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Sample records for family history age

  1. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysms » Diagnosis » Family History A- A A+ Family History Familial intracranial aneurysms are generally defined as the ... patients with an Intracranial Aneurysm (IA) have a history of smoking at some time in their life. ...

  2. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  3. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordimaina, Alicia M.; Sheldon, Jane P.; Kiedrowski, Lesli A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey,…

  4. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordimaina, Alicia M.; Sheldon, Jane P.; Kiedrowski, Lesli A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey,…

  5. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History.

    PubMed

    Giordimaina, Alicia M; Sheldon, Jane P; Kiedrowski, Lesli A; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-12-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey, nondiabetic Mexican Americans (n = 385), Blacks (n = 387), and Whites (n = 396) reported family histories of T2DM. Negative binomial regressions used age and gender to predict the number of affected relatives reported. Models were examined for the gender gap, parabolic age effect, and gender-by-age interaction predicted by kinkeeping. Results demonstrated support for gender and parabolic age effects but only among Whites. Kinkeeping may have application to the study of White family medical historians, but not Black or Mexican American historians, perhaps because of differences in family structure, salience of T2DM, and/or gender roles.

  6. Alcohol expectancies: effects of gender, age, and family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, L H; Davis, T M; Adesso, V J; Lukas, S E

    1997-01-01

    To explore the effects of gender, age, and positive (FH+) and negative (FH-) family history of alcoholism on alcohol-related expectancies, the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (AEQ) was administered to 627 college students (female n = 430). In an attempt to control for consumption effects, only individuals who described themselves as heavy drinkers were included in the study. A 2 (Family History) x 2 (Gender) x 2 (Age Range) multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted on the six scales of the AEQ. Results indicated that FH+ females under the age of 20 years reported stronger expectancies of social and physical pleasure than did FH- females. Results also suggested that females over the age of 20 reported significantly lower expectancies of global, positive effects compared to all other subjects, regardless of family history of alcoholism. Finally, both male and female subjects under the age of 20 reported greater expectancies of global, positive effects, sexual enhancement, feelings of increased power and aggression, and social assertion compared to individuals over the age of 20. These results indicate that alcohol-related expectancies vary as a function of age, gender, and family history of alcoholism.

  7. Genetic modifiers and subtypes in schizophrenia: investigations of age at onset, severity, sex and family history.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Sarah E; O'Dushlaine, Colm T; Lee, Phil H; Fanous, Ayman H; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Ripke, Stephan; Sullivan, Patrick F; Smoller, Jordan W; Purcell, Shaun M; Corvin, Aiden

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. Genetic risk factors for the disorder may differ between the sexes or between multiply affected families compared to cases with no family history. Additionally, limited data support a genetic basis for variation in onset and severity, but specific loci have not been identified. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examining genetic influences on age at onset (AAO) and illness severity as well as specific risk by sex or family history status using up to 2762 cases and 3187 controls from the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). Subjects with a family history of schizophrenia demonstrated a slightly lower average AAO that was not significant following multiple testing correction (p=.048), but no differences in illness severity were observed by family history status (p=.51). Consistent with prior reports, we observed earlier AAO (p=.005) and a more severe course of illness for men (p=.002). Family history positive analyses showed the greatest association with KIF5C (p=1.96×10(-8)), however, genetic risk burden overall does not differ by family history. Separate association analyses for males and females revealed no significant sex-specific associations. The top GWAS hit for AAO was near the olfactory receptor gene OR2K2 (p=1.52×10(-7)). Analyses of illness severity (episodic vs. continuous) implicated variation in ST18 (p=8.24×10(-7)). These results confirm recognized demographic relationships but do not support a simplified genetic architecture for schizophrenia subtypes based on these variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Colonoscopy screening among US adults aged 40 or older with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Xirasagar, Sudha; Li, Yi-Jhen; de Groen, Piet C

    2015-05-21

    Colonoscopy screening reduces colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality. CRC screening is recommended at age 50 for average-risk people. Screening of first-degree relatives of CRC patients is recommended to begin at age 40 or 10 years before the age at diagnosis of the youngest relative diagnosed with CRC. CRC incidence has increased recently among younger Americans while it has declined among older Americans. The objective of this study was to determine whether first-degree relatives of CRC patients are being screened according to recommended guidelines. We studied colonoscopy screening rates among the US population reporting a CRC family history using 2005 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey data. Of 26,064 study-eligible respondents, 2,470 reported a CRC family history; of those with a family history, 45.6% had a colonoscopy (25.2% in 2005 and 65.8% 2010). The colonoscopy rate among first-degree relatives aged 40 to 49 in 2010 (38.3%) was about half that of first-degree relatives aged 50 or older (69.7%). First-degree relatives were nearly twice as likely as nonfirst-degree relatives to have a colonoscopy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-1.9), but those aged 40 to 49 were less likely to have a colonoscopy than those in older age groups (AOR, 2.6 for age 50-64; AOR, 3.6 for age ≥65). Interactions with age, insurance, and race/ethnicity were not significant. Having health insurance tripled the likelihood of screening. Despite a 5-fold increase in colonoscopy screening rates since 2005, rates among first-degree relatives younger than the conventional screening age have lagged. Screening promotion targeted to this group may halt the recent rising trend of CRC among younger Americans.

  9. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients' demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME.

  10. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    NAJAFI, Mohammad Reza; NAJAFI, Mohammad Amin; SAFAEI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients’ demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. Materials & Methods From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. Results JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). Conclusion A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME. PMID:27247579

  11. Psychosocial Adjustment in School-age Girls With a Family History of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa; Egleston, Brian; Sands, Colleen Burke; Chung, Wendy K; Glendon, Gord; McDonald, Jasmine A; Moore, Cynthia; Rauch, Paula; Tuchman, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Buys, Saundra S; Frost, Caren J; Keegan, Theresa H M; Knight, Julia A; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M; Daly, Mary B

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH-), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer-specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH- peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer-specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH- peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P < .001), although many girls were unsure of their risk. In multivariable analyses, higher daughter anxiety was associated with higher maternal anxiety and poorer family communication. Higher daughter breast cancer-specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer-specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Psychosocial Adjustment in School-age Girls With a Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa; Egleston, Brian; Sands, Colleen Burke; Chung, Wendy K.; Glendon, Gord; McDonald, Jasmine A.; Moore, Cynthia; Rauch, Paula; Tuchman, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Frost, Caren J.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Knight, Julia A.; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. METHODS Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH−), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer–specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). RESULTS BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH− peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer–specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH− peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P < .001), although many girls were unsure of their risk. In multivariable analyses, higher daughter anxiety was associated with higher maternal anxiety and poorer family communication. Higher daughter breast cancer–specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. CONCLUSIONS Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer–specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters. PMID:26482668

  13. Role of Family Resources and Paternal History of Substance Use Problems in Psychosocial Adjustment among School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg-Oren, Neta; Rahav, Giora; Teichman, Meir

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines the role of family resources (parenting style and family cohesion) and paternal history of substance abuse on the psychosocial adjustment of their school-aged children. Data were collected from 148 children aged 8-11 (72 of fathers with history of substance use disorder, 76 children of fathers with no substance use…

  14. Family history of gynaecological cancers: relationships to the incidence of breast cancer prior to age 55.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D; Schildkraut, J M

    1991-09-01

    As part of a multi-centre epidemiological study of cancer in women between the ages of 20 and 54, data were collected concerning family history of gynaecological cancers in the female relatives of 4730 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer and the relatives of 4688 women from the general population. Women who were diagnosed with breast cancer prior to age 45 were more likely than controls to have a mother or sister with ovarian cancer (odds ratio (OR): 1.50), endometrial cancer (1.29), and cervical cancer (1.53), although none of these elevations achieved statistical significance. The corresponding odds ratios for women diagnosed with breast cancer between the ages of 45 and 54 were 1.88, 0.84 and 0.93. The association with ovarian cancer was statistically significant in this group (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-3.19). In this latter group, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer was associated approximately as strongly with breast cancer as was having a first degree relative with breast cancer. The results suggest that there may be a shared genetic basis for some cancers of the breast and ovary. From a clinical perspective, the results indicate that in setting appropriate levels of screening for breast cancer and in establishing an appropriate age at which to begin such screening for a particular woman, her family history of ovarian cancer should be considered in addition to her family history of breast cancer.

  15. Association of age and family history with supplement use in pediatric patients with allergy.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masaru; Mori, Nagisa; Hamada, Shoko; Nagai, Ayako; Seto, Shiro; Suehiro, Yutaka; Kusunoki, Takashi; Wakazono, Yoshihiro; Kiyomasu, Takahiro

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the frequency and characteristics of supplement use in pediatric patients with allergic disorders in Japan. A total of 229 patients with various allergic disorders aged between 0 and 15 years were enrolled. Supplements were defined as preparations that provided nutritional content in the form of a tablet, capsule, powder, liquid, or jelly. The parents of each subject were asked to complete a questionnaire on their child's use of supplements over the previous year. Demographic information, parents' perceived view of the child's health status over the previous month, and family history of both allergic disorders, and supplement use were collected. Four hundred eight age- and sex-matched healthy children served as the controls. Twenty-nine (12.7%) patients had used supplements. This frequency was not significantly different from that in the control group (15.0%). The types of supplements most commonly used were vitamins, followed by minerals, probiotics, and chlorella. Univariate analysis revealed that older age and a positive family history of supplement use were associated with patients' supplement use. The types of allergic disorders, health status from the point of view of the parents, and a family history of allergic disorders did not show any significant association. To our knowledge, this is the first cross-sectional study to demonstrate the frequency and the factors affecting supplement use in pediatric patients with allergic disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Family history of alcohol and drug abuse, childhood trauma, and age of first drug injection.

    PubMed

    Taplin, Chris; Saddichha, Sahoo; Li, Kathy; Krausz, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    Childhood maltreatment may lead to development of future substance use; however the contributions of a family history of substance use is unclear. To better understand the relationship between childhood abuse, family history of alcohol and drug abuse, and injecting drug use initiation in a cohort of chronic opioid users. A cross-sectional survey of long-term and difficult to treat intravenous opiate users of the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) cohort was conducted in two Canadian cities (Vancouver and Montreal). For the analysis, we selected a subsample (n = 87) of the population reported experiencing childhood abuse and completed a 12-month follow up. The sample was 41.4% female and 14.9% First Nations, with a mean age of 38 years. This sample then completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) beside others. Maternal alcohol and drug use was significantly associated with childhood sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and physical neglect. Paternal alcohol and drug use was significantly associated with childhood physical abuse. Increased severity of all types of childhood trauma was related to an earlier age of first injection. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: Family history of drug and alcohol use is strongly associated with childhood trauma, which may, in turn, lead to an earlier initiation to the dangerous routes of drug injection.

  17. Associations Between Family History of Substance Use, Childhood Trauma, and Age of First Drug Use in Persons With Methamphetamine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Svingen, Leah; Dykstra, Rita E; Simpson, Jamie L; Jaffe, Anna E; Bevins, Rick A; Carlo, Gustavo; DiLillo, David; Grant, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the association among family history of substance use problems, childhood maltreatment, and age of first drug use in a sample of men and women seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence. Various forms of childhood maltreatment were considered as mediators of the association between family history of substance use problems and age of first drug use. Participants (N = 99, 40% women, mean age 33) who were under treatment for methamphetamine dependence completed a baseline interview that obtained demographic information, past substance use by participants, history of drug/alcohol problems in their family of origin, and age at first use of any drug (excluding alcohol and tobacco). The Early Trauma Inventory Self-Report-Short Form was used to assess child maltreatment experiences before the age of 18. Family history of substance use problems and childhood physical (but not emotional or sexual) trauma significantly predicted age of first drug use. Further, childhood physical trauma mediated the association between family history of substance use problems and age of first drug use. These findings suggest that the experience of childhood physical abuse may be an important mechanism through which family history of substance use is associated with an earlier age of first drug use.

  18. Family Health History and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Test Family Health History Quiz Family Health History Quiz Family health history is an important risk ... Should Ask Your Family About Diabetes & Family Health History Knowing your family health history is important. Here ...

  19. White matter microstructure in late middle-age: Effects of apolipoprotein E4 and parental family history of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Doran, Samuel T; Birdsill, Alex C; Melah, Kelsey E; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Alexander, Andrew L; Dowling, N Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C; Sager, Mark A; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    Little is still known about the effects of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) on white matter microstructure in cognitively healthy adults. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the effect of two well-known risk factors for AD, parental family history and APOE4 genotype. This study included 343 participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention, who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A region of interest analysis was performed on fractional anisotropy maps, in addition to mean, radial, and axial diffusivity maps, aligned to a common template space using a diffeomorphic, tensor-based registration method. The analysis focused on brain regions known to be affected in AD including the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, fornix, cingulum, and uncinate fasciculus. Analyses assessed the impact of APOE4, parental family history of AD, age, and sex on white matter microstructure in late middle-aged participants (aged 47-76 years). Both APOE4 and parental family history were associated with microstructural white matter differences. Participants with parental family history of AD had higher FA in the genu of the corpus callosum and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. We observed an interaction between family history and APOE4, where participants who were family history positive but APOE4 negative had lower axial diffusivity in the uncinate fasciculus, and participants who were both family history positive and APOE4 positive had higher axial diffusivity in this region. We also observed an interaction between APOE4 and age, whereby older participants (=65 years of age) who were APOE4 carriers, had higher MD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and in the portion of the cingulum bundle running adjacent to the cingulate cortex, compared to non-carriers. Older participants who were APOE4 carriers also showed higher radial diffusivity in the genu compared to non-carriers. Across all participants, age had an

  20. Familial history of cancer and leukemia in children younger than 2 years of age in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Couto, Arnaldo C; Ferreira, Jeniffer D; Koifman, Sérgio; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of a familial history of cancer (FHC) to the development of leukemia in children below 2 years of age. This is a national hospital-based case-control study of children 0-24 months of age recruited from 15 Brazilian hospitals from several regions providing oncological care and local general hospitals. Participants' FHC antecedents were obtained through face-to-face interviews with the mothers of cases and controls using a standardized questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to determine crude and adjusted (adj.) odds ratios (OR), and the respective 95% confidence intervals (CI), of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after adjustment for selected variables. FHC antecedents were obtained from 178 ALL, 51 AML, and 428 controls. FHC in second-degree relatives (grandparents, uncles, cousins) showed an adj. OR=1.66 (95% CI 1.12-2.45) for ALL. Antecedents of two or more relatives with cancer showed a statistically significant two-fold higher risk of either ALL or AML. Paternal, and joint paternal and maternal antecedents of cancer also showed statistically significant higher adj. OR, respectively: 1.80 and 1.89 for ALL, and 2.34 and 3.23 for AML. Hematological malignancies among second-degree relatives showed an adj. OR=3.48 (95% CI 1.72-7.09) for ALL. According to the anatomic site, antecedents of leukemia/lymphoma among case relatives, compared with the control ones, showed an OR=2.98 (95% CI 1.52-5.82) for ALL, whereas stomach cancer antecedents showed an OR=3.55 (95% CI 1.02-12.39) for AML. The observed results support the hypothesis that FHC antecedents are associated with leukemogenesis in children below 2 years of age.

  1. Family History Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookmark, 1991

    1991-01-01

    The 12 articles in this issue focus on the theme of family history resources: (1) "Introduction: Family History Resources" (Joseph F. Shubert); (2) "Work, Credentials, and Expectations of a Professional Genealogist" (Coreen P. Hallenbeck and Lewis W. Hallenbeck); (3) "Computers and Genealogy" (Theresa C. Strasser);…

  2. Creating a family health history

    MedlinePlus

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... Many factors affect your health. These include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, and habits. ...

  3. The association of age, gender, ethnicity, family history, obesity and hypertension with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Sobrian, Arianne; Latiff, Khalif; Pope, Danielle; Rampersad, Akash; Lourenço, Kodi; Samuel, Nichole

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of risk factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, family history, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and hypertension, on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Trinidadian population. A cross-sectional case control study comprised 146 non-diabetics and 147 type 2 diabetics ≥18 years of age, from North Central, South West and Eastern regions of Trinidad. Cross-tabulations revealed a significant difference between type 2-diabetes and age at p<0.01, and between type 2 diabetes and family history, ethnicity, waist circumference and hypertension at p<0.05. Logistic regression showed age to be the most influential risk factor. The systolic blood pressure specifically showed a significant difference at p<0.05, with the mean values for non-diabetics and type 2 diabetics being, 130.62 (±2.124) and 141.35 (±2.312), respectively. No significant difference was observed between type 2 diabetes and gender and BMI. Age was the most significant risk factor of type 2 diabetes. Therefore it can be concluded that family history, ethnicity, waist circumference and hypertension are more significant risk factors of this disease than BMI and gender in the Trinidadian population. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for Health A family health history is a ... family members grew up. It's like a family tree for health. Click for more information What a ...

  5. Family History Is Important for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... be treated to reduce the chances of getting disease. Learning About Your Family History To learn about your family history: • ask questions, • talk at family gatherings, and • ... age of disease onset and age at death, and • ethnic background ...

  6. Using Family Health History for Chronic Disease Prevention in the Age of Genomics: Translation to Health Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl; Novilla, Lelinneth; Barnes, Michael; De La Cruz, Natalie; Meacham, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of human genomics have important implications for the prevention of chronic disease. In response to these advancements, public health professionals--including health educators--must become competent in the principles underlying the interface between genomics and the use of family health history. Family health history captures…

  7. Family Histories: Collecting, Connecting, Celebrating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damkoehler, Dee; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an integrated curriculum for grade two at Metcalf Laboratory School, Normal, Illinois, that celebrates family histories and American immigration. Reports that the journey begins with the teachers sharing their own family backgrounds, followed by story reading, sharing the family history project with parents, collecting oral histories,…

  8. Family history in primary care pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Tarini, Beth A; McInerney, Joseph D

    2013-12-01

    The family history has been called the first genetic test; it was a core element of primary care long before the current wave of genetics technologies and services became clinically relevant. Risk assessment based on family history allows providers to personalize and prioritize health messages, shifts the focus of health care from treatment to prevention, and can empower individuals and families to be stewards of their own health. In a world of rising health care costs, the family history is an important tool, with its primary cost being the clinician's time. However, a recent National Institutes of Health conference highlighted the lack of substantive evidence to support the clinical utility of family histories. Annual collection of a comprehensive 3-generation family history has been held up as the gold standard for practice. However, interval family histories targeted to symptoms and family histories tailored to a child's life stage (ie, age-based health) may be important and underappreciated methods of collecting family history that yield clinically actionable data and supplement existing family history information. In this article, we review the various applications, as well as capabilities and limitations, of the family history for primary care providers.

  9. Family History in Primary Care Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The family history has been called the first genetic test; it was a core element of primary care long before the current wave of genetics technologies and services became clinically relevant. Risk assessment based on family history allows providers to personalize and prioritize health messages, shifts the focus of health care from treatment to prevention, and can empower individuals and families to be stewards of their own health. In a world of rising health care costs, the family history is an important tool, with its primary cost being the clinician’s time. However, a recent National Institutes of Health conference highlighted the lack of substantive evidence to support the clinical utility of family histories. Annual collection of a comprehensive 3-generation family history has been held up as the gold standard for practice. However, interval family histories targeted to symptoms and family histories tailored to a child’s life stage (ie, age-based health) may be important and underappreciated methods of collecting family history that yield clinically actionable data and supplement existing family history information. In this article, we review the various applications, as well as capabilities and limitations, of the family history for primary care providers. PMID:24298128

  10. Age at onset of major depressive disorder in Han Chinese women: relationship with clinical features and family history.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuzhong; Li, Yihan; Xie, Dong; Shao, Chunhong; Ren, Jianer; Wu, Wenyuan; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Zhen; Zou, Ying; Zhang, Jiulong; Qiao, Dongdong; Gao, Chengge; Li, Youhui; Hu, Jian; Deng, Hong; Wang, Gang; Du, Bo; Wang, Xumei; Liu, Tiebang; Gan, Zhaoyu; Peng, Juyi; Wei, Bo; Pan, Jiyang; Chen, Honghui; Sun, Shufan; Jia, Hong; Liu, Ying; Chen, Qiaoling; Wang, Xueyi; Cao, Juling; Lv, Luxian; Chen, Yunchun; Ha, Baowei; Ning, Yuping; Chen, Yiping; Kendler, Kenneth S; Flint, Jonathan; Shi, Shenxun

    2011-12-01

    Individuals with early-onset depression may be a clinically distinct group with particular symptom patterns, illness course, comorbidity and family history. This question has not been previously investigated in a Han Chinese population. We examined the clinical features of 1970 Han Chinese women with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) between 30 and 60 years of age across China. Analysis of linear, logistic and multiple logistic regression models was used to determine the association between age at onset (AAO) with continuous, binary and discrete characteristic clinical features of MDD. Earlier AAO was associated with more suicidal ideation and attempts and higher neuroticism, but fewer sleep, appetite and weight changes. Patients with an earlier AAO were more likely to suffer a chronic course (longer illness duration, more MDD episodes and longer index episode), increased rates of MDD in their parents and a lower likelihood of marriage. They tend to have higher comorbidity with anxiety disorders (general anxiety disorder, social phobia and agoraphobia) and dysthymia. Early AAO in MDD may be an index of a more severe, highly comorbid and familial disorder. Our findings indicate that the features of MDD in China are similar to those reported elsewhere in the world. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stressful events, social support, and cognitive function in middle-aged adults with a family history of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zuelsdorff, Megan L; Engelman, Corinne D; Friedman, Elliot M; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Rue, Asenath La; Sager, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    To examine the associations of stressful experiences and social support with cognitive function in a sample of middle-aged adults with a family history of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using data from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP; N = 623), we evaluated relationships between stressful events experienced in the past year, as well as social support, and cognitive performance in four domains: speed and flexibility, immediate memory, verbal learning and memory, and working memory. We assessed interactions between psychosocial predictors, and with APOE ε4 status. Greater number of stressful events was associated with poorer performance on tests of speed and flexibility. Greater social support was associated with better performance in the same domain; this relationship was diminished by the presence of the ε4 allele. No associations were seen in the remaining three domains. Psychosocial factors may influence cognition in at-risk individuals; influence varies by cognitive domain and ε4 status.

  12. A prospective study of cognitive health in the elderly (Oregon Brain Aging Study): effects of family history and apolipoprotein E genotype.

    PubMed

    Payami, H; Grimslid, H; Oken, B; Camicioli, R; Sexton, G; Dame, A; Howieson, D; Kaye, J

    1997-04-01

    The oldest old are the fastest-growing segment of our population and have the highest prevalence of dementia. Little is known about the genetics of cognitive health in the very old. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD)--namely, apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele and a family history of dementia-continue to be important factors in the cognitive health of the very old. Case-control studies suggest that the effect of genetic factors diminishes at age >75 years. The present prospective study provided evidence to the contrary. We studied 114 Caucasian subjects who were physically healthy and cognitively intact at age 75 years and who were followed, for an average of 4 years, with neurological, psychometric, and neuroimaging examinations. Excellent health at entry did not protect against cognitive decline. Incidence of cognitive decline rose sharply with age. epsilon4 and a family history of dementia (independent of epsilon4) were associated with an earlier age at onset of dementia. Subjects who had epsilon4 or a family history of dementia had a ninefold-higher age-specific risk for dementia than did those who had neither epsilon4 nor a family history of dementia. These observations suggest that the rate of cognitive decline increases with age and that APOE and other familial/genetic factors influence the onset age throughout life.

  13. A prospective study of cognitive health in the elderly (Oregon Brain Aging Study): effects of family history and apolipoprotein E genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Payami, H; Grimslid, H; Oken, B; Camicioli, R; Sexton, G; Dame, A; Howieson, D; Kaye, J

    1997-01-01

    The oldest old are the fastest-growing segment of our population and have the highest prevalence of dementia. Little is known about the genetics of cognitive health in the very old. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD)--namely, apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele and a family history of dementia-continue to be important factors in the cognitive health of the very old. Case-control studies suggest that the effect of genetic factors diminishes at age >75 years. The present prospective study provided evidence to the contrary. We studied 114 Caucasian subjects who were physically healthy and cognitively intact at age 75 years and who were followed, for an average of 4 years, with neurological, psychometric, and neuroimaging examinations. Excellent health at entry did not protect against cognitive decline. Incidence of cognitive decline rose sharply with age. epsilon4 and a family history of dementia (independent of epsilon4) were associated with an earlier age at onset of dementia. Subjects who had epsilon4 or a family history of dementia had a ninefold-higher age-specific risk for dementia than did those who had neither epsilon4 nor a family history of dementia. These observations suggest that the rate of cognitive decline increases with age and that APOE and other familial/genetic factors influence the onset age throughout life. PMID:9106542

  14. Association of age at onset of migraine with family history of migraine in children attending a pediatric headache clinic: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Haimi-Cohen, Yishay; Zeharia, Avraham

    2015-07-01

    Migraine is known to run in families and has long been considered a strongly heritable disorder. This study sought to evaluate the relationship between age at onset of pediatric migraine and family history of migraine. Review of the medical files of the headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center yielded 344 children with migraine for whom details on migraine in family members were available. Mean age of the cohort was 11.69 ± 3.49 years, and mean frequency of headache per month, 13.68 ± 11.26. Mean age at migraine onset in patients with a negative parental history was10.48 ± 3.39 years; in patients with one parent with migraine, 8.84 ± 3.72 years; and in patients with both parents with migraine, 7.32 ± 3.22 years (p < 0.001).The duration of migraine attacks (in hours) was significantly longer in patients with any family member with migraine than in those with no family history (p = 0.026). Among children attending a tertiary pediatric headache clinic, migraine appears at a younger age in those with parental history of migraine than in those with a negative family history. The findings suggest that having a genetic background of migraine makes a child more susceptible to migraine earlier in life than a child without a family history. © International Headache Society 2014.

  15. Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Your Family Health History My Family Health Portrait Tool English Web Tool Printable Versions Source Code ... your family's health history. My Family Health History Portrait Tool Find out about this web-based tool ...

  16. Effect of a family history of psoriasis and age on comorbidities and quality of life in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: Results from the ARIZONA study.

    PubMed

    López-Estebaranz, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Carazo, Jose Luis; Sulleiro, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose clinical characteristics vary from patient to patient. We aimed to analyze how comorbidities and quality of life (QoL, as per the Dermatology Life Quality Index [DLQI]) may be affected by a family history of psoriasis and by age. The ARIZONA study was a multicenter, cross-sectional study in 1022 adult patients diagnosed with moderate to severe psoriasis at least 6 months prior to inclusion. The severity of psoriasis and the proportion of patients with comorbidities were not affected by the presence of a family history. The regression analysis revealed that the presence of a family history of psoriasis was associated with the effect on the patient's QoL (P = 0.002), regardless of disease severity. The mean DLQI total score varied significantly across age groups (5.1 ± 5.3 for the 18-30-year group, 5.7 ± 6.5 for the 31-60-year group and 3.8 ± 5.1 for the >60-year group; P = 0.001). In conclusion, the presence of a family history of psoriasis appears to disrupt QoL in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, but it hardly affected the prevalence of comorbid conditions. The effect of age on QoL was particularly noticeable in younger patients, highlighting its negative impact. As expected, older patients appeared to be burdened with a higher number of comorbidities than their younger counterparts.

  17. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged <55 years) with stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Smoking, family history of cancer, and diabetes mellitus are associated with the age of onset of pancreatic cancer in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Suguru; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Saito, Tomotaka; Takagi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Takeo; Uchino, Rie; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Miyabayashi, Koji; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Sasahira, Naoki; Hirano, Kenji; Tsujino, Takeshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of risk factors including diabetes mellitus (DM) with the age of onset in Japanese pancreatic cancer (PC) patients. We retrospectively reviewed 688 PC patients diagnosed at our institute. We analyzed the association between the age of onset of PC and the following variables: sex, smoking, alcohol, DM, and a family history of cancer especially PC. The mean age of PC diagnosis was 67.6 years. The onset of PC occurred earlier in current smokers (63.6 years old, P < 0.001) compared with past smokers (69.5 years old) and never smokers (68.6 years old). Patients with long-standing DM (>2 years) were older (70.5 years, P < 0.001) when diagnosed with PC than patients with new-onset DM (within 2 years) (66.9 years old) and patients without DM (66.7 years old). In the multivariate analysis, current smokers and a family history of cancer other than PC were associated with earlier onset. Conversely, long-standing DM was associated with later onset. In Japanese PC patients, current smokers and a family history of cancer other than PC were associated with a younger age of onset. Conversely, long-standing DM was associated with a later onset.

  19. Asteroid family ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani, Andrea; Knežević, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    A new family classification, based on a catalog of proper elements with ∼384,000 numbered asteroids and on new methods is available. For the 45 dynamical families with >250 members identified in this classification, we present an attempt to obtain statistically significant ages: we succeeded in computing ages for 37 collisional families. We used a rigorous method, including a least squares fit of the two sides of a V-shape plot in the proper semimajor axis, inverse diameter plane to determine the corresponding slopes, an advanced error model for the uncertainties of asteroid diameters, an iterative outlier rejection scheme and quality control. The best available Yarkovsky measurement was used to estimate a calibration of the Yarkovsky effect for each family. The results are presented separately for the families originated in fragmentation or cratering events, for the young, compact families and for the truncated, one-sided families. For all the computed ages the corresponding uncertainties are provided, and the results are discussed and compared with the literature. The ages of several families have been estimated for the first time, in other cases the accuracy has been improved. We have been quite successful in computing ages for old families, we have significant results for both young and ancient, while we have little, if any, evidence for primordial families. We found 2 cases where two separate dynamical families form together a single V-shape with compatible slopes, thus indicating a single collisional event. We have also found 3 examples of dynamical families containing multiple collisional families, plus a dubious case: for these we have obtained discordant slopes for the two sides of the V-shape, resulting in distinct ages. We have found 2 cases of families containing a conspicuous subfamily, such that it is possible to measure the slope of a distinct V-shape, thus the age of the secondary collision. We also provide data on the central gaps appearing in

  20. Neuropsychological Performance and Family History in Children at Age 7 who Develop Adult Schizophrenia or Bipolar Psychosis in the New England Family Studies

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, Larry J.; Cherkerzian, Sara; Goldstein, Jill M.; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; Tsuang, Ming T.; Buka, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Persons developing schizophrenia (SCZ) manifest various premorbid neuropsychological deficits, studied most often by measures of IQ. Far less is known about premorbid neuropsychological functioning in individuals who later develop bipolar psychoses (BP). We evaluated the specificity and impact of family history (FH) of psychosis on premorbid neuropsychological functioning. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study investigating the associations of neuropsychological data systematically collected at age 7 years for 99 adults with psychotic diagnoses (including 45 SCZ and 35 BP) and 101 controls, drawn from the New England cohort of the Collaborative Perinatal Project. A mixed model approach evaluated Full Scale IQ, four neuropsychological factors derived from principal components analysis, and the profile of 10 intelligence and achievement tests, controlling for maternal education, race, and intrafamilial correlation. We used a deviant responder approach (< 10%tile) to calculate rates of impairment. Results There was a significant linear trend, with the SCZ group performing worst. The profile of childhood deficits for persons with SCZ did not differ significantly from BP. 42.2% of SCZ, 22.9% of BP, and 7% of controls were neuropsychologically impaired. Presence of psychosis in first-degree relatives (FH+) significantly increased the severity of childhood impairment for SCZ but not for BP. Conclusions Premorbid neuropsychological deficits are found in a substantial proportion of children who later develop SCZ, especially in the SCZ FH+ subgroup, but less so in BP, suggesting especially impaired neurodevelopment underlying cognition in pre-SCZ children. Future work should assess genetic and environmental factors that explain this FH effect. PMID:22575089

  1. Family history in pediatric primary care.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Tracy L; Martin, Helen M

    2007-09-01

    The family history is a critical element in pediatric medicine and represents the gateway to the molecular age of medicine for both pediatric clinicians and their patients. The pediatric clinician has several opportunities to obtain a family history and multiple clinical and educational uses for that information. Available methods include paper and digital forms, classical pedigrees, online programs, and focused family history at the time of a new diagnosis or problem. Numerous barriers impede the application of family history information to primary pediatric practice. The most common barrier is the limited amount of time the typical primary care encounter allows for its collection. The family history can be used in many facets of pediatric practice: (1) as a diagnostic tool and guide to testing and evaluation; (2) to identify patterns of inheritance; and (3) as a patient-education tool. The most exciting future use of family history is as a tool for public health and preventive medicine. More accurately identifying children at risk for common chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular disease could change the primary care clinician's approach to pediatric medicine.

