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Sample records for family cytokines implications

  1. IL-12 Family Cytokines: Immunological Playmakers

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Dario A.A.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-12 (IL-12) family is unique in comprising the only heterodimeric cytokines, which includes IL-12, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35. This endows these cytokines with a unique set of connections and functional interactions not shared within other cytokine families. Despite sharing many structural features and molecular partners, they mediate surprisingly diverse functional effects. Here we discuss the unique and unusual structural and functional characteristics of this cytokine family. We outline how cells might interpret seemingly similar cytokine signals to give rise to the diverse functional outcomes which characterize this cytokine family. We will also discuss the therapeutic implications of this complexity. PMID:22814351

  2. Interleukin-12 family cytokines and sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ringkowski, Sabine; Thomas, Paul S; Herbert, Cristan

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease predominantly affecting the lungs. It is believed to be caused by exposure to pathogenic antigens in genetically susceptible individuals but the causative antigen has not been identified. The formation of non-caseating granulomas at sites of ongoing inflammation is the key feature of the disease. Other aspects of the pathogenesis are peripheral T-cell anergy and disease progression to fibrosis. Many T-cell-associated cytokines have been implicated in the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis, but it is becoming apparent that IL-12 cytokine family members including IL-12, IL-23, IL-27, and IL-35 are also involved. Although the members of this unique cytokine family are heterodimers of similar subunits, their biological functions are very diverse. Whilst IL-23 and IL-12 are pro-inflammatory regulators of Th1 and Th17 responses, IL-27 is bidirectional for inflammation and the most recent family member IL-35 is inhibitory. This review will discuss the current understanding of etiology and immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis with a specific focus on the bidirectional impact of IL-12 family cytokines on the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis.

  3. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  4. Tumor suppression in mice lacking GABARAP, an Atg8/LC3 family member implicated in autophagy, is associated with alterations in cytokine secretion and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Salah, F S; Ebbinghaus, M; Muley, V Y; Zhou, Z; Al-Saadi, K R D; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; O'Sullivan, G A; Betz, H; König, R; Wang, Z-Q; Bräuer, R; Petersen, I

    2016-01-01

    GABARAP belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene family that has a fundamental role in autophagy. There is ample evidence for a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as the immune response. However, the molecular details for these interactions are not fully characterized. Here, we report that the ablation of murine GABARAP, a member of the Atg8/LC3 family that is central to autophagosome formation, suppresses the incidence of tumor formation mediated by the carcinogen DMBA and results in an enhancement of the immune response through increased secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IFN-γ from stimulated macrophages and lymphocytes. In contrast, TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in the serum of these knockout mice. Further, DMBA treatment of these GABARAP knockout mice reduced the cellularity of the spleen and the growth of mammary glands through the induction of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of mammary glands revealed significantly elevated levels of Xaf1, an apoptotic inducer and tumor-suppressor gene, in knockout mice. Furthermore, DMBA treatment triggered the upregulation of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Apaf1, Bax), cell death (Tnfrsf10b, Ripk1) and cell cycle inhibitor (Cdkn1a, Cdkn2c) genes in the mammary glands. Finally, tumor growth of B16 melanoma cells after subcutaneous inoculation was inhibited in GABARAP-deficient mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence for the involvement of GABARAP in tumorigenesis in vivo by delaying cell death and its associated immune-related response. PMID:27124579

  5. Tumor suppression in mice lacking GABARAP, an Atg8/LC3 family member implicated in autophagy, is associated with alterations in cytokine secretion and cell death.

    PubMed

    Salah, F S; Ebbinghaus, M; Muley, V Y; Zhou, Z; Al-Saadi, K R D; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; O'Sullivan, G A; Betz, H; König, R; Wang, Z-Q; Bräuer, R; Petersen, I

    2016-01-01

    GABARAP belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene family that has a fundamental role in autophagy. There is ample evidence for a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as the immune response. However, the molecular details for these interactions are not fully characterized. Here, we report that the ablation of murine GABARAP, a member of the Atg8/LC3 family that is central to autophagosome formation, suppresses the incidence of tumor formation mediated by the carcinogen DMBA and results in an enhancement of the immune response through increased secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IFN-γ from stimulated macrophages and lymphocytes. In contrast, TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in the serum of these knockout mice. Further, DMBA treatment of these GABARAP knockout mice reduced the cellularity of the spleen and the growth of mammary glands through the induction of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of mammary glands revealed significantly elevated levels of Xaf1, an apoptotic inducer and tumor-suppressor gene, in knockout mice. Furthermore, DMBA treatment triggered the upregulation of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Apaf1, Bax), cell death (Tnfrsf10b, Ripk1) and cell cycle inhibitor (Cdkn1a, Cdkn2c) genes in the mammary glands. Finally, tumor growth of B16 melanoma cells after subcutaneous inoculation was inhibited in GABARAP-deficient mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence for the involvement of GABARAP in tumorigenesis in vivo by delaying cell death and its associated immune-related response. PMID:27124579

  6. PCTAIRE1-knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to TNF family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Teruki; Shi, Ranxin; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Reed, John C; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 is overexpressed in malignant cells and is crucial in tumorigenesis, its function in apoptosis remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PCTAIRE1 in apoptosis, especially in the extrinsic cell death pathway. Gene-knockdown of PCTAIRE1 sensitized prostate cancer PPC1 and Du145 cells, and breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells to TNF-family cytokines, including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Meanwhile, PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not sensitize non-malignant cells, including diploid fibroblasts IMR-90 and the immortalized prostate epithelial cell line 267B1. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not up-regulate death receptor expression on the cell surface or affect caspase-8, FADD and FLIP expression levels. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did promote caspase-8 cleavage and RIPK1 degradation, while RIPK1 mRNA knockdown sensitized PPC1 cells to TNF-family cytokines. Furthermore, the kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which inhibits PCTAIRE1 kinase activity, sensitized PPC1 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest that PCTAIRE1 contributes to the resistance of cancer cell lines to apoptosis induced by TNF-family cytokines, which implies that PCTAIRE1 inhibitors could have synergistic effects with TNF-family cytokines for cytodestruction of cancer cells. PMID:25790448

  7. Regulation of NF-κB by TNF Family Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Matthew S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    The NF-κB family of inducible transcription factors is activated in response to a variety of stimuli. Amongst the best-characterized inducers of NF-κB are members of the TNF family of cytokines. Research on NF-κB and TNF have been tightly intertwined for more than 25 years. Perhaps the most compelling examples of the interconnectedness of NF-κB and the TNF have come from analysis of knock-out mice that are unable to activate NF-kB. Such mice die embryonically, however, deletion of TNF or TNFR1 can rescue the lethality thereby illustrating the important role of NF-κB as the key regulator of transcriptional responses to TNF. The physiological connections between NF-κB and TNF cytokines are numerous and best explored in articles focusing on a single TNF family member. Instead, in this review, we explore general mechanisms of TNF cytokine signaling, with a focus on the upstream signaling events leading to activation of the socalled canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways by TNFR1 and CD40 respectively. PMID:24958609

  8. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases Escalate Inflammation through Activation of IL-36 Family Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Henry, Conor M; Sullivan, Graeme P; Clancy, Danielle M; Afonina, Inna S; Kulms, Dagmar; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has strongly implicated the IL-1 family cytokines IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ as key initiators of skin inflammation. Similar to the other members of the IL-1 family, IL-36 cytokines are expressed as inactive precursors and require proteolytic processing for activation; however, the responsible proteases are unknown. Here, we show that IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ are activated differentially by the neutrophil granule-derived proteases cathepsin G, elastase, and proteinase-3, increasing their biological activity ~500-fold. Active IL-36 promoted a strong pro-inflammatory signature in primary keratinocytes and was sufficient to perturb skin differentiation in a reconstituted 3D human skin model, producing features resembling psoriasis. Furthermore, skin eluates from psoriasis patients displayed significantly elevated cathepsin G-like activity that was sufficient to activate IL-36β. These data identify neutrophil granule proteases as potent IL-36-activating enzymes, adding to our understanding of how neutrophils escalate inflammatory reactions. Inhibition of neutrophil-derived proteases may therefore have therapeutic benefits in psoriasis. PMID:26776523

  9. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  10. Inflammatory Cytokines in Depression: Neurobiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Jennifer C.; Lotrich, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines contribute to the development of depression in both medically ill and medically healthy individuals. Cytokines are important for development and normal brain function, and have the ability to influence neurocircuitry and neurotransmitter systems to produce behavioral alterations. Acutely, inflammatory cytokine administration or activation of the innate immune system produces adaptive behavioral responses that promote conservation of energy to combat infection or recovery from injury. However, chronic exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines and persistent alterations in neurotransmitter systems can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. Mechanisms of cytokine behavioral effects involve activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain that results in changes in monoamine, glutamate, and neuropeptide systems, and decreases in growth factors, e.g. brain derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines may serve as mediators of both environmental (e.g. childhood trauma, obesity, stress, and poor sleep) and genetic (functional gene polymorphisms) factors that contribute to depression’s development. This review explores the idea that specific gene polymorphisms and neurotransmitter systems can confer protection from or vulnerability to specific symptom dimensions of cytokine-related depression. Additionally, potential therapeutic strategies that target inflammatory cytokine signaling or the consequences of cytokines on neurotransmitter systems in the brain to prevent or reverse cytokine effects on behavior are discussed. PMID:23644052

  11. Translational implications of inflammatory biomarkers and cytokine networks in psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Developments in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) need to be translated into personalized medicine to achieve better clinical outcomes. One of the most critical steps in this translational process is to identify systemic biomarkers for better diagnosis and treatment. Applications of systems biology approaches in PNI would enable the insights into the correlations among various systems and different levels for the identification of the basic elements of the psychophysiological framework. Among the potential PNI biomarkers, inflammatory markers deserve special attention as they play a pivotal role linking various health conditions and disorders. The elucidation of inflammatory markers, cytokine networks, and immune-brain-behavior interactions may help establish PNI profiles for the identification of potential targets for personalized interventions in at risk populations. The understanding of the general systemic pathways among different disorders may contribute to the transition from the disease-centered medicine to patient-centered medicine. Integrative strategies targeting these factors and pathways would be useful for the prevention and treatment of a spectrum of diseases that share the common links. Examples of the translational implications of potential PNI biomarkers and networks in diseases including depression, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and HIV are discussed in details.

  12. Optimized Expression of IL-12 Cytokine Family | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Human Retrovirus Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize methods for improved expression of IL-12 family cytokines.

  13. Systems biology of IL-6, IL-12 family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Anna; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Schaper, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-6-type cytokines play important roles in the communication between cells of multicellular organisms. They are involved in the regulation of complex cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation and act as key player during inflammation and immune response. A major challenge is to understand how these complex non-linear processes are connected and regulated. Systems biology approaches are used to tackle this challenge in an iterative process of quantitative experimental and mathematical analyses. Here we review quantitative experimental studies and systems biology approaches dealing with the function of Interleukin-6-type cytokines in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. These approaches cover the analyses of signal transduction on a cellular level up to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies on a whole organism level.

  14. Cytokines and chemokines in neuromyelitis optica: pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Masahiro, Mori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by severe optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. The discovery of an NMO-specific autoantibody to the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel has improved knowledge of NMO pathogenesis. Many studies have focused on inflammatory and pathological biomarkers of NMO, including cytokines and chemokines. Increased concentrations of T helper (Th)17- and Th2-related cytokines and chemokines may be essential factors for developing NMO inflammatory lesions. For example, interleukin-6 could play important roles in NMO pathogenesis, as it is involved in the survival of plasmablasts that produce anti-AQP4 antibody in peripheral circulation and in the enhancement of inflammation in the central nervous system. Therefore, assessment of these useful biomarkers may become a supportive criterion for diagnosing NMO. Significant advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis will lead to the development of novel treatment strategies. This review focuses on the current advances in NMO immunological research, particularly that of cytokines and chemokines.

  15. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:27381687

  16. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

  17. Policy implications for familial searching

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens. PMID:22040348

  18. Policy implications for familial searching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joyce; Mammo, Danny; Siegel, Marni B; Katsanis, Sara H

    2011-11-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens.

  19. Multiple Serum Cytokine Profiling to Identify Combinational Diagnostic Biomarkers in Attacks of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tomohiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Sato, Shuntaro; Umeda, Masataka; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Masumoto, Junya; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yachie, Akihiro; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    The precise cytokine networks in the serum of individuals with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) that are associated with its pathogenesis have been unknown. Here, we attempted to identify specific biomarkers to diagnose or assess disease activity in FMF patients. We measured serum levels of 45 cytokines in 75 FMF patients and 40 age-matched controls by multisuspension cytokine array. FMF in "attack" or "remission" was classified by Japan College of Rheumatology-certified rheumatologists according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Cytokines were ranked by their importance by a multivariate classification algorithm. We performed a logistic regression analysis to determine specific biomarkers for discriminating FMF patients in attack. To identify specific molecular networks, we performed a cluster analysis of each cytokine. Twenty-nine of the 45 cytokines were available for further analyses. Eight cytokines' serum levels were significantly elevated in the FMF attack versus healthy control group. Nine cytokines were increased in FMF attack compared to FMF remission. Multivariate classification algorithms followed by a logistic regression analysis revealed that the combined measurement of IL-6, IL-18, and IL-17 distinguished FMF patients in attack from the controls with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 89.2%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 95.5%). Among the FMF patients, the combined measurement of IL-6, G-CSF, IL-10, and IL-12p40 discriminated febrile attack periods from remission periods with the highest accuracy (sensitivity 75.0%, specificity 87.9%, and accuracy 84.0%). Our data identified combinational diagnostic biomarkers in FMF patients based on the measurement of multiple cytokines. These findings help to improve the diagnostic performance of FMF in daily practice and extend our understanding of the activation of the inflammasome leading to enhanced cytokine networks. PMID:27100444

  20. Characteristics common to a cytokine family spanning five orders of insects.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Date-Ito, Atsuko; Ohnishi, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2012-06-01

    Growth-blocking peptide (GBP) is a member of an insect cytokine family with diverse functions including growth and immunity controls. Members of this cytokine family have been reported in 15 species of Lepidoptera, and we have recently identified GBP-like peptides in Diptera such as Lucilia cuprina and Drosophila melanogaster, indicating that this peptide family is not specific to Lepidoptera. In order to extend our knowledge of this peptide family, we purified the same family peptide from one of the tenebrionids, Zophobas atratus,(1) isolated its cDNA, and sequenced it. The Z. atratus GBP sequence together with reported sequence data of peptides from the same family enabled us to perform BLAST searches against EST and genome databases of several insect species including Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera and identify homologous peptide genes. Here we report conserved structural features in these sequence data. They consist of 19-30 amino acid residues encoded at the C terminus of a 73-152 amino acid precursor and contain the motif C-x(2)-G-x(4,6)-G-x(1,2)-C-[KR], which shares a certain similarity with the motif in the mammalian EGF peptide family. These data indicate that these small cytokines belonging to one family are present in at least five insect orders.

  1. IL-12 Family Cytokines: General Characteristics, Pathogenic Microorganisms, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Among a wide range of cytokines, the Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family has its unique structural, functional, and immunological characteristics that have made this family as important immunological playmakers. Because of the importance of IL-12 heterodimeric cytokines in microbial infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancers, the authors of this literature discuss about the general characteristics of IL-12 family members, the interactions between IL-12 cytokines and pathogenic microorganisms, the interleukins receptors and their strategies for selecting different signalling pathways. IL-12 and IL-23 are similar in p40 subunits and both are involved in proinflammatory responses while, IL-27 and IL-35 contribute to anti-inflammatory activities; however, IL-27 is also involved in pro-inflammatory responses. There are some similarities and dissimilarities among IL-12 family members which make them a unique bridge between innate and adaptive immune systems. The bioactivities of IL-12 family indicate a brilliant promise for their applications in different fields of medicine. The members of IL-12 family are candidate for several therapeutics including gene therapy, cancer therapy, tumour therapy, and vaccination. To have an accurate diagnostic technique and definite treatment regarding to infectious diseases, the playmakers of IL-12 family as effective criteria together with microarray technology are the best choices for current and future applications.

  2. IL-12 Family Cytokines: General Characteristics, Pathogenic Microorganisms, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Among a wide range of cytokines, the Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family has its unique structural, functional, and immunological characteristics that have made this family as important immunological playmakers. Because of the importance of IL-12 heterodimeric cytokines in microbial infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancers, the authors of this literature discuss about the general characteristics of IL-12 family members, the interactions between IL-12 cytokines and pathogenic microorganisms, the interleukins receptors and their strategies for selecting different signalling pathways. IL-12 and IL-23 are similar in p40 subunits and both are involved in proinflammatory responses while, IL-27 and IL-35 contribute to anti-inflammatory activities; however, IL-27 is also involved in pro-inflammatory responses. There are some similarities and dissimilarities among IL-12 family members which make them a unique bridge between innate and adaptive immune systems. The bioactivities of IL-12 family indicate a brilliant promise for their applications in different fields of medicine. The members of IL-12 family are candidate for several therapeutics including gene therapy, cancer therapy, tumour therapy, and vaccination. To have an accurate diagnostic technique and definite treatment regarding to infectious diseases, the playmakers of IL-12 family as effective criteria together with microarray technology are the best choices for current and future applications. PMID:27020866

  3. The roles and functional mechanisms of interleukin-17 family cytokines in mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinyang; He, Xiao; Li, Xiaoxia; Qian, Youcun

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal immune system serves as our front-line defense against pathogens. It also tightly maintains immune tolerance to self-symbiotic bacteria, which are usually called commensals. Sensing both types of microorganisms is modulated by signalling primarily through various pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) on barrier epithelial cells or immune cells. After sensing, proinflammatory molecules such as cytokines are released by these cells to mediate either defensive or tolerant responses. The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family members belong to a newly characterized cytokine subset that is critical for the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the diverse functions and signals of this family of cytokines at different mucosal edges. PMID:27018218

  4. Tregs Are Regulated by Cytokines: Implications for Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    La Cava, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Several immune cell subsets contribute to the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by taking active participation in the networks that suppress autoreactive immune responses. There is ample evidence that CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can have an important role in suppressing the production of autoimmune responses in animal models and in humans. This review describes the influences that specific cytokines have on the differentiation, maintenance and survival of Tregs, and how these effects can ultimately directly influence both number and functional activity of these cells in autoimmune disease. PMID:18771756

  5. Inflammatory Cytokines and Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain: Review and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, Trehani M; Müller, Daniel J; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2016-05-01

    Antipsychotic medications (APs), particularly second-generation APs, are associated with significant weight gain in schizophrenia patients. Recent evidence suggests that the immune system may contribute to antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) via AP-mediated alterations of cytokine levels. Antipsychotics with a high propensity for weight gain, such as clozapine and olanzapine, influence the expression of immune genes, and induce changes in serum cytokine levels to ultimately down-regulate neuroinflammation. Since inflammatory cytokines are normally involved in anorexigenic responses, reduced inflammation has been independently shown to mediate changes in feeding behaviours and other metabolic parameters, resulting in obesity. Genetic variation in pro-inflammatory cytokines is also associated with both general obesity and weight change during AP treatment, and thus, may be implicated in the pharmacogenetics of AIWG. At this time, preliminary data support a cytokine-mediated model of AIWG which may have clinical utility in developing more effective metabolic monitoring guidelines and prevention measures. However, further research is still needed to clearly elucidate the validity of this immune model. This article reviews the evidence implicating inflammatory cytokines in AIWG and its potential clinical relevance. PMID:27606316

  6. Interaction of dietary fatty acids with tumour necrosis factor family cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Safaříková, Barbora; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF- α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NF κ B activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  7. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Šafaříková, Barbora; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined. PMID:24876678

  8. Evaluating the levels of interleukin-1 family cytokines in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease leading to the death of affected individuals within years. The involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS, is increasingly recognized but still not well understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the levels of inflammation-related IL-1 family cytokines (IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-37) and their endogenous inhibitors (IL-1Ra, sIL-1R2, IL-18BP, sIL-1R4) in patients with sporadic ALS (sALS), Methods Sera were collected from 144 patients (125 patients were characterized by disease form, duration, and disability, using the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) and from 40 matched controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from 54 patients with sALS and 65 patients with other non-infectious non-oncogenic diseases as controls. Cytokines and inhibitors were measured by commercial ELISA. Results Among the IL-1 family cytokines tested total IL-18, its endogenous inhibitor IL-18BP, and the active form of the cytokine (free IL-18) were significantly higher in the sALS sera than in controls. No correlation between these soluble mediators and different clinical forms of sALS or the clinical setting of the disease was found. IL-18BP was the only mediator detectable in the CSF of patients. Conclusions Among the IL-1 family cytokines, only IL-18 correlates with this disease and may therefore have a pathological role in sALS. The increase of total IL-18 suggests the activation of IL-18-cleaving inflammasome. Whether IL-18 upregulation in circulation of sALS patients is a consequence of inflammation or one of the causes of the pathology still needs to be addressed. PMID:24884937

  9. The TNF-family cytokine TL1A: from lymphocyte costimulator to disease co-conspirator

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Arianne C.; Ferdinand, John R.; Meylan, Françoise; Hayes, Erika T.; Gabay, Odile; Siegel, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 2002 as a T cell-costimulatory cytokine, the tumor necrosis factor family member TNF-like factor 1A (TL1A), encoded by the TNFSF15 gene, has since been found to affect multiple cell lineages through its receptor, death receptor 3 (DR3, encoded by TNFRSF25) with distinct cell-type effects. Genetic deficiency or blockade of TL1A-DR3 has defined a number of disease states that depend on this cytokine-receptor pair, whereas excess TL1A leads to allergic gastrointestinal inflammation through stimulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Noncoding variants in the TL1A locus are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and leprosy, predicting that the level of TL1A expression may influence host defense and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26188076

  10. Differential expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling-1, -2, and -3 in the rat hippocampus after seizure: implications for neuromodulation by gp130 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rosell, D R; Akama, K T; Nacher, J; McEwen, B S

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the expression of various cytokine families in the CNS after brain injury. The gp130 or interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokines have received a great deal of focus, and it is clear that they exhibit an acute and robust upregulation in various brain injury models. We are interested to determine, however, whether endogenously expressed cytokines in the CNS act in a direct neuromodulatory manner. In an accompanying study, we examined the expression of five gp130 cytokines and their receptors in the lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus. We follow up that study here by trying to determine if gp130 signal transduction occurs in hippocampal principal neurons after seizure. Therefore, using the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3 as indices of gp130 signal transduction, we performed a detailed in situ hybridization seizure time-course study in the adult rat hippocampus. For comparison, we also examined SOCS-2, which is involved in insulin-like growth factor signaling. We found that while SOCS-1 and -3 were faintly expressed under basal conditions, only SOCS-3 exhibited a rapid, robust, and transient induction. This occurred first in non-principal cells, which appeared to be glial, peaking at approximately 12 h post-seizure. Subsequently, a robust induction of SOCS-3 occurred in pyramidal and granule neurons, peaking at approximately 24 h. SOCS-2 displayed a relatively higher level of basal expression, particularly in CA3, and a mild and transient downregulation by 24 h. These findings corroborate the hypothesis that seizure-induced gp130 cytokines play a direct neuromodulatory role in the hippocampus. Since in our previous study we did not detect cytokine receptor expression in non-principal cells, it is unclear what elicits SOCS-3 expression in this population.

  11. Cytokine Gene Variation is Associated with Depressive Symptom Trajectories in Oncology Patients and Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Langford, Dale J.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dhruva, Anand; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; Merriman, John D.; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Depressive symptoms are common in cancer patients and their family caregivers (FCs). While these symptoms are characterized by substantial interindividual variability, the factors that predict this variability remain largely unknown. This study sought to confirm latent classes of oncology patients and FCs with distinct depressive symptom trajectories and to examine differences in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics among these classes. Method Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scores obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. One hundred four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in 15 candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two largest latent classes. Multivariate logistic regression analyses assessed effects of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on class membership. Results Four latent classes were confirmed: Resilient (56.3%), Subsyndromal (32.5%), Delayed (5.2%), and Peak (6.0%). Participants who were younger, female, non-white, and who reported higher baseline trait and state anxiety were more likely to be in the Subsyndromal, Delayed, or Peak groups. Variation in three cytokine genes (i.e., interleukin 1 receptor 2 [IL1R2], IL10, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFA]), age,and performance status predicted membership in the Resilient versus Subsyndromal classes. Conclusions Findings confirm the four latent classes of depressive symptom trajectories previously identified in a sample of breast cancer patients. Variations in cytokine genes may influence variability in depressive symptom trajectories. PMID:23187335

  12. Fibrosis Related Inflammatory Mediators: Role of the IL-10 Cytokine Family.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Lippai, Rita; Béres, Nóra Judit; Fekete, Andrea; Szabó, Attila J; Vannay, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Importance of chronic fibroproliferative diseases (FDs) including pulmonary fibrosis, chronic kidney diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and cardiovascular or liver fibrosis is rapidly increasing and they have become a major public health problem. According to some estimates about 45% of all deaths are attributed to FDs in the developed world. Independently of their etiology the common hallmark of FDs is chronic inflammation. Infiltrating immune cells, endothelial, epithelial, and other resident cells of the injured organ release an orchestra of inflammatory mediators, which stimulate the proliferation and excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production of myofibroblasts, the effector cells of organ fibrosis. Abnormal amount of ECM disturbs the original organ architecture leading to the decline of function. Although our knowledge is rapidly expanding, we still have neither a diagnostic tool to detect nor a drug to specifically target fibrosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the more comprehensive understanding of the pathomechanism of fibrosis and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In the present review we provide an overview of the common key mediators of organ fibrosis highlighting the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family members (IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, and IL-26), which recently came into focus as tissue remodeling-related inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Fibrosis Related Inflammatory Mediators: Role of the IL-10 Cytokine Family

    PubMed Central

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Lippai, Rita; Béres, Nóra Judit; Fekete, Andrea; Szabó, Attila J.; Vannay, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Importance of chronic fibroproliferative diseases (FDs) including pulmonary fibrosis, chronic kidney diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and cardiovascular or liver fibrosis is rapidly increasing and they have become a major public health problem. According to some estimates about 45% of all deaths are attributed to FDs in the developed world. Independently of their etiology the common hallmark of FDs is chronic inflammation. Infiltrating immune cells, endothelial, epithelial, and other resident cells of the injured organ release an orchestra of inflammatory mediators, which stimulate the proliferation and excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production of myofibroblasts, the effector cells of organ fibrosis. Abnormal amount of ECM disturbs the original organ architecture leading to the decline of function. Although our knowledge is rapidly expanding, we still have neither a diagnostic tool to detect nor a drug to specifically target fibrosis. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the more comprehensive understanding of the pathomechanism of fibrosis and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In the present review we provide an overview of the common key mediators of organ fibrosis highlighting the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family members (IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, and IL-26), which recently came into focus as tissue remodeling-related inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26199463

  14. Revisiting the regulatory roles of the TGF-β family of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Keshi; Komai, Toshihiko; Inoue, Mariko; Morita, Kaoru; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kauzhiko

    2016-09-01

    TGF-β family members are multipotent cytokines that are involved in many cellular processes, including cell differentiation, organ development, wound healing and immune regulation. TGF-β has pleiotropic effects on adaptive immunity, especially in the regulation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses. Furthermore, identification of CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce TGF-β3 revealed unexpected roles of TGF-β3 in the control of adaptive immunity. In contrast to TGF-β1, which induces extensive fibrosis, TGF-β3 induces non-scarring wound healing and counteracts tissue fibrosis. Recent progress in the understanding of the activation mechanism of TGF-β may enable us to develop novel biologic therapies based on advanced protein engineering. PMID:27392504

  15. Revisiting the regulatory roles of the TGF-β family of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Keshi; Komai, Toshihiko; Inoue, Mariko; Morita, Kaoru; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kauzhiko

    2016-09-01

    TGF-β family members are multipotent cytokines that are involved in many cellular processes, including cell differentiation, organ development, wound healing and immune regulation. TGF-β has pleiotropic effects on adaptive immunity, especially in the regulation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses. Furthermore, identification of CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce TGF-β3 revealed unexpected roles of TGF-β3 in the control of adaptive immunity. In contrast to TGF-β1, which induces extensive fibrosis, TGF-β3 induces non-scarring wound healing and counteracts tissue fibrosis. Recent progress in the understanding of the activation mechanism of TGF-β may enable us to develop novel biologic therapies based on advanced protein engineering.

  16. The Transformation of the Family: Implications for Child Care Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill-Scott, Karen

    This paper summarizes theories of American family organization, points out social changes that have had an impact on family structure, and discusses implications of current social and political conditions for child care policy. It is suggested that monistic characterizations of the family, emphasizing self-sufficiency and only one kind of family…

  17. Proinflammatory cytokines promote glial heme oxygenase-1 expression and mitochondrial iron deposition: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mehindate, K; Sahlas, D J; Frankel, D; Mawal, Y; Liberman, A; Corcos, J; Dion, S; Schipper, H M

    2001-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, pathological iron deposition, and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). HO-1 mRNA levels and mitochondrial uptake of [(55)Fe]Cl(3)-derived iron were measured in rat astroglial cultures exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alone or in combination with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamthasone (DEX), or interferon beta1b (INF-beta). HO-1 expression in astrocytes was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of spinal cord tissue derived from MS and control subjects. IL-1beta or TNF-alpha promoted sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by astroglial mitochondria. HO-1 inhibitors, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) blockers and antioxidants significantly attenuated cytokine-related mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. IFN-beta decreased HO-1 expression and mitochondrial iron sequestration in IL-1beta- and TNF-alpha-challenged astroglia. The percentage of astrocytes coexpressing HO-1 in affected spinal cord from MS patients (57.3% +/- 12.8%) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in normal spinal cord derived from controls subjects (15.4% +/- 8.4%). HO-1 is over-expressed in MS spinal cord astroglia and may promote mitochondrial iron deposition in MS plaques. In MS, IFN-beta may attenuate glial HO-1 gene induction and aberrant mitochondrial iron deposition accruing from exposure to proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Family Structure and Dynamics in Neglectful Families: Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudin, James M., Jr.

    To identify remedial and preventive interventions that target dysfunctional processes in the family, this study compared the structure and processes of neglectful and non-neglectful families. A sample of 102 neglectful families was identified and recruited from the caseloads of protective service workers in Georgia. A comparison group of 103…

  19. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency.

  20. Implications of Change in Mexican American Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Clark S.

    The Mexican American bilateral extended family system was a part of the cultural heritage from Mexico or Spain and a family system developed as a social and cultural response to the cultural isolation and frontier environment of the Borderlands. As a social system, it mobilized members to work the land, protect family members and property against…

  1. Military Families under Stress: Implications for Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummet, Amy Reinkober; Coleman, Marilyn; Cable, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a summary of the limited research on three uniquely stressful experiences of military families: relocation, separation, and reunion. Using the insights derived from this literature, identifies and discusses interventions to assist and guide military families through these unique events. (Contains 64 references.) (GCP)

  2. Grandparents' Rights: Implications for Family Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purnell, Marie; Bagby, Beatrice H.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that every state has passed laws giving grandparents right to petition courts for privilege of visiting their grandchildren. Family specialists need to understand nature of grandparents' rights laws because these laws affect their duties. Asserts that research findings and expert witness testimonies of family specialists should be included…

  3. Affirmative Action Implications for Worldwide Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Lora

    This paper views the interrelatedness of political, economic, and family systems as they are being affected by the growing awareness of sex discrimination. The reduction in sex inequalities throughout the world, regardless of political or economic orientation, will necessitate a new perception of the woman's role in the family unit. The hypothesis…

  4. Cell death and inflammation: the case for IL-1 family cytokines as the canonical DAMPs of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that necrotic cells are capable of promoting inflammation through releasing so-called endogenous 'danger signals' that can promote activation of macrophages, dendritic cells, and other sentinel cells of the innate immune system. However, the identity of these endogenous proinflammatory molecules, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), has been debated since the 'danger model' was first advanced 20 years ago. While a relatively large number of molecules have been proposed to act as DAMPs, little consensus has emerged concerning which of these represent the key activators of sterile inflammation. Here I argue that the canonical DAMPs have long been hiding in plain sight, in the form of members of the extended IL-1 cytokine family (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ). The latter cytokines possess all of the characteristics expected of endogenous DAMPs and initiate inflammation in a manner strikingly similar to that utilized by the other major category of inflammatory triggers, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Furthermore, many PAMPs upregulate the expression of IL-1 family DAMPs, enabling robust synergy between these distinct classes of inflammatory triggers. Thus, multiple lines of evidence now suggest that IL-1 family cytokines represent the key initiators of necrosis-initiated sterile inflammation, as well as amplifiers of inflammation in response to infection-associated tissue injury. PMID:27273805

  5. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  6. Development and Families: Implications for Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eloise

    1985-01-01

    This article integrates literature from such diverse sources as population, agriculture, women in development, macro-economics, and health studies to document the changes that have occurred in families in the last 20-25 years. Program issues for the home economics profession are considered in light of these changes. (CT)

  7. Quanta, quarks, and families: implications of quantum physics for family research.

    PubMed

    Doherty, W J

    1986-06-01

    This paper offers recommendations for family research in light of the scientific paradigm ushered in by quantum physics in the early twentieth century. After summarizing the basic discoveries of quantum physics, the author discusses philosophical implications of these discoveries, and then presents implications for conducting scientific research about families within a post-Newtonian paradigm that emphasizes relations, process, and dynamic causation. The author argues for using complementary research models, including linear and systemic, because no one theory or methodology can illuminate fully the inscrutable nature of family processes.

  8. Marital and Family Therapy Research: Outcomes and Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia; Huggins, Don

    1998-01-01

    A review of marriage-and-family therapy-outcome studies from the past 10 years is discussed. Results indicate success over a broad scope of practices, including problems traditionally treated with individual psychotherapy, and when used in collaboration with other treatment modalities. Implications for the field are presented. (Author/EMK)

  9. Family planning: implications for marital stability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, F C; Johnson, M R

    1980-01-01

    In Spring, 1977, a random sample of divorced persons (N=165) in Spokane County was compared to a matched group of people who had not divorced (N=102). It was found that it was not possible to predict marital stability from knowledge of number of children, presence or absence of children, or timing of childbirth in relationship to marriage date. A significant predictor of marital stability was found to be whether or not children were planned. In the past 2 decades, several fertility variables have been shown to have an effect on marital stability: presence or absence of children, child spacing, birth timing, and total number of children. Only 1 paper directly implicates the planning component of fertility, and then only from a theoretical perspective. Over 20% of the North American population will experience at least 1 divorce during their lifetime. Hurley and Palonen (1967) found that the higher the ratio of children per years of marriage, the less satisfactory the marital experience will be. Another study by Luckey (1966) found no relationship between the number of children and marital satisfaction. This study found that there was an effect on the stability of womens' marriages if there was a child from a previous marriage in the home. It also found that men did not regard paternity as critical to their marital happiness whereas women often depend on maternity for theirs.

  10. Cytokine and chemokine responses after exposure to ionizing radiation: Implications for the astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Baulch, Janet E.; Morgan, William F.

    For individuals traveling in space, exposure to space radiation is unavoidable. Since adequate shielding against radiation exposure is not practical, other strategies for protecting the astronauts must be developed. Radiation is also an important therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and evidence from the clinical and experimental settings now shows a firm connection between radiation exposure and changes in cytokine and chemokine levels. These small proteins can be pro- or anti-inflammatory in nature and the balance between those two effects can be altered easily because of exogenous stresses such as radiation. The challenge to identify a common perpetrator, however, lies in the fact that the cytokines that are produced vary based on radiation dose, type of radiation, and the cell types that are exposed. Based on current knowledge, special treatments have successfully been designed by implementing administration of proteins, antibodies, and drugs that counteract some of the harmful effects of radiation. Although these treatments show promising results in animal studies, it has been difficult to transfer those practices to the human situation. Further understanding of the mechanisms by which cytokines are triggered through radiation exposure and how those proteins interact with one another may permit the generation of novel strategies for radiation protection from the damaging effects of radiation. Here, we review evidence for the connection between cytokines and the radiation response and speculate on strategies by which modulating cytokine responses may protect astronauts against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiations.

  11. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  12. Progesterone modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Coronel, María F; Raggio, María C; Adler, Natalia S; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana L

    2016-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), still refractory to conventional treatment. Glial cell activation and cytokine production contribute to the pathology of central neuropathic syndromes. In this study we evaluated the effects of progesterone, a neuroactive steroid, on pain development and the spinal expression of IL-1β, its receptors (IL-1RI and IL-1RII) and antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-6 and TNFα, and NR1 subunit of NMDAR. Our results show that progesterone, by modulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuronal IL-1RI/NR1 colocalization, emerges as a promising agent to prevent chronic pain after SCI.

  13. Progesterone modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile after spinal cord injury: Implications for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Coronel, María F; Raggio, María C; Adler, Natalia S; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana L

    2016-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), still refractory to conventional treatment. Glial cell activation and cytokine production contribute to the pathology of central neuropathic syndromes. In this study we evaluated the effects of progesterone, a neuroactive steroid, on pain development and the spinal expression of IL-1β, its receptors (IL-1RI and IL-1RII) and antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-6 and TNFα, and NR1 subunit of NMDAR. Our results show that progesterone, by modulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuronal IL-1RI/NR1 colocalization, emerges as a promising agent to prevent chronic pain after SCI. PMID:26943964

  14. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  15. Identification of a fourth ancient member of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF cytokine family, KK34, in many mammals.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takuya; Schares, Susann; Fischer, Uwe; Dijkstra, Johannes M

    2016-12-01

    The related cytokine genes IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF map to the (extended) TH2 cytokine locus of the mammalian genome. For chicken an additional related cytokine gene, KK34, was reported downstream of the IL-3 plus GM-CSF cluster, but hitherto it was believed that mammalian genomes lack this gene. However, the present study identifies an intact orthologue of chicken KK34 gene in many mammals like cattle and pig, while remnants of KK34 can be found in human and mouse. Bovine KK34 was found to be transcribed, and its recombinant protein could induce STAT5 phosphorylation and proliferation of lymphocytes upon incubation with bovine PBMCs. This concludes that KK34 is a fourth functional cytokine of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF/KK34-family (alias IL-5 family) in mammals. While analyzing KK34, the present study also made new identifications of cytokine genes in the extended TH2 cytokine loci for reptiles, birds and marsupials. This includes a hitherto unknown cytokine gene in birds and reptiles which we designated "IL-5famE". Other newly identified genes are KK34, GM-CSF(-like), IL-5, and IL-13 in reptiles, and IL-3 in marsupials. PMID:27492645

  16. Misoprostol modulates cytokine expression through a cAMP pathway: Potential therapeutic implication for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gobejishvili, Leila; Ghare, Smita; Khan, Rehan; Cambon, Alexander; Barker, David F; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig; Hill, Daniell

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulated cytokine metabolism plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of many forms of liver disease, including alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. In this study we examined the efficacy of Misoprostol in modulating LPS-inducible TNFα and IL-10 expression in healthy human subjects and evaluated molecular mechanisms for Misoprostol modulation of cytokines in vitro. Healthy subjects were given 14day courses of Misoprostol at doses of 100, 200, and 300μg four times a day, in random order. Baseline and LPS-inducible cytokine levels were examined ex vivo in whole blood at the beginning and the end of the study. Additionally, in vitro studies were performed using primary human PBMCs and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, to investigate underlying mechanisms of misoprostol on cytokine production. Administration of Misoprostol reduced LPS inducible TNF production by 29%, while increasing IL-10 production by 79% in human subjects with no significant dose effect on ex vivo cytokine activity; In vitro, the effect of Misoprostol was largely mediated by increased cAMP levels and consequent changes in CRE and NFκB activity, which are critical for regulating IL-10 and TNF expression. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies demonstrated that Misoprostol treatment led to changes in transcription factor and RNA Polymerase II binding, resulting in changes in mRNA levels. In summary, Misoprostol was effective at beneficially modulating TNF and IL-10 levels both in vivo and in vitro; these studies suggest a potential rationale for Misoprostol use in ALD, NASH and other liver diseases where inflammation plays an etiologic role.

  17. Family ties after divorce: long-term implications for children.

    PubMed

    Ahrons, Constance R

    2007-03-01

    Drawing on the data from the longitudinal Binuclear Family Study, 173 grown children were interviewed 20 years after their parents' divorce. This article addresses two basic questions: (1) What impact does the relationship between parents have on their children 20 years after the divorce? and (2) When a parent remarries or cohabits, how does it impact a child's sense of family? The findings show that the parental subsystem continues to impact the binuclear family 20 years after marital disruption by exerting a strong influence on the quality of relationships within the family system. Children who reported that their parents were cooperative also reported better relationships with their parents, grandparents, stepparents, and siblings. Over the course of 20 years, most of the children experienced the remarriage of one or both parents, and one third of this sample remembered the remarriage as more stressful than the divorce. Of those who experienced the remarriage of both of their parents, two thirds reported that their father's remarriage was more stressful than their mother's. When children's relationships with their fathers deteriorated after divorce, their relationships with their paternal grandparents, stepmother, and stepsiblings were distant, negative, or nonexistent. Whether family relationships remain stable, improve, or get worse is dependent on a complex interweaving of many factors. Considering the long-term implications of divorce, the need to emphasize life course and family system perspectives is underscored.

  18. Lymphoid-Tissue-Resident Commensal Bacteria Promote Members of the IL-10 Cytokine Family to Establish Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Fung, Thomas C; Bessman, Nicholas J; Hepworth, Matthew R; Kumar, Nitin; Shibata, Naoko; Kobuley, Dmytro; Wang, Kelvin; Ziegler, Carly G K; Goc, Jeremy; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Sartor, R Balfour; Sullivan, Kaede V; Lawley, Trevor D; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2016-03-15

    Physical separation between the mammalian immune system and commensal bacteria is necessary to limit chronic inflammation. However, selective species of commensal bacteria can reside within intestinal lymphoid tissues of healthy mammals. Here, we demonstrate that lymphoid-tissue-resident commensal bacteria (LRC) colonized murine dendritic cells and modulated their cytokine production. In germ-free and antibiotic-treated mice, LRCs colonized intestinal lymphoid tissues and induced multiple members of the IL-10 cytokine family, including dendritic-cell-derived IL-10 and group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-derived IL-22. Notably, IL-10 limited the development of pro-inflammatory Th17 cell responses, and IL-22 production enhanced LRC colonization in the steady state. Furthermore, LRC colonization protected mice from lethal intestinal damage in an IL-10-IL-10R-dependent manner. Collectively, our data reveal a unique host-commensal-bacteria dialog whereby selective subsets of commensal bacteria interact with dendritic cells to facilitate tissue-specific responses that are mutually beneficial for both the host and the microbe. PMID:26982365

  19. The TNF-Family Cytokine TL1A Promotes Allergic Immunopathology through Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meylan, Françoise; Hawley, Eric T.; Barron, Luke; Barlow, Jillian L.; Penumetcha, Pallavi; Pelletier, Martin; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Richard, Arianne C.; Hayes, Erika T.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Chen, Xi; Paul, William E.; Wynn, Thomas A.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The TNF-family cytokine TL1A (TNFSF15) costimulates T cells and promotes diverse T-cell dependent models of autoimmune disease through its receptor DR3. TL1A polymorphisms also confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Here we find that allergic pathology driven by constitutive TL1A expression depends on IL-13, but not T, NKT, mast cells or commensal intestinal flora. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) express surface DR3 and produce IL-13 and other type 2 cytokines in response to TL1A. DR3 is required for ILC2 expansion and function in the setting of T cell dependent and independent models of allergic disease. By contrast, DR3 deficient ILC2 can still differentiate, expand and produce IL-13 when stimulated by IL-25 or IL-33, and mediate expulsion of intestinal helminths. These data identify costimulation of ILC2 as a novel function of TL1A important for allergic lung disease, and suggest that TL1A may be a therapeutic target in these settings. PMID:24368564

  20. Inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Bulati, Matteo; Caruso, Calogero; Castiglia, Laura; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Di Bona, Danilo; Duro, Giovanni; Lio, Domenico; Matranga, Domenica; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; Rizzo, Claudia; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Vasto, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and progressive neurodegenerative disease, which in Western society mainly accounts for senile dementia. Today many countries have rising aging populations and are facing an increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as AD, with increasing health-care costs. Understanding the pathophysiology process of AD plays a prominent role in new strategies for extending the health of the elderly population. Considering the future epidemic of AD, prevention and treatment are important goals of ongoing research. However, a better understanding of AD pathophysiology must be accomplished to make this objective feasible. In this paper, we review some hot topics concerning AD pathophysiology that have an important impact on therapeutic perspectives. Hence, we have focused our attention on inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E (APOE), cholesterol, oxidative stress, as well as exploring the related therapeutic possibilities, i.e., nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, cytokine blocking antibodies, immunotherapy, diet, and curcumin.

  1. Infant mortality and family welfare: policy implications for Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Poerwanto, S; Stevenson, M; de Klerk, N

    2003-01-01

    Design: A population based multistage stratified clustered survey. Setting: Women of reproductive age in Indonesia between 1983–1997. Data sources: The 1997 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey. Main results: Infant mortality was associated with FWI and maternal education. Relative to families of high FWI, the risk of infant death was almost twice among families of low FWI (aOR=1.7, 95%CI=0.9 to 3.3), and three times for families of medium FWI (aOR=3.3 ,95%CI=1.7 to 6.5). Also, the risk of infant death was threefold higher (aOR=3.4, 95% CI=1.6 to 7.1) among mothers who had fewer than seven years of formal education compared with mothers with more than seven years of education. Fertility related indicators such as young maternal age, absence from contraception, birth intervals, and prenatal care, seem to exert significant effect on the increased probability of infant death. Conclusions: The increased probability of infant mortality attributable to family income inequality and low maternal education seems to work through pathways of material deprivation and chronic psychological stress that affect a person's health damaging behaviours. The policies that are likely to significantly reduce the family's socioeconomic inequality in infant mortality are implicated. PMID:12821691

  2. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  3. Uninephrectomy in rats on a fixed food intake results in adipose tissue lipolysis implicating spleen cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Denis; Cajot, Jean-François; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The role of mild kidney dysfunction in altering lipid metabolism and promoting inflammation was investigated in uninephrectomized rats (UniNX) compared to Sham-operated controls rats. The impact of UniNX was studied 1, 2, and 4 weeks after UniNX under mild food restriction at 90% of ad libitum intake to ensure the same caloric intake in both groups. UniNX resulted in the reduction of fat pad weight. UniNX was associated with increased circulating levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate and glycerol, as well as increased fat pad mRNA of hormone sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, suggesting enhanced lipolysis. No decrease in fat pad lipogenesis as assessed by fatty acid synthase activity was observed. Circulating hormones known to regulate lipolysis such as leptin, T3, ghrelin, insulin, corticosterone, angiotensin 1, and angiotensin 2 were not different between the two groups. In contrast, a select group of circulating lipolytic cytokines, including interferon-gamma and granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor, were increased after UniNX. These cytokine levels were elevated in the spleen, but decreased in the kidney, liver, and fat pads. This could be explained by anti-inflammatory factors SIRT1, a member of the sirtuins, and the farnesoid x receptor (FXR), which were decreased in the spleen but elevated in the kidney, liver, and fat pads (inguinal and epididymal). Our study suggests that UniNX induces adipose tissue lipolysis in response to increased levels of a subset of lipolytic cytokines of splenic origin. PMID:26217234

  4. Microarray Analysis of Rat Sensory Ganglia after Local Inflammation Implicates Novel Cytokines in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Judith A.; Xie, Wenrui; Coyle, Dennis E.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation plays a role in neuropathic pain conditions as well as in pain induced solely by an inflammatory stimulus. Robust mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia can be induced by locally inflaming the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rat. This model allows investigation of the contribution of inflammation per se to chronic pain conditions. Most previous microarray studies of DRG gene expression have investigated neuropathic pain models. To examine the role of inflammation, we used microarray methods to examine gene expression 3 days after local inflammation of the L5 DRG in rat. We observed significant regulation in a large number of genes (23% of observed transcripts), and examined 221 (3%) with a fold-change of 1.5-fold or more in more detail. Immune-related genes were the largest category in this group and included members of the complement system as well as several pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, these upregulated cytokines had no prior links to peripheral pain in the literature other than through microarray studies, though most had previously described roles in CNS (especially neuroinflammatory conditions) as well as in immune responses. To confirm an association to pain, qPCR studies examined these cytokines at a later time (day 14), as well as in two different versions of the spinal nerve ligation pain model including a version without any foreign immunogenic material (suture). Cxcl11, Cxcl13, and Cxcl14 were found to be significantly upregulated in all these conditions, while Cxcl9, Cxcl10, and Cxcl16 were upregulated in at least two of these conditions. PMID:22815815

  5. Cytokines Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Formation: Implication for the Inflammatory Disease Condition

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Ravi S.; Jyoti, Anupam; Dubey, Megha; Kothari, Nikhil; Kohli, Monica; Bogra, Jaishri; Barthwal, Manoj K.; Dikshit, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) and cytokines have a critical role to play in host defense and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been shown to extracellularly kill pathogens, and inflammatory potential of NETs has been shown. Microbial killing inside the phagosomes or by NETs is mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). The present study was undertaken to assess circulating NETs contents and frequency of NETs generation by isolated PMNs from SIRS patients. These patients displayed significant augmentation in the circulating myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and DNA content, while PMA stimulated PMNs from these patients, generated more free radicals and NETs. Plasma obtained from SIRS patients, if added to the PMNs isolated from healthy subjects, enhanced NETs release and free radical formation. Expressions of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8) in the PMNs as well as their circulating levels were significantly augmented in SIRS subjects. Treatment of neutrophils from healthy subjects with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 enhanced free radicals generation and NETs formation, which was mediated through the activation of NADPH oxidase and MPO. Pre-incubation of plasma from SIRS with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 antibodies reduced the NETs release. Role of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 thus seems to be involved in the enhanced release of NETs in SIRS subjects. PMID:23110185

  6. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    PubMed Central

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  7. Cytokine networking of chondrocyte dedifferentiation in vitro and its implications for cell-based cartilage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Ma, Bin; Liang, Yujie; Chen, Jielin; Zhu, Weimin; Li, Mingtao; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a golden treatment for large defects of the knee joint without osteoarthritis or other complications. Despite notable progresses, generation of a stable chondrocyte phenotype using progenitor cells remains a main obstacle for chondrocyte-based cartilage treatment. Monolayer chondrocyte expansion in vitro is accompanied by chondrocyte dedifferentiation, which produces a non-specific mechanically inferior extracellular matrix (ECM) unsuitable for ACI. In-depth understanding of the molecular events during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is required to maintain the capacity of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to produce hyaline cartilage-specific ECM. This review discusses key cytokines and signaling pathways involved in chondrocyte dedifferentiation from the standpoint of catabolism and anabolism. Some potential therapeutic strategies are also presented to counteract chondrocyte dedifferentiation for cell-based cartilage therapy. PMID:25901191

  8. Upregulation of mitochondrial ferritin by proinflammatory cytokines: implications for a role in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongkuan; Guan, Hongpeng; Yang, Mingchun; Liu, Ziyi; Takeuchi, Shigeko; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Vincent, Steven R; Zhao, Shiguang; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown an increased expression of mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) and an antioxidant role for the protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, little information is available concerning the role of FtMt in other AD pathologies, including inflammation and amyloidogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the regulation and function of FtMt in inflammation and amyloidogenesis. FtMt protein expression was increased by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin 6 (IL-6), whereas FtMt mRNA levels were increased by TNF-α but not by IL-1β or IL-6 in IMR-32 cells. The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, suppressed this TNF-α-induced FtMt expression. FtMt overexpression increased NF-κB activity and translocation of p65 into the nucleus in HEK293 cells. Conversely, knockdown of FtMt attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Overexpression of FtMt inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the cell culture. FtMt overexpression reduced iron-mediated expression of amyloid-β protein precursor and decreased NF-κB-dependent increases in β- and γ-secretase, leading to decreased amyloid-β production. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of FtMt expression by proinflammatory cytokines and indicate further roles for FtMt in AD. PMID:25624418

  9. Upregulation of mitochondrial ferritin by proinflammatory cytokines: implications for a role in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongkuan; Guan, Hongpeng; Yang, Mingchun; Liu, Ziyi; Takeuchi, Shigeko; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Vincent, Steven R; Zhao, Shiguang; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown an increased expression of mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) and an antioxidant role for the protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, little information is available concerning the role of FtMt in other AD pathologies, including inflammation and amyloidogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the regulation and function of FtMt in inflammation and amyloidogenesis. FtMt protein expression was increased by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin 6 (IL-6), whereas FtMt mRNA levels were increased by TNF-α but not by IL-1β or IL-6 in IMR-32 cells. The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, suppressed this TNF-α-induced FtMt expression. FtMt overexpression increased NF-κB activity and translocation of p65 into the nucleus in HEK293 cells. Conversely, knockdown of FtMt attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Overexpression of FtMt inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the cell culture. FtMt overexpression reduced iron-mediated expression of amyloid-β protein precursor and decreased NF-κB-dependent increases in β- and γ-secretase, leading to decreased amyloid-β production. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of FtMt expression by proinflammatory cytokines and indicate further roles for FtMt in AD.

