion. Recent data further indicate that their processed peptides function prominently in metabolic and glucose homeostasis, emotional behavior, pain pathways, and blood pressure modulation, suggesting future utility of granins and granin-derived peptides as novel disease biomarkers. PMID:21862681

  5. Family Violence and Migrant Women: Implications for Practice. Migrant Clinicians Network Clinical Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Rachel; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter supplement is devoted to the theme of domestic violence affecting migrant women. It contains four articles describing programs providing violence prevention education to migrant women and children. "Family Violence and Migrant Women: Implications for Practice" (Rachel Rodriguez) discusses the social isolation of migrant women;…

  6. Occupational Training Families. Their Implications for FE. An FEU Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ron

    This occasional paper appraises the implications of occupational training families (OTF) for further education (FE) in Great Britain. In the early sections, the document sketches the background of OTFs and appraises the advantages and disadvantages of the concept. In so doing, four possible approaches to helping young people acquire flexibility,…

  7. Cytokines and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines are integral mediators for maintaining intestinal mucosal homeostasis, as well as prominent effector molecules during chronic gut inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on recent studies of the role of specific cytokines in mucosal immunity. Dichotomous, or even opposing, functions have been described for several cytokines involved in intestinal innate immunity (most notably for members of the interleukin-1 family), which depend on the specific inflammatory conditions within the intestinal mucosa. For example, both interleukin-1α and interleukin-33 exhibit 'alarmin'-type properties that can signal tissue or cell damage, which further add to their well described proinflammatory roles. Costimulatory molecules of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, such as TNF-like cytokine 1A and LIGHT, are actively involved in mucosal proinflammatory pathways, but also may exert protection against infectious agents to facilitate recovery from acute inflammation. Finally, innate lymphoid cells are increasingly recognized as important cellular sources of pivotal mucosal cytokines, including the interleukin-23/T helper 17 cytokine, interleukin-22. Elucidating the complexity of cytokine signaling within the normal mucosa and during acute and chronic inflammation will be a pivotal step toward understanding the pathogenesis of immune-mediated gut diseases and developing effective therapies to treat them.

  8. mom identifies a receptor for the Drosophila JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway and encodes a protein distantly related to the mammalian cytokine receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Chen, Xiu; Oh, Su-Wan; Marinissen, Maria J.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hou, Steven X.

    2002-01-01

    The JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway controls numerous events in Drosophila melanogaster development. Receptors for the pathway have yet to be identified. Here we have identified a Drosophila gene that shows embryonic mutant phenotypes identical to those in the hopscotch (hop)/JAK kinase and marelle (mrl)/Stat92e mutations. We named this gene master of marelle (mom). Genetic analyses place mom's function between upd (the ligand) and hop. We further show that cultured cells transfected with the mom gene bind UPD and activate the HOP/STAT92E signal transduction pathway. mom encodes a protein distantly related to the mammalian cytokine receptor family. These data show that mom functions as a receptor of the Drosophila JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway. PMID:11825879

  9. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Jun; Kaneko, Fumio; Suzuki, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th) cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes. PMID:24490076

  10. Implications for families of advances in understanding the genetic basis of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Carrie L; Thomas, Rhys H; Rees, Mark I; Kerr, Mike P; Rapport, Frances

    2010-12-01

    Investigations into families with a large number of individuals with epilepsy have led to the discovery of epilepsy-causing (or epilepsy associated) gene mutations. These discoveries offer advantages and insights for the patient, family, healthcare professionals and biomedical scientists. Despite these benefits, there is little evidence about the impact of participation in genetic research for families with epilepsy. Here we report on the reflections of individuals who have participated in epilepsy genetic research through the Wales Epilepsy Research Network (WERN). Undergoing genetic investigation for inherited epilepsy has extensive emotive impact, both positive and negative, on individuals and families. Recognising these impacts is imperative to researchers working with families; having implications for study design, research consent and the provision of appropriate support.

  11. Geographical distribution of Slovenian BRCA1/2 families according to family origin: implications for genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Krajc, M; Zadnik, V; Novaković, S; Stegel, V; Teugels, E; Bešič, N; Hočevar, M; Vakselj, A; De Grève, J; Zgajnar, J

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the geographical distribution of highly recurrent mutations may be useful for efficient screening in cancer families. Since the cloning of the BRCA1/2 genes, it is known that the wide spectrum of deleterious mutations shows high ethnic and geographic heterogeneity. In this study, we have tested probands from 582 breast/ovarian cancer families and positioned all 156 BRCA1/2 families on the map according to the family origin. We observed that high-risk families with the same recurrent mutation present a typical geographical distribution and that different recurrent mutations may show different distribution patterns. We then evaluated the genetic screening implications of this heterogeneous prevalence of the most recurrent mutations found [300T>G(c.181T>G), 1806C>T(c.1687C>T), 969ins7(c.844_850dupTCATTAC), 5382insC(c.5266dupC), 235G>A(c.116G>A) in BRCA1 and IVS16-2A>G(c.7806-2A>G) in BRCA2]. On the basis of these results, specific testing procedures for new incident cases may be offered according to their family origins and, according to the information regarding clusters revealed in this study, the individuals (especially those at low risk), originating from regions with clusters, might be screened preferentially for cluster mutations and analysis may be simplified according to the family origin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Neighborhood and Family Intersections: Prospective Implications for Mexican American Adolescents’ Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Roosa, Mark W.; Zeiders, Katharine H.

    2012-01-01

    We present an integrated model for understanding Mexican American youth mental health within family, neighborhood, and cultural contexts. We combined two common perspectives on neighborhood effects to hypothesize that (a) parents’ perceptions of neighborhood risk would negatively impact their children’s mental health by disrupting key parenting and family processes, and (b) objective neighborhood risk would alter the effect parent and family processes had on youth mental health. We further incorporated a cultural perspective to hypothesize that an ethnic minority group’s culture-specific values may support parents to successfully confront neighborhood risk. We provided a conservative test of the integrated model by simultaneously examining three parenting and family process variables: maternal warmth, maternal harsh parenting, and family cohesion. The hypothesized model was estimated prospectively in a diverse, community-based sample of Mexican American adolescents and their mothers (N = 749) living in the Southwestern, U.S. Support for specific elements of the hypothesized model varied depending on the parenting or family process variable examined. For family cohesion results were consistent with the combined neighborhood perspectives. The effects of maternal warmth on youth mental health were altered by objective neighborhood risk. For harsh parenting results were somewhat consistent with the cultural perspective. The value of the integrated model for research on the impacts of family, neighborhood, and cultural contexts on youth mental health are discussed, as are implications for preventive interventions for Mexican American families and youth. PMID:22866932

  13. Medicaid, family spending, and the financial implications of crowd-out.

    PubMed

    Dillender, Marcus

    2017-05-01

    A primary purpose of health insurance is to protect families from medical expenditure risk. Despite this goal and despite the fact that research has found that Medicaid can crowd out private coverage, little is known about the effect of Medicaid on families' spending patterns. This paper implements a simulated instrumental variables strategy with data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey to estimate the effect of an additional family member becoming eligible for Medicaid on family-level health insurance coverage and spending. The results indicate that an additional family member becoming eligible for Medicaid increases the number of people in the family with Medicaid coverage by about 0.135-0.142 and decreases the likelihood that a family has any medical spending in a quarter by 2.7 percentage points. As previous research often finds with different data sets, I find evidence that Medicaid expansions crowd out some private coverage. Unlike most other data sets, the Consumer Expenditure Survey allows for considering the financial implications of crowd-out. The results indicate that families that transition from private coverage to Medicaid are able to spend significantly less on health insurance expenses, meaning Medicaid expansions can be welfare improving for families even when crowd-out occurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The family in Romania: cultural and economic context and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Adriana; Butiu, Otilia

    2012-04-01

    The study of family structures, functioning, roles and values is fundamental in family therapist's activities for better understanding the psychological, cultural and social specificity of different clients and interventions. In this paper we describe the Romanian family and the family therapies which are available in Romania. We illustrate basic needs using demographic data and research available from Romania. The nuclear family remains dominant instead of other alternatives, the age of marriage is earlier than in western European countries and celibate and consensual living are exceptions or only for the transitional period before marriage. The role of marriage and childbirth within the marital setting is still important. The model of a single child appears increasingly common due to an improvement in financial resources and better living conditions. Relations with family of origin remain close. The difficulties for children with parents working in different countries raise problems and have implications for the extended family, educators and psychotherapists as well as mental health service providers. Family therapists should keep in mind the structure, function, role and values of the Romanian family for better understanding the issues and resources and use these accordingly in therapy. Policy-makers should be aware of the difficulties concerning availability and access to this therapeutic approach.

  15. The Consequences of Witnessing Family Violence on Children and Implications for Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    Although a large number of children are directly abused, an even larger number may indirectly experience the effects of abuse as witnesses of family violence. However, the effects on children who witness such violence have long been unaddressed, although a growing body of research indicates that these children are affected in various domains,…

  16. Family System Dynamics, Identity Development, and Adolescent Alcohol Use: Implications for Family Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle, Suzanne E.; Sabatelli, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Tested whether low levels of family differentiation and identity are associated with increased alcohol abuse. Administered questionnaire to college students (N=133) aged 17-24 years. Found females with less well-differentiated, reciprocal mother-daughter relationships and poorer sense of identity had more drinking problems, while results for males…

  17. Familial Mediterranean fever and its implications for fertility and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mijatovic, Velja; Hompes, Peter G A; Wouters, Maurice G A J

    2003-06-10

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited disease of episodic fever in combination with severe abdominal pain, pleurisy, arthritis or erysipelas-like skin rashes. The disease is mainly prevalent in Sephardic Jews, Armenians, Turks and Arabs. The gene responsible for FMF was cloned in 1997. The gene expresses a protein called pyrin which is believed to play a role in the downregulation of mediators of inflammation. Several mutations have been identified of which the homozygous form of the M694V mutation is associated with a more severe expression of FMF. Prophylactic administration of colchicine is effective in relieving most patients from their attacks and preventing the development of amyloidosis, which usually leads to end-stage renal disease. Unfortunately, there is little awareness of the disease in gynaecological practice although a FMF full blown episode may mimic an acute abdominal calamity suggesting several possible gynaecological diagnoses. FMF is also associated with subfertility. In females, infertility was mainly related to oligomenorrhea although the causes remain unclear. In male FMF patients, progression of the disease may induce testicular impairment, consequently affecting spermatogenesis. Some controversy exists as to the adverse effects of colchicine on sperm production and function although the impression is that the occurrence of sperm pathology in FMF patients, using the recommended dosage of colchicine, is very low. In pregnant FMF patients, an increased occurrence of miscarriage has been found. However, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Although colchicine is a mitotic inhibitor and transplacental crossing of colchicine has been demonstrated, no increased risk of foetal abnormalities in colchicine-treated pregnant FMF patients has been found. Therefore, amniocentesis should not be done for reassurance alone.

  18. Effect of pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulation on human breast cancer: implications of chemokine receptor expression in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Silva, Ana Luisa Esparza; Pont, Gisela Du; Soldevila, Gloria; Meza, Isaura; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2009-10-08

    Interactions between tumour cells and microenvironments may affect their growth and metastasis formation. In search for a better understanding of the role of cellular mediators in the progression of cancer, we investigated the effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma on the regulation of expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4, CXCR2, CX3CR1, CCR9, and CCR5 in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Our results showed that IL-1 increased CXCR4 expression whereas TNF-alpha increased CX3CR1, CCR9 and CCR5. Interestingly, this regulation was not homogeneous, emphasizing the inherent heterogeneity in cancer that may be responsive to specific inflammatory microenvironments.

  19. A cytotoxic anti-IL-3Rα antibody targets key cells and cytokines implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Shereen; Huynh, Huy; Tai, Tsin Yee; Ng, Milica; Monaghan, Katherine; Biondo, Mark; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Nash, Andrew D.; Wicks, Ian P.; Wilson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the major target of biologic therapeutics in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been the B cell, which produces pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, targeting type I IFN, which is elaborated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in response to endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation by SLE immune complexes, has shown promising results. pDCs express high levels of the IL-3Rα chain (CD123), suggesting an alternative potential targeting strategy. We have developed an anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody, CSL362, and show here that it affects key cell types and cytokines that contribute to SLE. CSL362 potently depletes pDCs via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, markedly reducing TLR7, TLR9, and SLE serum-induced IFN-α production and IFN-α-upregulated gene expression. The antibody also inhibits TLR7- and TLR9-induced plasmablast expansion by reducing IFN-α and IL-6 production. These effects are more pronounced than with IFN-α blockade alone, possibly because pDC depletion reduces production of other IFN subtypes, such as type III, as well as non-IFN proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. In addition, CSL362 depletes basophils and inhibits IL-3 signaling. These effects were confirmed in cells derived from a heterogeneous population of SLE donors, various IFN-dependent autoimmune diseases, and healthy controls. We also demonstrate in vivo activity of CSL362 following its s.c. administration to cynomolgus monkeys. This spectrum of effects provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic evaluation of CSL362 in SLE. PMID:27699260

  20. Differential implication of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the development of cephalic versus extracephalic neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Latrémolière, Alban; Mauborgne, Annie; Masson, Justine; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Kayser, Valérie; Hamon, Michel; Pohl, Michel

    2008-08-20

    Responses resulting from injury to the trigeminal nerve exhibit differences compared with those caused by lesion of other peripheral nerves. With the aim of elucidating the physiopathological mechanisms underlying cephalic versus extracephalic neuropathic pain, we determined the time course expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1beta, neuronal injury (ATF3), macrophage/microglial (OX-42), and satellite cells/astrocyte (GFAP) markers in central and ganglion tissues in rats that underwent unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) to either infraorbital nerve (IoN) (cephalic area) or sciatic nerve (SN) (extracephalic area). Whereas CCI induced microglial activation in both models, we observed a concomitant upregulation of IL-6 and ATF3 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of the lumbar cord in SN-CCI rats but not in the ipsilateral spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve (Sp5c) in IoN-CCI rats. Preemptive treatment with minocycline (daily administration of 20 mg/kg, i.p., for 2 weeks) partially prevented pain behavior and microglial activation in SN-CCI rats but was ineffective in IoN-CCI rats. We show that IL-6 can upregulate OX-42 and ATF3 expression in cultured microglia and neurons from spinal cord, respectively, as well as in the dorsal horn after acute intrathecal administration of the cytokine. We propose that IL-6 could be one of the promoters of the signaling cascade leading to abnormal pain behavior in SN-CCI but not IoN-CCI rats. Our data further support the idea that different pathophysiological mechanisms contribute to the development of cephalic versus extracephalic neuropathic pain.

  1. Baker's yeast β-glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K C; Breslin, W L; Davidson, T; Adams, A; McFarlin, B K

    2013-02-14

    Strenuous aerobic exercise is known to weaken the immune system, and while many nutritional supplements have been proposed to boost post-exercise immunity, few are known to be effective. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether 10 d of supplementation with a defined source of baker's yeast β-glucan (BG, Wellmune WGP®) could minimise post-exercise immunosuppression. Recreationally active men and women (n 60) completed two 10 d trial conditions using a cross-over design with a 7 d washout period: placebo (rice flour) and baker's yeast BG (250 mg/d of β-1,3/1,6-glucans derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) before a bout of cycling (49 ± 6 min) in a hot (38 ± 2°C), humid (45 ± 2 % relative humidity) environment. Blood was collected at baseline (before supplement), pre- (PRE), post- (POST) and 2 h (2H) post-exercise. Total and subset monocyte concentration was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production were measured using separate multiplex assays. Total (CD14⁺) and pro-inflammatory monocyte concentrations (CD14⁺/CD16⁺) were significantly greater at POST and 2H (P<0·05) with BG supplementation. BG supplementation boosted LPS-stimulated production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) at PRE and POST (P<0·05). Plasma IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ concentrations were greater at 2H following BG supplementation. It appears that 10 d of supplementation with BG increased the potential of blood leucocytes for the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ. The key findings of the present study demonstrate that BG may have potential to alter immunity following a strenuous exercise session.

  2. Cytokines and anti-cytokines as therapeutics--an update.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Vandana; Kalra, Bhupinder Singh

    2008-01-28

    Cytokines which comprise of a family of proteins--interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, and chemokines, are important components of the immune system. They act in concert with specific cytokine inhibitors and soluble cytokine receptors to regulate the human immune response. Their physiologic role in inflammation and pathologic role in systemic inflammatory states are now well recognized. An imbalance in cytokine production or cytokine receptor expression and/or dysregulation of a cytokine process contributes to various pathological disorders. Research is progressing rapidly in the area of cytokines and their therapeutic targets, the two major therapeutic modalities being the administration of purified recombinant cytokines and the use of their antagonists in various inflammatory disorders. However, given the large number of cytokines, it is disappointing that only relatively few can be used clinically. In the present article, we have made an attempt to review and present a glimpse of the history as well as up to date information that is pertinent to cytokines and anti-cytokine therapies in the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders and various other related diseases.

  3. Cytokines and Blastocyst Hatching.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Polani B; Vani, Venkatappa; Madhulika, Pathak

    2016-03-01

    Blastocyst implantation into the uterine endometrium establishes early pregnancy. This event is regulated by blastocyst- and/or endometrium-derived molecular factors which include hormones, growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines and proteases. Their coordinated expression and function are critical for a viable pregnancy. A rate-limiting event that immediately precedes implantation is the hatching of blastocyst. Ironically, blastocyst hatching is tacitly linked to peri-implantation events, although it is a distinct developmental phenomenon. The exact molecular network regulating hatching is still unclear. A number of implantation-associated molecular factors are expressed in the pre-implanting blastocyst. Among others, cytokines, expressed by peri-implantation blastocysts, are thought to be important for hatching, making blastocysts implantation competent. Pro-inflammatory (IL-6, LIF, GM-CSF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-11, CSF-1) cytokines improve hatching rates; they modulate proteases (MMPs, tPAs, cathepsins and ISP1). However, functional involvement of cytokines and their specific mediation of hatching-associated proteases are unclear. There is a need to understand mechanistic roles of cytokines and proteases in blastocyst hatching. This review will assess the available knowledge on blastocyst-derived pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and their role in potentially regulating blastocyst hatching. They have implications in our understanding of early embryonic loss and infertility in mammals, including humans.

  4. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  5. Family-Centered Preventive Intervention for Military Families: Implications for Implementation Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    school-based, trauma-focused, cognitive-behavioral therapy program developed in post- war Bosnia for children and parents exposed to trauma and loss in... war zones and other violent community settings (Layne et al. 2001). FOCUS incorpo- rated from this intervention core elements of trauma- Prev Sci...et al. 2007) after piloting with USMC families at Camp Pendleton, California during the early years of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars (Saltzman et al

  6. Differential regulation of Krüppel-like factor family transcription factor expression in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: Effects of endothelin-1, oxidative stress and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Cullingford, Timothy E.; Butler, Matthew J.; Marshall, Andrew K.; Tham, El Li; Sugden, Peter H.; Clerk, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like transcription factors (Klfs) modulate fundamental cell processes. Cardiac myocytes are terminally-differentiated, but hypertrophy in response to stimuli such as endothelin-1. H2O2 or cytokines promote myocyte apoptosis. Microarray studies of neonatal rat myocytes identified several Klfs as endothelin-1-responsive genes. We used quantitative PCR for further analysis of Klf expression in neonatal rat myocytes. In response to endothelin-1, Klf2 mRNA expression was rapidly increased (∼ 9-fold; 15–30 min) with later increases in expression of Klf4 and Klf6 (∼ 5-fold; 30–60 min). All were regulated as immediate early genes (cycloheximide did not inhibit the increases in expression). Klf5 expression was increased at 1–2 h (∼ 13-fold) as a second phase response (cycloheximide inhibited the increase). These increases were transient and attenuated by U0126. H2O2 increased expression of Klf2, Klf4 and Klf6, but interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor α downregulated Klf2 expression with no effect on Klf4 or Klf6. Of the Klfs which repress transcription, endothelin-1 rapidly downregulated expression of Klf3, Klf11 and Klf15. The dynamic regulation of expression of multiple Klf family members in cardiac myocytes suggests that, as a family, they are actively involved in regulating phenotypic responses (hypertrophy and apoptosis) to extracellular stimuli. PMID:18406357

  7. Gene expression of subunits of the IL-12 family cytokines in moDCs derived in vitro from the cord blood of children of healthy and allergic mothers.

    PubMed

    Hrdý, J; Novotná, O; Kocourková, I; Prokešová, L

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of allergic diseases is steadily increasing an urgent need to clarify the immunologic processes which occur early in life and signal an increased risk of possible future allergy development. The ratio and maturation state of DCs together with the cytokine environment are important in directing and modulating immune responses. The maturation state (presence of CD83) of cord blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) of 52 children of healthy mothers and 58 children of allergic mothers was estimated by flow cytometry. The capacity of moDCs to express genes for subunits of IL-12 family cytokines was monitored using real-time PCR and protein secretion in cell culture supernatants by ELISA. The percentage of CD83+ moDCs was significantly higher in the allergic group after LPS stimulation (43.11 ± 4.41) in comparison to the healthy group (24.85 ± 3.37). Significantly higher gene expression of subunits of IL-12 family members was observed in moDCs of children of allergic mothers, in comparison with children of healthy mothers. The differences were evident mainly after LPS stimulation of moDCs (healthy group: p19: 3.05 ± 1.24; p28: 14.8 ± 6.8; p35: 1.8 ± 0.6; p40: 8.0 ± 3.5; EBI3: 3.0 ± 1.2; allergic group: p19: 6.1 ± 2.7; p28: 61.4 ± 22.2; p35: 14.9 ± 6.5; p40: 36.4 ± 18.8; EBI3: 11.3 ± 3.2), with the exception of p28, whose expression was significantly higher in the allergic group even without stimulation (healthy group: 0.28 ± 0.12, allergic group: 0.87 ± 0.62). No significant difference between the healthy and allergic groups was found at the protein level. The observation of both increased presence of cell surface activation marker on moDCs and higher IL-12 family gene expression in LPS-stimulated moDCs of children of allergic mothers indicates a higher reactivity of these cells.

  8. Theory in Highly Cited Studies of Sexual Minority Parent Families: Variations and Implications.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rachel H; Tasker, Fiona; Goldberg, Abbie E

    2016-09-27

    This article includes a systematic review and citation analysis of the literature regarding sexual minority parent families, particularly attending to what theories have been used, and how. We consider the importance of theoretical frameworks for future research and implications for policy, practice, and law related to sexual minority parent families. Our review targets 30 highly cited studies located through Google Scholar (as an interdisciplinary search engine) and published within a specific timeframe (2005-2010). We highlight the dominant theoretical models employed across disciplines studying sexual minority parent families. Although the majority of studies reviewed referred to theoretical models or perspectives, explicit theoretical grounding was frequently lacking. Instead, the empirical work reviewed appeared to have a predominantly applied focus in addressing public debates on sexual minority parent families. We provide recommendations for how theory might be more fully integrated into the social science literature on sexual minority parents and their children.

  9. Ethical and practical implications of the human genome initiative for family medicine.

    PubMed

    McCrary, S V; Allen, B; Moseley, R; Crandall, L A; Ostrer, H; Curry, R W; Dewar, M A; Nye, D

    1993-11-01

    Major advances in predictive genetic testing resulting from the Human Genome Initiative could change significantly the routine practice of family medicine. Family physicians should be aware that increased genetic information may affect patients' abilities to acquire and maintain insurance and employment and that interested parties will have incentives to seek this information. The social consequences of genetic information, as well as increased health promotion efforts, may raise problems of informed consent and confidentiality. In addition to their ethical implications, these developments will also affect the practice of family physicians in practical ways such as record keeping. We discuss cases that illustrate the potential impact of these emerging technologies on the practice of family medicine.

  10. Cytokines and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Watson, P F; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines play a crucial role in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) through various mechanisms. They are produced in the thyroid by intrathyroidal inflammatory cells, in particular lymphocytes, as well as by the thyroid follicular cells (TFC) themselves and may thus act in a cascade to enhance the autoimmune process (Fig. 1). Cytokines upregulate the inflammatory reaction through stimulation of both T and B cells, resulting in antibody production and tissue injury. In addition, intrathyroidal cytokines induce immunological changes in TFC including enhancement of both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecule expression, and upregulation of adhesion and complement regulatory molecule expression. Cytokines can also modulate both growth and function of TFC and have a role in extrathyroidal complications of ATD, most importantly thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), where they induce fibroblast proliferation and enhance the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), resulting in proptosis and the other clinical features of the disease. In addition to these effects, exogenous administration of cytokines has been associated with impairment of thyroid function ranging from the appearance of autoantibodies alone to the development of frank thyroid dysfunction. Cytokines have also been implicated in subacute thyroiditis (SAT) and amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction, as well as in thyroid function abnormalities occurring in patients with non-thyroidal illnesses (NTI). Genetic variations in cytokine genes represent potential risk factors for ATD, and disease associations have been described for polymorphisms in IL-1ra and TNF beta genes. Recent experimental evidence suggests the possibility of novel cytokine-based therapeutic approaches for ATD and its complications, in particular TAO.

  11. N-Palmitoylethanolamine Prevents the Run-down of Amplitudes in Cortical Spreading Depression Possibly Implicating Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Frank; Koulen, Peter; Kaja, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a wave of neuronal depolarization in the cerebral cortex following traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia, significantly aggravates brain damage. Here, we tested whether N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), a substance that effectively reduces lesion volumes and neurological deficits after ischemic stroke, influences CSD. CSD was elicited chemically in adult rats and occurrence, amplitude, duration and propagation velocity of CSD was determined prior to and for 6 hours after intraperitoneal injection of PEA. The chosen systemic administration of PEA stabilized the amplitude of CSD for at least four hours and prevented the run-down of amplitudes that is typically observed and was also seen in untreated controls. The propagation velocity of the CSD waves was unaltered indicating stable neuronal excitability. The stabilization of CSD amplitudes by PEA indicates that inhibition or prevention of CSD does not underlie PEA’s profound neuroprotective effect. Rather, PEA likely inhibits proinflammatory cytokine release thereby preventing the run-down of CSD amplitudes. This contribution of PEA to the maintenance of neuronal excitability in healthy tissue during CSD potentially adds to neuroprotection outside a damaged area, while other mechanisms control PEA-mediated neuroprotection in damaged tissue resulting from traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia. PMID:27004851

  12. In vivo imaging visualizes discoid platelet aggregations without endothelium disruption and implicates contribution of inflammatory cytokine and integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Ichiro; Nagasaki, Mika; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Takayama, Naoya; Ooehara, Jun; Otsu, Makoto; Kamiya, Akihide; Petrich, Brian G.; Urano, Tetsumei; Kadono, Takafumi; Sato, Shinichi; Aiba, Atsu; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Sugiura, Seiryo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Nagai, Ryozo

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which thrombotic vessel occlusion occurs independently of plaque development or endothelial cell (EC) disruption remains unclear, largely because of an inability to visualize the formation of thrombus, especially at the single-platelet level in real time. Here we demonstrate that rapidly developing thrombi composed of discoid platelets can be induced in the mesenteric capillaries, arterioles, and large-sized arteries of living mice, enabling characterization of the kinetics of thrombosis initiation and the multicellular interrelationships during thrombus development. Platelet aggregation without EC disruption was triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) photochemically induced by moderate power laser irradiation. The inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1 could be key components of the EC response, acting through regulation of VWF mobilization to the cell surface. Thrombus formation was then initiated by the binding of platelet GPIbα to endothelial VWF in our model, and this effect was inhibited by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Actin linker talin-dependent activation of alphaIIb-beta3 integrin or Rac1 in platelets was required for late-phase thrombus stability. Our novel imaging technology illustrates the molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-based thrombus formation by discoid platelets on undisrupted ECs and suggests control of ROS could be a useful therapeutic target for the prevention of thrombotic diseases. PMID:22096246

  13. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents on behavioural changes and cytokine production following systemic inflammation: Implications for a role of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Cunningham, C; Newman, T A; Perry, V H

    2010-03-01

    Systemic inflammation gives rise to metabolic and behavioural changes, largely mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin production (PGE(2)) at the blood-brain barrier. Despite numerous studies, the exact biological pathways that give rise to these changes remains elusive. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying immune-to-brain communication following systemic inflammation using various anti-inflammatory agents. Mice were pre-treated with selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors, thromboxane synthase inhibitors or dexamethasone, followed by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Changes in body temperature, open-field activity, and burrowing were assessed and mRNA and/or protein levels of inflammatory mediators measured in serum and brain. LPS-induced systemic inflammation resulted in behavioural changes and increased production of IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, as well as PGE(2) in serum and brain. Indomethacin and ibuprofen reversed the effect of LPS on behaviour without changing peripheral or central IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA levels. In contrast, dexamethasone did not alter LPS-induced behavioural changes, despite complete inhibition of cytokine production. A selective COX-1 inhibitor, piroxicam, but not the selective COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, reversed the LPS-induced behavioural changes without affecting IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha protein expression levels in the periphery or mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the acute LPS-induced changes in burrowing and open-field activity depend on COX-1. We further show that COX-1 is not responsible for the induction of brain IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha synthesis or LPS-induced hypothermia. Our results may have implications for novel therapeutic strategies to treat or prevent neurological diseases with an inflammatory component. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ghrelin induces leptin resistance by activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression in male rats: implications in satiety regulation.

    PubMed

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung

    2014-10-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) -bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior.

  15. Ghrelin Induces Leptin Resistance by Activation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 Expression in Male Rats: Implications in Satiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il

    2014-01-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) –bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior. PMID:25060362

  16. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  17. Neuropsychiatric aspects of cytokines research: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malek-Ahmadi, P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a group of proteins primarily synthesized by various immune cells. They have multiple functions within the immune system and have been implicated in a number of disease states. There is growing evidence that some cytokines are also synthesized in the central nervous system. Taking into consideration that some cytokines are also capable of inducing behavioral effects, it has been suggested that cytokines may play a role in some psychiatric and neurologic disorders.

  18. Template-based docking of a prolactin receptor proline-rich motif octapeptide to FKBP12: implications for cytokine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Soman, K V; Hanks, B A; Tien, H; Chari, M V; O'Neal, K D; Morrisett, J D

    1997-05-01

    A conserved proline-rich motif (PRM) in the cytoplasmic domain of cytokine receptors has been suggested to be a signaling switch regulated by the action of the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidylprolyl isomerases (O'Neal KD, Yu-Lee LY, Shearer WT, 1995, Ann NY Acad Sci 766:282-284). We have docked the prolactin receptor PRM (Ile1-Phe2-Pro3-Pro4-Val5-Pro6-Gly7-Pro8) to the ligand binding site of FKBP12. The procedure involved conformational search restricted by NMR restraints (O'Neal KD et al., 1996, Biochem J 315:833-844), energy minimization of the octapeptide conformers so obtained, template-based docking of a selected conformer to FKBP12, and energy refinement of the resulting complex. The template used was the crystal structure of a cyclic FK506-peptide hybrid bound to FKBP12. Val5-Pro6 of the PRM was taken to be the biologically relevant Xaa-Pro bond. The docked conformer is stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds, N7H7-->O4 and N2H2-->O8, and two intermolecular ones, Ile56; N-H-->O = C:Pro6 and Tyr82:O-H-->O = C:Gly7. This conformer features a Type I beta-turn and has extensive hydrophobic contacts with the FKBP12 binding surface. The observed interactions support the hypothesis that FKBP12 catalyzes cis-trans isomerization in the PRM when it is part of the longer cytoplasmic domain of a cytokine receptor, and suggest a significant role for the PRM in signal transduction.

  19. The Implications of Grandparent Coresidence for Economic Hardship among Children in Mother-Only Families.

    PubMed

    Mutchler, Jan E; Baker, Lindsey A

    2009-11-01

    Estimates suggest that more than 6 million children live with at least one grandparent. Despite evidence establishing the growing prevalence of this arrangement, limited research has focused on estimating the implications of co-residence for the economic well-being of grandchildren. Using data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper examines levels of financial hardship among a particularly vulnerable group of children - those living in mother-only families. Findings suggest that children living in mother-only families that include a grandparent are substantially less likely to be living below or near the poverty level, compared to children living in mother-only families without a grandparent present. The financial security of children in these three-generation households is enhanced through significant economic contributions of the grandparents, and from household receipt of a wide range of financial resources, including means-tested cash transfers and other income such as Social Security.