  2. Effect of age, family history of diabetes, and antipsychotic drug treatment on risk of diabetes in people with psychosis: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2015-12-01

    Psychosis is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. A positive synergy between antipsychotic drug effects and a pre-existing liability to diabetes mellitus might explain the especially high relative risk of diabetes mellitus in young adults with psychosis. We aimed to assess the individual and joint effect of age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and currently prescribed antipsychotic drug treatment on risk for diabetes mellitus. In this study, we used data from the 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis-an observational study done at seven sites in five Australian states. We included data from 1155 people with psychosis aged 18-64 years who were in contact with psychiatric services and who gave a fasting blood sample to test for current diabetes mellitus. Using logistic regression, we modelled the association of diabetes mellitus with age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and current antipsychotic drug treatment. We compared model fit with and without two-way and three-way interaction terms and used likelihood ratio tests to establish which terms to include in the final model. After adjustment for older age, which was an independent risk factor, compared with not taking antipsychotic drugs, antipsychotic drug treatment was associated with diabetes mellitus only in those without a family history of diabetes mellitus (clozapine adjusted odds ratio [OR] 7·22, 95% CI 1·62-32·20, p=0·01; quetiapine 5·91, 1·33-26·30, p=0·02; aripiprazole 5·06, 0·86-29·64, p=0·07; risperidone 4·17, 0·90-19·24, p=0·07; and olanzapine 2·23, 0·45-11·06, p=0·32). Antipsychotic drug treatment was not associated with additional risk of diabetes mellitus in those with a family history (clozapine adjusted OR 1·51, 95% CI 0·64-3·54, p=0·34; quetiapine 1·09, 0·49-2·43, p=0·82; aripiprazole 0·43, 0·12-1·49, p=0·18; risperidone 1·12, 0·48-2·63, p=0·79; and olanzapine 0·67, 0·26-1·71, p=0·39). People with psychosis are at

  3. Assessment of association of D3 dopamine receptor MscI polymorphism with schizophrenia: Analysis of symptom ratings, family history, age at onset, and movement disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitonde, E.J.; Mollon, J.D.; McKenna, P.J.

    1996-09-20

    Several studies have reported an association between schizophrenia and homozygosity for the MscI restriction site in exon 1 of the D3 dopamine receptor gene, but other studies have failed to find this association. Recent reports have suggested that the association is most salient in male patients with a family history of schizophrenia. We examined this restriction site in a group of schizophrenic patients (n = 84) and in normal controls (n = 77). Patients were subdivided according to demographic and clinical features, particular attention being paid to movement disorders. No significant difference in allelic or genotypic distribution was seen between the two groups. No association was seen between homozygosity and a positive family history, age at onset of illness, clinical subtype, negative symptom score, or movement disorder scores. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Evaluation of mammographic surveillance services in women aged 40-49 years with a moderate family history of breast cancer: a single-arm cohort study.

    PubMed

    Duffy, S W; Mackay, J; Thomas, S; Anderson, E; Chen, T H H; Ellis, I; Evans, G; Fielder, H; Fox, R; Gui, G; Macmillan, D; Moss, S; Rogers, C; Sibbering, M; Wallis, M; Warren, R; Watson, E; Whynes, D; Allgood, P; Caunt, J

    2013-03-01

    Women with a significant family history of breast cancer are often offered more intensive and earlier surveillance than is offered to the general population in the National Breast Screening Programme. Up to now, this strategy has not been fully evaluated. To evaluate the benefit of mammographic surveillance for women aged 40-49 years at moderate risk of breast cancer due to family history. The study is referred to as FH01. This was a single-arm cohort study with recruitment taking place between January 2003 and February 2007. Recruits were women aged < 50 years with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer conferring at least a 3% risk of breast cancer between ages 40 and 49 years. The women were offered annual mammography for at least 5 years and observed for the occurrence of breast cancer during the surveillance period. The age group 40-44 years was targeted so that they would still be aged < 50 years after 5 years of surveillance. Seventy-four surveillance centres in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. A total of 6710 women, 94% of whom were aged < 45 years at recruitment, with a family history of breast cancer estimated to imply at least a 3% risk of the disease between the ages of 40 and 50 years. Annual mammography for at least 5 years. The primary study end point was the predicted risk of death from breast cancer as estimated from the size, lymph node status and grade of the tumours diagnosed. This was compared with the control group from the UK Breast Screening Age Trial (Age Trial), adjusting for the different underlying incidence in the two populations. As of December 2010, there were 165 breast cancers diagnosed in 37,025 person-years of observation and 30,556 mammographic screening episodes. Of these, 122 (74%) were diagnosed at screening. The cancers included 44 (27%) cases of ductal carcinoma in situ. There were 19 predicted deaths in 37,025 person-years in FH01, with an estimated incidence of 6.3 per 1000 per year. The corresponding

  5. Intertemporal Choice Behavior in Emerging Adults and Adults: Effects of Age Interact with Alcohol Use and Family History Status

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher T.; Steel, Eleanor A.; Parrish, Michael H.; Kelm, Mary K.; Boettiger, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    Adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) show marked immediate reward selection (or “Now”) bias in intertemporal choice tasks. This Now bias persists long into abstinence, suggesting an irreversible consequence of chronic alcohol abuse or a pre-existing AUD intermediate phenotype. However, some data show substantial Now bias among emerging adults (18–25), regardless of drinking behavior, suggesting age-dependent effects on Now bias. The objectives of the present study were to determine (1) whether Now bias is greater among emerging adults relative to adults, (2) whether any such age effect on Now bias is diminished in sub-clinical heavy alcohol users, and (3) whether having a problem drinking first degree relative is independently associated with elevated Now bias. To achieve these objectives, we used an intertemporal choice task to quantify Now bias in n = 237 healthy participants (ages 18–40; 50% female), and a wide range of non-zero alcohol use, based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). We found that among non-heavy drinkers, Now bias inversely correlated with age; this relationship was not present among heavy drinkers. We found no significant relationship between AUDIT score and Now bias among emerging adults, but AUDIT scores and Now bias were positively correlated among 26–40 year olds. Additionally, non-heavy drinking adults who reported a problem drinking first degree relative showed greater Now bias compared to those not reporting familial problem drinking. While not definitive, these findings lend support for elevated Now bias in adulthood as an intermediate phenotype for AUDs. Moreover, non-additive effects of age and heavy drinking on Now bias suggest perturbations in largely common neural circuits in both groups. PMID:26635580

  6. Aging and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, C. Roberta

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional, social, medical, and nutritional needs of older people, and stresses the need for education of the families of the elderly and the need for a coordinated approach to service delivery to this population. In this way, maximum independence of the aged can be achieved. (NRJ)

  7. Aging and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, C. Roberta

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional, social, medical, and nutritional needs of older people, and stresses the need for education of the families of the elderly and the need for a coordinated approach to service delivery to this population. In this way, maximum independence of the aged can be achieved. (NRJ)

  8. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  9. Differential expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval and screen-detected breast cancers: does age or family history matter?

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jan T; Byers, Tim; Kittelson, John; Hokanson, John E; Mouchawar, Judy; Lewin, John; Merrick, Dan; Hines, Lisa; Singh, Meenakshi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tumor expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval breast cancers and screen-detected breast cancers overall, and according to age at diagnosis and familial risk. Tissue micro-arrays were constructed from 98 breast cancers (47 interval and 51 screen-detected) diagnosed in women in the Cancer Genetics Network. Arrays were immuno-stained to compare protein expression of six biomarkers including estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR), Her2/neu, EGFR, cytokeratin 5/6, and Ki67. Fisher's Exact test was used to compare expression between interval and screen-detected cancers. Interval cancers were larger (P = 0.04), higher stage (P < 0.001), and more likely to have lobular histology (P = 0.01) than screen-detected cancers. Overall, interval cancers more often overexpressed EGFR (P = 0.01) and were somewhat more likely to be ER- (55% vs. 43%, P = 0.3), and triple negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) (21 vs. 12%, P = 0.26). A greater difference in the proportion of interval versus screen-detected tumors that were ER- (53 vs. 35%; P = 0.29), PR- (35 vs. 21%; P = 0.25) and EGFR+ (17 vs. 0%; P = 0.02) was evident among women over 50. There was a trend toward differential expression among women with familial risk for PR- (P = 0.005) and triple negative status (P = 0.02). This study provides new data indicating that EGFR may be important in the etiology of interval cancer and be a possible therapeutic target. Our data also suggest that biological differences between interval and screen-detected cancers are more defined in older women. Future studies to confirm this finding and to elucidate novel markers for characterizing interval cancers may be more beneficial to this subgroup.

  10. Family History May Magnify Your Hangover

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164499.html Family History May Magnify Your Hangover People whose relatives ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say people with a family history of alcoholism seem to recall the misery ...

  11. Medical History: Compiling Your Medical Family Tree

    MedlinePlus

    ... history. Or, you can compile your family's health history on your computer or in a paper file. If you encounter reluctance from your family, consider these strategies: Share your ... have a family history of certain diseases or health conditions. Offer to ...

  12. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication about Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N.; Quillin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet, few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. Average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that, in turn, inform cancer prevention interventions. PMID:26735646

  13. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication About Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Vivian M; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N; Quillin, John M

    2016-01-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. The women's average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% had graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy, and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that in turn inform cancer prevention interventions.

  14. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  15. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  16. Longitudinal Assessment of Self- and Informant-Subjective Cognitive Complaints in a Sample of Healthy Late-Middle Aged Adults Enriched with a Family History of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Christopher R; Dowling, N Maritza; Racine, Annie M; Clark, Lindsay R; Berman, Sara E; Koscik, Rebecca L; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal trajectory of self- and informant-subjective cognitive complaints (SCC), and to determine if SCC predict longitudinal changes in objective measures (OM) of cognitive function. The study included healthy and cognitively normal late middle-aged adults enriched with a family history of AD who were evaluated at up to three visits over a 4-year period. At each visit (Visit 1-3), self- and informant-SCC and OM were evaluated. Linear mixed models were used to determine if the longitudinal rate of change of self- and informant-SCC were associated with demographic variables, depressive symptoms, family history (FH), and apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE4) status. The same modeling approach was used to examine the effect of Visit 1 SCC on longitudinal cognitive change after controlling for the same variables. At Visit 1, more self-SCC were associated with fewer years of education and more depressive symptoms. SCC were also associated with poorer performance on cognitive measures, such that more self-SCC at Visit 1 were associated with poorer performance on memory and executive functioning measures at Visit 1, while more informant-SCC were associated with faster rate of longitudinal decline on a measure of episodic learning and memory. FH and APOE4 status were not associated with SCC. Self- and informant-SCC showed an association with OM, albeit over different time frames in our late middle-aged sample. Additional longitudinal follow-up will likely assist in further clarifying these relationships as our sample ages and more pronounced cognitive changes eventually emerge. (JINS, 2017, 23, 617-626).

  17. The impact of a family history of psychosis on age-at-onset and positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Michelle L; Trotman, Hanan D; Holtzman, Carrie; Compton, Michael T; Walker, Elaine F

    2010-07-01

    The results of research on the relation of family history (FH) of psychosis with clinical presentation in schizophrenia have been mixed. To date, there have been no comprehensive reviews that have examined this body of research. The current review quantitatively evaluates research on the relation of FH with two aspects of schizophrenia, age-at-onset and symptom presentation. Studies investigating the influence of a FH on age-at-onset (N=15 studies), age-at-onset and sex (N=12 studies), and/or positive (N=11 studies) and negative symptoms (N=12 studies) in patients with schizophrenia were included in the meta-analyses. Results showed that FH has a small but significant impact on age-at-onset as well as negative symptoms. Of most interest was the finding that sex differences in age-at-onset are not observed in samples with a FH. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between FH and sex with respect to negative symptoms. The findings of the current review are discussed in light of the diathesis-stress model. Theoretical assumptions and empirical research are reviewed to support the notion that FH influences susceptibility and presentation through similar mechanisms. Implications of the current findings, limitations of the review, and directions for future research are highlighted. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  19. Data reduction for prediction: a case study on robust coding of age and family history for the risk of having a genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Steyerberg, Ewout W; Balmaña, Judith; Stockwell, David H; Syngal, Sapna

    2007-12-30

    Data reduction is often desired in the development of a prediction model, for example for effects of age and family history in the identification of subjects having a genetic mutation. We aimed to evaluate a strategy for model simplification by robust coding of related predictors. We considered 898 patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome, which is caused primarily by mutations in the mismatch repair genes, MLH1 or MSH2. The presence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer in patients and their relatives was related to mutation prevalence with logistic regression analysis. The performances of simplified and more complex models were quantified with a concordance statistic (c), which was corrected for optimism by cross-validation and bootstrapping. External validation was performed in 1016 patients. The first challenge was the coding of age at diagnosis of CRC, where we forced effects to be identical in patients, in 1st degree and in 2nd degree relatives, by taking the sum of the ages at diagnosis. As a further simplification, CRC diagnosis in 2nd degree relatives was weighted half that of 1st degree relatives. These data reduction approaches were also followed for endometrial cancer. The simplified model used 7 instead of 17 degrees of freedom (df) for a more complex model incorporating individual predictor effects. The optimism-corrected c was higher (0.79 instead of 0.77), but the external c was similar (0.78 for the simplified and more complex models). A stepwise selected model performed slightly worse (external c=0.77). In conclusion, a prediction model could be developed with relatively few df that captured effects of age at diagnosis across patients and relatives per type of cancer in the family. Such robust coding may especially be relevant for modeling in relatively small data sets. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Influence of Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Susceptibility Regions, Age, Sex, and Family History to the Progression from Multiple Autoantibodies to Type 1 Diabetes: A TEDDY Study Report.

    PubMed

    Krischer, Jeffrey P; Liu, Xiang; Lernmark, Åke; Hagopian, William A; Rewers, Marian J; She, Jin-Xiong; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena

    2017-09-13

    This paper seeks to determine whether factors related to autoimmunity risk remain significant after the initiation of two or more diabetes-related autoantibodies and continue to contribute to T1D risk among autoantibody positive children in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Characteristics included are age at multiple autoantibody positivity, sex, selected high-risk HLA-DR-DQ genotypes, relationship to a family member with T1D, autoantibody at seroconversion, INS gene (rs1004446_A), and non-HLA gene polymorphisms identified by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium. The risk of progression to T1D was not different among those with or without a family history of T1D (p=0.39) nor HLA-DR-DQ genotypes (p=0.74). Age at developing multiple autoantibodies (HR=0.96 per 1 month increase in age, 95% CI=0.95, 0.97, p<0.001) and the type of first autoantibody (when more than a single autoantibody was the first appearing indication of seroconversion [p=0.006]) were statistically significant. Female sex was also a significant risk factor (p=0.03). Three SNPs were associated with increased diabetes risk (rs10517086_A, [p=0.03], rs1534422_G, [p=0.006], and rs2327832_G in TNFAIP3 [p=0.03]), and one with decreased risk (rs1004446_A in INS, [p=0.006]). The TEDDY data suggest that non-HLA gene polymorphisms may play a different role in the initiation of autoimmunity than they do in progression to T1D once autoimmunity has appeared. The strength of these associations may be related to the age of the population and the high-risk HLA-DR-DQ subtypes studied. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Reconsidering the Family History in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Eugene C; Burke, Wylie; Heaton, Caryl J; Haga, Susanne; Pinsky, Linda; Short, M Priscilla; Acheson, Louise

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this paper is to review the role of the family history in predictive genetic testing, describe how family history taking is practiced in adult primary care, identify the current barriers to appropriate application of the family history, and outline the requirements for a new family history tool for primary care. DESIGN We reviewed current perspectives on the family history, identifying key references in the medical literature and web-based family history tools through discussions with multiple content experts in clinical genetics, family medicine, and internal medicine. We conducted a Medline query using the search terms family history and primary care to identify references from the past 10 years. To illustrate the usefulness of family history information, we calculated the predictive value of family history and genetic information for familial adenomatous polyposis using current references and standard formulas. We identified paper and web-based family history tools through discussions with content experts. We also conducted a search on the World Wide Web to identify resources for electronic medical record and family history. RESULTS The family history is the most important tool for diagnosis and risk assessment in medical genetics, and promises to serve as a critical element in the use of predictive genetic testing in primary care. Traditional medical education about family history has often been unsophisticated and use of family history in adult primary care has been limited, compounded by multiple substantive barriers. Although there are numerous paper and computer-based aides for taking the family history, none currently meets all the needs of adult primary care. CONCLUSIONS The patient's family history remains a critical element in risk assessment for many conditions, but substantive barriers impede application in primary care practice, and evidence for its contribution to improved health outcomes is limited in this setting. Short of

  2. Stress-induced change in serum BDNF is related to quantitative family history of alcohol use disorder and age at first alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shobhit; Graham, Reiko; Rohde, Rodney; Ceballos, Natalie A

    2017-02-01

    Previous research in animal models suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in stress-modulated alcohol consumption. However, relatively few studies have investigated this issue in humans, and results of existing studies have been heterogeneous. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the within-subjects effect of acute stress (timed math plus cold pressor) on serum BDNF levels (ΔBDNF: post- minus pre-stress) in healthy social drinkers (N=68, 20 male). A secondary aim was to explore which heritable and environmental factors in our limited sample might exert the greatest influences on ΔBDNF. Importantly, presence versus absence of the BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism (rs6265), which has often been discounted in studies of human serum BDNF, was included as a between-subjects control variable in all statistical analyses. Our results indicated that acute stress decreased serum BDNF. Further, multiple regression analyses revealed that quantitative family history of alcohol use disorder (qFH) and age at first alcohol use together accounted for 15% of the variance in ΔBDNF. Thus, the influences of qFH and age at first alcohol use may explain some of the heterogeneity that exists in previous studies of human serum BDNF. These results parallel findings in animal models and suggest that stress-related changes in serum BDNF are influenced by both heritable (qFH) and environmental (early alcohol consumption) factors.

  3. Association between Family History and Keratoconus Severity.

    PubMed

    Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Zarrinbakhsh, Parviz; Naderan, Morteza; Bakhshi, Anahita

    2016-11-01

    The high prevalence of positive family history of keratoconus (KC) in KC patients is well-known. However, the results regarding the association between family history of KC and disease severity are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association between family history and severity of KC. Clinical data of 1496 KC patients were evaluated. All participants were asked if they had had a family member with KC. Topographic and keratometric measurements of KC patients, including central corneal thickness (CCT), thinnest corneal thickness (TCT), mean, flat, and steep keratometry values (K) by the use of Pentacam, best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BCVA), spherical equivalent (SE), and astigmatism were recorded and compared according to patients with and without a family history of KC, first- or second-degree family members, and the number of family members with KC. Severity of KC was classified according to the Amsler-Krumeich classification. Family history of KC was present in 292 (19.5%) patients. Of those 292 patients who had a family history of KC, 159 (54.5%) had one family member with KC and 133 (45.5%) had two or more family members with KC. There was not a significant difference between corneal pachymetry and K values of the patients with and without a family history of KC (p > 0.05). However, those with a positive family history of KC had more severe disease, according to the Amsler-Krumeich classification (p < 0.05). KC patients who had more family members with KC had significantly lower TCT and significantly higher steep K and astigmatism (p < 0.05), and had more severe disease, according to the Amsler-Krumeich classification (p < 0.05). We suggest that patients with more family members with KC should be subject to screening to identify early disease.

  4. Family history and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lesko, S M; Rosenberg, L; Shapiro, S

    1996-12-01

    The authors examined the relation between family history of prostate cancer and the risk of this cancer in a population-based case-control study conducted in Massachusetts between December 1992 and October 1994. Cases were all incident cases of prostate cancer in men younger than 70 years (n = 563); controls were men with no history of the disease matched to the cases on age and town of residence (n = 703). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of this cancer in either their fathers or brothers (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3). Risk varied with the number of relatives affected and their relationship to the case. For a history of prostate cancer in one relative, the OR was 2.2 (95% CI 1.5-3.2); if two or more relatives were affected, it was 3.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.2). For prostate cancer in the father, the OR was 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0); for prostate cancer in a brother, it was 3.0 (95% CI 1.8-4.9). Risk was inversely related to the subject's age and to age at diagnosis of prostate cancer in his affected relative. Among probands younger than 60 years, the OR was 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-12); for those 60-64 years of age, the OR was 2.7 (95% CI 1.3-5.5); and for those 65 years of age and older, the OR was 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5). For prostate cancer diagnosed in a relative before age 65, the OR was 4.1 (95% CI 2.3-7.3); for detection of the disease after age 74, the OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.38-1.5). The association was present both among men with local and advanced stage disease and among men whose prostate cancer was detected either by screening or because of symptoms. These data provide evidence that after controlling for diet and other potential confounders, familial factors are significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

  5. Family history influences the early onset of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chung-Hwa; Jeong, Seung-Hee; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Jin Dong; Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between a positive family history of primary liver cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in Korean HCC patients. METHODS: We studied a total of 2242 patients diagnosed with HCC between January 1990 and July 2008, whose family history of primary liver cancer was clearly described in the medical records. RESULTS: Of the 2242 patients, 165 (7.4%) had a positive family history of HCC and 2077 (92.6%) did not. The male to female ratio was 3.6:1, and the major causes of HCC were chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 75.1%, chronic hepatitis C virus infection in 13.2% and alcohol in 3.1%. The median ages at diagnosis in the positive- and negative-history groups were 52 years (range: 29-79 years) and 57 years (range: 18-89 years), respectively (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, among 1713 HCC patients with HBV infection, the number of patients under 45 years of age out of 136 patients with positive family history was 26 (19.1%), whereas those out of 1577 patients with negative family history was 197 (12.5%), suggesting that a positive family history may be associated with earlier development of HCC in the Korean population (P = 0.0028). CONCLUSION: More intensive surveillance maybe recommended to those with a positive family history of HCC for earlier diagnosis and proper management especially when HBV infection is present. PMID:22690075

  6. Instance testing of the family history ontology.

    PubMed

    Peace, Jane; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Brennan, Patti

    2008-11-06

    The Family History Ontology formalizes nursing conceptualization about family and family history. Traditional methods of instance testing were applied to evaluate the completeness of the ontology and demonstrated favorable domain coverage. Testing also revealed a need for a new category of instance test results, "by inference", for data that can be represented through the use of inference rules associated with the ontology rather than requiring direct manual entry.

  7. Photographs as a Source for Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Joseph M.; Nybakken, Elizabeth I.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the life of the family portrayed in the photograph included with the article. Discusses how to search for answers about the family by first analyzing the photograph and the information it contains, then looking for clues to their history through additional sources, and finally talking with members of the family. (CMK)

  8. Family Health Histories and Their Impact on Retirement Confidence.

    PubMed

    Zick, Cathleen D; Mayer, Robert N; Smith, Ken R

    2015-08-01

    Retirement confidence is a key social barometer. In this article, we examine how personal and parental health histories relate to working-age adults' feelings of optimism or pessimism about their overall retirement prospects. This study links survey data on retirement planning with information on respondents' own health histories and those of their parents. The multivariate models control for the respondents' socio-demographic and economic characteristics along with past retirement planning activities when estimating the relationships between family health histories and retirement confidence. Retirement confidence is inversely related to parental history of cancer and cardiovascular disease but not to personal health history. In contrast, retirement confidence is positively associated with both parents being deceased. As members of the public become increasingly aware of how genetics and other family factors affect intergenerational transmission of chronic diseases, it is likely that the link between family health histories and retirement confidence will intensify. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Family History of Early Infant Death Correlates with Earlier Age at Diagnosis But Not Shorter Time to Diagnosis for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Luk, Anderson Dik Wai; Lee, Pamela P; Mao, Huawei; Chan, Koon-Wing; Chen, Xiang Yuan; Chen, Tong-Xin; He, Jian Xin; Kechout, Nadia; Suri, Deepti; Tao, Yin Bo; Xu, Yong Bin; Jiang, Li Ping; Liew, Woei Kang; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Daengsuwan, Tassalapa; Gupta, Anju; Singh, Surjit; Rawat, Amit; Abdul Latiff, Amir Hamzah; Lee, Anselm Chi Wai; Shek, Lynette P; Nguyen, Thi Van Anh; Chin, Tek Jee; Chien, Yin Hsiu; Latiff, Zarina Abdul; Le, Thi Minh Huong; Le, Nguyen Ngoc Quynh; Lee, Bee Wah; Li, Qiang; Raj, Dinesh; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Thong, Meow-Keong; Ang, Maria Carmen D; Wang, Xiao Chuan; Xu, Chen Guang; Yu, Hai Guo; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Lee, Tsz Leung; Yau, Felix Yat Sun; Wong, Wilfred Hing-Sang; Tu, Wenwei; Yang, Wangling; Chong, Patrick Chun Yin; Ho, Marco Hok Kung; Lau, Yu Lung

    2017-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is fatal unless treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Delay in diagnosis is common without newborn screening. Family history of infant death due to infection or known SCID (FH) has been associated with earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features that affect age at diagnosis (AD) and time to the diagnosis of SCID. From 2005 to 2016, 147 SCID patients were referred to the Asian Primary Immunodeficiency Network. Patients with genetic diagnosis, age at presentation (AP), and AD were selected for study. A total of 88 different SCID gene mutations were identified in 94 patients, including 49 IL2RG mutations, 12 RAG1 mutations, 8 RAG2 mutations, 7 JAK3 mutations, 4 DCLRE1C mutations, 4 IL7R mutations, 2 RFXANK mutations, and 2 ADA mutations. A total of 29 mutations were previously unreported. Eighty-three of the 94 patients fulfilled the selection criteria. Their median AD was 4 months, and the time to diagnosis was 2 months. The commonest SCID was X-linked (n = 57). A total of 29 patients had a positive FH. Candidiasis (n = 27) and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine infection (n = 19) were the commonest infections. The median age for candidiasis and BCG infection documented were 3 months and 4 months, respectively. The median absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was 1.05 × 10(9)/L with over 88% patients below 3 × 10(9)/L. Positive FH was associated with earlier AP by 1 month (p = 0.002) and diagnosis by 2 months (p = 0.008), but not shorter time to diagnosis (p = 0.494). Candidiasis was associated with later AD by 2 months (p = 0.008) and longer time to diagnosis by 0.55 months (p = 0.003). BCG infections were not associated with age or time to diagnosis. FH was useful to aid earlier diagnosis but was overlooked by clinicians and not by parents. Similarly, typical clinical features of SCID were not recognized by clinicians to

  10. Using Genealogy and Family History to Teach Immigration History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adomanis, James F.

    1990-01-01

    Presents three exercises, employing research of census materials (available from the National Archives), and class or independent field trips to cemeteries, historical societies, and libraries to teach immigration history. Advocates primary sources as teaching resources for family history studies. Includes three documents for classroom use.…

  11. Disease severity and family history in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Szczotka-Flynn, L; Slaughter, M; McMahon, T; Barr, J; Edrington, T; Fink, B; Lass, J; Belin, M; Iyengar, S K

    2008-08-01

    To determine if disease severity is associated with a family history of keratoconus. Markers of disease severity in the CLEK Study cohort were assessed to determine if they could discriminate individuals with and without family history. Logistic regression was used to examine association between corneal scarring, average corneal power, flat and steep keratometry readings, and higher-order root mean square (RMS) wavefront error with family history. In univariate analyses, none of the severity indices had any significant associations with family history; however, contact lens use, gender, and Caucasian race were found to be significant predictors. After controlling for these confounders, there were no significant associations between any severity indices and family history. Presence or absence of family history is not associated with more severe clinical disease, at least when each marker for severity is considered independently. The results of this analysis are important for genetic studies of keratoconus in that it will allow recruitment of keratoconus patients across all stages of disease severity because it does not influence familial aggregation.

  12. Family Oral Histories for Multicultural Curriculum Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Irma M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a rationale and an approach for helping teachers use the life histories of parents and members of the community as scaffolds to teach social studies and history concepts. Examples from a case study are presented involving an extended Puerto Rican family and abstracts of teacher reflections on the process. (GR)

  13. Why Is It Important to Know My Family Medical History?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know my family medical history? Why is it important to know my family medical history? A ... certificates) can help complete a family medical history. It is important to keep this information up-to- ...

  14. Family Structure History and Adolescent Romance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Shannon E.; Crissey, Sarah R.; Raley, R. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the association between family structure history and adolescent romance. Using a national sample drawn from Add Health (N = 13,570), family structure at Wave I was associated with the likelihood that adolescents were involved in a romantic relationship at Wave II and, among those in a relationship, the number of relationships…

  15. Family Structure History and Adolescent Romance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Shannon E.; Crissey, Sarah R.; Raley, R. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the association between family structure history and adolescent romance. Using a national sample drawn from Add Health (N = 13,570), family structure at Wave I was associated with the likelihood that adolescents were involved in a romantic relationship at Wave II and, among those in a relationship, the number of relationships…

  16. Familial aggregation and coaggregation of history of hypertension and stroke.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Toyoshima, H; Tsuzuki, Y; Hori, Y; Yatsuya, H; Tamakoshi, K; Tamakoshi, A; Ohno, Y

    2005-02-01

    We attempted to evaluate familial aggregation and coaggregation of history of hypertension and stroke. Past and family history of hypertension and stroke for 83 089 probands and their relatives were obtained from a data set for the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk sponsored by the Ministry of Education (JACC Study), which was initiated from 1988 to 1990. First, evaluation was performed for familial aggregation of each of two disorders using ordinal logistic regression of the generalized estimation equations (GEE) to account for dependence of observations within families. Secondly, in order to evaluate the familial congregation of the history of hypertension and stroke, a GEE-based multivariate probed predictive model was applied. After adjusting for the proband's age, level of obesity, smoking status, drinking status, habitation area, and the gender and type of the relatives, the estimated odds ratios for the intraindividual clustering and familial aggregation of the disease history showed statistically significant relationships. In addition, the history of the two disorders showed a significant relationship in terms of familial coaggregation independently of the aggregation of each disorder itself. Our results confirmed that hypertension and stroke coaggregate strongly within families through possible effects of genetic factors, which, alone or in conjunction with environmental factors, influence susceptibility to both hypertension and stroke.

  17. Family history and risk of breast cancer: an analysis accounting for family structure.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Hannah R; Jones, Michael E; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2017-08-01

    Family history is an important risk factor for breast cancer incidence, but the parameters conventionally used to categorize it are based solely on numbers and/or ages of breast cancer cases in the family and take no account of the size and age-structure of the woman's family. Using data from the Generations Study, a cohort of over 113,000 women from the general UK population, we analyzed breast cancer risk in relation to first-degree family history using a family history score (FHS) that takes account of the expected number of family cases based on the family's age-structure and national cancer incidence rates. Breast cancer risk increased significantly (P trend < 0.0001) with greater FHS. There was a 3.5-fold (95% CI 2.56-4.79) range of risk between the lowest and highest FHS groups, whereas women who had two or more relatives with breast cancer, the strongest conventional familial risk factor, had a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.83-3.47) increase in risk. Using likelihood ratio tests, the best model for determining breast cancer risk due to family history was that combining FHS and age of relative at diagnosis. A family history score based on expected as well as observed breast cancers in a family can give greater risk discrimination on breast cancer incidence than conventional parameters based solely on cases in affected relatives. Our modeling suggests that a yet stronger predictor of risk might be a combination of this score and age at diagnosis in relatives.