  10. Elderly adult survivors of family violence. Implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anetzberger, G J

    1997-10-01

    This article on elderly adult survivors of domestic violence (usually women) reviews the literature that examines the impact on later life of domestic violence experienced earlier in life and that examines the effects of elder abuse perpetrated by adult family members. The discussion is illustrated with case studies and figures that list the physical, psychological, behavioral, and social effects of each type of violence as well as intervening variables. Next, the paper reviews the influence of culture and ethnicity on the meaning attached to elder abuse and on help-seeking or accepting behavior. The article then proposes a conceptual framework that uses contributing factors (cultural background, individual influences, and cohort influences), modifying factors (the nature of violence, personal circumstances, and relationship with perpetrator), the meaning of violence, and the effects on the survivor to explain the effects of early or late family violence on elderly adult survivors. The discussion notes that the framework focuses on negative effects but that survivors of domestic violence can experience positive effects, such as the development of personal coping skills. The article ends by noting that this proposed framework has clinical implications because it recognizes that the effects of domestic violence on elderly adults may be complicated, it helps practitioners link symptoms to domestic violence, it helps practitioners realize that the meaning of domestic violence may vary among elderly victims, and it shows that family violence occurs in a social context.

  11. Cytokine-mediated cPLA(2) phosphorylation is regulated by multiple MAPK family members.

    PubMed

    Geijsen, N; Dijkers, P F; Lammers, J J; Koenderman, L; Coffer, P J

    2000-04-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) plays a critical role in various neutrophil functions including the generation of leukotrienes and platelet-activating factor release. Enzyme activity is regulated both by translocation to the membrane in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and serine phosphorylation by members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. In this report, we have investigated the role of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated signalling pathways in the regulation of cPLA(2). GM-CSF-induced cPLA(2) phosphorylation was not affected by pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or Src. However, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK activation resulted in a partial inhibition of cPLA(2) phosphorylation, revealed in a slower onset of phosphorylation. A cell line stably transfected with the GM-CSF receptor was used to further analyze GM-CSF-mediated cPLA(2) phosphorylation. Mutation of tyrosine residues 577 and 612 resulted in a delayed cPLA(2) phosphorylation similar to the pharmacological ERK inhibition. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 MAPK in cells bearing the double mutant betac577/612 completely abrogated GM-CSF-induced cPLA(2) phosphorylation. We conclude that GM-CSF can mediate cPLA(2) phosphorylation through the redundant activation of both p38 and ERK MAP kinases.

  12. Transcriptome Changes Affecting Hedgehog and Cytokine Signalling in the Umbilical Cord: Implications for Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Stünkel, Walter; Tng, Emilia; Tan, Jun Hao; Chen, Li; Joseph, Roy; Cheong, Clara Y.; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Lee, Yung Seng; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang Mei; Meaney, Michael J.; Kwek, Kenneth; Sheppard, Allan M.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Holbrook, Joanna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Babies born at lower gestational ages or smaller birthweights have a greater risk of poorer health in later life. Both the causes of these sub-optimal birth outcomes and the mechanism by which the effects are transmitted over decades are the subject of extensive study. We investigated whether a transcriptomic signature of either birthweight or gestational age could be detected in umbilical cord RNA. Methods The gene expression patterns of 32 umbilical cords from Singaporean babies of Chinese ethnicity across a range of birthweights (1698–4151 g) and gestational ages (35–41 weeks) were determined. We confirmed the differential expression pattern by gestational age for 12 genes in a series of 127 umbilical cords of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity. Results We found that the transcriptome is substantially influenced by gestational age; but less so by birthweight. We show that some of the expression changes dependent on gestational age are enriched in signal transduction pathways, such as Hedgehog and in genes with roles in cytokine signalling and angiogenesis. We show that some of the gene expression changes we report are reflected in the epigenome. Conclusions We studied the umbilical cord which is peripheral to disease susceptible tissues. The results suggest that soma-wide transcriptome changes, preserved at the epigenetic level, may be a mechanism whereby birth outcomes are linked to the risk of adult metabolic and arthritic disease and suggest that greater attention be given to the association between premature birth and later disease risk. PMID:22808055

  13. Semaphorin 4D Contributes to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine Production: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuji; Kang, Sujin; Ebina, Kousuke; Shi, Kenrin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tomita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Toshio; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 has pleiotropic roles in immune activation, angiogenesis, bone metabolism, and neural development. We undertook this study to investigate the role of Sema4D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Soluble Sema4D (sSema4D) levels in serum and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Cell surface expression and transcripts of Sema4D were analyzed in peripheral blood cells from RA patients, and immunohistochemical staining of Sema4D was performed in RA synovium. Generation of sSema4D was evaluated in an ADAMTS‐4–treated monocytic cell line (THP‐1 cells). The efficacy of anti‐Sema4D antibody was evaluated in mice with collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA). Results Levels of sSema4D were elevated in both serum and synovial fluid from RA patients, and disease activity markers were correlated with serum sSema4D levels. Sema4D‐expressing cells also accumulated in RA synovium. Cell surface levels of Sema4D on CD3+ and CD14+ cells from RA patients were reduced, although levels of Sema4D transcripts were unchanged. In addition, ADAMTS‐4 cleaved cell surface Sema4D to generate sSema4D in THP‐1 cells. Soluble Sema4D induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) production from CD14+ monocytes. IL‐6 and TNFα induced ADAMTS‐4 expression in synovial cells. Treatment with an anti‐Sema4D antibody suppressed arthritis and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in CIA. Conclusion A positive feedback loop involving sSema4D/IL‐6 and TNFα/ADAMTS‐4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. The inhibition of arthritis by anti‐Sema4D antibody suggests that Sema4D represents a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25707877

  14. The βc receptor family - Structural insights and their functional implications.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Nero, Tracy L; Dhagat, Urmi; Kan, Winnie L; Hercus, Timothy R; Tvorogov, Denis; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2015-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and IL-5 are members of a small family of cytokines that share a beta receptor subunit (βc). These cytokines regulate the growth, differentiation, migration and effector function activities of many hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, blood and sites of inflammation. Excessive or aberrant signaling can result in chronic inflammatory conditions and myeloid leukemias. The crystal structures of the GM-CSF ternary complex, the IL-5 binary complex and the very recent IL-3 receptor alpha subunit build upon decades of structure-function studies, giving new insights into cytokine-receptor specificity and signal transduction. Selective modulation of receptor function is now a real possibility and the structures of the βc receptor family are being used to discover novel and disease-specific therapeutics. PMID:25982846

  15. Definition of a Family of Tissue-Protective Cytokines Using Functional Cluster Analysis: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Mengozzi, Manuela; Ermilov, Peter; Annenkov, Alexander; Ghezzi, Pietro; Pearl, Frances

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the tissue-protective activities of erythropoietin (EPO) has underlined the importance of some cytokines in tissue-protection, repair, and remodeling. As such activities have been reported for other cytokines, we asked whether we could define a class of tissue-protective cytokines. We therefore explored a novel approach based on functional clustering. In this pilot study, we started by analyzing a small number of cytokines (30). We functionally classified the 30 cytokines according to their interactions by using the bioinformatics tool STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes), followed by hierarchical cluster analysis. The results of this functional clustering were different from those obtained by clustering cytokines simply according to their sequence. We previously reported that the protective activity of EPO in a model of cerebral ischemia was paralleled by an upregulation of synaptic plasticity genes, particularly early growth response 2 (EGR2). To assess the predictivity of functional clustering, we tested some of the cytokines clustering close to EPO (interleukin-11, IL-11; kit ligand, KITLG; leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF; thrombopoietin, THPO) in an in vitro model of human neuronal cells for their ability to induce EGR2. Two of these, LIF and IL-11, induced EGR2 expression. Although these data would need to be extended to a larger number of cytokines and the biological validation should be done using more robust in vivo models, rather then just one cell line, this study shows the feasibility of this approach. This type of functional cluster analysis could be extended to other fields of cytokine research and help design biological experiments. PMID:24672526

  16. A Possible Change Process of Inflammatory Cytokines in the Prolonged Chronic Stress and Its Ultimate Implications for Health

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Hou, Gonglin; Li, Dan; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Sustained stress triggers series of changes in the brain and the body. At the early stage of stress, the activated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) axis can upregulate the levels of glucocorticoid (GCs) and catecholamines (CAs), respectively, and then they in turn inhibit the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines directly or indirectly while promoting the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines. At the prolonged stage, the sustained activated HPA demonstrates cortisol-resistance. At the same time, the inflammation related transcription pathway, such as nuclear-factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling, may be inhibited. Additionally, the inflammatory cytokines mediate a negative feedback regulation on themselves. Collectively, these regulations may increase the proinflammatory cytokines while decreasing the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may further activate NF-κB and increase the proinflammation cytokines, which in turn reduce the inflammatory responses, contributing to various diseases. PMID:24995360

  17. Cytokines in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H.; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25585875

  18. Child Abuse and Neglect in Cambodian Refugee Families: Characteristics and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S. Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services…

  19. Family Obligations in Micronesian Cultures: Implications for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliffe, Katherine T.

    2010-01-01

    Micronesian people, a new group of immigrants to the USA, have a strong system of responsibilities to family members that guides their priorities and actions. When family obligations clash with school priorities, conflicts can occur. I interviewed 26 adults to learn about the relationships and responsibilities of family members to each other in…

  20. Implications for expressed emotion therapy within a family therapeutic context.

    PubMed

    Fox, P

    1992-08-01

    Expressed emotion instruments measure variant levels of criticism, blaming, and anger within families of mentally ill people. Some theorists believe that high levels of expressed emotion predispose schizophrenic patients for relapse. However, recent trends in family therapy indicate that high expressed emotion may naturally result from caring for an ill family member. Families may therefore often feel unfairly blamed by practitioners for causing mental illness. The author examines the usefulness of integrating expressed emotion measures into family therapy from three theoretical perspectives: the transactional perspective, the coping and adaptation perspective, and the systems perspective. Each of these perspectives provides a framework for incorporating expressed emotion measures into the broader context of research on and treatment of schizophrenia. The author postulates that appropriate controls designed to reduce pent-up emotion in families must accompany expressed emotion interventions in family therapy. Appropriate controls might include exercise, meditation, spiritual focus, or membership in a support group.

  1. How Families Experience the Phenomenon of Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Implications for Family Therapists and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Glenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how family members experience the phenomenon of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the family unit, over time, and to examine the meanings family members attach to the experience. The participants were six nuclear families (20 individuals) of six adolescent mothers who had previously…

  2. Family Disengagement of Youth Offenders: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Kenneth M.; Juhnke, Gerald A.; Thobro, Patti; Haas, Robin; Smith Robinson, Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the differences among youth offenders for family engagement (as measured by the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales--III) and conduct-disordered behaviors (as measured by "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" [4th ed., text revision] criteria) by means of the Youth Comprehensive Risk…

  3. Influence of Familial Spirituality: Implications for School Counseling Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith M.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Ieva, Kara P.

    2011-01-01

    This article (a) addresses the importance of familial spirituality on students' holistic development; (b) explores professional ethical codes, standards, and counseling competencies relating to students' familial spirituality; (c) introduces educational activities to assist school counselors in increasing their understanding and appreciation of…

  4. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  5. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  6. Deletion of Slam locus in mice reveals inhibitory role of SLAM family in NK cell responses regulated by cytokines and LFA-1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaijian; Cranert, Stacey A; Lu, Yan; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Zhang, Shaohua; Chen, Jun; Li, Rui; Mahl, Sarah E; Wu, Ning; Davidson, Dominique; Waggoner, Stephen N; Veillette, André

    2016-09-19

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family receptors (SFRs) can mediate either activating or inhibitory effects during natural killer cell (NK cell) activation. In this study, we addressed the global role, regulation, and mechanism of action of the SLAM family in NK cells by analyzing a mouse lacking the entire ∼400-kilobase Slam locus, which encodes all six SFRs and CD48, the ligand of SFR 2B4. This mouse displayed enhanced NK cell activation responses toward hematopoietic target cells. Analyses of mice lacking individual SFRs showed that the inhibitory function of the Slam locus was due solely to 2B4 and was not influenced positively or negatively by other SFRs. Differences in NK cell responses between recognition of targets expressing or lacking ligands for SFRs were enhanced by IL-12 but suppressed by type I interferon. Cytokines also changed the levels of SLAM-associated protein adaptors, which prevent the inhibitory function of SFRs. The enhanced activation responses of SFR-deficient NK cells were dependent on integrin LFA-1 but not on DNAM-1 or NKG2D. SFR-mediated inhibition prevented the generation of activated forms of LFA-1. Hence, the Slam locus has an overall inhibitory role during NK cell activation that is solely dependent on 2B4. This effect is influenced by cytokines and leads to suppression of LFA-1 activity.

  7. The family in Italy: cultural changes and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Mario; Sampogna, Gaia; del Vecchio, Valeria; Giacco, Domenico; Mulè, Alice; de Rosa, Corrado; Fiorillo, Andrea; Maj, Mario

    2012-04-01

    In Italy family is characterized by strong ties and is based on mutual aid of all its members. In the last 20 years, the structure of families has been significantly influenced by demographic, economic and professional changes, determining a transition from a patriarchal to a nuclear family model, with a higher number of single-parent families, single-person households, childless couples, same-sex couples. However, this transition has been slower than that occurring in other countries, probably as an ongoing impact of prevalent Catholic ideology. Major demographic changes in Italian families include, 1) a decrease in the number of marriages, delays in getting married and an high number of civil ceremonies, 2) a reduced birth rate; Italy is becoming one of the European countries with lowest growth rate, and with an increasing number of births out of wedlock, 3) an increased marital instability, with a constantly growing number of legal separations. Like many countries, relatives in Italy are highly involved in the care of patients with physical and mental disorders. There are a number of psychosocial interventions used in Italy including the 'Milan Systemic Approach' and family psycho-educational interventions. However, there are difficulties in implementing these interventions which are highlighted in this paper. We recommend research strategies to identify the best options to involve families in the care of mentally ill patients and to adequately support them.

  8. Cytokine networks that mediate epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk in the mammary gland: implications for development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic interactions between the hormone responsive mammary gland epithelium and surrounding stromal macrophage populations are critical for normal development and function of the mammary gland. Macrophages are versatile cells capable of diverse roles in mammary gland development and maintenance of homeostasis, and their function is highly dependent on signals within the local cytokine microenvironment. The mammary epithelium secretes a number of cytokines, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) that affect the abundance, phenotype and function of macrophages. However, aberrations in these interactions have been found to increase the risk of tumour formation, and utilisation of stromal macrophage support by tumours can increase the invasive and metastatic potential of the cancer. Studies utilising genetically modified mouse models have shed light on the significance of epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk, and the cytokines that mediate this communication, in mammary gland development and tumourigenesis. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines in mammary gland development and cancer, with a focus on the crosstalk between epithelial cells and the local macrophage population.

  9. Cytokines, atherogenesis, and hypercatabolism in chronic kidney disease: a dreadful triad.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesus; Park, Sun-Hee; Axelsson, Jonas; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The term cytokine clusters denotes a copious family of molecules and correspondent receptors implicated in numerous processes mediating health and disease. In the context of chronic kidney disease (CKD), generation and metabolism of most of these cytokines are disturbed. Available evidence suggests that cytokine imbalances contribute to the progression of common CKD complications, such as atherosclerosis, mineral-bone disease, and protein-energy wasting via pleiotropic effects. The belief that cytokine CKD research is solely represented by interleukins (IL) and tumor-necrosis factors (TNF) (mainly IL-6 and TNF-alpha) is a common misconception among nephrologists. We here explore recent findings concerning the pathophysiological role of various cytokines in uremic complications, and discuss how cytokines could be used as novel potential therapeutic targets in CKD. At the same time, we provide a brief overview of current discoveries in the main transforming growth factors and chemokines.

  10. The Budget Enforcement Act: Implications for Children and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehler, Karen

    This analysis of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (BEA) and its implications for public financing of education and other children's services notes that voters want more and better education and related services, and at the same time want to pay less in taxes and balance budgets at every governmental level. The first section details recent…

  11. Custodial evaluations of Native American families: implications for forensic psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Wills, Cheryl D; Norris, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Native American children in the United States have been adopted by non-Indian families at rates that threaten the preservation of their Indian history, traditions, and culture. The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), which established restrictive parameters that govern the placement of Native American children into foster care and adoptive homes, was ratified in an effort to keep American Indian families intact. This article addresses matters of importance to psychiatrists who conduct custody evaluations of Native American children and families. A summary of events that preceded enactment of the ICWA is given, along with guidelines for forensic psychiatrists who conduct foster and adoptive care evaluations of Native American children. We use clinical vignettes to illustrate how the ICWA informs the custody evaluation process as well as approaches to cultural concerns, including biases that forensic evaluators may encounter during these evaluations.

  12. Family Background of Beginning Education Students: Implications for Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Roger A.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education has not historically focused on the social and emotional development of teachers even though there is evidence that such variables influence student success (Jennings & Greenberg, 2009). We believe such a focus is important and we explored variables in teacher education students' families of origin that underpin social…

  13. Hispanic Families and Their Culture: Implications for FCS Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Barbara N.; Bencomo, Angelina

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic children constitute the largest population of racial/ethnic minority students in the nation's public schools. By the year 2023, the Hispanic enrollment is expected to increase to 30% of the total school population (pre-K through 12) in the United States. Because cultural background affects student learning, family and consumer sciences…

  14. Farm Families in Transition: Implications for Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leistritz, F. Larry; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study of 169 North Dakota families (from a sample of 260) who quit farming for economic reasons describes (1) the demographic characteristics of former operators and the structural and financial character of their farms, (2) the financial circumstances of their departure from farming, and (3) their current employment situation and perceived…

  15. Protein families: implications for allergen nomenclature, standardisation and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Breiteneder, Heimo

    2009-01-01

    Allergens are embedded into the protein universe as members of large families and superfamilies of related proteins which is a direct consequence of their shared evolution. The classification of allergens by protein families offers a valuable frame of reference that allows the design of experiments to study cross-reactivity and allergenic potency of proteins. Information on protein family membership also complements the current official IUIS allergen nomenclature. All presently known allergens belong to one of 140 (1.4%) of the 10,340 protein families currently described by version 23.0 of the Pfam database. This is indicative of a strong bias among allergens towards certain protein architectures that are able to induce an IgE response in an atopic immune system. However, even small variations in the structure of a protein alter its immunological characteristics. Various isoforms of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were shown to possess highly variant immunogenic and allergenic properties. Ber e 1 and SFA8, two 2S albumins, were revealed to display differential capacities to polarise an immune response. Such data will be exploited in the future for the design of allergy vaccines.

  16. The Unwed Mother: Implications For Family Life Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkart, Joan; Whatley, Alice Elrod

    1973-01-01

    The family life educator is in a strategic position to assist in designing school and community programs for the unwed mother and the child. It appears important that the theories of causation be explored without bias; that prenatal and postnatal care be offered; that mental health consultation, therapy and crisis-therapy be promoted and the…

  17. The California Family Choice Initiatives: Implications for Urban Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koshiyama, Albert Noboru

    Three constitutional amendments proposed for the June and November, 1980, ballots in California are discussed in this paper. The amendments, all of which would channel public funds to private schools, are: (1) the "Family Choice Initiative," also known as the Sugarman-Coons proposal, which would permit parents to use public funds to send their…

  18. Experiences of Families Transmitting Values in a Rapidly Changing Society: Implications for Family Therapists.

    PubMed

    Akyil, Yudum; Prouty, Anne; Blanchard, Amy; Lyness, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Intergenerational value transmission affects parent-child relationships and necessitates constant negotiation in families. Families with adolescents from rapidly changing societies face unique challenges in balancing the traditional collectivistic family values that promote harmony with emerging values that promote autonomy. Using modern Turkey as an example of such a culture, the authors examine the transmission process in families that hold more traditional and collectivistic values than their adolescent children. Special consideration is given to generational and cultural differences in the autonomy and relatedness dimensions.

  19. A new mechanism for growth hormone receptor activation of JAK2, and implications for related cytokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Michael J; Brooks, Andrew J; Chhabra, Yash

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor was the first cytokine receptor to be cloned and crystallized, and provides a valuable exemplar for activation of its cognate kinase, JAK2. We review progress in understanding its activation mechanism, in particular the molecular movements made by this constitutively dimerized receptor in response to ligand binding, and how these lead to a separation of JAK-binding Box1 motifs. Such a separation leads to removal of the pseudokinase inhibitory domain from the kinase domain of a partner JAK2 bound to the receptor, and vice versa, leading to apposition of the kinase domains and transactivation. This may be a general mechanism for class I cytokine receptor action. PMID:25101218

  20. IL-17s adopt a cystine knot fold: structure and activity of a novel cytokine, IL-17F, and implications for receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Filvaroff, Ellen H.; Yin, JianPing; Lee, James; Cai, Liping; Risser, Philip; Maruoka, Miko; Mao, Weiguang; Foster, Jessica; Kelley, Robert F.; Pan, Guohua; Gurney, Austin L.; de Vos, Abraham M.; Starovasnik, Melissa A.

    2001-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 17 (IL-17) is the founding member of a family of secreted proteins that elicit potent cellular responses. We report a novel human IL-17 homolog, IL-17F, and show that it is expressed by activated T cells, can stimulate production of other cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and can regulate cartilage matrix turnover. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure of IL-17F reveals that IL-17 family members adopt a monomer fold typical of cystine knot growth factors, despite lacking the disulfide responsible for defining the canonical ‘knot’ structure. IL-17F dimerizes in a parallel manner like neurotrophins, and features an unusually large cavity on its surface. Remarkably, this cavity is located in precisely the same position where nerve growth factor binds its high affinity receptor, TrkA, suggesting further parallels between IL-17s and neurotrophins with respect to receptor recognition. PMID:11574464

  1. Multi-Family Groups for Multi-Stressed Families: Initial Outcomes and Future Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of caregiver stress on attendance among urban families involved in a multiple family group (MFG) intervention, as well as pre/post changes in childhood behavioral difficulties, caregiver stress, caregiver depressive symptoms, caregiver coping by substance use, and caregiver motivation to change. Methods:…

  2. Implication of alpha1-antichymotrypsin polymorphism in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nacmias, B; Marcon, G; Tedde, A; Forleo, P; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Amaducci, L; Sorbi, S

    1998-03-13

    A common polymorphism in the alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene has been shown to modify the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4-associated Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk identifying the combination of the ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes as a potential susceptibility marker for AD. Using the polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed the segregation of the ACT and ApoE polymorphisms in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) patients carrying mutations in Presenilin (PS) and APP genes and in both early onset (EO) and late onset (LO) FAD patients without known mutations. Our data suggest that ACT does not represent an additional risk factor for PS and APP mutated families. However, in LOFAD patients a high frequency of the combined ACT/AA and ApoE epsilon4/epsilon4 genotypes suggest that ACT may interact with ApoE and play a role in LOFAD. PMID:9572591

  3. Phenomenological implications of supersymmetric family nonuniversal U(1){sup '} models

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Lisa L.; Jiang Jing; Langacker, Paul G.; Liu Tao

    2010-11-01

    We construct a class of anomaly-free supersymmetric U(1){sup '} models that are characterized by family nonuniversal U(1){sup '} charges motivated from E{sub 6} embeddings. The family nonuniversality arises from an interchange of the standard roles of the two SU(5) 5{sup *} representations within the 27 of E{sub 6} for the third generation. We analyze U(1){sup '} and electroweak symmetry breaking and present the particle mass spectrum. The models, which include additional Higgs multiplets and exotic quarks at the TeV scale, result in specific patterns of flavor-changing neutral currents in the b{yields}s transitions that can accommodate the presently observed deviations in this sector from the standard model predictions.

  4. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  5. Adolescent homicide and family pathology: implications for research and treatment with adolescents.

    PubMed

    Crespi, T D; Rigazio-DiGilio, S A

    1996-01-01

    The origins of serious violence in adolescents has been of concern throughout the century. The number of felony-murder convictions of adolescents on death row in the United States is arguably a warning beacon about the serious nature of juvenile homicide. This article reviews the research on adolescent homicide and highlights significant family variables. The contributions of a family studies perspective for understanding adolescent homicide is discussed and implications suggested.

  6. The impact of burn injury and ethanol on the cytokine network of the mouse hypothalamus: reproductive implications.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Nicholas V; LaPaglia, Nancy; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Emanuele, Mary Ann

    2005-05-01

    Nearly 50% of the patients admitted to hospitals for burn injuries have detectable levels of alcohol (EtOH) in their circulation. In fact, EtOH is often a causal factor in their injury. It is well known that EtOH as well as burn injury disrupt function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The cellular mechanisms by which EtOH and/or burn impacts on the HPG are not entirely understood. In the studies reported here, we tested the hypothesis that these injuries mediated their effects by local hypothalamic inflammation. Young adult male mice were subjected to either a 15% total body surface area, full thickness scald, to EtOH, or to both and compared to appropriate controls. They were sacrificed 48 h later. EtOH and burn, as well as the combined injury, consistently and impressively reduced serum testosterone, while increasing hypothalamic concentrations of all three of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFalpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. In general, the increases induced by burn were greater than those caused by EtOH and the effect of the combined insult was not additive. Hypothalamic concentrations of LHRH were also increased. The data are consistent with the idea that EtOH and/or burn, as models of critical illness, medicate their hypothalamic suppressive effects via increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. The Extended Granin Family: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Possenti, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Loh, Y. Peng

    2011-01-01

    The chromogranins (chromogranin A and chromogranin B), secretogranins (secretogranin II and secretogranin III), and additional related proteins (7B2, NESP55, proSAAS, and VGF) that together comprise the granin family subserve essential roles in the regulated secretory pathway that is responsible for controlled delivery of peptides, hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Here we review the structure and function of granins and granin-derived peptides and expansive new genetic evidence, including recent single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping, genomic sequence comparisons, and analysis of transgenic and knockout mice, which together support an important and evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in large dense-core vesicle biogenesis and regulated secretion. Recent data further indicate that their processed peptides function prominently in metabolic and glucose homeostasis, emotional behavior, pain pathways, and blood pressure modulation, suggesting future utility of granins and granin-derived peptides as novel disease biomarkers. PMID:21862681

  8. The mitochondrial transporter family (SLC25): physiological and pathological implications.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2004-02-01

    The mitochondrial carriers (MCs) shuttle a variety of metabolites across the inner mitochondrial membrane (i.m.m.). In man they are encoded by the SLC25 genes. Some MCs have isoforms encoded by different SLC25 genes, whereas the phosphate carrier has two variants arising from an alternative splicing of SLC25A3. Six MCs have been sequenced after purification, and many more have been identified from their transport and kinetic properties following heterologous over-expression and reconstitution into liposomes. All MCs of known function belong to the same protein family, since their polypeptide chains consist of three tandemly related sequences of about 100 amino acids, and the repeats of the different carriers are homologous. They probably function as homodimers, each monomer being folded in the membrane into six transmembrane segments. The functional information obtained in studies with mitochondria and/or the reconstituted system has helped to gain an insight into the physiological role of the MCs in cell metabolism, as have tissue distribution, the use of knock-out mice (and/or yeast) and over-expression in human cell lines (or yeast) of individual carriers and isoforms. At the same time, the cloning and functional identification of many SLC25 genes has made it possible (i) to identify the genes (and their defects) responsible for some diseases, e.g. Stanley syndrome and Amish microcephaly, and (ii) where the genes were already known, to characterize the function of the gene products and hence understand the molecular basis and the symptoms of the diseases, e.g. hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia and homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome and type II citrullinemia. It is likely that further extension and functional characterization of the SLC25 gene family will elucidate other diseases caused by MC deficiency. PMID:14598172

  9. Genetic testing and familial implications in breast-ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Vries, Jakob; Mourits, Marian J; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-08-01

    DNA-testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become incorporated in the diagnostic procedure of patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer. Since 1994 an immense amount of information has been gathered on mutation spectra, mutation risk assessment, cancer risks for mutation carriers, factors that modify these risks, unclassified DNA variants, surveillance strategies and preventive options. For the patient and family the main determinator still is whether a mutation is found or not. When a pathogenic mutation is detected in an index case, relatives can opt for pre-symptomatic DNA testing. However in the vast majority no mutation, or only unclear mutations are detectable yet. This means that a hereditary cause cannot be excluded, but pre-symptomatic DNA-testing is still unavailable for relatives. Surveillance for both index cases and relatives is based of the family history of cancer. Next generation genetic testing may help to elucidate genetic causes in these families.

  10. Differential regulation of Krüppel-like factor family transcription factor expression in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: effects of endothelin-1, oxidative stress and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Timothy E; Butler, Matthew J; Marshall, Andrew K; Tham, El Li; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2008-06-01

    Krüppel-like transcription factors (Klfs) modulate fundamental cell processes. Cardiac myocytes are terminally-differentiated, but hypertrophy in response to stimuli such as endothelin-1. H2O2 or cytokines promote myocyte apoptosis. Microarray studies of neonatal rat myocytes identified several Klfs as endothelin-1-responsive genes. We used quantitative PCR for further analysis of Klf expression in neonatal rat myocytes. In response to endothelin-1, Klf2 mRNA expression was rapidly increased ( approximately 9-fold; 15-30 min) with later increases in expression of Klf4 and Klf6 ( approximately 5-fold; 30-60 min). All were regulated as immediate early genes (cycloheximide did not inhibit the increases in expression). Klf5 expression was increased at 1-2 h ( approximately 13-fold) as a second phase response (cycloheximide inhibited the increase). These increases were transient and attenuated by U0126. H2O2 increased expression of Klf2, Klf4 and Klf6, but interleukin-1beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha downregulated Klf2 expression with no effect on Klf4 or Klf6. Of the Klfs which repress transcription, endothelin-1 rapidly downregulated expression of Klf3, Klf11 and Klf15. The dynamic regulation of expression of multiple Klf family members in cardiac myocytes suggests that, as a family, they are actively involved in regulating phenotypic responses (hypertrophy and apoptosis) to extracellular stimuli.

  11. Toll-like receptor and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression during prolonged hyperinsulinaemia in horses: implications for laminitis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, M A; Clement, C K; McGowan, C M; Sillence, M N; Pollitt, C C; Lacombe, V A

    2014-01-15

    Equine laminitis, a disease of the lamellar structure of the horse's hoof, can be incited by numerous factors that include inflammatory and metabolic aetiologies. However, the role of inflammation in hyperinsulinaemic laminitis has not been adequately defined. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation results in up-regulation of inflammatory pathways and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and may be a pathogenic factor in laminitis. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLR4 expression and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production is increased in lamellae and skeletal muscle during equine hyperinsulinaemia. Standardbred horses were treated with either a prolonged, euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (p-EHC) or a prolonged, glucose infusion (p-GI), which induced marked and moderate hyperinsulinaemia, respectively. Age-matched control horses were treated simultaneously with a balanced electrolyte solution. Treated horses developed clinical (p-EHC) or subclinical (p-GI) laminitis, whereas controls did not. Skeletal muscle and lamellar protein extracts were analysed by Western blotting for TLR4, IL-6, TNF-α and suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) expression. Lamellar protein expression of TLR4 and TNF-α, but not IL-6, was increased by the p-EHC, compared to control horses. A significant positive correlation was found between lamellar TLR4 and SOCS3. Skeletal muscle protein expression of TLR4 signalling parameters did not differ between control and p-EHC-treated horses. Similarly, the p-GI did not result in up-regulation of lamellar protein expression of any parameter. The results suggest that insulin-sensitive tissues may not accurately reflect lamellar pathology during hyperinsulinaemia. While TLR4 is present in the lamellae, its activation appears unlikely to contribute significantly to the developmental pathogenesis of hyperinsulinaemic laminitis. However

  12. Neighborhood and family intersections: prospective implications for Mexican American adolescents' mental health.

    PubMed

    White, Rebecca M B; Roosa, Mark W; Zeiders, Katharine H

    2012-10-01

    We present an integrated model for understanding Mexican American youth mental health within family, neighborhood, and cultural contexts. We combined two common perspectives on neighborhood effects to hypothesize that (a) parents' perceptions of neighborhood risk would negatively impact their children's mental health by disrupting key parenting and family processes, and (b) objective neighborhood risk would alter the effect parent and family processes had on youth mental health. We further incorporated a cultural perspective to hypothesize that an ethnic minority group's culture-specific values may support parents to successfully confront neighborhood risk. We provided a conservative test of the integrated model by simultaneously examining three parenting and family process variables: maternal warmth, maternal harsh parenting, and family cohesion. The hypothesized model was estimated prospectively in a diverse, community-based sample of Mexican American adolescents and their mothers (N = 749) living in the southwestern United States. Support for specific elements of the hypothesized model varied depending on the parenting or family process variable examined. For family cohesion results were consistent with the combined neighborhood perspectives. The effects of maternal warmth on youth mental health were altered by objective neighborhood risk. For harsh parenting, results were somewhat consistent with the cultural perspective. The value of the integrated model for research on the impacts of family, neighborhood, and cultural contexts on youth mental health are discussed, as are implications for preventive interventions for Mexican American families and youth.

  13. The family in Romania: cultural and economic context and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Adriana; Butiu, Otilia

    2012-04-01

    The study of family structures, functioning, roles and values is fundamental in family therapist's activities for better understanding the psychological, cultural and social specificity of different clients and interventions. In this paper we describe the Romanian family and the family therapies which are available in Romania. We illustrate basic needs using demographic data and research available from Romania. The nuclear family remains dominant instead of other alternatives, the age of marriage is earlier than in western European countries and celibate and consensual living are exceptions or only for the transitional period before marriage. The role of marriage and childbirth within the marital setting is still important. The model of a single child appears increasingly common due to an improvement in financial resources and better living conditions. Relations with family of origin remain close. The difficulties for children with parents working in different countries raise problems and have implications for the extended family, educators and psychotherapists as well as mental health service providers. Family therapists should keep in mind the structure, function, role and values of the Romanian family for better understanding the issues and resources and use these accordingly in therapy. Policy-makers should be aware of the difficulties concerning availability and access to this therapeutic approach.

  14. Familial abdominal aortic aneurysm: prevalence and implications for screening.

    PubMed

    Adams, D C; Tulloh, B R; Galloway, S W; Shaw, E; Tulloh, A J; Poskitt, K R

    1993-11-01

    The high prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men over the age of 65 has led to the establishment of ultrasound screening programmes for this group. The apparent familial tendency towards AAA formation suggests that relatives of aneurysm patients may form another subpopulation in whom screening is appropriate. The first degree relatives of 100 consecutive aneurysm patients were identified. Of 110 relatives over 50 years of age, two were known to have had AAA and ultrasound scans were performed on 74, providing information on aortic size for 76 relatives (69%). No further aortic aneurysms (antero-posterior diameter > or = 4.0 cm) were found on scanning. However, nine relatives were demonstrated to have aortic dilatation (2.5-3.9 cm). Aortic dilatation was observed in 21% of male first degree relatives over 50 years of age, affecting 27% of sons and 17% of brothers. Only 4% of the sisters and none of the daughters were found to have aortic dilatation. The prevalence of aortic enlargement seems to be sufficiently high amongst male first degree relatives of AAA patients over 50 years of age to justify aortic screening.

  15. Family System Dynamics, Identity Development, and Adolescent Alcohol Use: Implications for Family Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle, Suzanne E.; Sabatelli, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Tested whether low levels of family differentiation and identity are associated with increased alcohol abuse. Administered questionnaire to college students (N=133) aged 17-24 years. Found females with less well-differentiated, reciprocal mother-daughter relationships and poorer sense of identity had more drinking problems, while results for males…

  16. The Consequences of Witnessing Family Violence on Children and Implications for Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    Although a large number of children are directly abused, an even larger number may indirectly experience the effects of abuse as witnesses of family violence. However, the effects on children who witness such violence have long been unaddressed, although a growing body of research indicates that these children are affected in various domains,…

  17. Schools, Families, and Communities Affecting the Dropout Rate: Implications and Strategies for Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2010-01-01

    Serious social and economic consequences affect the local and national levels when students drop out of school. Research has shown that collaboration among schools, families, and communities in the academic progression of students can decrease their drop out probability. The author presents findings related to a qualitative study conducted in…

  18. A cytotoxic anti-IL-3Rα antibody targets key cells and cytokines implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Shereen; Huynh, Huy; Tai, Tsin Yee; Ng, Milica; Monaghan, Katherine; Biondo, Mark; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Nash, Andrew D.; Wicks, Ian P.; Wilson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the major target of biologic therapeutics in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been the B cell, which produces pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, targeting type I IFN, which is elaborated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in response to endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation by SLE immune complexes, has shown promising results. pDCs express high levels of the IL-3Rα chain (CD123), suggesting an alternative potential targeting strategy. We have developed an anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody, CSL362, and show here that it affects key cell types and cytokines that contribute to SLE. CSL362 potently depletes pDCs via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, markedly reducing TLR7, TLR9, and SLE serum-induced IFN-α production and IFN-α-upregulated gene expression. The antibody also inhibits TLR7- and TLR9-induced plasmablast expansion by reducing IFN-α and IL-6 production. These effects are more pronounced than with IFN-α blockade alone, possibly because pDC depletion reduces production of other IFN subtypes, such as type III, as well as non-IFN proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. In addition, CSL362 depletes basophils and inhibits IL-3 signaling. These effects were confirmed in cells derived from a heterogeneous population of SLE donors, various IFN-dependent autoimmune diseases, and healthy controls. We also demonstrate in vivo activity of CSL362 following its s.c. administration to cynomolgus monkeys. This spectrum of effects provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic evaluation of CSL362 in SLE. PMID:27699260

  19. A cytotoxic anti-IL-3Rα antibody targets key cells and cytokines implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Shereen; Huynh, Huy; Tai, Tsin Yee; Ng, Milica; Monaghan, Katherine; Biondo, Mark; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Nash, Andrew D.; Wicks, Ian P.; Wilson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the major target of biologic therapeutics in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been the B cell, which produces pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, targeting type I IFN, which is elaborated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in response to endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation by SLE immune complexes, has shown promising results. pDCs express high levels of the IL-3Rα chain (CD123), suggesting an alternative potential targeting strategy. We have developed an anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody, CSL362, and show here that it affects key cell types and cytokines that contribute to SLE. CSL362 potently depletes pDCs via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, markedly reducing TLR7, TLR9, and SLE serum-induced IFN-α production and IFN-α-upregulated gene expression. The antibody also inhibits TLR7- and TLR9-induced plasmablast expansion by reducing IFN-α and IL-6 production. These effects are more pronounced than with IFN-α blockade alone, possibly because pDC depletion reduces production of other IFN subtypes, such as type III, as well as non-IFN proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. In addition, CSL362 depletes basophils and inhibits IL-3 signaling. These effects were confirmed in cells derived from a heterogeneous population of SLE donors, various IFN-dependent autoimmune diseases, and healthy controls. We also demonstrate in vivo activity of CSL362 following its s.c. administration to cynomolgus monkeys. This spectrum of effects provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic evaluation of CSL362 in SLE.

  20. Baker's yeast β-glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K C; Breslin, W L; Davidson, T; Adams, A; McFarlin, B K

    2013-02-14

    Strenuous aerobic exercise is known to weaken the immune system, and while many nutritional supplements have been proposed to boost post-exercise immunity, few are known to be effective. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether 10 d of supplementation with a defined source of baker's yeast β-glucan (BG, Wellmune WGP®) could minimise post-exercise immunosuppression. Recreationally active men and women (n 60) completed two 10 d trial conditions using a cross-over design with a 7 d washout period: placebo (rice flour) and baker's yeast BG (250 mg/d of β-1,3/1,6-glucans derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) before a bout of cycling (49 ± 6 min) in a hot (38 ± 2°C), humid (45 ± 2 % relative humidity) environment. Blood was collected at baseline (before supplement), pre- (PRE), post- (POST) and 2 h (2H) post-exercise. Total and subset monocyte concentration was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production were measured using separate multiplex assays. Total (CD14⁺) and pro-inflammatory monocyte concentrations (CD14⁺/CD16⁺) were significantly greater at POST and 2H (P<0·05) with BG supplementation. BG supplementation boosted LPS-stimulated production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) at PRE and POST (P<0·05). Plasma IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ concentrations were greater at 2H following BG supplementation. It appears that 10 d of supplementation with BG increased the potential of blood leucocytes for the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ. The key findings of the present study demonstrate that BG may have potential to alter immunity following a strenuous exercise session.

  1. N-Palmitoylethanolamine Prevents the Run-down of Amplitudes in Cortical Spreading Depression Possibly Implicating Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Frank; Koulen, Peter; Kaja, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a wave of neuronal depolarization in the cerebral cortex following traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia, significantly aggravates brain damage. Here, we tested whether N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), a substance that effectively reduces lesion volumes and neurological deficits after ischemic stroke, influences CSD. CSD was elicited chemically in adult rats and occurrence, amplitude, duration and propagation velocity of CSD was determined prior to and for 6 hours after intraperitoneal injection of PEA. The chosen systemic administration of PEA stabilized the amplitude of CSD for at least four hours and prevented the run-down of amplitudes that is typically observed and was also seen in untreated controls. The propagation velocity of the CSD waves was unaltered indicating stable neuronal excitability. The stabilization of CSD amplitudes by PEA indicates that inhibition or prevention of CSD does not underlie PEA’s profound neuroprotective effect. Rather, PEA likely inhibits proinflammatory cytokine release thereby preventing the run-down of CSD amplitudes. This contribution of PEA to the maintenance of neuronal excitability in healthy tissue during CSD potentially adds to neuroprotection outside a damaged area, while other mechanisms control PEA-mediated neuroprotection in damaged tissue resulting from traumatic brain injury or cerebral ischemia. PMID:27004851

  2. The implications of familial incidental findings from exome sequencing: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program experience

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Lauren; Sincan, Murat; Markello, Thomas; Adams, David R; Gill, Fred; Godfrey, Rena; Golas, Gretchen; Groden, Catherine; Landis, Dennis; Nehrebecky, Michele; Park, Grace; Soldatos, Ariane; Tifft, Cynthia; Toro, Camilo; Wahl, Colleen; Wolfe, Lynne; Gahl, William A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using exome sequence data from 159 families participating in the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program, we evaluated the number and inheritance of reportable incidental sequence variants. Methods Following the ACMG recommendations for reporting of incidental next generation sequencing findings, we extracted variants in 56 genes from the exome sequence data of 543 subjects and determined the reportable incidental findings for each participant. We also defined variant status as inherited or de novo for those with available parental sequence data. Results We identified 14 independent reportable variants in 159 (8.8%) families. For 9 families with parental sequence data in our cohort, a parent transmitted the variant to one or more children (9 minor children and 4 adult children). The remaining 5 variants occurred in adults for whom parental sequences were unavailable. Conclusion Our results are consistent with the expectation that a small percentage of exomes will result in identification of an incidental finding under the ACMG recommendations. Additionally, our analysis of family sequence data highlights that genome and exome sequencing of families has unavoidable implications for immediate family members and therefore requires appropriate counseling of the family. PMID:24784157

  3. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents on behavioural changes and cytokine production following systemic inflammation: Implications for a role of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Cunningham, C; Newman, T A; Perry, V H

    2010-03-01

    Systemic inflammation gives rise to metabolic and behavioural changes, largely mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin production (PGE(2)) at the blood-brain barrier. Despite numerous studies, the exact biological pathways that give rise to these changes remains elusive. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying immune-to-brain communication following systemic inflammation using various anti-inflammatory agents. Mice were pre-treated with selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors, thromboxane synthase inhibitors or dexamethasone, followed by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Changes in body temperature, open-field activity, and burrowing were assessed and mRNA and/or protein levels of inflammatory mediators measured in serum and brain. LPS-induced systemic inflammation resulted in behavioural changes and increased production of IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, as well as PGE(2) in serum and brain. Indomethacin and ibuprofen reversed the effect of LPS on behaviour without changing peripheral or central IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA levels. In contrast, dexamethasone did not alter LPS-induced behavioural changes, despite complete inhibition of cytokine production. A selective COX-1 inhibitor, piroxicam, but not the selective COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, reversed the LPS-induced behavioural changes without affecting IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha protein expression levels in the periphery or mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the acute LPS-induced changes in burrowing and open-field activity depend on COX-1. We further show that COX-1 is not responsible for the induction of brain IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha synthesis or LPS-induced hypothermia. Our results may have implications for novel therapeutic strategies to treat or prevent neurological diseases with an inflammatory component.

  4. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents on behavioural changes and cytokine production following systemic inflammation: Implications for a role of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Cunningham, C; Newman, T A; Perry, V H

    2010-03-01

    Systemic inflammation gives rise to metabolic and behavioural changes, largely mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin production (PGE(2)) at the blood-brain barrier. Despite numerous studies, the exact biological pathways that give rise to these changes remains elusive. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying immune-to-brain communication following systemic inflammation using various anti-inflammatory agents. Mice were pre-treated with selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors, thromboxane synthase inhibitors or dexamethasone, followed by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Changes in body temperature, open-field activity, and burrowing were assessed and mRNA and/or protein levels of inflammatory mediators measured in serum and brain. LPS-induced systemic inflammation resulted in behavioural changes and increased production of IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, as well as PGE(2) in serum and brain. Indomethacin and ibuprofen reversed the effect of LPS on behaviour without changing peripheral or central IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA levels. In contrast, dexamethasone did not alter LPS-induced behavioural changes, despite complete inhibition of cytokine production. A selective COX-1 inhibitor, piroxicam, but not the selective COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, reversed the LPS-induced behavioural changes without affecting IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha protein expression levels in the periphery or mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the acute LPS-induced changes in burrowing and open-field activity depend on COX-1. We further show that COX-1 is not responsible for the induction of brain IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha synthesis or LPS-induced hypothermia. Our results may have implications for novel therapeutic strategies to treat or prevent neurological diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:19931610

  5. [Cytokines. Transmittor substances of the immune system].

    PubMed

    Pisa, P; Söder, O

    1995-07-12

    Cytokines are hormone-like proteins and peptides whose principal function is that of signalling substances within the immunoinflammatory and haematopoietic systems. Since the first cytokines were characterised 15 years ago, over 50 cytokines have been strictly defined and characterised. Cytokines are classified mainly on the basis of functional criteria into families--e.g, interleukins, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and chemokines. The article provides a broad review of cytokine physiology and pathophysiology with an emphasis on recent findings of their involvement in various diseases such as infections, autoimmune and haematological disorders, and cancer. Different treatment modalities that affect cytokine activity are discussed.

  6. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Maza, Paloma K.; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  7. [Cytokines and the liver].

    PubMed

    Kershenobich, D; Borovoy, J; Guevara, L; Male, R; Alcocer, J

    1990-07-01

    The cytokines are proteins synthetized by lymphoid and monocyte/macrophage system cells in response to a wide variety of infectious stimulus, featuring bacterial endotoxins. These proteins have immunoregulatory effects and have been implicated in inflammation and fibrosis. In this review we refer to the interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor because of their elevated basal levels in acute and chronic hepatopaties and in response to lipopolisacharide mainly in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:19256129

  8. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk: implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schröder, Fritz H; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    • The most recent evidence for the link between a family history of prostate cancer and individual risk for future disease was examined, with the aim of understanding what the existence and nature of a family history of prostate cancer does to a man's risk of developing the disease. • Our findings highlighted the clear association between a family history of prostate cancer and increased risk of developing the disease; with a greater proximity of relatedness, greater number of family members affected and/or earlier age at diagnosis of the family member elevating risk further. • These findings have important clinical implications for the identification and subsequent management of men deemed to be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The evidence for prostate cancer risk reduction with the mono 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) finasteride in a low-risk population and, more recently, with the dual 5ARI dutasteride in a population at increased risk of developing the disease, has potential to expand management options for men at risk of developing prostate cancer beyond more frequent and/or earlier surveillance. • Given that family history can be easily assessed in routine clinical practice, it should be regarded as an important parameter to consider alongside PSA level for prostate cancer risk assessment. PMID:21166744

  9. "Cancer in the family" and genetic testing: implications for life insurance.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Elly L; Doherty, Rebecca J; Gaff, Clara L; Macrae, Finlay A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2003-11-01

    The potential for discrimination when applying for insurance can be of concern for individuals with a family history of cancer or of a genetic disorder and who are considering genetic counselling or genetic testing. The actual incidence of "genetic discrimination", however, is not known, despite considerable media coverage of this issue. The clinical details required by insurers have received less attention. We obtained primary application and personal statement forms used by 21 different underwriters of voluntary life insurance and found substantial differences in the information requested about family history and genetic testing. All insurance applications, however, contained a duty of disclosure that would require revealing the result, if known by the applicant, of a genetic test in a family member. Therefore, decisions made by family members can affect insurance applications, and people considering genetic testing may also need to consider the implications of the results for other family members. Health practitioners should balance the potential benefits of appropriate genetic testing against potential restriction to life and income-protection insurance when advising people about genetic testing.