  20. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Maza, Paloma K.; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  1. Oncostatin M is a member of a cytokine family that includes leukemia-inhibitory factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T M; Bruce, A G

    1991-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a glycoprotein of Mr approximately 28,000 produced by activated monocyte and T-lymphocyte cell lines, was previously identified by its ability to inhibit the growth of cells from melanoma and other solid tumors. We have detected significant similarities in the primary amino acid sequences and predicted secondary structures of OSM, leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Analysis of the genes encoding these proteins revealed a shared exon organization, suggesting evolutionary descent from a common ancestral gene. Using a panel of DNAs from somatic cell hybrids, we have shown that OSM, like LIF, is located on human chromosome 22. We have also demonstrated that OSM has the ability to inhibit the proliferation of murine M1 myeloid leukemic cells and can induce their differentiation into macrophage-like cells, a function shared by LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6. We propose that OSM, LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6 are structurally related members of a cytokine family that have in common the ability to modulate differentiation of a variety of cell types. Images PMID:1717982

  2. The Basic Biology of Redoxosomes in Cytokine-Mediated Signal Transduction and Implications for Disease-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Redox reactions have been established as major biological players in many cellular signaling pathways. Here we review mechanisms of redox signaling with an emphasis on redox-active signaling endosomes. Signals are transduced by relatively few reactive oxygen species (ROS), through very specific redox modifications of numerous proteins and enzymes. Although ROS signals are typically associated with cellular injury, these signaling pathways are also critical for maintaining cellular health at homeostasis. An important component of ROS signaling pertains to localization and tightly regulated signal transduction events within discrete microenvironments of the cell. One major aspect of this specificity is ROS compartmentalization within membrane-enclosed organelles such as redoxosomes (redox-active endosomes) and the nuclear envelope. Among the cellular proteins that produce superoxide are the NADPH oxidases (NOXes), transmembrane proteins that are implicated in many types of redox signaling. NOXes produce superoxide on only one side of a lipid bilayer; as such, their orientation dictates the compartmentalization of ROS and the local control of signaling events limited by ROS diffusion and/or movement through channels associated with the signaling membrane. NOX-dependent ROS signaling pathways can also be self-regulating, with molecular redox sensors that limit the local production of ROS required for effective signaling. ROS regulation of the Rac-GTPase, a required co-activator of many NOXes, is an example of this type of sensor. A deeper understanding of redox signaling pathways and the mechanisms that control their specificity will provide unique therapeutic opportunities for aging, cancer, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24555469

  3. Characterization of the Deleted in Autism 1 Protein Family: Implications for Studying Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation. PMID

  4. The role of family meals in the treatment of eating disorders: a scoping review of the literature and implications.

    PubMed

    Cook-Darzens, Solange

    2016-09-01

    Family meal research is a fast growing field that has significant implications for the prevention and treatment of eating disorders (ED). Using a scoping review procedure, this article overviewed major historical and clinical trends that have guided the use of family meals or lunch sessions in adolescent ED family therapy over the past 40 years, and synthesized essential findings from current therapeutic family meal research. The relevant body of literature is reported within the framework of three models of family therapy (Maudsley model, family-based treatment, multi-family therapy), with a focus on their specific use of family lunch sessions and related empirical evidence. Although promising, current evidence remains contradictory, tentative and colored by therapists' convictions, resistance and fears. Future research priorities are discussed, including the need for a more direct examination of the impact of the family meal practice on therapeutic change, as well as a better understanding of its active ingredients and of the characteristics of patients/families that may benefit most from it. This review of the literature may help clinicians and family therapists (1) adhere more reliably and confidently to ED-focused treatment protocols that include a strong family meal component, and (2) make more informed decisions regarding the inclusion or exclusion of family meals in their practice. When feasibility or acceptability issues preclude their use, alternatives to family meals are also discussed, including family meal role-plays and drawings, coaching of home-based family meals and manual/DVD-based guidance.

  5. Benefits and resource implications of family meetings for hospitalized palliative care patients: research protocol.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Peter L; Girgis, Afaf; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Philip, Jenny; Parker, Deborah; Currow, David; Liew, Danny; Thomas, Kristina; Le, Brian; Moran, Juli; Brand, Caroline

    2015-12-10

    Palliative care focuses on supporting patients diagnosed with advanced, incurable disease; it is 'family centered', with the patient and their family (the unit of care) being core to all its endeavours. However, approximately 30-50% of carers experience psychological distress which is typically under recognised and consequently not addressed. Family meetings (FM) are recommended as a means whereby health professionals, together with family carers and patients discuss psychosocial issues and plan care; however there is minimal empirical research to determine the net effect of these meetings and the resources required to implement them systematically. The aims of this study were to evaluate: (1) if family carers of hospitalised patients with advanced disease (referred to a specialist palliative care in-patient setting or palliative care consultancy service) who receive a FM report significantly lower psychological distress (primary outcome), fewer unmet needs, increased quality of life and feel more prepared for the caregiving role; (2) if patients who receive the FM experience appropriate quality of end-of-life care, as demonstrated by fewer hospital admissions, fewer emergency department presentations, fewer intensive care unit hours, less chemotherapy treatment (in last 30 days of life), and higher likelihood of death in the place of their choice and access to supportive care services; (3) the optimal time point to deliver FM and; (4) to determine the cost-benefit and resource implications of implementing FM meetings into routine practice. Cluster type trial design with two way randomization for aims 1-3 and health economic modeling and qualitative interviews with health for professionals for aim 4. The research will determine whether FMs have positive practical and psychological impacts on the family, impacts on health service usage, and financial benefits to the health care sector. This study will also provide clear guidance on appropriate timing in the disease

  6. Development of infants with disabilities and their families: implications for theory and service delivery.

    PubMed

    Shonkoff, J P; Hauser-Cram, P; Krauss, M W; Upshur, C C

    1992-01-01

    This Monograph presents the results of a nonexperimental, longitudinal investigation of developmental change in 190 infants and their families after 1 year of early intervention services. The Early Intervention Collaborative Study (EICS), conducted in association with 29 community-based programs in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, was designed to assess correlates of adaptation in young children with disabilities and their families over time, to inform social policy by analyzing the influences of family ecology and formal services on child and family outcomes, and to generate conceptual models to guide further investigation. The study sample (mean age at entry = 10.6 months) includes 54 children with Down syndrome, 77 with motor impairment, and 59 with developmental delays of uncertain etiology. Data were collected during two home visits (within 6 weeks of program entry and 12 months later) and included formal child assessments, observations of mother-child interaction, maternal interviews, and questionnaires completed independently by both parents as well as monthly service data collected from service providers. Child and family functioning varied considerably. Developmental change in the children (psychomotor abilities, adaptive behavior, spontaneous play, and child-mother interaction skills) was influenced to some extent by gestational age and health characteristics, but the strongest predictor of change was the relative severity of the child's psychomotor impairment at study entry. Families demonstrated generally positive and stable adaptation (in terms of the effect of rearing a child with disabilities on the family, parenting stress, and social support), despite persistent challenges with respect to mother-child interaction and differences in reported stress between mothers and fathers. Documentation of services revealed that early intervention is a complex and multidimensional experience that spans multiple public and private systems. Vulnerable and

  7. Black Families' Lay Views on Health and the Implications for Health Promotion: A Community-Based Study in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochieng, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Many studies focusing on beliefs about health and health promotion have paid little attention to the life experiences of Black and other visible minority ethnic families in western societies. This paper is a report of a study exploring Black families' beliefs about health and the implications of such beliefs for health promotion. Ten Black…

  8. Trajectories of Adolescent Hostile-Aggressive Behavior and Family Climate: Longitudinal Implications for Young Adult Romantic Relationship Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as…

  9. Black Families' Lay Views on Health and the Implications for Health Promotion: A Community-Based Study in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochieng, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Many studies focusing on beliefs about health and health promotion have paid little attention to the life experiences of Black and other visible minority ethnic families in western societies. This paper is a report of a study exploring Black families' beliefs about health and the implications of such beliefs for health promotion. Ten Black…

  10. Trajectories of Adolescent Hostile-Aggressive Behavior and Family Climate: Longitudinal Implications for Young Adult Romantic Relationship Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as…

  11. Do different funding mechanisms produce different results? The implications of family planning for fiscal federalism.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, D R; Meier, K J

    1998-06-01

    The 104th Congress considered massive structural changes in federal aid to the states. Not only would federal categorical grants be consolidated into block grants, but entitlement programs would be converted to block grants too. Using family planning as a case study, this article examines whether program impacts change if different grant mechanisms are employed. Findings from a pooled time series analysis of state family planning expenditures show that categorical funding (here, title X of the Public Health Service Act) is the most cost effective in producing desired outcomes, such as lowering infant mortality. Policies using entitlement grants are generally more cost effective than those that rely upon block grants. We discuss the implications of these findings for health policy more broadly and for fiscal federalism in general.

  12. Meal skipping children in low-income families and community practice implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Meesook; Hong, Soon Myoung

    2008-01-01

    We examined dietary habits, food intakes, health status, and school and community life of meal skipping children, and investigated factors predicting meal skipping of children. A sample was composed of 944 children in low-income families who were provided with public meal service. The sample was obtained from the Survey of Meal Service for Poor Children conducted by the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs in 2007. Meal skipping was significantly associated with a lower nutrition and health status, and poor school performance of children, as hypothesized. The school age of child, family structure, region, job of caretaker, concern about diet, and the child's visit to welfare center significantly predicted frequency of meal skipping. We suggested a few implications for community practice to reduce meal skipping of children. PMID:20126373

  13. Comparative genomic and proteomic anatomy of Mycobacterium ubiquitous Esx family proteins: implications in pathogenicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyan; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2014-04-01

    Secreted proteins are among the most important molecules involved in host-pathogen interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis (TB). M. tuberculosis encodes five types of VII secretion systems (ESX-1 to ESX-5) responsible for the exportation of many proteins. This system mediated substrates including members of the Esx family implicated in tuberculosis pathogenesis and survival within host cells. However, the distribution and evolution of this family remain elusive. To explore the evolution and distribution of Esx family proteins, we analyzed all available Mycobacteria genomes. Interestingly, amino mutations among M. tuberculosis esx family proteins may relate to their functions. We further analyzed the differences between pathogenic Mycobacteria, the attenuated Mycobacteria and non-pathogenic Mycobacteria. The stability, the globular domains and the phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues of M. tuberculosis esx proteins with their homologies among other Mycoabcteria were analyzed. Our comparative genomic and proteomic analysis found that the change of stability, gain or loss of globular domains and phosphorylation of serine/threonine might be responsible for the difference between the pathogenesis and virulence of the esx proteins and its homolog widespread among Mycobacteria and related species, which may provide clues for novel anti-tuberculosis drug targets.

  14. Cytokines and gastrointestinal disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Przemioslo, R T; Ciclitira, P J

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines mediate immune responses and are detectable in the normal gastrointestinal mucosa. It is unclear how cytokines are physiologically regulated but in inflammatory enteropathies their expression is often greatly increased and may account for the tissue damage observed. T-cells may be sub-divided according to the pattern of cytokines which they secrete. TH1 cytokine expression is increased in delayed type IV cell mediate immune responses whereas TH2 cytokines are raised in diseases in which humoral mechanisms are more important. Cytokines are secreted by macrophages in relatively greater amounts than from T-cells. They are non-specific products of inflammation and may account for the majority of tissue damage seen in mucosal disease. The pattern of cytokine secretion may determine the immunopathogenesis of an inflammatory disorder. The ultimate goal of cytokine research is the development of therapeutic measures based on a better understanding of their actions which may be achieved with a better understanding of the molecular immune-microenvironment in inflammatory enteropathies. Studies with transgenic mice and gene targeted mice have important implications to the understanding of the immune system and its role in intestinal diseases.

  15. Cytokines: sources, receptors and signalling.

    PubMed

    Barrett, K E

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines are a family of protein mediators that are important in transducing information between various cell types. These messengers are synthesized by a broad spectrum of cells. Cellular sources of cytokines include those cell types considered to play pivotal roles in the immune system as well as in inflammatory responses, including lymphocytes, monocytes and mast cells. Emerging data indicate that non-immune cells, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts, may also be important sources of certain cytokines. Cytokines fulfill a number of roles during immune and inflammatory reactions, and may display overlapping or redundant functions. In part, this redundancy may arise from the fact that cytokine receptors are not all unique entities, but may be divided into families. Many cytokine receptors have a subunit structure, with common subunits shared between receptors, and serving as affinity modifiers/signal transducers. Cytokines exert their effects on target cells by activating intracellular signalling mechanisms. In addition to 'classical' signal transduction path-ways, new data indicate that cytokines may also exemplify molecules that utilize novel signalling mechanisms, including the Jak-STAT pathways of transcriptional regulation and pathways involving the novel lipid second messenger, ceramide. In conclusion, molecular techniques have enabled the identification of many new cytokines, and the elucidation of their binding sites and mechanisms of action. This information has provided new insights into this complex area. Moreover, an understanding of the molecular basis of cytokine action and the pathways that lead to their acute and chronic effects may, in turn, facilitate interventions to prevent or modify their actions in disease states.

  16. TNF superfamily cytokines in the promotion of Th9 differentiation and immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Françoise; Siegel, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors and their corresponding cytokine ligands have been implicated in many aspects of the biology of immune functions. TNF receptors have key roles during various stages of T cell homeostasis. Many of them can co-stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Additionally, several TNF cytokines can regulate T cell differentiation, including promoting Th1, Th2, Th17, and more recently the newly described Th9 subset. Four TNF family cytokines have been identified as regulators for IL-9 production by T cells. OX40L, TL1A, and GITRL can promote Th9 formation but can also divert iTreg into Th9, while 4-1BBL seems to inhibit IL-9 production from iTreg and has not been studied for its ability to promote Th9 generation. Regulation of IL-9 production by TNF family cytokines has repercussions in vivo, including enhancement of anti-tumor immunity and immunopathology in allergic lung and ocular inflammation. Regulating T cell production of IL-9 through blockade or agonism of TNF family cytokine receptors may be a therapeutic strategy for autoimmune and allergic diseases and in tumor.

  17. Putting families in the center: family perspectives on decision making and ADHD and implications for ADHD care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Catherine C; Claudius, Milena; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Wong, John B; Leslie, Laurel K

    2012-11-01

    To examine components of family-centered care in families' stories about treatment decision making for their child with ADHD. Twenty-eight families participated in qualitative interviews that addressed families' perspectives on (a) the treatment decision-making process, (b) the cause and impact of their child's symptoms, and (c) treatment goals and preferences. The majority of families preferred to be primary or shared decision makers regarding treatment decisions. Families' perspectives on the cause of the child's symptoms varied and often were not consistent with a biomedical framework. Families described multiple areas of impairment on child, family relationships, and family functioning. Perspectives toward evidence-based treatments were mixed, with families also expressing interest in and pursuing interventions not delineated in current treatment guidelines. These findings reinforce the importance of eliciting families' perspectives and involving these important stakeholders in shared decision making as critical components of family-centered care for children with ADHD.

  18. The majority legal status of women in southern Africa: implications for women and families.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, M P; Ngwenya, B N

    1996-01-01

    The introduction to this article, which provides an overview of the legal status of women in southern Africa, notes that the legal majority status of women is an important social policy issue with broad implications for the socioeconomic welfare of women and their families. The dual legal system (general law and customary law) which arose from colonization is a complicating factor in the legal life of women in the region. The colonial legal system legitimized the subordination of women, and during the colonial period the customary system was reinvented to the detriment of women by male African leaders working in collusion with colonial authorities. The next section of this article presents a brief description of the legal standing of women in terms of majority/minority status, marriage arrangements, and right to own immovable property in the states of Botswana, Lesotho, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The implications of the majority/minority status of women are then explored through consideration of the economic effects of majority rights, of family relationships, and of efforts to change the legal system (by changing the content and implementation of laws and by empowering women to take advantage of their rights). The barriers that impede women from asserting their rights point to the need for removal of broad-based economic, educational, and cultural constraints. Granting majority rights is an important step toward the goals of eliminating poverty and ending the marginalization of women.

  19. Cytokines and cytokine-specific therapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dhananjay; Brightling, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is increasing in prevalence worldwide. It is characterized by typical symptoms and variable airway obstruction punctuated with episodes of worsening symptoms known as exacerbations. Underlying this clinical expression of disease is airway inflammation and remodeling. Cytokines and their networks are implicated in the innate and adaptive immune responses driving airway inflammation in asthma and are modulated by host-environment interactions. Asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease, and the paradigm of Th2 cytokine-mediated eosinophilic inflammation as a consequence of allergic sensitization has been challenged and probably represents a subgroup of asthma. Indeed, as attention has switched to the importance of severe asthma, which represents the highest burden both to the patient and health care provider, there is an increasing recognition of inflammatory subphenotypes that are likely to be driven by different cytokine networks. Interestingly, these networks may be specific to aspects of clinical expression as well as inflammatory cell profiles and therefore present novel phenotype-specific therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the breadth of cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and focus upon the outcomes of early clinical trials conducted using cytokines or cytokine-blocking therapies.

  20. Genetic testing in familial isolated hyperparathyroidism: unexpected results and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J; Epstein, M; Sweet, A; Singh, D; Burgess, J; Stranks, S; Hill, P; Perry-Keene, D; Learoyd, D; Robinson, B; Birdsey, P; Mackenzie, E; Teh, B; Prins, J; Cardinal, J

    2004-01-01

    Familial hyperparathyroidism is not uncommon in clinical endocrine practice. It encompasses a spectrum of disorders including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 (MEN1) and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), and familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Distinguishing among the five syndromes is often difficult but has profound implications for the management of patient and family. The availability of specific genetic testing for four of the syndromes has improved diagnostic accuracy and simplified family monitoring in many cases but its current cost and limited accessibility require rationalisation of its use. No gene has yet been associated exclusively with FIHP. FIHP phenotypes have been associated with mutant MEN1 and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) genotypes and, very recently, with mutation in the newly identified HRPT2 gene. The relative proportions of these are not yet clear. We report results of MEN1, CASR, and HRPT2 genotyping of 22 unrelated subjects with FIHP phenotypes. We found 5 (23%) with MEN1 mutations, four (18%) with CASR mutations, and none with an HRPT2 mutation. All those with mutations had multiglandular hyperparathyroidism. Of the subjects with CASR mutations, none were of the typical FHH phenotype. These findings strongly favour a recommendation for MEN1 and CASR genotyping of patients with multiglandular FIHP, irrespective of urinary calcium excretion. However, it appears that HRPT2 genotyping should be reserved for cases in which other features of the HPT-JT phenotype have occurred in the kindred. Also apparent is the need for further investigation to identify additional genes associated with FIHP. PMID:14985373

  1. ESCAP holds meet on implications of population future for families, aged.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This news brief draws attention to the recent Expert Group Meeting in November 1996 in Bangkok of the ESCAP Population Division. The meeting focused on implications for future families and the elderly in Asia and was attended by 14 senior officials, resource persons, and study directors from 10 countries in the Asian and Pacific region. The ESCAP region is experiencing changes in population composition and distribution by age and sex and in family structure and functioning. There is a shift to an increasing number and proportion of elderly, elderly living in urban areas, and elderly living in nuclear families. China alone has 113 million elderly. The number of elderly is 13 million in Indonesia, about 6 million in Bangladesh, about 6 million in Pakistan, 4.5 million in Thailand, and 1.6 million in Sri Lanka. Elderly women generally outnumber elderly men and require economic support from others. Women face special problems in remaining active and healthy. This challenge will require assistance from families, communities, and government. Government will need to implement policies and programs to strengthen the role of the family and community in maintaining the elderly in independent and productive life styles that reduce dependency on government resources. The meeting provided detailed information about a regional study of support for the elderly that would include a household survey and analysis. The meeting resulted in the development of terms of reference for implementing operations research on the role and functions of nongovernmental groups that provide community-based services for the elderly. Participants adopted recommendations for incorporating elderly issues into national population and development plans and projects.

  2. Functional characterization of novel ABCB6 mutations and their clinical implications in familial pseudohyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta; Manna, Francesco; De Rosa, Gianluca; Gambale, Antonella; Zouwail, Soha; Detta, Nicola; Pardo, Catia Lo; Alper, Seth L.; Brugnara, Carlo; Sharma, Alok K.; De Franceschi, Lucia; Iolascon, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Isolated familial pseudohyperkalemia is a dominant red cell trait characterized by cold-induced ‘passive leak’ of red cell potassium ions into plasma. The causative gene of this condition is ABCB6, which encodes an erythrocyte membrane ABC transporter protein bearing the Langereis blood group antigen system. In this study analyzing three new families, we report the first functional characterization of ABCB6 mutants, including the homozygous mutation V454A, heterozygous mutation R276W, and compound heterozygous mutations R276W and R723Q (in trans). All these mutations are annotated in public databases, suggesting that familial pseudohyperkalemia could be common in the general population. Indeed, we identified variant R276W in one of 327 random blood donors (0.3%). Four weeks’ storage of heterozygous R276W blood cells resulted in massive loss of potassium compared to that from healthy control red blood cells. Moreover, measurement of cation flux demonstrated greater loss of potassium or rubidium ions from HEK-293 cells expressing ABCB6 mutants than from cells expressing wild-type ABCB6. The R276W/R723Q mutations elicited greater cellular potassium ion efflux than did the other mutants tested. In conclusion, ABCB6 missense mutations in red blood cells from subjects with familial pseudohyperkalemia show elevated potassium ion efflux. The prevalence of such individuals in the blood donor population is moderate. The fact that storage of blood from these subjects leads to significantly increased levels of potassium in the plasma could have serious clinical implications for neonates and infants receiving large-volume transfusions of whole blood. Genetic tests for familial pseudohyperkalemia could be added to blood donor pre-screening. Further study of ABCB6 function and trafficking could be informative for the study of other pathologies of red blood cell hydration. PMID:27151991

  3. Putting Families in the Center: Family Perspectives on Decision Making and ADHD and Implications for ADHD Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Catherine C.; Claudius, Milena; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Wong, John B.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine components of family-centered care in families' stories about treatment decision making for their child with ADHD. Method: Twenty-eight families participated in qualitative interviews that addressed families' perspectives on (a) the treatment decision-making process, (b) the cause and impact of their child's symptoms, and (c)…

  4. Putting Families in the Center: Family Perspectives on Decision Making and ADHD and Implications for ADHD Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Catherine C.; Claudius, Milena; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Wong, John B.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine components of family-centered care in families' stories about treatment decision making for their child with ADHD. Method: Twenty-eight families participated in qualitative interviews that addressed families' perspectives on (a) the treatment decision-making process, (b) the cause and impact of their child's symptoms, and (c)…

  5. Mnk Kinases in Cytokine Signaling and Regulation of Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinases Mnk1 and Mnk2 are activated downstream of the p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Extensive work over the years has shown that these kinases control phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and regulate engagement of other effector elements, including hnRNPA1 and PSF. Mnk kinases are ubiquitously expressed and play critical roles in signaling for various cytokine receptors, while there is emerging evidence that they have important functions as mediators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this review the mechanisms of activation of MNK pathways by cytokine receptors are addressed and their roles in diverse cytokine-dependent biological processes are reviewed. The clinical-translational implications of such work and the relevance of future development of specific MNK inhibitors for the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders are discussed. PMID:23710261

  6. Filial piety by contract? The emergence, implementation, and implications of the "family support agreement" in China.

    PubMed

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-02-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the mid-1980s. Since then, the FSA has been promoted and monitored by the government. By the end of 2005, FSAs had been signed by more than 13 million rural families across China and is now finding its way into cities. A voluntary contract between older parents and adult children concerning parental provisions, the FSA represents an innovation to help meet the challenge of providing elder support. Although the FSA's moral persuasion is based on filial piety, violations of the FSA are subject to penalties by law. As the first systematic and comprehensive exploratory study on the FSA, this article examines (a) the FSA's emergence, content, legal foundation, and implementation; (b) the role of the government and the legal system in promoting or monitoring FSAs; (c) the FSA's strengths, limitations, and challenges; (d) the FSA's implications in light of Chinese history, intergenerational contract, filial piety, and intergenerational relations; and (e) the future of the FSA as a social policy.

  7. Crystal structure of a cytokine-binding region of gp130.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, J; Staunton, D; Heath, J K; Jones, E Y

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the cytokine-binding homology region of the cell surface receptor gp130 has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.0 A resolution. The beta sandwich structure of the two domains conforms to the topology of the cytokine receptor superfamily. This first structure of an uncomplexed receptor exhibits a similar L-shaped quaternary structure to that of ligand-bound family members and suggests a limited flexibility in relative domain orientation of some 3 degrees. The putative ligand-binding loops are relatively rigid, with a phenylalanine side chain similarly positioned to exposed aromatic residues implicated in ligand binding for other such receptors. The positioning and structure of the N-terminal portion of the polypeptide chain have implications for the structure and function of cytokine receptors, such as gp130, which contain an additional N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. PMID:9501088

  8. War and disaster in Sri Lanka: Implications for widows' family adjustment and perception of self-efficacy in caring for one's family.

    PubMed

    Witting, Alyssa Banford; Lambert, Jessica; Wickrama, Thulitha

    2016-12-12

    The data for this study were collected in 2014 from widows in Eastern Sri Lanka whose spouses died in the civil war, tsunami, or from health-related problems. Conservation of resources (COR) theory was used as a lens to examine the extent to which war and tsunami-related damages and family problems predict variation in social support, family adjustment and a perception of self-efficacy in caring for one's family as reported by widowed women. We also investigated whether social support from the community and social support from family and friends mediated those relationships. Results of a path model fit to the data suggested variation in family adjustment to be negatively predicted by war-related family problems and positively predicted by the social support of friends and family. Additionally, a sense of self-efficacy in caring for one's family was found to be inversely predicted by war-related family problems and tsunami damages. Clinical, social and theoretical implications are discussed as well as directions for further research.

  9. Involvement of purinergic receptors and NOD-like receptor-family protein 3-inflammasome pathway in the adenosine triphosphate-induced cytokine release from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Fautrel, Alain; Robert, Sacha; Gleonnec, Florence; Guezingar, Marie; Couillin, Isabelle; Catros, Véronique; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been described as a danger signal activating the NOD-like receptor-family protein 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome leading to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β, release in the lung. The NLRP3-inflammasome pathway has been previously described to be involved in experimental collagen deposition and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and P2X7 purinergic receptor in the activation of human macrophages in vitro by ATP. We showed that adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt (ATPγS) and 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), two stable analogs of ATP, are able to potentiate the release of IL-1β from human monocyte-derived macrophages induced by low concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, in the same conditions no increase in IL-1α and IL-6 was observed. Immunochemistry has shown that human macrophages natively express NLRP3 and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7 R). NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA expression were induced from LPS-primed macrophages, but also after 5-h treatment of BzATP as analysed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, other inflammasome pathways (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRC4, NLRP6 and AIM2) and P2X7 R were not induced by BzATP. We observed that P2X7 R antagonists, A-438079 and A-740003, were able to reduce the release of IL-1β, but not of IL-1α and IL-6 from macrophages stimulated by ATPγS or BzATP. The present results showed the involvement of the P2X7 R-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in the secretion of IL-1β from ATP-stimulated human macrophages, and suggest that P2X7 R were not involved in IL-1α and IL-6 release. This study also points out that repression of the P2X7 R represents a novel potential therapeutic approach to control fibrosis in lung injury.

  10. Inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cerami, A

    1992-01-01

    The immune system produces cytokines and other humoral factors to protect the host when threatened by inflammatory agents, microbial invasion, or injury. In some cases this complex defense network successfully restores normal homeostasis, but at other times the overproduction of immunoregulatory mediators may actually prove deleterious to the host. Some examples of immune system-mediated injury have been extensively investigated including anaphylactic shock, autoimmune disease, and immune complex disorders. More recently it has become clear that the cytokine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) occupies a key role in the pathophysiology associated with diverse inflammatory states and other serious illnesses including septic shock and cachexia. For example, when cachectin/TNF is produced by resident macrophages during early microbial infection, it mediates an inflammatory response that may alienate and repel the attacking organisms. If the infection spreads, however, the subsequent release of large quantities of cachectin/TNF into the circulation may be catastrophic and trigger a state of lethal shock. These toxic effects occur by direct action of TNF on host cells and by the interaction with a cascade of other endogenous mediators including interleukin-1 and interferon-gamma. The biology of cachectin/TNF will be reviewed, along with the potential for modulating the effects of this pluripotent molecule in a variety of pathologic states.

  11. [Cytokines in bone diseases. What is cytokine?].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cytokines have an essential role for cell-cell communication. They can regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and function. Interaction of cell surface receptor with cytokines is necessary for control of physiological responses. Activation of cytokine receptors transduces specific signal in the receptor-expressing cells, resulting that cytokines can regulate specific cell population. Thus, cytokines contribute directly or indirectly to morphogenesis, host defense and immune response, play critical roles for homeostasis and development.

  12. Sirtuins: a family of proteins with implications for human performance and exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Zekine

    2011-01-01

    The sirtuin family of proteins consists of seven members in mammals (SirT1-T7). Sirtuins share NAD dependency for their enzymatic activity, but some show NAD-dependent deacetylase activity, others exhibit ADP ribosyltransferase activity or both. Sirtuins have gained considerable attention due to their impact as physiological targets for treating diseases associated with aging. Sirtuins interact with metabolic pathways and may serve as entry points for drugs. This review discusses the biology of sirtuins and their potential as mediators of caloric restriction and pharmacological targets. Reduced insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial dysfunction, and others are consequences of aging or secondary to physical inactivity. Moreover, understanding human energy metabolism through sirtuins may provide a novel approach to exercise physiology. Quercetin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid that has been widely investigated for its other health benefits, may act as an inducer of SirT1. The benefits of quercetin for exercise performance may have implications for athletes and extended to disease prevention.

  13. Mutational analysis of the PRYSPRY domain of pyrin and implications for familial mediterranean fever (FMF).

    PubMed

    Goulielmos, G N; Fragouli, E; Aksentijevich, I; Sidiropoulos, P; Boumpas, D T; Eliopoulos, E

    2006-07-14

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal, recessively inherited disease, characterized by recurrent fever and serositis that affects mainly patients of the Mediterranean basin. The gene responsible for FMF, named MEFV, was cloned and several missense mutations were found to be responsible for the disease. Based on a recent molecular analysis of MEFV gene mutations in 43 patients from Crete aiming to correlate specific genotypes and clinical manifestations of FMF, we were prompted to construct a three-dimensional model (3-D model) of the PRYSPRY domain of pyrin. The majority of the known MEFV mutations located on this domain have been classified, according to disease severity, and localized on this 3-D model. The functional consequences of these mutations and their implications on disease severity are discussed. Moreover, we report a putative novel missense mutation, S702C, which we identified in exon 10 of the MEFV gene and localized on the constructed 3-D model.

  14. Transcription impairment and cell migration defects in elongator-depleted cells: implication for familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Close, Pierre; Hawkes, Nicola; Cornez, Isabelle; Creppe, Catherine; Lambert, Charles A; Rogister, Bernard; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Merville, Marie-Paule; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Bours, Vincent; Svejstrup, Jesper Q; Chariot, Alain

    2006-05-19

    Mutations in IKBKAP, encoding a subunit of Elongator, cause familial dysautonomia (FD), a severe neurodevelopmental disease with complex clinical characteristics. Elongator was previously linked not only with transcriptional elongation and histone acetylation but also with other cellular processes. Here, we used RNA interference (RNAi) and fibroblasts from FD patients to identify Elongator target genes and study the role of Elongator in transcription. Strikingly, whereas Elongator is recruited to both target and nontarget genes, only target genes display histone H3 hypoacetylation and progressively lower RNAPII density through the coding region in FD cells. Interestingly, several target genes encode proteins implicated in cell motility. Indeed, characterization of IKAP/hELP1 RNAi cells, FD fibroblasts, and neuronal cell-derived cells uncovered defects in this cellular function upon Elongator depletion. These results indicate that defects in Elongator function affect transcriptional elongation of several genes and that the ensuing cell motility deficiencies may underlie the neuropathology of FD patients.

  15. The genetic basis of familial adenomatous polyposis and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    PubMed Central

    Leoz, Maria Liz; Carballal, Sabela; Moreira, Leticia; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder that represents the most common gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome. Germline mutations in the APC gene were initially identified as responsible for FAP, and later, several studies have also implicated the MUTYH gene as responsible for this disease, usually referred to as MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). FAP and MAP are characterized by the early onset of multiple adenomatous colorectal polyps, a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and in some patients the development of extracolonic manifestations. The goal of colorectal management in these patients is to prevent CRC mortality through endoscopic and surgical approaches. Individuals with FAP and their relatives should receive appropriate genetic counseling and join surveillance programs when indicated. This review is focused on the description of the main clinical and genetic aspects of FAP associated with germline APC mutations and MAP. PMID:25931827

  16. Unmet Need for Family Planning: Implication for Under-five Mortality in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Odimegwu, Clifford; Imasiku, Eunice Ntwala; Ononokpono, Dorothy Ngozi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are gaps in evidence on whether unmet need for family planning has any implication for under-five mortality in Nigeria. This study utilized 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data to examine the effect of unmet need on under-five mortality. Cox regression analysis was performed on 28,647 children born by a nationally-representative sample of 18,028 women within the five years preceding the survey. Findings indicated elevated risks of under-five death for children whose mothers had unmet need for spacing [Hazard ratio (HR): 1.60, confidence interval (CI) 1.37-1.86, p<0.001] and children whose mothers had unmet need for limiting (HR: 1.78, CI 1.48-2.15, p<0.001) compared to children whose mothers had met need. These findings were consistent after adjusting for the effects of factors that could confound the association. Findings of this study underscore the need to address the present level of unmet need for family planning in Nigeria, if the country would achieve meaningful reduction in under-five mortality. PMID:25995735

  17. Whole exome sequencing in extended families with autism spectrum disorder implicates four candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nicola H; Nato, Alejandro Q; Bernier, Raphael; Ankenman, Katy; Sohi, Harkirat; Munson, Jeff; Patowary, Ashok; Archer, Marilyn; Blue, Elizabeth M; Webb, Sara Jane; Coon, Hilary; Raskind, Wendy H; Brkanac, Zoran; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, characterized by impairment in communication and social interactions, and by repetitive behaviors. ASDs are highly heritable, and estimates of the number of risk loci range from hundreds to >1000. We considered 7 extended families (size 12-47 individuals), each with ≥3 individuals affected by ASD. All individuals were genotyped with dense SNP panels. A small subset of each family was typed with whole exome sequence (WES). We used a 3-step approach for variant identification. First, we used family-specific parametric linkage analysis of the SNP data to identify regions of interest. Second, we filtered variants in these regions based on frequency and function, obtaining exactly 200 candidates. Third, we compared two approaches to narrowing this list further. We used information from the SNP data to impute exome variant dosages into those without WES. We regressed affected status on variant allele dosage, using pedigree-based kinship matrices to account for relationships. The p value for the test of the null hypothesis that variant allele dosage is unrelated to phenotype was used to indicate strength of evidence supporting the variant. A cutoff of p = 0.05 gave 28 variants. As an alternative third filter, we required Mendelian inheritance in those with WES, resulting in 70 variants. The imputation- and association-based approach was effective. We identified four strong candidate genes for ASD (SEZ6L, HISPPD1, FEZF1, SAMD11), all of which have been previously implicated in other studies, or have a strong biological argument for their relevance.