  18. Digital family histories for data mining.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Robert; Linnville, Steven; Chung, Hui-Min; Hutfless, Brent; Rice, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    As we move closer to ubiquitous electronic health records (EHRs), genetic, familial, and clinical information will need to be incorporated into EHRs as structured data that can be used for data mining and clinical decision support. While the Human Genome Project has produced new and exciting genomic data, the cost to sequence the human personal genome is high, and significant controversies regarding how to interpret genomic data exist. Many experts feel that the family history is a surrogate marker for genetic information and should be part of any paper-based or electronic health record. A digital family history is now part of the Meaningful Use Stage 2 menu objectives for EHR reimbursement, projected for 2014. In this study, a secure online family history questionnaire was designed to collect data on a unique cohort of Vietnam-era repatriated male veterans and a comparison group in order to compare participant and family disease rates on common medical disorders with a genetic component. This article describes our approach to create the digital questionnaire and the results of analyzing family history data on 319 male participants.

  19. Digital Family Histories for Data Mining

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Robert; Linnville, Steven; Chung, Hui-Min; Hutfless, Brent; Rice, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    As we move closer to ubiquitous electronic health records (EHRs), genetic, familial, and clinical information will need to be incorporated into EHRs as structured data that can be used for data mining and clinical decision support. While the Human Genome Project has produced new and exciting genomic data, the cost to sequence the human personal genome is high, and significant controversies regarding how to interpret genomic data exist. Many experts feel that the family history is a surrogate marker for genetic information and should be part of any paper-based or electronic health record. A digital family history is now part of the Meaningful Use Stage 2 menu objectives for EHR reimbursement, projected for 2014. In this study, a secure online family history questionnaire was designed to collect data on a unique cohort of Vietnam-era repatriated male veterans and a comparison group in order to compare participant and family disease rates on common medical disorders with a genetic component. This article describes our approach to create the digital questionnaire and the results of analyzing family history data on 319 male participants. PMID:24159269

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx in patients aged 18-45 years: A case-control study to evaluate the risk factors with emphasis on stress, diet, oral hygiene, and family history.

    PubMed

    Dholam, K P; Chouksey, G C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx is reported in young adults. However, there is a paucity regarding etiology and risk factors. To evaluate the exposure potential carcinogenic factors among a sample aged 45 years and younger, diagnosed with SCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Eighty-five case samples aged 18-45 years, diagnosed with SCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx were compared with 85 controls who had never had cancer, matched for age and sex. This study was conducted by questionnaire-based interviews. Questionnaire contained items about exposure to the following risk factors: Caries prevalence, oral hygiene status, dental trauma, dental visit, stress, family history of cancer, environmental exposure to potential carcinogens, diet, body mass index (BMI), habits such as smoking, tobacco chewing, betel quid/pan, or supari. Odds ratios (ORs) of oral and pharyngeal cancer and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Elevated OR was seen in young adults who had poor oral hygiene, stress, dental trauma, low BMI, family history of cancer, exposure to environmental carcinogens, and habit of placement of quid for 11-20 years. An increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer was seen in cases who had poor oral hygiene, stress, dental trauma, low BMI, family history of cancer, exposure to environmental carcinogens, and habit of placement of quid.

  1. Bipolar II disorder family history using the family history screen: findings and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2004-01-01

    Psychiatric family history of bipolar II disorder is understudied. The aims of the current study were to find the psychiatric family history of bipolar II patients using a new structured interview, the Family History Screen by Weissman et al (2000), and to find bipolar disorders family history predicting power for the diagnosis of bipolar II. One hundred sixty-four consecutive unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) and 241 consecutive bipolar II major depressive episode (MDE) outpatients were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). The Family History Screen was used. Sensitivity and specificity of predictors of the diagnosis of bipolar II (bipolar [type I and II] family history, bipolar II family history, atypical depression, depressive mixed state, many MDE recurrences, early onset) were studied. Bipolar II subjects had significantly more bipolar I, more bipolar II (50.7%), more MDE, and more social phobia in first-degree relatives than did unipolar subjects. Bipolar II subjects had many more first-degree relatives with bipolar II than with bipolar I. Among the predictors of the diagnosis of bipolar II, bipolar II family history had the highest specificity (82.8%), while early onset had the highest sensitivity. Discriminant analysis of predictor variables found that bipolar II family history and early onset were highly significant predictors. In conclusion, bipolar II family history was common in bipolar II patients, and it had high specificity for predicting bipolar II. If detected, it could reduce bipolar II misdiagnosis by inducing careful probing for a history of hypomania.

  2. Pattern of family history in stone patients.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Salim, Abiya; Vijay, Adarsh

    2009-12-01

    Genetic predisposition to urolithiasis is a much discussed topic. The objective of this paper is to identify the types of family members of proved urinary stone patients, who have a history of urinary stone formation. The study population consisted of 2,157 urinary stone patients interviewed in 2003-2007 in the urinary stone clinic. Family members with stone history were classified as group 1--first order single (one person in the immediate family-father, mother, siblings, or children), group 2--first order multiple (more than one member in the above group), group 3--second order single (one person in the blood relatives in family--grandparents, grandchildren, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc.) and group 4--second order multiple (more than one member in the above group). Of the 2,157 patients studied, 349 patients gave positive history of stone disease constituting 16.18%. Of these, 321 were males and 28 were females. Subdivision of the family members showed that 282 patients (80.80%) had single family member with stones and the rest 67 (19.20%) had multiple family members with history of stone disease. Group 1 which constituted one family member in the immediate family had 255 involvements (father: 88, mother: 16, brother: 135, sister: 2, son: 10, and daughter: 4); Group 2 with multiple members in the immediate family constituted 51 relatives; of these, father and brother combination was the most common with 35 occurrences. Group 3 with one person in the distant relatives in family namely grandparents, grand children, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc. constituted 27 occurrences and Group 4 with more than one member in the distant family constituted 16 occurrences. It is concluded that single family member involvement was more than multiple involvements. Males predominated. Stone occurrence was more in the immediate family members than distant relatives. Brothers formed the most common group to be involved with stone disease. Study of stone risk in the family members should

  3. Family History in Patients Who Present with Functional Articulation Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaraifi, Jehad Ahmad; Kamal, Sana Mohammed; Qa'dan, Wa'el Nafith; Haj-Tas, Maisa Atef

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine family history of functional articulation disorders (FAD) among Jordanian patients who present with FAD, as well as to investigate the relation of other factors related to the disorder (age, gender, genetic connection between parents, sounds affected, and type of disorder). A convenience sample of 45 patients (ages…

  4. Family History in Patients Who Present with Functional Articulation Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaraifi, Jehad Ahmad; Kamal, Sana Mohammed; Qa'dan, Wa'el Nafith; Haj-Tas, Maisa Atef

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine family history of functional articulation disorders (FAD) among Jordanian patients who present with FAD, as well as to investigate the relation of other factors related to the disorder (age, gender, genetic connection between parents, sounds affected, and type of disorder). A convenience sample of 45 patients (ages…

  5. Strong family history and early onset of schizophrenia: about 2 families in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nuhu, Folorunsho Tajudeen; Eseigbe, Edwin Ehi; Issa, Baba Awoye; Gomina, Michael Omeiza

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychotic disorder and high genetic loading is associated with early onset of the disease. The outcome of schizophrenia has also been linked with the age of onset as well as the presence of family history of the disease. Therefore families with patients with early onset Schizophrenia are subpopulations for genetic studies. We present 2 families with heavy genetic loading who have adolescents with schizophrenia.

  6. Strong family history and early onset of schizophrenia: about 2 families in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nuhu, Folorunsho Tajudeen; Eseigbe, Edwin Ehi; Issa, Baba Awoye; Gomina, Michael Omeiza

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychotic disorder and high genetic loading is associated with early onset of the disease. The outcome of schizophrenia has also been linked with the age of onset as well as the presence of family history of the disease. Therefore families with patients with early onset Schizophrenia are subpopulations for genetic studies. We present 2 families with heavy genetic loading who have adolescents with schizophrenia. PMID:28154637

  7. Multicultural Curriculum and Critical Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Family history research connects very well with multicultural curriculum because it opens up the multiple experiences of members and communities of a society, as well as helping to make visible the historic construction and ongoing legacy of unequal relationships. The author of this article began to play with what she later called "critical…

  8. Family History Fails to Detect the Majority of Children with High Capillary Blood Total Cholesterol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Dennis M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    To examine the predictive value of family history in detecting children with high blood cholesterol, finger-stick screening was done in children (n=1,118) ages 9-10 with parental and grandparental history of cardiovascular disease and risk factors. Findings showed that screening only children with positive family histories will leave most problems…

  9. Family History Fails to Detect the Majority of Children with High Capillary Blood Total Cholesterol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Dennis M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    To examine the predictive value of family history in detecting children with high blood cholesterol, finger-stick screening was done in children (n=1,118) ages 9-10 with parental and grandparental history of cardiovascular disease and risk factors. Findings showed that screening only children with positive family histories will leave most problems…

  10. Family history and oral health: findings from the Dunedin Study.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Dara M; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M; Poulton, Richie

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the oral health status of one generation on that of the next within families are unclear.   To determine whether parental oral health history is a risk factor for oral disease. Oral examination and interview data were collected during the age-32 assessments in the Dunedin Study. Parental data were also collected on this occasion. The sample was divided into two familial-risk groups for caries/tooth loss (high risk and low risk) based on parents' self-reported history of tooth loss at the age-32 assessment interview. Probands' dental caries and tooth loss status at age 32, together with lifelong dental caries trajectory (age 5-32). Caries/tooth loss risk analysis was conducted for 640 proband-parent groups. Reference groups were the low-familial-risk groups. After controlling for confounding factors (sex, episodic use of dental services, socio-economic status and plaque trajectory), the prevalence ratio (PR) for having lost 1+ teeth by age 32 for the high-familial-risk group was 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05, 1.88] and the rate ratio for DMFS at age 32 was 1.41 (95% CI 1.24, 1.60). In the high-familial-risk group, the PR of following a high caries trajectory was 2.05 (95% CI 1.37, 3.06). Associations were strongest when information was available about both parents' oral health. Nonetheless, when information was available for one parent only, associations were significant for some outcomes. People with poor oral health tend to have parents with poor oral health. Family/parental history of oral health is a valid representation of the intricacies of the shared genetic and environmental factors that contribute to an individual's oral health status. Associations are strongest when data from both parents can be obtained. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Teaching Family History: Papers from Old Sturbridge Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Family History, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Essays in this special issue of the "Journal of Family History" focus on the teaching of family history by using artifacts. The articles were written by the staff at Old Sturbridge Village (OSV). The first article discusses how family history is taught at OSV. Students study a real family using demographic information and artifacts such as…

  12. Family History in Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    ÖZDEMİR, Osman; COŞKUN, Salih; AKTAN MUTLU, Elif; ÖZDEMİR, Pınar Güzel; ATLI, Abdullah; YILMAZ, Ekrem; KESKİN, Sıddık

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to better understand the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder by examining the family history of patients. Methods Sixty-three patients with bipolar disorder and their families were included. The final sample comprised 156 bipolar patients and their family members. An inclusion criterion was the presence of bipolar disorder history in the family. The diagnosis of other family members was confirmed by analyzing their files, hospital records, and by calling them to the hospital. Results Sixty-five patients were women (41.6%) and 91 were men (58.3%) (ratio of men/women: 1.40). When analyzing the results in terms of the transition of disease from the mother’s or father’s side, similar results were obtained: 25 patients were from the mother’s side and 25 patients were from the father’s side in 63 cases. Conclusion The results of our study support the fact that a significant relationship exists between the degree of kinship and the heritability of bipolar disorder and, furthermore, that the effect of the maternal and paternal sides is similar on the transmission of genetic susceptibility. PMID:28373808

  13. Importance of updating family cancer history in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Selena; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine M; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-04-12

    Estimates of the number of childhood cancers with a genetic basis range from 5-8.5% found in germline samples to 29% based on clinical criteria. Family history-taking practice is a fundamental first step in detecting at risk individuals and families. This study focused on Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a highly penetrant cancer syndrome. Reported family history in a cohort of 648 of cancer survivor cohort (CCS) was examined. Eligible CCS were: (i) aged up to 14 years at diagnosis; (ii) more than 5 years postdiagnosis; (iii) treated for a childhood cancer at the study hospitals in NSW, Australia; (iv) in remission for more than 3 years. CCS completed self-administered questionnaires. Medical records confirmed diagnosis and treatment-related information. Our findings reveal an increased cancer risk among sibling and relatives of CCS. 91% of siblings diagnosed with cancer were diagnosed under the age of 40 and about 30% diagnosed under the aged of 15 revealing a 5- (RR = 5.1; 95% CI, 3.3-7.9) and 44-fold (RR = 44.6; 95% CI, 18.4-108.3) increased risked of cancer compared with the Australian population, respectively. About 2% of CCS reported that they had been diagnosed with a genetic cancer syndrome. However, 11% of survivors described a family history pattern which met Chompret criteria for screening for TP53 mutations associated with LFS. Our data suggests that familial cancer predispositions may be initially overlooked. Aperiodic and accurate ascertainment of family cancer history of childhood cancer patients and survivors is therefore recommended.

  14. Family History of Insomnia in a Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; LeBlanc, Mélanie; Mérette, Chantal; Dauvilliers, Yves; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the rates of family history of insomnia in a population-based sample composed of self-defined good sleepers and individuals with insomnia and compare individuals with and without family history of insomnia on several characteristics presumably associated with insomnia. Design: Cross-sectional comparisons of self-defined good sleepers and individuals with insomnia selected from a larger epidemiologic study using a randomly selected sample of 2001 adults of the province of Québec in Canada. Participants: Nine hundred fifty-three adults (60.3% women; mean age = 43.9 years) completed several postal questionnaires, including a survey of past and current history of insomnia/sleep disorders for self and first-degree relatives. Participants were classified as good sleepers, individuals with insomnia symptoms, or individuals with an insomnia syndrome. Interventions: N/A. Results: Of the total sample, 34.9% reported at least 1 first-degree relative with past or current insomnia. The mother was the most frequently afflicted first-degree relative with insomnia (19.7%). Family history rates of insomnia were not significantly different when individuals with current insomnia symptoms or syndrome were compared with self-defined good sleepers. However, significant group differences emerged when good sleepers were subdivided according to the presence or absence of past personal history of insomnia. Individuals with past or current insomnia were significantly more likely to report a family history of insomnia than were good sleepers who had never experienced insomnia in the past (39.1% vs 29.0%). Participants with a family history of insomnia endorsed higher scores on measures of insomnia severity, anxiety symptomatology, and arousal predisposition. Conclusions: These findings provide additional evidence about the potential role of both family and personal history of insomnia as predisposing factors to insomnia. Longitudinal family studies are needed to

  15. Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164202.html Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably ...

  16. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Diseases Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Preventive Services Task Force. February 2016. Family Health History, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk, and Women of ...

  17. Leucine 7 to proline 7 polymorphism in the neuropeptide Y gene and changes in serum lipids during a family-based counselling intervention among school-aged children with a family history of CVD.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Marika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Fan, Yue-Mei; Vahlberg, Tero; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa

    2008-11-01

    To compare whether serum lipids and their changes during a health education intervention are associated with the Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide part of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in children with normal weight and in those with overweight. An intervention study. A family-based intervention of risk factors for prevention of CHD in Finland. Subjects were 443 children with a family history of CVD participating in family-based health education. The children were divided into two groups according to NPY genotype: children with Leu7/Pro7 or Pro7/Pro7 genotype (n 50) and children with Leu7/Leu7 genotype (n 393). The final sample of the follow-up study included 353 (80 %) children (Pro7 allele carriers, n 43; Leu7/Leu7, n 310). At baseline, the Leu7Pro polymorphism was not associated with serum lipid values after adjustment for body weight in boys or girls. There was a significant interaction of NPY genotype group by time and body weight (P = 0.043 for three-way interaction: time x NPY genotype x body weight) in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration among boys. LDL-C decreased among boys with normal weight in both NPY groups and in overweight boys with the Leu7/Leu7 genotype, whereas it increased in overweight boys with the Pro7 allele. Two-way interaction (time x NPY genotype) showed no significant differences in changes of serum lipids between the NPY genotype groups among boys or girls. The Leu7Pro polymorphism may be associated with dietary response to LDL-C concentration in overweight boys with a family history of early-onset CVD.

  18. Sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, medical and family history, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, P; Lacroix, A; Perret, C; Maisonneuve, P; Boyle, P

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, family history of cancer, medical history, and reproductive factors and breast cancer was investigated in a population-based case-control study of French Canadians in Montreal. In this study, a total of 414 French-Canadian cases and 429 age- and language-matched population controls were interviewed. Ever-married women showed significantly lower risk (OR: 0.64 [0.45-0.92]) for breast cancer, as did smokers (OR: 0.73 [0.55-0.98]), particularly of nonfilter cigarettes (OR: 0.36 [0.17-0.72]). Weight history, both for the year before the diagnosis of breast cancer and 10 years previously, was associated with risk for the disease. A strong inverse relationship was found between the number of full-term pregnancies (OR: 0.48 [0.28-0.82]) and the risk of breast cancer, while the p trend for late age at first pregnancy (p = 0.02) and menopause (p = 0.004) was statistically significant. A history of breast problems (OR: 1.87 [1.34-2.60]) and a history of breast cancer in relatives (OR: 2.95 [1.63-5.34]) were strongly associated with risk. This study confirms the risk factors of late age at first full-term pregnancy, nulliparity, late age at menopause, and positive family history of breast cancer in the etiology of this disease. Perhaps the protective effect of smoking against breast cancer could be due to its antiestrogenic influence.

  19. Aging Hematopoietic Stem Cells Make Their History.

    PubMed

    Fast, Eva Maria; Zon, Leonard Ira

    2016-11-21

    A major hallmark of aging is a decline in tissue regeneration. In a recent issue of Cell, Bernitz and colleagues (2016) determine the divisional history of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to be a key player of regenerative potential in the aging mouse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Near work, education, family history, and myopia in Greek conscripts.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, A; Yadegarfar, G; Elgohary, M

    2008-04-01

    To investigate potential factors associated with the presence of myopia in a cohort of young adult men carrying out their military service in Greece. A nested case-control study of 200 conscripts (99 myopes and 101 non-myopes). The cohort consisted of approximately 1000 conscripts in compulsory national service. All cohort members had been screened for refractive errors by Snellen visual acuity measurement at presentation to military service; individuals not achieving visual activity 6/6 underwent noncycloplaegic refraction. The study sample consisted of the first 99 myopic and 101 nonmyopic conscripts who attended the study. In-person interviews of these 200 conscripts were conducted to obtain information on family history, occupation, level of education, near-work activities, and sleeping behaviour. chi(2) and Mann-Whitney tests were used as univariate analysis methods to identify the potential factors associated with the presence of myopia. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted relative risk of myopia. Univariate analysis showed that parental family history (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), tertiary education (P<0.001), hours of reading per day (P<0.001), hours of computer use per day (P<0.001), and higher social classes (P<0.001) were associated with myopia. Sleeping in artificial or ambient light was not associated with myopia (P=0.75). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that older age (OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.49), tertiary education (OR=12.67, 95% CI 3.57-44.88) and parental family history (OR=3.39, 95% CI 1.56-7.36) were independently associated with myopia. In young Greek conscripts, parental family history, older age, and education level are independently associated with myopia.

  1. Strength of family history in predicting levels of blood pressure, plasma glucose and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Wandeler, G; Paccaud, F; Vollenweider, P; Waeber, G; Mooser, V; Bochud, M

    2010-01-01

    Limited information is available on the quantitative relationship between family history and the corresponding underlying traits. We analyzed these associations for blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and cholesterol levels. Data were obtained from 6,102 Caucasian participants (2,903 men and 3,199 women) aged 35-75 years using a population-based cross-sectional survey in Switzerland. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were measured, and the corresponding family history was self-reported using a structured questionnaire. The prevalence of a positive family history (in first-degree relatives) was 39.6% for hypertension, 22.3% for diabetes, and 29.0% for hypercholesterolemia. Family history was not known for at least one family member in 41.8% of participants for hypertension, 14.4% for diabetes, and 50.2% for hypercholesterolemia. A positive family history was strongly associated with higher levels of the corresponding trait, but not with the other traits. Participants who reported not to know their family history of hypertension had a higher systolic blood pressure than participants with a negative history. Sibling histories had higher positive predictive values than parental histories. The ability to discriminate, calibrate, and reclassify was best for the family history of hypertension. Family history of hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia was strongly associated with the corresponding dichotomized and continuous phenotypes. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Variability in Adaptive Behavior in Autism: Evidence for the Importance of Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in autism is highly variable and strongly related to prognosis. This study explored family history as a potential source of variability in adaptive behavior in autism. Participants included 77 individuals (mean age = 18) with average or better intellectual ability and autism. Parents completed the Family History Interview about…

  3. Variability in Adaptive Behavior in Autism: Evidence for the Importance of Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in autism is highly variable and strongly related to prognosis. This study explored family history as a potential source of variability in adaptive behavior in autism. Participants included 77 individuals (mean age = 18) with average or better intellectual ability and autism. Parents completed the Family History Interview about…

  4. Family and personal medical history and risk of meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Elizabeth B.; Calvocoressi, Lisa; Bondy, Melissa L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wrensch, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Object Little is known about the epidemiology of meningioma, the most frequently reported primary brain tumor in the US. The authors undertook a case-control study to examine the relationship between family and personal medical history and meningioma risk. Methods The authors compared the personal and first-degree family histories of 1124 patients with meningioma (age range 20–79 years) in Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, the San Francisco Bay Area, and 8 Houston counties between May 1, 2006, and February 26, 2010, and the histories of 1000 control individuals who were frequency-matched for age, sex, and geography. Results The patients were more likely than the controls to report a first-degree family history of meningioma (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.6–11.5), and there was an even stronger association in younger cases. The patients were less likely than controls to report immune conditions including allergy (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5–0.7) but were more likely to report a history of thyroid cancer (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.02–21.5) or leukemia (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.2–24.1) (most after radiotherapy). Among women, patients were more likely than controls to report hormonally related conditions—uterine fibroid tumors (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0–1.5), endometriosis (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.5–2.1), and breast cancer (OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.8–2.3). Conclusions The influence of genetics, the immune system, and radiation near the head on meningioma risk is suggested in the authors’ findings; the role of hormones is intriguing but requires further study. PMID:21780859

  5. Theme: The Family in an Aging World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, George C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "The World Ages, the Family Ages" (Myers, Agree); "Grandparents as Parents in Developing Countries" (Tout); "Grandparents as Parents: The American Experience" (Minkler); "Playing for Informal Care" (Evers, Leichsenring); "Family Care in America" (Keigher, Stone); "Concerns for Carers: Family Support in Denmark" (Leeson, Tufte);…

  6. Theme: The Family in an Aging World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, George C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "The World Ages, the Family Ages" (Myers, Agree); "Grandparents as Parents in Developing Countries" (Tout); "Grandparents as Parents: The American Experience" (Minkler); "Playing for Informal Care" (Evers, Leichsenring); "Family Care in America" (Keigher, Stone); "Concerns for Carers: Family Support in Denmark" (Leeson, Tufte);…

  7. Family history of cancer and its association with breast cancer risk perception and repeat mammography.

    PubMed

    Haber, Gillian; Ahmed, Nasar U; Pekovic, Vukosava

    2012-12-01

    We examined the strength of association between family history of breast cancer and family history of other cancers with breast cancer risk perception and repeat mammography. The sample included 6706 women, aged 46 to 74 years, with no breast cancer history. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the association between family history of cancer and breast cancer risk perception. Structural equation modeling estimated the relationship between family history of cancer and repeat mammography. Breast cancer risk perception was strongly associated with family history of breast cancer in the mother or mother and sister (odds ratio [OR] = 32.15; P < .001); family history of breast cancer in the sister, daughter, or male first-degree relative (OR = 6.6-8.4; P < .001); and maternal history of other cancers (OR = 1.38-2.73; P < .001). For repeat mammography, women with maternal history of breast cancer had a mean increase of 0.50 more mammograms in the past 6 years compared with women without maternal history of breast cancer (P < .001). Breast cancer risk perception was associated with the type of cancer found in first-degree relatives and with the person's relationship to the family member with cancer. Family history of breast cancer affected repeat mammography behavior.

  8. The additive effect on suicidality of family history of suicidal behavior and early traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castroman, J; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Jaussent, I; Baca-García, E; Courtet, P

    2015-01-01

    Family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood abuse are reported risk factors for suicide attempts and suicide completion. We aim to quantify the additive effect of family history of suicidal behavior and different subtypes of childhood abuse on suicidal behavior. We examined a sample of 496 suicide attempters, comparing individuals with family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood (physical or sexual) abuse, individuals with family history of suicidal behavior only, individuals with history of early traumatic experiences only, and individuals with none of these two risk factors with regards to suicidal features. An additive effect was found for the age at the first attempt in suicide attempters with both family history of suicidal behavior and either physical or sexual abuse. No significant interactions were found between family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma in relation to any characteristics of suicidal behavior. Subjects presenting family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse attempt suicide earlier in life than subjects with just one or none of them, particularly if they were sexually abused. Other suicidality indexes were only partially or not associated with this combination of risk factors. A careful assessment of patients with both family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse could help to prevent future suicide attempts, particularly in young people.

  9. Variability in Adaptive Behavior in Autism: Evidence for the Importance of Family History

    PubMed Central

    Mazefsky, C. A.; Williams, D. L.; Minshew, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in autism is highly variable and strongly related to prognosis. This study explored family history as a potential source of variability in adaptive behavior in autism. Participants included 77 individuals (mean age=18) with average or better intellectual ability and autism. Parents completed the Family History Interview about the presence of broader autism phenotype symptoms and major psychiatric disorders in first degree relatives. Adaptive behavior was assessed via the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Based on family history variables, age, and intelligence quotient (IQ), 87% of participants were correctly classified as having impaired or average VABS scores. Family history of depression and shyness accounted for the most variance in VABS scores, and they had the greatest influence on VABS Socialization scores in particular. Possible underlying mechanisms include genetics, psychosocial factors, and social resources. This study provides initial evidence of the importance of family history to adaptive behavior in autism and has implications for genetics and treatment. PMID:18188537

  10. Variability in adaptive behavior in autism: evidence for the importance of family history.

    PubMed

    Mazefsky, Carla A; Williams, Diane L; Minshew, Nancy J

    2008-05-01

    Adaptive behavior in autism is highly variable and strongly related to prognosis. This study explored family history as a potential source of variability in adaptive behavior in autism. Participants included 77 individuals (mean age = 18) with average or better intellectual ability and autism. Parents completed the Family History Interview about the presence of broader autism phenotype symptoms and major psychiatric disorders in first degree relatives. Adaptive behavior was assessed via the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Based on family history variables, age, and intelligence quotient (IQ), 87% of participants were correctly classified as having impaired or average VABS scores. Family history of depression and shyness accounted for the most variance in VABS scores, and they had the greatest influence on VABS Socialization scores in particular. Possible underlying mechanisms include genetics, psychosocial factors, and social resources. This study provides initial evidence of the importance of family history to adaptive behavior in autism and has implications for genetics and treatment.

  11. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... for steady, modest loss. Seek emotional support from family and friends. Expect setbacks; forgive yourself. Make physical ...

  12. Family history of cancer associated with breast tumor clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Ricks, Luisel J; Ewing, Altovise; Thompson, Nicole; Harrison, Barbara; Wilson, Bradford; Richardson, Finie; Carter-Nolan, Pamela; Spencer, Cherie; Laiyemo, Adeyinka; Williams, Carla

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary breast cancers have unique clinicopathological characteristics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish the relationship between self-reported family history of cancer and clinicopathological features in breast cancer patients from Washington, DC. Data on incident breast cancer cases from 2000 to 2010 were obtained from the Washington, DC Cancer Registry. Variables such as estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor status, as well as stage and grade, were analyzed in those that self-reported with (n = 1,734) and without a family history of cancer (n = 1,712). The breast cancer molecular subtypes were compared when ER, PR, and HER2 statuses were available. Furthermore, tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity. Regression and chi-square analyses were performed. A report of family history was associated with age (OR = 1.27 95 % CI: 1.09-1.48; p < 0.0001), high grade tumors (OR = 1.29 95 % CI: 1.05-1.58; p = 0.02), and having ER and PR negative breast cancer (OR = 1.26 95 % CI: 1.02-1.57; p = 0.029). When tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity, those that self-reported as African American with a family history had a higher frequency of ER negative tumors (OR = 1.51 95 % CI: 1.09-2.08; p = 0.008), PR negative tumors (OR = 1.46 95 % CI: 1.09-1.94; p = 0.028), grade 3 tumors (OR = 1.42 95 % CI: 1.05-1.93; p < 0.0001), and ER/PR negative tumors (OR = 1.5 95 % CI: 1.088-2.064; p = 0.01). These results suggest that a positive family history of cancer in African Americans should increase suspicions of hereditary cancer. Therefore, behavioral risk reduction activities, such as collecting a family history, may reduce late stage diagnosis and cancer mortality.

  13. Early Predictors of Dyslexia in Chinese Children: Familial History of Dyslexia, Language Delay, and Cognitive Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lam, Fanny; Lam, Catherine; Chan, Becky; Fong, Cathy Y. C.; Wong, Terry T. Y.; Wong, Simpson W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This work tested the rates at which Chinese children with either language delay or familial history of dyslexia at age 5 manifested dyslexia at age 7, identified which cognitive skills at age 5 best distinguished children with and without dyslexia at age 7, and examined how these early abilities predicted subsequent literacy skills.…

  14. Early Predictors of Dyslexia in Chinese Children: Familial History of Dyslexia, Language Delay, and Cognitive Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lam, Fanny; Lam, Catherine; Chan, Becky; Fong, Cathy Y. C.; Wong, Terry T. Y.; Wong, Simpson W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This work tested the rates at which Chinese children with either language delay or familial history of dyslexia at age 5 manifested dyslexia at age 7, identified which cognitive skills at age 5 best distinguished children with and without dyslexia at age 7, and examined how these early abilities predicted subsequent literacy skills.…

  15. Maternal Family History is Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Vidoni, Eric D.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    A family history of Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases one's risk of developing late-onset AD (LOAD), and a maternal family history of LOAD influences risk more than a paternal family history. Accumulating evidence suggests that a family history of dementia associates with AD-typical biomarker changes. We analyzed cross-sectional data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and LOAD participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) with PET imaging using Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB, n = 99) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis (n = 403) for amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and total tau. We assessed the relationship of CSF and PiB biomarkers and family history of dementia, as well as parent gender effects. In the larger analysis of CSF biomarkers, we assessed diagnosis groups individually. In the overall sample, CSF Aβ, tau/Aβ ratio, and global PiB uptake were significantly different between family history positive and negative groups, with markers of increased AD burden associated with a positive maternal family history of dementia. Moreover, a maternal family history of dementia was associated with significantly greater PiB Aβ load in the brain in the parietal cortex, precuneus, and sensorimotor cortex. Individuals with MCI positive for a maternal family history of dementia had significantly more markers of AD pathophysiology than individuals with no family history of dementia. A family history of dementia is associated with AD-typical biomarker changes. These biomarker associations are most robust in individuals with a maternal family history, suggesting that a maternally inherited factor influences AD risk. PMID:22669011

  16. Increased blood BDNF in healthy individuals with a family history of depression.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Ulla; Søndergaard, Mia H Greisen; Koefoed, Pernille; Jørgensen, Anders; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-10-01

    The brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play an important role in the course of depression. We aimed to study the associations between peripheral whole blood BDNF levels in healthy individuals with and without a family history of depression. BDNF levels were significantly increased in healthy individuals with (n = 76), compared with healthy individuals without (n = 39) a family history of depression and persisted after adjustment for age and gender differences. Higher BDNF levels were associated with increasing age and seasonality. A family history of depression may contribute to an elevation of peripheral BDNF levels in healthy individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A life history model of the alcoholic family.