  10. Characterization of the Deleted in Autism 1 Protein Family: Implications for Studying Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation. PMID

  11. Trajectories of Adolescent Hostile-Aggressive Behavior and Family Climate: Longitudinal Implications for Young Adult Romantic Relationship Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as…

  12. Black Families' Lay Views on Health and the Implications for Health Promotion: A Community-Based Study in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochieng, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Many studies focusing on beliefs about health and health promotion have paid little attention to the life experiences of Black and other visible minority ethnic families in western societies. This paper is a report of a study exploring Black families' beliefs about health and the implications of such beliefs for health promotion. Ten Black…

  13. Familial adenomatous polyposis in an adolescent with coexisting schizophrenia: treatment strategies and implications

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Luisa; Alvarez, Jose; Weinstein, Erica; Korenis, Panagiota

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The etiology of schizophrenia remains unclear, studies implicate a multifactorial origin with genetic and environmental factors. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene has been associated with FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis), and studies have linked it to schizophrenia. However, there are few studies which examine the association between FAP and schizophrenia. Limited data exist regarding recommendations for genetic counseling of adolescents with comorbid psychiatric illness. A case of an adolescent with FAP who developed psychotic symptoms is presented. This case hopes to add to the literature about mental illness in those with FAP. A review of literature about the role of APC in schizophrenia as well as implications of genetic counseling on those who suffer with mental illness will be discussed. PMID:26436104

  14. Child abuse and neglect in Cambodian refugee families: characteristics and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (LAC-DCFS). Some of the major findings include (1) Cambodian child maltreatment cases were most frequently reported to the LAC-DCFS among various Asian Pacific ethnic groups; (2) Cambodian refugee families were more likely to be charged with neglect, while their Asian Pacific counterparts were more likely charged with physical abuse; (3) the circumstances under which maltreatment occurred most frequently were parental substance abuse and mental illness; and (4) while fathers who maltreated their child were likely to use alcohol, mothers were also more likely to have a mental health problem such as depression. This study suggests the importance of collaboration between Child Protective Service agencies, substance abuse programs, traditional healers, mental health services, and other social service agencies for effective child abuse prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:18575261

  15. Comparative genomic and proteomic anatomy of Mycobacterium ubiquitous Esx family proteins: implications in pathogenicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyan; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2014-04-01

    Secreted proteins are among the most important molecules involved in host-pathogen interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis (TB). M. tuberculosis encodes five types of VII secretion systems (ESX-1 to ESX-5) responsible for the exportation of many proteins. This system mediated substrates including members of the Esx family implicated in tuberculosis pathogenesis and survival within host cells. However, the distribution and evolution of this family remain elusive. To explore the evolution and distribution of Esx family proteins, we analyzed all available Mycobacteria genomes. Interestingly, amino mutations among M. tuberculosis esx family proteins may relate to their functions. We further analyzed the differences between pathogenic Mycobacteria, the attenuated Mycobacteria and non-pathogenic Mycobacteria. The stability, the globular domains and the phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues of M. tuberculosis esx proteins with their homologies among other Mycoabcteria were analyzed. Our comparative genomic and proteomic analysis found that the change of stability, gain or loss of globular domains and phosphorylation of serine/threonine might be responsible for the difference between the pathogenesis and virulence of the esx proteins and its homolog widespread among Mycobacteria and related species, which may provide clues for novel anti-tuberculosis drug targets.

  16. High glucose driven expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes in lymphocytes: molecular mechanisms of IL-17 family gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhakaran; Natarajan, Kartiga; Shanmugam, Narkunaraja

    2014-03-01

    High glucose is an independent risk factor that alters the expression pattern of cytokines/chemokine leading to leukocyte activation in diabetes. Fluctuation of cytokine milieu in lymphocytes may lead to differentiation into a particular subset. Our objectives were to profile high glucose induced inflammatory gene expression in lymphocytes, to examine in vivo relevance in diabetes and to identify the key transcription factors and signaling pathways involved. Cytokine gene arrays and T-helper (Th1/Th2/Th17) cytokine profiler RT(2)-PCR arrays used for cytokine expression profiling followed by validation using Real Time-qPCR and relative RT-PCR in Jurkat T-lymphocytes, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLCs) from normal and diabetes subjects. Luciferase reporter plasmid, pharmacological inhibitors and mutant plasmids were used for promoter activation and signaling pathway studies. High glucose induced gene profiling in Jurkat T-lymphocytes showed significantly increased expression of 64 proinflammatory genes including IL-6 and IL-17A and most of these genes were Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB and AP-1 regulated. RT(2)-PCR array results suggested the transcriptional activation of IL-17 and its downstream signaling in Jurkat T-lymphocytes upon high glucose treatment. Candidate genes like Interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-17E IL-17F and IL-6 were up-regulated in both Jurkat T-lymphocytes and PBLCs from normal and diabetes subjects. This high glucose induced cytokine expression was due to promoter activation. Pharmacology inhibitor studies showed the involvement of NF-κB, protein kinase-C, p38 Mitogen activated protein kinase; Janus activated kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription and extracellular regulated kinase signaling pathways. Further, high glucose treatment increased the adhesion of lymphocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results show that IL-17 cytokines are induced by high glucose via key signaling pathways leading to lymphocyte activation

  17. Functional characterization of novel ABCB6 mutations and their clinical implications in familial pseudohyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta; Manna, Francesco; De Rosa, Gianluca; Gambale, Antonella; Zouwail, Soha; Detta, Nicola; Pardo, Catia Lo; Alper, Seth L; Brugnara, Carlo; Sharma, Alok K; De Franceschi, Lucia; Iolascon, Achille

    2016-08-01

    Isolated familial pseudohyperkalemia is a dominant red cell trait characterized by cold-induced 'passive leak' of red cell potassium ions into plasma. The causative gene of this condition is ABCB6, which encodes an erythrocyte membrane ABC transporter protein bearing the Langereis blood group antigen system. In this study analyzing three new families, we report the first functional characterization of ABCB6 mutants, including the homozygous mutation V454A, heterozygous mutation R276W, and compound heterozygous mutations R276W and R723Q (in trans). All these mutations are annotated in public databases, suggesting that familial pseudohyperkalemia could be common in the general population. Indeed, we identified variant R276W in one of 327 random blood donors (0.3%). Four weeks' storage of heterozygous R276W blood cells resulted in massive loss of potassium compared to that from healthy control red blood cells. Moreover, measurement of cation flux demonstrated greater loss of potassium or rubidium ions from HEK-293 cells expressing ABCB6 mutants than from cells expressing wild-type ABCB6. The R276W/R723Q mutations elicited greater cellular potassium ion efflux than did the other mutants tested. In conclusion, ABCB6 missense mutations in red blood cells from subjects with familial pseudohyperkalemia show elevated potassium ion efflux. The prevalence of such individuals in the blood donor population is moderate. The fact that storage of blood from these subjects leads to significantly increased levels of potassium in the plasma could have serious clinical implications for neonates and infants receiving large-volume transfusions of whole blood. Genetic tests for familial pseudohyperkalemia could be added to blood donor pre-screening. Further study of ABCB6 function and trafficking could be informative for the study of other pathologies of red blood cell hydration. PMID:27151991

  18. Functional characterization of novel ABCB6 mutations and their clinical implications in familial pseudohyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta; Manna, Francesco; De Rosa, Gianluca; Gambale, Antonella; Zouwail, Soha; Detta, Nicola; Pardo, Catia Lo; Alper, Seth L.; Brugnara, Carlo; Sharma, Alok K.; De Franceschi, Lucia; Iolascon, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Isolated familial pseudohyperkalemia is a dominant red cell trait characterized by cold-induced ‘passive leak’ of red cell potassium ions into plasma. The causative gene of this condition is ABCB6, which encodes an erythrocyte membrane ABC transporter protein bearing the Langereis blood group antigen system. In this study analyzing three new families, we report the first functional characterization of ABCB6 mutants, including the homozygous mutation V454A, heterozygous mutation R276W, and compound heterozygous mutations R276W and R723Q (in trans). All these mutations are annotated in public databases, suggesting that familial pseudohyperkalemia could be common in the general population. Indeed, we identified variant R276W in one of 327 random blood donors (0.3%). Four weeks’ storage of heterozygous R276W blood cells resulted in massive loss of potassium compared to that from healthy control red blood cells. Moreover, measurement of cation flux demonstrated greater loss of potassium or rubidium ions from HEK-293 cells expressing ABCB6 mutants than from cells expressing wild-type ABCB6. The R276W/R723Q mutations elicited greater cellular potassium ion efflux than did the other mutants tested. In conclusion, ABCB6 missense mutations in red blood cells from subjects with familial pseudohyperkalemia show elevated potassium ion efflux. The prevalence of such individuals in the blood donor population is moderate. The fact that storage of blood from these subjects leads to significantly increased levels of potassium in the plasma could have serious clinical implications for neonates and infants receiving large-volume transfusions of whole blood. Genetic tests for familial pseudohyperkalemia could be added to blood donor pre-screening. Further study of ABCB6 function and trafficking could be informative for the study of other pathologies of red blood cell hydration. PMID:27151991

  19. Putting Families in the Center: Family Perspectives on Decision Making and ADHD and Implications for ADHD Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Catherine C.; Claudius, Milena; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Wong, John B.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine components of family-centered care in families' stories about treatment decision making for their child with ADHD. Method: Twenty-eight families participated in qualitative interviews that addressed families' perspectives on (a) the treatment decision-making process, (b) the cause and impact of their child's symptoms, and (c)…

  20. Cytokine response to vitamin E supplementation is dependent on pre-supplementation cytokine levels.

    PubMed

    Belisle, Sarah E; Leka, Lynette S; Dallal, Gerard E; Jacques, Paul F; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Ordovas, Jose M; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested to improve immune response in the aged in part by altering cytokine production. However, there is not a consensus regarding the effect of supplemental vitamin E on cytokine production in humans. There is evidence that baseline immune health can affect immune response to supplemental vitamin E in the elderly. Thus, the effect of vitamin E on cytokines may depend on their pre-supplementation cytokine response. Using data from a vitamin E intervention in elderly nursing home residents, we examined if the effect of vitamin E on ex vivo cytokine production of IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma depended on baseline cytokine production. We observed that the effect of vitamin E supplementation on cytokine production depended on pre-supplementation production of the respective cytokines. The interactions between vitamin E and baseline cytokine production were not explained by covariates known to impact cytokine production. Our results offer evidence that baseline cytokine production should be considered in studies that examine the effect of supplemental vitamin E on immune and inflammatory responses. Our results could have implications in designing clinical trials to determine the impact of vitamin E on conditions in which cytokines are implicated such as infections and atherosclerotic disease.

  1. Cytokine response to vitamin E supplementation is dependent on pre-supplementation cytokine levels

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Leka, Lynette S.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Jacques, Paul F.; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Ordovas, Jose M.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested to improve immune response in the aged in part by altering cytokine production. However, there is not a consensus regarding the effect of supplemental vitamin E on cytokine production in humans. There is evidence that baseline immune health can affect immune response to supplemental vitamin E in the elderly. Thus, the effect of vitamin E on cytokines may depend on their pre-supplementation cytokine response. Using data from a vitamin E intervention in elderly nursing home residents, we examined if the effect of vitamin E on ex vivo cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ depended on baseline cytokine production. . We observed that the effect of vitamin E supplementation on cytokine production depended on pre-supplementation production of the respective cytokines. The interactions between vitamin E and baseline cytokine production were not explained covariates known to impact cytokine production. Our results offer evidence that baseline cytokine production should be considered in studies that examine the effect of supplemental vitamin E on immune and inflammatory responses. Our results could have implications in designing clinical trials to determine the impact of vitamin E on conditions in which cytokines are implicated such as infections and atherosclerotic disease. PMID:19478423

  2. Innate Multigene Family Memories Are Implicated in the Viral-Survivor Zebrafish Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Since adaptive features such as memory were discovered in mammalian innate immunity, interest in the immunological status of primitive vertebrates after infections has grown. In this context, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio), a primitive vertebrate species suited to molecular and genetic studies to explore transcriptional memories of the immune system in long-term survivors of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus infections. Immune-gene targeted microarrays designed in-house, multipath genes, gene set enrichment, and leading-edge analysis, reveal unexpected consistent correlations between the viral-survivor phenotype and several innate multigene families. Thus, here we describe in survivors of infections the upregulation of the multigene family of proteasome subunit macropains, zebrafish-specific novel gene sets, mitogen activated protein kinases, and epidermal growth factor. We also describe the downregulation of the multigene families of c-reactive proteins, myxovirus-induced proteins and novel immunoglobulin-type receptors. The strength of those immunological memories was reflected by the exceptional similarity of the transcriptional profiles of survivors before and after re-infection compared with primary infected fish. On the other hand, the high levels of neutralizing antibodies in the blood plasma of survivors contrasted with the depletion of transcripts specific for most cell types present in lymphoid organs. Therefore, long-term survivors maintained unexpected molecular/cellular memories of previous viral encounters by modulating the expression levels of innate multigene families as well as having specific adaptive antibodies. The implications of the so-called "trained immunity" for future research in this field are also discussed. PMID:26270536

  3. Relational Issues Within Couples Coping With Parkinson's Disease: Implications and Ideas for Family-Focused Care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Summer C

    2016-05-01

    The ways in which Parkinson's disease (PD) impacts, and is experienced by, the couple (i.e., the individual with PD and his or her spouse or other romantic partner) have not been fully elucidated. Such research is strongly warranted because when one member of a couple is chronically ill, it can cause major distress for not only the patient but also for his or her partner and their relationship. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine how PD affects a couple's relationship. Data from 44 individual, in-depth interviews (with 21 persons with PD and 23 partners) revealed several challenges that PD commonly invokes in the patient-partner relationship, though most participants reported that PD had not decreased their overall relational closeness. The findings have significant practical implications for family-focused care.

  4. Unmet Need for Family Planning: Implication for Under-five Mortality in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Odimegwu, Clifford; Imasiku, Eunice Ntwala; Ononokpono, Dorothy Ngozi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are gaps in evidence on whether unmet need for family planning has any implication for under-five mortality in Nigeria. This study utilized 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data to examine the effect of unmet need on under-five mortality. Cox regression analysis was performed on 28,647 children born by a nationally-representative sample of 18,028 women within the five years preceding the survey. Findings indicated elevated risks of under-five death for children whose mothers had unmet need for spacing [Hazard ratio (HR): 1.60, confidence interval (CI) 1.37-1.86, p<0.001] and children whose mothers had unmet need for limiting (HR: 1.78, CI 1.48-2.15, p<0.001) compared to children whose mothers had met need. These findings were consistent after adjusting for the effects of factors that could confound the association. Findings of this study underscore the need to address the present level of unmet need for family planning in Nigeria, if the country would achieve meaningful reduction in under-five mortality. PMID:25995735

  5. Whole exome sequencing in extended families with autism spectrum disorder implicates four candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nicola H; Nato, Alejandro Q; Bernier, Raphael; Ankenman, Katy; Sohi, Harkirat; Munson, Jeff; Patowary, Ashok; Archer, Marilyn; Blue, Elizabeth M; Webb, Sara Jane; Coon, Hilary; Raskind, Wendy H; Brkanac, Zoran; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders, characterized by impairment in communication and social interactions, and by repetitive behaviors. ASDs are highly heritable, and estimates of the number of risk loci range from hundreds to >1000. We considered 7 extended families (size 12-47 individuals), each with ≥3 individuals affected by ASD. All individuals were genotyped with dense SNP panels. A small subset of each family was typed with whole exome sequence (WES). We used a 3-step approach for variant identification. First, we used family-specific parametric linkage analysis of the SNP data to identify regions of interest. Second, we filtered variants in these regions based on frequency and function, obtaining exactly 200 candidates. Third, we compared two approaches to narrowing this list further. We used information from the SNP data to impute exome variant dosages into those without WES. We regressed affected status on variant allele dosage, using pedigree-based kinship matrices to account for relationships. The p value for the test of the null hypothesis that variant allele dosage is unrelated to phenotype was used to indicate strength of evidence supporting the variant. A cutoff of p = 0.05 gave 28 variants. As an alternative third filter, we required Mendelian inheritance in those with WES, resulting in 70 variants. The imputation- and association-based approach was effective. We identified four strong candidate genes for ASD (SEZ6L, HISPPD1, FEZF1, SAMD11), all of which have been previously implicated in other studies, or have a strong biological argument for their relevance. PMID:26204995

  6. Trajectories of adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior and family climate: Longitudinal implications for young adult romantic relationship competence.

    PubMed

    Fosco, Gregory M; Van Ryzin, Mark J; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as key individual and family level factors that may forecast later romantic relationship functioning. Guided by a family systems framework, we evaluated the reciprocal influences of adolescent hostility and family climate, to provide a more comprehensive picture of the etiology of romantic relationship functioning. We drew on a large sample (N = 974) of young adults (mean age = 19.5) that were followed starting in the fall of 6th grade, and subsequently in spring of 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th grades prior to the young adult assessment. Using a latent difference score cross-lag model (McArdle, 2009), our results indicated that a more positive family climate was associated with decreases in HAB, but HAB was not associated with changes in family climate. Further, the influence of the family climate on HAB was consistent across all time points. HAB and family climate had different predictions for young adult romantic relationships: Increasing HAB over adolescence predicted relationship violence, while maintenance in family climate was a key predictor of relationship problem-solving skills. The only predictor of love and connection in relationships was early family functioning. Implications for developmental theory and prevention science are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337516

  7. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  8. The Implications of Changing Family Patterns and Behavior for Labor Force and Hardship Measurement. Background Paper No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Harold W.; Skidmore, Felicity

    Two major points are discussed concerning the implications of changing family patterns and behavior for labor force and hardship measurement. First, since household income is not restricted to the earnings of one individual, economic hardship cannot be measured by labor force statistics. Arguing that the poverty count is the appropriate measure of…

  9. Post-War Trauma and Reconciliation in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Observations, Experiences, and Implications for Marriage and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Briana S.

    2003-01-01

    The 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina caused mush devastation in that region of the world. This article describes the themes and issues that emerged from information gained from interviews with Bosnian professionals through a project entitled "Trauma and Reconciliation in Bosnia-Herzegovina." Recommendations and implications for family and…

  10. Structural design and molecular evolution of a cytokine receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F

    1990-01-01

    A family of cytokine receptors comprising molecules specific for a diverse group of hematopoietic factors and growth hormones has been principally defined by a striking homology of binding domains. This work proposes that the approximately 200-residue binding segment of the canonical cytokine receptor is composed of two discrete folding domains that share a significant sequence and structural resemblance. Analogous motifs are found in tandem approximately 100-amino acid domains in the extracellular segments of a receptor family formed by the interferon-alpha/beta and -gamma receptors and tissue factor, a membrane tether for a coagulation protease. Domains from the receptor supergroup reveal clear evolutionary links to fibronectin type III structures, approximately 90-amino acid modules that are typically found in cell surface molecules with adhesive functions. Predictive structural analysis of the shared receptor and fibronectin domains locates seven beta-strands in conserved regions of the chain; these strands are modeled to fold into antiparallel beta-sandwiches with a topology that is similar to immunoglobulin constant domains. These findings have strong implications for understanding the evolutionary emergence of an important class of regulatory molecules from primitive adhesive modules. In addition, the resulting double-barrel design of the receptors and the spatial clustering of conserved residues suggest a likely binding site for cytokine ligands. Images PMID:2169613

  11. Developing a Parent-Centered Obesity Prevention Program for 4-H Families: Implications for Extension Family Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benke, Carrie J.; Bailey, Sandra J.; Martz, Jill; Paul, Lynn; Lynch, Wesley; Eldridge, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Planning youth and family programming in the 21st century is daunting given family members' busy schedules. This is even more challenging when planning programs in rural areas, where there are vast distances between communities. This article discusses a research and educational outreach project that uses best practices in program development…

  12. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  13. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  14. Exome Sequence Data From Multigenerational Families Implicate AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Neurocognitive Impairment and Schizophrenia Risk.

    PubMed

    Kos, Mark Z; Carless, Melanie A; Peralta, Juan; Blackburn, August; Almeida, Marcio; Roalf, David; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Prasad, Konasale; Gur, Ruben C; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Curran, Joanne E; Duggirala, Ravi; Glahn, David C; Blangero, John; Gur, Raquel E; Almasy, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by impairments in behavior, thought, and neurocognitive performance. We searched for susceptibility loci at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) previously reported for abstraction and mental flexibility (ABF), a cognitive function often compromised in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives. Exome sequences were determined for 134 samples in 8 European American families from the original linkage study, including 25 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. At chromosome 5q32-35.3, we analyzed 407 protein-altering variants for association with ABF and schizophrenia status. For replication, significant, Bonferroni-corrected findings were tested against cognitive traits in Mexican American families (n = 959), as well as interrogated for schizophrenia risk using GWAS results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). From the gene SYNPO, rs6579797 (MAF = 0.032) shows significant associations with ABF (P = .015) and schizophrenia (P = .040), as well as jointly (P = .0027). In the Mexican American pedigrees, rs6579797 exhibits significant associations with IQ (P = .011), indicating more global effects on neurocognition. From the PGC results, other SYNPO variants were identified with near significant effects on schizophrenia risk, with a local linkage disequilibrium block displaying signatures of positive selection. A second missense variant within the QTL, rs17551608 (MAF = 0.19) in the gene WWC1, also displays a significant effect on schizophrenia in our exome sequences (P = .038). Remarkably, the protein products of SYNPO and WWC1 are interaction partners involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, a brain process implicated in synaptic plasticity. Our study reveals variants in these genes with significant effects on neurocognition and schizophrenia risk, identifying a potential pathogenic mechanism for schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:26405221

  15. Characterization and Clinical Implication of Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokines Produced from Three-Dimensionally Cultured Tumor Tissues Resected from Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomi, Anna; Makita, Masujiro; Ozeki, Tomoko; Li, Na; Satomura, Aiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Iwase, Takuji; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Several cytokines secreted from breast cancer tissues are suggested to be related to disease prognosis. We examined Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines produced from three-dimensionally cultured breast cancer tissues and related them with patient clinical profiles. METHODS: 21 tumor tissues and 9 normal tissues surgically resected from breast cancer patients were cultured in thermoreversible gelatin polymer–containing medium. Tissue growth and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine concentrations in the culture medium were analyzed and were related with hormone receptor expressions and patient clinical profiles. RESULTS: IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed highly in culture medium of both cancer and normal tissues. However, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-17A were not detected in the supernatant of the three-dimensionally cultured normal mammary gland and are seemed to be specific to breast cancer tissues. The growth abilities of hormone receptor–negative cancer tissues were significantly higher than those of receptor-positive tissues (P = 0.0383). Cancer tissues of stage ≥ IIB patients expressed significantly higher TNF-α levels as compared with those of patients with stage < IIB (P = 0.0096). CONCLUSIONS: The tumor tissues resected from breast cancer patients can grow in the three-dimensional thermoreversible gelatin polymer culture system and produce Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines. Hormone receptor–positive cancer tissues showed less growth ability. TNF-α is suggested to be a biomarker for the cancer stage. PMID:26310378

  16. Membrane-proximal TRAIL species are incapable of inducing short circuit apoptosis signaling: Implications for drug development and basic cytokine biology

    PubMed Central

    Tatzel, Katharina; Kuroki, Lindsay; Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Curiel, David T.; Goedegebuure, S. Peter; Powell, Matthew A.; Mutch, David G.; Hawkins, William G.; Spitzer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL continues to garner substantial interest as a recombinant cancer therapeutic while the native cytokine itself serves important tumor surveillance functions when expressed in membrane-anchored form on activated immune effector cells. We have recently developed the genetically stabilized TRAIL platform TR3 in efforts to improve the limitations associated with currently available drug variants. While in the process of characterizing mesothelin-targeted TR3 variants using a single chain antibody (scFv) delivery format (SS-TR3), we discovered that the membrane-tethered cytokine had a substantially increased activity profile compared to non-targeted TR3. However, cell death proceeded exclusively via a bystander mechanism and protected the mesothelin-positive targets from apoptosis rather than leading to their elimination. Incorporation of a spacer-into the mesothelin surface antigen or the cancer drug itself-converted SS-TR3 into a cis-acting phenotype. Further experiments with membrane-anchored TR3 variants and the native cytokine confirmed our hypothesis that membrane-proximal TRAIL species lack the capacity to physically engage their cognate receptors coexpressed on the same cell membrane. Our findings not only provide an explanation for the “peaceful” coexistence of ligand and receptor of a representative member of the TNF superfamily but give us vital clues for the design of activity-enhanced TR3-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:26935795

  17. Expansion and Homing of Adoptively Transferred Human NK Cells in Immunodeficient Mice Varies with Product Preparation and In Vivo Cytokine Administration: Implications for Clinical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey S.; Rooney, Cliona M; Curtsinger, Julie; McElmurry, Ron; McCullar, Valarie; Verneris, Michael R.; Lapteva, Natalia; McKenna, David; Wagner, John E.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Tolar, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    NK cell efficacy correlates with in vivo proliferation and we hypothesize that NK cell product manipulations may optimize this endpoint. Xenotransplantation was used to compare GMP grade freshly activated NK cells (FA-NK) and ex vivo expanded NK cells (Ex-NK). Cells were infused into NSG mice followed by IL-2, IL-15, or no cytokines. Evaluation of blood, spleen and marrow showed that persistence and expansion was cytokine dependent, IL-15 being superior to IL-2. Cryopreservation and immediate infusion resulted in less cytotoxicity and fewer NK cells in vivo and this could be rescued in FA-NK by overnight culture and testing the next day. Marked differences in the kinetics and homing of FA-NK versus Ex-NK were apparent: FA-NK cells preferentially homed to spleen, and persisted longer after cytokine withdrawal. These data would suggest that cryopreservation of FA-NK and Ex-NK is detrimental and that culture conditions profoundly affect homing, persistence and expansion of NK cells in vivo. The NSG mouse model is an adjuvant to in vitro assays prior to clinical testing. PMID:24816582

  18. Membrane-proximal TRAIL species are incapable of inducing short circuit apoptosis signaling: Implications for drug development and basic cytokine biology.

    PubMed

    Tatzel, Katharina; Kuroki, Lindsay; Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Curiel, David T; Goedegebuure, S Peter; Powell, Matthew A; Mutch, David G; Hawkins, William G; Spitzer, Dirk

    2016-03-03

    TRAIL continues to garner substantial interest as a recombinant cancer therapeutic while the native cytokine itself serves important tumor surveillance functions when expressed in membrane-anchored form on activated immune effector cells. We have recently developed the genetically stabilized TRAIL platform TR3 in efforts to improve the limitations associated with currently available drug variants. While in the process of characterizing mesothelin-targeted TR3 variants using a single chain antibody (scFv) delivery format (SS-TR3), we discovered that the membrane-tethered cytokine had a substantially increased activity profile compared to non-targeted TR3. However, cell death proceeded exclusively via a bystander mechanism and protected the mesothelin-positive targets from apoptosis rather than leading to their elimination. Incorporation of a spacer-into the mesothelin surface antigen or the cancer drug itself-converted SS-TR3 into a cis-acting phenotype. Further experiments with membrane-anchored TR3 variants and the native cytokine confirmed our hypothesis that membrane-proximal TRAIL species lack the capacity to physically engage their cognate receptors coexpressed on the same cell membrane. Our findings not only provide an explanation for the "peaceful" coexistence of ligand and receptor of a representative member of the TNF superfamily but give us vital clues for the design of activity-enhanced TR3-based cancer therapeutics.

  19. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam R; Mackey, Aaron J; Dejene, Eden A; Ramadan, James W; Langefeld, Carl D; Palmer, Nicholette D; Taylor, Kent D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Watanabe, Richard M; Rich, Stephen S; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  20. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  1. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  2. Transmembrane TNF-α Reverse Signaling Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Formation in Macrophages by Inducing TGF-β: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Pallai, Anna; Kiss, Beáta; Vereb, György; Armaka, Marietta; Kollias, George; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-02-01

    TNF-α, a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is generated in a precursor form called transmembrane (m)TNF-α that is expressed as a type II polypeptide on the surface of certain cells. mTNF-α was shown to act both as a ligand by binding to TNF-α receptors, as well as a receptor that transmits outside-to-inside (reverse) signals back into the mTNF-α-bearing cells. In this study, we show that nonactivated macrophages express basal levels of mTNF-α and respond to anti-TNF-α Abs by triggering the MAPK kinase 4 signaling pathway. The pathway induces TGF-β. Based on inhibitory experiments, the production of TGF-β1 is regulated via Jun kinases, whereas that of other TGF-βs is regulated via p38 MAPKs. Exposure to LPS further induced the expression of mTNF-α, and triggering of mTNF-α strongly suppressed the LPS-induced proinflammatory response. Neutralizing TGF-β by Abs prevented the mTNF-α-mediated suppression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation, indicating that the immune-suppressive effect of mTNF-α is mediated via TGF-β. Although apoptotic cells are also known to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation in macrophages by upregulating TGF-β, we show that they do not use the mTNF-α signaling pathway. Because TGF-β possesses a wide range of immune-suppressive effects, our data indicate that upregulation of TGF-β synthesis by those TNF-α-targeting molecules, which are able to trigger mTNF-α, might contribute to their therapeutic effect in the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, or sarcoidosis. Additionally, none of the TNF-α-targeting molecules is expected to interfere with the immune-silencing effects of apoptotic cells. PMID:26729808

  3. A new member of the GP138 multigene family implicated in cell interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Yamaguchi, N; Tanaka, Y; Urushihara, H

    1999-06-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum reproduces sexually under submerged and dark conditions. Its mating system is polymorphic and particularly interesting with respect to mechanisms of cell recognition. The cell-surface glycoprotein gp138 has been implicated in sexual cell interactions, as it was identified as a target molecule for the antibodies that block sexual cell fusion in D. discoideum. Two mutually homologous genes, GP138A and GP138B, have been cloned, but gene disruption experiments to clarify their functional relationships suggested that there is at least one more gene for gp138. Further protein analysis including peptide mapping also revealed that gp138 exists as three isoforms, DdFRP1, DdFRP2, and DdFRP3. GP138A encodes DdFRP2 and GP138B, DdFRP3, and the presence of a third gp138 gene encoding DdFRP1 was suggested. Here, we isolated and characterized a third GP138 gene, GP138C. Although the deduced amino acid sequences of GP138C matched completely with those of peptide fragments of DdFRP1 in the N-terminal half, the rest did not give complete matches. Overexpression of GP138C caused an increase in the intensity of DdFRP1, but disruption of this gene did not diminish DdFRP1. Our results indicate that GP138C encodes a protein very similar to but distinct from DdFRP1. The GP138 multigene family is thus composed of more members than previously expected, and their functional relationships are of special interest. PMID:10462174

  4. The complex nature of family support across the life span: Implications for psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R; Webster, Noah J; Antonucci, Toni C

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (ages 18-34), middle-aged (ages 35-49), and older adults (ages 50+). A sample of 881 adults (72% White; 26% Black) was drawn from the longitudinal Social Relations, Age, and Health Study. Structural equation modeling indicated that among young and middle-aged adults, increasing family negativity was associated with increases in depressive symptoms over time. In contrast, among older adults, lowered proportion of family in network and an increasing number of family members in the network (i.e., family size) were associated with decreases in depressive symptoms. These findings were moderated by family negativity. Among older adults with low family negativity, having a lower proportion of family and larger family size were associated with decreasing depressive symptoms, but there was no effect among those reporting high family negativity. Overall, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the complex, developmental nature of how family support influences well-being across the life span and highlights unique age differences. PMID:25602936

  5. Understanding Contexts of Family Violence in Rural, Farming Communities: Implications for Rural Women's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Sarah; Hornosty, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Research on family violence in rural communities in Australia and Canada has shown that women's experience of family violence is shaped by social and cultural factors. Concern for economic security and inheritance for children, closeness and belonging, and values of family unity and traditional gender roles are factors in rural communities that…

  6. Intrafamilial Separations in the Immigrant Family: Implications for Cross-Cultural Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciarra, Daniel T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a structural family-therapy (SFT) approach combined with the paradigm of acculturation to increase counselors' sensitivity to immigrant families whose members arrive at different times. The focus is on those families in which parents have preceded children in the immigration experience. Provides culturally sensitive counseling strategies…

  7. The Complex Nature of Family Support across the Life Span: Implications for Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R.; Webster, Noah J.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (ages 18-34), middle-aged (ages 35-49), and…

  8. The Chinese Family in Transition: Implications for Education and Society in Modern Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.

    This paper investigates the challenges facing the modern Chinese family in Taiwan. An understanding of how culture and family life interact in other cultures may be useful in helping to understand such interactions in one's own society. Confucianism and family stability have been two enduring features of the protracted civilizations of China. In…

  9. Becoming a Family: Parents' Stories and Their Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Rena D.

    Noting that the movement from young adulthood through coupling and the transition to parenthood may be among the most universal adult developmental transitions, this book uses a qualitative analysis of family narratives to examine the meanings that family members ascribe to the developmental process of becoming a family. Addressing issues of…

  10. Tying the knot: the cystine signature and molecular-recognition processes of the vascular endothelial growth factor family of angiogenic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shalini; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-11-01

    The cystine-knot motif, made up of three intertwined disulfide bridges, is a unique feature of several toxins, cyclotides and growth factors, and occurs in a variety of species, including fungi, insects, molluscs and mammals. Growth factor molecules containing the cystine-knot motif serve as ligands for a diverse range of receptors and play an important role in extracellular signalling. This superfamily of polypeptides comprises several homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules that are central characters in both health and disease. Amongst these molecules are a group of proteins that belong to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) subfamily. The members of this family are known angiogenic factors that regulate processes leading to blood vessel formation in physiological and pathological conditions. The focus of the present review is on the structural characteristics of proteins that belong to the VEGF family and on signal-transduction pathways that become initiated via the VEGF receptors.

  11. Implications of oxidative stress and hepatic cytokine (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) response in the pathogenesis of hepatic collagenesis in chronic arsenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subhankar; Santra, Amal; Lahiri, Sarbari; Guha Mazumder, D.N. . E-mail: dngm@apexmail.com

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has been reported to occur in humans due to prolonged intake of arsenic contaminated water. Further, oxystress and hepatic fibrosis have been demonstrated by us in chronic arsenic induced hepatic damage in murine model. Cytokines like tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are suspected to play a role in hepatic collagenesis. The present study has been carried out to find out whether increased oxystress and cytokine response are associated with increased accumulation of collagen in the liver due to prolonged arsenic exposure and these follow a dose-response relationship. Methods: Male BALB/c mice were given orally 200 {mu}l of water containing arsenic in a dose of 50, 100, and 150 {mu}g/mouse/day for 6 days a week (experimental group) or arsenic-free water (<0.01 {mu}g/l, control group) for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Hepatic glutathione (GSH), protein sulfhydryl (PSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Catalase, lipid peroxidation (LPx), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}), arsenic and collagen content in the liver were estimated from sacrificed animals. Results: Significant increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in the liver associated with depletion of hepatic thiols (GSH, PSH), and antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Catalase) occurred in mice due to prolonged arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. Significant elevation of hepatic collagen occurred at 9 and 12 months in all the groups associated with significant elevation of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. However, arsenic level in the liver increased progressively from 3 months onwards. There was a positive correlation between the hepatic arsenic level and collagen content (r = 0.8007), LPx (r = 0.779) and IL-6 (r = 0.7801). Further, there was a significant negative correlation between GSH and TNF-{alpha} (r = -0.5336)) and LPx (r = -0.644). Conclusion: Increasing dose and duration of arsenic exposure in

  12. Cytokine Regulation of Metastasis and Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Brummer, G; Acevedo, D; Cheng, N

    2016-01-01

    The human body combats infection and promotes wound healing through the remarkable process of inflammation. Inflammation is characterized by the recruitment of stromal cell activity including recruitment of immune cells and induction of angiogenesis. These cellular processes are regulated by a class of soluble molecules called cytokines. Based on function, cell target, and structure, cytokines are subdivided into several classes including: interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines. While cytokines regulate normal physiological processes, chronic deregulation of cytokine expression and activity contributes to cancer in many ways. Gene polymorphisms of all types of cytokines are associated with risk of disease development. Deregulation RNA and protein expression of interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines have been detected in many solid tumors and hematopoetic malignancies, correlating with poor patient prognosis. The current body of literature suggests that in some tumor types, interleukins and chemokines work against the human body by signaling to cancer cells and remodeling the local microenvironment to support the growth, survival, and invasion of primary tumors and enhance metastatic colonization. Some lymphokines are downregulated to suppress tumor progression by enhancing cytotoxic T cell activity and inhibiting tumor cell survival. In this review, we will describe the structure/function of several cytokine families and review our current understanding on the roles and mechanisms of cytokines in tumor progression. In addition, we will also discuss strategies for exploiting the expression and activity of cytokines in therapeutic intervention. PMID:27613135

  13. Control of apoptosis by the BCL-2 protein family: implications for physiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Lessene, Guillaume; Strasser, Andreas; Adams, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family determines the commitment of cells to apoptosis, an ancient cell suicide programme that is essential for development, tissue homeostasis and immunity. Too little apoptosis can promote cancer and autoimmune diseases; too much apoptosis can augment ischaemic conditions and drive neurodegeneration. We discuss the biochemical, structural and genetic studies that have clarified how the interplay between members of the BCL-2 family on mitochondria sets the apoptotic threshold. These mechanistic insights into the functions of the BCL-2 family are illuminating the physiological control of apoptosis, the pathological consequences of its dysregulation and the promising search for novel cancer therapies that target the BCL-2 family.

  14. Nitric oxide and superoxide mediate diesel particle effects in cytokine-treated mice and murine lung epithelial cells — implications for susceptibility to traffic-related air pollution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies associate childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution with increased respiratory infections and asthmatic and allergic symptoms. The strongest associations between traffic exposure and negative health impacts are observed in individuals with respiratory inflammation. We hypothesized that interactions between nitric oxide (NO), increased during lung inflammatory responses, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased as a consequence of traffic exposure ─ played a key role in the increased susceptibility of these at-risk populations to traffic emissions. Methods Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were used as surrogates for traffic particles. Murine lung epithelial (LA-4) cells and BALB/c mice were treated with a cytokine mixture (cytomix: TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ) to induce a generic inflammatory state. Cells were exposed to saline or DEP (25 μg/cm2) and examined for differential effects on redox balance and cytotoxicity. Likewise, mice undergoing nose-only inhalation exposure to air or DEP (2 mg/m3 × 4 h/d × 2 d) were assessed for differential effects on lung inflammation, injury, antioxidant levels, and phagocyte ROS production. Results Cytomix treatment significantly increased LA-4 cell NO production though iNOS activation. Cytomix +  DEP-exposed cells incurred the greatest intracellular ROS production, with commensurate cytotoxicity, as these cells were unable to maintain redox balance. By contrast, saline + DEP-exposed cells were able to mount effective antioxidant responses. DEP effects were mediated by: (1) increased ROS including superoxide anion (O2˙-), related to increased xanthine dehydrogenase expression and reduced cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity; and (2) increased peroxynitrite generation related to interaction of O2˙- with cytokine-induced NO. Effects were partially reduced by superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplementation or by blocking iNOS induction. In mice, cytomix +  DEP

  15. Work-Family Interface for Same-Sex, Dual-Earner Couples: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.

    2005-01-01

    The author highlights information for career counselors to consider when addressing work-family interface with individuals who are members of same-sex, dual-earner couples or families. D. E. Super's (1990) life-span, life-space theory is the framework used to organize the literature review and discussion of current trends. Issues related to the…

  16. Challenges to parenting in a new culture: Implications for child and family welfare.

    PubMed

    Lewig, Kerry; Arney, Fiona; Salveron, Mary

    2010-08-01

    Increasing numbers of families arriving through Australia's humanitarian settlement scheme are coming into contact with Australian child protection systems. A large number of these families come from African and Middle Eastern countries and have common experiences of trauma, dislocation, loss and many are victims of genocide, war, and torture. Pre-migration experiences together with the considerable challenges of settling into a new country can significantly affect family well-being and parenting practices. It is therefore important that child and family welfare service planners are well informed about how best to support refugee families using culturally competent family intervention and community development practices. This paper draws on the findings of a research project designed to examine why recently arrived families from refugee backgrounds are presenting in the South Australian child protection system and to identify culturally appropriate strategies for intervention. The paper presents findings from the project that relate to (1) refugee parents', community members' and child protection practitioners' perspectives on the challenges to being a refugee parent in Australia and (2) strategies and resources relevant to prevention and early intervention in refugee families before statutory child protection intervention becomes necessary.

  17. Predicting Suicide Risks among Outpatient Adolescents Using the Family Environment Scale: Implications for Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Christopher F.; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to identify characteristics of family functioning that relate to suicide potential in an outpatient adolescent population. Participants included 51 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 who were involved in outpatient counselling. The Family Environment Scale and the Suicide Probability Scale were used to assess…

  18. Impact of Health-Related Family Factors on School Enrollment in Bolivia: Implications for Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Dearden, Kirk; Heaton, Tim; Forste, Renata

    2005-01-01

    This study identified the extent to which family factors increase school enrollment in Bolivia, after adjusting for human and financial capital. The sample was drawn from the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of human capital, financial capital and family factors on school enrollment.…

  19. Filial Piety by Contract? The Emergence, Implementation, and Implications of the "Family Support Agreement" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-01-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the…

  20. Symposium: Social Implications and Alternatives for Families and Children in the Next Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Phyllis G.

    A number of major social and demographic trends are having a profound effect on American families with young children. Among these are changes in the characteristics of poverty in families with preschool-age children, curtailment of formerly available financial support or changes in the means of obtaining such support, and the increasing cost of…

  1. Fathers' Involvement in Young Children's Literacy Development: Implications for Family Literacy Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne; Nutbrown, Cathy; Hannon, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Relatively few studies of family literacy programmes have investigated parents' experiences and whilst a number of such programmes have been specifically aimed at fathers, little is known about the involvement of fathers in programmes which target both mothers and fathers. This article reports fathers' involvement in a family literacy programme…

  2. Protective Families in High- and Low-Risk Environments: Implications for Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Michael J.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study used data from a sample of 6th to 12th grade students (N = 48,641, 51% female), nested in 192 schools, to determine if the influence of family-based protective factors varied across different school contexts. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to examine the effects of individual-level family protective factors, relative…

  3. Family History of Speech and Language Impairment in African American Children: Implications for Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Sonja L.; Garrity, April W.; Oetting, Janna B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We explored the prevalence of a positive family history of speech and language impairment in African American children as a function of their socioeconomic status (SES), receipt of speech-language services, and diagnosis of specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Data were collected in 2 phases. Phase 1 included family questionnaires…

  4. Challenges to parenting in a new culture: Implications for child and family welfare.

    PubMed

    Lewig, Kerry; Arney, Fiona; Salveron, Mary

    2010-08-01

    Increasing numbers of families arriving through Australia's humanitarian settlement scheme are coming into contact with Australian child protection systems. A large number of these families come from African and Middle Eastern countries and have common experiences of trauma, dislocation, loss and many are victims of genocide, war, and torture. Pre-migration experiences together with the considerable challenges of settling into a new country can significantly affect family well-being and parenting practices. It is therefore important that child and family welfare service planners are well informed about how best to support refugee families using culturally competent family intervention and community development practices. This paper draws on the findings of a research project designed to examine why recently arrived families from refugee backgrounds are presenting in the South Australian child protection system and to identify culturally appropriate strategies for intervention. The paper presents findings from the project that relate to (1) refugee parents', community members' and child protection practitioners' perspectives on the challenges to being a refugee parent in Australia and (2) strategies and resources relevant to prevention and early intervention in refugee families before statutory child protection intervention becomes necessary. PMID:19552958

  5. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Congqi; Lin, Fengjuan; Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers.

  6. Work-family conflict: experiences and health implications among immigrant Latinos.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Arcury, Thomas A; Márin, Antonio; Carrillo, Lourdes; Burke, Bless; Coates, Michael L; Quandt, Sara A

    2007-07-01

    Work-family conflict research has focused almost exclusively on professional, White adults. The goal of this article was to expand the understanding of culture and industry in shaping experiences and consequences of work-family conflict. Using in-depth interview data (n = 26) and structured survey data (n = 200) from immigrant Latinos employed in the poultry processing industry, the authors evaluated predictions drawn from emerging models emphasizing the influence of cultural characteristics such as collectivism and gender ideology on work-family conflict. Results indicated that immigrant Latinos in poultry processing experienced infrequent work-to-family conflict; both the level and the antecedents of work-to-family conflict differed by gender, with physical demands contributing to greater conflict for women but not men. In addition, there was little evidence that work-family conflict was associated with health in this population. These results demonstrate how traditional models of work-family conflict need to be modified to reflect the needs and circumstances of diverse workers in the new global economy.

  7. Prevalence and community variation in harmful levels of family conflict witnessed by children: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Habib, Cherine; Toumbourou, John W; McRitchie, Martin; Williams, Joanne; Kremer, Peter; McKenzie, Dean; Catalano, Richard F

    2014-10-01

    Children's reports of high family conflict consistently predict poor outcomes. The study identified criteria for high family conflict based on prospective prediction of increased risk for childhood depression. These criteria were subsequently used to establish the prevalence of high family conflict in Australian communities and to identify community correlates suitable for targeting prevention programs. Study 1 utilised a longitudinal design. Grade 6 and 8 students completed a family conflict scale (from the widely used Communities That Care survey) in 2003 and depression symptomotology were evaluated at a 1-year follow-up (International Youth Development Study, N = 1,798). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis yielded a cut-off point on a family conflict score with depression symptomatology as a criterion variable. A cut-off score of 2.5 or more (on a scale of 1 to 4) correctly identified 69 % with depression symptomology, with a specificity of 77.2 % and sensitivity at 44.3 %. Study 2 used data from an Australian national survey of Grade 6 and 8 children (Healthy Neighbourhoods Study, N = 8,256). Prevalence estimates were calculated, and multivariate logistic regression with multi-level modelling was used to establish factors associated with community variation in family conflict levels. Thirty-three percent of Australian children in 2006 were exposed to levels of family conflict that are likely to increase their future risk for depression. Significant community correlates for elevated family conflict included Indigenous Australian identification, socioeconomic disadvantage, urban and state location, maternal absence and paternal unemployment. The analysis provides indicators for targeting family-level mental health promotion programs.

  8. Prevalence and Community Variation in Harmful Levels of Family Conflict Witnessed by Children: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Toumbourou, John W.; McRitchie, Martin; Williams, Joanne; Kremer, Peter; McKenzie, Dean; Catalano, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Children’s reports of high family conflict consistently predict poor outcomes. The study identified criteria for high family conflict based on prospective prediction of increased risk for childhood depression. These criteria were subsequently used to establish the prevalence of high family conflict in Australian communities and to identify community correlates suitable for targeting prevention programs. Study 1 utilised a longitudinal design. Grade 6 and 8 students completed a family conflict scale (from the widely used Communities That Care survey) in 2003 and depression symptomotology were evaluated at a 1-year follow-up (International Youth Development Study, N = 1,798). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis yielded a cut-off point on a family conflict score with depression symptomatology as a criterion variable. A cut-off score of 2.5 or more (on a scale of 1 to 4) correctly identified 69 % with depression symptomology, with a specificity of 77.2 % and sensitivity at 44.3 %. Study 2 used data from an Australian national survey of Grade 6 and 8 children (Healthy Neighbourhoods Study, N = 8,256). Prevalence estimates were calculated, and multivariate logistic regression with multi-level modelling was used to establish factors associated with community variation in family conflict levels. Thirty-three percent of Australian children in 2006 were exposed to levels of family conflict that are likely to increase their future risk for depression. Significant community correlates for elevated family conflict included Indigenous Australian identification, socio-economic disadvantage, urban and state location, maternal absence and paternal unemployment. The analysis provides indicators for targeting family-level mental health promotion programs. PMID:23812887

  9. The first mitochondrial genome for the butterfly family Riodinidae (Abisara fylloides) and its systematic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Huang, Dun-Yuan; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Qing-Hui; Hao, Jia-Sheng; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Yang, Qun

    2013-10-01

    The Riodinidae is one of the lepidopteran butterfly families. This study describes the complete mitochondrial genome of the butterfly species Abisara fylloides, the first mitochondrial genome of the Riodinidae family. The results show that the entire mitochondrial genome of A. fylloides is 15 301 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a 423 bp A+T-rich region. The gene content, orientation and order are identical to the majority of other lepidopteran insects. Phylogenetic reconstruction was conducted using the concatenated 13 protein-coding gene (PCG) sequences of 19 available butterfly species covering all the five butterfly families (Papilionidae, Nymphalidae, Peridae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae). Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses highly supported the monophyly of Lycaenidae+Riodinidae, which was standing as the sister of Nymphalidae. In addition, we propose that the riodinids be categorized into the family Lycaenidae as a subfamilial taxon.

  10. 'Train the trainer' model: implications for health professionals and farm family health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brumby, Susan; Smith, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for participants who are identified as passive learners or 'empty vessels.' A major challenge in rural health practice is to develop more inclusive and innovative models in building improved health outcomes. The Sustainable Farm Families Train the Trainer (SFFTTT) model is a 5-day program developed by Western District Health Service designed to enhance practice among health professionals working with farm families in Australia. This innovative model of addressing farmer health asks health professionals to understand the context of the farm family and encourages them to value the experience and existing knowledge of the farmer, the family and the farm business. The SFFTTT program has engaged with health agencies, community, government, and industry groups across Australia and over 120 rural nurses have been trained since 2005. These trainers have successfully delivered programs to 1000 farm families, with high participant completion, positive evaluation, and improved health indicators. Rural professionals report changes in how they approach health education, clinical practice, and promotion with farm families and agricultural industries. This paper highlights the success of SFFTTT as an effective tool in enhancing primary health practice in rural and remote settings. The program is benefiting not only drought ravaged farmers but assisting rural nurses, health agencies, and health boards to engage with farm families at a level not identified previously. Furthermore, nurses and health professionals are now embracing a more 'farmer

  11. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession. PMID:20183676

  12. Home care for ventilator-assisted children: implications for the children, their families, and health policy.

    PubMed

    Aday, L A; Wegener, D H

    1988-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national study of home care programs for ventilator-assisted children conducted between 1984 and 1987 by the Center for Health Administration Studies at The University of Chicago. These findings point to the issues that need to be addressed in the development of policies surrounding both the delivery and the financing of services for these children and their families: (a) ventilator-assisted children are a widely varying group with diverse needs; (b) most families report that though they are glad to bring their child home, many difficult adjustments are required to do so; (c) full-time nursing care offers support to families but also intrudes on their privacy; (d) both families and children need social and psychological support once the child is home; (e) the needs of the child and the family may change over time; and (f) the financial burden of having a child on a ventilator at home can be a big stress on the family.

  13. A Family-Focused Delirium Educational Initiative With Practice and Research Implications

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mcdougall, Graham J.; Fick, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is burdensome and psychologically distressing for formal and informal caregivers, yet family caregivers often have very little understanding or knowledge about delirium. As part of a large multisite intervention study, the Early Nurse Detection of Delirium Superimposed on Dementia (END-DSD), the authors identified a need for family educational materials. This educational initiative’s purpose was to develop a delirium admission brochure for family members to aid in the prevention and earlier identification of delirium during hospitalization. A brochure was developed using an iterative approach with an expert panel. Following three iterations, a final brochure was approved. The authors found that an iterative expert consensus approach can be used to develop a brochure for families. Major content areas were helping families understand the difference between delirium and dementia, signs and symptoms of delirium, causes of delirium, and strategies family members can use to prevent delirium. A caregiver-focused educational brochure is one intervention to use in targeting older adults hospitalized with delirium. PMID:26165565

  14. [Cytokines and allergic response].

    PubMed

    Guenounou, M

    1998-01-01

    Allergic reactions are under the control of several events that occur sequentially following allergen exposure, recognition by the immune system, IgE production and their interaction with effector cells bearing Fc epsilon receptors. The lymphocyte activation in response to allergens determines the intensity and the nature of the immune response. Cytokines produced by T (and non-T) cells are involved in the polarized development of the specific immune response. In particular, type 1 and type 2 cytokines are responsible for the control of the different steps during allergic reactions. Th2 cytokines and particularly IL4 are responsible for switching the immunoglobulin synthesis by B cells to IgE production. They also play a key role in the activation of effector cells that occurs following allergen interaction with fixed specific IgE and participate to the local inflammatory reaction. Cytokine profile determination appears to represent a helpful laboratory parameter in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying allergic diseases. The development of new technological tools may allow the use of cell activation parameters, and cytokine profiles determination in clinical biology. This review aims to analyze the involvement of the cytokine network in the mechanisms leading to IgE production and the involvement of cytokines in effector mechanisms of allergic reactions. It also analyses the potential use of cytokine profile determination for diagnosis purpose and survey of immune desensitization of allergic diseases.