  18. Ankylosing spondylitis patients display altered dendritic cell and T cell populations that implicate pathogenic roles for the IL-23 cytokine axis and intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Pamela B.; McEntegart, Anne; McCarey, David; McInnes, Iain B.; Siebert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. AS is a systemic inflammatory disease of the SpA family. Polymorphisms at loci including HLA-B27, IL-23R and ERAP-1 directly implicate immune mechanisms in AS pathogenesis. Previously, in an SpA model, we identified HLA-B27–mediated effects on dendritic cells that promoted disease-associated Th17 cells. Here we extend these studies to AS patients using deep immunophenotyping of candidate pathogenic cell populations. The aim of our study was to functionally characterize the immune populations mediating AS pathology. Methods. Using 11-parameter flow cytometry, we characterized the phenotype and functions of lymphocyte and myeloid cells from peripheral blood, and the synovial phenotype of AS patients and age-matched healthy controls. Results. Significantly fewer circulating CD1c-expressing dendritic cells were observed in AS patients, offset by an increase in CD14− CD16+ mononuclear cells. Ex vivo functional analysis revealed that this latter population induced CCR6 expression and promoted secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 when co-cultured with naive CD4+ T cells. Additionally, systemic inflammation in AS patients significantly correlated with increased proportions of activated CCR9+ CD4+ T cells. Conclusion. CD14− CD16+ mononuclear cells may contribute to AS by promoting Th17 responses, and antigen-presenting cells of mucosal origin are likely to contribute to systemic inflammation in AS. PMID:26320138

  19. Trajectories of Adolescent Hostile-Aggressive Behavior and Family Climate: Longitudinal Implications for Young Adult Romantic Relationship Competence

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as key individual and family-level factors that may forecast later romantic relationship functioning. Guided by a family systems framework, we evaluated the reciprocal influences of adolescent hostility and family climate, to provide a more comprehensive picture of the etiology of romantic relationship functioning. We drew on a large sample (N = 974) of young adults (mean age = 19.5) that were followed starting in the fall of 6th Grade, and subsequently in spring of 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th grades prior to the young adult assessment. Using a Latent Difference Score cross-lag model (McArdle, 2009), our results indicated that a more positive family climate was associated with decreases in HAB, but HAB was not associated with changes in family climate. Further, the influence of the family climate on HAB was consistent across all time points. HAB and family climate had different predictions for young adult romantic relationships: increasing HAB over adolescence predicted relationship violence, while maintenance in family climate was a key predictor of relationship problem-solving skills. The only predictor of love and connection in relationships was early family functioning. Implications for developmental theory and prevention science are discussed. PMID:27337516

  20. Trajectories of adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior and family climate: Longitudinal implications for young adult romantic relationship competence.

    PubMed

    Fosco, Gregory M; Van Ryzin, Mark J; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as key individual and family level factors that may forecast later romantic relationship functioning. Guided by a family systems framework, we evaluated the reciprocal influences of adolescent hostility and family climate, to provide a more comprehensive picture of the etiology of romantic relationship functioning. We drew on a large sample (N = 974) of young adults (mean age = 19.5) that were followed starting in the fall of 6th grade, and subsequently in spring of 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th grades prior to the young adult assessment. Using a latent difference score cross-lag model (McArdle, 2009), our results indicated that a more positive family climate was associated with decreases in HAB, but HAB was not associated with changes in family climate. Further, the influence of the family climate on HAB was consistent across all time points. HAB and family climate had different predictions for young adult romantic relationships: Increasing HAB over adolescence predicted relationship violence, while maintenance in family climate was a key predictor of relationship problem-solving skills. The only predictor of love and connection in relationships was early family functioning. Implications for developmental theory and prevention science are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Identification of a gene for an ancient cytokine, interleukin 15-like, in mammals; interleukins 2 and 15 co-evolved with this third family member, all sharing binding motifs for IL-15Rα.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Johannes M; Takizawa, Fumio; Fischer, Uwe; Friedrich, Maik; Soto-Lampe, Veronica; Lefèvre, Christophe; Lenk, Matthias; Karger, Axel; Matsui, Taei; Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2014-02-01

    Interleukins 2 and 15 (IL-2 and IL-15) are highly differentiated but related cytokines with overlapping, yet also distinct functions, and established benefits for medical drug use. The present study identified a gene for an ancient third IL-2/15 family member in reptiles and mammals, interleukin 15-like (IL-15L), which hitherto was only reported in fish. IL-15L genes with intact open reading frames (ORFs) and evidence of transcription, and a recent past of purifying selection, were found for cattle, horse, sheep, pig and rabbit. In human and mouse the IL-15L ORF is incapacitated. Although deduced IL-15L proteins share only ~21 % overall amino acid identity with IL-15, they share many of the IL-15 residues important for binding to receptor chain IL-15Rα, and recombinant bovine IL-15L was shown to interact with IL-15Rα indeed. Comparison of sequence motifs indicates that capacity for binding IL-15Rα is an ancestral characteristic of the IL-2/15/15L family, in accordance with a recent study which showed that in fish both IL-2 and IL-15 can bind IL-15Rα. Evidence reveals that the species lineage leading to mammals started out with three similar cytokines IL-2, IL-15 and IL-15L, and that later in evolution (1) IL-2 and IL-2Rα receptor chain acquired a new and specific binding mode and (2) IL-15L was lost in several but not all groups of mammals. The present study forms an important step forward in understanding this potent family of cytokines, and may help to improve future strategies for their application in veterinarian and human medicine.

  2. Kinetics and functional implications of Th1 and Th2 cytokine production following activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    McHugh, S; Deighton, J; Rifkin, I; Ewan, P

    1996-06-01

    The importance of cytokine production in some disease processes is now widely recognized. To investigate temporal relationships between cytokines, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro using the T cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and various antigens chosen to induce predominantly Th1 (streptokinase: streptodornase or purified protein derivative) or Th2 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, bee or wasp venom: allergens in sensitive subjects) responses. Cytokine production was measured by sensitive bioassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Of the 30 subjects studied, 10 were normal and 20 individuals were allergic to either D. pteronyssinus (n = 10) or bee venom (n = 10) (examined before specific allergen immunotherapy). We examined the temporal profiles of a panel of cytokines produced in primary culture. In PHA-driven cultures, cytokines were found to be sequentially produced in the order interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-3, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-10, IL-6, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The response to allergen in allergic patients was predominantly Th2 in nature, with the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10, but little or no IFN-gamma. IL-2, IL-3, TNF-alpha and IL-12 were also produced in low amounts. The response of both atopic and normal subjects to recall bacterial antigens was predominantly Th1, with high levels of IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha. The relevance of the order, amount and speed of production, characteristic kinetics (production, consumption, homeostatic regulation) and the cell source of the cytokines are discussed.

  3. The effect of shiftwork related fatigue on the family life of train operators: implications for safety and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Holland, Dennis W

    2006-01-01

    Drawing upon an original research study about the effects of fatigue on train operators, the present article focuses upon family issues as having the most significant impact on the participants. Family support, for example, represents an important mechanism for managing and coping with fatigue. Family support comprises understanding of the physiological and emotional issues surrounding shiftwork and erratic work schedules. This article explores the impact of fatigue upon a variety of family and relational issues. This inquiry describes the impact of family on the broader employee view of managing fatigue that considers such comprehensive issues as perception of the work environment, emotional stability, personal control concerns and other positive attributes. These issues ultimately impact the health, productivity and performance of employees. Final discussion includes implications for workplace application of the research findings.

  4. Side effects of cytokines approved for therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines, currently known to be more than 130 in number, are small MW (<30 kDa) key signaling proteins that modulate cellular activities in immunity, infection, inflammation and malignancy. Key to understanding their function is recognition of their pleiotropism and often overlapping and functional redundancies. Classified here into 9 main families, most of the 20 approved cytokine preparations (18 different cytokines; 3 pegylated), all in recombinant human (rh) form, are grouped in the hematopoietic growth factor, interferon, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. In the hematopoietin family, approved cytokines are aldesleukin (rhIL-2), oprelvekin (rhIL-11), filgrastim and tbo-filgrastim (rhG-CSF), sargramostim (rhGM-CSF), metreleptin (rh-leptin) and the rh-erythropoietins, epoetin and darbepoietin alfa. Anakinra, a recombinant receptor antagonist for IL-1, is in the IL-1 family; recombinant interferons alfa-1, alfa-2, beta-1 and gamma-1 make up the interferon family; palifermin (rhKGF) and becaplermin (rhPDGF) are in the PDGF family; and rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 represent the TGFβ family. The main physicochemical features, FDA-approved indications, modes of action and side effects of these approved cytokines are presented. Underlying each adverse events profile is their pleiotropism, potency and capacity to release other cytokines producing cytokine 'cocktails'. Side effects, some serious, occur despite cytokines being endogenous proteins, and this therefore demands caution in attempts to introduce individual members into the clinic. This caution is reflected in the relatively small number of cytokines currently approved by regulatory agencies and by the fact that 14 of the FDA-approved preparations carry warnings, with 10 being black box warnings.

  5. Developing a Parent-Centered Obesity Prevention Program for 4-H Families: Implications for Extension Family Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benke, Carrie J.; Bailey, Sandra J.; Martz, Jill; Paul, Lynn; Lynch, Wesley; Eldridge, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Planning youth and family programming in the 21st century is daunting given family members' busy schedules. This is even more challenging when planning programs in rural areas, where there are vast distances between communities. This article discusses a research and educational outreach project that uses best practices in program development…

  6. Developing a Parent-Centered Obesity Prevention Program for 4-H Families: Implications for Extension Family Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benke, Carrie J.; Bailey, Sandra J.; Martz, Jill; Paul, Lynn; Lynch, Wesley; Eldridge, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Planning youth and family programming in the 21st century is daunting given family members' busy schedules. This is even more challenging when planning programs in rural areas, where there are vast distances between communities. This article discusses a research and educational outreach project that uses best practices in program development…

  7. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  8. Exome Sequence Data From Multigenerational Families Implicate AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Neurocognitive Impairment and Schizophrenia Risk.

    PubMed

    Kos, Mark Z; Carless, Melanie A; Peralta, Juan; Blackburn, August; Almeida, Marcio; Roalf, David; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Prasad, Konasale; Gur, Ruben C; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Curran, Joanne E; Duggirala, Ravi; Glahn, David C; Blangero, John; Gur, Raquel E; Almasy, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by impairments in behavior, thought, and neurocognitive performance. We searched for susceptibility loci at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) previously reported for abstraction and mental flexibility (ABF), a cognitive function often compromised in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives. Exome sequences were determined for 134 samples in 8 European American families from the original linkage study, including 25 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. At chromosome 5q32-35.3, we analyzed 407 protein-altering variants for association with ABF and schizophrenia status. For replication, significant, Bonferroni-corrected findings were tested against cognitive traits in Mexican American families (n = 959), as well as interrogated for schizophrenia risk using GWAS results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). From the gene SYNPO, rs6579797 (MAF = 0.032) shows significant associations with ABF (P = .015) and schizophrenia (P = .040), as well as jointly (P = .0027). In the Mexican American pedigrees, rs6579797 exhibits significant associations with IQ (P = .011), indicating more global effects on neurocognition. From the PGC results, other SYNPO variants were identified with near significant effects on schizophrenia risk, with a local linkage disequilibrium block displaying signatures of positive selection. A second missense variant within the QTL, rs17551608 (MAF = 0.19) in the gene WWC1, also displays a significant effect on schizophrenia in our exome sequences (P = .038). Remarkably, the protein products of SYNPO and WWC1 are interaction partners involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, a brain process implicated in synaptic plasticity. Our study reveals variants in these genes with significant effects on neurocognition and schizophrenia risk, identifying a potential pathogenic mechanism for schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  9. Exome Sequence Data From Multigenerational Families Implicate AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Neurocognitive Impairment and Schizophrenia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Mark Z.; Carless, Melanie A.; Peralta, Juan; Blackburn, August; Almeida, Marcio; Roalf, David; Pogue-Geile, Michael F.; Prasad, Konasale; Gur, Ruben C.; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Curran, Joanne E.; Duggirala, Ravi; Glahn, David C.; Blangero, John; Gur, Raquel E.; Almasy, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by impairments in behavior, thought, and neurocognitive performance. We searched for susceptibility loci at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) previously reported for abstraction and mental flexibility (ABF), a cognitive function often compromised in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives. Exome sequences were determined for 134 samples in 8 European American families from the original linkage study, including 25 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. At chromosome 5q32–35.3, we analyzed 407 protein-altering variants for association with ABF and schizophrenia status. For replication, significant, Bonferroni-corrected findings were tested against cognitive traits in Mexican American families (n = 959), as well as interrogated for schizophrenia risk using GWAS results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). From the gene SYNPO, rs6579797 (MAF = 0.032) shows significant associations with ABF (P = .015) and schizophrenia (P = .040), as well as jointly (P = .0027). In the Mexican American pedigrees, rs6579797 exhibits significant associations with IQ (P = .011), indicating more global effects on neurocognition. From the PGC results, other SYNPO variants were identified with near significant effects on schizophrenia risk, with a local linkage disequilibrium block displaying signatures of positive selection. A second missense variant within the QTL, rs17551608 (MAF = 0.19) in the gene WWC1, also displays a significant effect on schizophrenia in our exome sequences (P = .038). Remarkably, the protein products of SYNPO and WWC1 are interaction partners involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, a brain process implicated in synaptic plasticity. Our study reveals variants in these genes with significant effects on neurocognition and schizophrenia risk, identifying a potential pathogenic mechanism for schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:26405221

  10. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  11. Examining reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation: Implications for school success.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengya; Fosco, Gregory M; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    Guided by family systems and ecological theories, this study examined the multicontextual implications of family, school, and individual domains for adolescents' school success. The first goal of this study was to examine reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation (ASR) during the middle school years. The second goal was to test the relative impact of each of these domains on adolescents' school adjustment and academic achievement after the transition to high school. We applied a cross-lag structural equation modeling approach to longitudinal data from 979 students in the 6th grade and their families, followed over 5 measurement occasions, from 6th through 9th grade. Controlling for family income, parent education, and adolescent gender, the results revealed reciprocal relationships between the family climate and school attachment over time; both of these factors were related to increases in ASR over time. In turn, ASR was a robust predictor of academic success, with unique associations with school adjustment and academic achievement. Family climate and school adjustment had modest to marginal associations with school adjustment, and no association with academic achievement. Applications of these findings for family school interventions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Agents to reduce cytokine storm

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term “cytokine storm” in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock. PMID:28105327

  13. Agents to reduce cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term "cytokine storm" in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock.

  14. Maternal and child health and family planning service utilization in Guatemala: implications for service integration.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Eric E; Hotchkiss, David R; Rous, Jeffrey J; Berruti, Andrés A

    2005-07-01

    Does the utilization of modern maternal and child health (MCH) services influence subsequent contraceptive use? The answer to this question holds important implications for proposals which advocate MCH and family planning service integration. This study uses data from the 1995/6 Guatemalan Demographic Health Survey and its 1997 Providers Census to test the influence of MCH service utilization on individual contraceptive use decisions. We use a full-information maximum likelihood regression model to control for unobserved heterogeneity. This model produces estimates of the MCH effect, independent of individual women's underlying receptiveness to MCH and contraceptive messages. The results of the analysis indicate that the intensity of MCH service use is indeed positively associated with subsequent contraceptive use among Guatemalan women, even after controlling for observed and unobserved individual- , household- , and community-level factors. Importantly, this finding holds even after controlling for the unobserved factors that 'predispose' some women to use both types of services. Simulations reveal that, for these Guatemalan women, key determinants such as age and primary schooling work indirectly through MCH service use to increase contraceptive utilization.

  15. Membrane-proximal TRAIL species are incapable of inducing short circuit apoptosis signaling: Implications for drug development and basic cytokine biology

    PubMed Central

    Tatzel, Katharina; Kuroki, Lindsay; Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Curiel, David T.; Goedegebuure, S. Peter; Powell, Matthew A.; Mutch, David G.; Hawkins, William G.; Spitzer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL continues to garner substantial interest as a recombinant cancer therapeutic while the native cytokine itself serves important tumor surveillance functions when expressed in membrane-anchored form on activated immune effector cells. We have recently developed the genetically stabilized TRAIL platform TR3 in efforts to improve the limitations associated with currently available drug variants. While in the process of characterizing mesothelin-targeted TR3 variants using a single chain antibody (scFv) delivery format (SS-TR3), we discovered that the membrane-tethered cytokine had a substantially increased activity profile compared to non-targeted TR3. However, cell death proceeded exclusively via a bystander mechanism and protected the mesothelin-positive targets from apoptosis rather than leading to their elimination. Incorporation of a spacer-into the mesothelin surface antigen or the cancer drug itself-converted SS-TR3 into a cis-acting phenotype. Further experiments with membrane-anchored TR3 variants and the native cytokine confirmed our hypothesis that membrane-proximal TRAIL species lack the capacity to physically engage their cognate receptors coexpressed on the same cell membrane. Our findings not only provide an explanation for the “peaceful” coexistence of ligand and receptor of a representative member of the TNF superfamily but give us vital clues for the design of activity-enhanced TR3-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:26935795

  16. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  17. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  18. Comparing families and staff in nursing homes and assisted living: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David; Gwyther, Lisa P; Washington, Tiffany; Cagle, John G; Beeber, Anna S; Sloane, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Nursing homes and residential care/assisted living settings provide care to 2.4 million individuals. Few studies compare the experience of, and relationships between, family and staff in these settings, despite ongoing family involvement and evidence that relationships are problematic. Data from 488 families and 397 staff members in 24 settings examined family involvement and family and staff burden, depressive symptoms, and perceptions; and staff absenteeism and turnover. There were few differences across setting types. Although conflict rarely occurred, there was room for improvement in family-staff relations; this area, and preparing family for their caregiving roles, are appropriate targets for social work intervention.

  19. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam R.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Dejene, Eden A.; Ramadan, James W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Taylor, Kent D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  20. Concerted action of Nrf2-ARE pathway, MRN complex, HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines - Implication in modification of radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Anuranjani; Bala, Madhu

    2014-01-01

    Whole body exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiations (IRs) damages vital intracellular bio-molecules leading to multiple cellular and tissue injuries as well as pathophysiologies such as inflammation, immunosuppression etc. Nearly 70% of damage is caused indirectly by radiolysis of intracellular water leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals and producing a state of oxidative stress. The damage is also caused by direct ionization of biomolecules. The type of radiation injuries is dependent on the absorbed radiation dose. Sub-lethal IR dose produces more of DNA base damages, whereas higher doses produce more DNA single strand break (SSBs), and double strand breaks (DSBs). The Nrf2-ARE pathway is an important oxidative stress regulating pathway. The DNA DSBs repair regulated by MRN complex, immunomodulation and inflammation regulated by HMGB1 and various types of cytokines are some of the key pathways which interact with each other in a complex manner and modify the radiation response. Because the majority of radiation damage is via oxidative stress, it is essential to gain in depth understanding of the mechanisms of Nrf2-ARE pathway and understand its interactions with MRN complex, HMGB1 and cytokines to increase our understanding on the radiation responses. Such information is of tremendous help in development of medical radiation countermeasures, radioprotective drugs and therapeutics. Till date no approved and safe countermeasure is available for human use. This study reviews the Nrf2-ARE pathway and its crosstalk with MRN-complex, HMGB1 and cytokines (TNF-a, IL-6, IFN-? etc.). An attempt is also made to review the modification of some of these pathways in presence of selected antioxidant radioprotective compounds or herbal extracts. PMID:25009785

  1. Transmembrane TNF-α Reverse Signaling Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Formation in Macrophages by Inducing TGF-β: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Pallai, Anna; Kiss, Beáta; Vereb, György; Armaka, Marietta; Kollias, George; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-02-01

    TNF-α, a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is generated in a precursor form called transmembrane (m)TNF-α that is expressed as a type II polypeptide on the surface of certain cells. mTNF-α was shown to act both as a ligand by binding to TNF-α receptors, as well as a receptor that transmits outside-to-inside (reverse) signals back into the mTNF-α-bearing cells. In this study, we show that nonactivated macrophages express basal levels of mTNF-α and respond to anti-TNF-α Abs by triggering the MAPK kinase 4 signaling pathway. The pathway induces TGF-β. Based on inhibitory experiments, the production of TGF-β1 is regulated via Jun kinases, whereas that of other TGF-βs is regulated via p38 MAPKs. Exposure to LPS further induced the expression of mTNF-α, and triggering of mTNF-α strongly suppressed the LPS-induced proinflammatory response. Neutralizing TGF-β by Abs prevented the mTNF-α-mediated suppression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation, indicating that the immune-suppressive effect of mTNF-α is mediated via TGF-β. Although apoptotic cells are also known to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation in macrophages by upregulating TGF-β, we show that they do not use the mTNF-α signaling pathway. Because TGF-β possesses a wide range of immune-suppressive effects, our data indicate that upregulation of TGF-β synthesis by those TNF-α-targeting molecules, which are able to trigger mTNF-α, might contribute to their therapeutic effect in the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, or sarcoidosis. Additionally, none of the TNF-α-targeting molecules is expected to interfere with the immune-silencing effects of apoptotic cells.

  2. The Complex Nature of Family Support across the Lifespan: Implications for Psychological Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R.; Webster, Noah J.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (aged 18-34), middle-aged (aged 35-49), and older adults (aged 50+). A sample of 881 adults (72% White; 26% Black) was drawn from the longitudinal Social Relations, Age and Health Study. Structural equation modeling indicated that among young and middle-aged adults, increasing family negativity was associated with increases in depressive symptoms over time. In contrast, among older adults, lowered proportion of family in network and an increasing number of family members in the network (i.e. family size) were associated with decreases in depressive symptoms. These findings were moderated by family negativity. Among older adults with low family negativity, having a lower proportion family and larger family size were associated with decreasing depressive symptoms, but there was no effect among those reporting high family negativity. Overall, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the complex, developmental nature of how family support influences well-being across the lifespan and highlights unique age differences. PMID:25602936

  3. Modulation of angiotensin II-induced inflammatory cytokines by the Epac1-Rap1A-NHE3 pathway: implications in renal tubular pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Dudeja, Pradeep; Sun, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Besides the glomerulus, the tubulointerstitium is often concomitantly affected in certain diseases, e.g., diabetic nephropathy, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, to a certain extent, worsens its outcome because of perturbations in hemodynamics and possibly tubuloglomerular feedback. Certain studies suggest that pathobiology of the tubulointerstitium is influenced by small GTPases, e.g., Rap1. We investigated the effect of ANG II on inflammatory cytokines, while at the same time focusing on upstream effector of Rap1, i.e., Epac1, and some of the downstream tubular transport molecules, i.e., Na/H exchanger 3 (NHE3). ANG II treatment of LLC-PK1 cells decreased Rap1a GTPase activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. ANG II treatment led to an increased membrane translocation of NHE3, which was reduced with Epac1 and PKA activators. ANG II-induced NHE3 translocation was notably reduced with the transfection of Rap1a dominant positive mutants, i.e., Rap1a-G12V or Rap1a-T35A. Transfection of cells with dominant negative Rap1a mutants, i.e., Rap1a-S17A, or Epac1 mutant, i.e., EPAC-ΔcAMP, normalized ANG II-induced translocation of NHE3. In addition, ANG II treatment led to an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, i.e., IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which was reduced with Rap1a-G12V or Rap1a-T35A transfection, while it reverted to previous comparable levels following transfection of Rap1a-S17A or EPAC-ΔcAMP. ANG II-induced expression of cytokines was reduced with the treatment with NHE3 inhibitor S3226 or with Epac1 and PKA activators. These data suggest that this novel Epac1-Rap1a-NHE3 pathway conceivably modulates ANG II-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, and this information may yield the impetus for developing strategies to reduce tubulointertstitial inflammation in various renal diseases. PMID:24553435

  4. Cytokine-mediated protection of human dendritic cells from prostate cancer-induced apoptosis is regulated by the Bcl-2 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pirtskhalaishvili, G; Shurin, G V; Esche, C; Cai, Q; Salup, R R; Bykovskaia, S N; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    2000-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and second in cancer-induced mortality. It is likely that tumour-induced immunosuppression is one of the reasons for low treatment efficacy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. It has been recently demonstrated that prostate cancer tissue is almost devoid of dendritic cells (DC), the major antigen-presenting cells responsible for the induction of specific antitumour immune responses. In this study, we have tested the hypothesis that prostate cancer induces progressive suppression of the DC system. We found that co-incubation of human DC with three prostate cancer cell lines led to the high levels of premature apoptosis of DC, which were significantly higher than in DC cultures co-incubated with normal prostate cells or blood leucocytes. Stimulation of DC for 24 hours with CD40 ligand (CD154), IL-12 or IL-15 prior to their co-incubation with prostate cancer cells resulted in a significant increase in DC survival in the tumour microenvironment. Furthermore, activation of DC with these cytokines was also accompanied by increased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) in DC, suggesting a possible mechanism involved in DC protection from apoptotic death. In summary, our data demonstrate that prostate cancer induces active elimination of DC in the tumour microenvironment. Stimulation of DC by CD154, IL-12 or IL-15 leads to an increased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and increased resistance of DC to prostate cancer-induced apoptosis. These results suggest a new mechanism of tumour escape from immune recognition and demonstrate the cytokine-based approaches which might significantly increase the efficacy of DC-based therapies for cancer.

  5. The Chinese Family in Transition: Implications for Education and Society in Modern Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.

    This paper investigates the challenges facing the modern Chinese family in Taiwan. An understanding of how culture and family life interact in other cultures may be useful in helping to understand such interactions in one's own society. Confucianism and family stability have been two enduring features of the protracted civilizations of China. In…

  6. Structure, Genomic Organization, and Phylogenetic Implications of Six New VH Families in the Channel Catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To define members of previously unknown VH gene families, a channel catfish immunoglobulin heavy chain cDNA library was constructed and screened with probes specific for the seven known catfish VH families. Reiterative screening and sequence studies defined six new VH families, designated VH8–VH13, ...

  7. The Complex Nature of Family Support across the Life Span: Implications for Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R.; Webster, Noah J.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (ages 18-34), middle-aged (ages 35-49), and…

  8. Understanding Contexts of Family Violence in Rural, Farming Communities: Implications for Rural Women's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Sarah; Hornosty, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Research on family violence in rural communities in Australia and Canada has shown that women's experience of family violence is shaped by social and cultural factors. Concern for economic security and inheritance for children, closeness and belonging, and values of family unity and traditional gender roles are factors in rural communities that…

  9. Becoming a Family: Parents' Stories and Their Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Rena D.

    Noting that the movement from young adulthood through coupling and the transition to parenthood may be among the most universal adult developmental transitions, this book uses a qualitative analysis of family narratives to examine the meanings that family members ascribe to the developmental process of becoming a family. Addressing issues of…

  10. The Complex Nature of Family Support across the Life Span: Implications for Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R.; Webster, Noah J.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (ages 18-34), middle-aged (ages 35-49), and…

  11. Depression, cytokines, and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Tobias, Kristen; Pessin, Hayley; Ku, Geoffrey Y.; Yuan, Jianda; Gibson, Christopher; Wolchok, Jedd

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine the relationships between cytokines, depression, and pancreatic cancer. Method 75 individuals were recruited from two New York City hospitals (a cancer center and a psychiatric hospital) and comprised 4 subgroups: patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who did (n=17) and did not (n=26) have a diagnosis of Major Depressive Episode (MDE), and healthy participants with (n=7) and without (n=25) MDE. All individuals completed a battery of self-report measures. Sera was assayed using Meso Scale Discovery techniques to measure the following pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and TNF-alpha; we also calculated the IL-2/IL-4 ratio. Results Pancreatic cancer patients had significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10, and significantly lower TGF-beta levels than healthy participants. When the sample was divided into those with and without MDE, the groups only differed with regard to serum IL-6 levels. No significant cancer×depression interaction effect was observed. Severity of depressive symptoms was also significantly correlated with IL-6, rs=.28, p=.02, while hopelessness was associated with IFN-alpha, rs=.34, p=.006. Pain, fatigue and sleep disturbance were associated with several of the cytokines assayed including IL-1beta (pain intensity), IL-4 (pain intensity and overall sleep quality), IL-12p70 (pain intensity), TGF-beta (fatigue intensity), but anxiety was not associated with any of the cytokines assayed. Conclusions This study demonstrated an association between depression and IL-6, but not with other cytokines. Moreover, IL-6 was not significantly associated with other measures of psychological distress (anxiety, hopelessness) or with symptom distress (pain, fatigue, sleep quality), although some cytokines assayed were associated with specific symptoms. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of depression in pancreatic cancer

  12. Low testosterone elevates interleukin family cytokines in a rodent model: a possible mechanism for the potentiation of vascular disease in androgen-deficient males.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian M; Mountain, Deidra J H; Brock, Timothy C; Chapman, Jason R; Kirkpatrick, Stacy S; Freeman, Michael B; Klein, Frederick A; Grandas, Oscar H

    2014-07-01

    Androgen deficiency (AD) is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular, and peripheral arterial disease. Although the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying this risk remain unclear, higher testosterone (TST) levels correlate to significant immunoprotective molecular and cellular responses. Our group has previously demonstrated that female sex hormones influence vascular pathogenesis via inflammatory-modulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) regulation. Here we investigated the role of AD and androgen replacement therapy in the modulation of these hormonally responsive pathways that could be playing a role in the development of vascular pathogenesis. Aged orchiectomized male rats underwent TST supplementation per controlled release pellet implantation (0-150 mg). Young and aged intact groups served as controls. Serum was collected at 0-4 wk and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, qualitative cytokine screening, and quantitative multiplex analyses. Human aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with 4,5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 0-3000 nM) before or after interleukin 1β (IL-1β; 5 ng/mL) stimulation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in-gel zymography was used to assay the effect on MMP expression and activity. Subphysiological, physiological, and supraphysiological levels of TST were achieved with 0.5, 2.5, and 35 mg TST pellet implants in vivo, respectively. Inflammatory arrays indicated that interleukin cytokines, specifically IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-13, were elevated at subphysiological level of TST, whereas TST supplementation decreased interleukins. Supraphysiological TST resulted in a significant increase in MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in vivo. Pretreatment with IL-1β slightly increased membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP) and MMP-2 expression at low to mid-level DHT exposure in vitro, although these trends were not statistically significant. Here we demonstrate AD

  13. Social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning: a participatory ethnographic study in Renk, South Sudan.

    PubMed

    Elmusharaf, Khalifa; Byrne, Elaine; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2017-01-17

    Understanding what determines family size is crucial for programmes that aim to provide family planning services during and after conflicts. Recent research found that development agents in post conflict settings do not necessarily take time to understand the context adequately, translate their context understanding into programming, or adjust programming in the light of changes. South Sudan, a country that has been suffering from war for almost 50 years, has one of the highest maternal death rates and the lowest contraceptive utilization rates in the world. This research used Participatory Ethnographic Evaluation and Research (PEER) to provide a contextualised understanding of social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning. Fourteen women were recruited from 14 villages in Renk County in South Sudan in the period 2010-2012. They were trained to design research instruments, conduct interviews, collect narratives and stories and analyse data to identify, prioritize and address their maternal health concerns. As a result of wars, people are under pressure to increase their family sizes and thus increase the nation's population. This is to compensate for the men perished in war and the high child death rates. Large family size is regarded as a national obligation. Women are caught up in a vicious cycle of high fertility and a high rate of child mortality. Determinants of large family size include: 1) Social and cultural practices, 2) Clan lineage and 3) Compensation for loss of family members. Three strategies are used to increase family size: 1) Marry several women, 2) Husbands taking care of women, and 3) Financial stability. Consequences of big families include: 1) Financial burden, 2) Fear of losing children, 3) Borrowing children and 4) Husband shirking responsibility. The desire to have a big family will remain in South Sudan until families realise that their children will live longer, that their men will not be taken by the war

  14. Implications of oxidative stress and hepatic cytokine (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) response in the pathogenesis of hepatic collagenesis in chronic arsenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subhankar; Santra, Amal; Lahiri, Sarbari; Guha Mazumder, D.N. . E-mail: dngm@apexmail.com

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has been reported to occur in humans due to prolonged intake of arsenic contaminated water. Further, oxystress and hepatic fibrosis have been demonstrated by us in chronic arsenic induced hepatic damage in murine model. Cytokines like tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are suspected to play a role in hepatic collagenesis. The present study has been carried out to find out whether increased oxystress and cytokine response are associated with increased accumulation of collagen in the liver due to prolonged arsenic exposure and these follow a dose-response relationship. Methods: Male BALB/c mice were given orally 200 {mu}l of water containing arsenic in a dose of 50, 100, and 150 {mu}g/mouse/day for 6 days a week (experimental group) or arsenic-free water (<0.01 {mu}g/l, control group) for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Hepatic glutathione (GSH), protein sulfhydryl (PSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Catalase, lipid peroxidation (LPx), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}), arsenic and collagen content in the liver were estimated from sacrificed animals. Results: Significant increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in the liver associated with depletion of hepatic thiols (GSH, PSH), and antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Catalase) occurred in mice due to prolonged arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. Significant elevation of hepatic collagen occurred at 9 and 12 months in all the groups associated with significant elevation of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. However, arsenic level in the liver increased progressively from 3 months onwards. There was a positive correlation between the hepatic arsenic level and collagen content (r = 0.8007), LPx (r = 0.779) and IL-6 (r = 0.7801). Further, there was a significant negative correlation between GSH and TNF-{alpha} (r = -0.5336)) and LPx (r = -0.644). Conclusion: Increasing dose and duration of arsenic exposure in

  15. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Long non-coding and endogenous retroviral RNA levels are associated with proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells: Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Melbourne, Jennifer K; Chase, Kayla A; Feiner, Benjamin; Rosen, Cherise; Sharma, Rajiv P

    2017-09-14

    Recent research indicates that the expression of long non-coding and endogenous retroviral RNAs is coordinated with the activity of immune molecules often dysregulated in schizophrenia. We measured the expression of TMEVPG1, NRON, HERV-W env and HERV-W gag in blood cells from participants with schizophrenia and controls. We report that a) expression levels of these non-coding RNAs are correlated with proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in all participants, b) HERV-W transcripts are negatively correlated with atypical antipsychotic use in participants with schizophrenia, and c) that these RNAs are transcribed in response to proinflammatory stimuli in a THP-1 monocyte cell line. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Priming Equine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Proinflammatory Cytokines: Implications in Immunomodulation-Immunogenicity Balance, Cell Viability, and Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Laura; Remacha, Ana Rosa; Romero, Antonio; Vázquez, Francisco José; Albareda, Jorge; Prades, Marta; Gosálvez, Jaime; Roy, Rosa; Zaragoza, Pilar; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Rodellar, Clementina

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a great potential for treating equine musculoskeletal injuries. Although their mechanisms of action are not completely known, their immunomodulatory properties appear to be key in their functions. The expression of immunoregulatory molecules by MSCs is regulated by proinflammatory cytokines; so inflammatory priming of MSCs might improve their therapeutic potential. However, inflammatory environment could also increase MSC immunogenicity and decrease MSC viability and differentiation capacity. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cytokine priming on equine bone marrow-derived MSC (eBM-MSC) immunoregulation, immunogenicity, viability, and differentiation potential, to enhance MSC immunoregulatory properties, without impairing their immune-evasive status, viability, and plasticity. Equine BM-MSCs (n = 4) were exposed to 5 ng/mL of TNFα and IFNγ for 12 h (CK5-priming). Subsequently, expression of genes coding for immunomodulatory, immunogenic, and apoptosis-related molecules was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Chromatin integrity and proliferation assays were assessed to evaluate cell viability. Trilineage differentiation was evaluated by specific staining and gene expression. Cells were reseeded in a basal medium for additional 7 days post-CK5 to elucidate if priming-induced changes were maintained along the time. CK5-priming led to an upregulation of immunoregulatory genes IDO, iNOS, IL-6, COX-2, and VCAM-1. MHC-II and CD40 were also upregulated, but no change in other costimulatory molecules was observed. These changes were not maintained 7 days after CK5-priming. Viability and differentiation potential were maintained after CK5-priming. These findings suggest that CK5-priming of eBM-MSCs could improve their in vivo effectiveness without affecting other eBM-MSC properties.