    PubMed

    Steinglass, P

    1980-09-01

    Research and clinical interest in the alcoholic family has tended to outpace the development of family-oriented conceptual models of alcoholism. A family development perspective has been almost totally absent, despite the chronic, longitudinal nature of alcoholism. A life history model is proposed that uses the concepts of the "alcoholic system," family homeostasis, and the "family alcohol phase" as its building blocks. Chronic alcoholism tends to produce distortions in the normative family life cycle. These distortions and their clinical implications are discussed, using four case histories as illustrations of the concepts proposed. The model is also examined in the light of current research findings about the alcoholic family.

  18. Family history of gastric cancer is associated with the risk of colorectal neoplasia in Korean population.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Kim, Nam Hee; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Park, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il

    2017-10-01

    Family history of cancers at different sites except for colorectum has not been evaluated as a risk factor for colorectal neoplasia (CRN). To investigate CRN risk according to family history of cancers at 12 different sites, including stomach and colorectum. A cross-sectional study was performed on 139,497 asymptomatic Koreans who underwent colonoscopy as part of a health check-up. The mean age of the study population was 41.6 and the prevalence of CRN was 16.3%. Multivariate analyses revealed that family histories of CRC (adjusted odds ratio; confidence interval, 1.26; 1.17-1.35) and gastric cancer (1.07; 1.01-1.13) were independent risk factors for CRN. Notably, the risk of CRN increased even more for participants with family histories of both CRC and gastric cancer (1.38; 1.12-1.70). Family history of CRC was associated with risk of CRN in participants aged both <50 and ≥50 years, whereas family history of gastric cancer was associated with risk of CRN in participants aged <50 years (1.22; 1.14-1.30), but not in participants aged ≥50 years (1.08; 0.99-1.18). Family history of gastric cancer was an independent risk factor for CRN, especially in those aged <50years. Persons with family histories of gastric cancer and CRC, especially those with family histories of both, may need to begin colonoscopy earlier. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Higher Fitness Is Strongly Protective in Patients with Family History of Heart Disease: The FIT Project.

    PubMed

    Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Patel, Jaideep; Hung, Rupert K; Nasir, Khurram; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Sakr, Sherif; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2017-03-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness protects against mortality; however, little is known about the benefits of improved fitness in individuals with a family history of coronary heart disease. We studied the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality, hypothesizing an inverse relationship similar to individuals without a family history of coronary heart disease. We included 57,999 patients (aged 53 ± 13 years; 49% were female; 29% were black) from the Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) Project. Cardiorespiratory fitness was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task based on exercise stress testing. Family history was determined as self-reported coronary heart disease in a first-degree relative at any age. We used Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics and cardiovascular disease risk factors to examine the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of incident coronary heart disease and mortality over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 5.5 (5.6) and 10.4 (6.8) years, respectively. Overall, 51% reported a positive family history. Each 1-unit metabolic equivalent increase was associated with lower incident coronary heart disease and mortality risk regardless of family history status. The hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval for a negative family history and a positive family history were 0.87 (0.84-0.89) and 0.87 (0.85-0.89) for incident coronary heart disease and 0.83 (0.82-0.84) and 0.83 (0.82-0.85) for mortality, respectively. There was no significant interaction between family history and categoric cardiorespiratory fitness, sex, or age (P >.05 for all). Higher cardiorespiratory fitness is strongly protective in all patients regardless of family history status, supporting recommendations for regular exercise in those with a family history. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Announcement: National Family History Day - November 24, 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-11-25

    In 2004, the U.S. Surgeon General declared that Thanksgiving would be National Family History Day, a day designed to encourage American families to learn about and create a written record of their family health history. Family history can identify those persons with a higher-than-average risk for many common diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Having at least one first-degree relative with a disease can increase a person's risk twofold or more (1). Family history is also a determinant of less common diseases like sickle cell disease and cystic fibrosis (1). Persons who might be at increased risk because of family history might benefit from screening or other interventions to prevent disease or detect it earlier.

  1. Family History Is a Risk Factor for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hokanson, John E.; Lynch, David A.; Washko, George R.; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that family history is a risk factor for COPD, but have not accounted for family history of smoking. Therefore, we sought to identify the effects of family history of smoking and family history of COPD on COPD susceptibility. Methods: We compared 821 patients with COPD to 776 control smokers from the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) Study. Questionnaires captured parental histories of smoking and COPD, as well as childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. Socioeconomic status was defined by educational achievement. Results: Parental history of smoking (85.5% case patients, 82.9% control subjects) was more common than parental history of COPD (43.0% case patients, 30.8% control subjects). In a logistic regression model, parental history of COPD (OR, 1.73; P < .0001) and educational level (OR, 0.48 for some college vs no college; P < .0001) were significant predictors of COPD, but parental history of smoking and childhood ETS exposure were not significant. The population-attributable risk from COPD family history was 18.6%. Patients with COPD with a parental history had more severe disease, with lower lung function, worse quality of life, and more frequent exacerbations. There were nonsignificant trends for more severe emphysema and airway disease on quantitative chest CT scans. Conclusions: Family history of COPD is a strong risk factor for COPD, independent of family history of smoking, personal lifetime smoking, or childhood ETS exposure. Although further studies are required to identify genetic variants that influence COPD susceptibility, clinicians should question all smokers, especially those with known or suspected COPD, regarding COPD family history. PMID:21310839

  2. Family history of myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes and cardiometabolic markers in children.

    PubMed

    Berentzen, Nina E; Wijga, Alet H; van Rossem, Lenie; Koppelman, Gerard H; van Nieuwenhuizen, Bo; Gehring, Ulrike; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Smit, Henriëtte A

    2016-08-01

    Despite the overlap in occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes and their risk factors, family history of these diseases has not yet been investigated simultaneously in relation to cardiometabolic markers in offspring. We examined how a family history of CVD and/or diabetes relates to cardiometabolic markers in offspring, and to what extent these diseases independently contribute to cardiometabolic markers. We used data from 1,374 12-year-old children and their parents participating in a birth cohort study in the Netherlands. Family history of CVD (myocardial infarction [MI] and stroke) and diabetes were reported by the parents. Children were classified as 'no', 'moderate' or 'strong' family history, based on early/late onset of disease in parents and grandparents. Cardiometabolic markers were measured at 12 years of age: waist circumference, cholesterol, blood pressure and HbA1c. Compared with those with no family history, children with a strong family history of MI and/or stroke and/or diabetes (29% of the study population) had 0.13 mmol/l higher total cholesterol (TC) (95% CI 0.03, 0.23) and 0.18 higher TC/HDL-cholesterol (HDLC) ratio (95% CI 0.04, 0.32). A strong family history of MI or diabetes was independently associated with unfavourable cardiometabolic markers specific to those diseases. These associations remained after adjusting for BMI. Children with a moderate family history had no unfavourable cardiometabolic markers. One-third of the children had a strong family history of CVD and/or diabetes. These children had higher TC levels and TC/HDLC ratios than children with no family history. A strong family history of MI or diabetes was independently associated with unfavourable cardiometabolic markers specific to those diseases.

  3. A Course in Latin American Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmori, Diana

    1981-01-01

    Presents a bibliographic review essay on Latin American families. The essay is presented in three major categories: (1) the family and enterprise; (2) the family--different regions, time periods, and socioeconomic conditions and (3) family networks. Entries include historical literature and articles in the English language, films, and novels. (DB)

  4. Genealogy and Family History in the Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, David G.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses public and scholarly interest in the fields of family history and genealogy. Highlights include attitudes before and after publication of Alex Haley's "Roots," library literature on genealogy, history of the family as a field of study, and academic library collection development and services. Twenty-five references are provided. (EJS)

  5. Genealogy and Family History in the Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, David G.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses public and scholarly interest in the fields of family history and genealogy. Highlights include attitudes before and after publication of Alex Haley's "Roots," library literature on genealogy, history of the family as a field of study, and academic library collection development and services. Twenty-five references are provided. (EJS)

  6. Family history of skin cancer is associated with increased risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Maryam M; Warton, E Margaret; Whittemore, Alice S

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of family history to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) risk has not been systematically quantified. To examine the association between self-reported family history of skin cancer and SCC risk. Cases (n = 415) with a pathology-verified SCC and 415 age-, gender-, and race-matched controls were identified within a large integrated health care delivery system. Family history and skin cancer risk factors were ascertained by survey. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of SCC with family history of skin cancer were estimated using conditional logistic regression adjusted for environmental and innate SCC risk factors. Any known family history of skin cancer was associated with a four-fold higher risk of SCC, adjusting for known environmental and innate SCC risk factors (OR, 4.0; confidence interval [CI]: 2.5-6.5). An unknown family history of skin cancer showed similar risk for SCC (OR, 3.9; CI: 2.4-6.5). In models including skin cancer type, the strongest association was for family history of basal cell carcinoma (OR, 9.8; CI: 2.6-36.8) and for multiple skin cancer types (OR, 10.5; CI: 3.7-29.6). Family history of skin cancer is an important independent risk factor for cutaneous SCCs.

  7. Aging Parents as Family Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Becker, Marion

    1988-01-01

    Investigated extent to which aging parents experience stress when problems arise in lives of their adult children, and ways in which they serve as resources to their children in need. Findings from 29 couples over age 60 revealed that mothers experienced significant stress resulting from adult children's problems, whereas fathers experienced…

  8. Understanding family member suicide narratives by investigating family history.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Dorothy; Maple, Myfanwy; Minichiello, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The complex family environments in which a suicide death had previously occurred were explored in a qualitative study of narratives of suicide-bereaved participants. The participants searched for reasons why the suicide occurred in their family. Family patterning stories and the context of the environment in which the suicide death occurred provided an additional depth of meaning into the relational aspects of the family. Fractured families emerged as an important theme. Shared in the narratives were stories of conditions within the family that may have contributed to vulnerability towards persistent negative feelings about their lives, their family, and their future. The study also identifies the strengths of family culture that led to resilience in the suicide bereaved. These stories highlight the importance of support for those bereaved by the suicide of a close family member and the issues that places people in vulnerable situations that perhaps may explain the increased risk of suicide for those bereaved family members.

  9. Does a family history of glaucoma affect disease severity at the time of diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Landers, John; Goldberg, Ivan; Graham, Stuart

    2003-02-01

    Progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy is an asymptomatic process with an insidious onset. Patients who are aware of glaucomatous signs and who suspect that they may have the disease may present earlier. If a person has glaucoma, this may alert his or her other family members to seek assessment and thereby permit earlier diagnosis. The authors sought to determine whether glaucoma patients with a family history of the disease were younger and showed less evidence of glaucomatous optic neuropathy at diagnosis than glaucoma patients without a family history of the disease. Family history of glaucoma, age at diagnosis, and visual field mean defect within 2 years after diagnosis were recorded in 292 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Results were analyzed to compare visual field loss with age and family history. At diagnosis, patients with a family history of glaucoma were younger than those without such a history (mean +/- SD, 58 +/- 12.7 years versus 63 +/- 10.8 years; = 3.68, P<0.001). Patients who were younger than 50 years at the time of diagnosis and had a positive family history were significantly less likely to have a worse visual field than those with a negative family history (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.6; P<0.001), whereas those aged 50 years or older showed no such correlation (OR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.7-1.3; P = 0.6). A family history of glaucoma was associated with a better visual field at diagnosis in patients younger than 50 years, but not in patients 50 years or older.

  10. Reduced gray matter volume in normal adults with a maternal family history of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Honea, R A; Swerdlow, R H; Vidoni, E D; Goodwin, J; Burns, J M

    2010-01-12

    A consistently identified risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) is family history of dementia, with maternal transmission significantly more frequent than paternal transmission. A history of maternal AD may be related to AD-like glucose consumption in cognitively healthy subjects. In this cross-sectional study, we tested whether cognitively healthy people with a family history of AD have less gray matter volume (GMV), an endophenotype for late-onset AD, than individuals with no family history, and whether decreases in GMV are different in subjects with a maternal family history. As part of the Kansas University Brain Aging Project, 67 cognitively intact individuals with a maternal history of late-onset AD (FHm, n = 16), a paternal history of AD (FHp, n = 8), or no parental history of AD (FH-, n = 43), similar in age, gender, education, and Mini-Mental State Examination score, were scanned at 3 T. We used voxel-based morphometry to examine GMV differences between groups, controlling for age, gender, and apoE4. Cognitively healthy individuals with a family history of late-onset AD had significantly decreased GMV in the precuneus, middle frontal, inferior frontal, and superior frontal gyri compared with FH- individuals. FHm subjects had significantly smaller inferior frontal, middle frontal, precuneus, and lingual gyri compared with FH- and FHp subjects. Overall, maternal family history of Alzheimer disease (AD) in cognitively normal individuals is associated with lower gray matter volume in AD-vulnerable brain regions. These data complement and extend reports of cerebral metabolic differences in subjects with a maternal family history.

  11. Accuracy of reporting of family history of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, R J; Brewster, D; Campbell, H; Porteous, M E M; Wyllie, A H; Bird, C C; Dunlop, M G

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Family history is used extensively to estimate the risk of colorectal cancer but there is considerable potential for recall bias and inaccuracy. Hence we systematically assessed the accuracy of family history reported at interview compared with actual cancer experience in relatives. Methods: Using face to face interviews, we recorded family history from 199 colorectal cancer cases and 133 community controls, totalling 5637 first and second degree relatives (FDRs/SDRs). We linked computerised cancer registry data to interview information to determine the accuracy of family history reporting. Results: Cases substantially underreported colorectal cancer arising both in FDRs (sensitivity 0.566 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.433, 0.690); specificity 0.990 (95% CI 0.983, 0.994)) and SDRs (sensitivity 0.271 (95% CI 0.166, 0.410); specificity 0.996 (95% CI 0.992, 0.998)). There was no observable difference in accuracy of reporting family history between case and control interviewees. Control subjects similarly underreported colorectal cancer in FDRs (sensitivity 0.529 (95% CI 0.310, 0.738); specificity 0.995 (95% CI 0.989, 0.998)) and SDRs (sensitivity 0.333 (95% CI 0.192, 0.512); specificity 0.995 (95% CI 0.991, 0.995)). To determine practical implications of inaccurate family history, we applied family history criteria before and after record linkage. Only two of five families reported at interview to meet surveillance criteria did so after validation, whereas only two of six families that actually merited surveillance were identified by interview. Conclusions: This study has quantified the inaccuracy of interview in identifying people at risk of colorectal cancer due to a family history. Colorectal cancer was substantially underreported and so family history information should be interpreted with caution. These findings have considerable relevance to identifying patients who merit surveillance colonoscopy and to epidemiological studies. PMID

  12. Changing family structure and aging issues.

    PubMed

    Bae, H

    1987-12-01

    Rapid industrialization, adaptation of modern values, and rural-urban migration in Korea have led to the replacement of the extended family with the nuclear of conjugal family. In 1980, 13% of Korean households were 1-generational, 70% were 2-generational, 17% were 3-generational and less than 1% were 4-generational. This trend has had serious implications for the aged, who have become increasingly isolated from Korean society. Hindering the adaptation of the aged to modern society are their low educational level, rural concentration, low income, and high rate of female members. Adult children who are well educated and prosperous economically are most likely to refuse to take responsibility for aged parents. Since some 23% of the aged currently live alone, Korean society must assume some of the responsibility that has traditionally been accepted by family members. There is a need for systematic programming that takes into account the current sociodemographic circumstances of Korea's aged population. Incentives such as tax exemptions and aged care allowances should be considered to encourage children to take responsibility for their aged parents. To meet the needs of the growing number of aged who are disabled and without family support, the number of geriatric hospitals and institutions must be expanded. Also important are supplementary programs such as housekeeping services, meals on wheels, and day care. Although the expansion of social welfare programs and institutions for the aged is essential, they can not in themselves meet the emotional needs of the aged that have traditionally been served by family connectedness.

  13. Family history: an opportunity for early interventions and improved control of hypertension, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sande, M. A.; Walraven, G. E.; Milligan, P. J.; Banya, W. A.; Ceesay, S. M.; Nyan, O. A.; McAdam, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a family history of high-risk groups for major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was a significant risk factor for these conditions among family members in a study population in the Gambia, where strong community and family coherence are important determinants that have to be taken into consideration in promoting lifestyle changes. METHODS: We questioned 5389 adults as to any first-degree family history of major noncommunicable diseases (hypertension, obesity, diabetes and stroke), and measured their blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). Total blood cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were measured in a stratified subsample, as well as blood glucose (2 hours after ingesting 75 g glucose) in persons aged > or = 35 years. FINDINGS: A significant number of subjects reported a family history of hypertension (8.0%), obesity (5.4%), diabetes (3.3%) and stroke (1.4%), with 14.6% of participants reporting any of these NCDs. Subjects with a family history of hypertension had a higher diastolic BP and BMI, higher cholesterol and uric acid concentrations, and an increased risk of obesity. Those with a family history of obesity had a higher BMI and were at increased risk of obesity. Individuals with a family history of diabetes had a higher BMI and higher concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and uric acid, and their risk of obesity and diabetes was increased. Subjects with a family history of stroke had a higher BMI, as well as higher cholesterol, triglyceride and uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: A family history of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or stroke was a significant risk factor for obesity and hyperlipidaemia. With increase of age, more pathological manifestations can develop in this high-risk group. Health professionals should therefore utilize every opportunity to include direct family members in health education. PMID:11357211

  14. Changing relative contribution of abdominal obesity and a family history of diabetes on prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Korean men and women aged 30-49 years from 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bo Kyung; Kim, Sang Wan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Kyong Soo; Moon, Min Kyong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the change in the relative impact of a family history of diabetes (FH) and abdominal obesity on diabetes mellitus (DM) over a 10-year period in Korea. We analyzed data from the 2001, 2005, and 2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey that were weighted to represent the entire Korean population in each year. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between DM and FH or abdominal obesity. In men aged 30-49 years, the association between FH and DM was stronger in 2010 than in 2001; the odds ratio (OR) was 1.508 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.814-2.792) in 2001, 3.351 (95% CI, 1.599-7.024) in 2005, and 7.302 (95% CI, 3.451-15.451) in 2010 (P for trend = 0.003). In contrast, the association between abdominal obesity and DM was weaker in 2010 (OR, 0.969 [95% CI, 0.465-2.018]) than in 2001 (OR, 2.532 [95% CI, 1.572-4.080]) (P for trend = 0.037). In women aged 30-49 years, there was no significant change in OR of FH or abdominal obesity during the same period. (P for trend = 0.367 and 0.401, respectively). In Korean men aged 30-49 years, the association between FH and DM has been stronger from 2001 to 2010, whereas abdominal obesity was less important in 2010 compared to 2001. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The context of collecting family health history: examining definitions of family and family communication about health among African American women.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Tess; Seo, Joann; Griffith, Julia; Baxter, Melanie; James, Aimee; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2015-04-01

    Public health initiatives encourage the public to discuss and record family health history information, which can inform prevention and screening for a variety of conditions. Most research on family health history discussion and collection, however, has predominantly involved White participants and has not considered lay definitions of family or family communication patterns about health. This qualitative study of 32 African American women-16 with a history of cancer-analyzed participants' definitions of family, family communication about health, and collection of family health history information. Family was defined by biological relatedness, social ties, interactions, and proximity. Several participants noted using different definitions of family for different purposes (e.g., biomedical vs. social). Health discussions took place between and within generations and were influenced by structural relationships (e.g., sister) and characteristics of family members (e.g., trustworthiness). Participants described managing tensions between sharing health information and protecting privacy, especially related to generational differences in sharing information, fear of familial conflict or gossip, and denial (sometimes described as refusal to "own" or "claim" a disease). Few participants reported that anyone in their family kept formal family health history records. Results suggest family health history initiatives should address family tensions and communication patterns that affect discussion and collection of family health history information.

  16. Interrogating Identity and Social Contexts through "Critical Family History"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John; Sleeter, Christine; Kumashiro, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Tracing one's family genealogy is a complex process that requires situating a family's narratives within a historical context. This article reviews the use of critical family history research in an undergraduate Asian American studies course to examine not only the diversity and experiences of Asian Americans but also the unspoken narratives that…

  17. Interrogating Identity and Social Contexts through "Critical Family History"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John; Sleeter, Christine; Kumashiro, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Tracing one's family genealogy is a complex process that requires situating a family's narratives within a historical context. This article reviews the use of critical family history research in an undergraduate Asian American studies course to examine not only the diversity and experiences of Asian Americans but also the unspoken narratives that…

  18. Talking (or Not) about Family Health History in Families of Latino Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Rosalie; Rodríguez, Vivian; Quillin, John; Gyure, Maria; Bodurtha, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Although individuals recognize the importance of knowing their family's health history for their own health, relatively few people (e.g., less than a third in one national survey) collect this type of information. This study examines the rates of family communication about family health history of cancer, and predictors of communication in a…

  19. Talking (or Not) about Family Health History in Families of Latino Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Rosalie; Rodríguez, Vivian; Quillin, John; Gyure, Maria; Bodurtha, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Although individuals recognize the importance of knowing their family's health history for their own health, relatively few people (e.g., less than a third in one national survey) collect this type of information. This study examines the rates of family communication about family health history of cancer, and predictors of communication in a…

  20. Synergy of BMI and family history on diabetes: the Humboldt Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Rennie, Donna C; Dosman, James A

    2010-04-01

    To examine the joint effect of family history and BMI on diabetes. Cross-sectional study. A rural community in Saskatchewan, Canada. The analysis was based on data from 2081 adults, 18-79 years of age, who participated in the Humboldt Study conducted in 2003. Doctor-diagnosed diabetes and family history of diabetes of biological parents and siblings were self-reported. Body weight and height were objectively measured. The interaction of family history and BMI on diabetes was assessed on an additive scale. The prevalence of diabetes was 7.9 %, and BMI and history of diabetes were two important predictors. The adjusted prevalence ratios were 1.76 (95 % CI 1.37, 2.27) and 2.59 (95 % CI 2.05, 3.31) for those with a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2 and of at least 30 kg/m2, respectively, compared with a BMI of less than 25 kg/m2, and was 2.41 (95 % CI 2.08, 2.80) for those with a family history of diabetes v. those without. The data indicated an additive interaction of family history and BMI on diabetes. When exposed to both family history and overweight/obesity, individuals would have an increased risk that was greater than the sum of their single effects. Reduction of BMI would also reduce the risk of diabetes associated family history.

  1. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family structures and households, (c) interdependence of family roles and functions, and (d) patterns and outcomes of caregiving. Although research on aging families has advanced theory and applied innovative statistical techniques, the literature has fallen short in fully representing diverse populations and in applying the broadest set of methodological tools available. We discuss these and other frontier areas of scholarship in light of the aging of baby boomers and their families. PMID:22930600

  2. "Cognitive, emotion control, and motor performance of adolescents in the NCANDA study: Contributions from alcohol consumption, age, sex, ethnicity, and family history of addiction": Correction to Sullivan et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    Reports an error in "Cognitive, emotion control, and motor performance of adolescents in the NCANDA study: Contributions from alcohol consumption, age, sex, ethnicity, and family history of addiction" by Edith V. Sullivan, Ty Brumback, Susan F. Tapert, Rosemary Fama, Devin Prouty, Sandra A. Brown, Kevin Cummins, Wesley K. Thompson, Ian M. Colrain, Fiona C. Baker, Michael D. De Bellis, Stephen R. Hooper, Duncan B. Clark, Tammy Chung, Bonnie J. Nagel, B. Nolan Nichols, Torsten Rohlfing, Weiwei Chu, Kilian M. Pohl and Adolf Pfefferbaum (Neuropsychology, 2016[May], Vol 30[4], 449-473). A problem with a computation to invert speed scores is noted and explained in this correction. All statements indicating group differences in speed scores, as well as Table 5 and Figure 8A, have been corrected in the online version of this article. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-00613-001.) To investigate development of cognitive and motor functions in healthy adolescents and to explore whether hazardous drinking affects the normal developmental course of those functions. Participants were 831 adolescents recruited across 5 United States sites of the National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence 692 met criteria for no/low alcohol exposure, and 139 exceeded drinking thresholds. Cross-sectional, baseline data were collected with computerized and traditional neuropsychological tests assessing 8 functional domains expressed as composite scores. General additive modeling evaluated factors potentially modulating performance (age, sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and pubertal developmental stage). Older no/low-drinking participants achieved better scores than younger ones on 5 accuracy composites (general ability, abstraction, attention, emotion, and balance). Speeded responses for attention, motor speed, and general ability were sensitive to age and pubertal development. The exceeds-threshold group (accounting for age, sex

  3. The Middle Ages: Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a four-volume reference set for elementary and middle school students called "The Middle Ages: An Encyclopedia for Students" edited by William Chester Jordan. Provides a sample lesson which includes library media skills objectives, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activity and procedures for…

  4. Emerging Trends in Family History of Breast Cancer and Associated Risk.

    PubMed

    Shiyanbola, Oyewale O; Arao, Robert F; Miglioretti, Diana L; Sprague, Brian L; Hampton, John M; Stout, Natasha K; Kerlikowske, Karla; Braithwaite, Dejana; Buist, Diana S M; Egan, Kathleen M; Newcomb, Polly A; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2017-10-06

    Increase in breast cancer incidence associated with mammography screening diffusion may have attenuated risk associations between family history and breast cancer. The proportions of women aged 40-74 years reporting a first-degree family history of breast cancer were estimated in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium cohort (BCSC, N=1,170,900; 1996-2012) and the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; cases N=23,400; controls N=26,460; 1987-2007). Breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive) relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with family history were calculated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard and logistic regression models. The proportion of women reporting a first-degree family history increased from 11% in the 1980s to 16% in 2010-13. Family history was associated with a >60% increased risk of breast cancer in the BCSC (hazard ratio=1.61;95%CI=1.55-1.66) and CBCS (odds ratio=1.64;95%CI=1.57-1.72). Relative risks decreased slightly with age. Consistent trends in relative risks were not observed over time or across stage of disease at diagnosis in both studies, except among older women (60-74) where estimates were attenuated from about 1.7 to 1.3 over the last 20 years (P-trend=0.08 for both studies). Although the proportion of women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer increased over time and by age, breast cancer risk associations with family history were nonetheless fairly constant over time for women under age 60. First-degree family history of breast cancer remains an important breast cancer risk factor, especially for younger women, despite its increasing prevalence in the mammography screening era. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Patterns of family health history communication among older African American adults.

    PubMed

    Hovick, Shelly R; Yamasaki, Jill S; Burton-Chase, Allison M; Peterson, Susan K

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined patterns of communication regarding family health history among older African American adults. The authors conducted 5 focus groups and 6 semi-structured interviews with African Americans aged 60 years and older (N = 28). The authors identified 4 distinct patterns of family health history communication: noncommunication, open communication, selective communication (communication restricted to certain people or topics), and one-way communication (communication not reciprocated by younger family members). In general, participants favored open family health history communication, often resulting from desires to change patterns of noncommunication in previous generations regarding personal and family health history. Some participants indicated that they were selective about what and with whom they shared health information in order to protect their privacy and not worry others. Others described family health history communication as one-way or unreciprocated by younger family members who appeared uninterested or unwilling to share personal and family health information. The communication patterns that the authors identified are consistent with communication privacy management theory and with findings from studies focused on genetic testing results for hereditary conditions, suggesting that individuals are consistent in their communication of health and genetic risk information. Findings may guide the development of health message strategies for African Americans to increase family health history communication.

  6. Family history and environmental risk factors for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Esteve; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia

    2004-04-01

    We analyzed the joint effect of environmental risk factors and family history of colorectal cancer on colon cancer. We used data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy between 1992 and 1996 including 1225 cases with colon cancer and 4154 controls. We created a weighed risk factor score for the main environmental risk factors in this population (positive family history, high education, low occupational physical activity, high daily meal frequency, low intake of fiber, low intake of calcium, and low intake of beta-carotene). Compared with the reference category (subjects with no family history of colorectal cancer and in the lowest tertile of the risk factor score), the odds ratios of colon cancer were 2.27 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.89-2.73] for subjects without family history and in the highest environmental risk factor score, 3.20 (95% CI = 2.05-5.01) for those with family history and low risk factor score, and 7.08 (95% CI = 4.68-10.71) for those with family history and high risk factor score. The pattern of risk was similar for men and women and no meaningful differences emerged according to subsite within the colon. Family history of colorectal cancer interacts with environmental risk factors of colon cancer.

  7. Maternal family history of hypertension attenuates neonatal pain response.

    PubMed

    France, Christopher R; Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti S; Pagé, M Gabrielle; Katz, Joel

    2009-04-01

    Reduced sensitivity to naturally occurring and laboratory pain stimuli has been observed in individuals with hypertension, high-normal blood pressure, and a family history of hypertension. The present study sought to extend these findings by examining the relationship between familial history of hypertension and pain responsivity in neonates. Eighty infants had intramuscular (IM) injections of vitamin K performed in the delivery room within 1h of birth as per institutional practice. Video recordings of the injection procedure were used by trained observers to code infant pain responses using facial grimacing and cry duration. Prior to the birth of the child, the infants' parents each completed a family blood pressure history survey and these responses were used to identify infants with and without a maternal and paternal family history of hypertension. As compared to infants without a maternal family history of hypertension, infants with a maternal family history of hypertension had significantly shorter crying times, F(1,74)=6.96, p=.01, eta(2)=.086, and marginally lower facial grimacing scores, F(1,74)=2.68, p=.10, eta(2)=.035, during vitamin K injection. The presence of attenuated responses to the IM injection in neonates with a maternal family history of hypertension provides important and novel evidence that reduced pain responding in individuals at risk for hypertension is not a learned response style, but rather may arise from prenatal or genetic influences.

  8. The Impact of Family History on the Clinical Features of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kringlen, Gabe; Kinsley, Lisa; Aufox, Sharon; Rouleau, Gerald; Bega, Danny

    2017-10-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. In most cases the disease is inherited from a parent, although a considerable number of affected persons have no reported family history of the disease. While CAG repeat length is negatively correlated with age of symptom onset, variability exists suggesting that other variables may influence symptom onset. The objective of this study is to determine whether awareness of a family history of HD has an impact on symptom onset and disease manifestations. Data were obtained from Enroll-HD to compare subjects with a family history of HD to subjects without on various key clinical outcomes. In addition, multiple regressions were performed to investigate the impact of family history on the age at onset of depression and motor symptoms. 4,285 mutation positive subjects were included in the analysis, of which 4.81% had a negative family history. Controlling for CAG repeat length, a positive family history predicted an onset of depression 11.438 years earlier and an onset of motor symptoms 6.681 years earlier when compared to having a negative family history. Subjects with a positive family history were more likely to report behavioral manifestations as the initial major symptom of HD (38.6% vs. 29.6%, p = 0.023), and were more likely to report previous suicidal ideation/attempts (26.2% vs. 20.3%, p = 0.046). A positive family history of HD appears to be associated with an earlier onset of depression and overall disease manifestations. Implications regarding the role of genetic versus environmental contributions to symptom onset in HD are discussed.