  15. Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in Eastern Nigeria: implications, prospects and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Uche, C; Ekanem, I I

    1982-01-01

    Despite high birthrates in most of Nigeria, government population and development policies stress economic development rather than attempts to reduce fertility. Findings on family planning knowledge, attitude, and practice from a national fertility and family planning survey conducted by the former Institute of Population and Manpower Studies of the University of Ife in 1972 are presented for 1725 Eastern Nigerian households. A total of 1839 currently married women aged 10-49 and 1585 of their husbands responded to questions about 14 contraceptive methods divided into 3 categories: folk (withdrawal, douche, breastfeeding, and abstinence), traditional (condom, diaphragm, foam, rhythm, jelly, suppositories, sponge) and modern (pill, IUD, and injectables). On the whole, husbands had greater knowledge of traditional and modern methods, while wives knew more about folk methods, regardless of residence. Wives began to approximate the knowledge level of their husbands with increasing education. Fewer than 17% of husbands or wives of any education or residence category could explain the use of modern methods. Female respondents agreed that children now had greater odds of surviving to adulthood than a generation or more ago, but 54.6% in urban areas and 58.7% in rural areas disapproved any kind of birth control. About 42.5% of urban women and 29.3% of rural women approved of birth control. 42.8% of the women felt that families have become smaller than in the past, while 37.4% felt they were larger. The mean desired family size was 5.9 in urban areas and 8.2 in rural, and did not differ significantly by education. Family size was found to be positively associated with desire for more children. Almost 3/4 of women in urban and rural areas wanted more children. Among husbands, 66.8% reported ever using folk methods, 29.9% traditional methods, and 4.2% modern methods, while among wives, 73.3% reported ever using folk methods, 22.6% traditional methods, and 4.1% modern methods

  16. Unique Loss of the PYHIN Gene Family in Bats Amongst Mammals: Implications for Inflammasome Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Matae; Cui, Jie; Irving, Aaron T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic analysis of two bat species (Pteropus alecto and Myotis davidii) revealed the absence of the PYHIN gene family. This family is recognized as important immune sensors of intracellular self and foreign DNA and activators of the inflammasome and/or interferon pathways. Further assessment of a wider range of bat genomes was necessary to determine if this is a universal pattern for this large mammalian group. Here we expanded genomic analysis of this gene family to include ten bat species. We confirmed the complete loss of this gene family, with only a truncated AIM2 remaining in one species (Pteronotus parnellii). Divergence of the PYHIN gene loci between the bat lineages infers different loss-of-function histories during bat evolution. While all other major groups of placental mammals have at least one gene member, only bats have lost the entire family. This removal of inflammasome DNA sensors may indicate an important adaptation that is flight-induced and related, at least in part, to pathogen-host co-existence. PMID:26906452

  17. Filipino men's familial roles and domestic violence: implications and strategies for community-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Romeo B

    2004-09-01

    Men's gender roles have contributed to family violence, but the ramifications of these roles in the development of community-based programmes for men have not been given much attention. A small-scale qualitative examination of the familial context of Filipino men's positions and roles, and their domestic violence experiences and attitudes was carried out using eight discussion groups, each group with seven to eight members. Verbatim tape-recorded transcripts were analysed using accepted techniques for theoretical analysis to establish emergent themes. Discussants saw themselves as being at the helm of their families. Men were knowledgeable of and took responsibility for their gender roles exerting control over the focus and direction of all their family affairs, including the gender roles of their wives/partners. This control demonstrated facets of their hegemonic masculinity such as sexual objectification and dominance. Men in this society come from a traditional position of power, dominance and privilege. They will be particularly sensitive to interventions aimed at reducing violence against women which will inquire into their private lives. In their view, such interventions were both a direct challenge to their family leadership and a basis for 'losing face'. Strategies for positive interventions include the need for male-sensitive and male-centred approaches which avoid demonising or stereotyping men.

  18. Sexual Behavior, Sexual Knowledge, and Sexual Attitudes of Emerging Adult Women: Implications for Working with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byno, Lucy H.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the sexual behavior of emerging adult women in relation to their sexual knowledge, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of their parents' sexual attitudes; and second, to discuss the implications of this research in working with young adult women. Three hundred and sixty-four college-age women…

  19. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice. PMID:24640227

  20. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice.

  1. Large family with both parents affected by distinct BRCA1 mutations: implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Voskresenskiy, Dmitry A; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Bit-Sava, Elena M; Gutkina, Nadezhda I; Anisimenko, Maxim S; Yu Sherina, Nathalia; Mitiushkina, Nathalia V; Ulibina, Yulia M; Yatsuk, Olga S; Zaitseva, Olga A; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Togo, Alexandr V; Pospelov, Valery A; Kovalenko, Sergey P; Semiglazov, Vladimir F; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2009-01-01

    Although the probability of both parents being affected by BRCA1 mutations is not negligible, such families have not been systematically described in the literature. Here we present a large breast-ovarian cancer family, where 3 sisters and 1 half-sister inherited maternal BRCA1 5382insC mutation while the remaining 2 sisters carried paternal BRCA1 1629delC allele. No BRCA1 homozygous mutations has been detected, that is consistent with the data on lethality of BRCA1 knockout mice. This report exemplifies that the identification of a single cancer-predisposing mutation within the index patient may not be sufficient in some circumstances. Ideally, all family members affected by breast or ovarian tumor disease have to be subjected to the DNA testing, and failure to detect the mutation in any of them calls for the search of the second cancer-associated allele. PMID:19338681

  2. Dynamics of ADHD in familial contexts: perspectives from children and parents and implications for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui Mei; Goh, Esther C L

    2014-01-01

    This article provides in-depth insights on the bidirectional dynamics between parents and their children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Five family units (8 parents, 5 children, N = 13) participated in this study. Parents and their child with ADHD were interviewed individually in their homes. Stressful moments of parent-child dynamics revolved around managing their child's behavior and doing homework. Findings highlight the child's agency and power of influence, and the possible recovery of negative dynamics. It is recommended that practitioners adopt the strengths perspective in working with these families and incorporate child's agency and bidirectional dynamics in interventions. PMID:25133296

  3. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5: implications for older adults and their families.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2013-03-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is targeted for publication in May 2013. Older adults and their families should be aware of the potential impact that changes in this important document may have on diagnosis and treatment of mental health concerns. Two specific changes related to a new category of Neurocognitive Disorders and a new interpretation of criteria for depression after bereavement are discussed in this article. Nurses can help older adults and their families understand the new DSM-5 terminology and encourage them to discuss risks, benefits, and likely outcomes of diagnoses, procedures, and treatments that may seem unfamiliar.

  4. Cytokines in Radiobiological Responses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaue, Dörthe; Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; McBride, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines function in many roles that are highly relevant to radiation research. This review focuses on how cytokines are structurally organized, how they are induced by radiation, and how they orchestrate mesenchymal, epithelial and immune cell interactions in irradiated tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are the major components of immediate early gene programs and as such can be rapidly activated after tissue irradiation. They converge with the effects of ionizing radiation in that both generate free radicals including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). “Self” molecules secreted or released from cells after irradiation feed the same paradigm by signaling for ROS and cytokine production. As a result, multilayered feedback control circuits can be generated that perpetuate the radiation tissue damage response. The pro-inflammatory phase persists until such times as perceived challenges to host integrity are eliminated. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory cytokines then act to restore homeostasis. The balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory forces may shift to and fro for a long time after radiation exposure, creating waves as the host tries to deal with persisting pathogenesis. Individual cytokines function within socially interconnected groups to direct these integrated cellular responses. They hunt in packs and form complex cytokine networks that are nested within each other so as to form mutually reinforcing or antagonistic forces. This yin-yang balance appears to have redox as a fulcrum. Because of their social organization, cytokines appear to have a considerable degree of redundancy and it follows that an elevated level of a specific cytokine in a disease situation or after irradiation does not necessarily implicate it causally in pathogenesis. In spite of this, “driver” cytokines are emerging in pathogenic situations that can clearly be targeted for therapeutic benefit, including in radiation settings. Cytokines can greatly

  5. Mothers' and Fathers' Racial Socialization in African American Families: Implications for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Burton, Linda M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Dotterer, Aryn M.; Swanson, Dena P.

    2006-01-01

    Mothers' and fathers' cultural socialization and bias preparation with older (M=13.9 years) and younger (M=10.31 years) siblings were studied in 162 two-parent, African American families. Analyses examined whether parental warmth and offspring age and gender were linked to parental practices and whether parents' warmth, spouses' racial…

  6. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  7. Ethnic Identity and Parenting Stress in South Asian Families: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shariff, Aneesa

    2009-01-01

    The South Asian culture is one in which family obligation and loyalty, as well as self-sacrifice and obedience toward one's elders, are paramount. These values can be different from those of the more individualistically oriented Euro-Canadian dominant culture, and can prompt challenges of cultural adjustment among Canadian-born South Asian youth…

  8. Transnational Intergenerationalities: Cultural Learning in Polish Migrant Families and Its Implications for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Daniela; Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we examine the impact of family migration on intergenerational learning, especially in relation to the transmission of cultural values and practices. Drawing on data collected through in-depth case studies with migrant Polish children and their parents, we explore the influence of intergenerationality on children's…

  9. Identification and characterization of new family members in the tautomerase superfamily: analysis and implications.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, Jamison P; Burks, Elizabeth A; Whitman, Christian P

    2014-12-15

    Tautomerase superfamily members are characterized by a β-α-β building block and a catalytic amino terminal proline. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) are the title enzymes of two of the five known families in the superfamily. Two recent developments in these families indicate that there might be more metabolic diversity in the tautomerase superfamily than previously thought. 4-OT homologues have been identified in three biosynthetic pathways, whereas all previously characterized 4-OTs are found in catabolic pathways. In the MSAD family, homologues have been characterized that lack decarboxylase activity, but have a modest hydratase activity using 2-oxo-3-pentynoate. This observation stands in contrast to the first characterized MSAD, which is a proficient decarboxylase and a less efficient hydratase. The hydratase activity was thought to be a vestigial and promiscuous activity. However, this recent discovery suggests that the hydratase activity might reflect a new activity in the MSAD family for an unknown substrate. These discoveries open up new avenues of research in the tautomerase superfamily.

  10. Identification and Characterization of New Family Members in the Tautomerase Superfamily: Analysis and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jamison P.; Burks, Elizabeth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members are characterized by a β–α–β building block and a catalytic amino terminal proline. 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) are the title enzymes of two of the five known families in the superfamily. Two recent developments in these families indicate that there might be more metabolic diversity in the tautomerase superfamily than previously thought. 4-OT homologues have been identified in three biosynthetic pathways, whereas all previously characterized 4-OTs are found in catabolic pathways. In the MSAD family, homologues have been characterized that lack decarboxylase activity, but have a modest hydratase activity using 2-oxo-3-pentynoate. This observation stands in contrast to the first characterized MSAD, which is a proficient decarboxylase and a less efficient hydratase. The hydratase activity was thought to be a vestigial and promiscuous activity. However, this recent discovery suggests that the hydratase activity might reflect a new activity in the MSAD family for an unknown substrate. These discoveries open up new avenues of research in the tautomerase superfamily. PMID:25219626

  11. A Study of Family Nurse Practitioners: Perceived Competencies and Some of Their Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Mary Jane Morrow

    This study was designed to determine the most common health needs and problems that family nurse practitioners (FNP) deal with, to determine how competent FNPs judge themselves to be, to determine what sources in nursing education FNPs judge to be most valuable, and to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the level of…

  12. The Changing Rural Appalachian Community and Low-Income Family: Implications for Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Photiadis, John D.

    Pressures on rural Appalachian families to function as an integral part of the larger American society have led to internal discord and a "Culture of Poverty"; consequently, a new vehicle for rural community reorganization is needed, particularly for low-income rural Appalachian communities. An alternative for non-conventional development should…

  13. The Implications of Psychosocial Theory for Personal Growth in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Philip R.; Newman, Barbara M.

    Psychosocial theory, based on the ideas of Erik Erikson and Robert Havighurst, is proposed as a useful framework for conceptualizing the potential for growth within the family. Erikson's (1950) eight stage theory of psychosocial development and Havighurst's (1959) concept of developmental tasks are used to take account of the stages of development…

  14. Different reasons, different results: implications of migration by gender and family status.

    PubMed

    Geist, Claudia; McManus, Patricia A

    2012-02-01

    Previous research on migration and gendered career outcomes centers on couples and rarely examines the reason for the move. The implicit assumption is usually that households migrate in response to job opportunities. Based on a two-year panel from the Current Population Survey, this article uses stated reasons for geographic mobility to compare earnings outcomes among job migrants, family migrants, and quality-of-life migrants by gender and family status. We further assess the impact of migration on couples' internal household economy. The effects of job-related moves that we find are reduced substantially in the fixed-effects models, indicating strong selection effects. Married women who moved for family reasons experience significant and substantial earnings declines. Consistent with conventional models of migration, we find that household earnings and income and gender specialization increase following job migration. Married women who are secondary earners have increased odds of reducing their labor supply following migration for job or family reasons. However, we also find that migrating women who contributed as equals to the household economy before the move are no more likely than nonmigrant women to exit work or to work part-time. Equal breadwinner status may protect women from becoming tied movers. PMID:22109084

  15. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  16. Committing to Your Work, Spouse, and Children: Implications for Work-Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Arla L.; Chamberlain, Trina C.

    2006-01-01

    When trying to balance work and family responsibilities, many workers experience conflict between these two roles. Although role commitment has been viewed both as contributing to and alleviating conflict, this relationship has not been fully tested. Using a sample of female nurses and police officers, we examined the direct and indirect…

  17. Interpersonal Relatedness and Psychological Functioning Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for Marital and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Esther H.; Blow, Adrian J.; Yan, Xie

    2012-01-01

    Recovery from a mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a challenging process for injured persons and their families. Guided by attachment theory, we investigated whether relationship conflict, social support, or sense of belonging were associated with psychological functioning. Community-dwelling persons with TBI (N = 75) and their…

  18. Parents' Experiences with Childhood Deafness: Implications for Family-Centered Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Traub, Randi J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the need for family-centered follow-up, this study examined parents' experiences with deafness after early identification. Qualitative inquiry methods were used to explore and describe the perceptions and experiences of nine parents of children identified with severe to profound deafness. Parents participated in face-to-face…

  19. Developmental Differences in Parent-Child Interpretations of Family Communication Patterns: Implications for Mass Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Erica Weintraub

    A study examined parent-child differences in the Family Communication Patterns (FCP) model using the FCP's socio- and concept orientation measures extended to include measures of structure of control and involvement with the expectation that developmental differences in interpretation by parents and children will be demonstrated via differing…

  20. The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993: An Overview and Implications for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Albert S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) applies new federally mandated employee leave provisions to institutions. Schools must formulate leave policies, communicate them to all staff, and document all FMLA-related actions. Offers a guide to planning and implementing FMLA leave. (MLF)

  1. African American Factors for Student Success: Implications for Families and Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, Michael K.; Moore, James L., III

    2002-01-01

    Many students who navigate the terrain of higher education often seek support during their journeys through college. The purpose of this article is to examine the different kinds of support African American students receive from family during the college years. After doing a comprehensive review of the literature on word combinations such as…

  2. The Dynamics of Families Who Are Homeless: Implications for Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    Family homelessness has emerged as a serious global problem (Stronge, 2000). Over the past 25 years in the United States, the makeup of the homeless population has changed significantly. As De Angelis (1994) reports: The landscape of homelessness has changed since the early 1980s, when nearly all homeless people were men. Today,…

  3. Marriage Opportunities and Family Formation: Further Implications of Imbalanced Sex Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.; Lloyd, Kim M.

    1992-01-01

    Used vital statistics data and census data to examine impact of women's marriage opportunities on family formation and dissolution. Linked measures of quantity/quality of potential spouses specific for woman's age, race, education, and area of residence to marriage, divorce, and nonmarital fertility rates. Greater marriage opportunities appear to…

  4. Cytokine expression in muscle following traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Wesley M.; Aragon, Amber B.; Onodera, Jun; Koehler, Steven M.; Ji, Youngmi; Bulken-Hoover, Jamie D.; Vogler, Jared A.; Tuan, Rocky S.; Nesti, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) occurs at a high frequency in severe orthopaedic extremity injuries; however, the etiology of traumatic HO is virtually unknown. Osteogenic progenitor cells have previously been identified within traumatized muscle. Although the signaling mechanisms that lead to this dysregulated differentiation pathway have not been identified, it is assumed that inflammation and fibrosis, which contribute to an osteoinductive environment, are necessary for the development of HO. The hypothesis of this study was that cytokines related to chronic inflammation, fibrogenesis and osteogenesis become up-regulated following severe muscle trauma where HO forms. Classification of these cytokines by their differential expression relative to control muscle will provide guidance for further study of the mechanisms leading to HO. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed no significant up-regulation of cytokines typically associated with HO (e.g., BMP-4, as observed in the genetic form of heterotopic ossification, Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Instead, the cytokine gene expression profile associated with the traumatized muscle included up-regulation of cytokines associated with osteogenesis and fibrosis (i.e., BMP-1 and TGF-beta1). Using immunohistochemistry, these cytokines were localized to fibroproliferative lesions, which have previously been implicated in HO. This study identifies other cell and tissue-level interactions in traumatized muscle that should be investigated further to better define the etiology of HO. PMID:21452302

  5. [The relation between the nursing team and patient's family: implications for care].

    PubMed

    Squassante, Nilcéia Dadalto; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2009-01-01

    Study of qualitative nature, developed along with the nursing team and the accompanying relatives of interned customers in a public hospital at Vitória/ES. The objectives were to describe the bases that sustain the relations among those subjects; to analyze the dynamics of this relation; and to discuss its implications for the nursing care. The theoretical reference was linked to the studies of power relations in the disciplined hospital environment and the care in a humanized perspective concept. The data collection was through a participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The results pointed out that those relations don't happen lineally. At same time that conflicting experiences emerge, there is another whose position of one and other subject reveals sensibility and solidarity that implicate directly in the delivered care to the hospitalized customer. PMID:19219348

  6. Familial adult onset hyperinsulinism due to an activating glucokinase mutation: Implications for pharmacological glucokinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Benjamin G.; Harris, Julie; Sleigh, Alison; Isaac, Iona; Orme, Steve M.; Seevaratnam, Nandini; Dhatariya, Ketan; Simpson, Helen L.; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucokinase (GCK) phosphorylates and thereby “traps” glucose in cells, thus serving as a gatekeeper for cellular glucose metabolism, particularly in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. In humans, activating GCK mutations cause familial hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (GCK-HH), leading to keen interest in the potential of small molecule glucokinase activators (GKAs) as treatments for diabetes mellitus. Many such agents have been developed, however observation of side effects including hypertriglyceridaemia and hepatic steatosis have delayed their clinical development. Objective To describe the clinical presentation and metabolic profiles of affected family members in a kindred with familial hyperinsulinism of adult presentation due to a known activating mutation in GCK. Design Clinical, biochemical and metabolic assessment, and GCK sequencing in affected family members. Results In the 60 year-old female proband, hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (blood glucose 2.1mmol/mol, insulin 18pmol/l) was confirmed following 34 hours of fasting, however abdominal computed tomography (CT), pancreatic MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, octreotide scintigraphy and selective arterial calcium stimulation failed to localise an insulinoma. A prolonged OGTT revealed fasting hypoglycaemia that was exacerbated after glucose challenge, consistent with dysregulated glucose-stimulated insulin release. A heterozygous activating mutation, p.Val389Leu, in the glucokinase gene (GCK) was found in the proband and four other family members. Of these, two had been investigated elsewhere for recurrent hypoglycaemia in adulthood, while the other two adult relatives were asymptomatic despite profound hypoglycaemia. All three of the available family members with the p.Val389Leu mutation had normal serum lipid profiles, normal rates of fasting hepatic de novo lipogenesis and had hepatic triglyceride levels commensurate with their degree of adiposity. Conclusion Activating GCK mutations may

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of Th1 and Th2 cytokines of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Konnai, S; Okagawa, T; Githaka, N W; Kariuki, E; Gakuya, F; Kanduma, E; Shirai, T; Ikebuchi, R; Ikenaka, Y; Ishizuka, M; Murata, S; Ohashi, K

    2012-04-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) has been implicated as the reservoir of several bovine infectious agents. However, there is insufficient information on the protective immune responses in the African buffalo, particularly in infected animals. In this study, we analysed Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ, and Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. The cloned cDNA of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ contained an open reading frame of 468, 501, 408 and 540 nucleotides, encoding polypeptides of 155, 166, 135 and 179 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide sequence homology of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-4 was more than 98% between the African buffalo and cattle, which resulted in identical polypeptides. Meanwhile, IL-10 gene of African buffalo and cattle had 95% homology in nucleotide sequence, corresponding to thirteen amino acid residues substitution. Cysteine residues and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the family Bovinae. Phylogenetic analyses including cytokines of the African buffalo placed them within a cluster comprised mainly of species belonging to the order Artiodactyla, including cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goat, pig and artiodactyl wildlife. A deeper understanding of the structure of these cytokines will shed light on their protective role in the disease-resistant African buffalo in comparison with other closely related species.

  8. Georges Brohee Prize 1996. Major cytochrome P-450 families: implications in health and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Horsmans, Y

    1997-01-01

    Cytochromes P-450 are a superfamily of hemoproteins which represent the main pathway for drug and chemical oxidation. This superfamily is divided into families, subfamilies and/or single enzymes. The majority of P-450s involved in drug metabolism appear to belong to three distinct families termed CYP1, CYP2 and CYP3. Numerous invasive and non-invasive methodologies have been developed to study these enzymes. Their activities are modulated by genetic and nongenetic factors as well as pathological conditions. In this work, the significance of genetic and nongenetic control of P-450s activities in normal subjects is described. Thereafter, the impact of P-450s on the apparition of liver diseases and the effects of liver disease on P-450s activities is emphasized. In conclusion, future perspectives on this field are presented.

  9. Dominant and marginalized discourses in interracial couples' narratives: implications for family therapists.

    PubMed

    Killian, Kyle D

    2002-01-01

    This study explores inter-racial couples' family histories, their experiences of their life together, and the dominant and subordinate discourses employed in negotiating racial and ethnic differences. Ten black-white couples were interviewed individually and conjointly. Dominant discourses that emerged from the couples' narratives included those of homogamy, hypersensitivity of persons of color, and the insignificance of familial and societal history. Interracial partners also simultaneously subverted these prevailing ideologies by voicing experience associated with life at the margins of the society. Dominant and subordinate dicourses used by therapists and interracial couples in the therapy room are examined to integrate marginalized "truths" crucial to effective work with interracial couples and persons of color.

  10. An extinct Eocene taxon of the daisy family (Asteraceae): evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical implications

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Viviana D.; Palazzesi, Luis; Katinas, Liliana; Crisci, Jorge V.; Tellería, María C.; Bremer, Kåre; Passala, Mauro G.; Bechis, Florencia; Corsolini, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Morphological, molecular and biogeographical information bearing on early evolution of the sunflower alliance of families suggests that the clade containing the extant daisy family (Asteraceae) differentiated in South America during the Eocene, although palaeontological studies on this continent failed to reveal conclusive support for this hypothesis. Here we describe in detail Raiguenrayun cura gen. & sp. nov., an exceptionally well preserved capitulescence of Asteraceae recovered from Eocene deposits of northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. Methods The fossil was collected from the 47·5 million-year-old Huitrera Formation at the Estancia Don Hipólito locality, Río Negro Province, Argentina. Key Results The arrangement of the capitula in a cymose capitulescence, the many-flowered capitula with multiseriate–imbricate involucral bracts and the pappus-like structures indicate a close morphological relationship with Asteraceae. Raiguenrayun cura and the associated pollen Mutisiapollis telleriae do not match exactly any living member of the family, and clearly represent extinct taxa. They share a mosaic of morphological features today recognized in taxa phylogenetically close to the root of Asteraceae, such as Stifftieae, Wunderlichioideae and Gochnatieae (Mutisioideae sensu lato) and Dicomeae and Oldenburgieae (Carduoideae), today endemic to or mainly distributed in South America and Africa, respectively. Conclusions This is the first fossil genus of Asteraceae based on an outstandingly preserved capitulescence that might represent the ancestor of Mutisioideae–Carduoideae. It might have evolved in southern South America some time during the early Palaeogene and subsequently entered Africa, before the biogeographical isolation of these continents became much more pronounced. The new fossil represents the first reliable point for calibration, favouring an earlier date to the split between Barnadesioideae and the rest of Asteraceae than previously

  11. Decreasing supply of family physicians and general practitioners. Serious implications for the future.

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, A. D.; Busing, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document a decrease in the supply of family physicians (FPs) and general practitioners among Canadian graduates of medical schools since rotating internships ceased to serve as a route to national licensure. DESIGN: Review of data from the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges, the Canadian Post-M.D. Education Registry, and the Canadian Institute for Health Information to track final training fields and eventual types of practice of graduates of Canadian faculties of medicine from 1987 to 1997. SETTING: Canadian faculties of medicine and residency training programs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of Canadian medical graduates entering family medicine training programs from 1991 to 1998, number of Canadian graduate physicians exiting from these training programs, and proportion of each graduating class (1987 to 1994) practising as FPs or GPs in Canada in 1997. RESULTS: In 1993, 890 physicians (51% of graduates) were trained as FPs or GPs. By 1994, although the proportion remained at 40%, the number of Canadian graduates entering family medicine had dropped to 646, and by 1998, to 619. CONCLUSIONS: A deficit of FPs is already noticeable in the practice environment. For the way in which medical care is delivered in Canada, with FPs serving as first contact for patients, the authors conclude that the number of graduating FPs in Canada will not be sufficient to provide the primary care services Canadians need. PMID:10509220

  12. Implications of living with a strong family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Christine

    2009-06-01

    The findings presented here are from a qualitative study in which data were gathered from 20 women who had received inconclusive genetic testing results for inherited breast cancer susceptibility. Before describing the significance, for them, of their genetic test results, all of the participants related what it was like to live with a strong family history of breast cancer. The focus of this article is the women's experience of living with a personal and strong family history of breast cancer. For these women, having such a history had become a fact of life that could not be ignored.Three themes were identified in the data: expecting and dealing with a diagnosis of breast cancer protecting oneself and others, and increasing exposure to cancer screening procedures. These themes address the underlying reality that having a personal and family history of breast cancer is not an isolated situation but part of one's journey in choosing to undergo genetic testing for inherited breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:19650516

  13. Availability of caregiver support services: implications for implementation of the National Family Caregiver Support Program.

    PubMed

    Whittier, Stephanie; Scharlach, Andrew E; Dal Santo, Teresa S

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the scope and range of existing resources for family caregivers from the perspective of the Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs), which are charged with implementing Title III-E of the reauthorized Older Americans Act. California is used as a case example because of its substantial experience in providing caregiver support services. In particular, we examine the extent and adequacy of resources available in California corresponding to each of the five Title III-E service areas, utilizing data from AAAArea Plans, a follow-up survey of AAAs, and an Internet search. AAAs identified more than 276 providers of caregiver support services, and our Internet search identified another 195. Nearly two-thirds of these programs offer access to respite care, while other support services (e.g., counseling, training, support groups) are less often available. Service gaps most frequently identified included culturally and linguistically appropriate caregiver services, transportation, respite care, financial assistance, and services in rural areas. These findings suggest the need for enhanced efforts to improve the service network for supporting family caregivers, as states implement the National Family Caregiver Support Program.

  14. Implications of conflicting definitions of probability to health risk communication: a case study of familial cancer and genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Kieran C

    2007-02-01

    The question of what probability actually is has long been debated in philosophy and statistics. Although the concept of probability is fundamental to many applications in the health sciences, these debates are generally not well known to health professionals. This paper begins with an outline of some of the different interpretations of probability. Examples are provided of how each interpretation manifests in clinical practice. The discipline of genetic counselling (familial cancer) is used to ground the discussion. In the second part of the paper, some of the implications that different interpretations of probability may have in practice are examined. The main purpose of the paper is to draw attention to the fact that there is much contention as to the nature of the concept of probability. In practice, this creates the potential for ambiguity and confusion. This paper constitutes a call for deeper engagement with the ways in which probability and risk are understood in health research and practice.

  15. Research Review: The Role of Cytokines in Depression in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Natalie T.; Scott, James G.; Wray, Naomi R.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While cytokines have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression in adults, the potential role in younger age groups such as adolescents is less clear. This article therefore reviews the literature (a) to explore the relationship between cytokines and depression in adolescents, and (b) to examine how cytokines may be related…

  16. Autophagy and IL-1 Family Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Harris, James

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, including immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role to play in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. As a result, autophagy acts a key modulator of IL-1β and IL-18, as well as IL-1α, release. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing, and secretion of IL-1 and IL-18 and the consequences of this important function.

  17. Autophagy and IL-1 Family Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Harris, James

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, including immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role to play in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. As a result, autophagy acts a key modulator of IL-1β and IL-18, as well as IL-1α, release. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing, and secretion of IL-1 and IL-18 and the consequences of this important function. PMID:23577011

  18. [Rheumatoid arthritis and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shunta; Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Sumida, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    The cytokines are an important substance involved in the immune reaction and maintenance of homeostasis. An imbalance in the cytokine network may lead to inflammation and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone and systemic manifestations. The pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-17 induce the inflammation of the joints and destruction of bone and cartilage via activation of macrophages, fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS), helper T (Th) cells and osteoclasts. Recently, the available therapeutic agents that target these cytokines have excellent clinical effects in RA patients.

  19. [Immunostimulating drugs and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Lehners, Nicola; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Raab, Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Cytokines are essential regulators of hematopoesis and the immune system. Genetic engineering of recombinant cytokines has facilitated their implementation in many clinical areas. In the field of oncology the granulopoetic human growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF are of particular importance. They can be applied to prevent chemotherapy induced neutropenia. Furthermore, they allow for mobilization of hematopoetic stem cells in order to obtain peripheral blood stem cell transplants. Another class of cytokines, the interferons, possess immunomodulating, antiproliferative, and antiviral properties. While the significance of interferon alfa as an antitumor agent is dwindling, it still plays a very important role in the therapy of chronic hepatitis b and c. Interferon beta is successfully used to treat multiple sclerosis. Among the heterogenous group of interleukines in particular interleukin 2 has reached clinical practice as an immunostimulating agent in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Many other cytokines have yet to undergo clinical trials.

  20. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  1. Family nurse practitioner students utilization of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs): implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan; Raley, Dionne; Conway, Jia Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) are a readily accessible source of information to aid in the delivery of patient care. A pilot group of five Family Nurse Practitioner students used PDAs to organize data and access information relevant to patient care. Utilization of the PDAs in the clinical setting provided practice guidelines, textbook information and protocols that were readily accessible. The PDA made it possible for students to utilize preexisting knowledge with additional learning resources. The PDAs were purchased with funds provided from a United States Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant.

  2. Alternative Reproductive Technologies: Implications for Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (May 21, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    A hearing was held for the purpose of receiving testimony about alternative reproductive technologies and their implications for children, families, and society. Testimony provided: (1) a comparison of in vitro fertilization and gamete intrafallopian transfer, and trends in in vitro fertilization; (2) a summary of definitions, statistics, and the…

  3. All subtypes of the Pmp adhesin family are implicated in chlamydial virulence and show species-specific function.

    PubMed

    Becker, Elisabeth; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2014-08-01

    The bacterial pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and C. pneumoniae are obligate intracellular parasites, cause a number of serious diseases, and can infect various cell types in humans. Chlamydial infections are probably initiated by binding of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmcB to host cell glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we show that all nine members of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family of C. trachomatis mediate adhesion to human epithelial and endothelial cells. Importantly, exposure of infectious particles to soluble recombinant Pmps blocks subsequent infection, thus implicating an important function of the entire protein family in the infection process. Analogous experiments with pairs of recombinant Pmps or a combination of Pmp and OmcB revealed that all Pmps probably act in an adhesion pathway that is distinct from the OmcB-GAG pathway. Finally, we provide evidence that the Pmps of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae exhibit species and tissue specificity. These findings argue for the involvement of C. trachomatis Pmps in the initial phase of infection and suggest that they may interact with a receptor other than the epidermal growth factor receptor recently identified for their counterparts in C. pneumoniae.

  4. Identification of 11 pseudogenes in the DNA methyltransferase gene family in rodents and humans and implications for the functional loci.

    PubMed

    Lees-Murdock, Diane J; McLoughlin, Gerard A; McDaid, Jennifer R; Quinn, Lisa M; O'Doherty, Alan; Hiripi, László; Hack, Catherine J; Walsh, Colum P

    2004-07-01

    DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase genes are important for normal development in mice and humans. We describe here 11 pseudogenes spread among human, mouse, and rat belonging to this gene family, ranging from 1 pseudogene in humans to 7 in rat, all belonging to the Dnmt3 subfamily. All except 1 rat Dnmt3b pseudogene appear to be transcriptionally silent. Dnmt3a2, a transcript variant of Dnmt3a starting at an alternative promoter, had the highest number of processed pseudogenes, while none were found for the canonical Dnmt3a, suggesting the former transcript is more highly expressed in germ cells. Comparison of human, mouse, and rat Dnmt3a2 sequences also suggests that human exon 8 is a recent acquisition. Alignment of the 3'UTR of Dnmt3a2 among the functional genes and the processed pseudogenes suggested that a second polyadenylation site downstream of the RefSeq poly(A) was being used in mice, resulting in a longer 3'UTR, a finding confirmed by RT-PCR in mouse tissues. We also found conserved cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, usually implicated in regulating translation in oocytes, in Dnmt3b and Dnmt1. Expression of DNMT3B in the mouse oocyte was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. These results clarify the structure of a number of loci in the three species examined and provide some useful insights into the structure and evolution of this gene family.

  5. All subtypes of the Pmp adhesin family are implicated in chlamydial virulence and show species-specific function

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Elisabeth; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and C. pneumoniae are obligate intracellular parasites, cause a number of serious diseases, and can infect various cell types in humans. Chlamydial infections are probably initiated by binding of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmcB to host cell glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we show that all nine members of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family of C. trachomatis mediate adhesion to human epithelial and endothelial cells. Importantly, exposure of infectious particles to soluble recombinant Pmps blocks subsequent infection, thus implicating an important function of the entire protein family in the infection process. Analogous experiments with pairs of recombinant Pmps or a combination of Pmp and OmcB revealed that all Pmps probably act in an adhesion pathway that is distinct from the OmcB-GAG pathway. Finally, we provide evidence that the Pmps of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae exhibit species and tissue specificity. These findings argue for the involvement of C. trachomatis Pmps in the initial phase of infection and suggest that they may interact with a receptor other than the epidermal growth factor receptor recently identified for their counterparts in C. pneumoniae. PMID:24985494

  6. Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia maps to a 6p25 region implicated in primary congenital glaucoma and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T; Ebenezer, N; Manners, R; McGill, J; Bhattacharya, S

    1997-01-01

    Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia (FGI) is a form of open-angle glaucoma in which developmental anomalies of the iris and irido-corneal angle are associated with a juvenile-onset glaucoma transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A single large family with this disorder was examined for genetic linkage to microsatellite markers. A peak LOD score of 11.63 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained with marker D6S967 mapping to chromosome 6p25. Haplotype analysis places the disease gene in a 6.4-cM interval between the markers D6S1713 and D6S1600. Two novel clinical appearances extend the phenotypic range and provide evidence of variable expressivity. The chromosome 6p25 region is now implicated in FGI, primary congenital glaucoma, and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly. This may indicate the presence of a common causative gene or, alternatively, a cluster of genes involved in eye development/function. Images Figure 2 PMID:9382099

  7. Reproductive desires of men and women living with HIV: implications for family planning counselling.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Cornelia; Visser, Maretha J

    2015-09-01

    The reproductive desires of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) of low socioeconomic standing attending public health facilities in South Africa were studied. HIV-positive men, pregnant and non-pregnant women were recruited from two clinics at a large public hospital in Tshwane, South Africa. Individual interviews were used to explore the reproductive desires of HIV-positive participants. HIV counsellors' perceptions of their clients' reproductive desires were explored during focus group discussions. Parenthood proved to be an important factor to all participants in continuation of the family and establishing their gender identities, despite the possible risk of HIV transmission and community stigmatization. Different cultural procreation rules for men and women and stigmatizing attitudes towards PLHIV affected their reproductive decision making. Women had the dilemma of choosing which community expectations they wanted to fulfil. Community stigmatization towards PLHIV was visible in the negative attitudes of some HIV counsellors regarding HIV and procreation. Because the reproductive desires of PLHIV are currently not given high priority in HIV prevention and family planning in the public health sector in South Africa, the prevention of HIV transmission may be jeopardized. These results necessitate the integration of HIV and sexual and reproductive health counselling on a primary health care level.

  8. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa.

  9. Lifeboat versus corporate ethic: social and demographic implications of stem and joint families.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, M

    1999-07-01

    We contrast stem and joint family systems, to show how differences in norms of inheritance and residence profoundly influence our values and social constructs. They shape how people evaluate each other and patterns of conflict and cooperation within and between generations. Through this, they influence many fundamental aspects of social organization and behaviour. These influence health outcomes through categorizing people into those whose health is encouraged to prosper or to fail. It also influences a wide range of other outcomes, including strategies of household resource management; migration; ways of exploiting commercial opportunities and the operation of civil society. A number of hypotheses are developed about the nature of these interrelationships, some of which are substantiated empirically and others which can be tested.

  10. Happyhour, a Ste20 family kinase, implicates EGFR signaling in ethanol-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Corl, Ammon B; Berger, Karen H; Ophir-Shohat, Galit; Gesch, Julie; Simms, Jeffrey A; Bartlett, Selena E; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2009-05-29

    The consequences of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are devastating to individuals and society, yet few treatments are currently available. To identify genes regulating the behavioral effects of ethanol, we conducted a genetic screen in Drosophila and identified a mutant, happyhour (hppy), due to its increased resistance to the sedative effects of ethanol. Hppy protein shows strong homology to mammalian Ste20 family kinases of the GCK-1 subfamily. Genetic and biochemical experiments revealed that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-signaling pathway regulates ethanol sensitivity in Drosophila and that Hppy functions as an inhibitor of the pathway. Acute pharmacological inhibition of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in adult animals altered acute ethanol sensitivity in both flies and mice and reduced ethanol consumption in a preclinical rat model of alcoholism. Inhibitors of the EGFR or components of its signaling pathway are thus potential pharmacotherapies for AUDs.

  11. Urban adolescent mothers exposed to community, family, and partner violence: prevalence, outcomes, and welfare policy implications.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Angie C

    2006-01-01

    The federal welfare reforms of 1996 mandated that all minor adolescent mothers receiving cash assistance must attend school and live at home to receive their cash grant. Though this law has been in place for over 8 years, little research has been done that explores the barriers facing adolescent mothers who try to attend school and live at home. Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from welfare reform evaluation studies suggests that violence may be just such a barrier. This article reviews the recent empirical literature on urban adolescent mothers' exposure to multiple forms of violence. The author delineates and critiques the existing research on the prevalence of and outcomes linked with exposure to community violence, witnessed parental violence, physical abuse within the family, and partner violence among this population. The article concludes with recommendations for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in light of the reviewed findings.

  12. The "Stolen Generations" and Cultural Genocide: The Forced Removal of Australian Indigenous Children from Their Families and Its Implications for the Sociology of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Krieken, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Examined the development and outcomes of Australian government policy of forced child removal from Aboriginal families. Discusses policy antecedents, its surrounding philosophy and politics, and the emergence of a more critical understanding of this policy in recent years. Examines the general implications of this history for the sociology of…

  13. [Plant-Producers Of Recombinant Cytokines (Review)].

    PubMed

    Burlakovskii, M S; Yemel'yanov, V V; Lutova, L A

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are a family of signaling polypeptides involved in cell-cell interactions in the process of the immune response, as well as in the regulation of a number of normal physiological functions. Cytokines are used in medicine for the treatment of cancer, immune disorders, viral infections, and other socially significant diseases, but the extent of their use is limited by the high production cost of the active agent. The development of this area of pharmacology is associated with the success of genetic engineering, which allows the production of significant amounts of protein by transgenic organisms. The review discusses the latest advances in the production of various cytokines with the use of genetically modified plants. PMID:27266244

  14. Identification of Novel Inflammatory Cytokines and Contribution of Keratinocyte-Derived Chemokine to Inflammation in Response to Vibrio vulnificus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jian; Cao, Yuan; Hu, Cheng-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Currently, only tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin family cytokines have been found to be elicited in Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus)-infected animal models and humans. However, multiple other cytokines are also involved in the immune and inflammatory responses to foreign microorganism infection. Antibody array technology, unlike traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is able to detect multiple cytokines at one time. Therefore, in this study, we examined the proinflammatory cytokine profile in the serum and liver homogenate samples of bacterial-infected mice using antibody array technology. We identified nine novel cytokines in response to V. vulnificus infection in mice. We found that keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) was the most elevated cytokine and demonstrated that KC played a very important role in the V. vulnificus infection-elicited inflammatory response in mice, as evidenced by the fact that the blocking of KC by anti-KC antibody reduced hepatic injury in vivo and that KC induced by V. vulnificus infection in AML-12 cells chemoattracted neutrophils. Our findings implicate that KC may serve as a novel diagnostic biomarker and a possible therapeutic target for V. vulnificus infection.

  15. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27775650

  16. Expression of the SOCS family in human chronic wound tissues: Potential implications for SOCS in chronic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Sanders, Andrew J.; Ruge, Fiona; Morris, Ceri-Ann; Harding, Keith G.; Jiang, Wen G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines play important roles in the wound healing process through various signalling pathways. The JAK-STAT pathway is utilised by most cytokines for signal transduction and is regulated by a variety of molecules, including suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins. SOCS are associated with inflammatory diseases and have an impact on cytokines, growth factors and key cell types involved in the wound-healing process. SOCS, a negative regulator of cytokine signalling, may hold the potential to regulate cytokine-induced signalling in the chronic wound-healing process. Wound edge tissues were collected from chronic venous leg ulcer patients and classified as non-healing and healing wounds. The expression pattern of seven SOCSs members, at the transcript and protein level, were examined in these tissues using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Significantly higher levels of SOCS3 (P=0.0284) and SOCS4 (P=0.0376) in non-healing chronic wounds compared to the healing/healed chronic wounds were observed at the transcript level. Relocalisation of SOCS3 protein in the non-healing wound environment was evident in the investigated chronic biopsies. Thus, the results show that the expression of SOCS transcript indicated that SOCS members may act as a prognostic biomarker of chronic wounds. PMID:27635428

  17. Intracellular localization of the BCL-2 family member BOK and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Echeverry, N; Bachmann, D; Ke, F; Strasser, A; Simon, H U; Kaufmann, T

    2013-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BOK is widely expressed and resembles the multi-BH domain proteins BAX and BAK based on its amino acid sequence. The genomic region encoding BOK was reported to be frequently deleted in human cancer and it has therefore been hypothesized that BOK functions as a tumor suppressor. However, little is known about the molecular functions of BOK. We show that enforced expression of BOK activates the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway in BAX/BAK-proficient cells but fails to kill cells lacking both BAX and BAK or sensitize them to cytotoxic insults. Interestingly, major portions of endogenous BOK are localized to and partially inserted into the membranes of the Golgi apparatus as well as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and associated membranes. The C-terminal transmembrane domain of BOK thereby constitutes a ‘tail-anchor' specific for targeting to the Golgi and ER. Overexpression of full-length BOK causes early fragmentation of ER and Golgi compartments. A role for BOK on the Golgi apparatus and the ER is supported by an abnormal response of Bok-deficient cells to the Golgi/ER stressor brefeldin A. Based on these results, we propose that major functions of BOK are exerted at the Golgi and ER membranes and that BOK induces apoptosis in a manner dependent on BAX and BAK. PMID:23429263

  18. The kindlin family: functions, signaling properties and implications for human disease.

    PubMed

    Rognoni, Emanuel; Ruppert, Raphael; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The kindlin (or fermitin) family of proteins comprises three members (kindlin-1,-2 and -3) of evolutionarily conserved focal adhesion (FA) proteins, whose best-known task is to increase integrin affinity for a ligand (also referred as integrin activation) through binding of β-integrin tails. The consequence of kindlin-mediated integrin activation and integrin-ligand binding is cell adhesion, spreading and migration, assembly of the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. Another hallmark of kindlins is their involvement in disease. Mutations in the KINDLIN-1 (also known as FERMT1) gene cause Kindler syndrome (KS)--in which mainly skin and intestine are affected, whereas mutations in the KINDLIN-3 (also known as FERMT3) gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III (LAD III), which is characterized by impaired extravasation of blood effector cells and severe, spontaneous bleedings. Also, aberrant expression of kindlins in various forms of cancer and in tissue fibrosis has been reported. Although the malfunctioning of integrins represent a major cause leading to kindlin-associated diseases, increasing evidence also point to integrin-independent functions of kindlins that play an important role in the pathogenesis of certain disease aspects. Furthermore, isoform-specific kindlin functions have been discovered, explaining, for example, why loss of kindlins differentially affects tissue stem cell homeostasis or tumor development. This Commentary focuses on new and isoform-specific kindlin functions in different tissues and discusses their potential role in disease development and progression.

  19. Structural insights into glycoside hydrolase family 32 and 68 enzymes: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Willem; Le Roy, Katrien; Schroeven, Lindsey; Van Laere, André; Rabijns, Anja; Van den Ende, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GH) have been shown to play unique roles in various biological processes like the biosynthesis of glycans, cell wall metabolism, plant defence, signalling, and the mobilization of storage reserves. To date, GH are divided into more than 100 families based upon their overall structure. GH32 and GH68 are combined in clan GH-J, not only harbouring typical hydrolases but also non-Leloir type transferases (fructosyltransferases), involved in fructan biosynthesis. This review summarizes the recent structure-function research progress on plant GH32 enzymes, and highlights the similarities and differences compared with the microbial GH32 and GH68 enzymes. A profound analysis of ligand-bound structures and site-directed mutagenesis experiments identified key residues in substrate (or inhibitor) binding and recognition. In particular, sucrose can bind as inhibitor in Cichorium intybus 1-FEH IIa, whereas it binds as substrate in Bacillus subtilis levansucrase and Arabidopsis thaliana cell wall invertase (AtcwINV1). In plant GH32, a single residue, the equivalent of Asp239 in AtcwINV1, appears to be important for sucrose stabilization in the active site and essential in determining sucrose donor specificity.

  20. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg(2+) bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites. PMID:27322068

  1. Jerusalem of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Levi, B Z; Sica, A; Müller-Newen, G; Takahashi, N; Vandenbeele, P; Fish, E

    1999-06-01

    The Second Joint Meeting of the International Cytokine Society and the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research was held on October 25-30, 1998 in Jerusalem, Israel. The nature of this Joint Meeting dictated that it was intensive and covered topics that included receptor-ligand interactions, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, antiviral action and apoptotic pathways induced by cytokines such as interferons, interleukines and chemokines. Their roles in infectious diseases and cancers were considered. This overview is by no mean comprehensive and covers only part of the many topics and subjects that were presented in the many plenary talks, symposia and poster sessions. The meeting was held in an excellent scientific atmosphere, that was probably affected by the "divine presence" in Jerusalem, and special thanks for the excellent organization are owed to Drs. Kaempfer, Revel, Wallach and Witz.

  2. Microeconomic loans and health education to families in impoverished communities: implications for the HIV pandemic.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Renslow D; Bronson, John D; Teter, Caroline J; Wykoff, Randolph F

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is among the root causes of death and poor health worldwide. Project HOPE's Village Health Bank (VHB) program is a public health intervention that combines integrated microcredit lending and health education. Groups of 18 to 25 women receive small loans, and biweekly, one-hour health education sessions. Since 1993, about 50,000 women in 949 VHBs have participated in seven countries in the Americas, Africa, and Southeast Asia, receiving more than US$25 million in loans and 8,445 hours of health education. Members of VHBs are charged modest interest rates that enable them to become self-sufficient (eg, able to cover all operating charges, including the costs of the health education staff, and the necessary loan capital to continue without infusion of outside resources). The VHB program produces substantial economic improvements for individuals and groups, and benefits in health knowledge and behaviors, including increased utilization of healthcare services. Data from Guatemala, Malawi, and Thailand demonstrate that VHBs in countries with high HIV prevalence have been comparably successful in spite of the enormous added burdens of chronic illness, deaths, and orphans in need of support. For example, in 2004, 48 percent of 266 VHB members in Malawi experienced at least one death in their household in the preceding year, and 67 percent housed one or more orphans with an average of two orphans per household. Because of the unique combination of increased household economic stability and improved health knowledge, the VHB program is now being adapted to families of people affected by HIV/AIDS, including orphans.