  18. Drug targets in the cytokine universe for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebin; Fang, Lei; Guo, Taylor B; Mei, Hongkang; Zhang, Jingwu Z

    2013-03-01

    In autoimmune disease, a network of diverse cytokines is produced in association with disease susceptibility to constitute the 'cytokine milieu' that drives chronic inflammation. It remains elusive how cytokines interact in such a complex network to sustain inflammation in autoimmune disease. This has presented huge challenges for successful drug discovery because it has been difficult to predict how individual cytokine-targeted therapy would work. Here, we combine the principles of Chinese Taoism philosophy and modern bioinformatics tools to dissect multiple layers of arbitrary cytokine interactions into discernible interfaces and connectivity maps to predict movements in the cytokine network. The key principles presented here have important implications in our understanding of cytokine interactions and development of effective cytokine-targeted therapies for autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Family team conferencing: results and implications from an experimental study in Florida.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robin; Yoo, Jane; Spoliansky, Toni; Edelman, Pebbles

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the outcome evaluation findings of an experimental study conducted with families in the child welfare system in Florida. Families were randomly assigned to one of three Family Team Conferencing (FTC) models. In Pathway 1, the comparison model, FTCs were facilitated by case-workers. In Pathway 2, one of two experimental models, FTCs were cofacilitated by caseworkers and a designated/trained facilitator, and included expedited family engagement as well as the provision of FTCs throughout the life of a case. Pathway 3, also an experimental model, had the same components of Pathway 2 but also included family alone time. In approximately three years of the project period, 623 families agreed to participate in the study. Study findings showed no statistically significant change observed for families participating in Pathway 1 FTCs in terms of protective factors, achieving family-defined service and plan-of-care goals, and emotional and behavioral symptomology of children. Cases in Pathway 2 demonstrated significant improvement in family functioning and resiliency, nurturing and attachment, and increasing parents' knowledge about "what to do as a parent." Caregivers and teens in Pathway 3 reported significant improvement in expression of emotional symptomology/problems, conduct problems, hyperactivity, peer problems, and a measure of total difficulties. However, foster care re-entry rates were significantly higher for Pathway 3 than Pathway 2 (but not Pathway 1). Moreover, Pathway 2 and Pathway 3 FTCs had a significant effect on moving the family toward agreed upon service goals. Taken together, these findings suggest that the experimental FTC models in which facilitators were used and family engagement was expedited and sustained through subsequent FTCs demonstrated moderate, yet mixed benefits to children, youth, and families.

  20. The p53 family orchestrates the regulation of metabolism: physiological regulation and implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Marco; Flores, Elsa R

    2017-01-01

    The p53 family of transcription factors is essential to counteract tumour formation and progression. Although previously this was exclusively associated with the ability of the p53 family to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, an increasing number of reports have now indisputably demonstrated that the tumour suppressive functions of the p53 family members also rely on their ability to control and regulate cellular metabolism and maintain cellular oxidative homeostasis. Here, we review how each p53 family member, including p63 and p73, controls metabolic pathways in physiological conditions, and how these mechanisms could be exploited to provide anticancer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27884017

  1. Compassion fatigue in marriage and family therapy: implications for therapists and clients.

    PubMed

    Negash, Sesen; Sahin, Seda

    2011-01-01

    Given that marriage and family therapists are exposed to a wide range of circumstances that leave them uniquely vulnerable to experiencing compassion fatigue, it is important to examine the stresses and hazards they face and what those consequences mean for both themselves and clients. It is essential that they identify how compassion fatigue negatively affects the therapeutic relationship and overall treatment outcome as well as that of the personal life of the family therapist. The marriage and family therapist is responsible and ethically obligated to identify and implement ways in which he or she can prevent and remedy compassion fatigue. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  2. Homophilic interaction of NTBA, a member of the CD2 molecular family: induction of cytotoxicity and cytokine release in human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Falco, Michela; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Romeo, Elisa; Bellora, Francesca; Marras, Daniele; Vély, Frédéric; Ferracci, Géraldine; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina

    2004-06-01

    NK-T-B antigen (NTBA) is a CD2 family member that functions as a coreceptor in human NK cell activation. Several receptor/ligand interactions occur between different members of this molecular family. In this study, in order to identify the natural ligand of NTBA, we produced a chimeric protein formed by the NTBA extracellular region fused with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (termed NTBA-Fc*). NTBA-Fc* specifically binds to NTBA cell transfectants but not to cells transfected with other CD2 family members including CD2, CD48, CD84, CD150, CD229, and CD244. Moreover, NTBA-Fc* also binds to NTBA(+) but not to NTBA(-) T cell lines. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, plasmon resonance analysis, as well as NTBA-Fc*-mediated down-regulation of NTBA surface expression further confirmed the occurrence of NTBA/NTBA homophilic interaction. Functionally, in NK cells, NTBA-Fc* promoted a strong production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Moreover, NTBA-transfected targets displayed increased susceptibility to NK-mediated killing as compared to untransfected cells and this effect was specifically inhibited by anti-NTBA mAb. Altogether our data indicate that NTBA is characterized by self recognition.

  3. Predicting Suicide Risks among Outpatient Adolescents Using the Family Environment Scale: Implications for Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Christopher F.; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to identify characteristics of family functioning that relate to suicide potential in an outpatient adolescent population. Participants included 51 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 who were involved in outpatient counselling. The Family Environment Scale and the Suicide Probability Scale were used to assess…

  4. The Implications of Family Size and Birth Order for Test Scores and Behavioral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silles, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    This article, using longitudinal data from the National Child Development Study, presents new evidence on the effects of family size and birth order on test scores and behavioral development at age 7, 11 and 16. Sibling size is shown to have an adverse causal effect on test scores and behavioral development. For any given family size, first-borns…

  5. Work-Family Interface for Same-Sex, Dual-Earner Couples: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.

    2005-01-01

    The author highlights information for career counselors to consider when addressing work-family interface with individuals who are members of same-sex, dual-earner couples or families. D. E. Super's (1990) life-span, life-space theory is the framework used to organize the literature review and discussion of current trends. Issues related to the…

  6. Protective Families in High- and Low-Risk Environments: Implications for Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Michael J.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study used data from a sample of 6th to 12th grade students (N = 48,641, 51% female), nested in 192 schools, to determine if the influence of family-based protective factors varied across different school contexts. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to examine the effects of individual-level family protective factors, relative…

  7. Families in the Energy Crisis: Impacts and Implications for Theory and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Robert; Warren, Roland L.

    This book analyzes the effects of the energy crisis of 1973-74 and 1977 on 1440 American families in three metropolitan areas. An analytic framework was developed for interpreting the outcomes and the processes by which families responded to the crisis. This book presents a conceptual framework for tracing the interactions between large-scale…

  8. Family Approaches to the Chronically Mentally Ill: Implications for Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Allie C.; Kilpatrick, Ebb G.

    The decade of the 1980s has witnessed a rebirth of concern regarding the chronically mentally ill. The way mental health professionals view families of the chronically mentally ill has changed dramatically, largely because of the emergence of the biological theories of causation for schizophrenia. Innovative programs for families have included…

  9. Filial Piety by Contract? The Emergence, Implementation, and Implications of the "Family Support Agreement" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-01-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the…

  10. Filial Piety by Contract? The Emergence, Implementation, and Implications of the "Family Support Agreement" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-01-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the…

  11. Extension's Evolving Alignment of Programs Serving Families and Youth: Organizational Change and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Franz, Nancy K.; Rennekamp, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Extension is experiencing a trend toward closer alignment of its programs serving families and youth, notably Family and Consumer Sciences and 4-H Youth Development. Projects are more multidisciplinary and comprehensive than in the past, and, in many states, FCS and 4-HYD are also becoming more administratively integrated. Several reasons for this…

  12. Predicting Suicide Risks among Outpatient Adolescents Using the Family Environment Scale: Implications for Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Christopher F.; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to identify characteristics of family functioning that relate to suicide potential in an outpatient adolescent population. Participants included 51 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 who were involved in outpatient counselling. The Family Environment Scale and the Suicide Probability Scale were used to assess…

  13. Adolescents' Views on Families as Metaphors in Hong Kong: Implications for Pre-Counselling Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Zenobia C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This interpretative study aims to offer metaphors that describe family meanings from the adolescent's perspective by encouraging them to give a metaphor with their own explanation on a self-administering essay form. This study has three objectives: to explore the family meanings as a metaphor from the Hong Kong adolescent's perspective; to reveal…

  14. Fathers' Involvement in Young Children's Literacy Development: Implications for Family Literacy Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne; Nutbrown, Cathy; Hannon, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Relatively few studies of family literacy programmes have investigated parents' experiences and whilst a number of such programmes have been specifically aimed at fathers, little is known about the involvement of fathers in programmes which target both mothers and fathers. This article reports fathers' involvement in a family literacy programme…

  15. Problems and Strengths of Single-Parent Families: Implications for Practice and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Leslie N.; Schmiege, Cynthia J.

    1993-01-01

    Used qualitative interview data from study of 60 single-parent mothers and 11 single-parent fathers to examine family problems and strengths identified by these parents. With exception of family finances and ex-spouses, mothers and fathers seemed to have very similar experiences. About two-thirds of single parents reported that single parenting…

  16. Families' Experiences in Different Homeless and Highly Mobile Settings: Implications for School and Community Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Family homelessness has been on the rise throughout the United States in recent years. As a result, more schools and communities than ever are challenged to serve students whose lives are touched by instability, uncertainty, and crisis. To date, there has been little inquiry into how families' particular places of homelessness might shape school…

  17. Adolescents' Views on Families as Metaphors in Hong Kong: Implications for Pre-Counselling Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Zenobia C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This interpretative study aims to offer metaphors that describe family meanings from the adolescent's perspective by encouraging them to give a metaphor with their own explanation on a self-administering essay form. This study has three objectives: to explore the family meanings as a metaphor from the Hong Kong adolescent's perspective; to reveal…

  18. Impact of Health-Related Family Factors on School Enrollment in Bolivia: Implications for Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Dearden, Kirk; Heaton, Tim; Forste, Renata

    2005-01-01

    This study identified the extent to which family factors increase school enrollment in Bolivia, after adjusting for human and financial capital. The sample was drawn from the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of human capital, financial capital and family factors on school enrollment.…

  19. Development of Infants with Disabilities and Their Families: Implications for Theory and Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonkoff, Jack P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Within 6 weeks of infants' entry into an early intervention program and again 12 months later, data on infant and family adaptation were collected in home visits to families with infants with disabilities. Found that the strongest predictor of infants' developmental change was the severity of infants' psychomotor impairment. (BC)

  20. The Implications of Family Size and Birth Order for Test Scores and Behavioral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silles, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    This article, using longitudinal data from the National Child Development Study, presents new evidence on the effects of family size and birth order on test scores and behavioral development at age 7, 11 and 16. Sibling size is shown to have an adverse causal effect on test scores and behavioral development. For any given family size, first-borns…

  1. Size of forest holdings and family forests: implications for forest management in South Carolina.

    Treesearch

    Brian Williams; Thomas Straka; Richard Harper

    2012-01-01

    There are about 11.3 million private forest owners in the United States; of those, 10.4 million are family forest owners who control 62% of the nation's private timberland. South Carolina has about 262,000 family forest owners who control almost two-thirds of the state's private timberland (Butler, 2008). In the recent past, these ownerships were generally...

  2. Families' Experiences in Different Homeless and Highly Mobile Settings: Implications for School and Community Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Family homelessness has been on the rise throughout the United States in recent years. As a result, more schools and communities than ever are challenged to serve students whose lives are touched by instability, uncertainty, and crisis. To date, there has been little inquiry into how families' particular places of homelessness might shape school…

  3. Mapping Challenges for Vulnerable Children, Youth, and Families: Implications for University-Assisted Community Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.; Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Lawson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Challenges confronting children, youth, and families in the current socioeconomic environment are examined, and the role of the university-assisted community school in addressing them is explored. Comprehensive, collaborative change strategies that support and strengthen families and nurture children and youth in addition to providing education…

  4. Understanding the Mental Health Consequences of Family Separation for Refugees: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexander; Hess, Julia Meredith; Bybee, Deborah; Goodkind, Jessica R

    2017-06-15

    Consistent evidence documents the negative impacts of family separation on refugee mental health and concerns for the welfare of distant family members and desire to reunite with family members as priorities for refugees postmigration. Less is known about refugees' emic perspectives on their experiences of family separation. Using mixed methods data from a community-based mental health intervention study, we found that family separation was a major source of distress for refugees and that it was experienced in a range of ways: as fear for family still in harm's way, as a feeling of helplessness, as cultural disruption, as the greatest source of distress since resettlement, and contributing to mixed emotions around resettlement. In addition to these qualitative findings, we used quantitative data to test the relative contribution of family separation to refugees' depression/anxiety symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and psychological quality of life. Separation from a family member was significantly related to all 3 measures of mental health, and it explained significant additional variance in all 3 measures even after accounting for participants' overall level of trauma exposure. Relative to 26 other types of trauma exposure, family separation was 1 of only 2 traumatic experiences that explained additional variance in all 3 measures of mental health. Given the current global refugee crisis and the need for policies to address this large and growing issue, this research highlights the importance of considering the ways in which family separation impacts refugee mental health and policies and practices that could help ameliorate this ongoing stressor. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Neuropeptides CRH, SP, HK-1, and Inflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and TNF Are Increased in Serum of Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome, Implicating Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsilioni, Irene; Russell, Irwin J.; Stewart, Julia M.; Gleason, Rae M.

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic, idiopathic condition of widespread musculoskeletal pain affecting more women than men. Even though clinical studies have provided evidence of altered central pain pathways, the lack of definitive pathogenesis or reliable objective markers has hampered development of effective treatments. Here we report that the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), substance P (SP), and SP-structurally-related hemokinin-1 (HK-1) were significantly (P = 0.026, P < 0.0001, and P = 0.002, respectively) elevated (0.82 ± 0.57 ng/ml, 0.39 ± 0.18 ng/ml, and 7.98 ± 3.12 ng/ml, respectively) in the serum of patients with FMS compared with healthy controls (0.49 ± 0.26 ng/ml, 0.12 ± 0.1 ng/ml, and 5.71 ± 1.08 ng/ml, respectively). Moreover, SP and HK-1 levels were positively correlated (Pearson r = 0.45, P = 0.002) in FMS. The serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were also significantly (P = 0.029 and P = 0.006, respectively) higher (2.97 ± 2.35 pg/ml and 0.92 ± 0.31 pg/ml, respectively) in the FMS group compared with healthy subjects (1.79 ± 0.62 pg/ml and 0.69 ± 0.16 pg/ml, respectively). In contrast, serum IL-31 and IL-33 levels were significantly lower (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.044, respectively) in the FMS patients (849.5 ± 1005 pg/ml and 923.2 ± 1284 pg/ml, respectively) in comparison with healthy controls (1281 ± 806.4 pg/ml and 3149 ± 4073 pg/ml, respectively). FMS serum levels of neurotensin were not different from controls. We had previously shown that CRH and SP stimulate IL-6 and TNF release from mast cells (MCs). Our current results indicate that neuropeptides could stimulate MCs to secrete inflammatory cytokines that contribute importantly to the symptoms of FMS. Treatment directed at preventing the secretion or antagonizing these elevated neuroimmune markers, both centrally and peripherally, may prove to be useful in the management of FMS. PMID

  6. Nitric oxide and superoxide mediate diesel particle effects in cytokine-treated mice and murine lung epithelial cells--implications for susceptibility to traffic-related air pollution.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Nicholas D; LaGier, Adriana J; Slade, Ralph; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy H; Dye, Janice A

    2012-11-15

    Epidemiologic studies associate childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased respiratory infections and asthmatic and allergic symptoms. The strongest associations between traffic exposure and negative health impacts are observed in individuals with respiratory inflammation. We hypothesized that interactions between nitric oxide (NO), increased during lung inflammatory responses, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased as a consequence of traffic exposure ─ played a key role in the increased susceptibility of these at-risk populations to traffic emissions. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were used as surrogates for traffic particles. Murine lung epithelial (LA-4) cells and BALB/c mice were treated with a cytokine mixture (cytomix: TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ) to induce a generic inflammatory state. Cells were exposed to saline or DEP (25 μg/cm(2)) and examined for differential effects on redox balance and cytotoxicity. Likewise, mice undergoing nose-only inhalation exposure to air or DEP (2 mg/m(3) × 4 h/d × 2 d) were assessed for differential effects on lung inflammation, injury, antioxidant levels, and phagocyte ROS production. Cytomix treatment significantly increased LA-4 cell NO production though iNOS activation. Cytomix +  DEP-exposed cells incurred the greatest intracellular ROS production, with commensurate cytotoxicity, as these cells were unable to maintain redox balance. By contrast, saline + DEP-exposed cells were able to mount effective antioxidant responses. DEP effects were mediated by: (1) increased ROS including superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)), related to increased xanthine dehydrogenase expression and reduced cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity; and (2) increased peroxynitrite generation related to interaction of O(2)(·-) with cytokine-induced NO. Effects were partially reduced by superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplementation or by blocking iNOS induction. In mice, cytomix +  DEP-exposure resulted in

  7. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  8. Validating the revised Health Belief Model for young families: implications for nurses' health promotion practice.

    PubMed

    Roden, Janet

    2004-12-01

    By modifying the Health Belief Model (HBM) nurses can provide health promotion guidance for families through the revised HBM for young families. The constructs 'perceived behavioral control' and 'behavioral intention' from Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior were added to the HBM to provide a health orientation. An initial qualitative study informed the second quantitative study through thematic data obtained by interviewing parents about family health. The second comparative study of low and high socioeconomic status families of preschool-aged children living in western Sydney, Australia, measured family health through the Parental Health Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ). After a small pilot study, the researcher distributed 150 questionnaires to center directors from preschools, kindergartens and long day care, who then handed out questionnaires to interested parents. Data collection occurred in 1998 with consenting parents returning the questionnaires for collection by the researchers. A convenience sample of 103 was obtained with a 69% return rate. Analysis was undertaken through MANCOVA. Justification for validity occurred through logical analysis and hypothesis testing, based on the literature, while reliability was acknowledged by undertaking Cronbach coefficient alphas on small variable clusters. Results support the constructs 'perceived behavioral control' and 'behavioral intention' in the revised model, suggesting that for families of different socioeconomic background, differences emerge in terms of their perceived control over their child's health and the initiation of health behaviors for their child. Recommendations for further research are for refinement of the PHBQ, new research with different families, and further testing of all the model constructs.

  9. Work-family conflict: experiences and health implications among immigrant Latinos.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Arcury, Thomas A; Márin, Antonio; Carrillo, Lourdes; Burke, Bless; Coates, Michael L; Quandt, Sara A

    2007-07-01

    Work-family conflict research has focused almost exclusively on professional, White adults. The goal of this article was to expand the understanding of culture and industry in shaping experiences and consequences of work-family conflict. Using in-depth interview data (n = 26) and structured survey data (n = 200) from immigrant Latinos employed in the poultry processing industry, the authors evaluated predictions drawn from emerging models emphasizing the influence of cultural characteristics such as collectivism and gender ideology on work-family conflict. Results indicated that immigrant Latinos in poultry processing experienced infrequent work-to-family conflict; both the level and the antecedents of work-to-family conflict differed by gender, with physical demands contributing to greater conflict for women but not men. In addition, there was little evidence that work-family conflict was associated with health in this population. These results demonstrate how traditional models of work-family conflict need to be modified to reflect the needs and circumstances of diverse workers in the new global economy.

  10. Prevalence and Community Variation in Harmful Levels of Family Conflict Witnessed by Children: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Toumbourou, John W.; McRitchie, Martin; Williams, Joanne; Kremer, Peter; McKenzie, Dean; Catalano, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Children’s reports of high family conflict consistently predict poor outcomes. The study identified criteria for high family conflict based on prospective prediction of increased risk for childhood depression. These criteria were subsequently used to establish the prevalence of high family conflict in Australian communities and to identify community correlates suitable for targeting prevention programs. Study 1 utilised a longitudinal design. Grade 6 and 8 students completed a family conflict scale (from the widely used Communities That Care survey) in 2003 and depression symptomotology were evaluated at a 1-year follow-up (International Youth Development Study, N = 1,798). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis yielded a cut-off point on a family conflict score with depression symptomatology as a criterion variable. A cut-off score of 2.5 or more (on a scale of 1 to 4) correctly identified 69 % with depression symptomology, with a specificity of 77.2 % and sensitivity at 44.3 %. Study 2 used data from an Australian national survey of Grade 6 and 8 children (Healthy Neighbourhoods Study, N = 8,256). Prevalence estimates were calculated, and multivariate logistic regression with multi-level modelling was used to establish factors associated with community variation in family conflict levels. Thirty-three percent of Australian children in 2006 were exposed to levels of family conflict that are likely to increase their future risk for depression. Significant community correlates for elevated family conflict included Indigenous Australian identification, socio-economic disadvantage, urban and state location, maternal absence and paternal unemployment. The analysis provides indicators for targeting family-level mental health promotion programs. PMID:23812887

  11. Family functioning and obesity risk behaviors: implications for early obesity intervention.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li Ming; Simpson, Judy M; Baur, Louise A; Rissel, Chris; Flood, Victoria M

    2011-06-01

    Family functioning is found to be associated with overweight and obesity in childhood, but its association with maternal obesity risk behaviors is not clear. This study aimed to investigate whether family functioning is associated with maternal obesity risk behaviors and to inform the development of early obesity interventions. A total of 408 first-time mothers at 24-34 weeks of pregnancy were included in the study. They participated in the Healthy Beginnings Trial (HBT) conducted in southwest Sydney, Australia in 2008. An analysis of cross-sectional baseline data was conducted using ordinal logistic regression modeling. Key measures were assessed using the McMaster Family Assessment Device, and self-reported obesity risk behaviors including excessive consumption of soft drinks, fast food, and excessive small screen time. The study found that 30% of the study population had a family functioning score ≥2, indicating unhealthy family functioning. About one-third (36%) of the mothers had more than one obesity risk behavior. Mothers with a family functioning score ≥2 were more likely to have more than one obesity risk behavior (47% vs. 32%, P < 0.05) than mothers with a lower score. The proportion of mothers with a family functioning score ≥2 increased from 22% to 29% to 39% as the number of maternal obesity risk behaviors increased from 0 to 1 to 2 or more, giving an adjusted proportional odds ratio (AOR) of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.0, P = 0.001). Family functioning is independently associated with the number of maternal obesity risk behaviors after allowing for the effects of maternal age and education. Overweight and obesity interventions should consider addressing family functioning.

  12. Semen donors who are open to contact with their offspring: issues and implications for them and their families.

    PubMed

    Daniels, K R; Kramer, W; Perez-y-Perez, M V

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the motivations, views and experiences of semen donors willing to have contact with their offspring. An online questionnaire for semen donors was posted by the US-based Donor Sibling Registry in 2009. A total of 164 respondents who had previously been donors completed the questionnaire, which consisted of 45 open and closed questions covering motivations for donating, health and medical information, experiences of donating, contact with offspring and implications of donating and contact for their families. The donors' primary motivation was to help other families, although payment was also a factor. Almost all donors were open to contact with their offspring and, where donors were partnered, three-quarters of the partners also supported possible contact. Almost one-third, however, had reservations about contact or were opposed. Two-thirds of donors' own children were interested in meeting the offspring. Contact between a donor and his offspring is often seen as a coming together of these two people only. The results of this study suggest that there are important ramifications for both of the families who become linked. Understanding gamete donation in this broader family context is crucial to the contribution that health professionals can make in this area.

  13. Female inmates, family caregivers, and young children's adjustment: A research agenda and implications for corrections programming

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Dawn K.; McHale, James; Strozier, Anne; Pietsch, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Attendant to the exponential increase in rates of incarceration of mothers with young children in the United States, programming has been established to help mothers attend to parenting skills and other family concerns while incarcerated. Unfortunately, most programs overlook the important, ongoing relationship between incarcerated mothers and family members caring for their children—most often, the inmates' own mothers. Research reveals that children's behavior problems escalate when different co-caregivers fail to coordinate parenting efforts and interventions, work in opposition, or disparage or undermine one another. This article presents relevant research on co-caregiving and child adjustment, highlights major knowledge gaps in need of study to better understand incarcerated mothers and their families, and proposes that existing interventions with such mothers can be strengthened through targeting and cultivating functional coparenting alliances in families. PMID:19884977

  14. Family Resource Allocation after Firstborns Leave Home: Implications for Secondborns' Academic Functioning.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alexander C; Whiteman, Shawn D; Bernard, Julia M; McHale, Susan M

    2015-12-29

    This study assessed secondborn adolescents' perceptions of changes in the allocation of family resources following their firstborn siblings' departure from home after high school, and whether perceived changes were related to changes over 1 year in secondborns' academic functioning. Participants were secondborn siblings (mean age = 16.58, SD = 0.91) from 115 families in which the older sibling had left the family home in the previous year. Allocation of resources was measured via coded qualitative interviews. Most (77%) secondborns reported increases in at least one type of family resource (i.e., parental companionship, attention, material goods), and many reported an increase in multiple types of resources in the year following their older sibling's departure. Consistent with resource dilution theory, perceptions of increases in fathers' companionship, fathers' attention, and mothers' companionship were related to improvements over time in secondborns' academic functioning.

  15. Female inmates, family caregivers, and young children's adjustment: A research agenda and implications for corrections programming.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Dawn K; McHale, James; Strozier, Anne; Pietsch, Joel

    2008-11-01

    Attendant to the exponential increase in rates of incarceration of mothers with young children in the United States, programming has been established to help mothers attend to parenting skills and other family concerns while incarcerated. Unfortunately, most programs overlook the important, ongoing relationship between incarcerated mothers and family members caring for their children-most often, the inmates' own mothers. Research reveals that children's behavior problems escalate when different co-caregivers fail to coordinate parenting efforts and interventions, work in opposition, or disparage or undermine one another. This article presents relevant research on co-caregiving and child adjustment, highlights major knowledge gaps in need of study to better understand incarcerated mothers and their families, and proposes that existing interventions with such mothers can be strengthened through targeting and cultivating functional coparenting alliances in families.

  16. Parenting, family life, and well-being among sexual minorities: nursing policy and practice implications.

    PubMed

    Weber, Scott

    2008-06-01

    Parenting and family life are fundamental social constructs in human society and in law and public policy. Family structures and support systems provide important economic and psychological advantages for parents as well as for their children. Stigma toward lesbian and gay parents often marginalize individuals in these families and restrict family members' full expression of social citizenship, humanity, and personhood. Stigma directly contributes to increased risk for substance abuse, anxiety, and depressive illness among both parents and children. This article reviews the relevant policy literature to deconstruct the impacts of stigma on the psychological health and well-being of sexual minority parents so that psychiatric/mental health nurses and other health care providers can identify and counter these effects in their practices and advocate for policy improvements.

  17. Identification of novel mutations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families and implications for diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Glaus, Esther; Lorenz, Birgit; Netzer, Christian; Li, Yün; Schambeck, Maria; Wittmer, Mariana; Feil, Silke; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Rosenberg, Thomas; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Bergen, Arthur A.B.; Barthelmes, Daniel; Baraki, Husnia; Schmid, Fabian; Tanner, Gaby; Fleischhauer, Johannes; Orth, Ulrike; Becker, Christian; Wegscheider, Erika; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Gal, Andreas; Berger, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to identify mutations in X-chromosomal genes associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in patients from Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark, and Switzerland. Methods In addition to all coding exons of RP2, exons 1 through 15, 9a, ORF15, 15a and 15b of RPGR were screened for mutations. PCR products were amplified from genomic DNA extracted from blood samples and analyzed by direct sequencing. In one family with apparently dominant inheritance of RP, linkage analysis identified an interval on the X chromosome containing RPGR, and mutation screening revealed a pathogenic variant in this gene. Patients of this family were examined clinically and by X-inactivation studies. Results This study included 141 RP families with possible X-chromosomal inheritance. In total, we identified 46 families with pathogenic sequence alterations in RPGR and RP2, of which 17 mutations have not been described previously. Two of the novel mutations represent the most 3’-terminal pathogenic sequence variants in RPGR and RP2 reported to date. In exon ORF15 of RPGR, we found eight novel and 14 known mutations. All lead to a disruption of open reading frame. Of the families with suggested X-chromosomal inheritance, 35% showed mutations in ORF15. In addition, we found five novel mutations in other exons of RPGR and four in RP2. Deletions in ORF15 of RPGR were identified in three families in which female carriers showed variable manifestation of the phenotype. Furthermore, an ORF15 mutation was found in an RP patient who additionally carries a 6.4 kbp deletion downstream of the coding region of exon ORF15. We did not identify mutations in 39 sporadic male cases from Switzerland. Conclusions RPGR mutations were confirmed to be the most frequent cause of RP in families with an X-chromosomal inheritance pattern. We propose a screening strategy to provide molecular diagnostics in these families. PMID:18552978

  18. The first mitochondrial genome for the butterfly family Riodinidae (Abisara fylloides) and its systematic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Huang, Dun-Yuan; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Qing-Hui; Hao, Jia-Sheng; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Yang, Qun

    2013-10-01

    The Riodinidae is one of the lepidopteran butterfly families. This study describes the complete mitochondrial genome of the butterfly species Abisara fylloides, the first mitochondrial genome of the Riodinidae family. The results show that the entire mitochondrial genome of A. fylloides is 15 301 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a 423 bp A+T-rich region. The gene content, orientation and order are identical to the majority of other lepidopteran insects. Phylogenetic reconstruction was conducted using the concatenated 13 protein-coding gene (PCG) sequences of 19 available butterfly species covering all the five butterfly families (Papilionidae, Nymphalidae, Peridae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae). Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly supported the monophyly of Lycaenidae+Riodinidae, which was standing as the sister of Nymphalidae. In addition, we propose that the riodinids be categorized into the family Lycaenidae as a subfamilial taxon. The Riodinidae is one of the lepidopteran butterfly families. This study describes the complete mitochondrial genome of the butterfly species Abisara fylloides, the first mitochondrial genome of the Riodinidae family. The results show that the entire mitochondrial genome of A. fylloides is 15 301 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a 423 bp A+T-rich region. The gene content, orientation and order are identical to the majority of other lepidopteran insects. Phylogenetic reconstruction was conducted using the concatenated 13 protein-coding gene (PCG) sequences of 19 available butterfly species covering all the five butterfly families (Papilionidae, Nymphalidae, Peridae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae). Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly supported the monophyly of Lycaenidae+Riodinidae, which was standing as the sister of Nymphalidae. In addition, we propose

  19. A Family-Focused Delirium Educational Initiative With Practice and Research Implications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; McDougall, Graham J; Fick, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Delirium is burdensome and psychologically distressing for formal and informal caregivers, yet family caregivers often have very little understanding or knowledge about delirium. As part of a large multisite intervention study, the Early Nurse Detection of Delirium Superimposed on Dementia (END-DSD), the authors identified a need for family educational materials. This educational initiative's purpose was to develop a delirium admission brochure for family members to aid in the prevention and earlier identification of delirium during hospitalization. A brochure was developed using an iterative approach with an expert panel. Following three iterations, a final brochure was approved. The authors found that an iterative expert consensus approach can be used to develop a brochure for families. Major content areas were helping families understand the difference between delirium and dementia, signs and symptoms of delirium, causes of delirium, and strategies family members can use to prevent delirium. A caregiver-focused educational brochure is one intervention to use in targeting older adults hospitalized with delirium.

  20. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession.