  9. Disparities in cancer screening in individuals with a family history of breast or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Ninez A; Tsui, Jennifer; Knight, Sara J; Afable-Munsuz, Aimee; Ladabaum, Uri; Hiatt, Robert A; Haas, Jennifer S

    2012-03-15

    Understanding racial/ethnic disparities in cancer screening by family history risk could identify critical opportunities for patient and provider interventions tailored to specific racial/ethnic groups. The authors evaluated whether breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) disparities varied by family history risk using a large, multiethnic population-based survey. By using the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, BC and CRC screening were evaluated separately with weighted multivariate regression analyses, and stratified by family history risk. Screening was defined for BC as mammogram within the past 2 years for women aged 40 to 64 years; for CRC, screening was defined as annual fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years, or colonoscopy within the past 10 years for adults aged 50 to 64 years. The authors found no significant BC screening disparities by race/ethnicity or income in the family history risk groups. Racial/ethnic disparities were more evident in CRC screening, and the Latino-white gap widened among individuals with family history risk. Among adults with a family history for CRC, the magnitude of the Latino-white difference in CRC screening (odds ratio [OR], 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.60) was more substantial than that for individuals with no family history (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.59-0.92). Knowledge of their family history widened the Latino-white gap in CRC screening among adults. More aggressive interventions that enhance the communication between Latinos and their physicians about family history and cancer risk could reduce the substantial Latino-white screening disparity in Latinos most susceptible to CRC. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  10. Relevance of family history of suicide in the long-term outcome of bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Romero, Soledad; Colom, Francesc; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Cruz, Nuria; Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Pacchiaroti, Isabella; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Vieta, Eduard

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the association between family history of completed suicide and suicidal behavior and other clinical variables in subjects with bipolar disorder. 374 outpatients aged from 19 to 88 years (mean +/- SD age = 41.9 +/- 4.1 years) (54.3% female) meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder type I or II or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype, were included in the study. Forty-eight subjects with a family history of completed suicide were compared to 326 subjects without a family history of completed suicide regarding several clinical and demographic variables. The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004. There were no statistically significant demographic differences between bipolar disorder subjects with and without a family history of suicide. Bipolar disorder subjects with a family history of suicide showed higher rates of cluster C personality disorders than subjects without a family history of suicide (14.9% vs. 2.5%, OR = 6.72, 95% CI = 2.31 to 19.51, p < .001). Subjects with a family history of suicide also demonstrated a significantly greater lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts (52.2% vs. 25.5%, OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.7 to 6.0, p < .001). Results remained significant after controlling for all possible interactions. Family history of completed suicide is a significant risk factor associated with suicidal attempts in patients with bipolar disorder. These findings underscore the importance of identifying patients with a family history of suicide in order to provide prompt treatment and careful follow-up.

  11. Cancer Visibility among Iranian Familial Networks: To What Extent Can We Rely on Family History Reports?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients’ unawareness of their cancer diagnosis (PUAW) and their tendency for non-disclosure (TTND) to relatives leads to a lack of cancer visibility among familial networks. Lack of familial cancer visibility could affect the accuracy of family cancer history (FCH) reports. In this study, we investigated familial cancer visibility and its potential determinants. Patients and Methods A sample of patients with a confirmed cancer diagnosis was interviewed. Participants were asked about their number of relatives, number of their relatives who are aware about the cancer diagnosis, and the number of relatives from whom they intended to conceal their diagnosis. PUAW was also assessed. Point estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the bootstrap technique. Multivariate analyses were conducted using mixed Poisson and logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 415 participants with a mean age of 53±15 years and a male to female ratio of 0.53 were enrolled in this study. The rates of PUAW, TTND, and familial cancer visibility in the total sample were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.24), 0.16 (95% CI: 0.12, 0.19), and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.89), respectively. PUAW (adjusted rate ratio (RR) = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.27, 1.38), TTND (RR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.91, 0.93), and the patients’ gender (RR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82, 0.95) were the most important determinants of familial cancer visibility. Conclusion Familial cancer visibility may be a point of concern among the Iranian population. Self-reported cancer histories and FCHs may have low sensitivities (not exceeding 80% and 86%, respectively) in this population. However, these estimates may vary across different societies, because of societal and cultural contexts. PMID:26308087

  12. Lifestyle and family history influence cancer prognosis in Brazilian individuals.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Raimundo F; Lira, George A; Guedes, Hugo G; Cardoso, Marília A; Cavalcante, Francisco J; Araújo, Ana Lucia M; Ramos, Carlos César O; de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study prognostic parameters of CRC by analyzing clinical and pathological variables associated with cancer patients at a northeastern Brazilian Hospital. This was a retrospective study evaluating CRC-diagnosed patients across a 10-year period (1995-2005) at Dr. Luiz Antônio Hospital in Natal, RN, Brazil. Data were collected from patients' medical files. A total of 358 patients were included over the 10-year period. The average age at diagnosis was 58.8 years (S.D.=15.26), 48.3% of the patients were males and 51.7% were females. Alcohol consumption significantly increased the chance of dying (p<0.023) from colorectal cancer; this increased risk of death was approximately 71%, compared to 52.2% of the non-alcoholics. In addition, tobacco increased the chance of developing high TNM stage tumors (level III, IV; p<0.001). Another risk factor for increased mortality was a family history for colorectal cancer (p<0.002). Our analysis found that patients with an unhealthy lifestyle and/or family history of colorectal cancer were more likely to develop advanced stage colorectal cancer and to have a poor disease prognosis compared to patients with healthy lifestyle and/or sporadic colorectal cancer. These data suggest that a mass screening program should be implemented in northeastern Brazil in order to better prevent and treat colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between documented family history of cancer and screening for breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carney, Patricia A; O'Malley, Jean P; Gough, Andrea; Buckley, David I; Wallace, James; Fagnan, Lyle J; Morris, Cynthia; Mori, Motomi; Heintzman, John D; Lieberman, David

    2013-11-01

    Previous research on ascertainment of cancer family history and cancer screening has been conducted in urban settings. To examine whether documented family history of breast or colorectal cancer is associated with breast or colorectal cancer screening. Medical record reviews were conducted on 3433 patients aged 55 and older from four primary care practices in two rural Oregon communities. Data collected included patient demographic and risk information, including any documentation of family history of breast or colorectal cancer, and receipt of screening for these cancers. A positive breast cancer family history was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.45-3.00 relative to a recorded negative history). A positive family history for colorectal cancer was associated with an increased likelihood of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force low risk guidelines for males (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.15-7.29) and females (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32-4.64) relative to a recorded negative family history. The absence of any recorded family cancer history was associated with a decreased likelihood of being up-to-date for mammography screening (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 relative to recorded negative history) or for colorectal cancer screening (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60-0.96 in females, OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.88 in males relative to recorded negative history). Further research is needed to determine if establishing routines to document family history of cancer would improve appropriate use of cancer screening. © 2013.

  14. Parental consanguinity and family history of coronary artery disease strongly predict early stenosis.

    PubMed

    Youhanna, Sonia; Platt, Daniel E; Rebeiz, Abdallah; Lauridsen, Michael; Deeb, Mary E; Nasrallah, Antoine; Alam, Samir; Puzantian, Houry; Kabbani, Samer; Ghoul, Melanie; Zreik, Tony G; el Bayeh, Hamid; Abchee, Antoine; Zalloua, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial disease with acquired and inherited components. We investigated the roles of family history and consanguinity on CAD risk and age at diagnosis in 4284 patients. The compounded impact of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI, which are known CAD risk factors, on CAD risk and age at diagnosis was also explored. CAD was determined by cardiac catheterization. Logistic regression and stratification were performed to determine the impact of family history and consanguinity on risk and onset of CAD, controlling for diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI. Family history of CAD and gender significantly increased the risk for young age at diagnosis of CAD (p<0.001). Consanguinity did not promote risk of CAD (p=0.38), but did affect age of disease diagnosis (p<0.001). The mean age at disease diagnosis was lowest, 54.8 years, when both family history of CAD and consanguinity were considered as unique risk factors for CAD, compared to 62.8 years for the no-risk-factor patient category (p<0.001). Family history of CAD and smoking are strongly associated with young age at diagnosis. Furthermore, parental consanguinity in the presence of family history lowers the age of disease diagnosis significantly for CAD, emphasizing the role of strong genetic and cultural CAD modifiers. These findings highlight the increased role of genetic determinants of CAD in some population subgroups, and suggest that populations and family structure influence genetic heterogeneity between patients with CAD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A survey of female students with migraine: what is the influence of family history and lifestyle?

    PubMed

    Dzoljic, Eleonora; Vlajinac, Hristina; Sipetic, Sandra; Marinkovic, Jelena; Grbatinic, Ivan; Kostic, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    To compare characteristics of migraine and some lifestyle habits in migraineurs with and without a positive family history for migraine. The prevalence study was combined with a case-control study and comprised 245 female students with migraine. Out of 245 female students with migraine, 132 (53.9%) had a positive family history for migraine. In comparison with migraineurs who had not, those with a positive family history were younger at the onset of migraine and significantly more frequently reported menstrual migraine (p < 0.001), unilateral pain (p < 0.05) and pulsate pain (p < 0.05) as well as severe headache (p < 0.01). In comparison to migraineurs with a positive family history for migraine, those who did not report a significantly higher frequency of average number of meals per day of <3 (p < 0.001), missed meals (p < 0.05) and an average sleep duration of ≤ 6 h (p < 0.05). The results of the present study are in line with literature showing a high frequency of positive family history for migraine among migraineurs. They also suggest that subjects with a positive family history have a lower "migrainous threshold" for the development of migraine and that environmental factors are more important for the occurrence of migraine in subjects without a positive family history. Accordingly, the conclusions of this study are limited to reproductive aged women.

  16. Family History of Psychological Problems in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Behar, Evelyn; Borkovec, TD

    2014-01-01

    The current investigation examined self-reported family history of psychological problems in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and nonanxious controls. The GAD participants were all individuals receiving cognitive–behavioral therapy as part of two large randomized clinical trials. Family history information was obtained from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Revised (ADIS-R; DiNardo & Barlow, 1988). The results indicate that, compared to control participants, individuals with GAD were more likely to have family members with anxiety problems, but not other psychological problems. Possible mechanisms for the familial transmission of GAD are discussed. PMID:18509873

  17. Impact of family history assessment on communication with family members and health care providers: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr).

    PubMed

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Plegue, Melissa; Ruffin, Mack T; O'Neill, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Acheson, Louise S

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the impact of Family Healthware™ on communication behaviors; specifically, communication with family members and health care providers about family health history. A total of 3786 participants were enrolled in the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr) in the United States from 2005-7. The trial employed a two-arm cluster-randomized design, with primary care practices serving as the unit of randomization. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), analyses focused on communication behaviors at 6month follow-up, adjusting for age, site and practice clustering. A significant interaction was observed between study arm and baseline communication status for the family communication outcomes (p's<.01), indicating that intervention had effects of different magnitude between those already communicating at baseline and those who were not. Among participants who were not communicating at baseline, intervention participants had higher odds of communicating with family members about family history risk (OR=1.24, p=0.042) and actively collecting family history information at follow-up (OR=2.67, p=0.026). Family Healthware™ did not have a significant effect on family communication among those already communicating at baseline, or on provider communication, regardless of baseline communication status. Greater communication was observed among those at increased familial risk for a greater number of diseases. Family Healthware™ prompted more communication about family history with family members, among those who were not previously communicating. Efforts are needed to identify approaches to encourage greater sharing of family history information, particularly with health care providers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Family History Assessment on Communication with Family Members and Health Care Providers: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Plegue, Melissa; Ruffin, Mack T.; O'Neill, Suzanne M.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Acheson, Louise S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examines the impact of Family Healthware™ on communication behaviors; specifically, communication with family members and health care providers about family health history. Methods A total of 3786 participants were enrolled in the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr) in the United States from 2005-7. The trial employed a two-arm cluster-randomized design, with primary care practices serving as the unit of randomization. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), analyses focused on communication behaviors at 6 month follow-up, adjusting for age, site and practice clustering. Results A significant interaction was observed between study arm and baseline communication status for the family communication outcomes (ps<.01), indicating that intervention had effects of different magnitude between those already communicating at baseline and those who were not. Among participants who were not communicating at baseline, intervention participants had higher odds of communicating with family members about family history risk (OR=1.24, p=0.042) and actively collecting family history information at follow-up (OR=2.67, p=0.026). Family Healthware™ did not have a significant effect on family communication among those already communicating at baseline, or on provider communication, regardless of baseline communication status. Greater communication was observed among those at increased familial risk for a greater number of diseases. Conclusion Family Healthware™ prompted more communication about family history with family members, among those who were not previously communicating. Efforts are needed to identify approaches to encourage greater sharing of family history information, particularly with health care providers. PMID:25901453

  19. The contribution of family history to hearing loss in an older population.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Catherine M; Kifley, Annette; Rochtchina, Elena; Newall, Philip; Mitchell, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Although it has been well established that the prevalence of and severity of hearing loss increase with age, the contribution of familial factors to age-related hearing loss cannot be quantified. This is largely because hearing loss in older people has both genetic and environmental contributions. As environmental factors play an increasing role with age, it is difficult to delineate the separate contribution of genetic factors to age-related hearing loss. In a population-based survey of hearing loss in a representative older Australian community, we attempted to overcome this using logistic regression analysis, accounting for known factors associated with hearing loss including age, sex, noise exposure at work, diabetes, and current smoking. We tested hearing thresholds using pure tone audiometry and used a forced choice questionnaire to determine the nature of family history in a population of individuals aged 50 yrs or older in a defined region, west of Sydney, Australia (N = 2669). We compared the characteristics of participants with and without family history of hearing loss. Of those reporting a positive family history, we compared subgroups for age, gender and severity of hearing loss, and trends by the severity of hearing loss. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that compared the chances of having hearing loss in participants with and without family history, after adjusting for other factors known associated with hearing loss. Our findings indicate that family history was most strongly associated with moderate to severe age-related hearing loss. We found a strong association between maternal family history of hearing loss and moderate to severe hearing loss in women (adjusted OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.6-5.6 in women with without a maternal history). Paternal family history of hearing loss was also significantly, though less strongly, associated with moderate-severe hearing loss in men (adjusted OR 2.0; CI 1

  20. THE SCHULHOF FAMILY: SOLVING THE AGE PUZZLE

    SciTech Connect

    Vokrouhlický, David; Ďurech, Josef; Pravec, Petr; Kušnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Vraštil, Jan; Krugly, Yurij N.; Inasaridze, Raguli Ya.; Ayvasian, Vova; Zhuzhunadze, Vasili; Pray, Donald; Husárik, Marek; Pollock, Joseph T.; Nesvorný, David

    2016-03-15

    The Schulhof family, a tight cluster of small asteroids around the central main belt body (2384) Schulhof, belongs to a so far rare class of very young families (estimated ages less than 1 Myr). Characterization of these asteroid clusters may provide important insights into the physics of the catastrophic disruption of their parent body. The case of the Schulhof family has been up to now complicated by the existence of two proposed epochs of its origin. In this paper, we first use our own photometric observations, as well as archival data, to determine the rotation rate and spin axis orientation of the largest fragment (2384) Schulhof. Our data also allow us to better constrain the absolute magnitude of this asteroid, and thus also improve the determination of its geometric albedo. Next, using the up-to-date catalog of asteroid orbits, we perform a new search of smaller members in the Schulhof family, increasing their number by 50%. Finally, the available data are used to access Schulhof's family age anew. We now find that the younger of the previously proposed two ages of this family is not correct, resulting from a large orbital uncertainty of single-opposition members. Our new runs reveal a single age solution of about 800 kyr with a realistic uncertainty of 200 kyr.

  1. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  2. Association Between Family History and Hypertension Among Chinese Elderly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Wang, Jianhua; Wu, Lei; Wang, Yiyan; Zhang, Di; Zeng, Jing; Yao, Yao

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between family history and prevalence of hypertension among Chinese community elderly, and also explore the gender difference. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Miyun district of Beijing, in 2014. The family history information was obtained from each subject and was divided into 3 categories, no family history (FH0), 1 generation of first-degree relatives with hypertension (FH1), and 2 generations of first-degree relatives with hypertension (FH2). The prevalence of hypertension was 53.0%. Participants with positive family history had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension (67.5%, 95% CI: 63.3-71.7) than those without (47.9%, 95% CI: 45.2-50.6), and even among participants without hypertension, the blood pressure levels were higher with positive FH. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a significantly linear-trend increase in hypertension according to family history of first degree relative numbers was observed in both genders (P for trend < 0.001). This study suggests that family history had not only a significant but also graded association with hypertension and with blood pressure levels, and this association exists even among those without hypertension.

  3. Family History Predicts Stress Fracture in Active Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Bristol, Stephanie; Austin, S. Bryn; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased physical activity and menstrual irregularity have been associated with increased risk for stress fracture among adult women active in athletics. The purposes of this study were to determine whether menstrual irregularity is also a risk factor for stress fracture in active female adolescents and to estimate the quantity of exercise associated with an increased risk for this injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS A case-control study was conducted of 13- to 22-year-old females diagnosed with their first stress fracture, each matched prospectively on age and self-reported ethnicity with 2 controls. Patients with chronic illnesses or use of medications known to affect bone mineral density were excluded, including use of hormonal preparations that could alter menstrual cycles. The primary outcome, stress fracture in any extremity or the spine, was confirmed radiographically. Girls with stress fracture had bone mineral density measured at the lumbar spine by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS The mean ± SD age of the 168 participants was 15.9 ± 2.1 years; 91.7% were postmenarchal, with a mean age at menarche of 13.1 ± 1.1 years. The prevalence of menstrual irregularity was similar among cases and controls. There was no significant difference in the mean hours per week of total physical activity between girls in this sample with stress fracture (8.2 hours/week) and those without (7.4 hours/week). In multivariate models, case subjects had nearly 3 times the odds of having a family member with osteoporosis or osteopenia. In secondary analyses, participants with stress fracture had a low mean spinal bone mineral density for their age. CONCLUSIONS Among highly active female adolescents, only family history was independently associated with stress fracture. The magnitude of this association suggests that further investigations of inheritable skeletal factors are warranted in this population, along with evaluation of bone mineral density in girls with stress

  4. The role of pediatricians in families with a history of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Ann Marie; Wallerstein, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Colon cancer is not an entity that pediatricians routinely confront; however, a family history of colon cancer can have pediatric implications when it is part of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Colonic (multiple intestinal polyps) and extracolonic manifestations (such as hepatoblastoma or brain tumors) can be the presenting features in children. The authors present 2 patients from different families with familial adenomatous polyposis who presented with the extracolonic manifestation of this syndrome and a family history of colon cancer. Identification of these families and education of their primary care givers can lead to improved screening and management of these high-risk individuals.

  5. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. Methods We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case–control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression and were adjusted for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Results Personal history of oral candidiasis was related to a significantly increased risk of oral cavity cancer (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.1-12.1). History of head and neck cancers among the first-degree relatives was associated with an OR of 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.8). The risk increased with the number of first-degree relatives with head and neck cancer. Conclusion A family history of head and neck cancer is a marker of an increased risk of oral cavity cancer and should be taken into account to target prevention efforts and screening. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between oral cavity cancer and personal history of candidiasis. PMID:24286495

  6. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents' education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores.

    PubMed

    Beison, Ashley; Rademacher, David J

    2017-03-01

    Background and aims Smartphones are ubiquitous. As smartphones increased in popularity, researchers realized that people were becoming dependent on their smartphones. The purpose here was to provide a better understanding of the factors related to problematic smartphone use (PSPU). Methods The participants were 100 undergraduates (25 males, 75 females) whose ages ranged from 18 to 23 (mean age = 20 years). The participants completed questionnaires to assess gender, ethnicity, year in college, father's education level, mother's education level, family income, age, family history of alcoholism, and PSPU. The Family Tree Questionnaire assessed family history of alcoholism. The Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS) and the Adapted Cell Phone Addiction Test (ACPAT) were used to determine the degree of PSPU. Whereas the MPPUS measures tolerance, escape from other problems, withdrawal, craving, and negative life consequences, the ACPAT measures preoccupation (salience), excessive use, neglecting work, anticipation, lack of control, and neglecting social life. Results Family history of alcoholism and father's education level together explained 26% of the variance in the MPPUS scores and 25% of the variance in the ACPAT scores. The inclusion of mother's education level, ethnicity, family income, age, year in college, and gender did not significantly increase the proportion of variance explained for either MPPUS or ACPAT scores. Discussion and conclusions Family history of alcoholism and father's education level are good predictors of PSPU. As 74%-75% of the variance in PSPU scale scores was not explained, future studies should aim to explain this variance.

  7. Family Structure History and Adolescent Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Shannon E.

    2008-01-01

    As patterns of union formation and dissolution in adult lives become complex, the living arrangements of American children are becoming increasingly fluid. With a sample (N = 12,843) drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study attempted to capture this complexity by mapping out children's family structure histories…

  8. A Family History Study of Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is a childhood-onset disorder often described as a mild variant of autism. Although classified as a distinct disorder in the DSM-IV, its overlap with autism continues to be a matter of ongoing debate. While the family genetic origins of autism are well established, few studies have investigated this topic in AS using current…

  9. Incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Razzak, Anthony; Yu, Kelly J; Berndt, Sonja I; Firl, Kevin; Riley, Thomas L; Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the change in risk conferred by family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) as a person ages. We evaluated the effect of family history on CRC incidence and mortality after 55 years of age, when the risk of early onset cancer had passed. We collected data from participants in the randomized, controlled Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial of flexible sigmoidoscopy versus usual care (55-74 years old, no history of CRC), performed at 10 US centers from 1993 to 2001. A detailed family history of colorectal cancer was obtained at enrollment, and subjects were followed for CRC incidence and mortality for up to 13 years. Among 144,768 participants, 14,961 subjects (10.3%) reported a family of CRC. Of 2090 incident cases, 273 cases (13.1%) had a family history of CRC; among 538 deaths from CRC, 71 (13.2%) had a family history of CRC. Overall, family history of CRC was associated with an increased risk of CRC incidence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.50; P<.0001) and increased mortality (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.69; P = .03). Subjects with 1 first degree relative (FDR) with CRC (n = 238; HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.07-1.42) or ≥2 FDRs with CRC (n = 35; HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.44-2.86) were at increased risk for incident CRC. However, among individuals with 1 FDR with CRC, there were no differences in risk based on age at diagnosis in the FDR (for FDR <60 years of age: HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.97-1.63; for FDR 60-70 years of age: HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.06-1.62; for FDR >70 years of age: HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.93-1.45; P trend = .59). After 55 years of age, subjects with 1 FDR with CRC had only a modest increase in risk for CRC incidence and death; age of onset in the FDR was not significantly associated with risk. Individuals with ≥2 FDRs with CRC had continued increased risk in older age. Guidelines and clinical practice for subjects with a family history of CRC should be modified to align CRC testing to risk

  10. Is a positive family history predictive for recurrent acute otitis media in children? An evidence-based case report.

    PubMed

    Albersen, Monique; Bulatović, Maja; Lindner, Sanneke H; van Stiphout, Feikje; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; Schilder, Anne G M; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2010-01-01

    In this evidence-based case report, we studied the clinical question: Is a positive family history of acute otitis media (AOM) predictive for recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) in children between zero and two years of age? The search yielded 3178 articles, of which only two were relevant and had a high validity regarding our clinical question. Neither of these two studies provided the final answer to our clinical question because they did not report stratified absolute risks for a positive family history. Fortunately, we were able to study the absolute risks in one of the two studies. The absolute risk of rAOM without distinguishing family history was 33 percent; the risk was 27 percent for children without a family history and 45 percent for children with a positive family history. Family history increases the absolute risk, but not in a way that it will help to predict rAOM accurately.

  11. Familial history of opium use and reported problems among opium addicts in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, H R; Arria, A; Tarter, R; Chaudhry, S; Chaudhry, N

    1991-06-01

    One-hundred and twenty-nine opiate addicts on a monthly maintenance regimen were studied. Subjects with a positive family history of opium use had an earlier age of onset than the subjects without a family history of opium use. Self-reported psychosocial problems resulting from opium use were documented in only seven subjects. Individuals who began opium use after 1979, when it became illegal to use the drug, had a significantly later age of onset than subjects who began before 1979, suggesting that negative legal sanctions can delay initiation of opium consumption.

  12. Association between family history and herpes zoster: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Akram; Farshchian, Mahmood; Ghasemzadeh, Mostafa; Sobhan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    There are many risk factors besides age and immune suppression for herpes zoster. Family history as a risk factor is suggested in some recent studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between herpes zoster and family history. This case-control study was undertaken in Farshchian Hospital, Hamadan, Iran. "Case group" included patients with confirmed diagnosis of herpes zoster. "Control group" was chosen among other dermatologic patients or their companions without any history of herpes zoster. Immune deficiency was the main excluding criteria. Information about age, gender, dermatome involved (only in patient group), history of chronic dermatologic or systemic diseases and family history of herpes zoster was asked using special questionnaires. Case and control groups included 217 and 200 participants respectively. Mean age of cases and controls was 49.08±15.59 and 49.96±15.54 years old respectively (P=0.936). 53.5% of cases and 54.5% of controls were women (P=0.845). Most frequent dermatomes involved in patients were thoracic (85/217; 39.25%) and cervical dermatomes (55/217; 25.3%). Frequency of herpes zoster in first-degree blood relatives in cases and controls was 65/217 (30%) and 16/200 (8%) respectively (OR=4.91; 95% CI: 2.73, 8.85; P=0.001). Our findings indicated a significantly higher proportion of patients with family history of herpes zoster comparing to controls. This study confirms family history as a risk factor for herpes zoster. Therefore, the old patients with positive family history of herpes zoster may be appropriate candidates for vaccination with Zostavax. However, more evidence based on large cohort studies in needed to confirm our findings.

  13. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Petr, Martin; Mallick, Swapan; Fernandes, Daniel; Furtwängler, Anja; Haak, Wolfgang; Meyer, Matthias; Mittnik, Alissa; Nickel, Birgit; Peltzer, Alexander; Rohland, Nadin; Slon, Viviane; Talamo, Sahra; Lazaridis, Iosif; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Schiffels, Stephan; Skoglund, Pontus; Derevianko, Anatoly P.; Drozdov, Nikolai; Slavinsky, Vyacheslav; Tsybankov, Alexander; Cremonesi, Renata Grifoni; Mallegni, Francesco; Gély, Bernard; Vacca, Eligio; González Morales, Manuel R.; Straus, Lawrence G.; Neugebauer-Maresch, Christine; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Constantin, Silviu; Moldovan, Oana Teodora; Benazzi, Stefano; Peresani, Marco; Coppola, Donato; Lari, Martina; Ricci, Stefano; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Valentin, Frédérique; Thevenet, Corinne; Wehrberger, Kurt; Grigorescu, Dan; Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Flas, Damien; Semal, Patrick; Mannino, Marcello A.; Cupillard, Christophe; Bocherens, Hervé; Conard, Nicholas J.; Harvati, Katerina; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Drucker, Dorothée G.; Svoboda, Jiří; Richards, Michael P.; Caramelli, David; Pinhasi, Ron; Kelso, Janet; Patterson, Nick; Krause, Johannes; Pääbo, Svante; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. We analyze genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000-7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3–6% to around 2%, consistent with natural selection against Neanderthal variants in modern humans. Whereas the earliest modern humans in Europe did not contribute substantially to present-day Europeans, all individuals between ~37,000 and ~14,000 years ago descended from a single founder population which forms part of the ancestry of present-day Europeans. A ~35,000 year old individual from northwest Europe represents an early branch of this founder population which was then displaced across a broad region, before reappearing in southwest Europe during the Ice Age ~19,000 years ago. During the major warming period after ~14,000 years ago, a new genetic component related to present-day Near Easterners appears in Europe. These results document how population turnover and migration have been recurring themes of European pre-history. PMID:27135931

  14. The influence of informant characteristics on the reliability of family history interviews.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Kim H W; Derks, Eske M; Hendriks, Eva J E; Cahn, Wiepke

    2011-06-01

    Family history interviews are widely used in psychiatric research, as well as in genetic and twin studies, and provide a way to collect family history information quickly and economically. To obtain a valid assessment of family history, it is important to investigate which family member will be able to provide accurate information. Previous research shows that the validity of family history reporting can be influenced by characteristics of the informant, such as age, gender and personal history of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of a subject's position in a pedigree on the validity of data collection. Family history data on diabetes and psychiatric disorders were collected in three generations of 33 families by interviewing both an index subject (3rd generation) and his or her mother (2nd generation). Mothers were shown to report higher rates of diabetes and psychiatric disorder in the family compared to the index subjects. There was no significant difference in the disease rate reported by male and female index subject. Mothers who experienced a depressive episode indicated significantly more family members as having a psychiatric disorder than mothers who never experienced such an episode. This could be explained by the presence of informant bias, but may also result from the fact that depression is a heritable disorder and is therefore actually more prevalent in these families. Our findings suggest that family interview data should be collected by interviewing subjects who have a central position in the pedigree and can therefore provide information on his/her own generation, the previous and the next. In addition, psychiatric status of the informant should be carefully addressed.

  15. An Analysis into Metacognition and Family History of Diabetes Mellitus among First Year Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Priya, Ak Sunitha; Babu, Rose; Panchu, Pallavi; Bahuleyan, Biju

    2017-07-01

    reduced metacognitive awareness. The awareness that metacognitive dysfunction can occur in early age in individuals with family history of diabetes would help us to identify them and device strategies to delay or prevent metacognitive dysfunction.

  16. Affective temperament, history of suicide attempt and family history of suicide in general practice patients.

    PubMed

    Rihmer, Zoltan; Gonda, Xenia; Torzsa, Peter; Kalabay, Laszlo; Akiskal, Hagop S; Eory, Ajandek

    2013-07-01

    Untreated major affective disorders are strongly associated with suicidal behaviour; however, clinical, psychological and psycho-social risk factors also play a contributory role. Personal history and family history of suicide are also important predictors of suicidal behaviours, and are also a powerful marker of current major depressive episode in general practice patients. Affective temperaments, which can be considered the subaffective manifestations of major mood disorders also show a specific pattern of association with suicidal behaviour. In the present study our aim was to investigate the association between affective temperaments, personal history of suicide attempts and family history of completed suicide in primary practice patients. Five hundred and nine patients from 6 primary care practices completed the TEMPS-A, and were assessed concerning self-reported history of personal or family suicide. We found that among those answering questions concerning suicide, 9.1% reported a family history of suicide in first and second degree relatives and 4.8% had at least one prior suicide attempt. Among those giving a positive answer to both questions, those who had a positive family history had significantly more frequent suicide attempts (15.4% vs. 4.0%). Patients with prior suicide attempts had a significantly higher score on the cyclothymic and depressive, and those with positive family history of suicide had on cyclothymic and anxious subscales. In the present study, personal and family history of suicide was assessed retrospectively and in a self-report way. The cross-sectional nature of this study and the facts that no current psychiatric morbidity has been investigated and only the documented history of depressive and anxiety disorders have been detected limit the generalisability of this study. We found a significant relationship between depressive and cyclothymic affective temperament and personal history of suicide attempts, and between cyclothymic and

  17. Rh factor, family history and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Alvaro L; Stoll, Mario; De Stéfani, Eduardo; Maisonneuve, Juan E; Mendoza, Beatriz A; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    To explore possible relationships among blood factors, family history of breast cancer (BC) and the risk of the disease, a case-control study was carried out in Montevideo, Uruguay. Eight hundred and one patients were interviewed, including 252 certified cases of BC and 549 frequency-matched controls. Blood groups (ABO, Rh) were obtained from medical records. Multivariate analyses were performed, adjusting for age, selected menstrual and reproductive factors, and family history of BC as well as of other cancers. We found that the absence of Rh factor (Rh-) was positively associated with the risk of BC (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR]=1.49, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.05-2.11). Stratified analyses by family history of BC showed a strong association for Rh- with a positive history of first degree relatives (OR=3.17, 95% CI 1.06-9.47). Also stratified analyses by family history of other cancers showed a positive association for Rh- with a positive history of first degree relatives (OR=2.08, 95% CI 1.05-4.11). Regarding the implications of an inherited factor like Rh and its associations with the family history of BC, it might increase the probability to generate high-risk individuals if further studies confirm the present preliminary findings.