  3. Yersinia enterocolitica Invasin Protein Triggers Differential Production of Interleukin-1, Interleukin-8, Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Epithelial Cells: Implications for Understanding the Early Cytokine Network in Yersinia Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Daniel; Schulte, Ralf; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica infection of epithelial cells results in interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. Herein we demonstrate that besides IL-8, increased mRNA levels of five other cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), can be detected upon infection of HeLa cells with Yersinia. Yersinia-triggered cytokine production was not affected by blocking phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase with wortmannin, which inhibited bacterial invasion. Comparable cytokine mRNA responses were triggered by Escherichia coli expressing Yersinia inv, while no response was triggered by an inv-deficient Yersinia mutant. Moreover, cytokine responses were independent from metabolic activity of the bacteria, as killed bacterial cells were sufficient for triggering cytokine responses in HeLa cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis was used to assess the kinetics of cytokine mRNA expression in infected HeLa cells. IL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, MCP-1, GM-CSF, and TNF-α mRNA expression increased within 1 h postinfection, reached a maximum after 3 to 4 h, and then declined to preinfection levels within 3 h. IL-8, MCP-1, and GM-CSF were secreted by HeLa cells, whereas IL-1α and IL-1β were not secreted and thus were found exclusively intracellularly. TNF-α protein could not be detected in cell lysates or supernatants. Stimulation of HeLa cells with IL-1α was followed by increased IL-8 mRNA expression, whereas stimulation with IL-8 did not induce cytokine production. Likewise, MCP-1 and GM-CSF did not induce significant cytokine responses in HeLa cells. Our results implicate that the initial host response to Yersinia infection might be sustained by IL-8, MCP-1, and GM-CSF produced by epithelial cells. PMID:10768935

  4. The complement of family M1 aminopeptidases of Haemonchus contortus--Biotechnological implications.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Hall, Ross S; Hu, Min; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Although substantial research has been focused on the 'hidden antigen' H11 of Haemonchus contortus as a vaccine against haemonchosis in small ruminants, little is know about this and related aminopeptidases. In the present article, we reviewed genomic and transcriptomic data sets to define, for the first time, the complement of aminopeptidases (designated Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-13) of the family M1 with homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterised by zinc-binding (HEXXH) and exo-peptidase (GAMEN) motifs. The three previously published H11 isoforms (accession nos. X94187, FJ481146 and AJ249941) had most sequence similarity to Hc-AP-2 and Hc-AP-8, whereas unpublished isoforms (accession nos. AJ249942 and AJ311316) were both most similar to Hc-AP-3. The aminopeptidases characterised here had homologues in C. elegans. Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 were most similar in amino acid sequence (28-41%) to C. elegans T07F10.1; Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 to C. elegans PAM-1 (isoform b) (53-54% similar); Hc-AP-11 and Hc-AP-12 to C. elegans AC3.5 and Y67D8C.9 (26% and 50% similar, respectively); and Hc-AP-13 to C. elegans C42C1.11 and ZC416.6 (50-58% similar). Comparative analysis suggested that Hc-AP-1 to Hc-AP-8 play roles in digestion, metabolite excretion, neuropeptide processing and/or osmotic regulation, with Hc-AP-4 and Hc-AP-7 having male-specific functional roles. The analysis also indicated that Hc-AP-9 and Hc-AP-10 might be involved in the degradation of cyclin (B3) and required to complete meiosis. Hc-AP-11 represents a leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase, predicted to have metallopeptidase and zinc ion binding activity, whereas Hc-AP-12 likely encodes an aminopeptidase Q homologue also with these activities and a possible role in gonad function. Finally, Hc-AP-13 is predicted to encode an aminopeptidase AP-1 homologue of C. elegans with hydrolase activity, suggested to operate, possibly synergistically with a PEPT-1 ortholog, as an oligopeptide transporter in the gut for protein uptake

  5. Parent and child fluency in a common language: implications for the parent-child relationship and later academic success in Mexican American families.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Thomas; Beaumont, Kelly; Widaman, Keith; Jochem, Rachel; Robins, Richard; Conger, Rand

    2012-12-01

    The current study tested elements of the theoretical model of Portes and Rumbaut (1996), which proposes that parent-child differences in English fluency in immigrant families affect various family processes that, in turn, relate to changes in academic success. The current study of 674 Mexican- origin families provided support for the model in that parent-child fluency in a common language was associated with several dimensions of the parent-child relationship, including communication, role reversal, and conflict. In turn, these family processes predicted child academic performance, school problems, and academic aspirations and expectations. The current findings extend the Portes and Rumbaut (1996) model, however, inasmuch as joint fluency in either English or Spanish was associated with better parent-child relationships. The findings have implications for educational and human service issues involving Mexican Americans and other immigrant groups. PMID:23244454

  6. Cytokines as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease: a multiplex approach.

    PubMed

    Litteljohn, Darcy; Hayley, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines, which are immunological messengers facilitating both intra- and inter-system communication, are considered central players in the neuroinflammatory cascades associated with the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurological disorders. They have also been implicated in depression and other cognitive (e.g., memory impairment, dementia) and affective disturbances (e.g., anxiety) that show high co-morbidity with neurodegenerative diseases. As such, cytokines may hold great promise as serological biomarkers in PD, with potential applications ranging from early diagnosis and disease staging, to prognosis, drug discovery, and tracking the response to treatment. Subclassification or risk stratification in PD could be based (among other things) on reliably determined cytokine panel profiles or "signatures" of particular co-morbid disease states or at-risk groups (e.g., PD alone, PD with depression and/or dementia). Researchers and clinicians seeking to describe cytokine variations in health vs. disease will benefit greatly from technologies that allow a high degree of multiplexing and thus permit the simultaneous determination of a large roster of cytokines in single small-volume samples. The need for such highly paralleled assays is underscored by the fact that cytokines do not act in isolation but rather against a backdrop of complementary and antagonistic cytokine effects; ascribing valence to the actions of any one cytokine thus requires specific knowledge about the larger cytokine milieu. This chapter provides a technological overview of the major cytokine multiplex assay platforms before discussing the implications of such tools for biomarker discovery and related applications in PD and its depressive and cognitive co-morbidities.

  7. Longitudinal tracking of cytokines after acute exposure to tuberculosis: association of distinct cytokine patterns with protection and disease development.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rabia; Talat, Najeeha; Shahid, Firdaus; Dawood, Ghaffar

    2007-12-01

    Household contacts (HCs) of patients with tuberculosis (TB) are at higher risk of infection as well as the development of active disease. Longitudinal tracking of antigen-specific cytokines after acute exposure may significantly advance our understanding of the dynamic changes in cytokine patterns associated with disease establishment. To achieve this objective, we carried out a prospective cohort study with healthy HCs after exposure to TB. The patterns of cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-gamma] and interleukin 10 [IL-10]) in response to mycobacterial antigens (culture filtrate [CF] proteins) and nonspecific mitogens (phytohemagglutinin [PHA] and lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months after exposure. Seven of 109 (6.4%) HCs developed active disease. Six of the seven individuals were females, and active disease developed between 12 and 15 months after exposure in 5/20 families. The most significant findings were the exponential increases ( approximately 1,000-fold) in both the CF protein- and the PHA- or LPS-induced IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio in healthy HCs (n = 26), which peaked at 12 months, compared to the levels in HCs who developed disease (n = 7), in whom relatively flat responses were observed during the 24-month period. Linear trends for 0 to 12 and 0 to 24 months for the CF protein-induced IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio showed significant differences between the two groups, as determined by the use of the Mantel extension test for chi(2) analysis (odds ratio = 0.45; 95% confidence interval = 0.295 to 0.685; P = 0.0002). Our results strongly suggest that the magnitude of the IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio at 12 months after exposure may be a critical determinant in the resolution of infection. These studies provide new insights into the cytokine responses associated with disease establishment or the resolution of infection after natural exposure to TB and have implications for TB control programs as well vaccine efficacy studies. PMID:17928427

  8. Transgenic models for cytokine-induced neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Iain L.; Hofer, Markus J.; Pagenstecher, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the idea that cytokines are important mediators of pathophysiologic processes within the central nervous system (CNS). Numerous studies have documented the increased production of various cytokines in the human CNS in a variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Deciphering cytokine actions in the intact CNS has important implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of these disorders. One approach to address this problem that has been used widely employs transgenic mice with CNS-targeted production of different cytokines. Transgenic production of cytokines in the CNS of mice allows not only for the investigation of complex cellular responses at a localized level in the intact brain, but also more closely recapitulates the expression of these mediators as found in disease states. As discussed in this review, the findings show that these transgenic animals exhibit wide-ranging structural and functional deficits that are linked to the development of distinct neuroinflammatory responses which are relatively specific for each cytokine. These cytokine-induced alterations often recapitulate those found in various human neurological disorders not only underscoring the relevance of these models but also reinforcing the clinicopathogenetic significance of cytokines in diseases of the CNS. PMID:19835956

  9. Autophagy and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Harris, James

    2011-11-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved homoeostatic mechanism for the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic constituents, including long-lived macromolecules, organelles and intracellular pathogens. Autophagosomes are formed in response to a number of environmental stimuli, including amino acid deprivation, but also by both host- and pathogen-derived molecules, including toll-like receptor ligands and cytokines. In particular, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6 and TGF-β have been shown to induce autophagy, while IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 are inhibitory. Moreover, autophagy can itself regulate the production and secretion of cytokines, including IL-1, IL-18, TNF-α, and Type I IFN. This review discusses the potentially pivotal roles of autophagy in the regulation of inflammation and the coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  10. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  11. Structural basis for receptor sharing and activation by interleukin-20 receptor-2 (IL-20R2) binding cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Naomi J.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Harris, Bethany D.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Walter, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 20 (IL-20) is a pleotropic IL-10 family cytokine that protects epithelial surfaces from pathogens. However, dysregulated IL-20 signaling is implicated in several human pathologies including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. IL-20, and related cytokines IL-19 and IL-24, designated IL-20 subfamily cytokines (IL-20SFCs), induce cellular responses through an IL-20R1/IL-20R2 (type I) receptor heterodimer, whereas IL-20 and IL-24 also signal through the IL-22R1/IL-20R2 (type II) receptor complex. The crystal structure of the IL-20/IL-20R1/IL-20R2 complex reveals how type I and II complexes discriminate cognate from noncognate ligands. The structure also defines how the receptor–cytokine interfaces are affinity tuned to allow distinct signaling through a receptor complex shared by three different ligands. Our results provide unique insights into the complexity of IL-20SFC signaling that may be critical in the design of mechanistic-based inhibitors of IL-20SFC–mediated inflammatory disease. PMID:22802649

  12. Perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers and their families: Implications for health, safety and social policy

    PubMed Central

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Spears, Chaya R.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, migrant farmworkers are a vulnerable group due to their low socioeconomic status, risk of occupational exposures and injury, lack of social mobility, lack of adequate access to health services and dependency on employer for provided housing. Previous reports have documented migrant farmworker housing conditions to be variable, but poor overall. This paper explores the perceptions of housing conditions among migrant farmworkers in rural North Carolina, as well as understanding potential impacts of their housing on health and safety. Methods This study used qualitative descriptive data and directed content analysis to analyze semi-structured interviews and photographs that were data elements of a larger community-based participatory research study designed to document housing quality and health among North Carolina farmworkers. Results Many of the study participants described poor housing conditions that were reflected in the photographic analysis of the houses and camps. Specific problems described by the participants include: exposure to pesticides, safety issues, pests, water supply and air quality, temperature and moisture. Conclusions This study describes migrant farmworkers’ perceptions of housing quality and numerous potential impacts on health and safety. Research, social policy and practice-based implications derived from this research could serve to improve the health status of these individuals and their families. This study suggests there is much room for sustained advocacy and action, given that many of the farmworkers’ descriptions and photographs depicted housing conditions below accepted standards of living. Access to adequate and safe employer-provided housing for migrant farmworkers should be considered a basic human right. PMID:25682066

  13. Brain iron accumulation affects myelin-related molecular systems implicated in a rare neurogenetic disease family with neuropsychiatric features

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, M; Johnstone, D M; Bassett, B; Graham, R M; Chua, A C G; House, M J; Collingwood, J F; Bettencourt, C; Houlden, H; Ryten, M; Olynyk, J K; Trinder, D; Milward, E A

    2016-01-01

    The ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation' (NBIA) disease family entails movement or cognitive impairment, often with psychiatric features. To understand how iron loading affects the brain, we studied mice with disruption of two iron regulatory genes, hemochromatosis (Hfe) and transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2). Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy demonstrated increased iron in the Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain (P=0.002, n ≥5/group), primarily localized by Perls' staining to myelinated structures. Western immunoblotting showed increases of the iron storage protein ferritin light polypeptide and microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed decreased transcript levels (P<0.04, n ≥5/group) for five other NBIA genes, phospholipase A2 group VI, fatty acid 2-hydroxylase, ceruloplasmin, chromosome 19 open reading frame 12 and ATPase type 13A2. Apart from the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin, all are involved in myelin homeostasis; 16 other myelin-related genes also showed reduced expression (P<0.05), although gross myelin structure and integrity appear unaffected (P>0.05). Overlap (P<0.0001) of differentially expressed genes in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain with human gene co-expression networks suggests iron loading influences expression of NBIA-related and myelin-related genes co-expressed in normal human basal ganglia. There was overlap (P<0.0001) of genes differentially expressed in Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut brain and post-mortem NBIA basal ganglia. Hfe−/− × Tfr2mut mice were hyperactive (P<0.0112) without apparent cognitive impairment by IntelliCage testing (P>0.05). These results implicate myelin-related systems involved in NBIA neuropathogenesis in early responses to iron loading. This may contribute to behavioral symptoms in NBIA and hemochromatosis and is relevant to patients with abnormal iron status and psychiatric disorders involving myelin abnormalities or resistant to conventional treatments. PMID:26728570

  14. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to explore further the effects of space flight on cyotokines and cytokine-directed immunological function. Among the tests carried out are interferon-alpha production, interferon-gamma production, interleukin-1 and -2 production, signal transduction in neutrophils, signal transduction in monocytes, and monocyte phagocytic activity. The experiments will be performed using peripheral blood obtained from human subjects. It is our intent to eventually carry out these experiments using astronauts as subjects to determine the effects of space flight on cytokine production and activity. However, these subjects are not currently available. Until they become available, we will carry out these experiments using subjects maintained in the bed-rest model for microgravity.

  15. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  16. Cytokines and Other Mediators in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Papafragkaki, Dafni; Kontochristopoulos, George; Rallis, Eustathios; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia areata, a disease of the hair follicles with multifactorial etiology and a strong component of autoimmune origin, has been extensively studied as far as the role of several cytokines is concerned. So far, IFN-γ, interleukins, TNF-α, are cytokines that are well known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease, while several studies have shown that many more pathways exist. Among them, MIG, IP-10, BAFF, HLA antigens, MIG, as well as stress hormones are implicated in disease onset and activity. Within the scope of this paper, the authors attempt to shed light upon the complexity of alopecia areata underlying mechanisms and indicate pathways that may suggest future treatments. PMID:20300578

  17. The Black Family: A Source of Mental Health (Implications for Increased Ethnic and Cultural Awareness of Mental Health Professionals).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Mental health issues in the African-American community are discussed, focusing on the family structure as a source of support. The historical value of the African-American family, extended family, and other community-based supports are examined. Barriers to mental health and strategies for increasing ethnic and cultural awareness of mental health…

  18. An Analysis of Bronfenbrenner's Bio-Ecological Perspective for Early Childhood Educators: Implications for Working with Families Experiencing Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin James; Williams, Reginald D.

    2006-01-01

    Today's families face many stressors during the early childhood years. Particular stressors like homelessness, violence, and chemical dependence, play havoc with the family system. Urie Bronfenbrenner's bio-ecological perspective offers an insightful lens for understanding and supporting families under stress. This article presents the key…

  19. Induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and apoptosis in human chorion cells of fetal membranes by influenza virus infection: possible implications for maintenance and interruption of pregnancy during infection.

    PubMed

    Uchide, Noboru; Ohyama, Kunio; Bessho, Toshio; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2005-01-01

    Human fetal membranes are composed of amnion, chorion and decidua tissues, which play a critical role in defense barriers as well as maintenance of pregnancy and parturition. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, produced by the tissues are postulated to facilitate parturition. Influenza virus infection is one of causes of pregnancy-associated complications, such as premature delivery, abortion and stillbirth. Recent studies have demonstrated that influenza virus infection induced the gene expression of a set of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, interferon (IFN)-beta, IFN-gamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and the secretion of unidentified monocyte differentiation-inducing factor(s) from primary cultured chorion cells undergoing apoptosis. These phenomena were not observed in primary cultured amnion cells infected with the virus. This article reviews, (1) the production of cytokines in fetal membrane tissues and their functions; (2) the differential induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and apoptosis in fetal membrane chorion and amnion cells by influenza virus infection. An accumulating number of evidence suggests that interactive reactions between fetal membrane chorion cells and maternal monocytes/macrophages may play a critical role in defense barriers against the virus infection. Understanding the interactions would make important contributions to the elucidation of the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection during pregnancy. PMID:15614205

  20. Interferons lambda, new cytokines with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Lopušná, K; Režuchová, I; Betáková, T; Skovranová, L; Tomašková, J; Lukáčiková, L; Kabát, P

    2013-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines in the establishment of a multifaceted antiviral response. Three distinct types of IFNs are now recognized (type I, type II, and type III) based on their receptor usage, structural features and biological activities. Although all IFNs are important mediators of antiviral protection, their roles in antiviral defence vary. Interferon lambda (IFN-λ) is a recently discovered group of small helical cytokines capable of inducing an antiviral response both in vitro as well as in vivo. They were discovered independently in 2003 by the groups of Sheppard and Kotenko. This family consists of three structurally related IFN-λ subtypes called IFN-λ1 (IL-29), IFN-λ2 (IL-28A), and IFN-λ3 (IL-28B). In this study we investigate the antiviral activities of IFN-λ1, λ2, and λ3 on some medically important viruses, influenza viruses, herpes viruses and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. PMID:23600875

  1. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Cytokine and postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2010-10-01

    Bone resorption is regulated by various cytokines. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, bone loss due to estrogen deficiency is closely related to the production of bone-resorbing cytokine. Especially, the increased production of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α could induce the expression of RANKL in bone tissues to enhance osteoclastogenesis. Relationship between estrogen deficiency and various cytokines is important to clarify the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  2. Oxidative stress impairs multiple regulatory events to drive persistent cytokine-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ivan H W; Yeap, Yvonne Y C; Ong, Lynette S R; Jans, David A; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2014-03-01

    Although cytokine-driven STAT3 phosphorylation and activation are often transient, persistent activation of STAT3 is a hallmark of a range of pathologies and underpins altered transcriptional responses. As triggers in disease frequently include combined increases in inflammatory cytokine and reactive oxygen species levels, we report here how oxidative stress impacts on cytokine-driven STAT3 signal transduction events. In the model system of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), combined treatment with the interleukin-6 family cytokine Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) drove persistent STAT3 phosphorylation whereas STAT3 phosphorylation increased only transiently in response to LIF alone and was not increased by H2O2 alone. Surprisingly, increases in transcript levels of the direct STAT3 gene target SOCS3 were delayed during the combined LIF + H2O2 treatment, leading us to probe the impact of oxidative stress on STAT3 regulatory events. Indeed, LIF + H2O2 prolonged JAK activation, delayed STAT3 nuclear localisation, and caused relocalisation of nuclear STAT3 phosphatase TC-PTP (TC45) to the cytoplasm. In exploring the nuclear import/ export pathways, we observed disruption of nuclear/cytoplasmic distributions of Ran and importin-alpha3 in cells exposed to H2O2 and the resultant reduced nuclear trafficking of Classical importin-alpha/3-dependent protein cargoes. CRM1-mediated nuclear export persisted despite the oxidative stress insult, with sustained STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation enhancing STAT3 nuclear residency. Our studies thus reveal for the first time the striking impact of oxidative stress to sustain STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear retention following disruption of multiple regulatory events, with significant implications for STAT3 function.

  3. State of volatiles in Jupiter Family Comets, and implications for outgassing and measurements by the MIRO instrument onboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.; von Allmen, P. A.; Gulkis, S.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Kamp, L.; Keihm, S.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Comets are remnants of the early solar system formation, with a volatile content expected to represent that of the solar nebula at the location where they formed. Jupiter Family Comets, including the target of the Rosetta mission 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, may have either formed close to their current location in standard solar system formation models, or originate from the Kuiper Belt according to the "Nice" model. On top of these two potential formation locations, a large uncertainty on their composition in volatiles comes from the poor understanding of the state of volatiles in the solar nebula: pure condensates may have formed if the conditions were cold enough, and/or volatiles may have been trapped (with various efficiency) in voids of amorphous ice, and/or clathrate hydrates may have formed by interaction of the nebular gas with crystalline ice. Each of these states implies different starting composition and evolutionary paths, as the properties of these icy materials vary widely. In particular, the phase behavior and the thermophysical properties of these icy materials will affect both the thermal evolution of comets along their orbit and the composition of volatiles that are emitted. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is in its current orbit since 1959, and will in 2015 be followed by the Rosetta spacecraft during its 9th passage at its current perihelion, 1.3 a.u. from the Sun (to be compared to the previous 2.8-3.0 a.u. predicted perihelion). The MIRO instrument onboard the Rosetta orbiter will measure both the thermophysical properties of the nucleus (continuum channels) and the composition of volatiles emitted (spectroscopic channel, complementary to in-situ measurements), providing data that will help address the state of volatiles at depth and track the evolution through time of a fairly fresh comet. We will discuss the implications of the state of volatiles on the thermal properties of the nucleus and outgassing composition. This work has been

  4. Work in America: Implications for Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This hearing explored the value of work, and how changes in the economy and the composition of the work force have affected families. Witnesses (1) reported data on such topics as the kinds of jobs currently available, women's participation in the work force, unemployment, and labor force growth over the next decade; (2) argued that the economy is…

  5. Signaling of Cytokines is Important in Regulation of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines encompass a broad class of peptides that mediate signals in a broad range of physiological situations including inflammation, infection, and obesity. The cytokine receptor-associated tyrosine kinase, Jak2, is one of the most important proteins mediating cytokine signaling pathway activation. Recently, our group has demonstrated that Jak2 signaling in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron plays a critical role in fertility in males and females, implicating cytokine activation of the neuron in GnRH neuronal development and function. To date, the specific cytokine(s) essential for activating Jak2 during neuroendocrine development are not known. In this article, we review the evidence for the role of several class 1 cytokines in regulating GnRH neuronal development, GnRH secretion, and GnRH expression. PMID:22161498

  6. Cytokine disbalance in common human cancers.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran

    2011-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6, -4, and -8 levels have been elevated in most patients suffering from prostate, breast, or colon cancer. There is a large body of evidence suggesting that chronic inflammation is one of the etiologic factors in these tumors. IL-6 is a multifunctional cytokine which is known to influence proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in cancer. Its transcription factor STAT3 is known as an oncogene that is constitutively phosphorylated in these malignancies. However, IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation may result in growth arrest. IL-6 activation of androgen receptor in prostate cancer may yield either tumor cell proliferation or differentiation. Prolonged treatment with IL-6 results in generation of sublines which express a more malignant phenotype. Therapy options against IL-6 have been established and the antibody siltuximab has been applied in preclinical and clinical studies. Recently, investigations of the role of suppressors of cytokine signaling have been carried out. IL-4 and -8 are implicated in regulation of apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis in cancers associated with chronic inflammation. All cytokines mentioned above regulate cellular events in stem cells. These cells could not be targeted by most conventional cancer therapies. PMID:21167870

  7. Keratinocytes as targets for interleukin-10-related cytokines: a putative role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Katia; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Bernard, François-Xavier; Dagregorio, Guy; Guillet, Gérard; Nau, François; Morel, Franck

    2005-12-01

    Cytokines are key factors in the cross talk between the immune system and other systems including hepatic, nervous, cardiac and cutaneous systems, leading to an adaptive and integrated response of the organism to stress. They are also involved in the regulation of many processes, including hematopoiesis, the immune response and inflammation. IL-10 is one of the most important anti-inflammatory cytokines. Five cytokines structurally related to IL-10 have been described and presently form this family of cytokines: IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24 and IL-26. In contrast to IL-10, these cytokines display pro-inflammatory activities in different tissues, including skin. Indeed, some of them induce an inflammatory keratinocyte gene expression profile and an epidermis histology resembling psoriatic lesions. In this review, we discuss recent knowledge about the effects of cytokines of the IL-10 family on keratinocytes and their potential role in psoriasis, a cutaneous inflammatory disease.

  8. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies.

  9. Social support and barriers to family involvement in caregiving for persons with AIDS: implications for patient education.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Y; Rapkin, B D

    1996-01-01

    If efforts to promote family involvement in patient education and other caregiving activities for people with AIDS (PWAs) are to be successful, clinicians need information concerning PWAs' family network and the barriers PWAs face in obtaining support. Using data from interviews with 224 PWAs in New York City, we assessed the size and composition of their family network and the self-identified barriers to support. Overall, respondents mentioned having an average of less than two sources of close support. Women relied on children for support more than men did. Male injection drug users and men reporting sex with men relied on friends and traditional family almost equally, while men at risk for HIV via heterosexual contact relied more on traditional family sources. Barriers to support included interpersonal costs, lack of access, lack of acceptance, lack of intimacy, negative interactions and fear of disclosure. Health professionals need to conduct comprehensive network assessments with PWAs in order to determine the full scope of support resources available to each patient. Educational initiatives that provide information about family conflict resolution and the course and transmission of HIV may assist in alleviating these barriers. Clinicians can facilitate family involvement in patient education by addressing the informational needs that are salient to both PWAs' and their family caregivers. PMID:8788752

  10. The Within-Year Concentration of Medical Care: Implications for Family Out-of-Pocket Expenditure Burdens

    PubMed Central

    Selden, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the within-year concentration of family health care and the resulting exposure of families to short periods of high expenditure burdens. Data Source Household data from the pooled 2003 and 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) yielding nationally representative estimates for the nonelderly civilian noninstitutionalized population. Study Design The paper examines the within-year concentration of family medical care use and the frequency with which family out-of-pocket expenditures exceeded 20 percent of family income, computed at the annual, quarterly, and monthly levels. Principal Findings On average among families with medical care, 49 percent of all (charge-weighted) care occurred in a single month, and 63 percent occurred in a single quarter). Nationally, 27 percent of the study population experienced at least 1 month in which out-of-pocket expenditures exceeded 20 percent of income. Monthly 20 percent burden rates were highest among the poor, at 43 percent, and were close to or above 30 percent for all but the highest income group (families above four times the federal poverty line). Conclusions Within-year spikes in health care utilization can create financial pressures missed by conventional annual burden analyses. Within-year health-related financial pressures may be especially acute among lower-income families due to low asset holdings. PMID:19674431

  11. Understanding the Complexity of Child Sexual Abuse: A Review of the Literature with Implications for Family Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Sally V

    2006-01-01

    Working with families in which there have been incidences of child sexual abuse is one of the most challenging assignments for a family counselor. Beyond ethical and legal mandates for reporting such assaults, less is understood about the long-term effects on victims. After reviewing the literature on child sexual abuse and gender differences,…

  12. Families' Experiences in Different Homeless and Highly Mobile Settings: Implications for School and Community Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Family homelessness has been on the rise throughout the United States in recent years. As a result, more schools and communities than ever are challenged to serve students whose lives are touched by instability, uncertainty, and crisis. To date, there has been little inquiry into how families' particular places of homelessness might shape…

  13. A Qualitative Study of Intimate Partner Violence Universal Screening by Family Therapy Interns: Implications for Practice, Research, Training, and Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todahl, Jeffrey L.; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented--and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening--is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy…

  14. I Felt Like My Heart Was Staying behind: Psychological Implications of Family Separations & Reunifications for Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Carola; Bang, Hee Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Though many transnational families undergo profound transformations that are often complicated by extended periods of separation between loved ones, it is challenging to establish a sense of prevalence of family separations as well as their effects on youth. Utilizing the Longitudinal Immigrant Student Adaptation data with 282 newcomer adolescents…

  15. Adolescents' Views on Families as Metaphors in Hong Kong: Implications for Pre-Counselling Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Zenobia C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This interpretative study aims to offer metaphors that describe family meanings from the adolescent's perspective by encouraging them to give a metaphor with their own explanation on a self-administering essay form. This study has three objectives: to explore the family meanings as a metaphor from the Hong Kong adolescent's perspective;…

  16. Extension's Evolving Alignment of Programs Serving Families and Youth: Organizational Change and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Franz, Nancy K.; Rennekamp, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Extension is experiencing a trend toward closer alignment of its programs serving families and youth, notably Family and Consumer Sciences and 4-H Youth Development. Projects are more multidisciplinary and comprehensive than in the past, and, in many states, FCS and 4-HYD are also becoming more administratively integrated. Several reasons for this…

  17. State policy decisions in the 1990s with implications for the financial well-being of later-life families.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gretchen J

    2006-01-01

    This study explores trends and patterns in states' policy decisions affecting the economic well-being of later-life individuals and families in the United States in recent decades, focusing on the 1990s. Rules were selected from the areas of inheritance, estate taxes, homestead exemptions, Medicaid eligibility, estate recovery, and filial responsibility. Results indicate an increasing use of a broad definition of family, one implying that spouses, the nuclear family, extended kin, step-relations, and sometimes in-laws constitute an ongoing collective whose members share economic resources and risks over their lives and beyond. Despite this global trend, states varied in their rules addressing intrafamilial financial obligations and families' accountability to states. While some seemed interested in facilitating the conservation of familial resources, others seemed willing to minimize public assistance while coercing kin into accepting financial responsibility for one another. Research was suggested to answer questions raised by this study.

  18. Modulation of Cytokines in Cancer Patients by Intravenous Ascorbate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mikirova, Nina; Riordan, Neil; Casciari, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytokines play an important role in tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. There is evidence in the literature that high doses of ascorbate can reduce inflammatory cytokine levels in cancer patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment by intravenous vitamin C (IVC) on cytokines and tumor markers. Material/Methods With the availability of protein array kits allowing assessment of many cytokines in a single sample, we measured 174 cytokines and additional 54 proteins and tumor markers in 12 cancer patients before and after a series of IVC treatments. Results Presented results show for our 12 patients the effect of treatment resulted in normalization of many cytokine levels. Cytokines that were most consistently elevated prior to treatments included M-CSF-R, Leptin, EGF, FGF-6, TNF-α, β, TARC, MCP-1,4, MIP, IL-4, 10, IL-4, and TGF-β. Cytokine levels tended to decrease during the course of treatment. These include mitogens (EGF, Fit-3 ligand, HGF, IGF-1, IL-21R) and chemo-attractants (CTAC, Eotaxin, E-selectin, Lymphotactin, MIP-1, MCP-1, TARC, SDF-1), as well as inflammation and angiogenesis factors (FGF-6, IL-1β, TGF-1). Conclusions We are able to show that average z-scores for several inflammatory and angiogenesis promoting cytokines are positive, indicating that they are higher than averages for healthy controls, and that their levels decreased over the course of treatment. In addition, serum concentrations of tumor markers decreased during the time period of IVC treatment and there were reductions in cMyc and Ras, 2 proteins implicated in being upregulated in cancer. PMID:26724916

  19. Susceptibility of members of the family Legionellaceae to thermal stress: implications for heat eradication methods in water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, J E; Best, M G; Yu, V L

    1986-01-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of heat inactivation as an eradication method applicable to all members of the family Legionellaceae, we tested the heat resistance of 75 isolates which represented 19 members of this family of organisms. The ranges of thermal death times at 60, 70, and 80 degrees C were 1.3 to 10.6, 0.7 to 2.6, and 0.3 to 0.7 min, respectively. These data suggest that the method of heat eradication will be effective against all members of the family Legionellaceae. PMID:3752999

  20. Add Volunteering to the Mix of Balancing Work and Family: The Findings and Implications for Volunteer Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Janet; Wheeler, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Provides a snapshot of situations that volunteers encounter and offers strategies used to balance the demands of volunteering, family, and work. Explains how situations encountered and strategies relate to volunteer satisfaction. (Contains 36 references.) (JOW)

  1. Characterization and Regulation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) Genes in Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are a family of intracellular proteins that are centrally involved with vertebrate growth, development, and immunity via their effects as negative feedback regulators of cytokine (and hormone) signaling. A number of SOCS genes have been recently ...

  2. Effects of antidepressants on cytokine production and actions.

    PubMed

    Castanon, Nathalie; Leonard, Brian E; Neveu, Pierre J; Yirmiya, Raz

    2002-10-01

    There are intriguing analogies between many features of depression and physiological and behavioral responses to infection, which are mediated by the brain effects of cytokines. These observations suggest that depression can be considered as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder where a central increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines, may have adverse consequences on the functional activity of the neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems implicated in the symptoms of the disorder. According to this hypothesis, the therapeutic effects of antidepressants should be at least partly exerted by attenuating the brain expression and/or actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Despite their inherent limitations, animal models of depression that are based on behavioral and pharmacological analogies with the symptoms observed in humans, represent the best available tool to test this hypothesis and to investigate the action mechanisms of the immune effects of antidepressants. Treatment with different classes of antidepressants indeed conferred protection against cytokine-induced depressive-like biological and behavioral changes. This 'anti-inflammatory' profile may be due to alterations of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. The mechanisms underlying these effects of antidepressants are presently unknown, but the available literature suggests several possibilities, including actions on different molecules representing potential mediators of mood disorders induced by cytokines. The studies summarized in this review have opened up new vistas in both the pathophysiology of depression and the pharmacology of antidepressants. Whether their demonstrated immune effects are a side effect or a significant part of their clinical activity still remains to be elucidated.

  3. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  4. Insights into pathogenesis and treatment of cytokines in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, L; Abraham, W T

    2000-03-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure is rapidly expanding. recent investigations suggest a role for various proinflammatory and vasoconstrictive cytokines in the development and progression of the disease. In particular, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interlukin-6, and endothelin have all been implicated in heart failure desease progression. These cytokines appear to be activated in response to a remodeling, induction of programmed cell death, neurohormonal activation, and hemodynamics, these agents cause a variety of deleterious effects in the setting of ventricular dysfunction. Investigational inhibitors and antagonists of these substances show promise for the future treatment of heart failure. PMID:10980882

  5. Identification, Localization, and Functional Implications of the Microdomain-Forming Stomatin Family in the Ciliated Protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Plattner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The SPFH protein superfamily is assumed to occur universally in eukaryotes, but information from protozoa is scarce. In the Paramecium genome, we found only Stomatins, 20 paralogs grouped in 8 families, STO1 to STO8. According to cDNA analysis, all are expressed, and molecular modeling shows the typical SPFH domain structure for all subgroups. For further analysis we used family-specific sequences for fluorescence and immunogold labeling, gene silencing, and functional tests. With all family members tested, we found a patchy localization at/near the cell surface and on vesicles. The Sto1p and Sto4p families are also associated with the contractile vacuole complex. Sto4p also makes puncta on some food vacuoles and is abundant on vesicles recycling from the release site of spent food vacuoles to the site of nascent food vacuole formation. Silencing of the STO1 family reduces mechanosensitivity (ciliary reversal upon touching an obstacle), thus suggesting relevance for positioning of mechanosensitive channels in the plasmalemma. Silencing of STO4 members increases pulsation frequency of the contractile vacuole complex and reduces phagocytotic activity of Paramecium cells. In summary, Sto1p and Sto4p members seem to be involved in positioning specific superficial and intracellular microdomain-based membrane components whose functions may depend on mechanosensation (extracellular stimuli and internal osmotic pressure). PMID:23376944

  6. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  7. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Elaine V; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can form immune complexes and deposit in tissues, causing inflammation and organ damage. There is evidence that interferons and some interleukins can have an active role in the pathogenesis of SLE and can contribute significantly to the immune imbalance in the disease, whereas the role of some cytokines (such as TNF) is still debated. This review discusses the activity of several cytokines in SLE, their effects on the immune cells in relation to the disease pathogenesis, and the promise and limitations of cytokine-based therapies in clinical trials for lupus patients.

  8. Social Support and HIV-Status Disclosure to Friends and Family: Implications for HIV-Positive Youth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonia; Yamazaki, Michiyo; Harris, D. Robert; Harper, Gary W.; Ellen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The fear of negative reactions from friends and family members affects many HIV-positive adolescents’ decisions regarding disclosure of their HIV status. The complex relationships and interplay among social support, fear of stigma, and disclosure of HIV status needs to be better understood among youth living with HIV. Methods Social support from friends and family members, and HIV status disclosure were examined among 402 youth, aged 12 to 24 years, living with HIV. Results In separate analyses, 1) HIV positive youth who reported more than one close friend, as well as 2) HIV positive youth who reported that friends and family members continued to socialize with them after disclosure of their HIV diagnosis, had higher levels of perceived social support overall (both p<0.05). Furthermore, perceived social support did not differ significantly between those participants for whom no family member knew their HIV status and those for whom at least one family member knew their status (p=0.13). Race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, education level, and current living situation were not associated with family's knowledge of the participants’ HIV infection status (p>0.07). Conclusion This investigation adds important information concerning youth living with HIV, whose early disclosure experiences may influence their resilience and future coping mechanisms regarding experienced stigma, and thus influence the length of time they conceal their HIV status, their decision to disclose their status, and potentially their decisions regarding treatment. Interventions and support systems to assist youth living with HIV with disclosure, as well as medical care, may improve their overall quality of life. PMID:25940217

  9. The dynamical evolution of dwarf planet (136108) Haumea's collisional family: general properties and implications for the trans-Neptunian belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Horner, Jonathan; Mukai, Tadashi; Nakamura, Akiko M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, the first collisional family was identified in the trans-Neptunian belt (otherwise known as the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt), providing direct evidence of the importance of collisions between trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). The family consists of the dwarf planet (136108) Haumea (formerly 2003 EL61), located at a semimajor axis, a, of ˜43 au, and at least 10 other ˜100-km-sized TNOs located in the region a= 42-44.5 au. In this work, we model the long-term orbital evolution (4 Gyr) of an ensemble of fragments (particles) representing hypothetical post-collision distributions at the time of the family's birth based on our limited current understanding of the family's creation and of asteroidal collision physics. We consider three distinct scenarios, in which the kinetic energy of dispersed particles was varied such that their mean ejection velocities (veje) were of the order of 200, 300 and 400 m s-1, respectively. Each simulation considered resulted in collisional families that reproduced that currently observed, despite the variation in the initial conditions modelled. The results suggest that 60-75 per cent of the fragments created in the collision will remain in the trans-Neptunian belt, even after 4 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The surviving particles were typically concentrated in wide regions of orbital element space centred on the initial impact location, with their orbits spread across a region spanning Δa˜ 6-12 au, Δe˜ 0.1-0.15 and Δi˜ 7°-10°, with the exact range covered being proportional to veje used in the model. Most of the survivors populated the so-called classical and detached regions of the trans-Neptunian belt, whilst a minor fraction either entered the scattered disc reservoir (<1 per cent) or were captured in Neptunian mean-motion resonances (<10 per cent). In addition, except for those fragments located near strong resonances (such as the 5:3 and 7:4), the great majority displayed negligible long-term orbital variation. This

  10. Cytokine-producing microglia have an altered beta-amyloid load in aged APP/PS1 Tg mice.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Alicia A; Ilkjær, Laura; Clausen, Bettina H; Villadsen, Birgitte; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Bendixen, Anita T M; Lyck, Lise; Lambertsen, Kate L; Finsen, Bente

    2015-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and chronic neuroinflammation are significant neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Microglial cells in aged brains have potential to produce cytokines such as TNF and IL-1 family members (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra) and to phagocytose Aβ in Alzheimer's disease, however the inter-relationship between these processes is poorly understood. Here we show that % Aβ plaque load followed a sigmoidal trajectory with age in the neocortex of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg mice, and correlated positively with soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42. Aβ measures were moderately correlated with mRNA levels of CD11b, TNF, and IL-1Ra. Cytokine production and Aβ load were assessed in neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia by flow cytometry. Whereas most microglia in aged mice produced IL-1Ra, relatively low proportions of microglia produced TNF, IL-1α, and IL-1β. However, microglial production of these latter cytokines was generally increased in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Microglia that phagocytosed endogenously-produced Aβ were only observed in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Differences in phagocytic index and total Aβ load were observed in microglia with specific cytokine profiles. Both phagocytic index and total Aβ load were higher in IL-1α(+) and IL-1Ra(+) microglia, than microglia that did not produce these cytokines. In contrast, total Aβ load was lower in IL-1β(+) and TNF(+) microglia, compared to IL-1β(-) and TNF(-) microglia, and TNF(+) microglia also had a lower phagocytic index. Using GFP bone marrow chimeric mice, we confirmed that the majority of neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia were resident cells (GFP(-)) in APP/PS1 Tg mice, even after selectively analysing CD11b(+)CD45(high) cells, which are typically considered to be infiltrating cells. Together, our data demonstrate that cytokine expression is selectively correlated with age and Aβ pathology, and is associated with an altered Aβ load in phagocytic microglia from APP/PS1 Tg mice. These findings have

  11. Parent's alcoholism severity and family topic avoidance about alcohol as predictors of perceived stigma among adult children of alcoholics: Implications for emotional and psychological resilience.

    PubMed

    Haverfield, Marie C; Theiss, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is a highly stigmatized condition, with both alcohol-dependent individuals and family members of the afflicted experiencing stigmatization. This study examined the severity of a parent's alcoholism and family topic avoidance about alcohol as two factors that are associated with family members' perceptions of stigma. Three dimensions of stigma were considered: discrimination stigma, disclosure stigma, and positive aspect stigma. In addition, this study assessed associations between perceived stigmatization and individuals' experiences of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience. Adult children of alcoholics (N = 622) were surveyed about family conditions, perceived stigma, and their emotional and psychological well-being. Regression analyses revealed that the severity of a parent's alcoholism predicted all three types of stigma for females, but not for males. In addition, family topic avoidance about alcohol predicted all types of stigma for males and discrimination stigma and positive aspect stigma for females. With few exceptions, the three types of stigma predicted depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience for both male and female adult children of alcoholics. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for promoting a family environment that mitigates stigma and encourages emotional and psychological well-being. In 2012, approximately 3.3 million deaths worldwide were due to the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization [WHO], 2014). Individuals who abuse alcohol are susceptible to a variety of negative health outcomes (Rehm et al., 2009) and display inappropriate social behaviors (Klingemann, 2001; Schomerus et al., 2011a). General societal perceptions tend to characterize alcohol-dependent individuals as irresponsible and lacking in self-control (Schomerus et al., 2011b). Research in the United Kingdom found that 54% of the population believes alcohol-dependent individuals are personally to blame for their own

  12. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients. PMID:26328243

  13. The Role of Community, Family, Peer, and School Factors in Group Bullying: Implications for School-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Michael J.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Smith, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although an ecological perspective suggests the importance of multiple levels of intervention, most bullying research has emphasized individual- and school-focused strategies. This study investigated community and family factors that influence school efforts to reduce odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. Methods: We used…

  14. The Role of Personal Resources in Work-Family Conflict: Implications for Young Mothers' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunstein-Bercovitz, Hedva; Frish-Burstein, Smadar; Benjamin, Benny A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the role that personal resources (person-environment [PE] congruence and personality types associated with resilience) and work-family conflict (WFC) play in the sense of well-being (as reflected by burnout and life-satisfaction) of mothers of young children. A sample of 146 mothers holding demanding…

  15. The Relationships between Childhood Depression, Perceptions of Family Functioning and Perceptions of Classroom Social Climate: Implications for School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Todd T.; Russell, Debra K.

    This study investigated the relationships between children's levels of depression, their perceptions of their classroom social climate, and their perceptions of their families' functioning. The three self-report instruments employed were the Reynolds Child Depression Scale (RCDS), the relationship dimension of the Classroom Environment Scale…

  16. Indian Families in the U.S. Who Have Children with Disabilities: Implications for Inclusive and Culturally Responsive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antony, Pavan John; Banks-Joseph, Susan Rae

    2010-01-01

    A grounded theory approach is used to explore the "lived experiences" of two upper-middle-class families from India who have children with disabilities. Findings provide insight into the parents' beliefs and perceptions about disabilities, their goals and expectations for their children, and their views of inclusive education programs.…

  17. Child Care Subsidies and the Economic Well-Being of Recipient Families: A Survey and Implications for Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The secular increase over the past several decades in the number of families where both the husband and wife work in the paid labor force, coupled with the surge in labor force participation of single mothers in the 1990s, has heightened policy focus on child care options for working parents; federal and state governments are now major players…

  18. Children and Political Violence from a Social Ecological Perspective: Implications from Research on Children and Families in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Mark E.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Cairns, Ed

    2009-01-01

    The effects on children of political violence are matters of international concern, with many negative effects well-documented. At the same time, relations between war, terrorism, or other forms of political violence and child development do not occur in a vacuum. The impact can be understood as related to changes in the communities, families and…

  19. Is autism a member of a family of diseases resulting from genetic/cultural mismatches? Implications for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Jones, John P; Parker, William

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that autism is a typical member of a large family of immune-related, noninfectious, chronic diseases associated with postindustrial society. This family of diseases includes a wide range of inflammatory, allergic, and autoimmune diseases and results from consequences of genetic/culture mismatches which profoundly destabilize the immune system. Principle among these consequences is depletion of important components, particularly helminths, from the ecosystem of the human body, the human biome. Autism shares a wide range of features in common with this family of diseases, including the contribution of genetics/epigenetics, the identification of disease-inducing triggers, the apparent role of immunity in pathogenesis, high prevalence, complex etiologies and manifestations, and potentially some aspects of epidemiology. Fortunately, using available resources and technology, modern medicine has the potential to effectively reconstitute the human biome, thus treating or even avoiding altogether the consequences of genetic/cultural mismatches which underpin this entire family of disease. Thus, if indeed autism is an epidemic of postindustrial society associated with immune hypersensitivity, we can expect that the disease is readily preventable.

  20. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients. PMID:26328243

  1. Impact of chronic illness on child and family: an overview based on five surveys with implications for management.

    PubMed

    Satterwhite, B B

    1978-01-01

    For the past eight years the Rochester Child Health Group has systematically investigated chronic illness in childhood with the goal of minimizing the psychosocial sequelae of chronic illness through more optimal management. This overview examines the impact of chronic illness on 404 children and their families in five separate studies: 1) 209 children in a follow-up of all children with chronic symptoms in a previous random sampling of children; 2) 42 children with juvenile arthritis; 3) 44 nephrotic children; 4) 54 asthmatic children; 5) 55 chronically ill children living in rural areas of Western New York. Information was obtained through parental interviews, school reports, and psychological testing of the child. The percentage of parents reporting impact of the child's illness on family differed according to study population. The percentage reporting areas of impact according to severity of the illness is as follows: worry, 75--97; financial, 46--60; fatigue of parent, 31--65; change in sleep arrangements, 17--31; change in furnishings, 15--40; less social life for parents, 12--35; restrictions on travel, 13--40; parental friction, 9--20; sibling neglect, 10--20; sibling resentment, 10--25; embarrassment, 12--20; interference from relatives, 5--17. Over half the parents felt their child's future education, job chances, and social life would be affected. One third reported activity limitations. Compared to a control group of children, a significantly greater percentage of parents of the chronically ill reported teacher concern about their child's effort and behavior, and showed concern about the child having too few friends. Two of the three studies in which psychological appraisals were obtained suggested that more of the ill children than controls showed indices of maladjustment. School information from two studies showed more of the ill children than controls underachieving and being referred to a school psychologist. Work by the Rochester Child Health Group

  2. Impact of chronic illness on child and family: an overview based on five surveys with implications for management.

    PubMed

    Satterwhite, B B

    1978-01-01

    For the past eight years the Rochester Child Health Group has systematically investigated chronic illness in childhood with the goal of minimizing the psychosocial sequelae of chronic illness through more optimal management. This overview examines the impact of chronic illness on 404 children and their families in five separate studies: 1) 209 children in a follow-up of all children with chronic symptoms in a previous random sampling of children; 2) 42 children with juvenile arthritis; 3) 44 nephrotic children; 4) 54 asthmatic children; 5) 55 chronically ill children living in rural areas of Western New York. Information was obtained through parental interviews, school reports, and psychological testing of the child. The percentage of parents reporting impact of the child's illness on family differed according to study population. The percentage reporting areas of impact according to severity of the illness is as follows: worry, 75--97; financial, 46--60; fatigue of parent, 31--65; change in sleep arrangements, 17--31; change in furnishings, 15--40; less social life for parents, 12--35; restrictions on travel, 13--40; parental friction, 9--20; sibling neglect, 10--20; sibling resentment, 10--25; embarrassment, 12--20; interference from relatives, 5--17. Over half the parents felt their child's future education, job chances, and social life would be affected. One third reported activity limitations. Compared to a control group of children, a significantly greater percentage of parents of the chronically ill reported teacher concern about their child's effort and behavior, and showed concern about the child having too few friends. Two of the three studies in which psychological appraisals were obtained suggested that more of the ill children than controls showed indices of maladjustment. School information from two studies showed more of the ill children than controls underachieving and being referred to a school psychologist. Work by the Rochester Child Health Group

  3. Caregivers' moral narratives of their African American children's out-of-school suspensions: implications for effective family-school collaborations.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Priscilla A; Haight, Wendy

    2013-07-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors examined the culturally nuanced meanings of out-of-school suspensions for 30 lower income caregivers of African American children suspended from school. Caregivers were invited to describe their experiences of their children's suspensions during in-depth, individual, audiotaped interviews. Caregivers generally valued their children's school success, recognized when their children had misbehaved, and supported educators' imposition of appropriate consequences. Out-of-school suspensions, however, were rarely viewed as appropriate consequences. On the contrary, caregivers produced emotionally laden moral narratives that generally characterized their children's suspensions as unjust; harmful to children; negligent in helping children with underlying problems such as bullying; undermining parents' racial socialization; and, in general, racially problematic. Suspensions also contributed to some families' withdrawal from participation in their schools. Understanding how caregivers experience children's out-of-school suspensions provides important clues to how families and schools can work together to effectively reduce racial disparities in out-of-school suspensions.

  4. The Impact of Social Roles on the Experience of Men in BRCA1/2 Families: Implications for Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics have identified several genes associated with inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer and have led to the commercial availability of mutation analyses. Although the majority of cancers associated with BRCA1/2 mutations are seen in women, men with BRCA1/2 mutations are at increased risk for male breast cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and melanoma. Limited data available on the response of men in BRCA1/2 families suggest that the majority do not pursue genetic counseling, thus they may forgo the opportunity to improve health practices and to pass on valuable cancer risk information to offspring. The patterns of relationships of men within the family and society can pose challenges to their recognition of genetic health threats and the need for preventive interventions. Genetic counselors are in a position to inform at-risk males of their genetic risk, and to help them explore their personal health options. PMID:18688698

  5. The Role of Cytokines in Breast Cancer Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, Margarita Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Castro, Julieta Ivonne

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are highly inducible, secretory proteins that mediate intercellular communication in the immune system. They are grouped into several protein families that are referred to as tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, interferons, and colony-stimulating factors. In recent years, it has become clear that some of these proteins as well as their receptors are produced in the organisms under physiological and pathological conditions. The exact initiation process of breast cancer is unknown, although several hypotheses have emerged. Inflammation has been proposed as an important player in tumor initiation, promotion, angiogenesis, and metastasis, all phenomena in which cytokines are prominent players. The data here suggest that cytokines play an important role in the regulation of both induction and protection in breast cancer. This knowledge could be fundamental for the proposal of new therapeutic approaches to particularly breast cancer and other cancer-related disorders. PMID:25068787

  6. Integration of Cytokine Biology and Lipid Metabolism in Stroke**

    PubMed Central

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Dempsey, R.; Hatcher, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines regulate the innate and adaptive immune responses and are pleiotropic, redundant and multifunctional. Expression of most cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1α/ß, is very low in normal brain. Metabolism of lipids is of particular interest due to their high concentration in the brain. Inflammatory response after stroke suggests that cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 α/ß, IL-6), affect the phospholipid metabolism and subsequent production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and ROS that may potentiate brain injury. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are source for lipid messengers. Sphingomyelin synthase serves as a bridge between metabolism of glycerolipids and sphingolipids. TNF-α and IL-1 α/ß can induce phospholipases (A2, C, and D) and sphingomyelinases, and concomitantly proteolyse phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin synthesizing enzymes. Together, these alterations contribute to loss of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin after stroke that can be attenuated by inhibiting TNF-α or IL-1 α/ß signaling. Inflammatory responses are instrumental in the formation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Secretory PLA2 IIA is found in human atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in initiation, progression and maturation of atherosclerosis, a risk factor for stroke. Lipoprotein-PLA2, part of apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL, plays a role in vascular inflammation and coronary endothelial dysfunction. Cytokine antagonism attenuated secretory PLA2 IIA actions, suggesting cytokine-lipid integration studies will lead to new concepts contributing to bench-to-bedside transition for stroke therapy. PMID:17981627

  7. Use of cytokines in infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoko; Xing, Zhou

    2004-11-01

    Infectious disease remains an ever-growing health concern worldwide due to increasing antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, immune-compromised populations, international traffic and globalisation, and bioterrorism. There exists an urgent need to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In addition to classic antibiotic therapeutics, immune-modulatory molecules such as cytokines or their inhibitors represent a promising form of antimicrobial therapeutics or immune adjuvant used for the purpose of vaccination. These molecules, in the form of either recombinant protein or transgene, exert their antimicrobial effect by enhancing infectious agent-specific immune activation or memory development, or by dampening undesired inflammatory and immune responses resulting from infection and host defence mechanisms. In the last two decades, a number of cytokine therapy-based experimental and clinical trials have been conducted, and some of these efforts have led to the routine clinical use of cytokines. For instance, although IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis C with great success, many other cytokines are yet to be fully evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. This review discusses the biology and therapeutic potential of selected immune modulatory cytokines and their inhibitors, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF.

  8. Psychosocial support intervention for HIV-affected families in Haiti: implications for programs and policies for orphans and vulnerable children.