  1. Critically examining diversity in end-of-life family caregiving: implications for equitable caregiver support and Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Melissa; Crooks, Valorie A; Williams, Allison; Hankivsky, Olena

    2012-11-01

    Family (i.e., unpaid) caregiving has long been thought of as a 'woman's issue', which ultimately results not only in gendered, but also financial and health inequities. Because of this, gender-based analyses have been prioritized in caregiving research. However, trends in current feminist scholarship demonstrate that gender intersects with other axes of difference, such as culture, socio-economic status, and geography to create diverse experiences. In this analysis we examine how formal front-line palliative care providers understand the role of such diversities in shaping Canadian family caregivers' experiences of end-of-life care. In doing so we consider the implications of these findings for a social benefit program aimed at supporting family caregivers, namely the Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB). This analysis contributes to a utilization-focused evaluation of Canada's CCB, a social program that provides job security and limited income assistance to Canadian family caregivers who take a temporary leave from employment to provide care for a dying family member at end-of-life. Fifty semi-structured phone interviews with front-line palliative care providers from across Canada were conducted and thematic diversity analysis of the transcripts ensued. Findings reveal that experiences of caregiving are not homogenous and access to services and supports are not universal across Canada. Five axes of difference were commonly raised by front-line palliative care providers when discussing important differences in family caregivers' experiences: culture, gender, geography, lifecourse stage, and material resources. Our findings reveal inequities with regard to accessing needed caregiver services and resources, including the CCB, based on these axes of difference. We contend that without considering diversity, patterns in vulnerability and inequity are overlooked, and thus continually reinforced in health policy. Based on our findings, we demonstrate that re

  2. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers. PMID:26871284

  3. Alloreactivity and anti-tumor activity segregate within two distinct subsets of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells: implications for their infusion across major HLA barriers.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, Dario; Martinuzzi, Emanuela; Todorovic, Maja; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Vallario, Antonella; Jordaney, Noela; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Capaldi, Antonio; Geuna, Massimo; Casorzo, Laura; Nash, Richard A; Aglietta, Massimo; Cignetti, Alessandro

    2008-07-01

    Donor-derived cytokine-induced killer (CIK) can be infused as adoptive immunotherapy after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Promising results were recently reported in HLA-identical HCT, where mild grafts versus host (GVH) events were observed. To extend this strategy across major HLA barriers (e.g. HLA-haploidentical HCT), further studies on CIK cells' alloreactivity are needed. We hypothesized that alloreactivity and anti-tumor activity of CIK cells segregate within two different cell subsets and could consequently be separated according to CD56 and CD3 expression. We tested CIK cells expanded from seven patients who underwent HCT as treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. We found that CIK cells maintained their alloreactivity across major HLA barriers when tested as bulk population; after CD56-positive selection, anti-tumor activity was restricted to the CD3+/CD56+ cell fraction and alloreactivity versus HLA-mismatched PBMC was restricted to the CD3+/CD56- cell fraction. Bulk CIK cells from engrafted patients did not exhibit alloreactivity in response to host- or donor-derived PBMC, confirming their low potential for GVH across minor HLA barriers. Moreover, we tested if CIK cells expanded from engrafted patients after HCT were as effective as donor-derived ones and could be considered as an alternative option. The expansion rate and tumor cell killing was comparable to that observed in sibling donors. In conclusion, depletion of CD3+/CD56- cells might reduce the risk of GVH without affecting the tumor-killing capacity and could help extending CIK infusions across major HLA barriers. Engrafted patients after HCT could also be considered as an effective alternative option to donor-derived CIK cells.

  4. Implications of gambling problems for family and interpersonal adjustment: results from the Quinte Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Suomi, Aino; Rodgers, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To evaluate (1) whether gambling problems predict overall trajectories of change in family or interpersonal adjustment and (2) whether annual measures of gambling problems predict time‐specific decreases in family or interpersonal adjustment, concurrently and prospectively. Design The Quinte Longitudinal Study (QLS) involved random‐digit dialling of telephone numbers around the city of Belleville, Canada to recruit ‘general population’ and ‘at‐risk’ groups (the latter oversampling people likely to develop problems). Five waves of assessment were conducted (2006–10). Latent Trajectory Modelling (LTM) estimated overall trajectories of family and interpersonal adjustment, which were predicted by gambling problems, and also estimated how time‐specific problems predicted deviations from these trajectories. Setting Southeast Ontario, Canada. Participants Community sample of Canadian adults (n = 4121). Measurements The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) defined at‐risk gambling (ARG: PGSI 1–2) and moderate‐risk/problem gambling (MR/PG: PGSI 3+). Outcomes included: (1) family functioning, assessed using a seven‐point rating of overall functioning; (2) social support, assessed using items from the Non‐support subscale of the Personality Assessment Inventory; and (3) relationship satisfaction, measured by the Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale. Findings Baseline measures of ARG and MR/PG did not predict rates of change in trajectories of family or interpersonal adjustment. Rather, the annual measures of MR/PG predicted time‐specific decreases in family functioning (estimate: −0.11, P < 0.01), social support (estimate: −0.28, P < 0.01) and relationship satisfaction (estimate: −0.53, P < 0.01). ARG predicted concurrent levels of family functioning (estimate: −0.07, P < 0.01). There were time‐lagged effects of MR/PG on subsequent levels of family functioning (estimate: −0.12, P < 0.01) and social

  5. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-08-16

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10(-7)), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (PTrend=4.43×10(-6)), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (PTrend≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. College Students' Attitudes toward Elderly Sexual Behavior: Implications for Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Clara C.; Schmall, Vicki L.

    1989-01-01

    Examined attitudes toward elderly sexual behavior in college students (N=290). Found results indicated that the most salient factor related to attitudes was the specific behavior being evaluated and not the age, gender, or relationship to the subject. Presents implications of research. (Author/ABL)

  7. The Implications of Grandparent Coresidence for Economic Hardship among Children in Mother-Only Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutchler, Jan E.; Baker, Lindsey A.

    2009-01-01

    Estimates suggest that more than 6 million children live with at least one grandparent. Despite evidence establishing the growing prevalence of this arrangement, limited research has focused on estimating the implications of coresidence for the economic well-being of grandchildren. Using data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program…

  8. Sexual Behavior, Sexual Knowledge, and Sexual Attitudes of Emerging Adult Women: Implications for Working with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byno, Lucy H.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the sexual behavior of emerging adult women in relation to their sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of their parents' sexual attitudes; and second, to discuss the implications of this research in working with young adult women. Three hundred and sixty-four college-age women…

  9. Models of Parenting: Implications for Adolescent Well-Being within Different Types of Family Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shucksmith, J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines parenting models and parent-child relationships from early to middle adolescence. Focuses on implications for adolescent functioning, including school integration and psychological well being. Results identify four distinct types of parenting styles characterized by different degrees of acceptance and control of young people's behavior.…

  10. Filipino men's familial roles and domestic violence: implications and strategies for community-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Romeo B

    2004-09-01

    Men's gender roles have contributed to family violence, but the ramifications of these roles in the development of community-based programmes for men have not been given much attention. A small-scale qualitative examination of the familial context of Filipino men's positions and roles, and their domestic violence experiences and attitudes was carried out using eight discussion groups, each group with seven to eight members. Verbatim tape-recorded transcripts were analysed using accepted techniques for theoretical analysis to establish emergent themes. Discussants saw themselves as being at the helm of their families. Men were knowledgeable of and took responsibility for their gender roles exerting control over the focus and direction of all their family affairs, including the gender roles of their wives/partners. This control demonstrated facets of their hegemonic masculinity such as sexual objectification and dominance. Men in this society come from a traditional position of power, dominance and privilege. They will be particularly sensitive to interventions aimed at reducing violence against women which will inquire into their private lives. In their view, such interventions were both a direct challenge to their family leadership and a basis for 'losing face'. Strategies for positive interventions include the need for male-sensitive and male-centred approaches which avoid demonising or stereotyping men.

  11. Unique Loss of the PYHIN Gene Family in Bats Amongst Mammals: Implications for Inflammasome Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Matae; Cui, Jie; Irving, Aaron T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic analysis of two bat species (Pteropus alecto and Myotis davidii) revealed the absence of the PYHIN gene family. This family is recognized as important immune sensors of intracellular self and foreign DNA and activators of the inflammasome and/or interferon pathways. Further assessment of a wider range of bat genomes was necessary to determine if this is a universal pattern for this large mammalian group. Here we expanded genomic analysis of this gene family to include ten bat species. We confirmed the complete loss of this gene family, with only a truncated AIM2 remaining in one species (Pteronotus parnellii). Divergence of the PYHIN gene loci between the bat lineages infers different loss-of-function histories during bat evolution. While all other major groups of placental mammals have at least one gene member, only bats have lost the entire family. This removal of inflammasome DNA sensors may indicate an important adaptation that is flight-induced and related, at least in part, to pathogen-host co-existence. PMID:26906452

  12. Gender nonconforming and transgender children/youth: Family, community, and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Alegría, Christine Aramburu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this article is to provide foundational knowledge on gender nonconforming/transgender children/youth. With this knowledge, providers' confidence and ability to address the needs of patients/families can increase. Academic Search Premier, Cinahl, PubMed, World Professional Association for Transgender Health. The number of gender nonconforming/transgender children/youth presenting to healthcare providers is increasing. The situation presents a myriad of challenges to families. The identity trajectory of gender nonconforming children is variable, and watchful waiting while providing support to the child and family is advised. If gender dysphoria persists as puberty approaches, treatment with puberty blockers is recommended. This provides youth time to further explore their identity, while alleviating the distress of developing unwanted secondary natal sex characteristics. For these individuals, cross-sex hormones may be started at age 16. The complexities of providing care to gender nonconforming children/youth and their families are best met through an interdisciplinary approach. Consultation with and/or referral to specialists knowledgeable about transgender health care is advised. Beyond a basic understanding of gender nonconformance, of primary importance to patients/families is being heard and supported by their providers. Establishing a safe and welcome environment is paramount. Resources are provided. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. The Family and Medical Leave Act: implications for occupational and environmental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Franke, Joanne V; Jeras, JoAnn; Gravitte, Joy T; Randolph, Susan A; Ostendorf, Judith S

    2009-06-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was enacted in 1993 to balance the demands of the workplace with the needs of families. Balancing work and family responsibilities will affect most workers as they experience their own serious illness or care for a child or a parent. The FMLA continues to present challenges regarding medical certifications, recordkeeping, intermittent leave management, and lack of understanding by employees and employers about rights and responsibilities under the law. This article discusses the rights and responsibilities of both parties. It also discusses how the occupational and environmental health nurse can bridge the gap between meeting the needs of the employee and those of the employer by serving as educator, advocate, and liaison/collaborator, leading to measurable cost savings for the employer and immeasurable benefits for the employee.

  14. Implications of living with a strong family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Christine

    2009-06-01

    The findings presented here are from a qualitative study in which data were gathered from 20 women who had received inconclusive genetic testing results for inherited breast cancer susceptibility. Before describing the significance, for them, of their genetic test results, all of the participants related what it was like to live with a strong family history of breast cancer. The focus of this article is the women's experience of living with a personal and strong family history of breast cancer. For these women, having such a history had become a fact of life that could not be ignored.Three themes were identified in the data: expecting and dealing with a diagnosis of breast cancer protecting oneself and others, and increasing exposure to cancer screening procedures. These themes address the underlying reality that having a personal and family history of breast cancer is not an isolated situation but part of one's journey in choosing to undergo genetic testing for inherited breast cancer susceptibility.

  15. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice.

  16. New genes, new dilemmas: FTLD genetics and its implications for families.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jill S; Adamson, Jennifer; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L; Hutton, Mike

    After Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second leading cause of dementia in persons less than 65 years of age. Up to 40% of FTLD cases have a positive family history. Research on these families has led to the discovery of four disease-causing genes: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (PGRN), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B). MAPT and PGRN are responsible for the largest number of familial cases. Each of these genes differs by disease mechanism. Moreover mutations in both genes are associated with significant interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variation. Genetic counseling needs to address the differences between the PGRN and MAPT mutations as well as the variation in clinical symptoms. The aims of this article are to describe the genetics of the FTLD spectrum and aid in the genetic counseling of individuals who may carry genetic mutations.

  17. Genetic toxicity of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lazutka, J R

    1996-12-12

    Review of the literature shows that such cytokines as human interferons alpha and gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, epidermal growth factor and interleukin-2 may exhibit genotoxic properties in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. For all above cytokines, except interleukin-2, parabolic-like relationship between the dose and the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges was found. Although the mechanisms of these genotoxic actions remain largely unknown, generation of free radicals or interaction with enzymes such as DNA topoisomerase II may be suspected. Human interferon alpha also may be considered as an antimutagenic compound in human cells. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha has been reported to enhance cytotoxicity and DNA fragmentation produced by DNA topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer drugs. At the same time, it has some radio- and chemoprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Despite these facts, the question about genotoxicity of cytokines is not answered. Some problems must be resolved before receiving the final answer. First, much more cytokines must be tested for their genotoxic activity. Second, appropriate test-systems must be designed. Third, genotoxicity studies of cytokines must account for cytokine interaction in the cytokine network as well as for such cytokine-induced effects as cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Fourth, in each case, it is necessary to have experimental evidence that observed genotoxic effects were caused by cytokine under investigation and not by the other factors.

  18. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5: implications for older adults and their families.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2013-03-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is targeted for publication in May 2013. Older adults and their families should be aware of the potential impact that changes in this important document may have on diagnosis and treatment of mental health concerns. Two specific changes related to a new category of Neurocognitive Disorders and a new interpretation of criteria for depression after bereavement are discussed in this article. Nurses can help older adults and their families understand the new DSM-5 terminology and encourage them to discuss risks, benefits, and likely outcomes of diagnoses, procedures, and treatments that may seem unfamiliar.

  19. Dynamics of ADHD in familial contexts: perspectives from children and parents and implications for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui Mei; Goh, Esther C L

    2014-01-01

    This article provides in-depth insights on the bidirectional dynamics between parents and their children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Five family units (8 parents, 5 children, N = 13) participated in this study. Parents and their child with ADHD were interviewed individually in their homes. Stressful moments of parent-child dynamics revolved around managing their child's behavior and doing homework. Findings highlight the child's agency and power of influence, and the possible recovery of negative dynamics. It is recommended that practitioners adopt the strengths perspective in working with these families and incorporate child's agency and bidirectional dynamics in interventions.

  20. Cytokine quantitation: technologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Naresh; Asthana, Deshratn

    2007-05-01

    Assessment of cytokines in body fluids, cells or tissues provides important information in understanding of disease process and designing treatment strategies. Today, wide range of cytokine assays are available, including; measurement of levels of cytokines (direct) or cytokine soluble receptor levels (indirect) in body fluids or cellular supernatants (immunoassays and cytokine bioassays), measurement of cytokines produced by population of cells (multiparametric flow cytometry, magnetic beads based quantitation of cytokine producing cells, mRNA based assays), measurement of cytokines produced by single cells (Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), Intra-cytoplasmic cytokine staining (ICC), mRNA based assays) and detection of cytokines in tissues (immunostaining). Improved understanding of cytokine interactions has led to a consensus that simultaneous assessment of many cytokines in a biological sample provides more comprehensive information rather than assessing a single cytokine. Thus, technologies that measure one cytokine at a time are being gradually replaced by multiplex-type formats (DNA and protein microarrays).

  1. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  2. The Dynamics of Families Who Are Homeless: Implications for Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    Family homelessness has emerged as a serious global problem (Stronge, 2000). Over the past 25 years in the United States, the makeup of the homeless population has changed significantly. As De Angelis (1994) reports: The landscape of homelessness has changed since the early 1980s, when nearly all homeless people were men. Today,…

  3. Family Decisionmaking Over the Life Cycle: Some Implications for Estimating the Effects of Income Maintenance Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James P.

    The standard one-period labor supply model that economists have used is in some ways an inadequate tool to evaluate a Family Assistance Plan (FAP). The principal difficulty is that an FAP will have important interperiod or life cycle effects. The pure life cycle model, an extension of the work of Becker and Ghez, is derived here without reference…

  4. The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993: An Overview and Implications for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Albert S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) applies new federally mandated employee leave provisions to institutions. Schools must formulate leave policies, communicate them to all staff, and document all FMLA-related actions. Offers a guide to planning and implementing FMLA leave. (MLF)

  5. Marriage Opportunities and Family Formation: Further Implications of Imbalanced Sex Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.; Lloyd, Kim M.

    1992-01-01

    Used vital statistics data and census data to examine impact of women's marriage opportunities on family formation and dissolution. Linked measures of quantity/quality of potential spouses specific for woman's age, race, education, and area of residence to marriage, divorce, and nonmarital fertility rates. Greater marriage opportunities appear to…

  6. Transnational Intergenerationalities: Cultural Learning in Polish Migrant Families and Its Implications for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Daniela; Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we examine the impact of family migration on intergenerational learning, especially in relation to the transmission of cultural values and practices. Drawing on data collected through in-depth case studies with migrant Polish children and their parents, we explore the influence of intergenerationality on children's…

  7. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  8. The Psychological Effects of Hospitalization for the Child and Family -- Implications for the School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouser, Kenia

    The author views hospitalization of the child as a time of potential crisis for the child and family and as an area where the school can play a significant role in minimizing potential disruption. Topics covered include historical trends in hospital treatment of children, the concept of crisis intervention, parents' reactions to their children's…

  9. Ethnic Identity and Parenting Stress in South Asian Families: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shariff, Aneesa

    2009-01-01

    The South Asian culture is one in which family obligation and loyalty, as well as self-sacrifice and obedience toward one's elders, are paramount. These values can be different from those of the more individualistically oriented Euro-Canadian dominant culture, and can prompt challenges of cultural adjustment among Canadian-born South Asian youth…

  10. Mothers' and Fathers' Racial Socialization in African American Families: Implications for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Burton, Linda M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Dotterer, Aryn M.; Swanson, Dena P.

    2006-01-01

    Mothers' and fathers' cultural socialization and bias preparation with older (M=13.9 years) and younger (M=10.31 years) siblings were studied in 162 two-parent, African American families. Analyses examined whether parental warmth and offspring age and gender were linked to parental practices and whether parents' warmth, spouses' racial…

  11. Identification and Characterization of New Family Members in the Tautomerase Superfamily: Analysis and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jamison P.; Burks, Elizabeth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members are characterized by a β–α–β building block and a catalytic amino terminal proline. 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) are the title enzymes of two of the five known families in the superfamily. Two recent developments in these families indicate that there might be more metabolic diversity in the tautomerase superfamily than previously thought. 4-OT homologues have been identified in three biosynthetic pathways, whereas all previously characterized 4-OTs are found in catabolic pathways. In the MSAD family, homologues have been characterized that lack decarboxylase activity, but have a modest hydratase activity using 2-oxo-3-pentynoate. This observation stands in contrast to the first characterized MSAD, which is a proficient decarboxylase and a less efficient hydratase. The hydratase activity was thought to be a vestigial and promiscuous activity. However, this recent discovery suggests that the hydratase activity might reflect a new activity in the MSAD family for an unknown substrate. These discoveries open up new avenues of research in the tautomerase superfamily. PMID:25219626

  12. A Study of Family Nurse Practitioners: Perceived Competencies and Some of Their Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Mary Jane Morrow

    This study was designed to determine the most common health needs and problems that family nurse practitioners (FNP) deal with, to determine how competent FNPs judge themselves to be, to determine what sources in nursing education FNPs judge to be most valuable, and to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the level of…

  13. Implications of New Marriages and Children for Coparenting in Nonresident Father Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGene, Juliana; King, Valarie

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has noted that although cooperative coparenting between resident and nonresident parents is beneficial to children, this form of shared parenting is relatively uncommon. Relying on nationally representative data from two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 628), this study examines the importance of…

  14. Head injury: long-term consequences for patients and families and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Kneafsey, Rosie; Gawthorpe, Dawn

    2004-07-01

    Head injury as a result of trauma is an important cause of long-term disability. Recently published guidance from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence on Acute Head Injuries and a forthcoming National Service Framework for Long-Term Neurological Conditions provides renewed focus on this practice specialty. This article presents a narrative review of a range of quantitative and qualitative studies that have explored the impact of head injury and postinjury disabilities on patients' and families lives. Patients may experience a range of physical, emotional, cognitive, social and behavioural problems after head injury that will have a significant impact on both their own and their families' everyday lives. It is important that the behavioural, physical and psychological aspects of head injury are addressed. Carers may be vulnerable to stress and anxiety as a result of their caring role. It is often in the longer term that the true complexity and impact of head injury may become apparent. Ongoing support, from a range of services, will be required to assist both patient and family to cope with their circumstances. Ensuring that practice is evidence based, it is necessary to conduct further research, both to explore the effectiveness of current service provision and investigate those aspects deemed important by patients and carers. As nurses play an important role in both the acute and long-term care and support of those who have suffered a head injury, it is vital that they are aware of the wide ranging needs with which patients and families may present.

  15. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  16. Interpersonal Relatedness and Psychological Functioning Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for Marital and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Esther H.; Blow, Adrian J.; Yan, Xie

    2012-01-01

    Recovery from a mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a challenging process for injured persons and their families. Guided by attachment theory, we investigated whether relationship conflict, social support, or sense of belonging were associated with psychological functioning. Community-dwelling persons with TBI (N = 75) and their…

  17. Deployment Experiences of Guard and Reserve Families. Implications for Support and Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    loneliness that arise during deployment, especially for those away from military sup- port, would be to connect spouses and families in the same situation...2008: http://www.defenselink.mil/prhome/mcfp.html References 337 Ryan, Gery W., and H. Russell Bernard, “Techniques to Identify Themes,” Field

  18. Patterns of Maternal Behavior among Neglectful Families: Implications for Research and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Samantha L.; Kuebli, Janet E.; Hughes, Honore M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The heterogeneity within neglecting caregivers has not been explored in an empirical fashion. The current study sought to address this limitation by utilizing archival data in order to explore variability of maternal behavior among neglectful families. Method: The current study utilized archival data containing caseworker and…

  19. Revisiting Emotional Geographies: Implications for Family Engagement and Education Policy in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    From 2000 to 2001, Andy Hargreaves produced a series of publications introducing the concept of distinctive emotional geographies of teaching. The concept addressed how teacher emotions are situated within the context of their work and influence interactions with students, colleagues, administrators, and families. Hargreaves contended that…

  20. Transnational Intergenerationalities: Cultural Learning in Polish Migrant Families and Its Implications for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Daniela; Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we examine the impact of family migration on intergenerational learning, especially in relation to the transmission of cultural values and practices. Drawing on data collected through in-depth case studies with migrant Polish children and their parents, we explore the influence of intergenerationality on children's…

  1. The Implications of Psychosocial Theory for Personal Growth in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Philip R.; Newman, Barbara M.

    Psychosocial theory, based on the ideas of Erik Erikson and Robert Havighurst, is proposed as a useful framework for conceptualizing the potential for growth within the family. Erikson's (1950) eight stage theory of psychosocial development and Havighurst's (1959) concept of developmental tasks are used to take account of the stages of development…

  2. Implications of New Marriages and Children for Coparenting in Nonresident Father Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGene, Juliana; King, Valarie

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has noted that although cooperative coparenting between resident and nonresident parents is beneficial to children, this form of shared parenting is relatively uncommon. Relying on nationally representative data from two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 628), this study examines the importance of…

  3. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  4. Interpersonal Relatedness and Psychological Functioning Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for Marital and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Esther H.; Blow, Adrian J.; Yan, Xie

    2012-01-01

    Recovery from a mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a challenging process for injured persons and their families. Guided by attachment theory, we investigated whether relationship conflict, social support, or sense of belonging were associated with psychological functioning. Community-dwelling persons with TBI (N = 75) and their…

  5. Parents' Experiences with Childhood Deafness: Implications for Family-Centered Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Traub, Randi J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the need for family-centered follow-up, this study examined parents' experiences with deafness after early identification. Qualitative inquiry methods were used to explore and describe the perceptions and experiences of nine parents of children identified with severe to profound deafness. Parents participated in face-to-face…

  6. Parents as Scholars: Education Works. Outcomes for Maine Families and Implications for TANF Reauthorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rebekah J.; Deprez, Luisa S.; Butler, Sandra S.

    Maine's Parents as Scholars (PaS) program provides parents who are eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) with cash assistance and support services while they attend a two-year or four-year postsecondary degree program. PaS participants receive the same cash benefits and access to support services as TANF recipients receive.…

  7. Some Behavioral Science Implications for Developing Literacy through Family and School Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    The effects of early family and school environments on the language development of young children are explored in this paper on developing literacy. It is stated that children's intellectual development can be detrimentally modified by such home conditions as: (1) poor prenatal nutrition, (2) low socioeconomic status, (3) poor language skills of…

  8. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  9. Understanding the Effects of Deployment on Military Families: Implications for Early Childhood Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbee, Ellie Ketchem; Correa, Vivian I.; Baughan, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood professionals can provide services and effective support to assist military families with healthy coping and functioning before, during, and after deployment. The purpose of this article is to examine what is known about the effects of stressors associated with the military lifestyle and how they impact returning military members,…

  10. Low population genetic differentiation in the Orchidaceae: implications for the diversification of the family.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ryan D; Dixon, Kingsley W; Peakall, Rod

    2012-11-01

    A leading hypothesis for the immense diversity of the Orchidaceae is that skewed mating success and small, disjunct populations lead to strong genetic drift and switches between adaptive peaks. This mechanism is only possible under conditions of low gene flow that lead to high genetic differentiation among populations. We tested whether orchids typically exhibit high levels of population genetic differentiation by conducting a meta-analysis to compare mean levels of population genetic differentiation (F(ST)) between orchids and other diverse families and between rare and common orchids. Compared with other families, the Orchidaceae is typically characterized by relatively low genetic differentiation among populations (mean F(ST) = 0.146) at allozyme loci. Rare terrestrial orchids showed higher population genetic differentiation than common orchids, although this value was still lower than the mean for most plant families. All lines of evidence suggest that orchids are typically characterized by low levels of population genetic differentiation, even in species with naturally disjunct populations. As such, we found no strong evidence that genetic drift in isolated populations has played a major role in the diversification of the Orchidaceae. Further research into the diversification of the family needs to unravel the relative roles of biotic and environmental selective pressures in the speciation of orchids. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [The relation between the nursing team and patient's family: implications for care].

    PubMed

    Squassante, Nilcéia Dadalto; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2009-01-01

    Study of qualitative nature, developed along with the nursing team and the accompanying relatives of interned customers in a public hospital at Vitória/ES. The objectives were to describe the bases that sustain the relations among those subjects; to analyze the dynamics of this relation; and to discuss its implications for the nursing care. The theoretical reference was linked to the studies of power relations in the disciplined hospital environment and the care in a humanized perspective concept. The data collection was through a participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The results pointed out that those relations don't happen lineally. At same time that conflicting experiences emerge, there is another whose position of one and other subject reveals sensibility and solidarity that implicate directly in the delivered care to the hospitalized customer.

  12. Diagnostic epitope variability within Taenia solium 8 kDa antigen family: implications for cysticercosis immunodetection.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Elizabeth; Sánchez, Jipsy; Milano, Adriana; Alvarez, Suhei; La Rosa, Rosamelia; Lares, María; González, Luís Miguel; Cortéz, María Milagros; Dávila, Iris; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Gárate, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    To study diagnostic epitopes within the Taenia solium 8 kDa antigen family, six overlapping synthetic peptides from an 8 kDa family member (Ts8B2) were synthesized and evaluated by ELISA and MABA with sera from patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), from infected pigs and from rabbits immunized with recombinant Ts8B2 protein. The pre-immune rabbit sera and the Ts8B2 recombinant protein served as negative and positive controls, respectively. A similar analysis was done with the already described antigenic peptides from another member of the 8 kDa family, highly similar to Ts8B2, the CyDA antigen. Surprisingly, neither the Ts8B2 peptides nor the CyDA peptides were recognized by infected human and porcine sera. However, the entire Ts8B2 recombinant, as well as amino and carboxy-terminal halves were recognized by the positive serum samples. The observed lack of recognition of linear Ts8B2 peptides suggests that the principal serological response to the Ts8B2 family is focused on conformational epitopes in contrast to the previously observed antigenicity of the CyDA peptides. This differential antigenicity of 8 kDa family peptides could be related with parasite antigenic variability. The fact that rabbits experimentally immunized with Ts8B2 did make anti-peptide antibodies to peptides Ts8B2-6 and CyDA-6, located in the carboxy-terminal region demonstrated that the Ts8B2 peptides are not intrinsically non-immunogenic.

  13. African American Transgender Women's Individual, Family, and Organizational Relationships: Implications for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Judith B; Whitaker-Brown, Charlene D

    2017-06-01

    Guided by the relational cultural theory, we conducted a qualitative study to examine the relationship experiences of African American transgender women living in North Carolina. A convenience sample of 15 transgender women participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews, guided by an investigator-developed interview guide, were used to explore the personal experiences of transgender women on individual, family, and organizational levels. The findings provide a scheme for understanding the process through which transgender women's relationships hinder or enhance their ability to connect with individuals, family, and organizations. Nurses can use these findings to better understand the connectedness that occurs or does not occur in transgender women's relationships and provide culturally competent care to empower them to become resilient.

  14. Ethical implications in genetic counseling and family studies of the epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Godard, Béatrice; Cardinal, Geneviève

    2004-10-01

    Most of the inherited epilepsies do not follow a Mendelian inheritance pattern but rather are complex disorders. This leads us to reconsider the traditional ethical framework applying to genetics, which is still based largely on the understanding of Mendelian inheritance, to ethically use the genetic tests likely to be forthcoming for the prevention and surveillance of epilepsies. This article is a review of the ethical issues raised by family studies of the epilepsies, in both a clinical and a research context. These issues include the use of genetic tests, the scope of genetic counseling, the upholding of the risk-benefit ratio in pharmacogenetics, as well as those related to the availability of treatments, health professionals' changing responsibilities, and the communication within families. A reasonable approach calls for a case-by-case determination of whether the benefit and harm of genetic testing outweigh benefit and harm of protecting autonomy and nonmaleficence.

  15. Dominant and marginalized discourses in interracial couples' narratives: implications for family therapists.

    PubMed

    Killian, Kyle D

    2002-01-01

    This study explores inter-racial couples' family histories, their experiences of their life together, and the dominant and subordinate discourses employed in negotiating racial and ethnic differences. Ten black-white couples were interviewed individually and conjointly. Dominant discourses that emerged from the couples' narratives included those of homogamy, hypersensitivity of persons of color, and the insignificance of familial and societal history. Interracial partners also simultaneously subverted these prevailing ideologies by voicing experience associated with life at the margins of the society. Dominant and subordinate dicourses used by therapists and interracial couples in the therapy room are examined to integrate marginalized "truths" crucial to effective work with interracial couples and persons of color.

  16. Interaction of TACC proteins with the FHL family: implications for ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Lauffart, Brenda; Sondarva, Gautam V; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Cincotta, Melissa; Still, Ivan H

    2007-06-01

    The Transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) proteins play a conserved role in normal development and tumorigenesis through interactions with multiple complexes involved in transcription, translation, and centrosomal dynamics. However, despite significant work on the function of TACC3 in the control of centrosomal mechanics, relatively little functional data is known about the family's founding member, TACC1. From a continued analysis of clones isolated by an unbiased yeast two-hybrid assay, we now show direct physical interactions between the TACC1 and the FHL (Four and a Half LIM-only) family of proteins. The authenticity of these interactions was validated both in vitro and in cellular systems. The FHLs exhibit diverse biological roles such as the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and are promiscuous coregulators for several transcription factors. The interaction of the endogenous TACC-FHL proteins is primarily localized to the nucleus. However, similar to FHL2, overexpression of TACC1A in HEK293 is able to sequester serum activated ERK to the cytoplasm. This has the effect of reducing the serum induced transcriptional response of the c-fos and c-jun genes. The observation that TACCs can interact with the FHLs and alter their serum induced activities raises the possibility that the TACCs participate in crosstalk between cell signaling pathways important for cancer development and tumor progression. The transforming acidic coiled coil genes are known to be important prognostic indicators for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In this manuscript, we identify a novel interaction between the TACCs and the FHL protein family. This interaction has an affect on ERK and may in part explain the variable associations and changes in subcellular locations of each family with specific subtypes of malignancy.

  17. An extinct Eocene taxon of the daisy family (Asteraceae): evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical implications

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Viviana D.; Palazzesi, Luis; Katinas, Liliana; Crisci, Jorge V.; Tellería, María C.; Bremer, Kåre; Passala, Mauro G.; Bechis, Florencia; Corsolini, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Morphological, molecular and biogeographical information bearing on early evolution of the sunflower alliance of families suggests that the clade containing the extant daisy family (Asteraceae) differentiated in South America during the Eocene, although palaeontological studies on this continent failed to reveal conclusive support for this hypothesis. Here we describe in detail Raiguenrayun cura gen. & sp. nov., an exceptionally well preserved capitulescence of Asteraceae recovered from Eocene deposits of northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. Methods The fossil was collected from the 47·5 million-year-old Huitrera Formation at the Estancia Don Hipólito locality, Río Negro Province, Argentina. Key Results The arrangement of the capitula in a cymose capitulescence, the many-flowered capitula with multiseriate–imbricate involucral bracts and the pappus-like structures indicate a close morphological relationship with Asteraceae. Raiguenrayun cura and the associated pollen Mutisiapollis telleriae do not match exactly any living member of the family, and clearly represent extinct taxa. They share a mosaic of morphological features today recognized in taxa phylogenetically close to the root of Asteraceae, such as Stifftieae, Wunderlichioideae and Gochnatieae (Mutisioideae sensu lato) and Dicomeae and Oldenburgieae (Carduoideae), today endemic to or mainly distributed in South America and Africa, respectively. Conclusions This is the first fossil genus of Asteraceae based on an outstandingly preserved capitulescence that might represent the ancestor of Mutisioideae–Carduoideae. It might have evolved in southern South America some time during the early Palaeogene and subsequently entered Africa, before the biogeographical isolation of these continents became much more pronounced. The new fossil represents the first reliable point for calibration, favouring an earlier date to the split between Barnadesioideae and the rest of Asteraceae than previously

  18. Autism in DSM-5 under the microscope: implications to patients, families, clinicians, and researchers.

    PubMed

    Fung, Lawrence K; Hardan, Antonio Y

    2014-10-01

    The changes in the diagnostic classification of the pervasive developmental disorders from the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) to DSM-5 are expected to affect patients with autism, their families, as well as clinicians and researchers in the field of autism. This article reviews the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Social Communication Disorder (SCD), and discusses potential consequences in the perspectives of major stakeholders.