  18. Arterial stiffness is increased in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Wang, Hongyu; Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Huan; Li, Lihong; Zhou, Yingyan

    2015-01-01

    A positive family history of hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the value of pulse wave velocity (PWV) in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension. 255 healthy subjects (M/F: 75/180) were divided into two groups according to without (group 1) or with (group 2) a positive family history of hypertension. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) was measured by Complior apparatus. Our results showed that CF-PWV was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (7.90 ± 1.31 versus 7.32 ± 1.15 m/s, p < 0.001). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Multiple linear regressions showed that age, family history, GLU, and MAP were independent influencing factors of CF-PWV in the entire study group. Our present study showed PWV is significantly higher in healthy subjects with a positive family history of hypertension. Family history might play an important role in this process.

  19. Depressive symptoms and family history in seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Allen, J M; Lam, R W; Remick, R A; Sadovnick, A D

    1993-03-01

    The authors' goal was to compare the symptoms and family history of seasonal affective disorder with those of nonseasonal mood disorders. From a subspecialty mood disorders clinic, 34 patients with major depression, seasonal pattern (seasonal affective disorder), diagnosed with DSM-III-R criteria, were matched in age, sex, and diagnostic subtype (recurrent unipolar, bipolar I, or bipolar II) to 34 patients with nonseasonal mood disorders. Data on symptoms during the most recent depressive episode were obtained by chart review and compared by using chi-square tests. Family history data for first-degree relatives of patients with seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders were gathered by using the family history method, and diagnoses were based on Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria. Patients with seasonal affective disorder reported significantly more hypersomnia, hyperphagia, and weight gain and reported less suicidal ideation and morning worsening of mood than the patients with nonseasonal mood disorders. No differences were found in family histories of mood disorders, other psychiatric disorders, and any psychiatric disorder between the groups with seasonal versus nonseasonal mood disorders. Alcoholism was found more frequently in the relatives of the patients with seasonal affective disorder. Differences in symptoms between seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders provide some support for seasonal affective disorder as a diagnostic subtype of mood disorders. However, the genetic loading for mood disorders (of unspecified seasonality), as determined by the family history method, is similar for seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders.

  20. Completeness of pedigree and family cancer history for ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Son, Yedong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang Yoon

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the completeness of pedigree and of number of pedigree analysis to know the acceptable familial history in Korean women with ovarian cancer. Interview was conducted in 50 ovarian cancer patients for obtaining familial history three times over the 6 weeks. The completeness of pedigree is estimated in terms of familial history of disease (cancer), health status (health living, disease and death), and onset age of disease and death. The completion of pedigree was 79.3, 85.1, and 85.6% at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time of interview and the time for pedigree analysis was 34.3, 10.8, and 3.1 minutes, respectively. The factors limiting pedigree analysis were as follows: out of contact with their relatives (38%), no living ancestors who know the family history (34%), dispersed family member because of the Korean War (16%), unknown cause of death (12%), reluctance to ask medical history of relatives (10%), and concealing their ovarian cancer (10%). The percentage of cancers revealed in 1st (2%) and 2nd degree (8%) relatives were increasing through surveys, especially colorectal cancer related with Lynch syndrome (4%). Analysis of pedigree at least two times is acceptable in Korean woman with ovarian cancer from the first study. The completion of pedigree is increasing, while time to take family history is decreasing during three time survey.

  1. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family…

  2. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family…

  3. Evolutionary history of the Asr gene family.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Nicolás; Carrari, Fernando; Hasson, Esteban; Iusem, Norberto D

    2006-08-15

    The Asr gene family is widespread in higher plants. Most Asr genes are up-regulated under different environmental stress conditions and during fruit ripening. ASR proteins are localized in the nucleus and their likely function is transcriptional regulation. In cultivated tomato, we identified a novel fourth family member, named Asr4, which maps close to its sibling genes Asr1-Asr2-Asr3 and displays an unshared region coding for a domain containing a 13-amino acid repeat. In this work we were able to expand our previous analysis for Asr2 and investigated the coding regions of the four known Asr paralogous genes in seven tomato species from different geographic locations. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic analysis on ASR proteins. The first conclusion drawn from this work is that tomato ASR proteins cluster together in the tree. This observation can be explained by a scenario of concerted evolution or birth and death of genes. Secondly, our study showed that Asr1 is highly conserved at both replacement and synonymous sites within the genus Lycopersicon. ASR1 protein sequence conservation might be associated with its multiple functions in different tissues while the low rate of synonymous substitutions suggests that silent variation in Asr1 is selectively constrained, which is probably related to its high expression levels. Finally, we found that Asr1 activation under water stress is not conserved between Lycopersicon species.

  4. Practising family history: 'identity' as a category of social practice.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Research on family history argues it performs the task of anchoring a sense of 'self' through tracing ancestral connection and cultural belonging, seeing it as a form of storied 'identity-work'. This paper draws on a small-scale qualitative study to think further on the identity-work of family history. Using practice theory, and a disaggregated notion of 'identity', it explores how the storying of family histories relates to genealogy as a leisure hobby, a form of historical research, and an information-processing activity; and examines the social organization of that narrativity, where various practical engagements render certain kinds of genealogical information more, or less, 'storyable'. Key features of 'identity-work' in family history, such as the construction of genealogy as a personal journey of discovery and identification with particular ancestors, emerge as a consequence of the procedures of family history, organized as a set of practical tasks. The paper explores 'identity-work' as a consequence of people's engagement in specific social practices which provide an internal logic to their actions, with various components of 'identity' emerging as categories of practice shaped within, and for, use. Focusing on 'identity' as something produced when we are engaged in doing other things, the paper examines how the practical organization of 'doing other things' helps produce 'identity' in particular ways.

  5. Family history and risk of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC).

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna L V; Andersson, Therese M-L; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Cnattingius, Sven; Dickman, Paul W; Lambe, Mats

    2015-05-01

    The risk of breast cancer is at least two-fold increased in young women with a family history of breast cancer. Pregnancy has a dual effect on breast cancer risk; a short-term increase followed by a long-term protection. We investigated if the risk of breast cancer during and within 10 years following pregnancy is affected by a family history of breast cancer. We followed a cohort of women aged 15-44 years between 1963 and 2009 identified in Swedish population-based registers. Family history was defined as having a mother or sister with breast cancer. We estimated incidence rate ratios of breast cancer during pregnancy and time intervals up to 10 years post-delivery, with a focus on pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), defined as breast cancer during pregnancy or within 2 years post-delivery. In 3,452,506 women, there were 15,548 cases of breast cancer (1208 were PABC). Compared to nulliparous women, the risk of breast cancer was decreased during pregnancy, similar during first year and increased during second year post-delivery. The pattern was similar in women with or without family history of breast cancer. A peak in risk was observed 5-6 years following the first birth regardless of family history. After a second birth, this peak was only present in women with a family history. Our results indicate that women with a family history of breast cancer do not have a different breast cancer risk during and within 10 years following pregnancy compared to women without a family history.

  6. Cabbage family affairs: the evolutionary history of Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Andreas; Lysak, Martin A; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A; Koch, Marcus A; Mummenhoff, Klaus

    2011-02-01

    Life without the mustard family (Brassicaceae) would be a world without many crop species and the model organism Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that has revolutionized our knowledge in almost every field of modern plant biology. Despite this importance, research breakthroughs in understanding family-wide evolutionary patterns and processes within this flowering plant family were not achieved until the past few years. In this review, we examine recent outcomes from diverse botanical disciplines (taxonomy, systematics, genomics, paleobotany and other fields) to synthesize for the first time a holistic view on the evolutionary history of the mustard family.

  7. Bringing History Home: Local and Family History Projects for Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, M. Gail

    This book aims to motivate children to learn about history and social studies by beginning with what they already know--from home life, family life, ethnic/cultural life--and then building on that personal knowledge by adding information from family and community resources. The book includes activities that can help the teacher show students that…

  8. Family history, body mass index and survival in Japanese patients with stomach cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yuko; Kawai, Masaaki; Fujiya, Tsuneaki; Suzuki, Masaki; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Yamanami, Hideaki; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Nishino, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-15

    Family history and nutritional status may affect the long-term prognosis of stomach cancer, but evidence is insufficient and inconsistent. To clarify the prognostic factors of stomach cancer, we conducted a prospective study of 1,033 Japanese patients with histologically confirmed stomach cancer who were admitted to a single hospital between 1997 and 2005. Family history of stomach cancer and pretreatment body mass index (BMI) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Clinical data were retrieved from a hospital-based cancer registry. All patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to family history in parents and siblings and BMI category. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 403 all-cause and 279 stomach cancer deaths were documented. Although no association with family history was observed in the patients overall, analysis according to age group found an increased risk of all-cause death associated with a history in first degree relatives (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.93-2.78, p = 0.09) and with a parental history (HR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.06-3.26) among patients aged under 60 years at diagnosis. BMI was related to all-cause and stomach cancer death among patients aged 60 and over, showing a J-shaped pattern (HR of all-cause death = 2.28 for BMI < 18.5; HR = 1.61 for 25 ≤ vs. ≥ 23.0 to < 25.0 kg/m(2)). A family history of stomach cancer, especially parental history, may affect mortality among younger stomach cancer patients, whereas nutritional status may be a prognostic factor in older patients. © 2014 UICC.

  9. History of the Chinese Family Planning program: 1970-2010.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuntong

    2012-06-01

    China launched a nationwide family planning program offering birth control methods and family planning services in the 1970s. Promotion of the widespread use of long-term contraceptive methods has been one of the program's core strategies. This paper reviews the history of China's Family Planning Program at the national level from 1970 to 2010. Special attention is paid to the history of contraception policy. This study provides an overview of the last four decades of the Chinese Family Planning Program. Programmatic goals are highlighted during different time periods, with special attention being paid to the role of contraceptive use and the history of contraceptive policy. The Chinese Family Planning Program has experienced several transitions. It has evolved from the 1970s period of moderate policy, represented by wan, xi, shao (late marriage and childbearing, birth spacing and limited fertility), through the strict one-child policy of 1979 to the early 1990s. From the mid-1990s to the present, a relatively lenient policy has been in force, characterized by client-centered informed choice. The success of the Chinese Family Planning Program has long been heavily dependent on policies advocated by the central government, including programs promoting contraception to reduce fertility rates. The Program also depended on a logistical support system, including organizational safeguards and free provision of contraception and family planning services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-08-16

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10(-7)), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (PTrend=4.43×10(-6)), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (PTrend≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Accuracy of family history reports of migraine in a community-based family study of migraine.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Tarannum M; Cui, Lihong; Nakamura, Erin; Dozier, Jaclyn; Merikangas, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Family history of migraine is the most potent and consistent risk factor for migraine. However, there has been limited systematic research on the reliability of family history information in detecting migraine based on valid diagnostic interviews. This study systematically evaluated the accuracy of migraine defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II) based on a direct structured interview compared to structured family history reports. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of migraine diagnosis provided by family history compared with direct interview using a validated diagnostic interview of headache syndromes in the context of a family study of migraine comorbidity. The sample included 921 study participants identified in a cross-sectional community-based controlled family study of comorbidity of migraine and affective disorders recruited from the greater Washington, DC community. Lifetime migraine and tension-type headache were ascertained by direct clinical interview using a validated interview that collects ICHD-II criteria for headache syndromes. A structured history of headache was also collected from all interviewed probands and relatives regarding their relatives. All family history reports were reviewed by the study neurologist according to ICHD-II criteria. Family history ratings and diagnoses were made by the neurologist, who was blinded to the headache diagnosis obtained by direct interview. The sensitivity and specificity of family history reports of migraine compared with direct interview were 38.6% and 96.8%, respectively, indicating that the false positive rate was very low, whereas the false negative rate was substantial. The positive and negative predictive values of migraine diagnosis provided by family member report are 90.0% and 67.6%, respectively. Our results confirm that migraine assessed by family member report largely underestimates migraine in relatives. This demonstrates the value of

  12. Notes for a cultural history of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Beels, C Christian

    2002-01-01

    The official history of family therapy describes its beginnings as a daring technical and philosophical departure from traditional individual treatment in the 1960s, inspired especially by the "system thinking" of Gregory Bateson. This celebrated origin story needs to be supplemented with a longer and larger history of both practice and thought about the family, and that is the subject of this article. The longer history goes back to the founding of social work by Mary Richmond, of pragmatism by William James, and of the organic view of social systems intervention by John Dewey. Seen against this background, family therapy is, among other things, a consequence of the development of persistent elements of American professional culture, experience, and philosophy. The taking of this historical-anthropological view discloses also the origins of two other histories that have made their contribution to the development of family therapy: a science of observing communication processes that starts with Edward Sapir and leads to contemporary conversation analysis, and a history of mesmerism in the United States that culminates in Milton Erickson and his followers.

  13. Family history of suicide and interpersonal functioning in suicide attempters.

    PubMed

    Rajalin, Mia; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Salander Renberg, Ellinor; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in interpersonal relationships are associated with a wide range of psychiatric diagnoses and have been reported as a trigger for suicidal behavior, too. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal problems and family history of suicide in suicide attempters and to describe relevant patterns of interpersonal problems in this patient group. The study involves 181 patients having their clinical follow-up after a suicide attempt. Family history of suicide was assessed by using the Karolinska Self Harm History Interview or retrieved in patient records. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems was used to assess personal style in an interpersonal context. Suicide attempters with a family history of suicide had significantly more often an intrusive personal style. The results remained significant after adjustment for personality disorder. The specific interpersonal patterns associated with family history of suicide may interfere with the ability to create stable, long-lasting relationships. In regards to treatment, these personal qualities could cause difficulties in the alliance with health care personnel and make it harder for suicide attempters to accept or benefit from treatment. Attention to suicide attempters' interpersonal problems is of importance to lower their distress.

  14. Family Histories of Anxiety in Overweight Men and Women with Binge Eating Disorder: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, Kerstin K.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A preliminary examination of the significance of family histories of anxiety in the expression of binge eating disorder (BED) and associated functioning. Methods Participants were 166 overweight patients with BED assessed using diagnostic interviews. Participants were administered a structured psychiatric history interview about their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) (N=897) to determine lifetime diagnoses of DSM-IV anxiety disorders and completed a battery of questionnaires assessing current and historical eating and weight variables and associated psychological functioning (depression). Results BED patients with a family history of anxiety disorder were significantly more likely than BED patients without a family history of anxiety disorder to have lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and mood disorders but not substance use disorders. A family history of anxiety was not significantly associated with timing or sequencing of age at onset of anxiety disorder, binge eating, dieting, or obesity, or with variability in current levels of binge eating, eating disorder psychopathology, or psychological functioning. Conclusions Although replication with direct interview method is needed, our preliminary findings suggest that a family history of anxiety confers greater risk for comorbid anxiety and mood disorders but is largely unrelated to the development of binge eating, dieting, or obesity and unrelated to variability in eating disorder psychopathology or psychological functioning in overweight patients with BED. PMID:26343481

  15. Family histories of anxiety in overweight men and women with binge eating disorder: A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Kerstin K; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-10-01

    A preliminary examination of the significance of family histories of anxiety in the expression of binge eating disorder (BED) and associated functioning. Participants were 166 overweight patients with BED assessed using diagnostic interviews. Participants were administered a structured psychiatric history interview about their first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) (N=897) to determine lifetime diagnoses of DSM-IV anxiety disorders and completed a battery of questionnaires assessing current and historical eating and weight variables and associated psychological functioning (depression). BED patients with a family history of anxiety disorder were significantly more likely than BED patients without a family history of anxiety disorder to have lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and mood disorders but not substance use disorders. A family history of anxiety was not significantly associated with timing or sequencing of age at onset of anxiety disorder, binge eating, dieting, or obesity, or with variability in current levels of binge eating, eating disorder psychopathology, or psychological functioning. Although replication with direct interview method is needed, our preliminary findings suggest that a family history of anxiety confers greater risk for comorbid anxiety and mood disorders but is largely unrelated to the development of binge eating, dieting, or obesity and unrelated to variability in eating disorder psychopathology or psychological functioning in overweight patients with BED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modification of family size in families reporting history of haemophilia from Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Potnis-Lele, Mugdha; Kar, Anita

    2003-04-01

    In India, genetic counselling services are largely unavailable. The question of whether awareness of the hereditary nature of the disorder leads to modified family size in affected families remains unanswered. The objective of this study was to determine whether family history of haemophilia resulted in modification of family size in families reporting haemophilia in the State of Maharashtra, India. The study was a retrospective cohort analysis from pedigrees collected from an earlier survey on haemophilia in Maharashtra. Pedigree data were manually defined into families with or without experience of haemophilia. Family size was defined as the number of live births per woman as documented in the pedigree. The data were analysed using Microsoft Excel package (version 2000) and SPSS package (version 10). Family size of obligate carriers who were daughters of patients was significantly less than the family size of obligate carriers who reported haemophilia in a brother or maternal relative (z = 7.14, P < 0.001). As compared with parents from an older generation, a significant reduction in the number of children born to younger families with haemophilia was observed, irrespective of family history of the condition. In families with history of haemophilia, there was no significant reduction in the number of families with more than one affected son in between two generations of parents (chi(2) = 1.43). The results revealed a reduction in size of families with haemophilia over a generation, which possibly reflected the reducing fertility trends observed in the Indian population. Reduction in the number of children born to women with a haemophilic father suggested a comprehension of father to daughter transmission of haemophilia. This was not true when relatives other than the father were affected. The lack of significant reduction in the number of families with history of haemophilia of having more than one affected son may suggest a compensatory response to the high

  17. AXIN2, Orofacial Clefts and Positive Family History for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Renato; Marazita, Mary Louise; McHenry, Toby Goldstein; Cooper, Margaret E.; Bardi, Kathleen; Brandon, Carla; Letra, Ariadne; Martin, Rick A.; Vieira, Alexandre Rezende

    2008-01-01

    Background Cancer and congenital malformations may occasionally have a common etiology. We investigated if families segregating orofacial clefts (CL/P) presented increased cancer incidence when compared to control families. Methods We assessed 75 CL/P families and 93 control families of Caucasian ethnicity from Pittsburgh regarding positive history of cancer. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine significant differences. Then, we performed molecular studies with genes in which mutations have been independently associated with both cancer and craniofacial anomalies. Results CL/P families reported positive family history of cancer more often than control families (p=0.0002), and had higher rates of specific cancer types: colon (p=0.0009), brain (p=0.003), leukemia (p=0.005), breast (p=0.009), prostate (p=0.01), skin (p=0.01), lung (p=0.02), and liver (0.02). Overtransmission of AXIN2 was detected in CL/P probands (p=0.003). Conclusion Families segregating CL/P may have an increased susceptibility for cancer, notably colon cancer. Further, AXIN2, a gene that when mutated increases susceptibility to colon cancer, is also associated with CL/P. Clinical Implications Individuals detected at a higher risk for disease predisposition will be able to adopt a better lifestyle avoiding exposure to other risk factors that may interact with the individual’s genotype. PMID:19119171

  18. Exploring Gaps of Family History Documentation in EHR for Precision Medicine -A Case Study of Familial Hypercholesterolemia Ascertainment

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Saeed; Wang, Yanshan; Ihrke, Donna; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    In the era of precision medicine, accurately identifying familial conditions is crucial for providing target treatment. However, it is challenging to identify familial conditions without detailed family history information. In this work, we studied the documentation of family history of premature cardiovascular disease and hypercholesterolemia. The information on patients’ family history of stroke within the Patient-provided information (PPI) forms was compared with the information gathered by clinicians in clinical notes. The agreement between PPI and clinical notes on absence of family history information in PPI was substantially higher compared to presence of family history. PMID:27570664

  19. Clinical survey and analysis of Chinese patients with family history of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qian-Hui; Xu, Mi-Mi; Han, Hong; Chen, Shao-Hua

    2013-03-01

    Nasal polyposis (NP) is frequently found to run in families. Earlier onset of the condition strongly suggested the genetic basis for the development of NP and implied that it might be a genetic disease involving multiple genes. The etiology and pathogenesis of NP remain largely unknown, although it is assumed to be associated with allergic reaction and infection. The reported familial cases suggested hereditary factors existing in NP. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a hereditary factor could be implicated in NP. A total of 418 NP patients admitted to our department were questioned concerning the existence of familial history (parents, siblings or children) and other accompanying diseases. In all, 253 cases were successfully followed up. Among these, 44 cases (17.4%) were confirmed to have a familial history of NP, most (59.1%) of which had two immediate family members with a positive family history, with the distribution significantly greater among first-degree and second-degree relatives. Patients with familial NP reported an earlier onset (mean age = 27.7 years) than the sporadic group (mean age = 32.7 years, t = 2.133, p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found when both groups were associated with fungal and allergic diseases.

  20. The KinFact intervention - a randomized controlled trial to increase family communication about cancer history.

    PubMed

    Bodurtha, Joann N; McClish, Donna; Gyure, Maria; Corona, Rosalie; Krist, Alexander H; Rodríguez, Vivian M; Maibauer, Alisa M; Borzelleca, Joseph; Bowen, Deborah J; Quillin, John M

    2014-10-01

    Knowing family history is important for understanding cancer risk, yet communication within families is suboptimal. Providing strategies to enhance communication may be useful. Four hundred ninety women were recruited from urban, safety-net, hospital-based primary care women's health clinics. Participants were randomized to receive the KinFact intervention or the control handout on lowering risks for breast/colon cancer and screening recommendations. Cancer family history was reviewed with all participants. The 20-minute KinFact intervention, based in communication and behavior theory, included reviewing individualized breast/colon cancer risks and an interactive presentation about cancer and communication. Study outcomes included whether participants reported collecting family history, shared cancer risk information with relatives, and the frequency of communication with relatives. Data were collected at baseline, 1, 6, and 14 months. Overall, intervention participants were significantly more likely to gather family cancer information at follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01, 3.71) and to share familial cancer information with relatives (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.37, 2.48). Communication frequency (1=not at all; 4=a lot) was significantly increased at follow-up (1.67 vs. 1.54). Differences were not modified by age, race, education, or family history. However, effects were modified by pregnancy status and genetic literacy. Intervention effects for information gathering and frequency were observed for nonpregnant women but not for pregnant women. Additionally, intervention effects were observed for information gathering in women with high genetic literacy, but not in women with low genetic literacy. The KinFact intervention successfully promoted family communication about cancer risk. Educating women to enhance their communication skills surrounding family history may allow them to partner more effectively with their families and ultimately

  1. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

  2. Family history and outcome of young patients with breast cancer in the UK (POSH study).

    PubMed

    Eccles, B K; Copson, E R; Cutress, R I; Maishman, T; Altman, D G; Simmonds, P; Gerty, S M; Durcan, L; Stanton, L; Eccles, D M

    2015-07-01

    Young patients presenting to surgical clinics with breast cancer are usually aware of their family history and frequently believe that a positive family history may adversely affect their prognosis. Tumour pathology and outcomes were compared in young British patients with breast cancer with and without a family history of breast cancer. Prospective Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) is a large prospective cohort study of women aged less than 41 years with breast cancer diagnosed and treated in the UK using modern oncological management. Personal characteristics, tumour pathology, treatment and family history of breast/ovarian cancer were recorded. Follow-up data were collected annually. Family history data were available for 2850 patients. No family history was reported by 65·9 per cent, and 34·1 per cent reported breast/ovarian cancer in at least one first- or second-degree relative. Patients with a family history were more likely to have grade 3 tumours (63·3 versus 58·9 per cent) and less likely to have human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive tumours (24·7 versus 28·8 per cent) than those with no family history. In multivariable analyses, there were no significant differences in distant disease-free intervals for patients with versus those without a family history, either for the whole cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 0·89, 95 per cent c.i. 0·76 to 1·03; P = 0·120) or when stratified by oestrogen receptor (ER) status (ER-negative: HR 0·80, 0·62 to 1·04, P = 0·101; ER-positive: HR 0·95, 0·78 to 1·15, P = 0·589). Young British patients presenting to breast surgical clinics with a positive family history can be reassured that this is not a significant independent risk factor for breast cancer outcome. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Family history in patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Babinkostova, Z; Stefanovski, B

    2011-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia and they can occur during any phase of the disorder. Some authors report an association between depression in schizophrenic patients and a positive family history of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients and to compare their family history with that in patients with depressive disorder. The examined group consisted of 50 patients with schizophrenic disorder, both inpatients and outpatients treated at the University Psychiatry Clinic who had prominent depressive symptoms (total score>7 on 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). The control group consisted of 50 patients with depressive disorder. Differential diagnosis was established on the basis of ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Patients were evaluated with PANSS, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and a questionnaire for demographic and clinical data. The clinical depression seen in patients with schizophrenia differed significantly from that in patients with depressive disorder. Depressive symptomatology was significantly more frequently reported in a family history of schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms than in patients with depressive disorder. Schizophrenic patients with prominent depressive symptoms have significantly more frequently a positive family history of depression compared to patients with depressive disorder.

  4. Young women with family history of breast cancer and their risk factors for benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Berkey, Catherine S; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rosner, Bernard; Frazier, A Lindsay; Colditz, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) patients wonder how their daughters might reduce their risk. The authors investigated childhood/adolescent risk factors for benign breast disease (BBD), a well-documented risk factor for BC, among girls with a family history. GUTS (the Growing Up Today Study) includes females, aged 9 to 15 years in 1996, who completed annual questionnaires during 1996 to 2001, then in 2003, 2005, and 2007. Participants provided information regarding alcohol, menarche, height, and body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)). Peak height growth velocity (PHV; in./y) was estimated from longitudinal heights. On 2005-2007 surveys, 6888 women (18-27 years old) reported whether they were diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed BBD (n = 67 cases); 6741 women (noncases) reported no BBD. Participants' mothers reported their own biopsy-confirmed BBD and BC, and BC in their sisters and mothers. Stratified by family history, logistic models investigated BBD risk factors. Young women whose mothers or aunts had BC were more likely to be diagnosed with BBD (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = .01), as were those with maternal BBD (OR, 1.59; P = .095). Adolescents with BC family history (mother, aunt, grandmother) who consumed alcohol (7 drinks/wk) doubled their BBD risk (OR, 2.28; P = .01), similar to those with maternal BBD (OR, 1.96; P = .02). Girls whose mother or aunt had BC saw their BBD risk elevated with higher PHV (OR, 1.82 [inch/yr]; P = .05). Among girls with no family history, BBD risk appeared to be related to other factors: childhood BMI, adolescent waist circumference, and adult height. Adolescents with family history may reduce their risk by avoiding alcohol. Separate risk factors were observed among girls with family history versus girls with no family history, possibly reflecting different causes of BC. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  5. Prevalence of family history of breast, colorectal, prostate, and lung cancer in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mai, P L; Wideroff, L; Greene, M H; Graubard, B I

    2010-01-01

    A positive family history is a known risk factor for several cancers; thus, obtaining a thorough family cancer history is essential in cancer risk evaluation and prevention management. The Family Health Study, a telephone survey in Connecticut, was conducted in 2001. A total of 1,019 participants with demographic information and family cancer history were included in this study. Prevalence of a positive family history of breast, colorectal, prostate, and lung cancer for first- and second-degree relatives was estimated. Logistic regression was used to compare prevalence by demographic factors. A positive family history among first-degree relatives was reported by 10.9% (95% Confidence Interval, CI = 8.8-13.3) of respondents for breast cancer, 5.1% (95% CI = 3.9-6.7) for colorectal cancer, 7.0% (95% CI = 5.2-9.4) for prostate cancer, and 6.4% (95% CI = 4.9-8.3) for lung cancer. The reported prevalence of family history of specific cancers varied by sex, age and race/ethnicity of the respondents. Family history prevalence for 4 of the most common adult solid tumors is substantial and the reported prevalence varied by respondent characteristics. Additional studies are needed to evaluate tools to promote accurate reporting of family history of cancer. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Polycystic Kidney Disease without an Apparent Family History.