    PubMed

    Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Eustache, Eddy; Oswald, Catherine; Louis, Ermaze; Surkan, Pamela J; Scanlan, Fiona; Hook, Sarah; Mancuso, Anna; Mukherjee, Joia S

    2012-05-01

    Given the increased access of antiretroviral therapy (ART) throughout the developing world, what was once a terminal illness is now a chronic disease for those receiving treatment. This requires a paradigmatic shift in service provision for those affected by HIV/AIDS in low-resource settings. Although there is a need for psychosocial support interventions for HIV-affected youth and their caregivers, to date there has been limited empirical evidence on the effectiveness of curriculum-based psychosocial support groups in HIV-affected families in low-income countries. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and assess the preliminary effectiveness of a psychosocial support group intervention for HIV-affected youth and their caregivers in central Haiti. The study was conducted at six Partners In Health-affiliated sites between February 2006 and September 2008 and included quantitative as well as qualitative methods. HIV-affected youth (n = 168) and their caregivers (n = 130) completed a baseline structured questionnaire prior to participation in a psychosocial support group intervention. Ninety-five percent of families completed the intervention and a follow-up questionnaire. Psychological symptoms, psychosocial functioning, social support, and HIV-related stigma at baseline were compared with outcomes one year later. Qualitative methods were also used to assess the participants' perspectives of the intervention. Comparing pre- and post-intervention assessment, youth affected by HIV experienced decreased psychological symptoms as well as improved psychosocial functioning and social support. Caregivers (95% HIV-positive) demonstrated a significant reduction in depressive symptoms, improved social support, and decreased HIV-related stigma. Although further study is needed to assess effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial, corroborative findings from qualitative data reflected reduced psychological distress, less social isolation and

  9. Molecular heterogeneity in the choroid plexus epithelium: the 22-member γ-protocadherin family is differentially expressed, apically localized, and implicated in CSF regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lobas, Mark A.; Helsper, Lindsey; Vernon, Claire G.; Schreiner, Dietmar; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Weiner, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) epithelium develops from the ependyma that lines the ventricular system, and plays a critical role in the development and function of the brain. In addition to being the primary site of CSF production, the CP maintains the blood-CSF barrier via apical tight junctions between epithelial cells. Here we show that the 22-member γ-Protocadherin (γ-Pcdh) family of cell adhesion molecules, which we have implicated previously in synaptogenesis and neuronal survival, is highly expressed by both CP epithelial and ependymal cells, in which γ-Pcdh protein localization is, surprisingly, tightly restricted to the apical membrane. Multi-label immunostaining demonstrates that γ-Pcdhs are excluded from tight junctions, basolateral adherens junctions, and apical cilia tufts. RT-PCR analysis indicates that, as a whole, the CP expresses most members of the Pcdh-γ gene family. Immunostaining using novel monoclonal antibodies specific for single γ-Pcdh proteins shows that individual epithelial cells differ in their apically-localized γ-Pcdh repertoire. Restricted mutation of the Pcdh-γ locus in the choroid plexus and ependyma leads to significant reductions in ventricular volume, without obvious disruptions of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Together, these results suggest an unsuspected role for the γ-Pcdhs in CSF production and demonstrate a surprising molecular heterogeneity in the CP epithelium. PMID:22092001

  10. Therapeutic modulation of growth factors and cytokines in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Effie

    2006-01-01

    Regeneration that takes place in the human body is limited throughout life. Therefore, when organs are irreparably damaged, they are usually replaced with an artificial device or donor organ. The term "regenerative medicine" covers the restoration or replacement of cells, tissues, and organs. Stem cells play a major role in regenerative medicine by providing the way to repopulate organs damaged by disease. Stem cells have the ability to self renew and to regenerate cells of diverse lineages within the tissue in which they reside. Stem cells could originate from embryos or adult tissues. Growth factors are proteins that may act locally or systemically to affect the growth of cells in several ways. Various cell activities, including division, are influenced by growth factors. Cytokines are a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that are produced by numerous cell types and are responsible for regulating the immune response, inflammation, tissue remodeling and cellular differentiation. Target cells of growth factors and cytokines are mesenchymal, epithelial and endothelial cells. These molecules frequently have overlapping activities and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. A complex network of growth factors and cytokines guides cellular differentiation and regeneration in all organs and tissues. The aim of this paper is to review the role of growth factors and cytokines in different organs or systems and explore their therapeutic application in regenerative medicine. The role of stem cells combined with growth factors and cytokines in the regeneration of vascular and hematopoietic, neural, skeletal, pancreatic, periodontal, and mucosal tissue is reviewed. There is evidence that supports the use of growth factors and cytokines in the treatment of neurological diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, periodontal disease, cancer and its complication, oral mucositis. After solving the ethical issues and establishing clear and reasonable regulations

  11. The organizational social context of mental health medicaid waiver programs with family support services: implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Peer family support specialists (FSS) are parents with practical experience in navigating children's mental health care systems who provide support, advocacy, and guidance to the families of children who need mental health services. Their experience and training differ from those of formally trained mental health clinicians, creating potential conflicts in priorities and values between FSS and clinicians. We hypothesized that these differences could negatively affect the organizational cultures and climates of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and mental health clinicians, and lower the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of FSS. The Organizational Social Context measure was administered on site to 209 FSS and clinicians in 21 mental health programs in New York State. The study compared the organizational-level culture and climate profiles of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and formally trained clinicians to national norms for child mental health clinics, assessed individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment as a function of job (FSS vs. clinician) and other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics, and tested whether FSS and clinicians job attitudes were differentially associated with organizational culture and climate. The programs organizational culture and climate profiles were not significantly different from national norms. Individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment were unrelated to position (FSS vs. clinician) or other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics except for culture and climate. Both FSS' and clinicians' individual-level work attitudes were associated similarly with organizational culture and climate. PMID:24065458

  12. HERV-K(HML-2), the Best Preserved Family of HERVs: Endogenization, Expression, and Implications in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Oliver; Hanke, Kirsten; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses that have the ability to infect germ line cells can become an integral and inherited part of the host genome. About 8% of the human chromosomal DNA consists of sequences derived from infections by retroviruses that presumably circulated 2–40 millions of years ago, and some elements are actually much older. Post-insertional recombinations, deletions, and mutations have rendered all known human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) non-infectious. However some, particularly the most recently acquired proviruses of the HERV-K(HML-2) family, can expresses viral proteins and produce viral particles. In this review we will first discuss the major aspects of the endogenization process and peculiarities of the different HERV-K families. We will then focus on the genes and proteins encoded by HERV-K(HML-2) as well as inactivation of these proviruses by postinsertional mutations and their inhibition by antiretroviral factors. After describing the evolutionary interplay between host and endogenous retrovirus we will delve deeper into the currently limited understanding of HERV-K and its possible association with disease, particularly tumorigenesis. PMID:24066280

  13. The Brachodidae of Sub-Saharan Africa (Lepidoptera, Cossoidea), with implications for the origin of the family.

    PubMed

    Kallies, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Brachodidae are a small family of day-flying, rarely collected cossoid moths. Here, the Brachodidae fauna of Sub-Saharan Africa and the neighboring Arabian Peninsula is reviewed with special attention to the species of the subfamily Brachodinae. The origin of the African Brachodinae and their relationship to the Palaearctic genus Brachodes are discussed, and a Gondwanan origin of the family Brachodidae sensu stricto is proposed. A total of 34 brachodid species are considered in this study, most of which are figured. Two new genera, Archaeotychia gen. nov. (type species Atychia quiris Felder & Rogenhofer, 1875) and Nothobrachodes gen. nov. (type species Atychia infanda Meyrick, 1920) are described. Furthermore, 12 species are described as new to science: Archaeotychia semicuprea sp. nov., Archaeotychia dicksoni sp. nov., Archaeotychia khoisanorum sp. nov., Archaeotychia krooni sp. nov., Archaeotychia dentata sp. nov., Phycodes nigeriana sp. nov., Nigilgia scoblei sp. nov., Nigilgia agassizi sp. nov., Nigilgia ruwenzoriensis sp. nov., Nigilgia megabella sp. nov., Nigilgia arcana sp. nov. and Nigilgia crocea sp. nov. Moreover, Atychia metaspila Meyrick, 1926 syn. nov. is established as a new synonym of Archaeotychia albiciliata (Walsingham, 1891), and Atychia nycteropis Meyrick, 1920 syn. nov. as a new synonym of Nothobrachodes infanda (Meyrick, 1920). Atractoceros xanthoprocta (Meyrick, 1914) is transferred to the subfamily Phycodinae. PMID:27394217

  14. Tamm-Horsfall Protein Regulates Circulating and Renal Cytokines by Affecting Glomerular Filtration Rate and Acting as a Urinary Cytokine Trap*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; El-Achkar, Tarek M.; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2012-01-01

    Although few organ systems play a more important role than the kidneys in cytokine catabolism, the mechanism(s) regulating this pivotal physiological function and how its deficiency affects systemic cytokine homeostasis remain unclear. Here we show that elimination of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) expression from mouse kidneys caused a marked elevation of circulating IFN-γ, IL1α, TNF-α, IL6, CXCL1, and IL13. Accompanying this were enlarged spleens with prominent white-pulp macrophage infiltration. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exacerbated the increase of serum cytokines without a corresponding increase in their urinary excretion in THP knock-out (KO) mice. This, along with the rise of serum cystatin C and the reduced inulin and creatinine clearance from the circulation, suggested that diminished glomerular filtration may contribute to reduced cytokine clearance in THP KO mice both at the baseline and under stress. Unlike wild-type mice where renal and urinary cytokines formed specific in vivo complexes with THP, this “trapping” effect was absent in THP KO mice, thus explaining why cytokine signaling pathways were activated in renal epithelial cells in such mice. Our study provides new evidence implicating an important role of THP in influencing cytokine clearance and acting as a decoy receptor for urinary cytokines. Based on these and other data, we present a unifying model that underscores the role of THP as a major regulator of renal and systemic immunity. PMID:22451664

  15. Targeted cytokines for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Reisfeld, R A

    2000-01-01

    Targeting of cytokines into the tumor microenvironment using antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, called immunocytokines, represents a novel approach in cancer immunotherapy. This article summarizes therapeutic efficacy and immune mechanisms involved in targeting interleukin-2 (IL-2) to neuroectodermal tumors using ganglioside GD2-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion protein (ch14.18-IL-2). Treatment of established melanoma metastases with ch14.18-IL-2 resulted in eradication of disease followed by a vaccination effect protecting mice from lethal challenges with wild-type tumor calls. In a syngeneic neuroblastoma model, targeted IL-2 was effective in the amplification of a weak memory immune response previously induced by IL-12 gene therapy using an engineered linear version of this heterodimeric cytokine. These findings show that targeted IL-2 may provide an effective tool in cancer immunotherapy and establish the missing link between T cell-mediated vaccination and objective clinical responses.

  16. Genomic identification of chemokines and cytokines in opossum.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Belov, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    The cytokine repertoire of marsupials is largely unknown. The sequencing of the opossum genome has expedited the identification of many immune genes. However, many genes have not been identified using automated annotation pipelines because of high levels of sequence divergence. To fill gaps in our knowledge of the cytokine gene complement in marsupials, we searched the genome assembly of the gray short-tailed opossum for chemokine, interleukin, colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor, and transforming growth factor genes. In particular, we focused on genes that were not previously identified through Ensembl's automatic annotations. We report that the vast majority of cytokines are conserved, with direct orthologs between therian species. The major exceptions are chemokine genes, which show lineage-specific duplication/loss. Thirty-six chemokines were identified in opossum, including a lineage-specific expansion of macrophage inflammatory protein family genes. Divergent cytokines IL7, IL9, IL31, IL33, and CSF2 were identified. This is the first time IL31 and IL33 have been described outside of eutherian species. The high levels of similarities between the cytokine gene repertoires of therians suggest that the marsupial immune response is highly similar to eutherians.

  17. Circulating low IL-23: IL-35 cytokine ratio promotes progression associated with poor prognosisin breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanghui; Liang, Yanfang; Guan, Xin; Chen, Hui; Liu, Qiankun; Lin, Bihua; Chen, Can; Huang, Mingyuan; Chen, Jianan; Wu, Weiquan; Liang, Yi; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12 family, composed of heterodimeric cytokines including IL-12 (formed by IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-23 (formed by IL-23p19 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-27 (formed by IL-27p28 and EBI3 subunits) and IL-35 (formed by IL-12p35 and EBI3 subunits), establishes a link between innate and adaptive immunity that involves different immune effector cells and cytokines to tumors. However, the role of IL-12 family in breast cancer (BC) progression and prognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated evidence indicating that EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19 or IL-27p28 were highly expressed in BC tissues, suggested that tumor derived EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were associated with tumor progression. Circulating IL-12 and IL-23 low expressed, but IL-27 and IL-35 high expressed in BC patients, especially circulating IL-23 associated with IL-35 to mediate BC tumor resection. Ki-67, p53 and EGFR expression on BC tissues, as well as CA125, CA153 and CA199 levels on BC bloods increased when circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio decreased. Together, for the first time, our data suggest that circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio may be an important indicator association with BC progression and prognosis. However, further research should be carried out to assess the implications of circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio in a larger sample size.

  18. Circulating low IL-23: IL-35 cytokine ratio promotes progression associated with poor prognosisin breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanghui; Liang, Yanfang; Guan, Xin; Chen, Hui; Liu, Qiankun; Lin, Bihua; Chen, Can; Huang, Mingyuan; Chen, Jianan; Wu, Weiquan; Liang, Yi; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12 family, composed of heterodimeric cytokines including IL-12 (formed by IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-23 (formed by IL-23p19 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-27 (formed by IL-27p28 and EBI3 subunits) and IL-35 (formed by IL-12p35 and EBI3 subunits), establishes a link between innate and adaptive immunity that involves different immune effector cells and cytokines to tumors. However, the role of IL-12 family in breast cancer (BC) progression and prognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated evidence indicating that EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19 or IL-27p28 were highly expressed in BC tissues, suggested that tumor derived EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were associated with tumor progression. Circulating IL-12 and IL-23 low expressed, but IL-27 and IL-35 high expressed in BC patients, especially circulating IL-23 associated with IL-35 to mediate BC tumor resection. Ki-67, p53 and EGFR expression on BC tissues, as well as CA125, CA153 and CA199 levels on BC bloods increased when circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio decreased. Together, for the first time, our data suggest that circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio may be an important indicator association with BC progression and prognosis. However, further research should be carried out to assess the implications of circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio in a larger sample size. PMID:27347332

  19. Growing up in the genomic era: implications of whole-genome sequencing for children, families, and pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Wade, Christopher H; Tarini, Beth A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has advanced to a point where it is beginning to be integrated into pediatric practice. With little consensus on how to maximize the benefits of WGS for children, there is a growing need for focused efforts that connect researchers, clinicians, and families to chart a path forward. To illustrate relevant concerns, two contrasting applications of pediatric WGS are explored: clinical use with children who have undiagnosed conditions, and population-based screening. Specific challenges for health care services, policy development, and the well-being of children are discussed in light of current research. In the interest of ensuring evidence-based pediatric WGS, strategies are identified for advancing our understanding of what it means for children to grow up with WGS results guiding their health care.

  20. Comparative gene expression analysis of the fmnl family of formins during zebrafish development and implications for tissue specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Ledo, Adrian; Jenny, Andreas; Marlow, Florence L.

    2012-01-01

    Fmlns belong to the Formin family, catalysts of linear Actin polymerization with mostly unknown roles in vivo. In cell culture Fmnls are involved in cell migration and adhesion and the formation of different types of protrusions including filopodia and blebs, suggesting important roles during development. Moreover, Fmnls can act downstream of Rac and Cdc42, mediators of cytoskeletal changes as targets of important pathways required for shaping tissues. The zebrafish genome encodes five Fmnls. Here we report their tissue specific expression patterns during early development and pharyngula stages. The fmnls show overlapping and distinct expression patterns, which suggest that they could regulate similar processes during development, but may also have independent functions. In particular, we find a strong maternal contribution of all fmnls, but distinct expression patterns in the developing brain eye, ear, heart and vascular system. PMID:23072729

  1. A Drosophila protein family implicated in pheromone perception is related to Tay-Sachs GM2-activator protein.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Elena; Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Heping; Pikielny, Claudio W

    2009-01-01

    Low volatility, lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones produced by Drosophila melanogaster females play an essential role in triggering and modulating mating behavior, but the chemosensory mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that the CheB42a protein, which is expressed in only 10 pheromone-sensing taste hairs on the front legs of males, modulates progression to late stages of male courtship behavior in response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Here we report that expression of all 12 genes in the CheB gene family is predominantly or exclusively gustatory-specific, and occurs in many different, often non-overlapping patterns. Only the Gr family of gustatory receptor genes displays a comparable variety of gustatory-specific expression patterns. Unlike Grs, however, expression of all but one CheB gene is sexually dimorphic. Like CheB42a, other CheBs may therefore function specifically in gustatory perception of pheromones. We also show that CheBs belong to the ML superfamily of lipid-binding proteins, and are most similar to human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP). In particular, GM2-AP residues involved in ligand binding are conserved in CheBs but not in other ML proteins. Finally, CheB42a is specifically secreted into the inner lumen of pheromone-sensing taste hairs, where pheromones interact with membrane-bound receptors. We propose that CheB proteins interact directly with lipid-like Drosophila pheromones and modulate their detection by the gustatory signal transduction machinery. Furthermore, as loss of GM2-AP in Tay-Sachs disease prevents degradation of GM2 gangliosides and results in neurodegeneration, the function of CheBs in pheromone response may involve biochemical mechanisms critical for lipid metabolism in human neurons. PMID:18952610

  2. Parent's alcoholism severity and family topic avoidance about alcohol as predictors of perceived stigma among adult children of alcoholics: Implications for emotional and psychological resilience.

    PubMed

    Haverfield, Marie C; Theiss, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is a highly stigmatized condition, with both alcohol-dependent individuals and family members of the afflicted experiencing stigmatization. This study examined the severity of a parent's alcoholism and family topic avoidance about alcohol as two factors that are associated with family members' perceptions of stigma. Three dimensions of stigma were considered: discrimination stigma, disclosure stigma, and positive aspect stigma. In addition, this study assessed associations between perceived stigmatization and individuals' experiences of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience. Adult children of alcoholics (N = 622) were surveyed about family conditions, perceived stigma, and their emotional and psychological well-being. Regression analyses revealed that the severity of a parent's alcoholism predicted all three types of stigma for females, but not for males. In addition, family topic avoidance about alcohol predicted all types of stigma for males and discrimination stigma and positive aspect stigma for females. With few exceptions, the three types of stigma predicted depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and resilience for both male and female adult children of alcoholics. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for promoting a family environment that mitigates stigma and encourages emotional and psychological well-being. In 2012, approximately 3.3 million deaths worldwide were due to the harmful use of alcohol (World Health Organization [WHO], 2014). Individuals who abuse alcohol are susceptible to a variety of negative health outcomes (Rehm et al., 2009) and display inappropriate social behaviors (Klingemann, 2001; Schomerus et al., 2011a). General societal perceptions tend to characterize alcohol-dependent individuals as irresponsible and lacking in self-control (Schomerus et al., 2011b). Research in the United Kingdom found that 54% of the population believes alcohol-dependent individuals are personally to blame for their own

  3. Neutral buoyancy and sleep-deprived serum factors alter expression of cytokines regulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M.; Gorczynski, Christopher P.; Gorczynski, Laura Y.; Hu, Jiang; Lu, Jin; Manuel, Justin; Lee, Lydia

    2005-05-01

    We examined expression of genes associated with cytokine production, and genes implicated in regulating bone metabolism, in bone stromal and osteoblast cells incubated under standard ground conditions and under conditions of neutral buoyancy, and in the presence/absence of serum from normal or sleep-deprived mice. We observed a clear interaction between these two conditions (exposure to neutral buoyancy and serum stimulation) in promoting enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Both conditions independently altered expression of a number of cytokines implicated in the regulation of bone metabolism. However, using stromal cells from IL-1 and TNF α cytokine r KO mice, we concluded that the increased bone loss under microgravity conditions was not primarily cytokine mediated.

  4. Circulating Cytokine Levels as Markers of Inflammation in Philadelphia Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Diagnostic and Prognostic Interest

    PubMed Central

    Mondet, Julie; Hussein, Kais; Mossuz, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are well known mediators of numerous physiological and pathological processes. They contribute to the regulation of normal hematopoiesis but increasing data suggest that they also have a clinical impact in some hematopoietic malignancies. In particular, there is evidence that cytokines are implicated in the functional symptoms of Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph− MPNs), suggesting that evaluation of circulating levels of cytokines could be of clinical interest for the characterization of patients at the time of diagnosis and for disease prognosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge on alteration of circulating cytokine profiles in MPNs and their role in myelofibrosis pathogenesis. Phenotypic correlation, prognostic value of cytokines, and impact of JAK inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:26525644

  5. Children and political violence from a social ecological perspective: implications from research on children and families in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cummings, E Mark; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Schermerhorn, Alice C; Merrilees, Christine E; Cairns, Ed

    2009-03-01

    The effects on children of political violence are matters of international concern, with many negative effects well-documented. At the same time, relations between war, terrorism, or other forms of political violence and child development do not occur in a vacuum. The impact can be understood as related to changes in the communities, families and other social contexts in which children live, and in the psychological processes engaged by these social ecologies. To advance this process-oriented perspective, a social ecological model for the effects of political violence on children is advanced. This approach is illustrated by findings and methods from an ongoing research project on political violence and children in Northern Ireland. Aims of this project include both greater insight into this particular context for political violence and the provision of a template for study of the impact of children's exposure to violence in other regions of the world. Accordingly, the applicability of this approach is considered for other social contexts, including (a) another area in the world with histories of political violence and (b) a context of community violence in the US.

  6. Children and Political Violence from a Social Ecological Perspective: Implications from Research on Children and Families in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, E. Mark; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Cairns, Ed

    2013-01-01

    The effects on children of political violence are matters of international concern, with many negative effects well-documented. At the same time, relations between war, terrorism or other forms of political violence and child development do not occur in a vacuum. The impact can be understood as related to changes in the communities, families and other social contexts in which children live, and in the psychological processes engaged by these social ecologies. To advance this process-oriented perspective, a social ecological model for the effects of political violence on children is advanced. This approach is illustrated by findings and methods from an ongoing research project on political violence and children in Northern Ireland. Aims of this project include both greater insight into this particular context for political violence and the provision of a template for study of the impact of children’s exposure to violence in other regions of the world. Accordingly, the applicability of this approach is considered for other social contexts, including (a) another area in the world with histories of political violence, and (b) a context of community violence in the US. PMID:19229611

  7. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  8. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening.

    PubMed

    Gerkes, E H; Fock, J M; den Dunnen, W F A; van Belzen, M J; van der Lans, C A; Hoving, E W; Fakkert, I E; Smith, M J; Evans, D G; Olderode-Berends, M J W

    2016-04-01

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are causative, giving rise to an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. We report on an extended family with a pediatric CCM patient and an adult CCM patient and several asymptomatic relatives carrying a germline SMARCE1 mutation, and discuss difficulties in genetic counseling for this heritable condition. Because of the few reported cases so far, the lifetime risk of developing meningiomas for SMARCE1 mutation carriers is unclear and the complete tumor spectrum is unknown. There is no surveillance guideline for asymptomatic carriers nor a long-term follow-up recommendation for SMARCE1-related CCM patients as yet. Until more information is available about the penetrance and tumor spectrum of the condition, we propose the following screening advice for asymptomatic SMARCE1 mutation carriers: neurological examination and MRI of the brain and spine, yearly from diagnosis until the age of 18 and once every 3 years thereafter, or in between if there are clinical symptoms. This advice can also be used for long-term patient follow-up. More data is needed to optimize this proposed screening advice. PMID:26803492

  9. miR-29s: a family of epi-miRNAs with therapeutic implications in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Rossi, Marco; Raimondi, Lavinia; Pitari, Maria Rita; Botta, Cirino; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of studies has highlighted the biological complexity of hematologic malignancies and the role of dysregulated signal transduction pathways. Along with the crucial role of genetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations are nowadays emerging as relevant players in cancer development, and significant research efforts are currently focusing on mechanisms by which histone post-translational modifications, DNA methylation and noncoding RNAs contribute to the pathobiology of cancer. As a consequence, these studies have provided the rationale for the development of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors and demethylating compounds, some of which are currently in advanced phase of pre-clinical investigation or in clinical trials. In addition, a more recent body of evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) might target effectors of the epigenetic machinery, which are aberrantly expressed or active in cancers, thus reverting those epigenetic abnormalities driving tumor initiation and progression. This review will focus on the broad epigenetic activity triggered by members of the miR-29 family, which underlines the potential of miR-29s as candidate epi-therapeutics for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:25968566

  10. Hemocyanin gene family evolution in spiders (Araneae), with implications for phylogenetic relationships and divergence times in the infraorder Mygalomorphae.

    PubMed

    Starrett, James; Hedin, Marshal; Ayoub, Nadia; Hayashi, Cheryl Y

    2013-07-25

    Hemocyanins are multimeric copper-containing hemolymph proteins involved in oxygen binding and transport in all major arthropod lineages. Most arachnids have seven primary subunits (encoded by paralogous genes a-g), which combine to form a 24-mer (4×6) quaternary structure. Within some spider lineages, however, hemocyanin evolution has been a dynamic process with extensive paralog duplication and loss. We have obtained hemocyanin gene sequences from numerous representatives of the spider infraorders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae in order to infer the evolution of the hemocyanin gene family and estimate spider relationships using these conserved loci. Our hemocyanin gene tree is largely consistent with the previous hypotheses of paralog relationships based on immunological studies, but reveals some discrepancies in which paralog types have been lost or duplicated in specific spider lineages. Analyses of concatenated hemocyanin sequences resolved deep nodes in the spider phylogeny and recovered a number of clades that are supported by other molecular studies, particularly for mygalomorph taxa. The concatenated data set is also used to estimate dates of higher-level spider divergences and suggests that the diversification of extant mygalomorphs preceded that of extant araneomorphs. Spiders are diverse in behavior and respiratory morphology, and our results are beneficial for comparative analyses of spider respiration. Lastly, the conserved hemocyanin sequences allow for the inference of spider relationships and ancient divergence dates.

  11. The PIM family of oncoproteins: small kinases with huge implications in myeloid leukemogenesis and as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Kumar; Scherzer, Michael T; Shah, Parag P; Mims, Alice S; Lockwood, William W; Kraft, Andrew S; Beverly, Levi J

    2014-09-30

    PIM kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases involved in cell survival and proliferation. There is significant structural similarity between the three PIM kinases (PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3) and only few amino acid differences. Although, several studies have specifically monitored the role of PIM1 in tumorigenesis, much less is known about PIM2 and PIM3. Therefore, in this study we have used in vitro cell culture models and in vivo bone marrow infection/transplantation to assess the comparative signaling and oncogenic potential of each of the three PIM kinases. All three PIM kinases were able to protect FL5.12 cells from IL3 withdrawal induced death. Interestingly, the downstream signaling cascades were indistinguishable between the three kinases. Transplantation of murine bone marrow co-expressing MYC and PIM1, PIM2 or PIM3 caused rapid and uniformly lethal myeloid leukemia. De-induction of MYC 18 days following transplantation significantly increased the survival of mice, even with continual expression of PIM kinases. Alternatively, mice treated at the pre-leukemic stage with a PIM kinase inhibitor increased the lifespan of the mice, even with continual expression of the MYC transgene. These data demonstrate the role of PIM kinases in driving myeloid leukemia, and as candidate molecules for therapy against human malignancies. PMID:25238262

  12. Cytokine signaling-1 suppressor is inducible by IL-1beta and inhibits the catabolic effects of IL-1beta in chondrocytes: its implication in the paradoxical joint-protective role of IL-1beta

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although IL-1β is believed to be crucial in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), the IL-1β blockade brings no therapeutic benefit in human OA and results in OA aggravation in several animal models. We explored the role of a cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) suppressor as a regulatory modulator of IL-1β signaling in chondrocytes. Methods Cartilage samples were obtained from patients with knee OA and those without OA who underwent surgery for femur-neck fracture. SOCS1 expression in cartilage was assessed with immunohistochemistry. IL-1β-induced SOCS1 expression in chondrocytes was analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot. The effect of SOCS1 on IL-1β signaling pathways and the synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanase-1 was investigated in SOCS1-overexpressing or -knockdown chondrocytes. Results SOCS1 expression was significantly increased in OA cartilage, especially in areas of severe damage (P < 0.01). IL-1β stimulated SOCS1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent pattern (P < 0.01). The IL-1β-induced production of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-4 (aggrecanase-1, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4) was affected by SOCS1 overexpression or knockdown in both SW1353 cells and primary human articular chondrocytes (all P values < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of SOCS1 were mediated by blocking p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, and by downregulating transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) expression. Conclusions Our results show that SOCS1 is induced by IL1-β in OA chondrocytes and suppresses the IL-1β-induced synthesis of matrix-degrading enzymes by inhibiting IL-1β signaling at multiple levels. It suggests that the IL-1β-inducible SOCS1 acts as a negative regulator of the IL-1β response in OA cartilage. PMID:24238405

  13. Women in management means women in power: implications for society, family and culture in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    King-irani, L

    1995-01-01

    A May 1995 conference in Beirut on "The Arab Woman and Business Management" focused on the fact that women are relatively absent from decision-making positions in the public and private sectors in the Arab world. Conference participants also identified characteristics of Arab women who have successfully penetrated the ranks of management, discussed how to balance work and home life, and considered the potentially important role of women managers in the nonprofit sector. Recurring and interrelated themes of the conference addressed the fact that women who have become empowered at work will have increased self-confidence in every aspect of their lives. Also, women who have successfully managed a busy household are able to transfer these skills to the workplace. Women will increasingly demand access to the highest ranks of decision-making, but their culturally-shaped sense of themselves may ultimately hinder them from attaining positions currently reserved for men. Research has shown that women's conceptions of power are more egalitarian and cooperative than the competitiveness exhibited by men. Women may, therefore, offer an important approach to the rapidly changing world market which requires the cooperation of people from diverse backgrounds. Ultimately, it is women who define themselves (rather than accept an identity chosen by society, the family, or culture) who will progress the fastest and achieve the highest ranks in management. Women should neither passively wait to be handed power not allow men to define the nature and uses of power. Instead they must seize their own power and exercise it in their own ways. PMID:12290463

  14. Women in management means women in power: implications for society, family and culture in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    King-irani, L

    1995-01-01

    A May 1995 conference in Beirut on "The Arab Woman and Business Management" focused on the fact that women are relatively absent from decision-making positions in the public and private sectors in the Arab world. Conference participants also identified characteristics of Arab women who have successfully penetrated the ranks of management, discussed how to balance work and home life, and considered the potentially important role of women managers in the nonprofit sector. Recurring and interrelated themes of the conference addressed the fact that women who have become empowered at work will have increased self-confidence in every aspect of their lives. Also, women who have successfully managed a busy household are able to transfer these skills to the workplace. Women will increasingly demand access to the highest ranks of decision-making, but their culturally-shaped sense of themselves may ultimately hinder them from attaining positions currently reserved for men. Research has shown that women's conceptions of power are more egalitarian and cooperative than the competitiveness exhibited by men. Women may, therefore, offer an important approach to the rapidly changing world market which requires the cooperation of people from diverse backgrounds. Ultimately, it is women who define themselves (rather than accept an identity chosen by society, the family, or culture) who will progress the fastest and achieve the highest ranks in management. Women should neither passively wait to be handed power not allow men to define the nature and uses of power. Instead they must seize their own power and exercise it in their own ways.

  15. Extinction in a hyperdiverse endemic Hawaiian land snail family and implications for the underestimation of invertebrate extinction.

    PubMed

    Régnier, Claire; Bouchet, Philippe; Hayes, Kenneth A; Yeung, Norine W; Christensen, Carl C; Chung, Daniel J D; Fontaine, Benoît; Cowie, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List includes 832 species listed as extinct since 1600, a minuscule fraction of total biodiversity. This extinction rate is of the same order of magnitude as the background rate and has been used to downplay the biodiversity crisis. Invertebrates comprise 99% of biodiversity, yet the status of a negligible number has been assessed. We assessed extinction in the Hawaiian land snail family Amastridae (325 species, IUCN lists 33 as extinct). We did not use the stringent IUCN criteria, by which most invertebrates would be considered data deficient, but a more realistic approach comparing historical collections with modern surveys and expert knowledge. Of the 325 Amastridae species, 43 were originally described as fossil or subfossil and were assumed to be extinct. Of the remaining 282, we evaluated 88 as extinct and 15 as extant and determined that 179 species had insufficient evidence of extinction (though most are probably extinct). Results of statistical assessment of extinction probabilities were consistent with our expert evaluations of levels of extinction. Modeling various extinction scenarios yielded extinction rates of 0.4-14.0% of the amastrid fauna per decade. The true rate of amastrid extinction has not been constant; generally, it has increased over time. We estimated a realistic average extinction rate as approximately 5%/decade since the first half of the nineteenth century. In general, oceanic island biotas are especially susceptible to extinction and global rate generalizations do not reflect this. Our approach could be used for other invertebrates, especially those with restricted ranges (e.g., islands), and such an approach may be the only way to evaluate invertebrates rapidly enough to keep up with ongoing extinction.

  16. Small-molecule control of cytokine function: new opportunities for treating immune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Thomas B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Shamji, Alykhan F.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating cytokine function with protein-based drugs has proven effective for treating a wide variety of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory disorders. However, the limited ability of protein-based drugs to modulate intracellular targets, including many implicated by studies of the genetics and physiology of these diseases, and to coordinately neutralize redundant inflammatory cytokines, suggest an important and complementary role for small molecules in immunomodulatory drug development. The recent clinical approval of Janus kinase and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, along with emerging evidence from other compound classes, firmly establish small molecules as effective tools for modulating therapeutically relevant proteins that give rise to aberrant cytokine signaling or mediate its downstream consequences. PMID:25222143

  17. Targeted resequencing implicates the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV and the toll-like receptor 4 gene TLR4 in Behçet disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirino, Yohei; Zhou, Qing; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Seyahi, Emire; Özyazgan, Yilmaz; Ugurlu, Serdal; Erer, Burak; Abaci, Neslihan; Ustek, Duran; Meguro, Akira; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ombrello, Michael J.; Satorius, Colleen L.; Maskeri, Baishali; Mullikin, James C.; Sun, Hong-Wei; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Kim, Yoonhee; Wilson, Alexander F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Gül, Ahmet; Remmers, Elaine F.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful means of identifying genes with disease-associated common variants, but they are not well-suited to detecting genes with disease-associated rare and low-frequency variants. In the current study of Behçet disease (BD), nonsynonymous variants (NSVs) identified by deep exonic resequencing of 10 genes found by GWAS (IL10, IL23R, CCR1, STAT4, KLRK1, KLRC1, KLRC2, KLRC3, KLRC4, and ERAP1) and 11 genes selected for their role in innate immunity (IL1B, IL1R1, IL1RN, NLRP3, MEFV, TNFRSF1A, PSTPIP1, CASP1, PYCARD, NOD2, and TLR4) were evaluated for BD association. A differential distribution of the rare and low-frequency NSVs of a gene in 2,461 BD cases compared with 2,458 controls indicated their collective association with disease. By stringent criteria requiring at least a single burden test with study-wide significance and a corroborating test with at least nominal significance, rare and low-frequency NSVs in one GWAS-identified gene, IL23R (P = 6.9 × 10−5), and one gene involved in innate immunity, TLR4 (P = 8.0 × 10−4), were associated with BD. In addition, damaging or rare damaging NOD2 variants were nominally significant across all three burden tests applied (P = 0.0063–0.045). Furthermore, carriage of the familial Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutation Met694Val, which is known to cause recessively inherited familial Mediterranean fever, conferred BD risk in the Turkish population (OR, 2.65; P = 1.8 × 10−12). The disease-associated NSVs in MEFV and TLR4 implicate innate immune and bacterial sensing mechanisms in BD pathogenesis. PMID:23633568

  18. Neuroendocrine hormones such as growth hormone and prolactin are integral members of the immunological cytokine network.

    PubMed

    Redelman, Doug; Welniak, Lisbeth A; Taub, Dennis; Murphy, William J

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) have been demonstrated to accelerate the recovery of the immune response after chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation and to enhance the restoration of immunity in individuals infected with HIV and in normal individuals with compromised immune systems associated with aging. As the mechanism of action of these hormones has been elucidated, it has become clear that they are integral members of the immunological cytokine/chemokine network and share regulatory mechanisms with a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines. The members of this cytokine network induce and can be regulated by members of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of intracellular proteins. In order to take advantage of the potential beneficial effects of hormones such as GH or PRL, it is essential to take into consideration the overall cytokine network and the regulatory effects of SOCS proteins.

  19. Highly heterogeneous rates of evolution in the SKP1 gene family in plants and animals: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hongzhi; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Ni, Weimin; dePamphilis, Claude W; Ma, Hong

    2004-01-01

    (N)/d(S) values, and amino acid changes at key positions. In addition, our analyses revealed several monophyletic groups within the SKP1 gene family, one for each of protists, fungi, animals, and plants, as well as nematodes, arthropods, and angiosperms, suggesting that the extant SKP1 genes within each of these eukaryote groups shared only one common ancestor.

  20. Interleukin-6-type cytokine signalling through the gp130/Jak/STAT pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, P C; Behrmann, I; Müller-Newen, G; Schaper, F; Graeve, L

    1998-01-01

    The family of cytokines signalling through the common receptor subunit gp130 comprises interleukin (IL)-6, IL-11, leukaemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin M, ciliary neurotrophic factor and cardiotrophin-1. These so-called IL-6-type cytokines play an important role in the regulation of complex cellular processes such as gene activation, proliferation and differentiation. The current knowledge on the signal-transduction mechanisms of these cytokines from the plasma membrane to the nucleus is reviewed. In particular, we focus on the assembly of receptor complexes after ligand binding, the activation of receptor-associated kinases of the Janus family, and the recruitment and phosphorylation of transcription factors of the STAT family, which dimerize, translocate to the nucleus, and bind to enhancer elements of respective target genes leading to transcriptional activation. The important players in the signalling pathway, namely the cytokines and the receptor components, the Janus kinases Jak1, Jak2 and Tyk2, the signal transducers and activators of transcription STAT1 and STAT3 and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 [SH2 (Src homology 2) domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase] are introduced and their structural/functional properties are discussed. Furthermore, we review various mechanisms involved in the termination of the IL-6-type cytokine signalling, namely the action of tyrosine phosphatases, proteasome, Jak kinase inhibitors SOCS (suppressor of cytokine signalling), protein inhibitors of activated STATs (PIAS), and internalization of the cytokine receptors via gp130. Although all IL-6-type cytokines signal through the gp130/Jak/STAT pathway, the comparison of their physiological properties shows that they elicit not only similar, but also distinct, biological responses. This is reflected in the different phenotypes of IL-6-type-cytokine knock-out animals. PMID:9716487

  1. Induction of Cytokines by Glucosyltransferases of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jean-San; Lien, Huei-Ting; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chen, Pei-Min; Sun, Andy; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2002-01-01

    Production of proinflammatory cytokines is implicated in the pathogenesis of viridans streptococcus-induced α-streptococcal shock syndrome and infective endocarditis. Streptococcus mutans, one of the opportunistic pathogens causing infective endocarditis, was reported previously to stimulate monocytes and epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro to produce various cytokines. We found that glucosyltransferases (GTFs) GtfC and GtfD of S. mutans stimulated predominantly the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from T cells cultured in vitro. The level of IL-6 but not of tumor necrosis factor alpha in blood was significantly elevated when rats were injected intravenously with S. mutans GS-5, whereas IL-6 was detected at a much lower level when rats were challenged with NHS1DD, an isogenic mutant defective in the expression of GTFs. The serum IL-6 level was elevated in patients with endocarditis caused by different species of viridans streptococci which express GTF homologues. Affinity column-purified GTFs reduced the levels of detectable IL-2 of T cells stimulated by another bacterial antigen, tetanus toxoid. These results suggested that GTFs might modulate the production of Th1-type cytokines and that GTFs of S. mutans play a significant role in stimulating the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 in vivo. PMID:12093691

  2. Neuropoietic cytokines and activin A differentially regulate the phenotype of cultured sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Fann, M J; Patterson, P H

    1994-01-01

    A number of cytokines sharing limited sequence homology have been grouped as a family because of partially overlapping biological activities, receptor subunit promiscuity, and the prediction of a shared secondary structure. Since several of these cytokines regulate gene expression and cell number in the nervous and hematopoietic systems, this specific group is termed the neuropoietic cytokine family. Using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based assay system for monitoring the expression of multiple phenotypic markers in cultured sympathetic neurons, we present further evidence that, in addition to cholinergic differentiation factor/leukemia inhibitory factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor, oncostatin M, growth promoting activity, interleukin 6, and interleukin 11 belong in this family. In addition, one member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, activin A, shares a selective overlap with the neuropoietic family in the spectrum of neuropeptides that it induces in sympathetic neurons. The particular neuropeptides induced by activin A, however, demonstrate that the activity of this cytokine is distinct from that of the neuropoietic family. Twenty-six other cytokines and growth factors were without detectable activity in this assay. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7904069

  3. Molecular analysis of deletion (17)(p11.2p11.2) in a family segregating a 17p paracentric inversion: implications for carriers of paracentric inversions.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S P; Bidichandani, S I; Figuera, L E; Juyal, R C; Saxon, P J; Baldini, A; Patel, P I

    1997-01-01

    A male child with multiple congenital anomalies initially was clinically diagnosed as having Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS). Subsequent cytogenetic studies revealed an interstitial deletion of 17p11.2, which is associated with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Biochemical studies were not supportive of a diagnosis of SLOS, and the child did not display the typical SMS phenotype. The father's karyotype showed a paracentric inversion of 17p, with breakpoints in p11.2 and p13.3, and the same inversion was also found in two of the father's sisters. FISH analyses of the deleted and inverted 17p chromosomes indicated that the deletion was similar to that typically seen in SMS patients and was found to bracket the proximal inversion breakpoint. Available family members were genotyped at 33 polymorphic DNA loci in 17p. These studies determined that the deletion was of paternal origin and that the inversion was of grandpaternal origin. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that the 17p11.2 deletion arose following a recombination event involving the father's normal and inverted chromosome 17 homologues. A mechanism is proposed to explain the simultaneous deletion and apparent "reinversion" of the recombinant paternal chromosome. These findings have implications for prenatal counseling of carriers of paracentric inversions, who typically are considered to bear minimal reproductive risk. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9150166

  4. Evident and latent plasticity across the rice diterpene synthase family with potential implications for the evolution of diterpenoid metabolism in the cereals

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, Dana; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Mead, Matthew E.; Lowry, Luke; Fulton, D. Bruce; Peters, Reuben J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The evolution of natural products biosynthetic pathways can be envisioned to occur via a number of mechanisms. Here we provide evidence that latent plasticity plays a role in such metabolic evolution. In particular, rice (Oryza sativa) produces both ent- and syn-copalyl diphosphate (CPP), which are substrates for downstream diterpene synthases. Here we report that several members of this enzymatic family exhibit dual reactivity with some pairing of ent-, syn-, or normal CPP stereochemistry. Evident plasticity was observed, as a previously reported ent-sandaracopimaradiene synthase also converts syn-CPP to syn-labda-8(17),12E,14-triene, which can be found in planta. Notably, normal CPP is not naturally found in rice. Thus, the presence of diterpene synthases that react with this non-native metabolite reveals latent enzymatic/metabolic plasticity, providing biochemical capacity for utilization of such a novel substrate (i.e., normal CPP) that may arise during evolution, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:21323642

  5. Evident and latent plasticity across the rice diterpene synthase family with potential implications for the evolution of diterpenoid metabolism in the cereals.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Dana; Hillwig, Matthew L; Mead, Matthew E; Lowry, Luke; Fulton, D Bruce; Peters, Reuben J

    2011-05-01

    The evolution of natural product biosynthetic pathways can be envisioned to occur via a number of mechanisms. In the present study we provide evidence that latent plasticity plays a role in such metabolic evolution. In particular, rice (Oryza sativa) produces both ent- and syn-CPP (copalyl diphosphate), which are substrates for downstream diterpene synthases. In the present paper we report that several members of this enzymatic family exhibit dual reactivity with some pairing of ent-, syn- or normal CPP stereochemistry. Evident plasticity was observed, as a previously reported ent-sandaracopimaradiene synthase also converts syn-CPP into syn-labda-8(17),12E,14-triene, which can be found in planta. Notably, normal CPP is not naturally found in rice. Thus the presence of diterpene synthases that react with this non-native metabolite reveals latent enzymatic/metabolic plasticity, providing biochemical capacity for utilization of such a novel substrate (i.e. normal CPP) which may arise during evolution, the implications of which are discussed.

  6. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  7. Cytokine decoy and scavenger receptors as key regulators of immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bonecchi, Raffaella; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Riva, Federica

    2016-11-01

    IL-1R2 was the first decoy receptor to be described. Subsequently receptors which act as pure decoys or scavengers or trigger dampening of cytokine signaling have been described for cytokines and chemokines. Here we review the current understanding of the mode of action and significance in pathology of the chemokine atypical receptor ACKR2, the IL-1 decoy receptor IL-1R2 and the atypical IL-1 receptor family IL-1R8. Decoy and scavenger receptors with no or atypical signaling have emerged as a general strategy conserved in evolution to tune the action of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. PMID:27498604

  8. Circulating Cytokines as Biomarkers of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Achur, Rajeshwara N.; Freeman, Willard M.; Vrana, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently no consistent objective biochemical markers of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Development of reliable diagnostic biomarkers that permit accurate assessment of alcohol intake and patterns of drinking is of prime importance to treatment and research fields. Diagnostic biomarker development in other diseases has demonstrated the utility of both open, systems biology, screening for biomarkers and more rational focused efforts on specific biomolecules or families of biomolecules. Long term alcohol consumption leads to altered inflammatory cell and adaptive immune responses with associated pathologies and increased incidence of infections. This has led researchers to focus attention on identifying cytokine biomarkers in models of alcohol abuse. Alcohol is known to alter cytokine levels in plasma and a variety of tissues including lung, liver, and very importantly brain. A number of cytokine biomarker candidates have been identified, including: TNF alpha, IL1-alpha, IL1-beta, IL6, IL8, IL12 and MCP-1. This is an emerging and potentially exciting avenue of research in that circulating cytokines may contribute to diagnostic biomarker panels and a combination of multiple biomarkers may significantly increase the sensitivity and specificity of the biochemical tests aiding reliable and accurate detection of excessive alcohol intake. PMID:20020329

  9. Cytokine disturbances in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Noam; Stohl, William

    2011-07-06

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex, and the resulting disease manifestations are heterogeneous. Cytokine dysregulation is pervasive, and their protein and gene expression profiles may serve as markers of disease activity and severity. Importantly, biologic agents that target specific cytokines may represent novel therapies for SLE. Four cytokines (IL-6, TNFα, IFNα, and BLyS) are being evaluated as therapeutic targets in SLE. The present review will examine the roles of each of these cytokines in murine and human SLE, and will summarize results from clinical trials of agents that target these cytokines.

  10. Discovery of potential new gene variants and inflammatory cytokine associations with fibromyalgia syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinong; Zhang, Zhifang; Wu, Xiwei; Mao, Allen; Chang, Frances; Deng, Xutao; Gao, Harry; Ouyang, Ching; Dery, Kenneth J; Le, Keith; Longmate, Jeffrey; Marek, Claudia; St Amand, R Paul; Krontiris, Theodore G; Shively, John E

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder affecting 2% to 5% of the general population. Both genetic and environmental factors may be involved. To ascertain in an unbiased manner which genes play a role in the disorder, we performed complete exome sequencing on a subset of FMS patients. Out of 150 nuclear families (trios) DNA from 19 probands was subjected to complete exome sequencing. Since >80,000 SNPs were found per proband, the data were further filtered, including analysis of those with stop codons, a rare frequency (<2.5%) in the 1000 Genomes database, and presence in at least 2/19 probands sequenced. Two nonsense mutations, W32X in C11orf40 and Q100X in ZNF77 among 150 FMS trios had a significantly elevated frequency of transmission to affected probands (p = 0.026 and p = 0.032, respectively) and were present in a subset of 13% and 11% of FMS patients, respectively. Among 9 patients bearing more than one of the variants we have described, 4 had onset of symptoms between the ages of 10 and 18. The subset with the C11orf40 mutation had elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1 and IP-10, compared with unaffected controls or FMS patients with the wild-type allele. Similarly, patients with the ZNF77 mutation have elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokine, IL-12, compared with controls or patients with the wild type allele. Our results strongly implicate an inflammatory basis for FMS, as well as specific cytokine dysregulation, in at least 35% of our FMS cohort.

  11. Interferon, a growing cytokine family: 50 years of interferon research.

    PubMed

    Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K; Wietzerbin, Juana

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of an antiviral state in cells is the defining activity of interferons (IFNs) as well as the property that permitted their discovery in 1957 by Isaacs and Lindenmann. In addition, interferons have other cellular functions that have potential clinical applications. Today, interferons are used for the treatment of a variety of malignancies and viral diseases. The publication of this special issue of Biochimie gives us a great opportunity to review the state of the art in knowledge about interferons and to explore possible future directions. This commentary text will introduce the reviews written by colleagues who are experts in different aspects of interferon research, to mark the 50th anniversary of the discovery of interferon.

  12. Granzymes regulate proinflammatory cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2015-01-15

    Granzymes (Grs) are serine proteases mainly produced by cytotoxic lymphocytes and are traditionally considered to cause apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. However, the cytotoxicity of several Grs is currently being debated, and additional, predominantly extracellular, functions of Grs in inflammation are emerging. Extracellular soluble Grs are elevated in the circulation of patients with autoimmune diseases and infections. Additionally, Grs are expressed by several types of immune cells other than cytotoxic lymphocytes. Recent research has revealed novel immunomodulatory functions of Grs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on the role of Grs in inflammation, highlighting their role in cytokine induction and processing.

  13. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  14. Polymorphisms at Cytokine Genes May Determine the Effect of Vitamin E on Cytokine Production in the Elderly1–3

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Leka, Lynette S.; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Jacques, Paul F.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin E has been shown to affect cytokine production. However, individual response to vitamin E supplementation varies. Previous studies indicate that cytokine production is heritable and common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) may explain differences in cytokine production between individuals. We hypothesize that the differential response to the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin E reflects genetic differences among individuals, including SNP at cytokine genes that modulate cytokine production. We used data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled 1-y vitamin E (182 mg d,l-α-tocopherol) intervention study in elderly men and women (mean age 83 y) to test this hypothesis (vitamin E, n = 47; placebo, n = 63). We found that the effect of vitamin E on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in whole blood stimulated for 24 h with lipopolysaccharide (1.0 mg/L) is dependent on TNFα -308G > A. Participants with the A/A and A/G genotypes at TNFα -308G > A who were treated with vitamin E had lower TNFα production than those with the A allele treated with placebo. These observations suggest that individual immune responses to vitamin E supplementation are in part mediated by genetic factors. Because the A allele at TNFα has been previously associated with higher TNFα levels in whole blood and isolated immune cells, our observations suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of vitamin E is specific to those genetically predisposed to higher inflammation. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism driving the interaction between vitamin E treatment and TNFα -308G > A and its implications for disease resistance. PMID:19710156

  15. Polymorphisms at cytokine genes may determine the effect of vitamin E on cytokine production in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Belisle, Sarah E; Leka, Lynette S; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Jacques, Paul F; Ordovas, Jose M; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2009-10-01

    Vitamin E has been shown to affect cytokine production. However, individual response to vitamin E supplementation varies. Previous studies indicate that cytokine production is heritable and common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) may explain differences in cytokine production between individuals. We hypothesize that the differential response to the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin E reflects genetic differences among individuals, including SNP at cytokine genes that modulate cytokine production. We used data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled 1-y vitamin E (182 mg d,l-alpha-tocopherol) intervention study in elderly men and women (mean age 83 y) to test this hypothesis (vitamin E, n = 47; placebo, n = 63). We found that the effect of vitamin E on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production in whole blood stimulated for 24 h with lipopolysaccharide (1.0 mg/L) is dependent on TNFalpha -308G > A. Participants with the A/A and A/G genotypes at TNFalpha -308G > A who were treated with vitamin E had lower TNFalpha production than those with the A allele treated with placebo. These observations suggest that individual immune responses to vitamin E supplementation are in part mediated by genetic factors. Because the A allele at TNFalpha has been previously associated with higher TNFalpha levels in whole blood and isolated immune cells, our observations suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of vitamin E is specific to those genetically predisposed to higher inflammation. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism driving the interaction between vitamin E treatment and TNFalpha -308G > A and its implications for disease resistance.