  19. The ethnic context of child and adolescent problem behavior: implications for child and family interventions.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Miwa; Dishion, Thomas J

    2007-06-01

    This article links the empirical literature on race and ethnicity in developmental psychopathology with interventions designed to reduce adolescent problem behavior. We present a conceptual framework in which culture is endogenous to the socialization of youth and the development of specific self-regulatory strategies. The importance of cultural influence is identified at three levels: (a) intrapersonal developmental processes (e.g., ethnic identity development, development of coping modifies mechanisms and self-regulatory mechanisms), (b) family socialization processes (e.g., racial and ethnic socialization), and (c) interaction with larger societal contexts (e.g., maintenance of bicultural competence in adapting to mainstream and ethnic cultures). We discuss limitations of current assessment and intervention practices that focus on reducing adolescent problem behavior with respect to the cultural issues identified above. We propose that empirically supported adaptive and tailored interventions for adolescent problem behavior are optimal for serving multicultural children and families. To empower such interventions to better serve children and families of color, it is essential that assessments that guide the adaptation and tailoring process include culturally salient dynamics such as ethnic identity, racial socialization, and culturally informed parenting practices.

  20. Bridging the digital divide in diabetes: family support and implications for health literacy.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Lindsay S; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell L; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2011-10-01

    Abstract Background: Patient web portals (PWPs) offer patients remote access to their medical record and communication with providers. Adults with health literacy limitations are less likely to access and use health information technology (HIT), including PWPs. In diabetes, PWP use has been associated with patient satisfaction, patient-provider communication, and glycemic control. Using mixed methods, we explored the relationships between health literacy, numeracy, and computer literacy and the usage of a PWP and HIT. Participants (N=61 adults with type 2 diabetes) attended focus groups and completed surveys, including measures of health literacy, numeracy, and computer anxiety (an indicator of computer literacy) and frequency of PWP and HIT use. Computer literacy was positively associated with health literacy (r=0.41, P<0.001) and numeracy (r=0.35, P<0.001), but health literacy was not associated with numeracy. Participants with limited health literacy (23%), numeracy (43%), or computer literacy (25%) were no less likely to access PWPs or HIT, but lower health literacy was associated with less frequent use of a computer to research diabetes medications or treatments. In focus groups, participants spontaneously commented on family support when accessing and using PWPs or HIT for diabetes management. Participants reported family members facilitated access and usage of HIT, taught them usage skills, and acted as online delegates. Participant statements suggest family members may bridge the HIT "digital divide" in diabetes by helping adults access a PWP or HIT for diabetes management.

  1. Implications of changes in family dynamics in India: 1971-1988.

    PubMed

    Pathak, K B; Pandey, A; Shajy, K I

    1994-01-01

    "This paper examines the implications of demographic transition...on kinship relationships in India during 1971-1988. Three simulations based on the schedules of fertility and mortality of India during 1971, 1981, and 1988 have been undertaken. The kinship size constitutes parents, grand parents, siblings (brothers and sisters) and children. Improved mortality condition has increased the percentage of kins in ancestor generation. The percentage of kins in ancestor generation was 15 percent in 1988 as compared to 8.5 percent in 1971.... The increase in the percent of kins in ancestor generation and the support ratio obviously shows the aging of the population."

  2. Insights into cytokine-receptor interactions from cytokine engineering.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Jamie B; Moraga, Ignacio; Mendoza, Juan L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines exert a vast array of immunoregulatory actions critical to human biology and disease. However, the desired immunotherapeutic effects of native cytokines are often mitigated by toxicity or lack of efficacy, either of which results from cytokine receptor pleiotropy and/or undesired activation of off-target cells. As our understanding of the structural principles of cytokine-receptor interactions has advanced, mechanism-based manipulation of cytokine signaling through protein engineering has become an increasingly feasible and powerful approach. Modified cytokines, both agonists and antagonists, have been engineered with narrowed target cell specificities, and they have also yielded important mechanistic insights into cytokine biology and signaling. Here we review the theory and practice of cytokine engineering and rationalize the mechanisms of several engineered cytokines in the context of structure. We discuss specific examples of how structure-based cytokine engineering has opened new opportunities for cytokines as drugs, with a focus on the immunotherapeutic cytokines interferon, interleukin-2, and interleukin-4.

  3. Cytokines in Radiobiological Responses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaue, Dörthe; Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; McBride, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines function in many roles that are highly relevant to radiation research. This review focuses on how cytokines are structurally organized, how they are induced by radiation, and how they orchestrate mesenchymal, epithelial and immune cell interactions in irradiated tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are the major components of immediate early gene programs and as such can be rapidly activated after tissue irradiation. They converge with the effects of ionizing radiation in that both generate free radicals including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). “Self” molecules secreted or released from cells after irradiation feed the same paradigm by signaling for ROS and cytokine production. As a result, multilayered feedback control circuits can be generated that perpetuate the radiation tissue damage response. The pro-inflammatory phase persists until such times as perceived challenges to host integrity are eliminated. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory cytokines then act to restore homeostasis. The balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory forces may shift to and fro for a long time after radiation exposure, creating waves as the host tries to deal with persisting pathogenesis. Individual cytokines function within socially interconnected groups to direct these integrated cellular responses. They hunt in packs and form complex cytokine networks that are nested within each other so as to form mutually reinforcing or antagonistic forces. This yin-yang balance appears to have redox as a fulcrum. Because of their social organization, cytokines appear to have a considerable degree of redundancy and it follows that an elevated level of a specific cytokine in a disease situation or after irradiation does not necessarily implicate it causally in pathogenesis. In spite of this, “driver” cytokines are emerging in pathogenic situations that can clearly be targeted for therapeutic benefit, including in radiation settings. Cytokines can greatly

  4. Polyphyly of the extinct family Oviparosiphidae and its implications for inferring aphid evolution (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha).

    PubMed

    Żyła, Dagmara; Homan, Agnieszka; Wegierek, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Aphidoidea, the so-called "true aphids" are one of the most challenging groups in terms of solving the phylogenetic relationships. Morphology-based analyses were strongly affected by widespread homoplasy, while the molecular-based attempts struggled with the lack of sufficient phylogenetic signal. Despite significant improvements, the higher classification still remains unresolved and rather controversial. However, the use of the fossil record, one of the most valuable sources of information, was mainly limited to calibration of a phylogenetic tree, without a direct inclusion into the analysis. The extinct family Oviparosiphidae has long been considered as the common ancestor of all recent Aphidoidea and it was used as a calibration point in several analyses, but it has been never analyzed in a phylogenetic context. The family has been treated as a monophyletic group purely based on the simultaneous presence of two abdominal structures, ovipositor and siphunculi. However, it has been shown recently that at least one more extinct lineage, present at the same time, was characterized by the same features. For these reasons, we performed a maximum parsimony analysis using morphological data for extinct aphid taxa to prove the monophyly of Oviparosiphidae. Our analysis shows that the presumed ancestor lineage of recent aphids is a polyphyletic group. Our results support the hypothesis of an early Mesozoic rapid radiation of aphids, which led to several different lineages characterized by both ovipositor and siphunculi. The results indicate the necessity of examining the other extinct families, and shows that the diversity of aphids before the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (KTR) was higher than expected. Even though there is not enough data to perform a formal analysis, fossils seem to suggest a significant impact of the KTR on aphid diversification. Additionally, we have made a redescription of two genera and description of a new species, Vitimaphis subridens sp

  5. Polyphyly of the extinct family Oviparosiphidae and its implications for inferring aphid evolution (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha)

    PubMed Central

    Żyła, Dagmara; Homan, Agnieszka; Wegierek, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Aphidoidea, the so-called "true aphids" are one of the most challenging groups in terms of solving the phylogenetic relationships. Morphology-based analyses were strongly affected by widespread homoplasy, while the molecular-based attempts struggled with the lack of sufficient phylogenetic signal. Despite significant improvements, the higher classification still remains unresolved and rather controversial. However, the use of the fossil record, one of the most valuable sources of information, was mainly limited to calibration of a phylogenetic tree, without a direct inclusion into the analysis. The extinct family Oviparosiphidae has long been considered as the common ancestor of all recent Aphidoidea and it was used as a calibration point in several analyses, but it has been never analyzed in a phylogenetic context. The family has been treated as a monophyletic group purely based on the simultaneous presence of two abdominal structures, ovipositor and siphunculi. However, it has been shown recently that at least one more extinct lineage, present at the same time, was characterized by the same features. For these reasons, we performed a maximum parsimony analysis using morphological data for extinct aphid taxa to prove the monophyly of Oviparosiphidae. Our analysis shows that the presumed ancestor lineage of recent aphids is a polyphyletic group. Our results support the hypothesis of an early Mesozoic rapid radiation of aphids, which led to several different lineages characterized by both ovipositor and siphunculi. The results indicate the necessity of examining the other extinct families, and shows that the diversity of aphids before the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (KTR) was higher than expected. Even though there is not enough data to perform a formal analysis, fossils seem to suggest a significant impact of the KTR on aphid diversification. Additionally, we have made a redescription of two genera and description of a new species, Vitimaphis subridens sp

  6. Interaction of TACC proteins with the FHL family: implications for ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lauffart, Brenda; Sondarva, Gautam V.; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Cincotta, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The Transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) proteins play a conserved role in normal development and tumorigenesis through interactions with multiple complexes involved in transcription, translation, and centrosomal dynamics. However, despite significant work on the function of TACC3 in the control of centrosomal mechanics, relatively little functional data is known about the family’s founding member, TACC1. From a continued analysis of clones isolated by an unbiased yeast two-hybrid assay, we now show direct physical interactions between the TACC1 and the FHL (Four and a Half LIM-only) family of proteins. The authenticity of these interactions was validated both in vitro and in cellular systems. The FHLs exhibit diverse biological roles such as the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and are promiscuous coregulators for several transcription factors. The interaction of the endogenous TACC-FHL proteins is primarily localized to the nucleus. However, similar to FHL2, overexpression of TACC1A in HEK293 is able to sequester serum activated ERK to the cytoplasm. This has the effect of reducing the serum induced transcriptional response of the c-fos and c-jun genes. The observation that TACCs can interact with the FHLs and alter their serum induced activities raises the possibility that the TACCs participate in crosstalk between cell signaling pathways important for cancer development and tumor progression. The transforming acidic coiled coil genes are known to be important prognostic indicators for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In this manuscript, we identify a novel interaction between the TACCs and the FHL protein family. This interaction has an affect on ERK and may in part explain the variable associations and changes in subcellular locations of each family with specific subtypes of malignancy. PMID:18481206

  7. Cross-cultural perspectives: implications for attachment theory and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Minuchin, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Cross-cultural perspectives have always been useful for understanding behavior. They clarify the distinction between aspects that are essentially part of the human condition and those that are the most responsive to variation. The interesting article by Rothbaum and his colleagues is in that tradition, contrasting the cultural values and family patterns in Japanese society with those of Western cultures, including our own, and suggesting that these differences shape the nature and course of attachment. It stimulates questions about what we have taken for granted in our theories and in our evaluations of dysfunctional behavior.

  8. Meeting demand for family planning within a generation: prospects and implications at country level.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjoung; Fabic, Madeleine Short; Hounton, Sennen; Koroma, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    In order to track progress towards the target of universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services of the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a measure (demand for family planning satisfied with modern contraceptive methods) and a benchmark (at least 75% by 2030 in all countries) have been recommended. The goal of this study was to assess the prospects of reaching the benchmark at the country level. Such information can facilitate strategic planning, including resource allocation at global and country levels. We selected 63 countries based on their status as least developed according to the United Nations or as a priority country in global family planning initiatives. Using United Nations estimates and projections of family planning indicators between 1970 and 2030, we calculated percent demand for family planning satisfied with modern contraceptive methods for each year and country. We then calculated the annual percentage point changes between 2014 and 2030 required to meet the benchmark. The required rates of change were compared to current projections as well as estimates between 1970 and 2010. To reach the benchmark on average across the 63 countries, demand satisfied with modern methods must increase by 2.2 percentage points per year between 2014 and 2030 - more than double current projections. Between 1970 and 2010, such rapid progress was observed in 24 study countries but typically spanning 5-10 years. At currently projected rates, only 9 of the 63 study countries will reach the benchmark. Meanwhile, the gap between projected and required changes is largest in the Central and West African regions, 0.9 and 3.0 percentage points per year, respectively. If the benchmark is achieved, 334 million women across the study countries will use a modern contraceptive method in 2030, compared to 226 million women in 2014. In order to achieve the component of the SDGs calling for universal access to sexual and reproductive health services

  9. Meeting demand for family planning within a generation: prospects and implications at country level

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoonjoung; Fabic, Madeleine Short; Hounton, Sennen; Koroma, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to track progress towards the target of universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services of the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a measure (demand for family planning satisfied with modern contraceptive methods) and a benchmark (at least 75% by 2030 in all countries) have been recommended. Objectives The goal of this study was to assess the prospects of reaching the benchmark at the country level. Such information can facilitate strategic planning, including resource allocation at global and country levels. Design We selected 63 countries based on their status as least developed according to the United Nations or as a priority country in global family planning initiatives. Using United Nations estimates and projections of family planning indicators between 1970 and 2030, we calculated percent demand for family planning satisfied with modern contraceptive methods for each year and country. We then calculated the annual percentage point changes between 2014 and 2030 required to meet the benchmark. The required rates of change were compared to current projections as well as estimates between 1970 and 2010. Results To reach the benchmark on average across the 63 countries, demand satisfied with modern methods must increase by 2.2 percentage points per year between 2014 and 2030 – more than double current projections. Between 1970 and 2010, such rapid progress was observed in 24 study countries but typically spanning 5–10 years. At currently projected rates, only 9 of the 63 study countries will reach the benchmark. Meanwhile, the gap between projected and required changes is largest in the Central and West African regions, 0.9 and 3.0 percentage points per year, respectively. If the benchmark is achieved, 334 million women across the study countries will use a modern contraceptive method in 2030, compared to 226 million women in 2014. Conclusions In order to achieve the component of the SDGs calling for universal

  10. Autophagy in the Degenerating Human Intervertebral Disc: In Vivo Molecular and Morphological Evidence, and Induction of Autophagy in Cultured Annulus Cells Exposed to Proinflammatory Cytokines-Implications for Disc Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helen E; Hoelscher, Gretchen L; Ingram, Jane A; Bethea, Synthia; Hanley, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Autophagy-related gene expression and ultrastructural features of autophagy were studied in human discs. To obtain molecular/morphological data on autophagy in human disc degeneration and cultured human annulus cells exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy is an important process by which cytoplasm and organelles are degraded; this adaptive response to sublethal stresses (such as nutrient deprivation present in disc degeneration) supplies needed metabolites. Little is known about autophagic processes during disc degeneration. Human disc specimens were obtained after institutional review board approval. Annulus mRNA was analyzed to determine autophagy-related gene expression levels. Immunolocalization and ultrastructural studies for p62, ATG3, ATG4B, ATG4C, ATG7, L3A, ULK-2, and beclin were conducted. In vitro experiments used IL-1β- or TNF-α-treated human annulus cells to test for autophagy-related gene expression. More degenerated versus healthier discs showed significantly greater upregulation of well-recognized autophagy-related genes (P ≤ 0.028): beclin 1 (upregulated 1.6-fold); ATG8 (LC3) (upregulated 2.0-fold); ATG12 (upregulated 4.0-fold); presenilin 1 (upregulated 1.6-fold); cathepsin B (upregulated 4.5-fold). p62 was localized, and ultrastructure showed autophagic vacuolization and autophagosomes with complex, redundant whorls of membrane-derived material. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines significantly upregulated autophagy-related genes (P ≤ 0.04): DRAM1 (6.24-fold); p62 (4.98-fold); PIM-2 oncogene, a positive regulator of autophagy (3-fold); WIPI49 (linked to starvation-induced autophagy) (upregulated 2.3-fold). Data provide initial molecular and morphological evidence for the presence of autophagy in the degenerating human annulus. In vivo gene analyses showed greater autophagy-related gene expression in more degenerated than healthier discs. In vitro data suggested a mechanism implicating a role of TNF-α and IL-1β in disc autophagy

  11. The prevalence of intimate partner violence in the family: a systematic review of the implications for adolescents in Africa.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicolette V; Frantz, José M

    2013-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and its multiple effects are well documented in Western research, but these are not adequately described in Africa. The effects of IPV on adolescent health and well-being are not conclusive. The aim of this review was to systematically appraise prevalence studies conducted on the African continent to establish the prevalence of IPV and the implications of exposure on adolescents in Africa. A comprehensive search was conducted in May 2012 for the previous 10 years, using databases such as Ebscohost (Medline, CINAHL, PsyArticles), Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Project Muse and BioMed Central and also specific journals Lancet, and JSTOR. Two reviewers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the studies reviewed. Seven eligible epidemiological studies were included in this review. Five of the studies were conducted in South Africa, one in Liberia, and another was a multi-country study that included Egypt, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda and Zambia. The prevalence of IPV in African countries ranged from approximately 26.5% to 48%. All studies reported exposure to family violence during childhood. The findings support the global burden of IPV. There is also a need for standardized tools to determine IPV in Africa and a clear definition that can be used in research to allow comparison with future IPV studies. In addition, the studies point to a need for interventions focusing on adolescents exposed to family violence.

  12. All subtypes of the Pmp adhesin family are implicated in chlamydial virulence and show species-specific function

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elisabeth; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and C. pneumoniae are obligate intracellular parasites, cause a number of serious diseases, and can infect various cell types in humans. Chlamydial infections are probably initiated by binding of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmcB to host cell glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we show that all nine members of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family of C. trachomatis mediate adhesion to human epithelial and endothelial cells. Importantly, exposure of infectious particles to soluble recombinant Pmps blocks subsequent infection, thus implicating an important function of the entire protein family in the infection process. Analogous experiments with pairs of recombinant Pmps or a combination of Pmp and OmcB revealed that all Pmps probably act in an adhesion pathway that is distinct from the OmcB-GAG pathway. Finally, we provide evidence that the Pmps of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae exhibit species and tissue specificity. These findings argue for the involvement of C. trachomatis Pmps in the initial phase of infection and suggest that they may interact with a receptor other than the epidermal growth factor receptor recently identified for their counterparts in C. pneumoniae. PMID:24985494

  13. Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia maps to a 6p25 region implicated in primary congenital glaucoma and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T; Ebenezer, N; Manners, R; McGill, J; Bhattacharya, S

    1997-01-01

    Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia (FGI) is a form of open-angle glaucoma in which developmental anomalies of the iris and irido-corneal angle are associated with a juvenile-onset glaucoma transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A single large family with this disorder was examined for genetic linkage to microsatellite markers. A peak LOD score of 11.63 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained with marker D6S967 mapping to chromosome 6p25. Haplotype analysis places the disease gene in a 6.4-cM interval between the markers D6S1713 and D6S1600. Two novel clinical appearances extend the phenotypic range and provide evidence of variable expressivity. The chromosome 6p25 region is now implicated in FGI, primary congenital glaucoma, and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly. This may indicate the presence of a common causative gene or, alternatively, a cluster of genes involved in eye development/function. Images Figure 2 PMID:9382099

  14. Alternative Reproductive Technologies: Implications for Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (May 21, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    A hearing was held for the purpose of receiving testimony about alternative reproductive technologies and their implications for children, families, and society. Testimony provided: (1) a comparison of in vitro fertilization and gamete intrafallopian transfer, and trends in in vitro fertilization; (2) a summary of definitions, statistics, and the…

  15. MicroRNA208 family in cardiovascular diseases: therapeutic implication and potential biomarker.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains to be a severe and yet unsolved health problem that has become a leading threat to human health. It is urgent to explore early diagnostic biomarker and innovative therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are conserved endogenous, non-coding small RNAs that are essential modulators of gene expression by inhibiting translation or promoting degradation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). A large range of functions has been attributed to miRNAs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. So far, miRNAs have shown characteristic changes in expression during the process of cardiovascular disease that may act as potential biomarkers. A series of studies have clearly discovered that the miR-208 family is closely associated with the development of cardiac diseases, such as myocardial hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, and heart failure. In this review, we will highlight novel insights into miR-208 family functions and discuss it as potential biomarker and therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases.

  16. The Freud-1/CC2D1A family: transcriptional regulators implicated in mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Rogaeva, Anastasia; Galaraga, Kimberly; Albert, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    The CC2D1A gene family consists of two homologous genes, Freud-1/CC2D1A and Freud-2/CC2D1B, that share conserved domains, including several DM14 domains that are specific to this protein family, a C-terminal helix-loop-helix domain, and a C2 calcium-dependent phospholipid binding domain. Although the function of Freud-2 is unknown, Freud-1 has been shown to function as a transcriptional repressor of the serotonin-1A receptor gene that binds to a novel DNA element (FRE, 5'-repressor element). The DNA binding and repressor activities of Freud-1 are inhibited by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Recently, a deletion in the CC2D1A gene has been linked to nonsyndromic mental retardation. This deletion results in the truncation of the helix-loop-helix DNA binding and the C2 domains, crucial for Freud-1 repressor activity, and hence is predicted to generate an inactive or weakly dominant negative protein. The possible mechanisms by which inactivation of Freud-1 could lead to abnormal cortical development and cognitive impairment and the potential roles of Freud-1 gene targets are discussed.

  17. Production of MMP-9 and inflammatory cytokines by Trypanosoma cruzi-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; da Silva, Wellington Seguins; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; da Silva Vasconcelos Sousa, Periela; de Araujo Soares, Renata Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) dependent endopeptidases implicated in tissue remodeling and chronic inflammation. MMPs also play key roles in the activation of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines produced by many cell types, including lymphocytes, granulocytes, and, in particular, activated macrophages. Their synthesis and secretion appear to be important in a number of physiological processes, including the inflammatory process. Here, we investigated the interaction between human and mouse macrophages with T. cruzi Colombian and Y strains to characterize MMP-9 and cytokine production in this system. Supernatants and total extract of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages were obtained and used to assess MMP-9 profile and inflammatory cytokines. The presence of metalloproteinase activity was determined by zymography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting assays. The effect of cytokines on MMP-9 production in human macrophages was verified by previous incubation of cytokines on these cells in culture, and analyzed by zymography. We detected an increase in MMP-9 production in the culture supernatants of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages. The addition of IL-1β or TNF-α to human macrophage cultures increased MMP-9 production. In contrast, MMP-9 production was down-modulated when human macrophage cultures were treated with IFN-γ or IL-4 before infection. Human macrophages infected with T. cruzi Y or Colombian strains produced increased levels of MMP-9, which was related to the production of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of Th1 and Th2 cytokines of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Konnai, S; Okagawa, T; Githaka, N W; Kariuki, E; Gakuya, F; Kanduma, E; Shirai, T; Ikebuchi, R; Ikenaka, Y; Ishizuka, M; Murata, S; Ohashi, K

    2012-04-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) has been implicated as the reservoir of several bovine infectious agents. However, there is insufficient information on the protective immune responses in the African buffalo, particularly in infected animals. In this study, we analysed Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ, and Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. The cloned cDNA of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ contained an open reading frame of 468, 501, 408 and 540 nucleotides, encoding polypeptides of 155, 166, 135 and 179 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide sequence homology of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-4 was more than 98% between the African buffalo and cattle, which resulted in identical polypeptides. Meanwhile, IL-10 gene of African buffalo and cattle had 95% homology in nucleotide sequence, corresponding to thirteen amino acid residues substitution. Cysteine residues and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the family Bovinae. Phylogenetic analyses including cytokines of the African buffalo placed them within a cluster comprised mainly of species belonging to the order Artiodactyla, including cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goat, pig and artiodactyl wildlife. A deeper understanding of the structure of these cytokines will shed light on their protective role in the disease-resistant African buffalo in comparison with other closely related species.

  19. Recombinant cytokines from plants.

    PubMed

    Sirko, Agnieszka; Vaněk, Tomas; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Redkiewicz, Patrycja

    2011-01-01

    Plant-based platforms have been successfully applied for the last two decades for the efficient production of pharmaceutical proteins. The number of commercialized products biomanufactured in plants is, however, rather discouraging. Cytokines are small glycosylated polypeptides used in the treatment of cancer, immune disorders and various other related diseases. Because the clinical use of cytokines is limited by high production costs they are good candidates for plant-made pharmaceuticals. Several research groups explored the possibilities of cost-effective production of animal cytokines in plant systems. This review summarizes recent advances in this field.

  20. Cytokines and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Phan, S H

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, significant progress in many aspects of pulmonary fibrosis research has been made. Among them, the finding that a variety of cytokines play important roles in the complex process appears most intriguing. These cytokines include at least transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factors, (TGF-alpha), interleukin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. These cytokines have been demonstrated to be produced at the sites of active fibrosis where they appear to be expressed by activated inflammatory cells, such as macrophages and eosinophils. More interestingly, other noninflammatory lung cells including mesenchymal cells, such as myofibroblasts, and epithelial cells, have been found to be significant sources as well, albeit in most instances at somewhat different time points than those by inflammatory cells. Study of the individual cytokines in vitro has revealed a variety of potential roles for these cytokines in the regulation of the fibrotic process in vivo, including chemoattractant, mitogenic activities for fibroblasts, stimulation of extracellular matrix and alpha-smooth muscle actin gene expression, alteration of the contractile phenotype of fibroblasts and regulation of diverse functions of lung inflammatory and epithelial cells which can further impact on the fibrotic process by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Of these cytokines, it appears that TGF-beta is probably the most important cytokine in terms of the direct stimulation of lung matrix expression which typifies fibrosis. Recently however, there is accumulating evidence to indicate that the situation is much more complex than any one single cytokine being solely responsible for the fibrotic response. The concept of complex lung cytokine networks, orchestrated by a few key cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, being responsible for this response has

  1. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K.; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P.; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa. PMID:26731612

  2. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa.

  3. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and cytokines genes in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Sippert, Emília Ângela; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility.

  4. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and Cytokines Genes in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility. PMID:23936864

  5. Research Review: The Role of Cytokines in Depression in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Natalie T.; Scott, James G.; Wray, Naomi R.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While cytokines have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression in adults, the potential role in younger age groups such as adolescents is less clear. This article therefore reviews the literature (a) to explore the relationship between cytokines and depression in adolescents, and (b) to examine how cytokines may be related…

  6. Research Review: The Role of Cytokines in Depression in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Natalie T.; Scott, James G.; Wray, Naomi R.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While cytokines have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression in adults, the potential role in younger age groups such as adolescents is less clear. This article therefore reviews the literature (a) to explore the relationship between cytokines and depression in adolescents, and (b) to examine how cytokines may be related…

  7. Ligand Activation of TAM Family Receptors-Implications for Tumor Biology and Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Davra, Viralkumar; Kimani, Stanley G.; Calianese, David; Birge, Raymond B.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM family of receptors (i.e., Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and their ligands Growth arrest specific factor 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1) contribute to several oncogenic processes, such as cell survival, invasion, migration, chemo-resistance, and metastasis, whereby expression often correlates with poor clinical outcomes. In recent years, there has been great interest in the study of TAM receptors in cancer, stemming both from their roles as oncogenic signaling receptors, as well as their roles in tumor immunology. As a result, several classes of TAM inhibitors that include small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, decoy receptors, as well as novel strategies to target TAM ligands are being developed. This paper will review the biology of TAM receptors and their ligands with a focus on cancer, as well as evidence-based data for the continued pursuit of TAM/Gas6 inhibitors in clinical practice. PMID:27916840

  8. Mothers' and fathers' racial socialization in African American families: implications for youth.

    PubMed

    McHale, Susan M; Crouter, Ann C; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Burton, Linda M; Davis, Kelly D; Dotterer, Aryn M; Swanson, Dena P

    2006-01-01

    Mothers' and fathers' cultural socialization and bias preparation with older (M=13.9 years) and younger (M=10.31 years) siblings were studied in 162 two-parent, African American families. Analyses examined whether parental warmth and offspring age and gender were linked to parental practices and whether parents' warmth, spouses' racial socialization, or youth age or gender moderated links between racial socialization and youth outcomes. Parental warmth was linked to parents' socialization. Mothers engaged in more socialization with older offspring, and fathers more with sons. Mothers' cultural socialization was positively related to youth ethnic identity and fathers' was negatively related to youth depression symptoms. Youth exhibited a lower locus of control when mothers were high but fathers were low in racial socialization.

  9. Urban adolescent mothers exposed to community, family, and partner violence: prevalence, outcomes, and welfare policy implications.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Angie C

    2006-01-01

    The federal welfare reforms of 1996 mandated that all minor adolescent mothers receiving cash assistance must attend school and live at home to receive their cash grant. Though this law has been in place for over 8 years, little research has been done that explores the barriers facing adolescent mothers who try to attend school and live at home. Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from welfare reform evaluation studies suggests that violence may be just such a barrier. This article reviews the recent empirical literature on urban adolescent mothers' exposure to multiple forms of violence. The author delineates and critiques the existing research on the prevalence of and outcomes linked with exposure to community violence, witnessed parental violence, physical abuse within the family, and partner violence among this population. The article concludes with recommendations for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in light of the reviewed findings.

  10. [Molecular and cellular characterization ion of IKAP protein and the Elongator complex. Implications for familial dysautonomia].

    PubMed

    Close, P; Creppe, C; Cornez, I; Chariot, M A; Chariot, A

    2007-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD), a severe neuro-developmental and neurodegenerative genetic disorder, is caused by mutations of IKBKAP encoding a subunit of Elongator. FD patients have decreased expression of IKAP in a tissue-specific manner and consequently impaired Elongator function. The biological roles of human IKAP/Elongator remained elusive for a while. However, recent data based on the generation of cellular loss of function models of IKAP through RNA interference strongly suggest a role for this protein in transcriptional elongation. Other data also provide evidence for a role of Elongator in tRNA modifications. Importantly, cells depleted for IKAP have defects in cell motility because of impaired transcriptional elongation of some genes coding for proteins involved in cell migration. Therefore, cell motility deficiency seen in IKAP depleted cells may underlie the neuropathology of FD patients.

  11. Functional conservation of suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins between teleosts and mammals: Atlantic salmon SOCS1 binds to JAK/STAT family members and suppresses type I and II IFN signaling.

    PubMed

    Skjesol, Astrid; Liebe, Theresa; Iliev, Dimitar B; Thomassen, Ernst I S; Tollersrud, Linn Greiner; Sobhkhez, Mehrdad; Lindenskov Joensen, Lisbeth; Secombes, Christopher J; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2014-07-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are crucially involved in the control of inflammatory responses through their impact on various signaling pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway. Although all SOCS protein family members are identified in teleost fish, their functional properties in non-mammalian vertebrates have not been extensively studied. To gain further insight into SOCS functions in bony fish, we have identified and characterized the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) SOCS1, SOCS2 and CISH genes. These genes exhibited sequence conservation with their mammalian counterparts and they were ubiquitously expressed. SOCS1 in mammalian species has been recognized as a key negative regulator of interferon (IFN) signaling and recent data for the two model fish Tetraodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) suggest that these functions are conserved from teleost to mammals. In agreement with this we here demonstrate a strong negative regulatory activity of salmon SOCS1 on type I and type II IFN signaling, while SOCS2a and b and CISH only moderately affected IFN responses. SOCS1 also inhibited IFNγ-induced nuclear localization of STAT1 and a direct interaction between SOCS1 and STAT1 and between SOCS1 and the Tyk2 kinase was found. Using SOCS1 mutants lacking either the KIR domain or the ESS, SH2 and SOCS box domains showed that all domains affected the ability of SOCS1 to inhibit IFN-mediated signaling. These results are the first to demonstrate that SOCS1 is a potent inhibitor of IFN-mediated JAK-STAT signaling in teleost fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Common mutations of familial hypercholesterolemia patients in Taiwan: characteristics and implications of migrations from southeast China.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Charng, Min-Ji

    2012-04-25

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B-100 (APOB), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. This study investigated FH patients carrying common mutations in Taiwan and compared them to FH southeastern Asians. Causal FH mutations were identified by exon-by-exon sequencing with/without multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification among 208 Taiwanese with clinically diagnosed FH. Haplotype analyses among probands and family members were undertaken using TaqMan® Assays. Totally, LDLR mutations were found in 118 probands, consisting of 61 different loci, and APOB 10579C>T mutations in 12 probands. Three mutations (64delG, 1661C>T, and 2099A>G) were novel. LDLR 986G>A (13.1%), 1747C>T (10.8%), and APOB 10579C>T (9.2%) were common mutations with no differences in phenotypes. LDLR 1747C>T associated with one haplotype (CAAGCCCCATGG/(dTA)n-112nt); LDLR 986G>A with two. APOB 10579C>T associated with the same LDLR binding-domain pattern in Taiwanese and southeastern Asians. We concluded that LDLR 986G>A, 1747C>T and APOB 10579C>T are common mutations, with combined frequency of approximately 33%. The presence of different haplotypes associated with FH common mutations in Taiwan indicates multiple historical migrations, probable multiple recurrent origins from southern China, and haplotype homologies reflect the presence of common ancestors in southern China.

  13. Clinical and functional data implicate the Arg(151)Ser variant of MSX1 in familial hypodontia.

    PubMed

    Kamamoto, Munefumi; Machida, Junichiro; Yamaguchi, Seishi; Kimura, Masashi; Ono, Takao; Jezewski, Peter A; Higashi, Yujiro; Nakayama, Atsuo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tokita, Yoshihito

    2011-08-01

    Multiple previous reports confirm that several missense alleles of MSX1 exhibit Mendelian inheritance of an oligodontia phenotype (agenesis of more than six secondary teeth besides third molars). However, the extent to which missense MSX1 alleles contribute to common, multifactorial disorders is less certain. It is still not yet clear whether multiple non-synonomous MSX1-coding variants identified among patients with oral clefting are merely neutral polymorphisms or whether any of these might represent real mutations with mild effects. The present work steps toward resolving these issues for at least one MSX1 allele: R151S, previously identified in a single Japanese proband with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Candidate gene sequencing within a patient cohort demonstrating mild tooth agenesis (loss of six or less secondary teeth besides third molars, hypodontia), secondarily identified this same MSX1 variant, functioning as a mildly deleterious, moderately penetrant allele. Four of five heterozygous R151S individuals from one Japanese family exhibited the hypodontia phenotype. The in vitro functional assays of the variant protein display partial repression activity with normal nuclear localization. These data establish that the MSX1-R151S allele is a low-frequency, mildly deleterious allele for familial hypodontia that alone is insufficient to cause oral facial clefting. Yet, as this work also establishes its hypomorphic nature, it suggests that it may in fact contribute to the likelihood of common birth disorder phenotypes, such as partial tooth agenesis and oral facial clefting. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism in which differential pleiotropy is manifested will need further and deeper clinical and functional analyses.