    PubMed

    Iliuta, Ioan-Andrei; Kalatharan, Vinusha; Wang, Kairong; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Conklin, John; Pourafkari, Marina; Ting, Ryan; Chen, Chen; Borgo, Alessia C; He, Ning; Song, Xuewen; Heyer, Christina M; Senum, Sarah R; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Paterson, Andrew D; Harris, Peter C; Khalili, Korosh; Pei, York

    2017-09-01

    The absence of a positive family history (PFH) in 10%-25% of patients poses a diagnostic challenge for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the Toronto Genetic Epidemiology Study of Polycystic Kidney Disease, 210 affected probands underwent renal function testing, abdominal imaging, and comprehensive PKD1 and PKD2 mutation screening. From this cohort, we reviewed all patients with and without an apparent family history, examined their parental medical records, and performed renal imaging in all available parents of unknown disease status. Subsequent reclassification of 209 analyzed patients revealed 72.2% (151 of 209) with a PFH, 15.3% (32 of 209) with de novo disease, 10.5% (22 of 209) with an indeterminate family history, and 1.9% (four of 209) with PFH in retrospect. Among the patients with de novo cases, we found two families with germline mosaicism and one family with somatic mosaicism. Additionally, analysis of renal imaging revealed that 16.3% (34 of 209) of patients displayed atypical PKD, most of which followed one of three patterns: asymmetric or focal PKD with PFH and an identified PKD1 or PKD2 mutation (15 of 34), asymmetric and de novo PKD with proven or suspected somatic mosaicism (seven of 34), or focal PKD without any identifiable PKD1 or PKD2 mutation (eight of 34). In conclusion, PKD without an apparent family history may be due to de novo disease, missing parental medical records, germline or somatic mosaicism, or mild disease from hypomorphic PKD1 and PKD2 mutations. Furthermore, mutations of a newly identified gene for ADPKD, GANAB, and somatic mosaicism need to be considered in the mutation-negative patients with focal disease. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Breast Cancer Risk Perception and Lifestyle Behaviors among White and Black Women with a Family History

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Denise; Mishel, Merle; Skinner, Celette Sugg; DeRoo, Lisa A.; VanRiper, Marcia; Sandler, Dale P.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about relationships between a positive family history of breast cancer, perception of risk, and lifestyle behaviors. This qualitative study explored factors involved in formulation of perceived breast cancer risk and the association between risk perception and lifestyle behaviors in white and black women with a family history of breast cancer. Eligible participants were North Carolina residents in the Sister Study, a nationwide study of environmental and genetic risk factors for breast cancer among women aged 35 to 74 who have at least one sister diagnosed with breast cancer. Personal interviews were conducted with thirty-two women, twenty white and twelve black. While many had a heightened sense of risk and perceived family history as a main risk factor, 16% considered themselves at low or average risk for breast cancer and Gail risk scores did not correspond to perceived risk. Many women were unaware of associations between lifestyle behaviors and breast cancer risk. Eleven women, six black and five white, reported making healthy lifestyle changes because of family history; dietary change was most frequently reported. These findings may be important for future developers of breast cancer education programs for both white and black women with a family history of breast cancer. PMID:19444084

  8. Family History of Stroke and Cardiovascular Health in a National Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Ambar; Vaccarino, Viola; Goyal, Abhinav; McClellan, William; Nahab, Fadi; Howard, Virginia J.; Judd, Suzanne E

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association between family history of stroke and Life’s Simple 7, a public health metric defined by the American Heart Association. Methods REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke is a national population-based cohort of 30,239 blacks and whites, aged ≥ 45 years, sampled from the US population in 2003 – 2007. Data were collected by telephone, mail questionnaires, and in-home exams. Family history of stroke was defined as any first degree relative with stroke. Levels of the Life’s Simple 7 components (total cholesterol, blood pressure, fasting glucose, physical activity, diet, smoking and body mass index) were each coded as poor (0 points), intermediate (1 point) or ideal (2 points) health. Ordinal logistic regression was used to model the data. Results Among 20,567 subjects with complete Life’s Simple 7 and family history of stroke data, there were 7702 (37 %) participants with family history of stroke. The mean age of the participants was 64 years. The mean (± SD) overall Life’s Simple 7 score was lower for blacks (6.5 ± 2.0) than whites (7.6 ± 2.1). Family history of stroke was associated with poorer levels of physiological factors, particularly high blood pressure (OR=1.13, 95% CI = 1.07, 1.19) and inversely associated with behaviors such as smoking (OR= 0.92, 95% CI= 0.85, 0.99). Conclusion Our results suggest that screening for family history of stroke can provide an opportunity for earlier detection and management of modifiable risk factors. PMID:25497723

  9. Parental family history of dementia in relation to subclinical brain disease and dementia risk.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Frank J; van der Lee, Sven J; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Kamran; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-04-25

    To determine the association of parental family history with risk of dementia by age at onset and sex of affected parent in a population-based cohort. From 2000 to 2002, we assessed parental history of dementia in participants without dementia of the Rotterdam Study. We investigated associations of parental history with risk of dementia until 2015, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and known genetic risk variants. Furthermore, we determined the association between parental history and markers of neurodegeneration and vascular disease on MRI. Of 2,087 participants (mean age 64 years, 55% female), 407 (19.6%) reported a history of dementia in either parent (mean age at diagnosis 79 years). During a mean follow-up of 12.2 years, 142 participants developed dementia. Parental history was associated with risk of dementia independently of known genetic risk factors (hazard ratio [HR] 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.48), in particular when parents were diagnosed at younger age (<80 years: HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61-4.15; ≥80 years: HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.58-1.77). Accordingly, age at diagnosis in probands was highly correlated with age at diagnosis in their parents <80 years (r = 0.57, p = 0.001) but not thereafter (r = 0.17, p = 0.55). Among 1,161 participants without dementia with brain MRI, parental history was related to lower cerebral perfusion and higher burden of white matter lesions and microbleeds. Dementia risk and MRI markers were similar for paternal and maternal history. Parental history of dementia increases risk of dementia, primarily when age at parental diagnosis is <80 years. Unexplained heredity may be attributed in part to cerebral hypoperfusion and small vessel disease. We found no evidence of preferential maternal compared to paternal transmission. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Correlates of Family Health History Discussions between College Students and Physicians: Does Family Cancer History Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T.; Hochhalter, Angela K.; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students…

  11. Correlates of Family Health History Discussions between College Students and Physicians: Does Family Cancer History Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T.; Hochhalter, Angela K.; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students…

  12. Family History of Breast Cancer, Breast Density, and Breast Cancer Risk in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Population.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Sprague, Brian L; Bissell, Michael C S; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana S M; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-06-01

    Background: The utility of incorporating detailed family history into breast cancer risk prediction hinges on its independent contribution to breast cancer risk. We evaluated associations between detailed family history and breast cancer risk while accounting for breast density.Methods: We followed 222,019 participants ages 35 to 74 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, of whom 2,456 developed invasive breast cancer. We calculated standardized breast cancer risks within joint strata of breast density and simple (1(st)-degree female relative) or detailed (first-degree, second-degree, or first- and second-degree female relative) breast cancer family history. We fit log-binomial models to estimate age-specific breast cancer associations for simple and detailed family history, accounting for breast density.Results: Simple first-degree family history was associated with increased breast cancer risk compared with no first-degree history [Risk ratio (RR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.1 at age 40; RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.7 at age 50; RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6 at age 60; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5 at age 70). Breast cancer associations with detailed family history were strongest for women with first- and second-degree family history compared with no history (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2 at age 40); this association weakened in higher age groups (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.88-1.5 at age 70). Associations did not change substantially when adjusted for breast density.Conclusions: Even with adjustment for breast density, a history of breast cancer in both first- and second-degree relatives is more strongly associated with breast cancer than simple first-degree family history.Impact: Future efforts to improve breast cancer risk prediction models should evaluate detailed family history as a risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 938-44. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Assessing family history of chronic disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Permaul, Joanne A.; Myers, Jesse; Manca, Donna P.; Meaney, Christopher; Moineddin, Rahim; Grunfeld, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the proportion of primary care patients who report a family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or colorectal cancer (CRC); assess concordance of FH information derived from the electronic medical record (EMR) compared with patient-completed health questionnaires; and assess whether appropriate screening was informed by risk based solely on FH. Design Data from the BETTER (Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care) trial were used. Patients were mailed questionnaires. Baseline FH and screening data were obtained for enrolled patients from the EMR and health questionnaires. Setting Ontario and Alberta. Participants Randomly selected patients from 8 family practices. Main outcome measures Agreement on FH between the EMR and questionnaire was determined; logistic regression was used to assess significant predictors of screening. Results In total, 775 of 789 (98%) patients completed the health questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 52.5 years and 72% were female. A minimum of 12% of patients (range 12% to 36%) had a reported FH of 1 of 4 chronic diseases. Among patients with positive FH, the following proportions of patients had that FH recorded in the EMR compared with the questionnaire: diabetes, 24% in the EMR versus 36% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.466; coronary artery disease, 35% in the EMR versus 22% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.225; breast cancer, 21% in the EMR versus 22% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.241; and CRC, 12% in the EMR versus 14% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.510. There was moderate agreement for diabetes and CRC. The presence of FH was a significant predictor of CRC screening (odds ratio 1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1). Conclusion A moderate prevalence of FH was found for 4 conditions for which screening recommendations vary with risk based on FH. Having patients self-complete an FH was thought to be feasible; however, questions

  14. Neurobiological Phenotypes Associated with a Family History of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with a family history of alcoholism are at much greater risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) than youth or adults without such history. A large body of research suggests that there are premorbid differences in brain structure and function in family history positive (FHP) individuals relative to their family history negative (FHN) peers. Methods This review summarizes the existing literature on neurobiological phenotypes present in FHP youth and adults by describing findings across neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies. Results Neuroimaging studies have shown FHP individuals differ from their FHN peers in amygdalar, hippocampal, basal ganglia, and cerebellar volume. Both increased and decreased white matter integrity has been reported in FHP individuals compared with FHN controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have found altered inhibitory control and working memory-related brain response in FHP youth and adults, suggesting neural markers of executive functioning may be related to increased vulnerability for developing AUDs in this population. Additionally, brain activity differences in regions involved in bottom-up reward and emotional processing, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala, have been shown in FHP individuals relative to their FHN peers. Conclusions It is critical to understand premorbid neural characteristics that could be associated with cognitive, reward-related, or emotional risk factors that increase risk for AUDs in FHP individuals. This information may lead to the development of neurobiologically informed prevention and intervention studies focused on reducing the incidence of AUDs in high-risk youth and adults. PMID:26559000

  15. Neurobiological phenotypes associated with a family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Cservenka, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of alcoholism are at much greater risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) than youth or adults without such history. A large body of research suggests that there are premorbid differences in brain structure and function in family history positive (FHP) individuals relative to their family history negative (FHN) peers. This review summarizes the existing literature on neurobiological phenotypes present in FHP youth and adults by describing findings across neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies. Neuroimaging studies have shown FHP individuals differ from their FHN peers in amygdalar, hippocampal, basal ganglia, and cerebellar volume. Both increased and decreased white matter integrity has been reported in FHP individuals compared with FHN controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have found altered inhibitory control and working memory-related brain response in FHP youth and adults, suggesting neural markers of executive functioning may be related to increased vulnerability for developing AUDs in this population. Additionally, brain activity differences in regions involved in bottom-up reward and emotional processing, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala, have been shown in FHP individuals relative to their FHN peers. It is critical to understand premorbid neural characteristics that could be associated with cognitive, reward-related, or emotional risk factors that increase risk for AUDs in FHP individuals. This information may lead to the development of neurobiologically informed prevention and intervention studies focused on reducing the incidence of AUDs in high-risk youth and adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in Australian men: the influence of family history.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michelle E; Occhipinti, Stefano; Gardiner, Robert A; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2012-04-01

    To describe how a family history of prostate cancer influences men's prostate cancer testing behaviours, information support preferences, and motives for testing. Men with a first-degree family history (239 men) and a comparison sample from the general population of Queensland, Australia (289) aged 40-65 years, and no prior history of cancer. Cross-sectional, retrospective survey assessing: prevalence of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examination (DRE); discussion of prostate cancer risks and benefits with a physician; prostate cancer information needs and preferences; motivations for testing. Men with a family history were more likely to report: having ever had a PSA test (odds ratio [OR] 4.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.16-7.85), more PSA tests in their lifetimes (b 1.04; se 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-1.82); to have had a DRE (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.54-3.23); to have spoken to a doctor about prostate cancer (OR 3.72; 95% CI 2.30-6.02); and to have instigated these discussions (OR 1.74; 95%CI 1.13-2.70). Most men from both groups did not recall any discussion of the 'cons' of prostate cancer testing with a doctor. Men with a family history reported a greater desire for information about prostate cancer prevention than did men without a family history. Men with a family history are more concerned about getting prostate cancer and are tested more often; however, information needs, discussions about prostate cancer, and motivations for testing are similar to those of all men. There appears to be a disparity between public health approaches that promote informed decision-making and what is happening in practice. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. Family history of cardiovascular disease is associated with cardiovascular responses to stress in healthy young men and women.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caroline E; O'Donnell, Katie; Brydon, Lena; Wardle, Jane; Steptoe, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    Heightened cardiovascular stress responsivity is associated with cardiovascular disease, but the origins of heightened responsivity are unclear. The present study investigated whether disturbances in cardiovascular responsivity were evident in individuals with a family history of cardiovascular disease risk. Data were collected from 60 women and 31 men with an average age of 21.4 years. Family history of cardiovascular disease risk was defined by the presence of coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes or high cholesterol in participants' parents and grandparents; 75 participants had positive, and 16 had negative family histories. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate and heart rate variability were measured continuously for 5 min periods at baseline, during two mental stress tasks (Stroop and speech task) and at 10-15 min, 25-30 min and 40-45 min post-stress. Individuals with a positive family history exhibited significantly greater diastolic BP reactivity and poorer systolic and diastolic BP recovery from the stressors in comparison with family history negative individuals. In addition, female participants with a positive family history had heightened heart rate and heart rate variability reactivity to stressors. These effects were independent of baseline cardiovascular activity, body mass index, waist to hip ratio and smoking status. Family history of hypertension alone was not associated with stress responsivity. The findings indicate that a family history of cardiovascular disease risk influences stress responsivity which may in turn contribute to risk of future cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents’ education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores

    PubMed Central

    Beison, Ashley; Rademacher, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Smartphones are ubiquitous. As smartphones increased in popularity, researchers realized that people were becoming dependent on their smartphones. The purpose here was to provide a better understanding of the factors related to problematic smartphone use (PSPU). Methods The participants were 100 undergraduates (25 males, 75 females) whose ages ranged from 18 to 23 (mean age = 20 years). The participants completed questionnaires to assess gender, ethnicity, year in college, father’s education level, mother’s education level, family income, age, family history of alcoholism, and PSPU. The Family Tree Questionnaire assessed family history of alcoholism. The Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS) and the Adapted Cell Phone Addiction Test (ACPAT) were used to determine the degree of PSPU. Whereas the MPPUS measures tolerance, escape from other problems, withdrawal, craving, and negative life consequences, the ACPAT measures preoccupation (salience), excessive use, neglecting work, anticipation, lack of control, and neglecting social life. Results Family history of alcoholism and father’s education level together explained 26% of the variance in the MPPUS scores and 25% of the variance in the ACPAT scores. The inclusion of mother’s education level, ethnicity, family income, age, year in college, and gender did not significantly increase the proportion of variance explained for either MPPUS or ACPAT scores. Discussion and conclusions Family history of alcoholism and father’s education level are good predictors of PSPU. As 74%–75% of the variance in PSPU scale scores was not explained, future studies should aim to explain this variance. PMID:28316252

  19. Perceptions of family history and genetic testing and feasibility of pedigree development among African Americans with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M; McSweeney, Jean C; Stewart, Katharine E; Price, Elvin T; Cleves, Mario A; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedigree development, family history, and genetic testing are thought to be useful in improving outcomes of chronic illnesses such as hypertension (HTN). However, the clinical utility of pedigree development is still unknown. Further, little is known about African Americans’ (AAs’) perceptions of family history and genetic testing. Aims This study examined the feasibility of developing pedigrees for AAs with HTN and explored perceptions of family history and genetic research among AAs with HTN. Methods The US Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait was administered, and 30–60 minute in-person individual interviews were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze pedigree data. Interview transcripts were analyzed with content analysis and constant comparison. Results Twenty-nine AAs with HTN were recruited from one free clinic (15 women, 14 men; mean age 49 years, SD 9.6). Twenty-six (90%) reported their family history in sufficient detail to develop a pedigree. Perceptions of family history included knowledge of HTN in the family, culturally influenced family teaching about HTN, and response to family history of HTN. Most participants agreed to future genetic testing and DNA collection because they wanted to help others; some said they needed more information and others expressed a concern for privacy. Conclusion The majority of AAs in this sample possessed extensive knowledge of HTN within their family and were able to develop a three generation pedigree with assistance. The majority were willing to participate in future genetic research. PMID:25322748

  20. Perceptions of family history and genetic testing and feasibility of pedigree development among African Americans with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pettey, Christina M; McSweeney, Jean C; Stewart, Katharine E; Price, Elvin T; Cleves, Mario A; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2015-02-01

    Pedigree development, family history, and genetic testing are thought to be useful in improving outcomes of chronic illnesses such as hypertension (HTN). However, the clinical utility of pedigree development is still unknown. Further, little is known about the perceptions of African Americans (AAs) of family history and genetic testing. This study examined the feasibility of developing pedigrees for AAs with HTN and explored perceptions of family history and genetic research among AAs with HTN. The US Surgeon General's My Family Health Portrait was administered, and 30-60 min in-person individual interviews were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze pedigree data. Interview transcripts were analyzed with content analysis and constant comparison. Twenty-nine AAs with HTN were recruited from one free clinic (15 women, 14 men; mean age 49 years, standard deviation (SD) 9.6). Twenty-six (90%) reported their family history in sufficient detail to develop a pedigree. Perceptions of family history included knowledge of HTN in the family, culturally influenced family teaching about HTN, and response to family history of HTN. Most participants agreed to future genetic testing and DNA collection because they wanted to help others; some said they needed more information and others expressed a concern for privacy. The majority of AAs in this sample possessed extensive knowledge of HTN within their family and were able to develop a three-generation pedigree with assistance. The majority were willing to participate in future genetic research. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  1. Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Young Adults with Family History of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Kanimozhi; Nagarajan, Poornima; Durai, Indira; Sundari, Meenakshi; Ayyavoo, Saravanan; Ramamoorthy, Thilagavathi

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that accelerated athero-sclerosis occurs in middle-aged and elderly adults with family history of coronary artery disease (CAD). However similar data on younger population with genetic predisposition is lacking. As identifying and treating this target group at an early stage will help in postponing the disease progression and delay the onset of clinical events later in life. We undertook the present study to investigate whether structural vascular changes related to atherosclerosis are detectable in healthy young adults with family history of CAD by non-invasive high resolution scan of the carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT). Fifty healthy young adults of both sexes, aged 18-25 years with family history of CAD were taken as cases and fifty age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure matched subjects without family history of CAD served as control. All participants completed a standardized cardiovascular disease risk assessment questionnaire and resting blood pressure, pulse rate and BMI were recorded. None of the subjects were smoker or alcoholic. Both cases and controls were subjected to high resolution B-mode ultrasonographic evaluation of CIMT. Fasting blood samples were drawn for baseline investigations and lipid profile estimation. Compared to control subjects, cases had increased CIMT (mean of combined sites 0.57 ± 0.08 mm vs 0.46 ± 0.05 mm in controls, p<0.001). Offspring with family history of CAD exhibited an unfavourable lipid profile. We observed a direct association between carotid intima media thickness and triglyceride concentration (Correlation coefficient=0.32). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed family history of CAD to be independent risk factor for CIMT (Odds ratio=5.36, confidence interval 1.84 - 10.53, p=0.003). Arterial wall abnormalities are present at an early age in offspring with family history of CAD. Identifying such high risk individuals is feasible with an easy, non-invasive and

  2. Family history of breast cancer and short-term effects of childbirths on breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Albrektsen, Grethe; Heuch, Ivar; Thoresen, Steinar; Kvåle, Gunnar

    2006-09-15

    The long-term protective effect of a pregnancy on breast cancer risk is preceded by a short-term adverse effect, possibly reflecting a promoting effect of pregnancy hormones. In the present study, we explore whether a family history of breast cancer modifies time-related effects of pregnancies, with special emphasis on the transient increase in risk of breast cancer shortly after birth. Our study cohort comprises 1,067,289 Norwegian women aged 20-74 years. The mean follow-up time was 18 years. Incidence rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression analyses of person-years at risk. Of the 7,377 women diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up, a total of 828 (11%) had a mother or a sister with breast cancer diagnosis. Women with a family history of breast cancer had a 2-3-fold higher risk of breast cancer than did women without any affected family member, highest for those with a relative diagnosed before they were 50 years. Similar to women without a familial excess risk, increasing parity was associated with an overall protective effect among women with a familial predisposition, regardless of age at diagnosis of the relative. Whereas women with no familial excess risk experienced a transient increase in risk mainly after late age births, women with a family history of breast cancer experienced an adverse effect of pregnancies also at younger ages. The present results give further support to the hypothesis that the adverse effect of a term birth can be explained by a promoting effect of pregnancy hormones.

  3. Family history of cancer and the risk of bladder cancer: A case-control study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Turati, Federica; Bosetti, Cristina; Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo; Facchini, Gaetano; Ferraroni, Monica; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva

    2017-06-01

    A family history of bladder cancer has been associated with the risk of bladder cancer, but quantification of the excess risk in different populations is still a relevant issue. Further, the role of a family history of other cancers on the risk of bladder cancer remains unclear. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study, including 690 bladder cancer cases and 665 hospital controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated through unconditional logistic regression models, adjusted for sex, age, study center, year of interview and further for education, smoking and sibling's number. The OR for family history of bladder cancer was 2.13 (95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) 1.02-4.49) from the model with partial adjustment, and 1.99 (95%CI 0.91-4.32) after additional adjustment for smoking and siblings' number, based on 23 cases (3.3%) and 11 controls (1.7%) with a family history of bladder cancer. The fully adjusted OR was 3.77 when the relative was diagnosed at age below 65years. Smokers with a family history of bladder cancer had a four-fold increased risk compared to non-smokers without a family history. Bladder cancer risk was significantly increased among subjects with a family history of hemolymphopoietic cancers (OR=2.97, 95%CI 1.35-6.55). Family history of cancer at other sites showed no significant association with bladder cancer risk. This study confirms an approximately two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer for family history of bladder cancer, and indicates a possible familial clustering of bladder cancer with cancers of the hemolymphopoietic system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of national guidelines on family history breast cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, J D; Garrett, R M; Snaddon, L; Longmuir, M; Bradshaw, N; Watt, C; George, W D; Wilson, C R; Doughty, J C; Stallard, S; Reid, I; Murday, V; Davidson, R

    2011-11-01

    The breast cancer risk of women already under family history surveillance was accurately assessed according to national guidelines in an attempt to rationalize the service. Women attending two breast units in Glasgow between November 2003 and February 2005 were included. One thousand and five women under annual surveillance were assessed and had their relatives diagnoses verified. Four hundred and ninety-seven women were at significantly increased risk and eligible for follow-up. Five hundred and eight (50%) women attending were not eligible for family history surveillance, and 498 (98%) of these women accepted discharge. In conclusion, national guidelines have helped to more clearly define women who should undergo surveillance. This avoids unnecessary and potentially harmful routine investigations, and the service has been improved.

  5. Family history and psychiatric comorbidity in persons with kleptomania.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E

    2003-01-01

    The current study was constructed to examine the family history and psychiatric comorbidity of a group of persons with kleptomania. Thirty-one subjects with DSM-IV kleptomania were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Minnesota Impulse Disorders Inventory (MIDI). The Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria (FH-RDC) were used to collect information about psychiatric disorders in first-degree relatives. Subjects with kleptomania were more likely than comparison subjects to have any lifetime impulse-control disorder (chi2=12.569; df=1; P<.001) and to have a first-degree relative with an alcohol use disorder (chi2=6.994; df=1; P=.008) or any psychiatric disorder (chi2=12.056; df=1; P=.001). Persons with kleptomania appear to have a higher lifetime prevalence of impulse-control disorders and are more likely to have first-degree relatives with alcohol problems than are comparison subjects.

  6. Family history in breast cancer is not a prognostic factor?

    PubMed

    Jobsen, J J; Meerwaldt, J H; van der Palen, J

    2000-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if breast conservative treatment is justified for patients with a positive family history of breast cancer and to investigate whether they have a worse prognosis. We performed a prospective cohort study of breast cancer patients, treated with breast conservative treatment with radiotherapy at the Radiotherapy Department of the Medisch Spectrum Twente. Between 1984 and 1996, 1204 patients with T1 and T2 < or =3 cm were treated. Family history (FH) was recorded according to first degree relative (FDR). Treatment consisted of lumpectomy with axillary dissection followed by radiotherapy to the whole breast with a boost to the primary area. Adjuvant systemic therapy was given to patients with positive nodes. A positive FH was noted in 243 (20.5%) patients, of whom 208 (17.6%) had one FDR, and 35 (3.0%) > or =2 FDRs. The local recurrence rate was 4.1%, with similar rates for all groups. In young patients, < or =40 years, a significant relation between local recurrence and FH was found. The distant metastasis rate was 15.5%, with the lowest rate (5.7%) among patients with > or =2 FDRs. Patients with a positive FH had significantly more contralateral tumours. The 5-year corrected survival was 91.3%. Among patients with a positive FH, a 5-year corrected survival of 91% was observed and the survival 100% among patients with one and > or =2 FDR. Family history is not a contraindication for breast conservative treatment and is not associated with a worse prognosis. Family history is not a prognostic factor for local recurrence rate in patients older than 40 years.

  7. FAMILY HISTORY OF PROSTATE CANCER IN A BLACK POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Leske, M. Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background Although family history of prostate cancer (PC) is an established risk factor for the disease, few studies have investigated this relationship among men with an African heritage. Methods The Prostate Cancer in a Black Population (PCBP) study is a large, nationwide case-control study conducted in Barbados, West Indies from 2002–2011. Results In the PCBP study, a family history of PC in fathers or brothers was associated with a 3-fold increased risk of disease (OR=3.04, 95% CI (2.18, 4.22)) and a strong positive relationship was noted for the number of affected first degree relatives. Tumor grade did not generally influence the relationship between family history and PC. Discussion The magnitude of risks associated with having a father affected with the disease was slightly higher in the PCBP study compared to other populations. It remains unclear whether this finding is the result of an increased genetic susceptibility in African-Barbadian men. PMID:22936456

  8. Nme protein family evolutionary history, a vertebrate perspective

    PubMed Central

    Desvignes, Thomas; Pontarotti, Pierre; Fauvel, Christian; Bobe, Julien

    2009-01-01

    Background The Nme family, previously known as Nm23 or NDPK, is involved in various molecular processes including tumor metastasis and some members of the family, but not all, exhibit a Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase (NDPK) activity. Ten genes are known in humans, in which some members have been extensively studied. In non-mammalian species, the Nme protein family has received, in contrast, far less attention. The picture of the vertebrate Nme family remains thus incomplete and orthology relationships with mammalian counterparts were only partially characterized. The present study therefore aimed at characterizing the Nme gene repertoire in vertebrates with special interest for teleosts, and providing a comprehensive overview of the Nme gene family evolutionary history in vertebrates. Results In the present study, we present the evolutionary history of the Nme family in vertebrates and characterize the gene family repertoire for the first time in several non-mammalian species. Our observations show that vertebrate Nme genes can be separated in two evolutionary distinct groups. Nme1, Nme2, Nme3, and Nme4 belong to Group I while vertebrate Nme5, Nme6, Nme7, Nme8, and Nme9 belong to Group II. The position of Nme10 is in contrast more debatable due to its very specific evolutionary history. The present study clearly indicates that Nme5, Nme6, Nme7, and Nme8 originate from duplication events that occurred before the chordate radiation. In contrast, Nme genes of the Group I have a very different evolutionary history as our results suggest that they all arise from a common gene present in the chordate ancestor. In addition, expression patterns of all zebrafish nme transcripts were studied in a broad range of tissues by quantitative PCR and discussed in the light of the function of their mammalian counterparts. Conclusion This work offers an evolutionary framework that will pave the way for future studies on vertebrate Nme proteins and provides a unified vertebrate Nme

  9. Family History Correlates of Digit Ratio Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Anjith; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C.; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Narayan, Vidya; Rao, Naren P.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The differences in digit ratio are proposed to arise due to differential effects of sex steroids on the growth of finger bones. In this study, we sought to examine the sex differences and the influence of family history of psychosis on digit ratio in patients with schizophrenia compared to matched healthy controls (HCs). Materials and Methods: Digit ratio (2D: 4D) was examined for a large sample of schizophrenia patients (n=200) and HC (n=177) to evaluate the potential effects of family history. Results: The right hand 2D: 4D digit ratio was lesser in schizophrenia patients compared to HC (0.97±0.05 vs 0.98±0.04, t=2.2, P=0.02). There was a significant difference in the right hand 2D: 4D digit ratio of female patients with schizophrenia when compared to female HCs (0.96±0.05 vs 0.98±0.03, t=2.1, P=0.03) while males showed no such difference on either hands. On the contrary, family history‑positive males showed a significantly greater digit ratio for the left hand (FH present (0.99±0.04) vs HC (0.97±0.04), t=2.15, P=0.03), while there was no difference between family history‑positive females and HC. Conclusion: Overall, in patients, reversal of expected “directionality” in digit ratio was observed in our study with greater left 2D: 4D in male patients having a family history of schizophrenia being a novel finding. Reversal of sexual dimorphism has been linked to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. It is possible that such reversal might have a putative genetic basis, perhaps only in men with schizophrenia. PMID:23723544

  10. The Context of Collecting Family Health History: Examining Definitions of Family and Family Communication About Health Among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    THOMPSON, TESS; SEO, JOANN; GRIFFITH, JULIA; BAXTER, MELANIE; JAMES, AIMEE; KAPHINGST, KIMBERLY A.

    2015-01-01

    Public health initiatives encourage the public to discuss and record family health history (FHH) information, which can inform prevention and screening for a variety of conditions. Most research on FHH discussion and collection, however, has involved predominantly White participants and has not considered lay definitions of family or family communication patterns about health. This qualitative study of 32 African American women, 16 with a history of cancer, analyzed participants’ definitions of family, family communication about health, and collection of FHH information. “Family” was defined by biological relatedness, social ties, interactions, and proximity. Several participants noted using different definitions of family for different purposes (e.g. biomedical vs. social). Health discussions took place between and within generations and were influenced by structural relationships (e.g. sister) and characteristics of family members (e.g. trustworthiness). Participants described managing tensions between sharing health information and protecting privacy, especially related to generational differences in sharing information, fear of familial conflict or gossip, and denial (sometimes described as refusal to “own” or “claim” a disease). Few participants reported that anyone in their family kept formal FHH records. Results suggest FHH initiatives should address family tensions and communication patterns that affect discussion and collection of FHH information. PMID:25730634

  11. Is there an association between invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast and a family history of gastric cancer?

    PubMed

    Chikman, Bar; Davidson, Tima; Kais, Hasan; Jeroukhimov, Igor; Leshno, Ari; Sandbank, Judith; Halevy, Ariel; Lavy, Ron

    2016-01-01

    CDH1 gene mutations have been found to be associated with diffuse type gastric cancer and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only study relating a family history of gastric cancer to ILC of the breast. We conducted a retrospective study comparing the family history of malignancies in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and ILC treated in our Medical Center. The comparison was evaluated in both types of breast cancer groups, dividing the patients into two age groups, <50 and ≥50 years. One thousand one hundred and sixty-seven patients with IDC and ILC entered the study. A family history of malignancies was reported in 21.6 % of patients with IDC as opposed to 37.8 % of patients with ILC (P < 0.001). A history of gastric cancer was reported in 7.2 % in the ILC group as compared to 2.3 % in the IDC group, P < 0.008. A family history of breast cancer was more common in the ILC group as opposed to the IDC group, 18 versus 8.1 % respectively, P = 0.002 and persisted in both age groups. We conclude that a family history of malignancies in first degree relatives is more common in patients with ILC than IDC and that there is a significant association between a family history of gastric cancer and ILC.

  12. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  13. Renal outcomes in children with lupus and a family history of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Apenteng, T; Kaplan, B; Meyers, K

    2006-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility and development of lupus nephritis (LN). The significance, however, of a positive family history of autoimmune disease on renal outcome in SLE patients is unknown. This retrospective study of 64 children with LN investigates whether children with LN and a family history of AID (autoimmune disease; 34 patients) had worse renal outcomes when compared with children who did not have a family history (26 patients) of AID. In four patients the family history was unknown. The primary endpoint was doubling of serum creatinine (sCr) and the secondary endpoint was requiring dialysis or transplant (ESRD). Demographic variables for family history + versus mean age in years (range) at onset of LN were 13.5 (7.4-15.9) versus 13.2 (6.4-19.7); female 26: 34 (76%) versus 24: 26 (92%), P = 0.097; race Black 23 (68%), Caucasian 7 (21%), Asian 1 (2%), Hispanic 3(9%) versus Black 14 (54%), Caucasian 6 (23%), Asian 2 (8%), Hispanic 4 (15%). Three patients died (1.6%); sCr doubled in 6/34 (17.6%) versus 2/26 (7.7%), P = 0.45, followed for 2.8 years (0.8-5.8) and 1.8 years (1.8-1.9), respectively, P = 0.24; sCr doubled plus ESRD in 10/34 (29%) versus 6/26 (23%), P = 0.77, followed for 2.7 years (0.8-5.8) and 2.0 years (0.7-4.1) respectively, P = 0.29. In the family history + group, more Black versus non-Black patients doubled their sCr or reached ESRD, 8/23 (35%) versus 2/11 (18%), P = 0.44. More males and Black patients with LN had a positive family history for AID and were more likely to double their sCr or reach ESRD. These results suggest that a family history of AID impacts on renal outcome in children with SLE.

  14. The antisocial family tree: family histories of behavior problems in antisocial personality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Michael G; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; DeLisi, Matt; Qian, Zhengmin

    2015-05-01

    Multiple avenues of research (e.g., criminal careers, intergenerational family transmission, and epidemiological studies) have indicated a concentration of antisocial traits and behaviors that cluster among families and within individuals in a population. The current study draws on each of these perspectives in exploring the intergenerational contours of antisocial personality disorder across multiple generations of a large-scale epidemiological sample. The analytic sample of persons meeting criteria for antisocial personality disorder (N = 1,226) was derived from waves I and II of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Path analytic, latent class, and multinomial models were executed to describe and elucidate family histories among persons diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder. Three classes of an antisocial family tree were found: minimal family history of problem behaviors (70.3 % of sample) who were characterized by higher socioeconomic functioning, parental and progeny behavior problems (9.4 % of sample) who were characterized by criminal behaviors, psychopathology, and substance use disorders, and multigenerational history of problem behaviors (20.3 % of sample) who were characterized by alcoholism, psychopathology, and versatile criminal offending. These findings add a typology to intergenerational studies of antisocial behavior that can assist in identifying etiological and treatment factors among those for whom crime runs in the family.

  15. Gastric cancer risk factors in subjects with family history.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Ferraroni, M; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    1997-02-01

    Until now, it has been unclear whether there are differences in various risk factor profiles for familial gastric cancer, i.e., gastric cancer among subjects with a family history of the disease. A total of 722 gastric cancer patients and 2024 controls were admitted between 1985 and 1992 to a network of hospitals in the Greater Milan area. Of these, 88 cases and 103 controls who reported a family history of gastric cancer in first degree relatives were considered in the present analysis. There was no relationship between gastric cancer risk and tobacco smoking or alcohol drinking. Shorter duration of electrical refrigerator use was related to a nonsignificant increased risk and a high daily meal frequency was associated with an increased gastric cancer risk. Significant direct trends of risk were observed for pasta (odds ratio, OR = 4.20 for the highest versus the lowest tertile), bread (OR, 2.86), red meat (OR, 3.38), and preserved meat (OR, 1.90). Inverse associations were observed for increasing consumption of selected vegetables and fruits, chiefly peppers (OR = 0.31), total fruits (OR, 0.47), and citrus fruits (OR, 0.38). With reference to selected micronutrients, a significant inverse trend in risk with increasing consumption for beta-carotene (OR, 0.27) and ascorbic acid (OR, 0.20) was observed. These results suggest that dietary risk factors for subjects with a family history of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives are not appreciably different from well-established risk factors of the disease in the general population.