  16. Effect of exercise training on skeletal muscle cytokine expression in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Della Gatta, Paul A; Garnham, Andrew P; Peake, Jonathan M; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-07-01

    Aging is associated with increased circulating pro-inflammatory and lower anti-inflammatory cytokines. Exercise training, in addition to improving muscle function, reduces these circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet, few studies have evaluated changes in the expression of cytokines within skeletal muscle after exercise training. The aim of the current study was to examine the expression of cytokines both at rest and following a bout of isokinetic exercise performed before and after 12weeks of resistance exercise training in young (n=8, 20.3±0.8yr) and elderly men (n=8, 66.9±1.6yr). Protein expression of various cytokines was determined in muscle homogenates. The expression of MCP-1, IL-8 and IL-6 (which are traditionally classified as 'pro-inflammatory') increased substantially after acute exercise. By contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 increased only slightly (or not at all) after acute exercise. These responses were not significantly different between young and elderly men, either before or after 12weeks of exercise training. However, compared with the young men, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines 2h post exercise tended to be greater in the elderly men prior to training. Training attenuated this difference. These data suggest that the inflammatory response to unaccustomed exercise increases with age. Furthermore, regular exercise training may help to normalize this inflammatory response, which could have important implications for muscle regeneration and adaptation in the elderly.

  17. Overview of cytokines and nitric oxide involvement in immuno-pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soufli, Imene; Toumi, Ryma; Rafa, Hayet; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are complex disorders with undetermined etiology. Several hypotheses suggest that IBDs result from an abnormal immune response against endogenous flora and luminal antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. The dysfunction of the mucosal immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. The balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-17A], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13), and immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factors β) is disturbed. Moreover, evidence from animal and clinical studies demonstrate a positive correlation between an increased concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the severity of the disease. Interestingly, proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of inducible oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in IBD. However, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines are responsible for the negative regulation of iNOS. A positive correlation between NO production and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12, and interferon-γ) were reported in patients with IBD. This review focuses on the role of cytokines in intestinal inflammation and their relationship with NO in IBD. PMID:27602236

  18. Overview of cytokines and nitric oxide involvement in immuno-pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Soufli, Imene; Toumi, Ryma; Rafa, Hayet; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are complex disorders with undetermined etiology. Several hypotheses suggest that IBDs result from an abnormal immune response against endogenous flora and luminal antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. The dysfunction of the mucosal immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. The balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-17A], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13), and immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factors β) is disturbed. Moreover, evidence from animal and clinical studies demonstrate a positive correlation between an increased concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the severity of the disease. Interestingly, proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of inducible oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in IBD. However, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines are responsible for the negative regulation of iNOS. A positive correlation between NO production and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12, and interferon-γ) were reported in patients with IBD. This review focuses on the role of cytokines in intestinal inflammation and their relationship with NO in IBD. PMID:27602236

  19. Analysis of intracellular cytokines using flowcytometry.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunil K

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of T-cell clones and identification of functional subsets of the helper T-cells with polarized cytokine production is based on testing of cytokine expression. Several methods have been developed that allow cytokine expression to be measured like ELISA, RT-PCR, ELISPOT, ISH and flowcytometry. Among all these methods, monitoring of cytokine production using flowcytometric analysis has its own advantages and disadvantages. Multi-parametric characterization of cytokine production on single cell basis, without long-term culture and cloning along with high throughput of samples is main feature attached to flowcytometric analysis. The interpretation may be difficult at times due to change in the phenotype of the cells. Cells with similar surface phenotype but synthesizing different cytokines and having different functional characteristics can be analyzed with this technique. PMID:12815288

  20. Bioanalytical Chemistry of Cytokines-A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stenken, Julie A.; Poschenrieder, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described. PMID:25467452

  1. Cytokine-Modulating Strategies and Newer Cytokine Targets for Arthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are the key mediators of inflammation in the course of autoimmune arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases. Uncontrolled production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17 can promote autoimmune pathology, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-10, and IL-27 can help control inflammation and tissue damage. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are the prime targets of the strategies to control rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For example, the neutralization of TNFα, either by engineered anti-cytokine antibodies or by soluble cytokine receptors as decoys, has proven successful in the treatment of RA. The activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines can also be downregulated either by using specific siRNA to inhibit the expression of a particular cytokine or by using small molecule inhibitors of cytokine signaling. Furthermore, the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines or cytokine antagonists delivered via gene therapy has proven to be an effective approach to regulate autoimmunity. Unexpectedly, under certain conditions, TNFα, IFN-γ, and few other cytokines can display anti-inflammatory activities. Increasing awareness of this phenomenon might help develop appropriate regimens to harness or avoid this effect. Furthermore, the relatively newer cytokines such as IL-32, IL-34 and IL-35 are being investigated for their potential role in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:25561237

  2. Current status and challenges of cytokine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zídek, Z; Anzenbacher, P; Kmoníčková, E

    2009-01-01

    The major concern of pharmacology about cytokines has originated from plentiful data showing association between gross changes in their production and pathophysiological processes. Despite the enigmatic role of cytokines in diseases, a number of them have become a subject of cytokine and anti-cytokine immunotherapies. Production of cytokines can be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous stimuli including drugs. Cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, are richly endowed with receptors for the mediators of physiological functions, such as biogenic amines, adenosine, prostanoids, steroids, etc. Drugs, agonists or antagonists of these receptors can directly or indirectly up- and down-regulate secretion of cytokines and expression of cytokine receptors. Vice versa, cytokines interfere with drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics through the interactions with cytochrome P450 and multiple drug resistance proteins. The aim of the review is to encourage more intensive studies in these fields of cytokine pharmacology. It also outlines major areas of searching promising candidates for immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19371342

  3. Principles of interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokine signalling and its regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Peter C; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Serge; Hermanns, Heike M; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Schaper, Fred

    2003-01-01

    The IL (interleukin)-6-type cytokines IL-6, IL-11, LIF (leukaemia inhibitory factor), OSM (oncostatin M), ciliary neurotrophic factor, cardiotrophin-1 and cardiotrophin-like cytokine are an important family of mediators involved in the regulation of the acute-phase response to injury and infection. Besides their functions in inflammation and the immune response, these cytokines play also a crucial role in haematopoiesis, liver and neuronal regeneration, embryonal development and fertility. Dysregulation of IL-6-type cytokine signalling contributes to the onset and maintenance of several diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis and various types of cancer (e.g. multiple myeloma and prostate cancer). IL-6-type cytokines exert their action via the signal transducers gp (glycoprotein) 130, LIF receptor and OSM receptor leading to the activation of the JAK/STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. This review focuses on recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IL-6-type cytokine signal transduction. Emphasis is put on the termination and modulation of the JAK/STAT signalling pathway mediated by tyrosine phosphatases, the SOCS (suppressor of cytokine signalling) feedback inhibitors and PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) proteins. Also the cross-talk between the JAK/STAT pathway with other signalling cascades is discussed. PMID:12773095

  4. Assessing postpartum family functioning.

    PubMed

    Midmer, D; Talbot, Y

    1988-09-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals.

  5. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  6. Interleukin-6, a Major Cytokine in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Erta, María; Quintana, Albert; Hidalgo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine originally identified almost 30 years ago as a B-cell differentiation factor, capable of inducing the maturation of B cells into antibody-producing cells. As with many other cytokines, it was soon realized that IL-6 was not a factor only involved in the immune response, but with many critical roles in major physiological systems including the nervous system. IL-6 is now known to participate in neurogenesis (influencing both neurons and glial cells), and in the response of mature neurons and glial cells in normal conditions and following a wide arrange of injury models. In many respects, IL-6 behaves in a neurotrophin-like fashion, and seemingly makes understandable why the cytokine family that it belongs to is known as neuropoietins. Its expression is affected in several of the main brain diseases, and animal models strongly suggest that IL-6 could have a role in the observed neuropathology and that therefore it is a clear target of strategic therapies. PMID:23136554

  7. Performance Status in Elderly Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Exploring Gene Expression Signatures of Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Nipp, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive disease that predominantly affects elderly patients. Cytokines and chemokines are major players in the pathogenesis of AML. They regulate the disease course and play a deleterious role in the progression of AML. The geriatric population is particularly vulnerable to these mediators as these cytokines and chemokines are also implicated in the development of frailty, fatigue, and declining cognitive function. It is the combination of these adverse effects of cytokines and chemokines that affect performance status and, in turn, the poor prognosis in this age group. Cytokines and chemokines are emerging as therapeutic targets in AML. Future endeavors to treat AML will likely involve cytokines and chemokines as attempts are made to disrupt the bone marrow environment. By modulating the bone marrow stroma, the goal is to create an environment less favorable to AML cells and more favorable to the effects of chemotherapy against AML. PMID:23783402

  8. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  9. Time course of cytokine levels in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1995-11-01

    In severe sepsis, a network of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8) is activated and blood levels of these cytokines are elevated, albeit inconsistently and with large individual variations. In addition, elevated blood levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), as well as of soluble cytokine receptors (sTNF-RI and II, IL-1ra), have been found. They seem to have a regulatory function in the host response. Levels of TNF and IL-6 are usually highest at the time of admission, whereas the time course of IL-1 beta levels (when detectable) can vary considerably. Limited data on IL-8 levels suggest that they may remain elevated for longer periods. Elevated levels of sTNFR and IL-1ra may also persist for a prolonged period of time. The pathogenetic significance of these observations is still unclear, but persistingly high levels of proinflammatory cytokines may be associated with organ failure and mortality.

  10. Cytokines in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

    PubMed

    Mangge, H; Schauenstein, K

    1998-06-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), unlike rheumatoid arthritis of adulthood (RA), is a heterogenous disease comprising at least five subtypes that differ in clinical course and prognosis, and require different therapeutical approaches. As compared to RA, the production of local and systemic cytokines in JRA have not yet been as extensively investigated. In this article we review the available literature on cytokine expression in serum and synovial fluid in all five different subtypes of JRA. Even though the data are still fragmentary, the evidence so far suggests that the determination of serum cytokines yields relevant information as to clinical subtype and inflammatory activity of the disease. Furthermore, the cytokine data suggest that the pathogenesis of JRA may even by more heterogenous than defined by the clinical subtypes. Finally, future directions of research in this area are proposed, and-based on the latest results-arguments for (anti)cytokine therapies in JRA are critically discussed.

  11. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tian-Tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy.

  12. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  13. Cytokine variations and mood disorders: influence of social stressors and social support

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Marie-Claude; McQuaid, Robyn J.; Merali, Zul; Anisman, Hymie

    2014-01-01

    Stressful events have been implicated in the evolution of mood disorders. In addition to brain neurotransmitters and growth factors, the view has been offered that these disorders might be provoked by the activation of the inflammatory immune system as well as by de novo changes of inflammatory cytokines within the brain. The present review describes the impact of social stressors in animals and in humans on behavioral changes reminiscent of depressive states as well as on cytokine functioning. Social stressors increase pro-inflammatory cytokines in circulation as well as in brain regions that have been associated with depression, varying with the animal's social status and/or behavioral methods used to contend with social challenges. Likewise, in humans, social stressors that favor the development of depression are accompanied by elevated circulating cytokine levels and conversely, conditions that limit the cytokine elevations correlated with symptom attenuation or reversal. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the potentially powerful effects of social support, social identity, and connectedness in maintaining well-being and in diminishing symptoms of depression. PMID:25565946

  14. Cytokine dysregulation in autism spectrum disorders (ASD): Possible role of the environment

    PubMed Central

    Goines, Paula E.; Ashwood, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental diseases that affect an alarming number of individuals. The etiological basis of ASD is unclear, and evidence suggests it involves both genetic and environmental factors. There are many reports of cytokine imbalances in ASD. These imbalances could have a pathogenic role, or they may be markers of underlying genetic and environmental influences. Cytokines act primarily as mediators of immunological activity, but they also have significant interactions with the nervous system. They participate in normal neural development and function, and inappropriate activity can have a variety of neurological implications. It is therefore possible that cytokine dysregulation contributes directly to neural dysfunction in ASD. Further, cytokine profiles change dramatically in the face of infection, disease, and toxic exposures. Therefore, imbalances may represent an immune response to environmental contributors to ASD. The following review is presented in two main parts. First, we discuss select cytokines implicated in ASD, including IL-1Β, IL-6, IL-4, IFN-γ, and TGF-Β, and focus on their role in the nervous system. Second, we explore several neurotoxic environmental factors that may be involved in the disorders, and focus on their immunological impacts. This review represents an emerging model that recognizes the importance of both genetic and environmental factors in ASD etiology. We propose that the immune system provides critical clues regarding the nature of the gene by environment interactions that underlie ASD pathophysiology. PMID:22918031

  15. Inconsistencies in the Roles of Family- and Paid- Carers in Monitoring Health Issues in People with Learning Disabilities: Some Implications for the Integration of Health and Social Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the living circumstances of people with learning disabilities have seen responsibility for their health become the provenance of paid-and family-carers. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with three family-carers and ten paid-carers. Findings revealed that the role of these carers was undefined, leading to difficulty in…

  16. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families: Implications of Recent Legislative and Economic Changes for State Programs and Work Participation Rates. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-10-525

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) reauthorized the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant and made modifications expected to strengthen work requirements for families receiving cash assistance through state TANF programs. Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and states were required to take steps to…

  17. Spanish-Speaking Mexican-American Families' Involvement in School-Based Activities and Their Children's Literacy: The Implications of Having Teachers Who Speak Spanish and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sandra; Dearing, Eric; Weiss, Heather B.

    2012-01-01

    For a sample of low-income, Spanish-speaking Mexican-American families (n = 72), we investigated associations between family involvement in school-based activities and children's literacy in their preferred language (English or Spanish) during early elementary school. We gave special attention to the potential moderating role of teacher fluency in…

  18. Beyond the ball: implications for HIV risk and prevention among the constructed families of African American men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Owczarzak, Jill; St Lawrence, Janet; Sitzler, Cheryl; Quinn, Katherine; Pearson, Broderick; Kelly, Jeffrey A; Amirkhanian, Yuri A

    2014-11-01

    African American men who have sex with men (AAMSM) are disproportionately burdened by new and existing HIV infections. In spite of this, few HIV prevention interventions have been developed that meet the specific needs of AAMSM and that are culturally appropriate and build on strengths and resources. In this paper, we examine constructed families, including those who belong to houses and those who do not, from a three city sample of 196 AAMSM. Results show that the majority of AAMSM who belong to constructed families do not participate in houses or balls. Both house and non-house affiliated constructed families are important sources of social support among AAMSM. Participants reported limited success in spreading HIV messages at ball events, but talk about HIV within their constructed families. Social network approaches to HIV prevention may capitalize on existing social ties within constructed families to promote safer sexual behaviors.

  19. Non-penetrance in a MODY 3 family with a mutation in the hepatic nuclear factor 1alpha gene: implications for predictive testing.

    PubMed

    Miedzybrodzka, Z; Hattersley, A T; Ellard, S; Pearson, D; de Silva, D; Harvey, R; Haites, N

    1999-09-01

    The most common cause of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a mutation in the hepatic nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1alpha) gene (MODY3). We describe a family in which a missense mutation causing a Thr-Ile substitution at codon 620 has been found in all affected members. The mutation is not fully penetrant as two family members aged 87 and 46 have the mutation but do not have diabetes. The severity and age of diagnosis of diabetes varies widely within the family, and most presented over the age of 25. HNF1alpha mutation screening should be considered in any family with autosomal dominant inheritance of diabetes where one member has presented with diabetes before the age of 25. Predictive testing is now possible within the majority of MODY families, and is of clinical benefit, but the possibility of non-penetrance should be addressed during counselling and interpretation of results. PMID:10482964

  20. Beyond the Ball: Implications for HIV risk and prevention among the constructed families of African American Men who have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Owczarzak, Jill; Lawrence, Janet St.; Sitzler, Cheryl; Quinn, Katherine; Pearson, Broderick; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Amirkhanian, Yuri A.

    2014-01-01

    African American men who have sex with men (AAMSM) are disproportionately burdened by new and existing HIV infections. In spite of this, few HIV prevention interventions have been developed that meet the specific needs of AAMSM and that are culturally appropriate and build on strengths and resources. In this paper, we examine constructed families, including those who belong to houses and those who do not, from a three city sample of 196 AAMSM. Results show that the majority of AAMSM who belong to constructed families do not participate in houses or balls. Both house and non-house affiliated constructed families are important sources of social support among AAMSM. Participants reported limited success in spreading HIV messages at ball events, but talk about HIV within their constructed families. Social network approaches to HIV prevention may capitalize on existing social ties within constructed families to promote safer sexual behaviors. PMID:24980248

  1. Role of Cytokines as a Double-edged Sword in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    CHAUDHRY, HINA; ZHOU, JUHUA; ZHONG, YIN; ALI, MIR MUSTAFA; MCGUIRE, FRANKLIN; NAGARKATTI, PRAKASH S.; NAGARKATTI, MITZI

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis is a deadly immunological disorder and its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. We aimed to determine if specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines can be used as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for sepsis. Materials and Methods Recent publications in the MEDLINE database were searched for articles regarding the clinical significance of inflammatory cytokines in sepsis. Results In response to pathogen infection, pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) increased in patients with sepsis. Importantly, a decrease in IL-6 was associated with a better prognosis and overproduction of IL-10 was found to be the main predictor of severity and fatal outcome. Conclusion Both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines constitute a double-edged sword in sepsis; on one hand they are critical to eliminate the infection while on the other, excessive production can cause tissue and organ damage. Increase in cytokines such as IL-6, Il-8, IL-10, IL-18 and TNF-α may have implications in diagnosis and treatment of sepsis. PMID:24292568

  2. Flowering Date of Taxonomic Families Predicts Phenological Sensitivity to Temperature: Implications for Forecasting the Effects of Climate Change on Unstudied Taxa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, Susan J.; Travers, Steven E.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Davies, T. Jonathan; Bolmgren, Kjell; Kraft, Nathan J. B.; Salamin, Nicolas; Inouye, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Numerous long-term studies in seasonal habitats have tracked interannual variation in fi rst fl owering date (FFD) in relation to climate, documenting the effect of warming on the FFD of many species. Despite these efforts, long-term phenological observations are still lacking for many species. If we could forecast responses based on taxonomic affi nity, however, then we could leverage existing data to predict the climate-related phenological shifts of many taxa not yet studied; Methods: We examined phenological time series of 1226 species occurrences (1031 unique species in 119 families) across seven sites in North America and England to determine whether family membership (or family mean FFD) predicts the sensitivity of FFD to standardized interannual changes in temperature and precipitation during seasonal periods before fl owering and whether families differ signifi cantly in the direction of their phenological shifts; Key results: Patterns observed among species within and across sites are mirrored among family means across sites; earlyfl owering families advance their FFD in response to warming more than late-fl owering families. By contrast, we found no consistent relationships among taxa between mean FFD and sensitivity to precipitation as measured here; Conclusions: Family membership can be used to identify taxa of high and low sensitivity to temperature within the seasonal, temperate zone plant communities analyzed here. The high sensitivity of early-fl owering families (and the absence of earlyfl owering families not sensitive to temperature) may refl ect plasticity in fl owering time, which may be adaptive in environments where early-season conditions are highly variable among years.

  3. Targeted cytokine delivery to neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dehal, P K; Embleton, M J; Kemshead, J T; Hawkins, R E

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a fusion protein from the cytokine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and a single-chain Fv fragment (scFv D29) and to investigate its potential to activate cells of the immune system against neuroblastoma cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Mammalian cell expression of the scFv D29-GM-CSF fusion protein was compared using a number of vectors, including retroviral and adenoviral vectors. The resultant fusion protein, expressed by HeLa cells, was found by ELISA to bind immobilized recombinant NCAM. Moreover, FACS analysis confirmed binding to the human neuroblastoma cell line SKNBE and a murine neuroblastoma cell line engineered to express the glycosylphosphatidylinositol form of human NCAM (N2A-rKNIE). The fusion protein was also found to stimulate the proliferation of the FDC-P1 haemopoietic cell line, which is dependent on GM-CSF (or interleukin 3) for continued growth. In vitro clonogenic assays indicated that scFv-GM-CSF could selectively induce growth inhibition of SKNBE cells by murine lymphoid cells.

  4. Inflammatory cytokines in newborn infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sarandakou, A; Giannaki, G; Malamitsi-Puchner, A; Rizos, D; Hourdaki, E; Protonotariou, E; Phocas, I

    1998-01-01

    Serum levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were measured in 48 healthy, termed neonates on the 1st (N1), 5th (N5) and 40th (N40) day after birth, compared with those in maternal serum (MS), umbilical cord (UC) and adult controls. Cytokine values in N1 and N5 were significantly elevated, than those in UC and in controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta and IL-6 declined significantly from N1 to N40 (P<0.0001), while TNF-alpha increased significantly from N1 to N5 and declined thereafter. MS infinity IL-1beta and IL-6, but not MS infinity TNF-alpha, were significantly higher than those of controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta values depended on the mode of delivery. In conclusion, the increased concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha during the perinatal period might suggest their involvement in an inflammation-like process during normal parturition, and reflect also a newborn immune response to the stress of delivery and environmental changes. PMID:9883964

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Sarandakou, A; Giannaki, G; Malamitsi-Puchner, A; Rizos, D; Hourdaki, E; Protonotariou, E; Phocas, I

    1998-01-01

    Serum levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were measured in 48 healthy, termed neonates on the 1st (N1), 5th (N5) and 40th (N40) day after birth, compared with those in maternal serum (MS), umbilical cord (UC) and adult controls. Cytokine values in N1 and N5 were significantly elevated, than those in UC and in controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta and IL-6 declined significantly from N1 to N40 (P<0.0001), while TNF-alpha increased significantly from N1 to N5 and declined thereafter. MS infinity IL-1beta and IL-6, but not MS infinity TNF-alpha, were significantly higher than those of controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta values depended on the mode of delivery. In conclusion, the increased concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha during the perinatal period might suggest their involvement in an inflammation-like process during normal parturition, and reflect also a newborn immune response to the stress of delivery and environmental changes.

  6. Perilla frutescens extract ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and inducing anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Urushima, Hayato; Nishimura, Junichi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Ito, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects have been reported in Perilla frutescens leaf extract (PE), which is a plant of the genus belonging to the Lamiaceae family. We examined the effect of PE on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Preliminarily, PE was safely administered for 7 wk without any adverse effects. In the preventive protocol, mice were fed 1.5% DSS solution dissolved in distilled water (control group) or 0.54% PE solution (PE group) ad libitum for 7 days. In the therapeutic protocol, distilled water or 0.54% PE solution was given for 10 days just after administration of 1.5% DSS for 5 days. PE intake significantly improved body weight loss. The serum cytokine profile demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-17A, and IL-10 were significantly lower in the PE group than in the control group. In the therapeutic protocol, mice in the PE group showed significantly higher body weight and lower histological colitis scores compared with mice in the control group on day 15. The serum cytokine profile demonstrated that TGF-β was significantly higher in the PE group than in the control group. In distal colon mRNA expression, TNF-α, and IL-17A were significantly downregulated. In vitro analyses of biologically active ingredients, such as luteolin, apigenin, and rosmarinic acid, in PE were performed. Luteolin suppressed production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17A. Apigenin also suppressed secretion of IL-17A and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Rosmarinic acid increased the regulatory T cell population. We conclude that PE might be useful in treatment and prevention of DSS-induced colitis.

  7. Modulation of cytokine production by carnitine

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Claudio

    1993-01-01

    The ability of carnitine congeners to modulate cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was investigated. Modulation of cytokine production by PBMC of young (30 years of age or younger) and old (70 years of age or older) normal donors was first compared. The PBMC were collected over Ficoll–Hypaque and incubated in the presence of various concentrations of acetyl L-carnitine for 24 h. Subsequently the supernatants were collected and examined for cytokine production. The presence of cytokines in tissue culture supernatants was examined by ELISA. The cytokines measured included IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNFα, GM–CSF, and IFNγ. The results showed that at 50 μg/ml of acetyl L-carnitine the most significant response was obtained for TNFα. In this regard four of five young donors responded, but only one of five old donors responded. More recently these studies were expanded to examine the ability of L-carnitine to modulate cytokine production at higher doses, 200 and 400 μg/ml, in young donors. The results of these studies showed that in addition to TNFα, significant production of IL-1β and IL-6 was observed. These preliminary studies provide evidence that carnitine may modulate immune functions through the production of selected cytokines. PMID:18475565

  8. Expression of class II cytokine genes in children's skin.

    PubMed

    Reemann, Paula; Reimann, Ene; Suutre, Siim; Paavo, Maarjaliis; Loite, Ulvi; Porosaar, Orm; Abram, Kristi; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli

    2014-07-01

    Immune regulation of the skin plays an important role in susceptibility and development of illnesses. The aim of our study was to localise the interleukin (IL)-10 family of cytokines, in children's skin and to determine possible age-related differences in the expression level. The mRNA expression level of IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24, IL26, IL28B, IL29 and their receptors IL10RA, IL10RB, IL20RA, IL20RB, IL22RA1, IL22RA2, IL28RA was compared in skin biopsies of children and adults and in childrens' skin cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm the qRT-PCR findings. We found age-related differences in the expression of IL10RB, IL20, IL20RA, IL22RA1, IL22RA2, IL26 and IL28RA genes. Cell type-dependent expression of IL10 family cytokines was apparent in the skin. In addition to previously known differences in systemic immunological response of adults and children, the present results reveal differences in immune profile of adult and juvenile skin.

  9. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  10. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:24302815

  11. Immunopathological roles of cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Lian; Kuan, Woon-Pang; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with unknown etiology affecting more than one million individuals each year. It is characterized by B- and T-cell hyperactivity and by defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells and immune complexes. Understanding the complex process involved and the interaction between various cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the immune pathways will provide valuable information on the development of novel therapeutic targets for treating SLE. In this paper, we review the immunopathological roles of novel cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, PRRs, and their interactions in immunoregulatory networks and suggest how their disturbances may implicate pathological conditions in SLE.

  12. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field.

  13. Spread of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection within a family: implications for antibiotic therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Amir, N H; Rossney, A S; Veale, J; O'Connor, M; Fitzpatrick, F; Humphreys, H

    2010-04-01

    Outbreaks or clusters of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) within families have been reported. We describe a family cluster of CA-MRSA skin and soft-tissue infection where CA-MRSA was suspected because of recurrent infections which failed to respond to flucloxacillin. While the prevalence of CA-MRSA is low worldwide, CA-MRSA should be considered in certain circumstances depending on clinical presentation and risk assessment. Surveillance cultures of family contacts of patients with MRSA should be considered to help establish the prevalence of CA-MRSA and to inform the optimal choice of empiric antibiotic treatment.

  14. Bone mineral density and circulating cytokines in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, S; Di Somma, C; Di Rella, F; Angelillo, N; Ferone, D; Colao, A; Merola, B; Lombardi, G

    1998-11-01

    Acromegalic patients present an increase of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity, showing a different effect on the axial and appendicular skeletal structures. At this regard controversial data about bone mineral density (BMD) have been published in literature. In fact an increase of BMD levels in femoral neck and Ward's triangle without any difference in lumbar spine has been described. On the other hand normal BMD levels at forearm and reduced BMD levels at lumbar spine were found. These patients seem to have a reduction of trabecular BMD similar to postmenopausal osteoporotic patients despite normal or slightly elevated cortical BMD. Recently, it has been described that cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), are implicated in the pathogenetic mechanism of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Taking into account that growth hormone (GH) can increase TNF-alpha and IL-1 secretion by mononuclear blood cells, the evaluation of possible relationship between the reduced BMD at lumbar spine and circulating cytokines levels was carried out in acromegalic patients. In addition we evaluated the effect of acute octreotide administration on serum TNF-alpha and IL-I concentrations. Eleven patients with active acromegaly and eleven healthy age-, sex-, weight- and heightmatched subjects were enrolled in this study. BMD was significantly reduced at lumbar spine (0.80 +/- 0.29 g/cm2 vs 1.02 +/- 0.11 g/cm2; p < 0.01), but not at femoral neck level or at Ward's triangle level (0.92 + 0.15 g/cm2 vs 0.97 + 0.11 g/cm2, p = NS; and 0.74 +/- 0.16 g/cm2 vs 0.85 +/- 0.1 g/cm2, p = NS) when compared to controls. Baseline serum levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 were in the normal range both in patients and controls. After acute octreotide administration, no differences in circulating TNF-alpha and IL-1 levels were found. In conclusion, acromegalic patients present a reduced BMD at lumbar spine but not at femoral neck level and Ward's triangle

  15. Ultrastructural and functional adaptations of the female reproductive system in the family Heterozerconidae (Acari, Anactinotrichida, Gamasida, Heterozerconina) and implications for the systematic position of the group.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, A; de Moraes, G J; Gerdeman, B S; Huber, S; Kitajima, E W; Alberti, G

    2015-11-01

    Heterozerconidae is a poorly known, early derived mite family belonging to Heterozerconina (Monogynaspida, Gamasida (= Mesostigmata)). The systematic position of the family is still controversial and little is known about the biology and anatomy of the taxon. In this paper, the gross anatomy, ultrastructure and functional morphology of the female reproductive system are described comparing genera from different geographic areas. The occurence of podospermy (i.e. the use of a sperm transfer process carried by the fixed digit of the male chelicerae to inseminate females through secondary insemination pores instead of through the oviporus) as insemination mode in this family was documented. Nevertheless, morphological and functional evidence in the reproductive system of the females supports the idea that, in the same family, more than one insemination mode is present: some genera are plesiomorphically tocospemic (i.e. insemination through the oviporus) while others switched to podospermy. Such discovery is of fundamental importance for the determination of the relationship between the family Heterozerconidae and the family Discozerconidae, both belonging tentatively to Heterozerconina and for the phylogenetic position of the Heterozerconina among Gamasida.

  16. [Targeted therapy in inflammatory disease: cytokines].

    PubMed

    von Frenckell, C; Malaise, M G

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing 15 years of therapeutic development of a discipline into a few lines is not an easy thing to do. There are many potential targets involved in the inflammatory of auto-immune diseases. Due to the development of biotherapies the choice has become larger, and it is now possible to target practically any molecule (cytokine, chemokine or surface receptor for example). Cytokines represent the first example of therapeutic target that played a major role in the revolution of our discipline. The first part of presentation will focus on the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, and interleukines 1 and 6). We shall then, detail the development of a new cytokinic target: BLyS (B lymphocyte stimulator) whose role in the autoimmune diseases appeared recently.

  17. Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

  18. Cytokines in neuroblastoma: from pathogenesis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Vito; Bianchi, Giovanna; Borgonovo, Giacomo; Raffaghello, Lizzia

    2011-07-01

    Cytokines released by cancer cells or by cells of the tumor microenvironment stimulate angiogenesis, act as autocrine or paracrine growth factors for malignant cells, promote tumor cell migration and metastasis or create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. These tumor-promoting effects of cytokines also apply to neuroblastoma (NB), a pediatric neuroectodermal malignancy with frequent metastatic presentation at diagnosis and poor prognosis. IL-6 and VEGF are the best characterized cytokines that stimulated tumor growth and metastasis, while others such as IFN-γ can exert anti-NB activity by inducing tumor cell apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. On the other hand, cytokines are part of the anti-NB therapeutic armamentarium, as exemplified by IL-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor that potentiate the activity of anti-NB antibodies. These recent results raise hope for more efficacious treatment of this ominous pediatric malignancy.

  19. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  20. The role of cytokines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, J; Fujiwara, H

    1996-10-01

    The role of cytokines was intensively discussed over the course of a two and a half day meeting sponsored by the US-JAPAN Cancer Cooperative Research Program of the Office of International Affairs, National Cancer Institute and held at The National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland on 15-17 January 1996. Most of the first day was devoted to a discussion of the role of cytokines in modulating angiogenesis and the consequent effect of this on tumor growth and metastases. This was followed by sessions on the effect of various cytokines in enhancing or suppressing immunological responses to tumors. Several presentations focused on the direct inhibitory or growth promoting effects of cytokines on tumor growth. The final session consisted of a comparison of the efficacy of different approaches to tumor vaccination including gene therapy, enhanced antigen presentation, use of polymeric carriers or of DNA vectors. For background information the reader is referred to appropriate chapters on the role of cytokines in neoplastic diseases (Oppenheim JJ, Rossio JL, Gearing AJH, eds. In Clinical Application of Cytokines: Role of Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Therapy. Oxford University Press, New York, 1993 [1]).

  1. Serum cytokine changes in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Grau, G E; Roux-Lombard, P; Gysler, C; Lambert, C; Lambert, P H; Dayer, J M; Guillevin, L

    1989-01-01

    Cytokines are known to alter a number of vascular tissue cell functions. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine serum cytokine levels in patients with vasculitis and to analyse the possible relation to the severity of the disease. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1)beta, IL-2, interferon (IFN)- and IFN-gamma were assayed in 33 patients with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) or Churg and Strauss angiitis (CSA), and three with Wegener granulomatosis (WG). Serum cytokine changes were observed in most patients with active disease, i.e. before treatment was started. In the majority of patients with PAN or CSA, there was a marked increase in serum IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels, while TNF-alpha and IL-beta levels were moderately elevated. Serum IFN-gamma remained undetectable in all but one of these patients. In patients with WG, serum IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels were also elevated, whereas IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma and TNF alpha levels remained within normal limits. In paired samples of patients with PAN, IFN-alpha and IL-2 levels were significantly higher before than after treatment. These preliminary data suggest that a particular pattern of cytokine changes is associated with vasculitis and that cytokines might be involved in the pathogenesis of PAN/CSA and WG. Prospective studies are warranted to determine whether cytokines could be considered for the monitoring of disease activity and therapy. PMID:2478451

  2. Family functioning in families with older institutionalized retarded offspring.

    PubMed

    Kazak, A E

    1989-12-01

    Psychological distress, marital satisfaction, family adaptability, and cohesion are explored in 31 families with mentally retarded (MR) institutionalized offspring (late adolescence and young adulthood) and 38 comparison families. Multivariate analyses indicate no differences between the groups, although univariate analyses point to higher levels of cohesion in the families with MR offspring and the importance of the construct of adaptability in understanding family functioning. The results are discussed in terms of the adaptive coping mechanisms of the families with MR offspring and the implications of this for intervention, research, and policy.

  3. The impact of anti-inflammatory cytokines on the pancreatic β-cell

    PubMed Central

    Russell, M A; Morgan, N G

    2014-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been invested to understand the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate the demise of β-cells in type 1 diabetes but much less attention has been paid to the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines as potential cytoprotective agents in these cells. Despite this, there is increasing evidence that anti-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-13 can exert a direct influence of β-cell function and viability and that the circulating levels of these cytokines may be reduced in type 1 diabetes. Thus, it seems possible that targeting of anti-inflammatory pathways might offer therapeutic potential in this disease. In the present review, we consider the evidence implicating IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 as cytoprotective agents in the β-cell and discuss the receptor components and downstream signaling pathways that mediate these effects. PMID:25322830

  4. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes.

    PubMed

    Haxholm, Gitte W; Nikolajsen, Louise F; Olsen, Johan G; Fredsted, Jacob; Larsen, Flemming H; Goffin, Vincent; Pedersen, Stine F; Brooks, Andrew J; Waters, Michael J; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2015-06-15

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signalling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking. The present study provides the first comprehensive structural characterization of any cytokine receptor ICD and demonstrates that the human prolactin (PRL) receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) ICDs are intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths. We show that they interact specifically with hallmark lipids of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs resembling immuno receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). However, contrary to the observations made for ITAMs, lipid association of the PRLR and GHR ICDs was shown to be unaccompanied by changes in transient secondary structure and independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. The results of the present study provide a new structural platform for studying class 1 cytokine receptors and may implicate the membrane as an active component regulating intracellular signalling.

  5. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  6. Education and information needs identified by patients and key family members prior to surgery for a skull base neoplasm: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Durity, M B; Wyness, A; Durity, F; Ratel, M

    2000-09-01

    Many patients with extensive skull base neoplasms poorly understand the nature of their problems. Therefore, education of patients and family members is an important component of care. Research has established the benefits of pre-operative education for other types of surgery and information seeking as an important method of coping. Yet in 184 references on skull base surgery (1996-1999), no case-based or research data that examined education and information needs prior to hospitalization for surgery was found. The investigators present findings from Phase 1 of a descriptive research study designed to determine the education and information needs perceived by patients and family members at their initial visit to the neurosurgeon and on admission to hospital. Data was collected, using interviews and a questionnaire, from 18 patients with skull base neoplasms and 15 key family members. The study findings provide insight into the experience of patients and families during a time period (prehospitalization) that has not been explored. Results indicate that key education needs of participants are related to the brain tumour and surgery. Findings reveal patient participants in contrast to family members had little in the way of information needs. Underlying and impacting the education and information needs is the theme of 'Hearing the News'. Relevance of the results to nursing practice in the pre-operative phase is addressed. PMID:11901493

  7. Fixation, Segregation and Linkage of Allozyme Loci in Inbred Families of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea Gigas (Thunberg): Implications for the Causes of Inbreeding Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGoldrick, D. J.; Hedgecock, D.

    1997-01-01

    The effect that inbreeding has on the fixation and segregation of genes has rarely been confirmed by direct observation. Here, fixation, segregation, and linkage of allozymes is investigated in the progeny of self-fertilized hermaphrodites of the normally outcrossing Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The estimate of fixation pooled over loci, individuals, and families, F = 0.462, is significantly lower than the expected value of 0.5. Log-likelihood ratios reveal significant heterogeneity in fixation among individuals, among families, and among loci. In addition, the grand pooled segregation ratio, 127:243:54, deviates significantly from 1:2:1, with a bias against homozygotes for alleles of lesser frequency in the natural population. Segregation ratios for 11 of 14 loci are significantly heterogeneous among families, and exact tests for segregation within families reveal 16 significant results out of 51 tests. Thus, fixation and segregation of allozyme markers in inbred oyster families deviates from the expectations of neutral inbreeding theory. Di-genic disequilibria are significant for four of 74 di-locus pairs revealing two linkage groups. Strong viability selection is apparently conditional on the genotype of the hermaphrodite-founders and is largely focused on these two linkage groups. These genetic effects are explained by interaction between cis-linked factors and polymorphic regulatory backgrounds. PMID:9136021

  8. Understanding the contribution of family history to colorectal cancer risk and its clinical implications: A state-of-the-science review.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jan T; Ahnen, Dennis J; Schroy, Paul C; Hampel, Heather; Baxter, Nancy; Boland, C Richard; Burt, Randall W; Butterly, Lynn; Doerr, Megan; Doroshenk, Mary; Feero, W Gregory; Henrikson, Nora; Ladabaum, Uri; Lieberman, David; McFarland, Elizabeth G; Peterson, Susan K; Raymond, Martha; Samadder, N Jewel; Syngal, Sapna; Weber, Thomas K; Zauber, Ann G; Smith, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Persons with a family history (FH) of colorectal cancer (CRC) or adenomas that are not due to known hereditary syndromes have an increased risk for CRC. An understanding of these risks, screening recommendations, and screening behaviors can inform strategies for reducing the CRC burden in these families. A comprehensive review of the literature published within the past 10 years has been performed to assess what is known about cancer risk, screening guidelines, adherence and barriers to screening, and effective interventions in persons with an FH of CRC and to identify FH tools used to identify these individuals and inform care. Existing data show that having 1 affected first-degree relative (FDR) increases the CRC risk 2-fold, and the risk increases with multiple affected FDRs and a younger age at diagnosis. There is variability in screening recommendations across consensus guidelines. Screening adherence is <50% and is lower in persons under the age of 50 years. A provider's recommendation, multiple affected relatives, and family encouragement facilitate screening; insufficient collection of FH, low knowledge of guidelines, and poor family communication are important barriers. Effective interventions incorporate strategies for overcoming barriers, but these have not been broadly tested in clinical settings. Four strategies for reducing CRC in persons with familial risk are suggested: 1) improving the collection and utilization of the FH of cancer, 2) establishing a consensus for screening guidelines by FH, 3) enhancing provider-patient knowledge of guidelines and communication about CRC risk, and 4) encouraging survivors to promote screening within their families and partnering with existing screening programs to expand their reach to high-risk groups. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2633-2645. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. Fetal asphyctic preconditioning modulates the acute cytokine response thereby protecting against perinatal asphyxia in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a major cause of brain damage and neurodevelopmental impairment in infants. Recent investigations have shown that experimental sublethal fetal asphyxia (FA preconditioning) protects against a subsequent more severe asphyctic insult at birth. The molecular mechanisms of this protection have, however, not been elucidated. Evidence implicates that inflammatory cytokines play a protective role in the induction of ischemic tolerance in the adult brain. Accordingly, we hypothesize that FA preconditioning leads to changes in the fetal cytokine response, thereby protecting the newborn against a subsequent asphyctic insult. Methods In rats, FA preconditioning was induced at embryonic day 17 by clamping the uterine vasculature for 30 min. At term birth, global PA was induced by placing the uterine horns, containing the pups, in a saline bath for 19 min. We assessed, at different time points after FA and PA, mRNA and protein expression of several cytokines and related receptor mRNA levels in total hemispheres of fetal and neonatal brains. Additionally, we measured pSTAT3/STAT3 levels to investigate cellular responses to these cytokines. Results Prenatally, FA induced acute downregulation in IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA levels. At 96 h post FA, IL-6 mRNA and IL-10 protein expression were increased in FA brains compared with controls. Two hours after birth, all proinflammatory cytokines and pSTAT3/STAT3 levels decreased in pups that experienced FA and/or PA. Interestingly, IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels increased after PA. When pups were FA preconditioned, however, IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels were comparable to those in controls. Conclusions FA leads to prenatal changes in the neuroinflammatory response. This modulation of the cytokine response probably results in the protective inflammatory phenotype seen when combining FA and PA and may have significant implications for preventing post-asphyctic perinatal encephalopathy. PMID:23351591

  10. How pediatricians can respond to the psychosocial implications of disasters. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health, 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, M L; Aceves, J; Feldman, H M; Hagan, J F; Howard, B J; Navarro, A; Richtsmeier, A J; Tolmas, H C

    1999-02-01

    Natural and human-caused disasters, violence with weapons, and terrorist acts have touched directly the lives of thousands of families with children in the United States.1 Media coverage of disasters has brought images of floods, hurricanes, and airplane crashes into the living rooms of most American families, with limited censorship for vulnerable young children. Therefore, children may be exposed to disastrous events in ways that previous generations never or rarely experienced. Pediatricians should serve as important resources to the community in preparing for disasters, as well as acting in its behalf during and after such events. PMID:9925857

  11. Implications for observant Jewish families in the provision of mother's own and donor milk for their very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Kassierer, Moshe Yair; O'Connor, Deborah L; Rutherford, Eva; Rolnitzky, Asaph; Unger, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Jewish law recognizes the importance of breast milk, and breastfeeding rates are high among religious mothers. Infants born at very low birth weight are medically fragile, and breast milk is of critical importance for their health protection and optimal growth and development. For observant Jewish infants and their families, there may be scenarios for special consideration in their health care. This report reviews briefly the relevant Jewish laws related to breast milk provision, both mother's own milk and donor milk, in the neonatal intensive care unit with background information for counseling such families.

  12. Implications for observant Jewish families in the provision of mother's own and donor milk for their very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Kassierer, Moshe Yair; O'Connor, Deborah L; Rutherford, Eva; Rolnitzky, Asaph; Unger, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Jewish law recognizes the importance of breast milk, and breastfeeding rates are high among religious mothers. Infants born at very low birth weight are medically fragile, and breast milk is of critical importance for their health protection and optimal growth and development. For observant Jewish infants and their families, there may be scenarios for special consideration in their health care. This report reviews briefly the relevant Jewish laws related to breast milk provision, both mother's own milk and donor milk, in the neonatal intensive care unit with background information for counseling such families. PMID:25092199

  13. How pediatricians can respond to the psychosocial implications of disasters. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health, 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, M L; Aceves, J; Feldman, H M; Hagan, J F; Howard, B J; Navarro, A; Richtsmeier, A J; Tolmas, H C

    1999-02-01

    Natural and human-caused disasters, violence with weapons, and terrorist acts have touched directly the lives of thousands of families with children in the United States.1 Media coverage of disasters has brought images of floods, hurricanes, and airplane crashes into the living rooms of most American families, with limited censorship for vulnerable young children. Therefore, children may be exposed to disastrous events in ways that previous generations never or rarely experienced. Pediatricians should serve as important resources to the community in preparing for disasters, as well as acting in its behalf during and after such events.

  14. A genetic contribution to circulating cytokines and obesity in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytokines are considered to be involved in obesity-related metabolic diseases. Study objectives are to determine the heritability of circulating cytokine levels, to investigate pleiotropy between cytokines and obesity traits, and to present genome scan results for cytokines in 1030 Hispanic children...

  15. Cytokine Regulation of Microenvironmental Cells in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hoermann, Gregor; Greiner, Georg; Valent, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The term myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases including not only polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), but also chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and systemic mastocytosis (SM). Despite the clinical and biological differences between these diseases, common pathophysiological mechanisms have been identified in MPN. First, aberrant tyrosine kinase signaling due to somatic mutations in certain driver genes is common to these MPN. Second, alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment are found in all MPN types and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Finally, elevated levels of proinflammatory and microenvironment-regulating cytokines are commonly found in all MPN-variants. In this paper, we review the effects of MPN-related oncogenes on cytokine expression and release and describe common as well as distinct pathogenetic mechanisms underlying microenvironmental changes in various MPN. Furthermore, targeting of the microenvironment in MPN is discussed. Such novel therapies may enhance the efficacy and may overcome resistance to established tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in these patients. Nevertheless, additional basic studies on the complex interplay of neoplastic and stromal cells are required in order to optimize targeting strategies and to translate these concepts into clinical application. PMID:26543328

  16. Work, Welfare, and Family Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, Merrile; Hill, Heather; Mendenko, Linda

    As more families move from welfare to work, little is known about the implications of employment for family well-being. This survey and case study examined the effects of employment on the economic, social, and emotional well-being of parents, children, and families. Survey respondents received assistance through Iowa's Family Investment Program…

  17. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship of Family Support and Coping with Adjustment: Implications for College Students with a Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodka, Ericka L.; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the role of family support and coping in the adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness (CI) transitioning into college, college freshmen and sophomores (N[subscript chronic illness] = 32, N[subscript primarily negative life event] = 53, N[subscript primarily positive life event] = 16) were administered standard measures. CI group…

  18. International Symposium on Services for Young Disabled Children, Their Parents, and Families. Proceedings: Discussions and Implications for Future Activities (Washington, D.C., December 6-11, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The document reports on a symposium, sponsored by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization), designed to develop strategies for improving educational, health, and social service to handicapped children and their families, particularly in developing nations. Section 1 is an overview of the background and organization…

  19. Individuals with a family history of ESRD are a high-risk population for CKD: implications for targeted surveillance and intervention activities.

    PubMed

    McClellan, William M; Satko, Scott G; Gladstone, Elisa; Krisher, Jenna O; Narva, Andrew S; Freedman, Barry I

    2009-03-01

    Activities intended to improve the detection, treatment, and control of chronic kidney disease (CKD) should be incorporated into existing health care systems and targeted to high-risk populations to avoid redundancy and waste of resources. One high-risk population consists of first- or second-degree family members of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), who are 2 to 3 times as likely to have incident ESRD, have high rates of impaired kidney function and undetected and uncontrolled high blood pressure, and are more likely to be obese. These individuals usually are unaware of their underlying CKD and may discount their own risk of ESRD. The ESRD Network 6 Family History Project shows that the ESRD Networks, which constitute a national CKD surveillance system for patients with stage 5 CKD, may be an existing resource that can be used to identify relatives of incident patients with ESRD and provide these families with information about CKD. Nationally available resources have been developed by the National Kidney Disease Education Program for use with these at-risk families. Individuals interested in population-based CKD control activities should be aware of and use these resources. PMID:19231753

  20. The Implications of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and How They Relate to the New Roles of College and University Counselors and Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Joseph A.

    The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act was passed in 1974 because some legislation was needed in order to discourage the abuse of individual rights due to the personal prejudices and/or disapproval of others. There are thousands of persons in American society who because of advanced educational training and a keen sense of perceptivity, can…

  1. Fathers' and Mothers' Home Literacy Involvement and Children's Cognitive and Social Emotional Development: Implications for Family Literacy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    The relations between fathers' and mothers' home literacy involvement at 24 months and children's cognitive and social emotional development in preschool were examined using a large sample of African American and Caucasian families ("N" = 5190) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). Hierarchical…

  2. Black Suicide and the Relational System: Theoretical and Empirical Implications of Communal and Familial Ties. Discussion Papers No. 481-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert

    The findings of a national study of black suicide are reported in this paper. A suitable explanation is sought for the increasing suicide rate among young blacks. The possibility of a link between suicide and the weakening of black community and family ties is explored. Specifically, the isolating effects of inmigration and living alone are…

  3. The Industrialization of Agriculture in Texas and the Nation: Implications for the Family Farm, Community, and Land Grant University System. Technical Report No. 83-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Don E.