  14. Clinical and functional data implicate the Arg(151)Ser variant of MSX1 in familial hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    Kamamoto, Munefumi; Machida, Junichiro; Yamaguchi, Seishi; Kimura, Masashi; Ono, Takao; Jezewski, Peter A; Higashi, Yujiro; Nakayama, Atsuo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tokita, Yoshihito

    2011-01-01

    Multiple previous reports confirm that several missense alleles of MSX1 exhibit Mendelian inheritance of an oligodontia phenotype (agenesis of more than six secondary teeth besides third molars). However, the extent to which missense MSX1 alleles contribute to common, multifactorial disorders is less certain. It is still not yet clear whether multiple non-synonomous MSX1-coding variants identified among patients with oral clefting are merely neutral polymorphisms or whether any of these might represent real mutations with mild effects. The present work steps toward resolving these issues for at least one MSX1 allele: R151S, previously identified in a single Japanese proband with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Candidate gene sequencing within a patient cohort demonstrating mild tooth agenesis (loss of six or less secondary teeth besides third molars, hypodontia), secondarily identified this same MSX1 variant, functioning as a mildly deleterious, moderately penetrant allele. Four of five heterozygous R151S individuals from one Japanese family exhibited the hypodontia phenotype. The in vitro functional assays of the variant protein display partial repression activity with normal nuclear localization. These data establish that the MSX1-R151S allele is a low-frequency, mildly deleterious allele for familial hypodontia that alone is insufficient to cause oral facial clefting. Yet, as this work also establishes its hypomorphic nature, it suggests that it may in fact contribute to the likelihood of common birth disorder phenotypes, such as partial tooth agenesis and oral facial clefting. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism in which differential pleiotropy is manifested will need further and deeper clinical and functional analyses. PMID:21448236

  15. Familial Turner syndrome with an X;Y translocation mosaicism: implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Portnoï, Marie-France; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Carbonne, Bruno; Beaujard, Marie-Paule; Keren, Boris; Lévy, Jonathan; Dommergues, Marc; Cabrol, Sylvie; Hyon, Capucine; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous fertility is rare among patients with Turner syndrome and is most likely in women with mosaicism for a normal 46,XX cell line. We report an unusual case of familial Turner syndrome with mosaicism for a novel X;Y translocation involving Xp and Yp. The chromosomal analysis was carried out through cytogenetics and molecular karyotyping using a SNP array platform. The mother, a Turner syndrome woman, diagnosed in midchildhood because of short stature, was found to have a 45,X/46,X,der(X)t(X;Y)(p11.4;p11.2) karyotype, with a predominant 45,X cell line. Her parents decided against prophylactic gonadectomy, generally recommended at an early age when Y chromosome has been identified, because at age 13, she had spontaneous puberty and menarche. She reached a final height of 154 cm after treatment with growth hormone. At age 24, she became spontaneously pregnant. She had a mild aortic coarctation and close follow-up cardiac evaluation, including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, had been performed during her pregnancy, which progressed uneventfully, except for intra-uterine growth retardation. Prenatal diagnosis revealed a female karyotype, with transmission of the maternal translocation with an unexpected different mosaic:47,X,der(X)t(X;Y)x2/46,X,der(X)t(X;Y) karyotype. This complex and unusual karyotype, including a mosaic partial trisomy X and a non-mosaic Xpter-Xp11.4 monosomy, results in transmission of Turner syndrome from mother to daughter. At birth, the girl had normal physical examination except for growth retardation. This family illustrates the complexity and difficulties, in term of patient counseling and management in Turner syndrome, in determining ovarian status, fertility planning, risks associated with pregnancies, particularly when mosaicism for Y material chromosome is identified.

  16. Inhibiting inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kluth, D C; Rees, A J

    1996-11-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction and ultimately renal failure. The inflammation involved is a tightly regulated response with pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines playing key roles. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by intrinsic cells and infiltrating leukocytes. IL-1 and TNF can be directly antagonized using IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) or binding proteins such as soluble receptors or antibodies. Alternatively, cytokines with anti-inflammatory properties can be used to decrease IL-1 and TNF synthesis, increase the production of their natural antagonists and deactivate inflammatory cells such as macrophages. This review will focus on these anti-inflammatory cytokines, principally IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13, and highlight recent research of their activities in existing models of renal disease. The results of these experiments offer a promising new avenue of treatment.

  17. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27775650

  18. The role of cytokines in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brincat, S D; Borg, M; Camilleri, G; Calleja-Agius, J

    2014-08-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a silent systemic progressive disease characterised by a decrease in bone mass per unit volume. This condition compromises the physical strength of the skeleton and increases the susceptibility to fractures on minor trauma. The imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption is known to be responsible for postmenopausal bone loss. Estrogen deficiency contributes to bone loss by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow and bone cells. Clinical and molecular evidence indicates that estrogen-regulated cytokines exert regulatory effects on bone turnover implicating their role as being the primary mediators of the accelerated bone loss at menopause. The current perspective on the role and interaction of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ and TGF-β in bone loss linked with estrogen deficiency is reviewed. Current treatment options and emerging drug therapies in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis are also evaluated.

  19. Phylogeography of the ancient catfish family Diplomystidae: biogeographic, systematic, and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ramírez, C P; Unmack, P J; Habit, E; Johnson, J B; Cussac, V E; Victoriano, P

    2014-04-01

    The catfish family Diplomystidae is one of the earliest branching lineages within the diverse order Siluriformes and shows a deep phylogenetic split from all other extant and extinct major catfish groups. Despite its relevance in the evolution of siluriforms, phylogenetic relationships within the Diplomystidae are poorly understood, and prior to this study, no phylogenetic hypotheses using molecular data had been published. By conducting a phylogeographic study across the entire distribution of the family, that encompasses river systems from Central-South Chile and Argentina, we provide the first molecular phylogenetic hypothesis among all known species of Diplomystidae, and in addition, investigate how their evolutionary history relates to major historical events that took place in southern South America. Our phylogenetic analyses show four main lineages and nine sub-lineages strongly structured geographically. All Pacific basin populations, with one exception (those found in the Baker basin) clustered within three of the four main lineages (clades I-III), while all populations from Atlantic basins and those from the Baker basin clustered in a single main clade (clade IV). There was a tendency for genetic diversity to decrease from north to south for Pacific basins consistent with an increasing north-south ice coverage during the last glacial maximum. However, we did not find a statistically significant correlation between genetic diversity and latitude. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that river basins and the barrier created by the Andes Mountains explained a high percentage of the genetic variation. Interestingly, most of the genetic variation among drainages was explained among Pacific basins. Molecular phylogenetic analyses agree only partially with current systematics. The geographical distribution of main lineages did not match species distribution and suggests a new taxonomic hypothesis with support for four species of Diplomystes, three

  20. Implications of climate change for the reproductive capacity and survival of New World silversides (family Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Strüssmann, C A; Conover, D O; Somoza, G M; Miranda, L A

    2010-11-01

    The New World silversides (family Atherinopsidae) are found in marine, estuarine and inland waters of North, Central and South America, where they are ecologically important as forage fishes and sometimes economically important for commercial and recreational fisheries. This report reviews the knowledge of the reproductive attributes of temperate and subtropical atherinopsids in relation to temperature and discusses the potential effects of climate change on their reproduction and adaptive responses. Their reproductive cycles are primarily entrained by photoperiod with high temperature acting as a limiting factor. They are generally multiple spawners which release successive batches of eggs in spring, but some species can spawn also in autumn and even summer when temperatures do not increase excessively. The decoupling of temperature patterns and photoperiod with further global warming and associated asymmetric thermal fluctuations could lead to spawning at times or temperatures that are unsuitable for larval development and growth. Many members of this family show temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), where the phenotypic sex of an individual is determined partly or wholly by the temperature experienced during gonadal sex differentiation, and high-temperature induced germ cell degeneration and decreased fertility. The predicted short-term reproductive responses of atherinopsids to climate change therefore include acceleration, shortening or overall disruption of spawning activity, and also more subtle, but nonetheless equally population-threatening, dysfunctions such as highly skewed sex ratios and partial or total loss of fertility. In the case of species with TSD, asymmetric thermal fluctuations could also cause larvae to encounter temperatures lower than normal during early development and be feminized. Such dysfunctions have been documented already in natural populations but are confined so far to landlocked, inland water habitats, perhaps because

  1. The Human Coparental Bond Implicates Distinct Corticostriatal Pathways: Longitudinal Impact on Family Formation and Child Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Eyal; Gilam, Gadi; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Jacob, Yael; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna; Hendler, Talma; Feldman, Ruth

    2017-11-01

    Alloparental care, the cooperative care of offspring by group members other than the biological mother, has been widely practiced since early hominin evolution to increase infant survival and thriving. The coparental bond-a relationship of solidarity and commitment between two adults who join their effort to care for children-is a central contributor to children's well-being and sociality; yet, the neural basis of coparenting has not been studied in humans. Here, we followed 84 first-time co-parents (42 couples) across the first 6 years of family formation, including opposite-sex and same-sex couples, measured brain response to coparental stimuli, observed collaborative and undermining coparental behaviors in infancy and preschool, assayed oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP), and measured coparenting and child behavior problems at 6 years. Across family types, coparental stimuli activated the striatum, specifically the ventral striatum and caudate, striatal nodes implicated in motivational goal-directed social behavior. Psychophysiological interaction analysis indicated that both nodes were functionally coupled with the vmPFC in support of the human coparental bond and this connectivity was stronger as collaborative coparental behavior increased. Furthermore, caudate functional connectivity patterns differentiated distinct corticostriatal pathways associated with two stable coparental behavioral styles; stronger caudate-vmPFC connectivity was associated with more collaborative coparenting and was linked to OT, whereas a stronger caudate-dACC connectivity was associated with increase in undermining coparenting and was related to AVP. Finally, dyadic path-analysis model indicated that the parental caudate-vmPFC connectivity in infancy predicted lower child externalizing symptoms at 6 years as mediated by collaborative coparenting in preschool. Findings indicate that the coparental bond is underpinned by striatal activations and corticostriatal connectivity similar to

  2. The kindlin family: functions, signaling properties and implications for human disease.

    PubMed

    Rognoni, Emanuel; Ruppert, Raphael; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The kindlin (or fermitin) family of proteins comprises three members (kindlin-1,-2 and -3) of evolutionarily conserved focal adhesion (FA) proteins, whose best-known task is to increase integrin affinity for a ligand (also referred as integrin activation) through binding of β-integrin tails. The consequence of kindlin-mediated integrin activation and integrin-ligand binding is cell adhesion, spreading and migration, assembly of the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. Another hallmark of kindlins is their involvement in disease. Mutations in the KINDLIN-1 (also known as FERMT1) gene cause Kindler syndrome (KS)--in which mainly skin and intestine are affected, whereas mutations in the KINDLIN-3 (also known as FERMT3) gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III (LAD III), which is characterized by impaired extravasation of blood effector cells and severe, spontaneous bleedings. Also, aberrant expression of kindlins in various forms of cancer and in tissue fibrosis has been reported. Although the malfunctioning of integrins represent a major cause leading to kindlin-associated diseases, increasing evidence also point to integrin-independent functions of kindlins that play an important role in the pathogenesis of certain disease aspects. Furthermore, isoform-specific kindlin functions have been discovered, explaining, for example, why loss of kindlins differentially affects tissue stem cell homeostasis or tumor development. This Commentary focuses on new and isoform-specific kindlin functions in different tissues and discusses their potential role in disease development and progression.

  3. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J.; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2016-06-20

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg2+ bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites.

  4. [Important differences between faculties of medicine. Implications for family and community medicine].

    PubMed

    González Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Ortún, Vicente; Barber, Patricia; Harris, Jeffrey E

    2014-03-01

    To determine if there are significant differences between universities in the proclivity to choose Family and Community Medicine (FCM), given the constraints imposed by the number of choice. To test the hypothesis that the Schools of Medicine that have the FCM as a compulsory subject in the degree (3 of 27) had the highest preference for this specialty. Observational study on the data file of all the individuals taking the MIR examination between 2003 and 2011. Spain. All those who sat the examinations called by MIR 2003-2011. Position in the ranking of each candidate, elected position (specialty and center), post code of residence, sex, nationality and university in which they studied, and post code location for the residence chosen. The percentage electing FCM is highly correlated with the position in the ranking: 8% of graduates for the 'best' college, 46% for the worst. Very noticeable and consistent differences in the preparation for the MIR among the 27 medical schools. Ranking in the exam, female and foreigner, help predict the choice of FCM. The FCM compulsory curriculum from three universities does not seem to exert any influence. The convenient yardstick competition between the schools of medicine, FCM in their curriculum and the emphasis on the most attractive attributes of the specialty can contribute to the necessary renewal of FCM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lili; Shanklin, John; Khusnutdinova, Anna; ...

    2016-06-20

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in pro- and eukaryotes but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), subfamily II being split into standalone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metaldependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed amore » novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg2+ bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites.« less

  6. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lili; Shanklin, John; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Remi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J.; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, III, Jesse F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexie; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2016-06-20

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in pro- and eukaryotes but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), subfamily II being split into standalone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metaldependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg2+ bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites.

  7. The interferon-inducible HIN-200 gene family in apoptosis and inflammation: implication for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Costa, Silvia; Sponza, Simone; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2010-04-01

    The Ifi-200/HIN-200 gene family encodes highly homologous human (IFI16, myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen, absent in melanoma 2, and IFIX) and murine proteins (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Ifi205, and Ifi206), which are induced by type I and II interferons (IFN). These proteins have been described as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation and, more recently, several reports have suggested their involvement in both apoptotic and inflammatory processes. The relevance of HIN-200 proteins in human disease is beginning to be clarified, and emerging experimental data indicate their role in autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are sustained by perpetual activation of inflammatory process and a link between autoimmunity and apoptosis has been clearly established. Moreover, the interferon system is now considered as a key player in autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythemathosus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome, and it is therefore conceivable to hypothesize that HIN-200 may be among the pivotal mediators of IFN activity in autoimmune disease. In particular, the participation of HIN-200 proteins in apoptosis and inflammation could support their potential role in autoimmunity.

  8. The thermo-TRP ion channel family: properties and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Vay, Laura; Gu, Chunjing; McNaughton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    The thermo-transient receptor potentials (TRPs), a recently discovered family of ion channels activated by temperature, are expressed in primary sensory nerve terminals where they provide information about thermal changes in the environment. Six thermo-TRPs have been characterised to date: TRP vanilloid (TRPV) 1 and 2 are activated by painful levels of heat, TRPV3 and 4 respond to non-painful warmth, TRP melastatin 8 is activated by non-painful cool temperatures, while TRP ankyrin (TRPA) 1 is activated by painful cold. The thermal thresholds of many thermo-TRPs are known to be modulated by extracellular mediators, released by tissue damage or inflammation, such as bradykinin, PG and growth factors. There have been intensive efforts recently to develop antagonists of thermo-TRP channels, particularly of the noxious thermal sensors TRPV1 and TRPA1. Blockers of these channels are likely to have therapeutic uses as novel analgesics, but may also cause unacceptable side effects. Controlling the modulation of thermo-TRPs by inflammatory mediators may be a useful alternative strategy in developing novel analgesics. PMID:21797839

  9. Families With Children With Diabetes: Implications of Parent Stress for Parent and Child Health

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Dorothy; Escobar, Oscar; Siminerio, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of parent stress to parent mental health and child mental and physical health. Methods We interviewed children with type 1 diabetes (n = 132; mean age 12 years) annually for 5 years and had one parent complete a questionnaire at each assessment. Parents completed measures of general life stress, stress related to caring for a child with diabetes, benefit finding, and mental health. Child outcomes were depressive symptoms, self-care behavior, and glycemic control. Multilevel modeling was used to examine concurrent and longitudinal relations. Results Greater parent general stress and greater parent diabetes-specific stress were associated with poorer parent mental health. Overall, greater parent general stress was associated with poorer child outcomes, whereas greater parent diabetes-specific stress was associated with better child outcomes. Conclusions Families with high levels of general life stress should be identified as they are at risk for both poor parent and child health outcomes. PMID:22267104

  10. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses of the intelectin gene family: implications for their origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Xu, Lingxiao; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Changqing; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Fei; Feng, Lijun

    2013-10-01

    Intelectin is a newly characterized gene family involved in early embryogenesis, host-pathogen interactions and iron metabolism. In this study, we searched the genomes of metazoans by extensive BLAST survey and found no intelectin homologs in invertebrate metazoans but 12 in amphioxus Branchiostoma floridae and 21 in ascidians Ciona intestinalis. Some ascidians oocyte cortical granule lectins (CGLs) have unknown insertion sequences between fibrinogen-related domain (FReD) and Intelectin Domain, the boundaries of which are equivalent to exon structures. In addition to ascidians intelectins/CGLs located in the base, phylogenetic tree comprises four main clades representing mammal, frog, fish, and amphioxus, indicating that intelectin genes undergo extensive lineage-specific duplication or gene conversion. However, genomic neighborhood surrounding analysis shows that clear proto-orthologies are difficult to be established among these counterparts. In addition, sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of FReDs from intelectins and other fibrinogen-like proteins from choanoflagellate, anemone, frog and human indicate FReDs of intelectins are unique. Likewise, these choanoflagellate and anemone genes may be close to intelectin gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sterilization regret among married women in India: implications for the Indian national family planning program.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Ogollah, Reuben; Ram, Faujdar; Pallikadavath, Saseendran

    2012-12-01

    In India, female sterilization accounts for 66% of contraceptive use, and age at sterilization is declining. It is likely that some women regret having been sterilized, but data on the prevalence of, and the social and economic correlates of, regret at the national level are insufficient. Data for analysis came from 30,999 sterilized women aged 15-49 interviewed in the 2005-2006 Indian National Family Health Survey. Logistic regression analyses and Wald tests were used to identify the social and demographic characteristics associated with sterilization regret. Nationally, 5% of sterilized women aged 15-49 reported sterilization regret. Women sterilized at age 30 or older were less likely than women sterilized before age 25 to express regret (odds ratio, 0.8). Compared with women having only sons, those who had only daughters were more likely to express regret (1.3), while those having both sons and daughters were less likely to express regret (0.8). Women who had experienced child loss had higher odds of reporting regret than women who had not (for one child lost, 1.6; for two or more children lost, 2.0). Given the large proportion of women undergoing sterilization, the potential numbers experiencing regret are considerable. If age at sterilization continues to decline, sterilization regret is likely to increase. Encouraging couples to delay sterilization and increasing the availability of highly effective reversible contraceptives are options that India may consider to avert sterilization regret.

  12. Sphingolipid regulation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins family: implications for cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2014-05-01

    A key but poorly studied domain of sphingolipid functions encompasses endocytosis, exocytosis, cellular trafficking, and cell movement. Recently, the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) family of proteins emerged as novel potent targets regulated by sphingolipids. ERMs are structural proteins linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, also forming a scaffold for signaling pathways that are used for cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and cell division. Opposing functions of the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), contribute to ERM regulation. S1P robustly activates whereas ceramide potently deactivates ERM via phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, respectively. This recent dimension of cytoskeletal regulation by sphingolipids opens up new avenues to target cell dynamics, and provides further understanding of some of the unexplained biological effects mediated by sphingolipids. In addition, these studies are providing novel inroads into defining basic mechanisms of regulation and action of bioactive sphingolipids. This review describes the current understanding of sphingolipid regulation of the cytoskeleton, it also describes the biologies in which ERM proteins have been involved, and finally how these two large fields have started to converge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology.

  13. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lili; Shanklin, John; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Remi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J.; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, III, Jesse F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexie; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2016-06-20

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in pro- and eukaryotes but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), subfamily II being split into standalone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metaldependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg2+ bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites.

  14. Kinetin in familial dysautonomia carriers: implications for a new therapeutic strategy targeting mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Goldberg, Judith D; Rolnitzky, Linda M; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Axelrod, Felicia B

    2009-03-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IkappaB kinase-associated protein gene (IKBKAP) that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction of IkappaB kinase-associated protein/elongator protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1 protein). Kinetin increases IKBKAP mRNA and protein expression in FD cell lines. To determine whether oral kinetin alters IKBKAP splicing in vivo, we administered kinetin to 29 healthy carriers of the major FD mutation for 8 d. Adverse effects, kinetin, and IKBKAP mRNA levels were monitored. In the highest dosing cohorts (23.5 mg/kg/d), the target plasma kinetin level was achieved in 91% of subjects at 2 h. After 8 d, IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes increased as kinetin levels increased. There is a linear association between log plasma kinetin level and corresponding log change from baseline in IKBKAP mRNA expression that allows estimation of IKBKAP mRNA levels because of kinetin ingestion. Adverse effects were transient and mild. This is the first report of in vivo IKBKAP splicing modification and strongly suggests kinetin's therapeutic potential in FD and perhaps in other splicing disorders. Furthermore, our findings support our hypothesis that treatments, which target a particular splicing mutation, can be successfully developed.

  15. Diagnosis implications of the whole genome sequencing in a large Lebanese family with hyaline fibromatosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Zahraa; Temanni, Ramzi; Chouery, Eliane; Jitesh, Puthen; Liu, Wei; Al-Ali, Rashid; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Jalkh, Nadine; Haddad, Soha; Haidar, Wassim; Chouchane, Lotfi; Mégarbané, André

    2017-01-19

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (HFS) is a recently introduced alternative term for two disorders that were previously known as juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) and infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH). These two variants are secondary to mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2) located on chromosome 4q21. The main clinical features of both entities include papular and/or nodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and osteolytic bone lesions that appear in the first few years of life, and the syndrome typically progresses with the appearance of new lesions. We describe five Lebanese patients from one family, aged between 28 and 58 years, and presenting with nodular and papular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and bone lesions. Because of the particular clinical features and the absence of a clinical diagnosis, Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) was carried out on DNA samples from the proband and his parents. A mutation in ANTXR2 (p. Gly116Val) that yielded a diagnosis of HFS was noted. The main goal of this paper is to add to the knowledge related to the clinical and radiographic aspects of HFS in adulthood and to show the importance of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques in resolving such puzzling cases.

  16. Immunization requirements of the top 200 universities: Implications for vaccine-hesitant families.

    PubMed

    Noesekabel, Allison; Fenick, Ada M

    2017-06-22

    The majority of pediatricians encounter vaccine hesitancy in their practices. As part of a broad discussion about vaccination, school requirements arise as a topic yet providers may lack information about the effects of immunization on university matriculation. We surveyed the top-ranked 200 universities regarding required immunizations, medical, religious, and philosophical exemptions, and noncompliance policies. We examined the legal requirements for involved jurisdictions. Of 129 responding universities (64%), 94% had ≥1 pre-matriculation immunization requirement (PIR), with a mean of 3.53 (95%CI 3.17-3.89) requirements. In unadjusted analyses, funding, region, jurisdictional requirements, undergraduate size, and tuition were significant predictors of the number of PIRs. In multivariate modeling, jurisdictional requirements outperformed all other university demographics, but excluding these, Northeast and South region and smaller undergraduate size persisted. The most common PIR was measles (93%). 67% of involved jurisdictions have laws mandating ≥1 university PIR, and 45% of universities surpassed their jurisdiction's law. With respect to medical, religious, and philosophical exemptions, 24%, 40%, and 60% of universities with PIRs had the highest hardship category, and 2%, 2%, and 46% disallowed these outright. Frequent responses to student noncompliance were: hold on classes (89%), additional registration fees (13%), and hold on housing (11%). Requirements for pre-matriculation immunizations in top universities are common and exemptions are difficult to obtain. Conversations between providers and vaccine-hesitant families may be enriched by discussion of these future effects of their decision on immunization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of the SOCS family in human chronic wound tissues: Potential implications for SOCS in chronic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Sanders, Andrew J.; Ruge, Fiona; Morris, Ceri-Ann; Harding, Keith G.; Jiang, Wen G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines play important roles in the wound healing process through various signalling pathways. The JAK-STAT pathway is utilised by most cytokines for signal transduction and is regulated by a variety of molecules, including suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. SOCS are associated with inflammatory diseases and have an impact on cytokines, growth factors and key cell types involved in the wound-healing process. SOCS, a negative regulator of cytokine signalling, may hold the potential to regulate cytokine-induced signalling in the chronic wound-healing process. Wound edge tissues were collected from chronic venous leg ulcer patients and classified as non-healing and healing wounds. The expression pattern of seven SOCSs members, at the transcript and protein level, were examined in these tissues using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Significantly higher levels of SOCS3 (P=0.0284) and SOCS4 (P=0.0376) in non-healing chronic wounds compared to the healing/healed chronic wounds were observed at the transcript level. Relocalisation of SOCS3 protein in the non-healing wound environment was evident in the investigated chronic biopsies. Thus, the results show that the expression of SOCS transcript indicated that SOCS members may act as a prognostic biomarker of chronic wounds. PMID:27635428

  18. Oclacitinib (APOQUEL(®)) is a novel Janus kinase inhibitor with activity against cytokines involved in allergy.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, A J; Bowman, J W; Fici, G J; Zhang, M; Mann, D W; Mitton-Fry, M

    2014-08-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) enzymes are involved in cell signaling pathways activated by various cytokines dysregulated in allergy. The objective of this study was to determine whether the novel JAK inhibitor oclacitinib could reduce the activity of cytokines implicated in canine allergic skin disease. Using isolated enzyme systems and in vitro human or canine cell models, potency and selectivity of oclacitinib was determined against JAK family members and cytokines that trigger JAK activation in cells. Oclacitinib inhibited JAK family members by 50% at concentrations (IC50 's) ranging from 10 to 99 nm and did not inhibit a panel of 38 non-JAK kinases (IC50 's > 1000 nM). Oclacitinib was most potent at inhibiting JAK1 (IC50 = 10 nM). Oclacitinib also inhibited the function of JAK1-dependent cytokines involved in allergy and inflammation (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-13) as well as pruritus (IL-31) at IC50 's ranging from 36 to 249 nM. Oclacitinib had minimal effects on cytokines that did not activate the JAK1 enzyme in cells (erythropoietin, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-12, IL-23; IC50 's > 1000 nM). These results demonstrate that oclacitinib is a targeted therapy that selectively inhibits JAK1-dependent cytokines involved in allergy, inflammation, and pruritus and suggests these are the mechanisms by which oclacitinib effectively controls clinical signs associated with allergic skin disease in dogs. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cross-talk among gp130 cytokines in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Baugh, James E; Arbour-Reily, Patricia; Mynatt, Randall L; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2005-10-07

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is a family of structurally and functionally related proteins, including IL-6, IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1). These proteins are also known as gp130 cytokines because they all share gp130 as a common transducer protein within their functional receptor complexes. Several of these cytokines (LIF, OSM, CNTF, and CT-1) also utilize the LIF receptor (LIFR) as a component of their receptor complex. We have shown that all of these cytokines are capable of activating both the JAK/STAT and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. By performing a variety of preincubation studies and examining the ability of these cytokines to activate STATs, ERKs, and induce transcription of SOCS-3 mRNA, we have also examined the ability of gp130 cytokines to modulate the action of their family members. Our results indicate that a subset of gp130 cytokines, in particular CT-1, LIF, and OSM, has the ability to impair subsequent signaling activity initiated by gp130 cytokines. However, IL-6 and CNTF do not exhibit this cross-talk ability. Moreover, our results indicate that the cross-talk among gp130 cytokines is mediated by the ability of these cytokines to induce ligand-dependent degradation of the LIFR, in a proteasome-independent manner, which coincides with decreased levels of LIFR at the plasma membrane. In summary, our results demonstrate that an inhibitory cross-talk among specific gp130 cytokines in 3T3-L1 adipocytes occurs as a result of specific degradation of LIFR via a lysosome-mediated pathway.

  20. FEE-SCHEDULE INCREASES IN CANADA: IMPLICATION FOR SERVICE VOLUMES AMONG FAMILY AND SPECIALIST PHYSICIANS.

    PubMed

    Ariste, Ruolz

    2015-01-01

    Physician spending has substantially increased over the last few years in Canada to reach $27.4 billion in 2010. Total clinical payment to physicians has grown at an average annual rate of 7.6% from 2004 to 2010. The key policy question is whether or not this additional money has bought more physician services. So, the purpose of this study is to understand if we are paying more for the same amount of medical services in Canada or we are getting more bangs for our buck. At the same time, the paper attempts to find out whether or not there is a productivity difference between family physician services and surgical procedures. Using the Baumol theory and data from the National Physician Database for the period 2004-2010, the paper breaks down growth in physician remuneration into growth in unit cost and number of services, both from the physician and the payer perspectives. After removing general inflation and population growth from the 7.6% growth in total clinical payment, we found that real payment per service and volume of services per capita grew at an average annual rate of 3.2% and 1.4% respectively, suggesting that payment per service was the main cost driver of physician remuneration at the national level. Taking the payer perspective, it was found that, for the fee-for-service (FFS) scheme, volume of services per physician decreased at an average annual rate of -0.6%, which is a crude indicator that labour productivity of physicians on FFS has fallen during the period. However, the situation differs for the surgical procedures. Results also vary by province. Overall, our finding is consistent with the Baumol theory, which hypothesizes higher productivity growth in technology-driven sectors.

  1. Microeconomic loans and health education to families in impoverished communities: implications for the HIV pandemic.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Renslow D; Bronson, John D; Teter, Caroline J; Wykoff, Randolph F

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is among the root causes of death and poor health worldwide. Project HOPE's Village Health Bank (VHB) program is a public health intervention that combines integrated microcredit lending and health education. Groups of 18 to 25 women receive small loans, and biweekly, one-hour health education sessions. Since 1993, about 50,000 women in 949 VHBs have participated in seven countries in the Americas, Africa, and Southeast Asia, receiving more than US$25 million in loans and 8,445 hours of health education. Members of VHBs are charged modest interest rates that enable them to become self-sufficient (eg, able to cover all operating charges, including the costs of the health education staff, and the necessary loan capital to continue without infusion of outside resources). The VHB program produces substantial economic improvements for individuals and groups, and benefits in health knowledge and behaviors, including increased utilization of healthcare services. Data from Guatemala, Malawi, and Thailand demonstrate that VHBs in countries with high HIV prevalence have been comparably successful in spite of the enormous added burdens of chronic illness, deaths, and orphans in need of support. For example, in 2004, 48 percent of 266 VHB members in Malawi experienced at least one death in their household in the preceding year, and 67 percent housed one or more orphans with an average of two orphans per household. Because of the unique combination of increased household economic stability and improved health knowledge, the VHB program is now being adapted to families of people affected by HIV/AIDS, including orphans.

  2. Development of Aortic Valve Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemic Swine: Implications for Elucidating Disease Etiology.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Meudt, Jennifer J; Krueger, Christian G; Hacker, Timothy A; Rahko, Peter S; Reed, Jess D; Masters, Kristyn S

    2015-10-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a prevalent hereditary disease associated with increased atherosclerosis and calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, in both FH and non-FH individuals, the role of hypercholesterolemia in the development of CAVD is poorly understood. This study used Rapacz FH (RFH) swine, an established model of human FH, to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemia alone in the initiation and progression of CAVD. The valves of RFH swine have not previously been examined. Aortic valve leaflets were isolated from wild-type (0.25- and 1-year-old) and RFH (0.25-, 1-, 2-, and 3-year-old) swine. Adult RFH animals exhibited numerous hallmarks of early CAVD. Significant leaflet thickening was found in adult RFH swine, accompanied by extensive extracellular matrix remodeling, including proteoglycan enrichment, collagen disorganization, and elastin fragmentation. Increased lipid oxidation and infiltration of macrophages were also evident in adult RFH swine. Intracardiac echocardiography revealed mild aortic valve sclerosis in some of the adult RFH animals, but unimpaired valve function. Microarray analysis of valves from adult versus juvenile RFH animals revealed significant upregulation of inflammation-related genes, as well as several commonalities with atherosclerosis and overlap with human CAVD. Adult RFH swine exhibited several hallmarks of early human CAVD, suggesting potential for these animals to help elucidate CAVD etiology in both FH and non-FH individuals. The development of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, but only early-stage CAVD, in RFH swine supports the hypothesis of an initial shared disease process, with additional stimulation necessary for further progression of CAVD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. From contraceptive prevalence to family planning service users: implications for policy and programmes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Adnan Ahmad; Abbas, Khadija; Hamza, Hasan Bin; Bilal, Ahmed; Khan, Ayesha

    2013-04-01

    Contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) is a widely accepted measure of maternal health and uptake of family planning (FP) services. However, the overall CPR obscures the actual utilization of FP services due to over-representation of long-term methods. This study used CPR from 2007 to arrive at and compare the number of actual number of women who availed different FP services in order to understand issues and gaps in FP services in Pakistan. This study used secondary data from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-7 estimate the CPR and modern method mix for 2007.These were then multiplied by the estimated number of married women of reproductive age (MWRA) to arrive at the actual numbers of women using specific FP methods and utilizing FP services in a given year. In 2007 the CPR was 30% overall and 22% for modern methods. However, the number of women availing FP services decreased to 12% when adjusted for FP users who had availed services in the past 12 months. Within this "service mix", self-procurement of FP commodities directly from stores without a advice from a health provider constitutes around 37% of all FP "services" and the public sector accounts for another 33%. Condoms are the commonest method served, accounting for over half of all "services". The bulk of FP is self-procured and the service mixed is skewed towards client controlled methods that do not require medical advice. Thus, lack of quality for contraceptive services that require some form of supportive healthcare services and counselling may be a bottleneck to improving CPR.

  4. IKAP/Elp1 involvement in cytoskeleton regulation and implication for familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Cheishvili, David; Maayan, Channa; Cohen-Kupiec, Rachel; Lefler, Sharon; Weil, Miguel; Ast, Gil; Razin, Aharon

    2011-04-15

    Deficiency in the IKAP/Elp1 protein leads to the recessive sensory autosomal congenital neuropathy which is called familial dysautonomia (FD). This protein was originally identified as a role player in transcriptional elongation being a subunit of the RNAPII transcriptional Elongator multi-protein complex. Subsequently, IKAP/Elp1 was shown to play various functions in the cytoplasm. Here, we describe experiments performed with IKAP/Elp1 downregulated cell lines and FD-derived cells and tissues. Immunostaining of the cytoskeleton component α-tubulin in IKAP/Elp1 downregulated cells revealed disorganization of the microtubules (MTs) that was reflected in aberrant cell shape and process formation. In contrast to a recent report on the decrease in α-tubulin acetylation in IKAP/Elp1 downregulated cells, we were unable to observe any effect of IKAP/Elp1 deficiency on α-tubulin acetylation in the FD cerebrum and in a variety of IKAP/Elp1 downregulated cell lines. To explore possible candidates involved in the observed aberrations in MTs, we focused on superior cervical ganglion-10 protein (SCG10), also called STMN2, which is known to be an MT destabilizing protein. We have found that SCG10 is upregulated in the IKAP/Elp1-deficient FD cerebrum, FD fibroblasts and in IKAP/Elp1 downregulated neuroblastoma cell line. To better understand the effect of IKAP/Elp1 deficiency on SCG10 expression, we investigated the possible involvement of RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST), a known repressor of the SCG10 gene. Indeed, REST was downregulated in the IKAP/Elp1-deficient FD cerebrum and IKAP/Elp1 downregulated neuroblastoma cell line. These results could shed light on a possible link between IKAP/Elp1 deficiency and cytoskeleton destabilization.

  5. Implications of childhood obesity for adult health: findings from thousand families cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wright, C M; Parker, L; Lamont, D; Craft, A W

    2001-12-01

    To determine whether being overweight in childhood increases adult obesity and risk of disease. Prospective cohort study. City of Newcastle upon Tyne. 932 members of thousand families 1947 birth cohort, of whom 412 attended for clinical examination age 50. Blood pressure; carotid artery intima-media thickness; fibrinogen concentration; total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations; triglyceride concentration; fasting insulin and 2 hour glucose concentrations; body mass index; and percentage body fat. Body mass index at age 9 years was significantly correlated with body mass index age 50 (r=0.24, P<0.001) but not with percentage body fat age 50 (r=0.10, P=0.07). After adult body mass index had been adjusted for, body mass index at age 9 showed a significant inverse association with measures of lipid and glucose metabolism in both sexes and with blood pressure in women. However, after adjustment for adult percentage fat instead of body mass index, only the inverse associations with triglycerides (regression coefficient= -0.21, P<0.01) and total cholesterol (-0.17, P<0.05) in women remained significant. Little tracking from childhood overweight to adulthood obesity was found when using a measure of fatness that was independent of build. Only children who were obese at 13 showed an increased risk of obesity as adults. No excess adult health risk from childhood or teenage overweight was found. Being thin in childhood offered no protection against adult fatness, and the thinnest children tended to have the highest adult risk at every level of adult obesity.

  6. Family Influences on the Achievement of Economically Disadvantaged Students: Implications for Gifted Identification and Programming. Research Monograph 95206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scott L.; And Others

    This review of the literature looks at family influences on the achievement of economically disadvantaged youth, with an emphasis on relationships among families, academic achievement, and gifted education. Theoretical perspectives on the study of families have focused primarily on families as static systems and families as dynamic systems and,…

  7. Cytokine inhibition in the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M; Di Stefano, Antonino; Chung, Kian Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play an important part in many pathobiological processes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including the chronic inflammatory process, emphysema, and altered innate immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines of potential importance include tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, IL-32, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β. The current objectives of COPD treatment are to reduce symptoms, and to prevent and reduce the number of exacerbations. While current treatments achieve these goals to a certain extent, preventing the decline in lung function is not currently achievable. In addition, reversal of corticosteroid insensitivity and control of the fibrotic process while reducing the emphysematous process could also be controlled by specific cytokines. The abnormal pathobiological process of COPD may contribute to these fundamental characteristics of COPD, and therefore targeting cytokines involved may be a fruitful endeavor. Although there has been much work that has implicated various cytokines as potentially playing an important role in COPD, there have been very few studies that have examined the effect of specific cytokine blockade in COPD. The two largest studies that have been reported in the literature involve the use of blocking antibody to TNFα and CXCL8 (IL-8), and neither has provided benefit. Blocking the actions of CXCL8 through its CXCR2 receptor blockade was not successful either. Studies of antibodies against IL-17, IL-18, IL-1β, and TSLP are currently either being undertaken or planned. There is a need to carefully phenotype COPD and discover good biomarkers of drug efficacy for each specific target. Specific groups of COPD patients should be targeted with specific anticytokine therapy if there is evidence of high expression of that cytokine and there are features of the clinical expression of COPD that will respond

  8. TH1/TH2 cytokines in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sredni-Kenigsbuch, Dvora

    2002-06-01

    For the past 20 years it has become increasingly evident that cytokines play an important role in both the normal development of the brain, acting as neurotrophic factors, and in brain injuries. Although cytokines and their receptors are synthesized and expressed in the brain (normally at low levels), increased cytokine production levels are now associated with various neurological disorders. T lymphocytes are the cells responsible for coordinating the immune response and a major source of cytokines. Different cytokines induce different subsets of T cells or have different effects on proliferation within a particular subset. Recent studies suggest that the immune response is in fact regulated by the balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines. These two pathways are often mutually exclusive, the one resulting in protection and the other in progression of disease. Various studies describe the function and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in health and disease. Inflammation is upregulated following activation of Th1 cells, whereas Th2 cells may play a significant role in downregulating Th1 proinflammatory responses in those instances in which there is overproduction of Th2 cytokines. Although both Th1 and Th2 cytokines may influence CNS functioning, most studies have so far dealt with proinflammatory cytokines, probably because they directly affect CNS cells and are thought to be implicated in CNS pathology. It is of interest that endogenous glucocorticoids also control Th1-Th2 balance, favoring Th2 cell development. This review presents the evidence that cytokines have important functions in the CNS, both during development and as a part of brain pathology. In particular, the author highlighted recent work that supports a major role for the so-called inflammatory cytokines, Th1, and the anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines.

  9. The globin gene family of the cephalochordate amphioxus: implications for chordate globin evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The lancelet amphioxus (Cephalochordata) is a close relative of vertebrates and thus may enhance our understanding of vertebrate gene and genome evolution. In this context, the globins are one of the best studied models for gene family evolution. Previous biochemical studies have demonstrated the presence of an intracellular globin in notochord tissue and myotome of amphioxus, but the corresponding gene has not yet been identified. Genomic resources of Branchiostoma floridae now facilitate the identification, experimental confirmation and molecular evolutionary analysis of its globin gene repertoire. Results We show that B. floridae harbors at least fifteen paralogous globin genes, all of which reveal evidence of gene expression. The protein sequences of twelve globins display the conserved characteristics of a functional globin fold. In phylogenetic analyses, the amphioxus globin BflGb4 forms a common clade with vertebrate neuroglobins, indicating the presence of this nerve globin in cephalochordates. Orthology is corroborated by conserved syntenic linkage of BflGb4 and flanking genes. The kinetics of ligand binding of recombinantly expressed BflGb4 reveals that this globin is hexacoordinated with a high oxygen association rate, thus strongly resembling vertebrate neuroglobin. In addition, possible amphioxus orthologs of the vertebrate globin X lineage and of the myoglobin/cytoglobin/hemoglobin lineage can be identified, including one gene as a candidate for being expressed in notochord tissue. Genomic analyses identify conserved synteny between amphioxus globin-containing regions and the vertebrate β-globin locus, possibly arguing against a late transpositional origin of the β-globin cluster in vertebrates. Some amphioxus globin gene structures exhibit minisatellite-like tandem duplications of intron-exon boundaries ("mirages"), which may serve to explain the creation of novel intron positions within the globin genes. Conclusions The identification

  10. Identification of Novel Inflammatory Cytokines and Contribution of Keratinocyte-Derived Chemokine to Inflammation in Response to Vibrio vulnificus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jian; Cao, Yuan; Hu, Cheng-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Currently, only tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin family cytokines have been found to be elicited in Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus)-infected animal models and humans. However, multiple other cytokines are also involved in the immune and inflammatory responses to foreign microorganism infection. Antibody array technology, unlike traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is able to detect multiple cytokines at one time. Therefore, in this study, we examined the proinflammatory cytokine profile in the serum and liver homogenate samples of bacterial-infected mice using antibody array technology. We identified nine novel cytokines in response to V. vulnificus infection in mice. We found that keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) was the most elevated cytokine and demonstrated that KC played a very important role in the V. vulnificus infection-elicited inflammatory response in mice, as evidenced by the fact that the blocking of KC by anti-KC antibody reduced hepatic injury in vivo and that KC induced by V. vulnificus infection in AML-12 cells chemoattracted neutrophils. Our findings implicate that KC may serve as a novel diagnostic biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for V. vulnificus infection.

  11. Oral application of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, J A; Fleischmann, W R

    1996-01-01

    A number of different laboratories reported on studies with orally administered interferons and cytokines. Their observations extend previous observations which showed that orally administered interferons and cytokines can exert both local and systemic effects. As difficult as it may be to understand how orally administered interferons and cytokines may exert both effects, the increasing number of laboratories that demonstrate biological effects with orally administered cytokines suggests that serious consideration be given to the possibility that orally administered interferons and cytokines can indeed exert effects. They also raise the possibility that these effects may have biological relevance for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, they may indicate that the nasal/oral region is a window on the environment. It is most important, however, to assure that these experiments are performed with special care to avoid presenting preliminary data that is not properly controlled. It is essential to carry out these studies with sufficient animals or patients to ascertain their significance; and to plan the studies as double-blind evaluations to avoid misinterpretations when subjective tests are used. Nevertheless, the overall data presented give one the impression of an area that should be pursued.

  12. [Cytokines and asthma].

    PubMed

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  13. The complement of family M1 aminopeptidases of Haemonchus contortus--Biotechnological implications.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Hall, Ross S; Hu, Min; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Although substantial research has been focused on the 'hidden antigen' H11 of Haemonchus contortus as a vaccine against haemonchosis in small ruminants, little is know about this and related aminopeptidases. In the present article, we reviewed genomic and transcriptomic data sets to define, for the first time, the complement of aminopeptidases (designated Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-13) of the family M1 with homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterised by zinc-binding (HEXXH) and exo-peptidase (GAMEN) motifs. The three previously published H11 isoforms (accession nos. X94187, FJ481146 and AJ249941) had most sequence similarity to Hc-AP-2 and Hc-AP-8, whereas unpublished isoforms (accession nos. AJ249942 and AJ311316) were both most similar to Hc-AP-3. The aminopeptidases characterised here had homologues in C. elegans. Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 were most similar in amino acid sequence (28-41%) to C. elegans T07F10.1; Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 to C. elegans PAM-1 (isoform b) (53-54% similar); Hc-AP-11 and Hc-AP-12 to C. elegans AC3.5 and Y67D8C.9 (26% and 50% similar, respectively); and Hc-AP-13 to C. elegans C42C1.11 and ZC416.6 (50-58% similar). Comparative analysis suggested that Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 play roles in digestion, metabolite excretion, neuropeptide processing and/or osmotic regulation, with Hc-AP-4 and Hc-AP-7 having male-specific functional roles. The analysis also indicated that Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 might be involved in the degradation of cyclin (B3) and required to complete meiosis. Hc-AP-11 represents a leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase, predicted to have metallopeptidase and zinc ion binding activity, whereas Hc-AP-12 likely encodes an aminopeptidase Q homologue also with these activities and a possible role in gonad function. Finally, Hc-AP-13 is predicted to encode an aminopeptidase AP-1 homologue of C. elegans with hydrolase activity, suggested to operate, possibly synergistically with a PEPT-1 ortholog, as an oligopeptide transporter in the gut for protein uptake

  14. JAK/STAT signaling by cytokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, K D; Gaffen, S L; Goldsmith, M A

    1998-06-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is recognized as one of the major mechanisms by which cytokine receptors transduce intracellular signals. This system is regulated at multiple levels, including JAK activation, nuclear trafficking of STAT factors, and negative feedback loops. Gene deletion studies have implicated selected STAT factors as predominant mediators for a limited number of lymphokines. This signaling pathway influences normal cell survival and growth mechanisms and may contribute to oncogenic transformation.

  15. Perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers and their families: implications for health, safety and social policy.

    PubMed

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    In the USA, migrant farmworkers are a vulnerable group due to their low socioeconomic status, risk of occupational exposures and injury, lack of social mobility, lack of adequate access to health services and dependency on employer for provided housing. Previous reports have documented migrant farmworker housing conditions to be variable, but poor overall. This paper explores the perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers in rural North Carolina, and develops an understanding of potential impacts of their housing on health and safety. This study used qualitative descriptive data and directed content analysis to analyse semi-structured interviews and photographs that were data elements of a larger community-based participatory research study designed to document housing quality and health among North Carolina farmworkers. Many of the study participants described poor housing conditions that were reflected in the photographic analysis of the houses and camps. Specific problems described by the participants include exposure to pesticides, safety issues, pests, water supply and air quality, temperature and moisture. This study describes migrant farmworkers' perceptions of housing quality and numerous potential impacts on health and safety. Research, social policy and practice-based implications derived from this research could serve to improve the health status of these individuals and their families. This study suggests there is much room for sustained advocacy and action, given that many of the farmworkers' descriptions and photographs depicted housing conditions below accepted standards of living. Access to adequate and safe employer-provided housing for migrant farmworkers should be considered a basic human right.

  16. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) Proteins with Implications for Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marshall V.; Cox, Brandon; Ariza, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person’s lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase), as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein–Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:28036046

  17. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) Proteins with Implications for Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marshall V; Cox, Brandon; Ariza, Maria Eugenia

    2016-12-28

    The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person's lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase), as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein-Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

  18. Expression of the SOCS family in human chronic wound tissues: Potential implications for SOCS in chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Sanders, Andrew J; Ruge, Fiona; Morris, Ceri-Ann; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines play important roles in the wound healing process through various signalling pathways. The JAK-STAT pathway is utilised by most cytokines for signal transduction and is regulated by a variety of molecules, including suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. SOCS are associated with inflammatory diseases and have an impact on cytokines, growth factors and key cell types involved in the wound‑healing process. SOCS, a negative regulator of cytokine signalling, may hold the potential to regulate cytokine‑induced signalling in the chronic wound‑healing process. Wound edge tissues were collected from chronic venous leg ulcer patients and classified as non-healing and healing wounds. The expression pattern of seven SOCSs members, at the transcript and protein level, were examined in these tissues using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Significantly higher levels of SOCS3 (P=0.0284) and SOCS4 (P=0.0376) in non-healing chronic wounds compared to the healing/healed chronic wounds were observed at the transcript level. Relocalisation of SOCS3 protein in the non-healing wound environment was evident in the investigated chronic biopsies. Thus, the results show that the expression of SOCS transcript indicated that SOCS members may act as a prognostic biomarker of chronic wounds.

  19. Immunoreactive cytokines within primates.

    PubMed

    Ahne, W; Mayr, A; Wiesner, H

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of primates (man, orang utan, gorilla, baboon), rodents (mouse, rat), carnivores (cat, dog), artiodactyls (cattle, goat, pig) and perissodactyls (horse) were isolated and stimulated with mitogens (5 micrograms/ml LPS, 5 micrograms/ml PHA) at 37 degrees C. Cytokines immunoreactive to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed to human cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma) could be detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the case of primates only. The mAb used did not recognize cytokines of the other mammalian species investigated. The results demonstrate the close relationship within the primates from the immunophysiological point of view.

  20. Implications of Changes in Family Structure and Composition for the Psychological Well-Being of Filipino Women in Middle and Later Years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feinian; Bao, Luoman; Shattuck, Rachel M; Borja, Judith B; Gultiano, Socorro

    2015-10-16

    The health implications of multigenerational coresidence for older adults is a well-researched topic in the aging literature. Much less is known of its impact for women in midlife. We used data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Study (2002, 2005, 2007, and 2012) to study the influence of transitions in multigenerational household composition on depressive symptoms for women in midlife transitioning into old age. Our initial analysis showed little effect when we use the conventional classification of nuclear versus extended family and transition in and out of extended family. When we described shifts in the family environment by compositional changes, that is, change in the presence and absence of particular family members, we found significant association between depressive symptoms and two types of role transitions: the loss of a spouse in the household and the entry and exit of grandchildren in the household. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Implications of Changes in Family Structure and Composition for the Psychological Well-being of Filipina Women in Middle and Later Years

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feinian; Bao, Luoman; Shattuck, Rachel M.; Borja, Judith B.; Gultiano, Socorro

    2015-01-01

    The health implications of multigenerational coresidence for older adults is a well-researched topic in the aging literature. Much less is known of its impact for women in mid-life. We used data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Study (2002, 2005, 2007 and 2012), to study the influence of transitions in multigenerational household composition on depressive symptoms for women in mid-life transitioning into old age. Our initial analysis showed little effect when we use the conventional classification of nuclear vs. extended family and transition in and out of extended family. When we described shifts in the family environment by compositional changes, that is, change in the presence and absence of particular family members, we found significant association between depressive symptoms and two types of role transitions: the loss of a spouse in the household, and the entry and exit of grandchildren in the household. PMID:26475652

  2. Sepsis and cytokines: current status.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T S; Christman, J W

    1996-07-01

    Sepsis is a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from excessive systemic host inflammatory response to infection. This inflammatory response is largely mediated by cytokines, which are released into the systemic circulation. Plasma concentrations of specific cytokines, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8 are frequently elevated in human sepsis and cytokine concentrations correlate with severity and outcome of sepsis. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, cytokine receptor antagonists and counter-inflammatory cytokines are also produced in large quantities in patients with sepsis; however, the specific role of these molecules in sepsis remains undefined. A complex interaction of cytokines and cytokine-neutralizing molecules probably determines the clinical presentation and course of sepsis. Intervening in this sequence of events to modify the host inflammatory responses may prove to be a beneficial treatment strategy for sepsis, but currently tested anticytokine therapies have been largely unsuccessful.

  3. Cytokines in the host response to mycotic agents.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J W; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Singer-Vermes, L M; Ferrante, A; Moser, S; Russo, M; Vaz, C A; Burger, E; Calich, V L; Kowanko, I C

    1994-01-01

    In summary, different approaches have been taken to understand cytokine responses to different fungal infections. Singer-Vermes and co-investigators indirectly examined cytokine responses to paracoccidioidomycosis by studying the types of cellular and humoral immune responses that were induced in resistant and susceptible mouse strains. Their results implicated Th1 cell responses in the resistant mouse strain and Th2 cell responses in the mouse strain susceptible to paracoccidioidomycosis. By measuring cytokine production and through cytokine depletion experiments, Wu-Hsieh showed that besides IFN gamma, TNF alpha was important in host defences against the intracellular pathogen, H. capsulatum. Both cytokines play important roles in the regulation of other cytokines. In histoplasmosis, the dynamics of the complex interactions amongst cytokines govern the efficiency of host clearance of the fungus from tissues. Ferrante and collaborators, examining TNF alpha and TNF alpha receptors on neutrophils presented data showing that TNF alpha plays an important role in the activation of neutrophils for anti-Candida activity. Through the detection of cytokine mRNAs with RT-PCR, Moser and co-workers found that cytokine mRNAs of macrophage origin were produced preferentially in the lungs of mice infected with Histoplasma or Blastomyces. A great challenge still lies ahead of us. It is well understood that the interactions of cytokines are extremely complex at the levels of the induction and expression of the immune responses as well as on effects on natural cellular defences. Work accomplished thus far has laid the ground work for future studies in the effort to dissect host cytokine responses and to understand the roles of cytokines in protection against fungal infections.

  4. SN79, a sigma receptor ligand, blocks methamphetamine-induced microglial activation and cytokine upregulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Turner, Ryan C; Naser, Zachary J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Huber, Jason D; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2013-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with several negative side effects including neurotoxicity in specific brain regions such as the striatum. The precise molecular mechanisms by which METH usage results in neurotoxicity remain to be fully elucidated, with recent evidence implicating the importance of microglial activation and neuroinflammation in damaged brain regions. METH interacts with sigma receptors which are found in glial cells in addition to neurons. Moreover, sigma receptor antagonists have been shown to block METH-induced neurotoxicity in rodents although the cellular mechanisms underlying their neuroprotection remain unknown. The purpose of the current study was to determine if the prototypic sigma receptor antagonist, SN79, mitigates METH-induced microglial activation and associated increases in cytokine expression in a rodent model of METH-induced neurotoxicity. METH increased striatal mRNA and protein levels of cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68), indicative of microglial activation. METH also increased ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (IBA-1) protein expression, further confirming the activation of microglia. Along with microglial activation, METH increased striatal mRNA expression levels of IL-6 family pro-inflammatory cytokines, leukemia inhibitory factor (lif), oncostatin m (osm), and interleukin-6 (il-6). Pretreatment with SN79 reduced METH-induced increases in CD68 and IBA-1 expression, demonstrating its ability to prevent microglial activation. SN79 also attenuated METH-induced mRNA increases in IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokine family members. The ability of a sigma receptor antagonist to block METH-induced microglial activation and cytokine production provides a novel mechanism through which the neurotoxic effects of METH may be mitigated.

  5. Myometrial cytokines and their role in the onset of labour.

    PubMed

    Sivarajasingam, S P; Imami, N; Johnson, M R

    2016-12-01

    Human labour is an inflammatory event, physiologically driven by an interaction between hormonal and mechanical factors and pathologically associated with infection, bleeding and excessive uterine stretch. The initiation and communicators of inflammation is still not completely understood; however, a key role for cytokines has been implicated. We summarise the current understanding of the nature and role of cytokines, chemokines and hormones and their involvement in signalling within the myometrium particularly during labour. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers and their families: Implications for health, safety and social policy

    PubMed Central

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Spears, Chaya R.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, migrant farmworkers are a vulnerable group due to their low socioeconomic status, risk of occupational exposures and injury, lack of social mobility, lack of adequate access to health services and dependency on employer for provided housing. Previous reports have documented migrant farmworker housing conditions to be variable, but poor overall. This paper explores the perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers in rural North Carolina, as well as understanding potential impacts of their housing on health and safety. Methods This study used qualitative descriptive data and directed content analysis to analyze semi-structured interviews and photographs that were data elements of a larger community-based participatory research study designed to document housing quality and health among North Carolina farmworkers. Results Many of the study participants described poor housing conditions that were reflected in the photographic analysis of the houses and camps. Specific problems described by the participants include: exposure to pesticides, safety issues, pests, water supply and air quality, temperature and moisture. Conclusions This study describes migrant farmworkers’ perceptions of housing quality and numerous potential impacts on health and safety. Research, social policy and practice-based implications derived from this research could serve to improve the health status of these individuals and their families. This study suggests there is much room for sustained advocacy and action, given that many of the farmworkers’ descriptions and photographs depicted housing conditions below accepted standards of living. Access to adequate and safe employer-provided housing for migrant farmworkers should be considered a basic human right. PMID:25682066

  7. Brain iron accumulation affects myelin-related molecular systems implicated in a rare neurogenetic disease family with neuropsychiatric features

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, M; Johnstone, D M; Bassett, B; Graham, R M; Chua, A C G; House, M J; Collingwood, J F; Bettencourt, C; Houlden, H; Ryten, M; Olynyk, J K; Trinder, D; Milward, E A

    2016-01-01

    The ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation' (NBIA) disease family entails movement or cognitive impairment, often with psychiatric features. To understand how iron loading affects the brain, we studied mice with disruption of two iron regulatory genes, hemochromatosis (Hfe) and transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2). Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy demonstrated increased iron in the Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain (P=0.002, n ≥5/group), primarily localized by Perls' staining to myelinated structures. Western immunoblotting showed increases of the iron storage protein ferritin light polypeptide and microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed decreased transcript levels (P<0.04, n ≥5/group) for five other NBIA genes, phospholipase A2 group VI, fatty acid 2-hydroxylase, ceruloplasmin, chromosome 19 open reading frame 12 and ATPase type 13A2. Apart from the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin, all are involved in myelin homeostasis; 16 other myelin-related genes also showed reduced expression (P<0.05), although gross myelin structure and integrity appear unaffected (P>0.05). Overlap (P<0.0001) of differentially expressed genes in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain with human gene co-expression networks suggests iron loading influences expression of NBIA-related and myelin-related genes co-expressed in normal human basal ganglia. There was overlap (P<0.0001) of genes differentially expressed in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain and post-mortem NBIA basal ganglia. Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut mice were hyperactive (P<0.0112) without apparent cognitive impairment by IntelliCage testing (P>0.05). These results implicate myelin-related systems involved in NBIA neuropathogenesis in early responses to iron loading. This may contribute to behavioral symptoms in NBIA and hemochromatosis and is relevant to patients with abnormal iron status and psychiatric disorders involving myelin abnormalities or resistant to conventional treatments. PMID:26728570

  8. Cytokines in human milk.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M D; Srivastava, A; Brouhard, B; Saneto, R; Groh-Wargo, S; Kubit, J

    1996-09-01

    Breast feeding improves the health of children. The greatest significance is to host defense, prevention of autoimmunity, and development of the digestive system; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are not well understood. Based on recent evidence that cytokines might be important in these processes, we have used ELISA to quantitate the cytokines in human colostrum, transitional, and mature milk from mothers delivering preterm or at term. We also used reverse transcription PCR to test breast milk cells for the production of cytokine mRNA. No significant (< 10 pg/ml) GM-CSF, SCF, LIF, MIP-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-4, IL-11, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, sIL-2R, or IFN-gamma was detected. And, in contrast to earlier studies using bioassays or RIA, no significant IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, or IL-6 was present; nor was IL-10, which had been tested using less specific antibodies. We did confirm the presence of high levels of M-CSF, which remained high throughout lactation. Human milk contained latent, but not free, TGF-beta 1, and especially TGF-beta 2, both of which may be activated by gastric acid pH. High levels of IL-1RA were detected, and like activated TGF-beta, may protect against autoimmunity. Chemokines, particularly GRO-alpha and MCP-1, but also RANTES and IL-8, were present and could protect against infection. Maternal cells in breast milk expressed mRNA for MCP-1 (20/20), IL-8 (14/20), TGF-beta 1 (14/16), TGF-beta 2 (4/6), M-CSF (9/12), IL-6 (6/12) and IL-1 beta (7/12), and may be a source of these cytokines. mRNA for IL-2, IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha was not detected and only weak expression was found for RANTES (1/18). There was considerable variability between individual women, and women delivering preterm had lower levels of several cytokines in colostrum than women delivering at term. Yet, cytokine levels remained high months to years into lactation, providing immunological benefit to the breastfed infant/child.

  9. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  10. Role of IL-38 and Its Related Cytokines in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xianli; Peng, Xiao; Li, Yan; Li, Mingcai

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin- (IL-) 38 is a recently discovered cytokine and is the tenth member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-38 shares structural features with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36Ra. IL-36R is the specific receptor of IL-38, a partial receptor antagonist of IL-36. IL-38 inhibits the production of T-cell cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. IL-38 also inhibits the production of IL-8 induced by IL-36γ, thus inhibiting inflammatory responses. IL-38-related cytokines, including IL-1Ra and IL-36Ra, are involved in the regulation of inflammation and immune responses. The study of IL-38 and IL-38-related cytokines might provide new insights for developing anti-inflammatory treatments in the near future. PMID:25873772

  11. Chromosomes 4 and 8 Implicated in a Genome Wide SNP Linkage Scan of 762 Prostate Cancer Families Collected by the ICPCG

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lingyi; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Valeri, Antoine; Cussenot, Olivier; Lange, Ethan M.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Farnham, James M.; Camp, Nicola J.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hoegel, Josef; Herkommer, Kathleen; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Wiklund, Fredrik; Emanuelsson, Monica; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiley, Kathleen E.; Isaacs, Sarah D.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Helfand, Brian T.; Kan, Donghui; Catalona, William J.; Stanford, Janet L.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Johanneson, Bo; Deutsch, Kerry; McIntosh, Laura; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Hebbring, Scott; Schaid, Daniel J.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Powell, Isaac; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Carpten, John D.; Seminara, Daniela; Zheng, S. Lilly; Xu, Jianfeng; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas R.; Foulkes, William D.; Maehle, Lovise; Moller, Pal; Badzioch, Michael D.; Edwards, Steve; Guy, Michelle; Eeles, Ros; Easton, Douglas; Isaacs, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Background In spite of intensive efforts, understanding of the genetic aspects of familial prostate cancer remains largely incomplete. In a previous microsatellite-based linkage scan of 1233 prostate cancer (PC) families, we identified suggestive evidence for linkage (i.e. LOD≥1.86) at 5q12, 15q11, 17q21, 22q12, and two loci on 8p, with additional regions implicated in subsets of families defined by age at diagnosis, disease aggressiveness, or number of affected members. Methods In an attempt to replicate these findings and increase linkage resolution, we used the Illumina 6000 SNP linkage panel to perform a genome-wide linkage scan of an independent set of 762 multiplex PC families, collected by 11 ICPCG groups. Results Of the regions identified previously, modest evidence of replication was observed only on the short arm of chromosome 8, where HLOD scores of 1.63 and 3.60 were observed in the complete set of families and families with young average age at diagnosis, respectively. The most significant linkage signals found in the complete set of families were observed across a broad, 37 cM interval on 4q13-25, with LOD scores ranging from 2.02 to 2.62, increasing to 4.50 in families with older average age at diagnosis. In families with multiple cases presenting with more aggressive disease, LOD scores over 3.0 were observed at 8q24 in the vicinity of previously identified common PC risk variants, as well as MYC, an important gene in PC biology. Conclusions These results will be useful in prioritizing future susceptibility gene discovery efforts in this common cancer. PMID:21748754

  12. In vitro effects of oxpentifylline on inflammatory cytokine release in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, J M; Dumont, S; Muller, C D; Kenney, J S; Kedinger, M; Baumann, R; Poindron, P; Duclos, B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-1 beta, have been implicated as primary mediators of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of oxpentifylline (pentoxifylline; PTX; a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) on inflammatory cytokine production (1) by peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and (2) by inflamed intestinal mucosa cultures from patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS: PBMCs and mucosal biopsy specimens were cultured for 24 hours in the absence or presence of PTX (up to 100 micrograms/ml), and the secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8 determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). RESULTS: PTX inhibited the release of TNF-alpha by PBMCs from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by organ cultures of inflamed mucosa from the same patients. Secretion of TNF-alpha by PBMCs was inhibited by about 50% at a PTX concentration of 25 micrograms/ml (IC50). PTX was equally potent in cultures from controls, patients with Crohn's disease, and those with ulcerative colitis. The concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were not significantly modified in PBMCs, but IL-6 increased slightly in organ culture supernatants. CONCLUSIONS: PTX or more potent related compounds may represent a new family of cytokine inhibitors, potentially interesting for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:9176074

  13. The Enigmatic Cytokine Oncostatin M and Roles in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Carl D.

    2013-01-01

    Oncostatin M is a secreted cytokine involved in homeostasis and in diseases involving chronic inflammation. It is a member of the gp130 family of cytokines that have pleiotropic functions in differentiation, cell proliferation, and hematopoetic, immunologic, and inflammatory networks. However, Oncostatin M also has activities novel to mediators of this cytokine family and others and may have fundamental roles in mechanisms of inflammation in pathology. Studies have explored Oncostatin M functions in cancer, bone metabolism, liver regeneration, and conditions with chronic inflammation including rheumatoid arthritis, lung and skin inflammatory disease, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. This paper will review Oncostatin M biology in a historical fashion and focus on its unique activities, in vitro and in vivo, that differentiate it from other cytokines and inspire further study or consideration in therapeutic approaches. PMID:24381786

  14. An Analysis of Bronfenbrenner's Bio-Ecological Perspective for Early Childhood Educators: Implications for Working with Families Experiencing Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin James; Williams, Reginald D.

    2006-01-01

    Today's families face many stressors during the early childhood years. Particular stressors like homelessness, violence, and chemical dependence, play havoc with the family system. Urie Bronfenbrenner's bio-ecological perspective offers an insightful lens for understanding and supporting families under stress. This article presents the key…

  15. Temperament-induced father-son family dysfunction: etiological implications for child behavior problems and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Blackson, T C; Tarter, R E; Martin, C S; Moss, H B

    1994-04-01

    The impact on family dysfunction and child behavior problems of difficult affective temperament in fathers and sons was investigated. In preadolescent sons of both substance-abusing and non-substance-abusing fathers, temperament was found to mediate the relationship between family history of substance abuse and family dysfunction.

  16. Parental Characteristics, Somatic Fetal Growth, and Season of Birth Influence Innate and Adaptive Cord Blood Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Diane R; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Cruikshank, William W; Visness, Cynthia M; Schwarz, John; Kattan, Meyer; O’Connor, George T; Wood, Robert A; Burger, Melissa S.; Wright, Rosalind J; Witter, Frank; Lee-Parritz, Aviva; Sperling, Rhoda; Sadovsky, Yoel; Togias, Alkis; Gern, James E

    2009-01-01

    Background Immunologic responses at birth likely relate to subsequent risks for allergic diseases and wheezing in infancy; however, the influences of parental characteristics and prenatal factors on neonatal immune responses are incompletely understood. Objective This study investigates potential correlations between urban parental, prenatal and perinatal factors on innate and adaptive stimuli-induced cytokine responses. Methods 560 and 49 children of parents with and without allergic disease or asthma, respectively, were enrolled into a prospective birth cohort study (Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma [URECA]). Cord blood mononuclear cells were incubated with innate and adaptive immune stimuli, and cytokine responses (ELISA) were compared to season of birth, parental characteristics, in-utero stressors, and fetal growth. Results Many