    This report demonstrates the complexity and diversity of agricultural structures in the United States and discusses changes produced in the family farm by agricultural industrialization. Data from the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the 1978 Census of Agriculture describe similarities and differences in social…

  4. The New Welfare Law and Vulnerable Families: Implications for Child Welfare/Child Protection Systems. Children and Welfare Reform Issue Brief 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitzer, Jane; Bernard, Stanley

    This report examines the potential impact of federal welfare legislation, Public Law 104-193, The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, on vulnerable families already in or at risk of entering the child welfare/child protection systems. The report includes an overview of the challenges states face; questions for state…

  5. Interleukin-26: An IL-10-related cytokine produced by Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Raymond P.; Sheikh, Faruk; Dickensheets, Harold; Savan, Ram; Young, Howard A.; Walter, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    IL-26 is classified as a member of the IL-10 cytokine family because it has limited sequence homology to IL-10 and the IL-10-related cytokines. The human IL-26 gene, IL26, is located on chromosome 12q15 between the genes for two other important class-2 cytokines, IFNG (IFN-γ) and IL22 (IL-22). IL-26 is often co-expressed with IL-22 by activated T cells, especially Th17 cells. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex composed of the IL-20R1 and IL-10R2 chains. IL-26 receptors are primarily expressed on non-hematopoietic cell types, particularly epithelial cells. Signaling through IL-26 receptor complexes results in the activation of STAT1 and STAT3 with subsequent induction of IL-26-responsive genes. The biological functions of IL-26 have only begun to be defined. PMID:20947410

  6. Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling in Sickness and in Health of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cheng; Driver, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are a family of eight proteins that negatively regulate Janus kinase and signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling in cells that utilize this pathway to respond to extracellular stimuli. SOCS are best known for attenuating cytokine signaling in the immune system. However, they are also expressed in many other cell types, including pancreatic β-cells, where there is considerable interest in harnessing SOCS molecules to prevent cytokine-mediated apoptosis during diabetes and allogeneic transplantation. Apart from their potential as therapeutic targets, SOCS molecules play a central role for regulating important functions in β-cells, including growth, glucose sensing, and insulin secretion. This review will discuss SOCS proteins as central regulators for diverse cellular processes important for normal β-cell function as well as their protective anti-apoptotic effects during β-cell stress. PMID:27242781

  7. Proinflammatory Cytokines Induce Endocrine Differentiation in Pancreatic Ductal Cells via STAT3-Dependent NGN3 Activation.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Ivan Achel; Dirice, Ercument; Gupta, Manoj K; Shirakawa, Jun; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2016-04-19

    A major goal of diabetes research is to develop strategies that replenish pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. One emerging strategy is to harness pancreatic plasticity-the ability of pancreatic cells to undergo cellular interconversions-a phenomenon implicated in physiological stress and pancreatic injury. Here, we investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokine stress on the differentiation potential of ductal cells in a human cell line, in mouse ductal cells by pancreatic intraductal injection, and during the progression of autoimmune diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We find that inflammatory cytokine insults stimulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as the endocrine program in human pancreatic ductal cells via STAT3-dependent NGN3 activation. Furthermore, we show that inflammatory cytokines activate ductal-to-endocrine cell reprogramming in vivo independent of hyperglycemic stress. Together, our findings provide evidence that inflammatory cytokines direct ductal-to-endocrine cell differentiation, with implications for beta cell regeneration. PMID:27068459

  8. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and HIV-1 synergistically enhance CXCL10 expression in human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rachel; Dhillon, Navneet K.; Hegde, Sonia T.; Yao, Honghong; Peng, Fuwang; Callen, Shannon; Chebloune, Yahia; Davis, Randall L.; Buch, Shilpa J.

    2009-01-01

    HIV encephalitis (HIVE), the pathologic correlate of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is characterized by astrogliosis, cytokine/chemokine dysregulation and neuronal degeneration. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation is actively involved in the pathogenesis of HAD. In fact, the severity of HAD/HIVE correlates more closely with the presence of activated glial cells than with the presence and amount of HIV-infected cells in the brain. Astrocytes, the most numerous cell type within the brain, provide an important reservoir for the generation of inflammatory mediators, including interferon-γ inducible peptide-10 (CXCL10), a neurotoxin and a chemoattractant, implicated in the pathophysiology of HAD. Additionally, the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and TNF-α, are also markedly increased in CNS tissues during HIV-1 infection. In the present study we hypothesized that the interplay of host cytokines and HIV-1 could lead to enhanced expression of the toxic chemokine, CXCL10. Our findings demonstrate a synergistic induction of CXCL10 mRNA and protein in human astrocytes exposed to HIV-1 and the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Signaling molecules, including JAK, STATs, MAPK (via activation of Erk1/2, AKT, and p38), and NF-κB were identified as instrumental in the synergistic induction of CXCL10. Understanding the mechanisms involved in HIV-1 and cytokine mediated up-regulation of CXCL10 could aid in the development of therapeutic modalities for HAD. PMID:18985732

  9. Proteomic-Based Approaches for the Study of Cytokines in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marrugal, Ángela; Ojeda, Laura; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic techniques are currently used to understand the biology of different human diseases, including studies of the cell signaling pathways implicated in cancer progression, which is important in knowing the roles of different proteins in tumor development. Due to its poor prognosis, proteomic approaches are focused on the identification of new biomarkers for the early diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment of lung cancer. Cytokines are proteins involved in inflammatory processes and have been proposed as lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets because it has been reported that some cytokines play important roles in tumor development, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we aim to summarize the different proteomic techniques used to discover new lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Several cytokines have been identified as important players in lung cancer using these techniques. We underline the most important cytokines that are useful as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We also summarize some of the therapeutic strategies targeted for these cytokines in lung cancer. PMID:27445423

  10. The impact of the interferon-lambda family on the innate and adaptive immune response to viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna M; O'Shea, Daire; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type-III interferons (IFN-λ, IFNL) are the most recently described family of IFNs. This family of innate cytokines are increasingly being ascribed pivotal roles in host–pathogen interactions. Herein, we will review the accumulating evidence detailing the immune biology of IFNL during viral infection, and the implications of this novel information on means to advance the development of therapies and vaccines against existing and emerging pathogens. IFNLs exert antiviral effects via induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IFNL3, IFNL4 and the IFNL receptor α-subunit genes have been strongly associated with IFN-α-based treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The clinical impact of these SNPs may be dependent on the status of viral infection (acute or chronic) and the potential to develop viral resistance. Another important function of IFNLs is macrophage and dendritic cell polarization, which prime helper T-cell activation and proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IFNL increase Th1- and reduce Th2-cytokines. Therefore, can such SNPs affect the IFNL signaling and thereby modulate the Th1/Th2 balance during infection? In turn, this may influence the subsequent priming of cytotoxic T cells versus antibody-secreting B cells, with implications for the breadth and durability of the host response. PMID:26038748

  11. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS.

  12. Familial risk of childhood cancer and tumors in the Li-Fraumeni spectrum in the Utah Population Database: implications for genetic evaluation in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Karen; Smith, Ken R; Fraser, Alison; Pimentel, Richard; Kohlmann, Wendy; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2013-11-15

    We used the Utah Population Database to examine risk of cancer in relatives of 4,482 pediatric cancer cases (≤18 years old) diagnosed from 1966 to 2009 compared to matched population controls. We quantified cancer risk in relatives of children with cancer to determine evidence of familial aggregation and to inform risk assessment and counseling for families. Odds ratios that reflect risk were obtained using conditional logistic regression models adjusting for number of biological relatives, their degree of genetic relatedness and their person-years at risk. First-degree relatives (primarily siblings) of pediatric cases faced a twofold increased risk of a cancer diagnosis before age 19, which extended to their second-degree relatives (p < 10(-4), respectively). Furthermore, first-degree relatives of children diagnosed before age 5 had a 3.6-fold increased risk of developing pediatric cancer (p < 10(-7)), second-degree relatives of very young (under age 5) cases were at 2.5-fold risk (p < 10(-4)) and third-degree relatives were at twofold risk (P < 10(-3)) of childhood cancer. Although first-degree relatives of pediatric cases have a slight increased risk of adult tumors, when they do develop cancer they have a 1.7-fold risk of developing a tumor in the Li-Fraumeni spectrum. Our findings support the hypothesis of familial aggregation in pediatric cancer and suggest that a higher percent of childhood cancers may be related to hereditary syndromes than are adult cancers. We encourage the collection of a family medical history that is routinely updated for all pediatric cancer patients, and that families with early-onset adult cancers or clusters of several cancers are referred for genetic counseling.

  13. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS. PMID:25873685

  14. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS. PMID:25873685

  15. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries.

    PubMed

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Santaella, Marina; Mira-Pascual, Laia; Martínez-Arias, Elena; Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2015-10-19

    Breast milk (BM) is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs) and fatty acids (FAs) is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term) collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA) and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk.

  16. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Santaella, Marina; Mira-Pascual, Laia; Martínez-Arias, Elena; Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk (BM) is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs) and fatty acids (FAs) is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term) collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA) and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk. PMID:26492267

  17. Cytokines in common variable immunodeficiency as signs of immune dysregulation and potential therapeutic targets - a review of the current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Varzaneh, Farnaz Najmi; Keller, Bärbel; Unger, Susanne; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Warnatz, Klaus; Rezaei, Nima

    2014-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by low levels of circulating immunoglobulins and compromised specific antibody response leading to frequent infections. Cytokines play an important role in the orchestration of the antibody response. Several previous studies have attempted to identify distinct cytokines responsible for the inflammatory changes and different manifestations of CVID, but there are conflicting results regarding the cytokine profiles in CVID patients. In light of this, an extensive review regarding the level of various cytokines and their potential therapeutic role in CVID patients was performed. This review delineates the contribution of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12, IL-21, interferons, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, APRIL (a proliferation inducing ligand) and BAFF (B cell activating factor) in CVID disease and outline their potential therapeutic implications in these patients.

  18. Avian cytokines - the natural approach to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, J W; Lambrecht, B; van den Berg, T P; Andrew, M E; Strom, A D; Bean, A G

    2000-01-01

    While the effective use of antibiotics for the control of human disease has saved countless lives and has increased life expectancy over the past few decades, there are concerns arising from their usage in livestock. The use of antibiotic feed additives in food production animals has been linked to the emergence in the food chain of multiple drug-resistant bacteria that appear impervious to even the most powerful antimicrobial agents. Furthermore, the use of chemical antimicrobials has led to concerns involving environmental contamination and unwanted residues in food products. The imminent banning of antibiotic usage in livestock feed has intensified the search for environmentally-friendly alternative methods to control disease. Cytokines, as natural mediators and regulators of the immune response, offer exciting new alternatives to conventional chemical-based therapeutics. The utilisation of cytokines is becoming more feasible, particularly in poultry, with the recent cloning of a number of avian cytokine genes. Chickens offer an attractive small animal model system with which to study the effectiveness of cytokine therapy in the control of disease in intensive livestock. In this report we will review the status of avian cytokines and focus on our recent studies involving the therapeutic potential of chicken interferon gamma (ChIFN-gamma) as a vaccine adjuvant and a growth promoter. PMID:10717298

  19. Cytokines and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Kennedy, R L

    1993-11-01

    Several cytokines are now known to affect the release of anterior pituitary hormones by an action on the hypothalamus and/or the pituitary gland. The major cytokines involved are IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha and interferon-tau. Their predominant effects are to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and to suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and gonadal axes, and growth hormone release. The relative importance of systemically and locally produced cytokines in achieving these responses and their precise sites of action have not been fully established. There are indeed conflicting reports on the individual effects of each cytokine which need to be clarified. There is now cumulating evidence that there are important interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems which may explain in part, some of the effects on growth, thyroid, adrenal and reproductive functions which occur in acute and chronic disease. This article reviews the current knowledge of the effects of some cytokines on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

  20. Induction of inflammatory cytokines by cartilage extracts.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Simjee, Shabana; Smith, Sylvia L

    2007-03-01

    Shark cartilage extracts were examined for induction of cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood leukocytes. Primary leukocyte cultures were exposed to a variety of aqueous and organic extracts prepared from several commercial brands of shark cartilage. From all commercial sources of shark cartilage tested the acid extracts induced higher levels of TNFalpha than other extracts. Different commercial brands of shark cartilage varied significantly in cytokine-inducing activity. TNFalpha induction was seen as early as 4 h and IFNgamma at detectable levels for up to four days. Shark cartilage extracts did not induce physiologically significant levels of IL-4. Results suggest that shark cartilage, preferentially, induces Th1 type inflammatory cytokines. When compared to bovine cartilage extract, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage induced significantly higher levels of TNFalpha. Treatment with digestive proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin) reduced the cytokine induction response by 80%, suggesting that the active component(s) in cartilage extracts is proteinaceous. The induction of Th1 type cytokine response in leukocytes is a significant finding since shark cartilage, taken as a dietary supplement for a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, would be contraindicated in cases where the underlying pathology of the chronic condition is caused by inflammation. PMID:17276897

  1. Cytokines in Neuropathic Pain and Associated Depression.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Fivelman, Brett; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system and is present in a diverse set of peripheral and central pathologies such as nerve trauma, diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Debilitating symptoms including allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain have a substantial negative impact on patients' quality of life. The currently available therapeutic treatments are generally ineffective and characterised by poor response rates. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and cytokine signalling play a critical role in neuropathic pain. Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that certain pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in neuropathic pain conditions, and administration of these cytokines can elicit pain hypersensitivity in the absence of injury or disease. This phenomenon is also apparent in the 'sickness response', which encompasses a broad inflammatory response to disease and injury and involves a series of physiological and behavioural changes including pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, the 'sickness response' is also similar in nature to some of the defining characteristics of the depressed state of affective disorder. In this review, we explore links that may relate the co-existence of depression in neuropathic pain patients with the activity of cytokines and discuss the role of several key pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain. PMID:26437375

  2. Cytokine Expression in Keratoconus and its Corneal Microenvironment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Robert P L; Kuiper, Jonas J W; Gans, Renze; Imhof, Saskia; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Van der Lelij, Allegonda

    2015-10-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a progressive corneal ecstasia characterized by thinning and weakening of the cornea that leads to a cone-like appearance, scarring, and decreased vision. Despite the well-described clinical signs, the cause of KC is unknown. Nevertheless, various genes, proteinases, and environmental factors (eye-rubbing, contact lens wear, tear film composition) have been implicated in its etiology. Although classically defined as a predominantly degenerative disease, with mechanically induced trauma accelerating its course, accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role for inflammation in the pathophysiology of KC. Several reports have linked various inflammatory mediators (cytokines) with KC, but with contradictory findings. The methods and materials used in these studies vary considerably and warrant critical evaluation to decipher the role of inflammatory mediators in KC. We performed a systematic review of current literature on cytokine expression studies in KC and discuss critical soluble and cellular inflammatory mediators that are implicated in its pathogenesis.

  3. JAK2 activation by growth hormone and other cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Michael J.; Brooks, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and structurally related cytokines regulate a great number of physiological and pathological processes. They do this by coupling their single transmembrane domain (TMD) receptors to cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, either as homodimers or heterodimers. Recent studies have revealed that many of these receptors exist as constitutive dimers rather than being dimerized as a consequence of ligand binding, which has necessitated a new paradigm for describing their activation process. In the present study, we describe a model for activation of the tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) by the GH receptor homodimer based on biochemical data and molecular dynamics simulations. Binding of the bivalent ligand reorientates and rotates the receptor subunits, resulting in a transition from a form with parallel TMDs to one where the TMDs separate at the point of entry into the cytoplasm. This movement slides the pseudokinase inhibitory domain of one JAK kinase away from the kinase domain of the other JAK within the receptor dimer–JAK complex, allowing the two kinase domains to interact and trans-activate. This results in phosphorylation and activation of STATs and other signalling pathways linked to this receptor which then regulate postnatal growth, metabolism and stem cell activation. We believe that this model will apply to most if not all members of the class I cytokine receptor family, and will be useful in the design of small antagonists and agonists of therapeutic value. PMID:25656053

  4. Transcriptional upregulation of SOCS 1 and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 mRNA in the absence of suppressors of cytokine signaling 2 mRNA after infection with West Nile virus or tick-borne encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; Johnson, Nicholas; Cosby, S Louise; Solomon, Tom; Fooks, Anthony R

    2010-10-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are a family of proteins that are able to act in a classic negative feedback loop to regulate cytokine signal transduction. The regulation of the immune response by SOCS proteins may contribute to persistent infection or even a fatal outcome. In this study, we have investigated the induction of SOCS 1-3 after peripheral infection with West Nile virus (WNV) or tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in the murine model. We have shown that the cytokine response after infection of mice with WNV or TBEV induces an upregulation in the brain of mRNA transcripts for SOCS 1 and SOCS 3, but not SOCS 2. We hypothesize that SOCS proteins may play a role in limiting cytokine responses in the brain as a neuroprotective mechanism, which may actually enhance the ability of neuroinvasive viruses such as WNV and TBEV to spread and cause disease.

  5. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, I.; Macedo, D.; Alho, I.; Dionísio, M. R.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom. PMID:26538839

  6. The role of cytokines in pulp inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kokkas, A; Goulas, A; Stavrianos, C; Anogianakis, G

    2011-01-01

    Pulpitis is a typical inflammatory disease of dental pulp, characterized by the local accumulation of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines. In addition to serving as intercellular messengers mediating the inflammatory response, cytokines and chemokines induce the expression and stimulate the activity of molecular and cellular agents which participate actively in destructive and reparative processes in the pulp. It is the balance between these processes which eventually determines the extent of pulp inflammation and the viability of the affected tooth. Over the last decade, a number of studies have attempted to correlate cytokine gene expression in the pulp with various stages of inflammation, with possible diagnostic applications in mind. A small survey of relevant information is presented in this paper.

  7. Kitasato symposium 2010: new prospects for cytokines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Second Kitasato Symposium: New Prospects for Cytokines brought together researchers and rheumatologists to consider the essential role of cytokines in health and their contributions to autoimmunity. Topics addressed during the Symposium - which was held in Berlin, Germany from 27 to 29 May 2010 - included established and new cytokine targets in arthritis and autoimmunity and innovative aspects of osteoimmunology as well as current perspectives from translational and clinical studies. The keynote lecture, delivered by George Kollias, focused on insights gained from animal models into the mechanisms of TNF function in chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. The presentations at the Symposium resulted in productive discussions regarding potential new targets for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:21235827

  8. Cytokine production associated with smallpox vaccine responses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Whitney L; Salk, Hannah M; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Smallpox was eradicated 34 years ago due to the success of the smallpox vaccine; yet, the vaccine continues to be studied because of its importance in responding to potential biological warfare and the adverse events associated with current smallpox vaccines. Interindividual variations in vaccine response are observed and are, in part, due to genetic variation. In some cases, these varying responses lead to adverse events, which occur at a relatively high rate for the smallpox vaccine compared with other vaccines. Here, we aim to summarize the cytokine responses associated with smallpox vaccine response to date. Along with a description of each of these cytokines, we describe the genetic and adverse event data associated with cytokine responses to smallpox vaccination.

  9. IL-35, an anti-inflammatory cytokine which expands CD4+CD25+ Treg Cells.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Maria Luisa; Anogeianaki, A; Felaco, P; Toniato, E; De Lutiis, M A; Shaik, B; Fulcheri, M; Vecchiet, J; Tetè, S; Salini, V; Theoharides, T C; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Frydas, I; Conti, P; Cuccurullo, C; Ciampoli, C; Cerulli, G; Kempuraj, D

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL 12) p35/p40 is a heterodimeric cytokine which plays a critical role in inflammation, immunity and tissue proliferation, and also plays a relevant function in T helper (Th) cell polarization and Th1 T-cell differentiation. IL-12 family members, IL-12p70, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35, play an important role in influencing helper T-cell differentiation. EBV-induced gene 3 can be associated with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, also called IL-35. It has been shown that IL-35 has biological activity and able to expand CD4+CD25+ Treg cells, suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- effector cells and inhibit Th17 cell polarization. IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. IL-35 is a crucial mediator which provokes CD4+CD25+ T cell proliferation and IL-10 generation, another well-known anti-inflammatory cytokine, along with TGFbeta cytokine. These studies suggest that IL-35, together with other successfully discovered cytokine inhibitors, represents a new potential therapeutic cytokine for chronic inflammation, autoimmunity and other immunological disorders.

  10. Genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies risk polymorphisms in German familial cases and implicates MAPK signalling pathways in disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lascorz, Jesús; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Buch, Stephan; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Schulmann, Karsten; Goecke, Timm; Kloor, Matthias; Engel, Cristoph; Büttner, Reinhard; Kunkel, Nelli; Weires, Marianne; Hoffmeister, Michael; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Novotny, Jan; Schreiber, Stefan; Krawczak, Michael; Bröring, Clemens D; Völzke, Henry; Schafmayer, Clemens; Vodicka, Pavel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Propping, Peter; Hampe, Jochen; Hemminki, Kari

    2010-09-01

    Genetic susceptibility accounts for approximately 35% of all colorectal cancer (CRC). Ten common low-risk variants contributing to CRC risk have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In our GWAS, 610 664 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed the quality control filtering in 371 German familial CRC patients and 1263 controls, and replication studies were conducted in four additional case-control sets (4915 cases and 5607 controls). Known risk loci at 8q24.21 and 11q23 were confirmed, and a previously unreported association, rs12701937, located between the genes GLI3 (GLI family zinc finger 3) and INHBA (inhibin, beta A) [P = 1.1 x 10(-3), odds ratio (OR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.23, dominant model in the combined cohort], was identified. The association was stronger in familial cases compared with unselected cases (P = 2.0 x 10(-4), OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.16-1.60, dominant model). Two other unreported SNPs, rs6038071, 40 kb upstream of CSNK2A1 (casein kinase 2, alpha 1 polypeptide) and an intronic marker in MYO3A (myosin IIIA), rs11014993, associated with CRC only in the familial CRC cases (P = 2.5 x 10(-3), recessive model, and P = 2.7 x 10(-4), dominant model). Three software tools successfully pointed to the overrepresentation of genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways among the 1340 most strongly associated markers from the GWAS (allelic P value < 10(-3)). The risk of CRC increased significantly with an increasing number of risk alleles in seven genes involved in MAPK signalling events (P(trend) = 2.2 x 10(-16), OR(per allele) = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61).

  11. Transition from the Lactational Amenorrhea Method to other modern family planning methods in rural Bangladesh: barrier analysis and implications for behavior change communication program intervention design.

    PubMed

    Kouyaté, Robin Anthony; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Haver, Jaime; McKaig, Catharine; Akter, Nargis; Nash-Mercado, Angela; Baqui, Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    The timely transition from Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM)(2) to another modern family planning method contributes to healthy spacing of pregnancies by increasing the adoption of family planning during the first year postpartum. Yet, literature suggests challenges in completing a timely LAM transition. To guide program implementation in Bangladesh, this study identified factors influencing women's transition decisions. Eighty postpartum women, comprising 40 who transitioned from LAM(3) and 40 who did not,(4) participated. Half of each group participated in in-depth interviews to explore the decision-making process. All participants responded to a "Barrier Analysis" questionnaire to identify differences in eight behavioral determinants. More than half of transitioners switched to another modern method before or within the same month that LAM ended. Of the 18 transitioners who delayed,(5) 15 waited for menses to return. For non-transitioners, key barriers included waiting for menses to return, misconceptions on return to fertility, and perceived lack of familial support. The LAM transition can help women prevent unintended pregnancy during the first year postpartum. Increased emphasis on counseling women about the risk of pregnancy, and misconceptions about personal fertility patterns are critical for facilitating the transition. Strategies should also include interventions that train health workers and improve social support.

  12. Conformational Changes of rBTI from Buckwheat upon Binding to Trypsin: Implications for the Role of the P8′ Residue in the Potato Inhibitor I Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Longfei; Zhao, Fei; Li, Mei; Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Cao, Peng; Pan, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhuanhua; Chang, Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    BWI-1 (buckwheat trypsin inhibitor), a member of the potato inhibitor I family, suppresses the growth of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and induces apoptosis in human solid tumor cell lines. Here, we report the crystal structure of rBTI (recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor), a recombinant protein of BWI-1, at 1.84 Å resolution and the structure of rBTI in complex with bovine trypsin at 2.26 Å resolution. A conformational change of Trp53 at the P8′ position in rBTI was observed upon its binding to trypsin, which is not seen in other members of the potato inhibitor I family reported previously. The role of the P8′ residue in the potato inhibitor I family was examined by measuring the association and dissociation rates of four rBTI mutants with different substitutions at the P2 and P8′ positions when binding to trypsin. One of the mutants, P44T, was found to be a much stronger inhibitor than wild-type rBTI, with a picomolar (pM) dissociation constant. Our results could provide valuable insights for designing a new rBTI-based antitumor drug in the future. PMID:21698291

  13. Germ-line transmission of trisomy 21: Data from 80 families suggest an implication of grandmaternal age and a high frequency of female-specific trisomy rescue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Trisomy of chromosome 21 (T21; Down syndrome, DS) is the most common aneuploidy in live births. Though its etiology has been intensively studied for a half of century, there are surprisingly many problems awaiting their elucidation. Some of the open questions are related directly to germ line mosaicism for T21, other problems include the prevalence of males with non-mosaic trisomy over females (skewed sex ratio, SR), the genetic predisposition to non-disjunction, etc. Studies in families of gonadal mosaicism (GM) carriers might help resolving some of these problems. Results 80 families of carriers of GM, in which the sex of the offspring had been specified, were identified in the literature and in logbooks of two local genetic units. Mothers in these families were relatively young: only 8% of mothers were 35 years old and older at the time of delivery of their first affected offspring while the proportion of grandmothers on the GM carrier's side aged 35 years old and older was significantly higher (39%). Postzygotic rescue of T21 due to error in the meiosis I had been proposed as a mechanism of parental GM formation in 78% of the families with known origin of the T21. For the other 22%, rescue of errors in the meiosis II or postzygotic mitotic non-disjunction was assumed. Mosaicism for T21 in successive generations was reported in at least 12 families. The proportion of mosaics among affected female offspring (14%) is significantly higher compared to that among affected male offspring (0%). Male preponderance (SR = 1.5) is found in non mosaic liveborn offspring with either maternally- or paternally transmitted T21. Among unaffected offspring of male carriers of GM there is a notable excess of females (SR = 0.27). Conclusion Both direct (results of cytogenetic and molecular study of the origin of trisomic line) and indirect (advanced grandmaternal age on the side of GM carrier) evidences allow to assume that significant proportion of the mosaic parents

  14. Gene cloning and function analysis of cytokine-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Guang; Huang, Xian-De; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Mi; Wu, Shan-Zeng; He, Mao-Xian

    2013-03-01

    Cytokine-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family acts as a negative regulator of cytokine receptor signaling to control excessive cytokine effects and inhibit a variety of signal transduction pathways, particularly the Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. In present study, SOCS-2 homolog (PfSOCS-2) from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata was cloned and its gene has no intron. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis showed that PfSOCS-2 was clustered with other mollusk SOCS-2. LPS or polyI:C challenge and gene expression analysis revealed that PfSOCS-2 involved the innate immune response against bacterial and viral infections and that induction of PfSOCS-2 was varied with the different challenge stimulations. Furthermore, Dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that PfSOCS-2 involved in the regulation of vertebrate target genes containing the IFN-stimulated response element or NF-κB binding site in vitro. These results indicated that SOCS-2 from P. fucata plays a regulatory role against the stimulation.

  15. Cytokine Reduction in the Treatment of Joint Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martel-Pelletier, J.; Otterness, I. G.; Pelletier, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The destruction of joints caused by rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis is characterized by an imbalance of enzyme catalysed cartilage breakdown and regeneration. A complex cytokine network perpetuates joint conditions by direct regulation of metalloproteases, by indirect recruitment of cells that secrete degradative enzymes, and by inhibition of reparative processes. The destructive action of cytokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α can be modulated at multiple points associated either with cytokine production or with cytokine action. Potential agents for cytokine reduction include selective anti-cytokine antibodies, anticytokine receptor antibodies, cytokine receptor antagonist proteins, and soluble and chimeric cytokine receptor molecules. Pharmacologic regulation of IL-1 and TNFα remain primary targets for treatment of arthritis, and results of early clinical trials are promising. However, the results of long-term clinical trials will be required to support the value of anti-cytokine therapy in treatment of arthritis. PMID:18472950

  16. Extremely low penetrance of deafness associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation in 16 Chinese families: Implication for early detection and prevention of deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Pu; Liu Xin; Han Dongyi . E-mail: hdy301@263.net; Qian Yaping; Huang Deliang; Yuan Huijun; Li Weiming; Yu Fei; Zhang Ruining; Lin Hongyan; He Yong; Yu Youjun; Sun Quanzhu; Qin Huaiyi; Li Ronghua; Zhang Xin; Kang Dongyang; Cao Juyang; Young Wieyen . E-mail: ywy301@163.net; Guan Minxin |. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of 16 Chinese pedigrees (a total of 246 matrilineal relatives) with aminoglycoside-induced impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: being bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss, ranging from 4% to 18%, with an average of 8%. In particular, nineteen of 246 matrilineal relatives in these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Mutational analysis of the mtDNA in these pedigrees showed the presence of homoplasmic 12S rRNA A1555G mutation, which has been associated with hearing impairment in many families worldwide. The extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in these Chinese families carrying the A1555G mutation strongly supports the notion that the A1555G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce the clinical phenotype. Children carrying the A1555G mutation are susceptible to the exposure of aminoglycosides, thereby inducing or worsening hearing impairment, as in the case of these Chinese families. Using those genetic and molecular approaches, we are able to diagnose whether children carry the ototoxic mtDNA mutation. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  17. Time budgets of Snow Geese Chen caerulescens and Ross's Geese Chen rossii in mixed flocks: Implications of body size, ambient temperature and family associations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonsson, J.E.; Afton, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Body size affects foraging and forage intake rates directly via energetic processes and indirectly through interactions with social status and social behaviour. Ambient temperature has a relatively greater effect on the energetics of smaller species, which also generally are more vulnerable to predator attacks than are larger species. We examined variability in an index of intake rates and an index of alertness in Lesser Snow Geese Chen caerulescens caerulescens and Ross's Geese Chen rossii wintering in southwest Louisiana. Specifically we examined variation in these response variables that could be attributed to species, age, family size and ambient temperature. We hypothesized that the smaller Ross's Geese would spend relatively more time feeding, exhibit relatively higher peck rates, spend more time alert or raise their heads up from feeding more frequently, and would respond to declining temperatures by increasing their proportion of time spent feeding. As predicted, we found that Ross's Geese spent more time feeding than did Snow Geese and had slightly higher peck rates than Snow Geese in one of two winters. Ross's Geese spent more time alert than did Snow Geese in one winter, but alert rates differed by family size, independent of species, in contrast to our prediction. In one winter, time spent foraging and walking was inversely related to average daily temperature, but both varied independently of species. Effects of age and family size on time budgets were generally independent of species and in accordance with previous studies. We conclude that body size is a key variable influencing time spent feeding in Ross's Geese, which may require a high time spent feeding at the expense of other activities. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  18. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Stangou, M.; Bantis, C.; Skoularopoulou, M.; Korelidou, L.; Kouloukouriotou, D.; Scina, M.; Labropoulou, I. T.; Kouri, N. M.; Papagianni, A.; Efstratiadis, G.

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17–67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25–80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  19. Cytokine therapeutics: lessons from interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gutterman, J U

    1994-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that allow for communication between cells and the external environment. Interferon (IFN) alpha, the first cytokine to be produced by recombinant DNA technology, has emerged as an important regulator of growth and differentiation, affecting cellular communication and signal transduction pathways as well as immunological control. This review focuses on the biological and clinical activities of the cytokine. Originally discovered as an antiviral substance, the efficacy of IFN-alpha in malignant, viral, immunological, angiogenic, inflammatory, and fibrotic diseases suggests a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologies. The principles learned from in vivo studies will be discussed, particularly hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, certain angiogenic diseases, and hepatitis. After the surprising discovery of activity in a rare B-cell neoplasm, IFN-alpha emerged as a prototypic tumor suppressor protein that represses the clinical tumorigenic phenotype in some malignancies capable of differentiation. Regulatory agencies throughout the world have approved IFN-alpha for treatment of 13 malignant and viral disorders. The principles established with this cytokine serve as a paradigm for future development of natural proteins for human disease. PMID:8108387

  20. Cytokine levels as biomarkers for leptospirosis patients.

    PubMed

    Chirathaworn, C; Supputtamongkol, Y; Lertmaharit, S; Poovorawan, Y

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory mediators were suggested to be biomarkers for prediction of disease severity. In this study, we investigated the levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α in leptospirosis patients with mild or severe illnesses. Sera samples were divided into two groups. The OI group and NOI groups included sera from patients with and without organ involvement, respectively. Each group consisted of 20 pairs of sera. Twenty-five sera from healthy individuals were included as controls. Cytokine levels were compared. Although IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels in acute sera from the OI group were significantly higher than NOI group, only IL-8 level was significantly higher in the OI group when cytokine levels in convalescent sera were compared. TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine widely studied in leptospirosis was not significantly different between two groups of patients. Our data suggested that IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were involved in disease severity. However, time of specimen collection could affect the significant levels of cytokines especially as biomarkers for monitoring disease severity. PMID:27295614

  1. Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale objects, whether of biologic origin or synthetically created, are being developed into devices for a variety of bionanotechnology diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications. However, the potential immunotoxicity of these nanomaterials and mechanisms by which they may induce adverse reactions have not received sufficient attention. Nanomaterials, depending on their characteristics and compositions, can interact with the immune system in several ways and either enhance or suppress immune system function. Cytokines perform pleiotropic functions to mediate and regulate the immune response and are generally recognized as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. While the specificity and validity of certain cytokines as markers of adverse immune response has been established for chemicals, small and macromolecular drugs, research on their applicability for predicting and monitoring the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials is still ongoing. The goal of this review is to provide guidelines as to important cytokines that can be utilized for evaluating the immunotoxicity of nanomaterials and to highlight the role of those cytokines in mediating adverse reactions, which is of particular importance for the clinical development of nanopharmaceuticals and other nanotechnology-based products. Importantly, the rational design of nanomaterials of low immunotoxicity will be discussed, focusing on synthetic nanodevices, with emphasis on both the nanoparticle-forming materials and the embedded cargoes. PMID:23549679

  2. Ndfip-mediated degradation of Jak1 tunes cytokine signalling to limit expansion of CD4+ effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Claire E.; Riling, Christopher R.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Ding, Hua; Kumar, Suresh; Deng, Guoping; Liu, Yuhong; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Oliver, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    Nedd4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to restrict T-cell function and impact T-cell differentiation. We show here that Ndfip1 and Ndfip2, activators of Nedd4 family ligases, together limit accumulation and function of effector CD4+ T cells. Using a three-part proteomics approach in primary T cells, we identify stabilization of Jak1 in Ndfip1/2-deficient T cells stimulated through the TCR. Jak1 degradation is aborted in activated T cells that lack Ndfips. In wild-type cells, Jak1 degradation lessens CD4+ cell sensitivity to cytokines during TCR stimulation, while in Ndfip-deficient cells cytokine responsiveness persists, promoting increased expansion and survival of pathogenic effector T cells. Thus, Ndfip1/Ndfip2 regulate the cross talk between the T-cell receptor and cytokine signalling pathways to limit inappropriate T-cell responses. PMID:27088444

  3. Mechanisms of Cytokine-Induced Behavioral Changes: Psychoneuroimmunology at the Translational Interface Norman Cousins Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Timmie, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Work in our laboratory has focused on the mechanisms by which cytokines can influence the brain and behavior in humans and non-human primates. Using administration of interferon (IFN)-alpha as a tool to unravel these mechanisms, we have expanded upon findings from the basic science literature implicating cytokine-induced changes in monoamine metabolism as a primary pathway to depression. More specifically, a role for serotonin metabolism has been supported by the clinical efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in blocking the development of IFN-alpha-induced depression, and the capacity of IFN-alpha to activate metabolic enzymes (indolamine 2,3 dioxygenase) and cytokine signaling pathways (p38 mitogen activated protein kinase) that can influence the synthesis and reuptake of serotonin. Our data also support a role for dopamine depletion as reflected by IFN-alpha-induced changes in behavior (psychomotor slowing and fatigue) and regional brain activity, which implicate the involvement of the basal ganglia, as well as the association of IFN-alpha-induced depressive-like behavior in rhesus monkeys with decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the dopamine metabolite, homovanillic acid. Neuroimaging data in IFN-alpha-treated patients also suggest that activation of neural circuits (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) associated with anxiety and alarm may contribute to cytokine-induced behavioral changes. Taken together, these effects of cytokines on the brain and behavior appear to subserve competing evolutionary survival priorities that promote reduced activity to allow healing, and hypervigilance to protect against future attack. Depending on the relative balance between these behavioral accoutrements of an activated innate immune response, clinical presentations may be distinct and warrant individualized therapeutic approaches. PMID:18793712

  4. Increased specific T cell cytokine responses in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis from Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Stefan; Necek, Magdalena; Winkler, Heidi; Adegnika, Ayola A; Perkmann, Thomas; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G

    2005-07-01

    An understanding of T cell responses that are crucial for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has major implications for the development of immune-based interventions. We studied the frequency of purified protein derivative (PPD)-specific CD3) cells expressing interleukin-2 (IL)-2, gamma interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10 in HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB, n=30) as well as in healthy individuals (controls, n=21) from Central Africa. Increased frequencies of PPD-stimulated CD3+ cells expressing IL-2, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha in TB were seen when compared with frequencies of controls. The presence of type 1 cytokine biased responses in TB patients was supported by a shift in the distribution pattern of cytokine expression from exclusively IL-2 or TNF-alpha expression seen in controls towards an increased frequency of IFN-gamma/IL-2 or IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha co-expression in TB. Higher levels of PPD-induced IFN-gamma in the supernatants from TB patients than from controls were found, which correlated with its intracellular expression. PPD was a weak inducer of IL-10 in T cells and insufficient in promoting cytokine production in TCRgammadelta+CD3+ cells. Non-specific stimulation with PMA and ionomycin revealed increased frequencies of CD4+ cells expressing IFN-gamma in controls, while expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and TNF-alpha was not different. Non-specific cytokine responses of TCRgammadelta+CD3+ cells were similar in all groups. Pulmonary TB in Central Africa is associated with enhanced expression and secretion of specifically induced cytokines that are frequently implicated in host defense against MTB.

  5. Structural conservation despite huge sequence diversity allows EPCR binding by the PfEMP1 family implicated in severe childhood malaria.

    PubMed

    Lau, Clinton K Y; Turner, Louise; Jespersen, Jakob S; Lowe, Edward D; Petersen, Bent; Wang, Christian W; Petersen, Jens E V; Lusingu, John; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas; Higgins, Matthew K

    2015-01-14

    The PfEMP1 family of surface proteins is central for Plasmodium falciparum virulence and must retain the ability to bind to host receptors while also diversifying to aid immune evasion. The interaction between CIDRα1 domains of PfEMP1 and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is associated with severe childhood malaria. We combine crystal structures of CIDRα1:EPCR complexes with analysis of 885 CIDRα1 sequences, showing that the EPCR-binding surfaces of CIDRα1 domains are conserved in shape and bonding potential, despite dramatic sequence diversity. Additionally, these domains mimic features of the natural EPCR ligand and can block this ligand interaction. Using peptides corresponding to the EPCR-binding region, antibodies can be purified from individuals in malaria-endemic regions that block EPCR binding of diverse CIDRα1 variants. This highlights the extent to which such a surface protein family can diversify while maintaining ligand-binding capacity and identifies features that should be mimicked in immunogens to prevent EPCR binding.

  6. Growth of Chitinophaga pinensis on Plant Cell Wall Glycans and Characterisation of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 27 β-l-Arabinopyranosidase Implicated in Arabinogalactan Utilisation

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Lauren S.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the soil bacterium Chitinophaga pinensis encodes a diverse array of carbohydrate active enzymes, including nearly 200 representatives from over 50 glycoside hydrolase (GH) families, the enzymology of which is essentially unexplored. In light of this genetic potential, we reveal that C. pinensis has a broader saprophytic capacity to thrive on plant cell wall polysaccharides than previously reported, and specifically that secretion of β-l-arabinopyranosidase activity is induced during growth on arabinogalactan. We subsequently correlated this activity with the product of the Cpin_5740 gene, which encodes the sole member of glycoside hydrolase family 27 (GH27) in C. pinensis, CpArap27. Historically, GH27 is most commonly associated with α-d-galactopyranosidase and α-d-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity. A new phylogenetic analysis of GH27 highlighted the likely importance of several conserved secondary structural features in determining substrate specificity and provides a predictive framework for identifying enzymes with the less common β-l-arabinopyranosidase activity. PMID:26448175

  7. Structural Conservation Despite Huge Sequence Diversity Allows EPCR Binding by the PfEMP1 Family Implicated in Severe Childhood Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Clinton K.Y.; Turner, Louise; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Lowe, Edward D.; Petersen, Bent; Wang, Christian W.; Petersen, Jens E.V.; Lusingu, John; Theander, Thor G.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Higgins, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The PfEMP1 family of surface proteins is central for Plasmodium falciparum virulence and must retain the ability to bind to host receptors while also diversifying to aid immune evasion. The interaction between CIDRα1 domains of PfEMP1 and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) is associated with severe childhood malaria. We combine crystal structures of CIDRα1:EPCR complexes with analysis of 885 CIDRα1 sequences, showing that the EPCR-binding surfaces of CIDRα1 domains are conserved in shape and bonding potential, despite dramatic sequence diversity. Additionally, these domains mimic features of the natural EPCR ligand and can block this ligand interaction. Using peptides corresponding to the EPCR-binding region, antibodies can be purified from individuals in malaria-endemic regions that block EPCR binding of diverse CIDRα1 variants. This highlights the extent to which such a surface protein family can diversify while maintaining ligand-binding capacity and identifies features that should be mimicked in immunogens to prevent EPCR binding. PMID:25482433

  8. Psychosocial functioning among HIV-affected youth and their caregivers in Haiti: implications for family-focused service provision in high HIV burden settings.

    PubMed

    Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Eustache, Eddy; Oswald, Catherine; Surkan, Pamela; Louis, Ermaze; Scanlan, Fiona; Wong, Richard; Li, Michelle; Mukherjee, Joia

    2010-03-01

    The study is an analysis of baseline data from a pilot psychosocial support intervention for HIV-affected youth and their caregivers in Haiti. Six sites in Haiti's Central Department affiliated with Partners In Health/Zanmi Lasante (PIH/ZL) and the Haitian Ministry of Health were included. Participants were recruited from a list of HIV-positive patients receiving care at PIH/ZL. The baseline questionnaire was administered from February 2006 to January 2007 with HIV-affected youth (n = 492), ages 10-17, and their caregivers (n = 330). According to findings at baseline, the youth reported high levels of anxiety, including constant fidgeting (86%), restlessness (83%), and worrying a lot (56%). Their parents/caregivers also reported a high level of depressive symptoms, such as low energy (73%), feeling everything is an effort (71%), and sadness (69%). Parents' depressive symptoms were positively associated with their children's psychological symptoms (odds ratio [OR] =1.6-2.4) and psychosocial functioning (OR =1.6 according to parental report). The significant levels of anxiety and depression observed among HIV-affected youth and their caregivers suggest that psychosocial interventions are needed among HIV-affected families in central Haiti and other high HIV burden areas. The results suggest that a family-focused approach to service provision may be beneficial, possibly improving quality of life, as well as psychosocial and physical health-related outcomes among HIV-affected youth and their caregivers, particularly HIV-positive parents. PMID:20214482

  9. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  10. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  11. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  12. Cytokine balance and cytokine-driven natural killer cell dysfunction in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avau, Anneleen; Put, Karen; Wouters, Carine H; Matthys, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a severe inflammatory childhood disorder, characterized by a specific pattern of systemic features and a typical cytokine profile. Patients are at risk to develop macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), an acute life-threatening condition defined by excessive proliferation and activation of macrophages and T cells. Defects of unknown cause in the natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic capacity are presumed to underlie the pathogenesis of MAS and have been detected in sJIA patients. Here, we provide an overview of the cytokine profiles in sJIA and related mouse models. We discuss the influence of cytokines on NK cell function, and hypothesize that NK cell dysfunction in sJIA is caused by altered cytokine profiles.

  13. Identification and expression of Helios, a member of the Ikaros family, in the Mexican axolotl: implications for the embryonic origin of lymphocyte progenitors.

    PubMed

    Durand, Charles; Kerfourn, Fabienne; Charlemagne, Jacques; Fellah, Julien S

    2002-06-01

    Transcription factors of the Ikaros gene family are critical for the differentiation of T and B lymphocytes from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. To study the first steps of lymphopoiesis in the Mexican axolotl, we have cloned the Helios ortholog in this urodele amphibian species. We demonstrated that the axolotl Helios contains a 144-bp deletion at the 5' end of the activation domain. Helios is expressed in both the thymus and spleen but not in the liver of the pre-adult axolotl. During ontogeny, Helios transcripts are detected from neurula stage, before the apparition of the first Ikaros transcripts and the colonization of lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, Helios and Ikaros mRNA are found predominantly in the ventral blood islands of late tail-bud embryos. These results suggest that in contrast to the Xenopus and amniote embryos where two sites of hematopoiesis have been characterized, the ventral blood islands could be the major site of hematopoiesis in the axolotl. PMID:12115658

  14. New family host and records of Acanthocrios furnarii (Cordero & Vogelsang, 1928) (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) from Argentina, and implications in the transmission mechanism of cimicid bugs among birds' nests.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo; Turienzo, Paola; Bragagnolo, Laura; Santillan, Miguel Angel; Grande, Juan Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Acanthocrios furnarii (Cordero & Vogelsang, 1928) [Hemiptera: Cimicidae: Haematosiphoninae] is an ectoparasite on avian hosts from Argentina and Uruguay. It has been mostly found in mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Aves: Furnariidae], but its true hosts are some of the inquiline birds that use F. rufus nests. These inquiline hosts belong to the families Emberizidae, Hirundinidae, Icteridae, Passeridae, and Troglodytidae. Outside F. rufus mud nests, A. furnarii has been found in nests of other Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, and Passeridae. The present work adds the first nonpasserine host (Falconidae) of A. furnarii, together with new records in La Pampa, Argentina. The transmission mechanism of A. furnarii, together with all other cimicid bugs from Argentina and adjacent countries, is increased considering this new host; and we also take into account the birds that nidificate in nest boxes, the cavity-nesting birds in trees and earth, and the inquiline birds in stick nests of Furnariidae and Psittacidae.

  15. Maternal depressive symptoms and low literacy as potential barriers to employment in a sample of families receiving welfare: are there two-generational implications?

    PubMed

    Zaslow, M J; Hair, E C; Dion, M R; Ahluwalia, S K; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the role of maternal depressive symptoms and low maternal literacy in predicting outcomes in two generations in families receiving welfare: mothers' employment and children's development. The sample consists of 351 African-American families, each with a preschool-age child, in which the mother had applied for or was receiving welfare. Close to the start of the study, 52.6 percent of the mothers in the sample had scores indicating lower literacy, 39.5 percent reported moderate to high levels of depressive symptoms, and 24.6 percent had a co-occurrence of these. Using continuous scores, in multivariate analyses of variance, neither level of literacy, extent of depressive symptoms, nor the interaction of these, were found to predict two measures of subsequent employment (any employment across the two year follow-up period, and current employment at the time of the follow-up). However, when cut points were used (low literacy; moderate to high depressive symptoms), mothers with low literacy were found less often to be employed approximately two years later. Multivariate analyses of variance examining the set of child outcomes (cognitive school readiness and behavior problems) in light of mothers' depressive symptoms and literacy level found a statistically significant interaction of literacy level and extent of depressive symptoms: children of mothers with more depressive symptoms had less favorable developmental outcomes only in the presence of low maternal literacy. Structural equation models provide evidence that parenting behavior mediates the relationship between the predictor variables and child outcomes, and that the pathways from depressive symptoms through parenting to child outcomes are stronger when maternal depressive symptoms co-occur with low maternal literacy.

  16. Feminism and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldner, V

    1985-03-01

    Feminism has had a profound effect on contemporary culture and on thinking in most academic fields, including psychoanalysis. Interestingly, until very recently it had made virtually no impact on the theory and practice of family therapy. This paper proposes an explanation for this peculiar phenomenon and argues that family therapy has been considerably handicapped by its insularity from the feminist critique. Utilizing feminist scholarship in psychoanalysis, history, and sociology, the paper analyzes the structural contradictions in family life that family therapists have essentially ignored and then outlines their clinical implications. Key points in the discussion include the argument that systems theory is an inadequate explanatory matrix from which to build a theory of the family, that the archetypal "family case" of the overinvolved mother and peripheral father is best understood, not as a clinical problem, but as the product of a historical process two hundred years in the making, and that power relations between men and women in families function in terms of paradoxical, incongruous hierarchies that reflect the complex interpenetration between the structure of family relations and the world of work. This conceptual model then provides the basis for an analysis and critique of sexual politics as they emerge in the prototypical clinical situation.

  17. Cytokine induction by the hepatitis B virus capsid in macrophages is facilitated by membrane heparan sulfate and involves TLR2.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arik; Tal, Guy; Lider, Ofer; Shaul, Yosef

    2005-09-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core Ag (HBcAg) serves as the structural subunit of the highly immunogenic capsid shell. HBcAg harbors a unique arginine-rich C terminus that was implicated in immune responses induced by the capsid. In this study, we examined the capacity of the HBV capsid to induce proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines in human THP-1 macrophages and the possible underlying mechanism. Full-length HBc capsids, but not HBc-144 capsids lacking the arginine-rich domain of HBcAg, efficiently bound differentiated THP-1 macrophages and strongly induced TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p40. Capsid binding to macrophages and cytokine induction were independent of the RNA associated with the arginine-rich domain. Soluble heparin and heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfates greatly diminished cytokine induction through inhibition of capsid binding to THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, serine phosphorylation in the arginine-rich domain modulates capsid binding to macrophages and the cytokine response. Induction of cytokines by the capsid involved activation of NF-kappaB, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK and did not require endosomal acidification. Finally, NF-kappaB activation by the capsid in HEK 293 cells specifically required expression of TLR2 and was compromised by soluble heparin. Thus, cytokine induction by the HBV capsid in macrophages is facilitated by interaction of its arginine-rich domain with membrane heparan sulfate and involves signaling through TLR2. PMID:16116207

  18. The novel chicken interleukin 26 protein is overexpressed in T cells and induces proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Truong, Anh Duc; Park, Boyeong; Ban, Jihye; Hong, Yeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the cloning and functional characterization of chicken interleukin 26 (ChIL-26). ChIL-26, a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines by T cells. The ChIL-26 cDNA encodes an 82-amino-acid protein whose amino acid sequence has 22.63, 46.31 and 43.15% homology with human IL-26, pig IL-26 and canary IL-26, respectively. ChIL-26 signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex composed of the IL-20R1 and IL-10R2 chains, which are expressed primarily in the CU91 T cell line as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Recombinant ChIL-26 protein induced Th1 cytokines (IL-16 and IFN-γ), Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10), Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-17D, and IL-17F), and chemokine transcripts (mainly CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CCL20 and CXCL13) in the CU91 T cell line and in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, however IL-18 was not expressed in the CU91 T cell line. Taken together, the data demonstrates that T cells express the functional ChIL-26 receptor complex and that ChIL-26 modulates T cell proliferation and proinflammatory gene expression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cloned ChIL-26. We evaluated its functional roles, particularly in the pathogenic costimulation of T cells, which may be significantly associated with the induction of cytokines. PMID:27312894

  19. Cytokine mRNA profiles in mononuclear cells in acute aseptic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Navikas, V; Haglund, M; Link, J; He, B; Lindqvist, L; Fredrikson, S; Link, H

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines are important modulators of inflammation and immune responses. Using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled cDNA oligonucleotide probes, we studied the expression of mRNA encoding the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), lymphotoxin, and perforin in mononuclear cells (MNC) from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM) and from blood of healthy controls. Patients in the acute phase of AM had elevated numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in the blood compared with that of controls and higher numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in their CSF compared with that of convalescent-phase patients, which is in accordance with the antiviral effects of this cytokine. Upregulation of IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 was found in convalescent-phase patients, which is consistent with the longstanding B-cell response found in AM. TGF-beta and perforin were upregulated in both stages of AM, while the numbers of blood and CSF MNC expressing cytokine mRNA of the TNF family (TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin) did not differ between patients with AM and controls. An even higher elevation in CSF was noticed for MNC expressing most of the cytokines, particularly IL-4 and TGF-beta, reflecting the autonomy of the immune response in the CSF. The definition of cytokine profiles in AM, a self-limiting and benign disease, provides a foundation for future comparisons with other infectious and inflammatory nervous system diseases. PMID:7890425

  20. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5. Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. PMID:27183578