  16. Family history in public health practice: a genomic tool for disease prevention and health promotion.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Rodolfo; Yoon, Paula W; Qureshi, Nadeem; Green, Ridgely Fisk; Khoury, Muin J

    2010-01-01

    Family history is a risk factor for many chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Professional guidelines usually include family history to assess health risk, initiate interventions, and motivate behavioral changes. The advantages of family history over other genomic tools include a lower cost, greater acceptability, and a reflection of shared genetic and environmental factors. However, the utility of family history in public health has been poorly explored. To establish family history as a public health tool, it needs to be evaluated within the ACCE framework (analytical validity; clinical validity; clinical utility; and ethical, legal, and social issues). Currently, private and public organizations are developing tools to collect standardized family histories of many diseases. Their goal is to create family history tools that have decision support capabilities and are compatible with electronic health records. These advances will help realize the potential of family history as a public health tool.

  17. Liminality and low-income aging families by choice: meanings of family and support.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Susan; Gazso, Amber

    2014-12-01

    Through the lens of individualization, aging families demonstrate changes both in family composition and in meanings of family and support. So, also, do low-income families that - in order to survive - choose flexible, sometimes novel, social-support relations, including kin and non-kin: these are aging families by choice. Applying the concept of liminality (transitional states of being) created through individualization, we explored the experiences of close relations in low-income families consisting of aging kin and non-kin members. Qualitative interviews with respondents representing two or three generations of aging families of choice illustrated how these families perceive the meanings of family and social support. We find that reciprocity is less vital to relationships of older with younger members in familial networks than may be expected. Liminality contours meanings and exchanges in low-income aging families of choice such that no matter how tenuous relations may be, they provide a sense of belonging and meaning.

  18. The genetic history of Ice Age Europe.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiaomei; Posth, Cosimo; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Petr, Martin; Mallick, Swapan; Fernandes, Daniel; Furtwängler, Anja; Haak, Wolfgang; Meyer, Matthias; Mittnik, Alissa; Nickel, Birgit; Peltzer, Alexander; Rohland, Nadin; Slon, Viviane; Talamo, Sahra; Lazaridis, Iosif; Lipson, Mark; Mathieson, Iain; Schiffels, Stephan; Skoglund, Pontus; Derevianko, Anatoly P; Drozdov, Nikolai; Slavinsky, Vyacheslav; Tsybankov, Alexander; Cremonesi, Renata Grifoni; Mallegni, Francesco; Gély, Bernard; Vacca, Eligio; Morales, Manuel R González; Straus, Lawrence G; Neugebauer-Maresch, Christine; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Constantin, Silviu; Moldovan, Oana Teodora; Benazzi, Stefano; Peresani, Marco; Coppola, Donato; Lari, Martina; Ricci, Stefano; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Valentin, Frédérique; Thevenet, Corinne; Wehrberger, Kurt; Grigorescu, Dan; Rougier, Hélène; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Flas, Damien; Semal, Patrick; Mannino, Marcello A; Cupillard, Christophe; Bocherens, Hervé; Conard, Nicholas J; Harvati, Katerina; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Drucker, Dorothée G; Svoboda, Jiří; Richards, Michael P; Caramelli, David; Pinhasi, Ron; Kelso, Janet; Patterson, Nick; Krause, Johannes; Pääbo, Svante; Reich, David

    2016-06-09

    Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. Here we analyse genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000-7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3-6% to around 2%, consistent with natural selection against Neanderthal variants in modern humans. Whereas there is no evidence of the earliest modern humans in Europe contributing to the genetic composition of present-day Europeans, all individuals between ~37,000 and ~14,000 years ago descended from a single founder population which forms part of the ancestry of present-day Europeans. An ~35,000-year-old individual from northwest Europe represents an early branch of this founder population which was then displaced across a broad region, before reappearing in southwest Europe at the height of the last Ice Age ~19,000 years ago. During the major warming period after ~14,000 years ago, a genetic component related to present-day Near Easterners became widespread in Europe. These results document how population turnover and migration have been recurring themes of European prehistory.

  19. Risk of Second Cancer in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors and Influence of Family History.

    PubMed

    Sud, Amit; Thomsen, Hauke; Sundquist, Kristina; Houlston, Richard S; Hemminki, Kari

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Although advances in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment have led to improved disease-free survival, this has been accompanied by an increased risk of second cancers. We sought to quantify the second cancer risks and to investigate the impact of family history. Patients and Methods Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Project Database, we identified 9,522 individuals with primary HL diagnosed between 1965 and 2012. We calculated standardized incidence ratios and cumulative incidence of second cancer in HL survivors and compared the standardized incidence ratios of lung, breast, colorectal, and all second cancers in HL survivors with and without a site-specific family history of cancer. Interactions between family history of cancer and HL treatment were evaluated under additive and multiplicative models. Results Overall, the risk of a second cancer in HL survivors was increased 2.39-fold (95% CI, 2.29 to 2.53). The 30-year cumulative incidence of breast cancer in women diagnosed with HL at younger than 35 years of age was 13.8%. We observed no significant difference in cancer risk over successive time periods. The risk of all second cancers was 1.3-fold higher for HL survivors with a first-degree relative with cancer ( P < .001), with 3.3-fold, 2.1-fold, and 1.8-fold differences shown for lung, colorectal, and breast cancers, respectively. Moreover, a greater than additive interaction between family history of lung cancer and HL treatment was shown ( P = .03). Conclusion HL survivorship is associated with a substantive risk of a second cancer. Notably, the risk is higher in individuals with a family history of cancer. This information should be used to inform risk-adapted therapy and to assist in screening to reduce long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with HL.

  20. Factors associated with young adults' knowledge regarding family history of Stroke 1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maria Jose Melo Ramos; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Florêncio, Raquel Sampaio; Braga, Predro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the factors associated with young adults' knowledge regarding family history of stroke. Method: an analytical transversal study, with 579 young adults from state schools, with collection of sociodemographic, clinical and risk factor-related variables, analyzed using logistic regression (backward elimination). Results: a statistical association was detected between age, civil status, and classification of arterial blood pressure and abdominal circumference with knowledge of family history of stroke. In the final logistic regression model, a statistical association was observed between knowledge regarding family history of stroke and the civil status of having a partner (ORa=1.61[1.07-2.42]; p=0.023), abdominal circumference (ORa=0.98[0.96-0.99]; p=0.012) and normal arterial blood pressure (ORa=2.56[1.19-5.52]; p=0.016). Conclusion: an association was observed between socioeconomic factors and risk factors for stroke and knowledge of family history of stroke, suggesting the need for health education or even educational programs on this topic for the clientele in question. PMID:27878217

  1. Descriptive analysis of endoscopic findings in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cuenllas, B; Díez-Rodríguez, R; Vaquero, L; Pisabarros, C; Aparicio, M; Rodríguez-Martín, L; Muñoz, F; Olcoz, J L; Jorquera, F; Vivas, S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a family history implies an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC), and may require a different screening strategy. The aim of this study was to evaluate lesions found during colonoscopies of patients that had a family history of CRC. A retrospective study was conducted that included consecutive colonoscopies performed on patients with a family history of CRC at a referral center within the period from April 2000 to January 2012. The colonoscopic findings were analyzed in relation to sex, age, and the presence or absence of symptoms. Data from 3,792 colonoscopies were collected. The mean age of the patients was 53.14 years (SD 12.22), and 57.4% were women. Colonoscopy was normal in 71.7% of the cases, with hyperplastic polyps being detected in 7.1%, and adenomatous polyps in 19.8% (39.4% of them were high risk). There was a 1.5% presence of adenocarcinomas in the subjects. Polyps and CRC were predominant in men (P=.001 and P=.027, respectively) and there was a linear increase with age. Symptomatic patients had a higher CRC detection rate (P<.001), but no differences were observed in relation to polyp diagnosis. Age and male sex increased the risk for presenting with CRC or adenomas in the group of patients with a family history of CRC, and the presence of symptoms was associated with a greater risk for presenting with CRC. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Positive Family History of Autoimmunity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Characteristics; a Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mehdi; Ziaee, Vahid; Moradinejad, Mohamad-Hassan; Parvaneh, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) patients with and without family history of autoimmune disease with respect to clinical features and laboratory data. Methods Sixteen JIA patients with family history of autoimmune disease were identified during study, 32 patients were chosen for comparative group from referred patients to the rheumatology clinic according to the date of referral. Two groups were compared with respect to age of onset, sex, subtype, disease activity, duration of active disease and laboratory variables. Findings The age of onset was significantly lower in JIA patients with family history of autoimmunity (4.7 years vs. 7.0 years; P=0.02), polyarthicular subtype was more frequent in patients with positive family history (50% vs.25%; P=0.04) most of JIA patients with positive family history were in the active phase at the time of study (64% vs 25%; P=0.02) and had a longer duration of active disease (21.0 months vs 12.3 months; P=0.04). Patients with positive family history had more positive ANA (43.5%% vs 12.5%; P=0.01) and also more positive ADA (75% vs 20.8%; P=0.002). Two groups were similar according to sex, and other laboratory variables. Conclusion JIA patients with family history of autoimmune disease seem to have a more severe disease than patients without such family history, they are younger at the onset, and have mostly poyarthicular subtype. They also have more ANA and ADA positivity. These findings are different from familial JIA case-control studies according to active disease duration, subtype, and ANA positivity. PMID:24800019

  3. Family History and Risk of Recurrent Cystitis and Pyelonephritis in Women

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Delia; Hawn, Thomas R.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Li, Sue S.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Zhao, Lue-Ping; Stamm, Walter E.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Recurrent urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis have risk factors suggesting genetic sources. Family history variables indicative of genetic risk merit further investigation. We evaluated the risk of recurrent cystitis and pyelonephritis in women with and those without a family history of urinary tract infection. Materials and Methods We conducted a population based case-control study of 1,261 women 18 to 49 years old enrolled in a Northwest health plan. Participants were cases identified from plan databases with documented recurrent cystitis (431) or pyelonephritis (400). Shared controls (430) were similar age women with no urinary tract infection history. We evaluated the history of urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis in first-degree female relatives (mother, sister[s], daughter[s]) and other covariates, ascertained through questionnaires and computerized databases. Results Of the cases 70.9% with recurrent cystitis and 75.2% with pyelonephritis, and of the controls 42.4% reported a urinary tract infection history in 1 or more female relative (p <0.001 for each case group vs controls). In both case groups odds ratios were significantly increased for women reporting a urinary tract infection history in their mother, sister(s) or daughter(s). Risk increased with a greater number of affected relatives. In women with 1 vs 2 or more relatives the ORs for recurrent cystitis were 3.1 (95% CI 2.1, 4.7) and 5.0 (3.1, 8.1), and the ORs for pyelonephritis were 3.3 (2.2, 5.0) and 5.5 (3.4, 9.0), respectively. Conclusions In these community dwelling women a urinary tract infection history in female relatives was strongly and consistently associated with urinary tract infection recurrence and pyelonephritis. Risk estimates increased with stronger family history indices, suggesting a genetic component for increased susceptibility to these infections. PMID:20639019

  4. Personal Factors Associated with Reported Benefits of Huntington Disease Family History or Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janet K.; Erwin, Cheryl; Juhl, Andrew; Mills, James; Brossman, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    Aims: A family history of Huntington disease (HD) or receiving results of HD predictive genetic testing can influence individual well-being, family relationships, and social interactions in positive and negative ways. The aim of this study was to examine benefits reported by people with an HD family history or those who have undergone predictive HD testing, as well as the personal variables associated with perceived benefits. Methods: Seventy-four of 433 people completing the International Response of a Sample Population to HD risk (I-RESPOND-HD) survey reported benefits. Knowledge and understanding was perceived as the most common benefit from participants in both groups. The next most frequent perceived benefits from a family history were connecting with others and achieving life meaning and insights. The next most common perceived benefits from genetic testing were life planning and social support. The least common perceived benefit for both groups was renewed hope and optimism. Older age and spirituality were significantly associated with benefits in both groups. Conclusions: Perceptions of benefit may not be as likely until later years in people with prodromal HD. A developed sense of spirituality is identified as a personal resource associated with the perception of benefit from genetic testing for HD. Associations among spirituality, perceived benefits, and other indicators of personal and family well-being may be useful in genetic counseling and health care of people with prodromal HD. PMID:20722493

  5. Assessment of the role of general, biochemical and family history characteristics in kidney stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Jabbar, Faiza; Asif, Muhammad; Dutani, Hajirah; Hussain, Abrar; Malik, Arif; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Rasool, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Aim The main objective of the study was to determine the urinary risk factors involved in kidney stone formation. Method In this study a total number of 101 patients (64 males and 37 females) between the age group 2 and 70 years were selected. Personal characteristics like age, family history, clinical sign and symptoms, education, monthly income, living style, smoking or tobacco chewing habit, dietary intake and daily amount of drinking water were recorded. Results The study showed that the risk of kidney stone formation was high in the median age group (16–25 years) both in male and female population. The most important factors associated with this were lack of drinking clean water, over weight and obesity as well as family history (37.5% and 27.02% in men and women, respectively). Conclusion Our study has confirmed that lack of drinking sufficient amount of water, increasing weight and obesity and family history are some major factors contributing to the increased risk of kidney stone formation. Therefore it is very important to live a healthy life, drink clean water and control weight to prevent such diseases. PMID:25561886

  6. Age and Family Control Influences on Children's Television Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Alan M.

    1986-01-01

    Indicates that (1) age and family control did not influence children's television viewing levels; (2) age influenced program preferences of children; (3) cartoon preferences related negatively to family control for the youngest groups; and (4) comedy and children's program preferences and television realism related positively to family control for…

  7. Families with school-age children.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture

  8. Family history of cancer and the risk of laryngeal cancer: a case-control study from Italy and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Garavello, Werner; Turati, Federica; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; Levi, Fabio; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Chiesa, Fausto; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva

    2012-02-01

    Only limited data is available on the relationship between family history of laryngeal and other neoplasms and laryngeal cancer risk. We investigated the issue using data from a multicentre case-control study conducted in Italy and Switzerland between 1992 and 2009 including 852 cases with histologically confirmed laryngeal cancer and 1970 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non neoplastic conditions. Unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, study center, education, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and number of siblings were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of laryngeal cancer. The multivariate OR was 2.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-5.3) in subjects reporting a first-degree relative with laryngeal cancer, as compared to subjects with no family history. The OR was higher when the relative was diagnosed before 60 years of age (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.4-8.8). As compared to subjects without family history, non-smokers, and moderate drinkers, the OR was 37.1 (95% CI 9.9-139.4) for current smokers, heavy drinkers, with family history of laryngeal cancer. Family history of colorectal (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.3) and kidney (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-12.1) cancer were also associated to an increased risk of laryngeal cancer, while no significant increase in risk was found for family history of cancer at all sites, excluding the larynx (OR = 1.1).

  9. [Association between family history and the risk of hypertension in rural districts of Hanzhong in Shaanxi province].

    PubMed

    Wu, X Y; Li, Q; Yan, H; Liu, D M; Gao, J Y; Zhao, Y L

    2017-08-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence of hypertension and quantitative relationship between family history and the risk of hypertension among rural residents living in Hanzhong District, Shaanxi province. Methods: A multistage random sampling survey was conducted. Data on the characteristics related to hypertension were collected and physical examination was conducted. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between family history and hypertension. Results: A total number of 2 817 rural residents aged 18-80 with complete information were recruited. The crude prevalence of hypertension was 33.7%. Results from the logistic regression analysis showed that the OR was 2.06 (95% CI: 1.70-2.50) between family histories with or without hypertension. When the first-degree relatives were with the degrees of family history of hypertention as Ⅰ, Ⅱ or Ⅲ, the OR values of hypertension appeared as 1.83 (95% CI: 1.47-2.27), 2.94 (95% CI: 2.09-4.13) and 4.48 (95% CI: 2.17-9.27) respectively. Either father or mother having the positive family history of hypertension, the corresponding OR values appeared as 2.50 (95% CI: 1.84-3.40), 1.61(95% CI: 1.22-2.12) seen in mothers. However, when both father and mother having the family history of hypertention, the OR value was seen 2.82 (95%CI: 1.76-4.51) in the mothers. Conclusion: Family history appeared as a risk factor for hypertension. The number of first-degree relatives with positive family history showed a dose-response relationship to the occurrence of hypertension. Family history in both father or mother might further affect the incidence of hypertension.

  10. A qualitative evaluation of the psychosocial impact of family history screening in Australian primary care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Gabrielle T; Walter, Fiona M; Emery, Jon D

    2015-04-01

    Whilst the family history is perceived as a routine part of the medical family history it is not used in a systematic way to tailor disease prevention in primary care. Family history questionnaires (FHQs) may have an important role in primary care as a screening tool to support tailored disease prevention. The potential harms and benefits of family history screening in primary care require investigation before routine adoption. This study aimed: first to explore the experience and impact of family history collection via a novel family history questionnaire and subsequent familial risk assessment, and secondly, to assess the acceptability and feasibility of using the questionnaire in Australian primary care. Twenty-eight semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with patients already enrolled in a family history screening study through their family physician. Qualitative constant comparative analysis was undertaken of transcript data. Common themes included the way in which the family unit, individual stage of life and a number of external triggers interact and contribute to how an individual comes to terms with familial disease risk. Unique findings emerged relating to the Australian perspective of participants. Living in Australia created a barrier to effective communication amongst family members about family health, and family history collection. In addition to the vast geographical distance both within Australia, and between Australia and other countries, there was an additional sense of isolation described within an historical context. The family history screening questionnaire was considered user-friendly and a worthwhile approach to supporting disease prevention in primary care, although some participants did not retain an accurate understanding of their familial cancer risk. In conclusion, a person's response to family history screening is reliant on a complex interplay of family, personal and external factors, which in turn are driven by their

  11. The impact of a family history of prostate cancer on the prognosis and features of the disease in Korea: results from a cross-sectional longitudinal pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Suk; Koo, Kyo Chul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2017-09-13

    Reports on the impact of a family history of prostate cancer among Asians are scarce. We evaluated whether a positive prostate cancer family history is associated with the prognosis and features of the disease. From January 2006 to December 2015, patients who received treatment for pathologically diagnosed prostate cancer were enrolled. Information on family history was obtained via self-administered questionnaires between January 2015 and December 2016. The overall survival rate for all patients and the rate of biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy were assessed according to the presence of family history. Of 1266 patients (median age, 68.1 years; median prostate-specific antigen, 8.73 ng/mL; median follow-up, 40.0 months), 47 (3.8%) were identified as having a family history. Men with a family history had a younger age, higher proportion of cases diagnosed before 55 years of age, and lower stage than those without a family history. Family history was not a potential risk factor for overall survival. In an analysis of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (median prostate-specific antigen, 7.40 ng/mL; median follow-up, 40.5 months), no differences in pathologic characteristics were found between patients with (n = 39, 93.5%) and without (n = 567, 6.4%) a family history. Family history was not predictive of biochemical failure. A family history of prostate cancer seemed to have no effect on prognosis and disease aggressiveness. However, this study proposed a rationale for performing earlier prostate-specific antigen testing in men with a family history of prostate cancer.

  12. Maternal and paternal family history of type 2 diabetes differently influence lipid parameters in young nondiabetic Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kemal; Yoshida, Aya; Ohta, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Kojima, Akiko; Chiba, Hitomi; Mizuguchi, Shin; Ishidzuka, Tatsunori; Goto, Hiroshi; Uegaki, Chiho; Kotake, Kyuhei

    2013-03-01

    We assessed the association of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D) with parameters used for health checkups in young Japanese women. The subjects were 497 nondiabetic women aged 19-39 years. Among them, the mothers of 34 subjects and fathers of 50 had T2D (MD group and PD group, respectively). The subjects were assessed for levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglyceride (TG). TC and LDL-C level showed a tendency to increase in the MD group compared with subjects without family history of T2D. LDL-C/HDL-C ratio ≥2.14 was found in 32.4 and 18.0 % of subjects in the MD and PD groups, respectively. When adjusted for differences in age, body mass index, smoking status, and drinking habits, the MD group was found to have a higher risk of abnormal TC and LDL-C levels than the PD group. LDL-C/HDL-C ratio was independently associated with maternal family history but not with paternal family history (odds ratio 3.44 [99 % confidence interval 1.11-10.6] and 1.21 [0.38-3.89], respectively). There was no association between TG/HDL-C ratio and family history type of T2D. Maternal family history of T2D had a more pronounced effect on the lipid parameters generally evaluated during health checkups than did paternal family history of T2D. Therefore, we recommend systematic screening for early detection and appropriate healthcare guidance for Japanese women, particularly those with maternal family history of T2D.

  13. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs.

    PubMed

    Goede, Simon Lucas; Rabeneck, Linda; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Zauber, Ann G; Paszat, Lawrence F; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Yong, Jean H E; van Hees, Frank; Tinmouth, Jill; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-09-01

    In the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to estimate the cumulative number of CRC deaths prevented and colonoscopies performed between 2008 and 2038 with this family history-based screening program, compared to a regular gFOBT program. In both programs, we assumed screening uptake increased from 30% (participation level in 2008 before the program was launched) to 60%. We assumed that 11% of the population had a family history, defined as having at least one first-degree relative diagnosed with CRC. The programs offered screening between age 50 and 74 years, every two years for gFOBT, and every ten years for colonoscopy. Compared to opportunistic screening (2008 participation level kept constant at 30%), the gFOBT program cumulatively prevented 6,700 more CRC deaths and required 570,000 additional colonoscopies by 2038. The family history-based screening program increased these numbers to 9,300 and 1,100,000, a 40% and 93% increase, respectively. If biennial gFOBT was replaced with biennial fecal immunochemical test (FIT), annual Hemoccult Sensa or five-yearly sigmoidoscopy screening, both the added benefits and colonoscopies required would decrease. A biennial gFOBT screening program that identifies individuals with a family history of CRC and recommends them to undergo colonoscopy screening would prevent 40% (range in sensitivity analyses: 20-51%) additional deaths while requiring 93% (range: 43-116%) additional colonoscopies, compared to a regular gFOBT screening program. © 2015 UICC.

  14. The LEGACY Girls Study: Growth and Development in the Context of Breast Cancer Family History.

    PubMed

    John, Esther M; Terry, Mary Beth; Keegan, Theresa H M; Bradbury, Angela R; Knight, Julia A; Chung, Wendy K; Frost, Caren J; Lilge, Lothar; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa A; Whittemore, Alice S; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Andrulis, Irene L

    2016-05-01

    Although the timing of pubertal milestones has been associated with breast cancer risk, few studies of girls' development include girls at increased breast cancer risk due to their family history. The Lessons in Epidemiology and Genetics of Adult Cancer from Youth (LEGACY) Girls Study was initiated in 2011 in the USA and Canada to assess the relation between early life exposures and intermediate markers of breast cancer risk (e.g., pubertal development, breast tissue characteristics) and to investigate psychosocial well being and health behaviors in the context of family history. We describe the methods used to establish and follow a cohort of 1,040 girls ages 6-13 years at baseline, half with a breast cancer family history, and the collection of questionnaire data (family history, early life exposures, growth and development, psychosocial and behavioral), anthropometry, biospecimens, and breast tissue characteristics using optical spectroscopy. During this initial 5-year phase of the study, follow-up visits are conducted every 6 months for repeated data and biospecimen collection. Participation in baseline components was high (98% for urine, 97.5% for blood or saliva, and 98% for anthropometry). At enrollment, 77% of girls were premenarcheal and 49% were at breast Tanner stage T1. This study design allows thorough examination of events affecting girls' growth and development and how they differ across the spectrum of breast cancer risk. A better understanding of early life breast cancer risk factors will be essential to enhance prevention across the lifespan for those with and without a family history of the disease.

  15. The LEGACY Girls Study: Growth and development in the context of breast cancer family history

    PubMed Central

    John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Knight, Julia A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Frost, Caren J.; Lilge, Lothar; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the timing of pubertal milestones has been associated with breast cancer risk, few studies of girls’ development include girls at increased breast cancer risk due to their family history. Methods The LEGACY (Lessons in Epidemiology and Genetics of Adult Cancer from Youth) Girls Study was initiated in 2011 in the USA and Canada to assess the relation between early-life exposures and intermediate markers of breast cancer risk (e.g., pubertal development, breast tissue characteristics) and to investigate psychosocial well-being and health behaviors in the context of family history. We describe the methods used to establish and follow a cohort of 1,040 girls ages 6–13 years at baseline, half with a breast cancer family history, and the collection of questionnaire data (family history, early-life exposures, growth and development, psychosocial and behavioral), anthropometry, biospecimens, and breast tissue characteristics using optical spectroscopy. Results During this initial 5-year phase of the study, follow-up visits are conducted every six months for repeated data and biospecimen collection. Participation in baseline components was high (98% for urine, 97.5% for blood or saliva, and 98% for anthropometry). At enrollment, 77% of girls were pre-menarcheal and 49% were at breast Tanner stage T1. Conclusions This study design allows thorough examination of events affecting girls’ growth and development and how they differ across the spectrum of breast cancer risk. A better understanding of early-life breast cancer risk factors will be essential to enhance prevention across the lifespan for those with and without a family history of the disease. PMID:26829160

  16. The association between family history of mental disorder and delusional-like experiences: a general population study.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Daniel; Saha, Sukanta; Scott, James D; Chan, Raymond C K; McGrath, John J

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have indicated that isolated delusional-like experiences (DLE) are common in the general population. Furthermore, there is preliminary evidence to suggest that these experiences are more common in those with a family history of mental disorders. We had the opportunity to explore the association between family history of a wide range of mental disorders and DLE in an Australian general population survey. The Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 examined 8,841 adult community residents. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to generate various DSM-IV lifetime diagnoses and to assess DLE. The participants were asked to report mental disorders in their first-degree relatives. The influence of family history of mental disorders on DLE endorsement was assessed with logistic regression, with adjustments for age, sex, and the presence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in the respondents. A family history of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or alcohol or illicit drug abuse/dependence was each significantly associated with endorsement of DLE, and these associations remained significant when we adjusted for the presence of mental illness in the respondents. When we examined a more restrictive definition of DLE, only a family history of depression and schizophrenia remained significantly associated with DLE. DLE are associated with a family history of a wide range of mental disorders. These findings suggest that familial factors associated with DLE may be shared with a wide range of common mental disorders. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

  18. The association of tumor microsatellite instability phenotype with family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Bharati; Lindor, Noralane M; Baron, John; Siegmund, Kim; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Haile, Robert; Gallinger, Steve; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P; Cotterchio, Michelle; Jenkins, Mark; Grove, John; Casey, Graham; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Bishop, D Timothy; Hopper, John L; Ahnen, Dennis; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John D; Seminara, Daniela

    2009-03-01

    Family history is a strong predictor of colorectal cancer risk; however, a diagnosis of colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives has not been systematically investigated as a function of the colorectal cancer molecular subtypes related to tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) status. We investigated whether the observable familial colorectal cancer risks differed according to tumor MSI subtypes, stratified as MSI-High (>30% instability), MSI-Low (<30% instability), and MSS (no instability). Data from 3,143 population-based colorectal cancer cases from five institutions were assessed for family history according to the Amsterdam criteria and the Bethesda guidelines, age at diagnosis, sex, tumor location, and MSI status. The distribution of patient characteristics by MSI status was compared using polytomous logistic regression. Overall, 2.8% colorectal cancer cases met the Amsterdam criteria and 37% met the Bethesda guidelines. There were 14% MSI-High, 13% MSI-Low, and 73% MSS colorectal cancers. MSI-High (P<0.0001) and MSI-Low tumors (P=0.01) were more proximally located than MSS tumors. MSI-High tumors were more common among females (P<0.001). The highest proportion of MSI-High tumors occurred in cases<40 years of age whereas the age-dependent distribution of MSI-Low tumors was unchanged. MSI-High tumors showed a statistically significant association with increasing numbers of first-degree relatives with colorectal cancer (P=0.002); this association disappeared, however, when MSI-High cases meeting Amsterdam criteria were removed from the analysis. MSI-Low tumors did not show a similar association with family history of colorectal cancer. Familial risk associated with MSI-High tumors is primarily driven by the Amsterdam-criteria patients. MSI-Low tumors may represent a distinct subtype of colorectal cancer with respect to certain epidemiologic variables studied here.

  19. Family history and apoE genotype interaction in Alzheimer`s disease (AD)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvik, G.P.; Kukull, W.A.; Goddards, K.

    1994-09-01

    The apoE {epsilon}4 allele is associated with increased risk and decreased age of onset of AD. The {epsilon}4 allele may have opposing effects. We determined that family history of a parent or sib with memory problems (famhx+) modified the effect of apoE genotype in a population-based, case (n=165, 72 famhx+)-control (n=233, 73 famhx+) sample. Logistic regression analyses detected a significant apoE genotype (E) by family history (F) by age (A) interaction (ExFxA, p=0.003) and ExF interaction (p=0.0001) in the prediction of AD. ExFxA remained significant when only {epsilon}4+ genotypes were included (p<0.01). ExFxSex (p=0.04) and ExF (p<0.0001) were significant when only {epsilon}4- genotypes were included. Similary, multiple regression detected significant ExF interaction in the prediction of age of AD onset for {epsilon}4+ genotypes (p=0.04) or {epsilon}4- genotypes (p=0.04). Sex did not interact in the prediction of age of onset. Famhx+ increased risk of AD differentially and reduced age of onset except in {epsilon}2+ genotypes. Family history modifies the apoE genotype influence on risk and onset age of AD, suggesting that non-apoE genetic effects interact with apoE in AD. It is most predictive of risk in those with the {epsilon}2{epsilon}3 genotype. Variation in risk and onset among both {epsilon}4+ and {epsilon}4- genotypes demonstrate that {epsilon}2 and {epsilon}3 mediate {epsilon}4 allele effects in AD.

  20. Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).

    PubMed

    Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife.

  1. A pediatric approach to family history of cardiovascular disease: diagnosis, risk assessment, and management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Erin M; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-02-01

    The medical family history is a comprehensive and dynamic record of illnesses and other pertinent health information among family members. Family history is used to facilitate diagnosis, to identify family members at risk for developing a particular disease, and increasingly to manage disease. This article reviews the application of family history to pediatric cardiovascular disease. As more is learned about the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease, the family history will play an increasingly central role in management. Improved understanding of the causes of pediatric cardiovascular disease promises the opportunity to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of an online family history tool for identifying hereditary and familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, F G J; Aalfs, C M; The, F O; Wientjes, C A; Depla, A C; Mundt, M W; Bossuyt, P M M; Dekker, E

    2017-09-21

    Identifying a hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome or familial CRC (FCC) in a CRC patient may enable the patient and relatives to enroll in surveillance protocols. As these individuals are insufficiently recognized, we evaluated an online family history tool, consisting of a patient-administered family history questionnaire and an automated genetic referral recommendation, to facilitate the identification of patients with hereditary CRC or FCC. Between 2015 and 2016, all newly diagnosed CRC patients in five Dutch outpatient clinics, were included in a trial with a stepped-wedge design, when first visiting the clinic. Each hospital continued standard procedures for identifying patients at risk (control strategy) and then, after a predetermined period, switched to offering the family history tool to included patients (intervention strategy). After considering the tool-based recommendation, the health care provider could decide on and arrange the referral. Primary outcome was the relative number of CRC patients who received screening or surveillance recommendations for themselves or relatives because of hereditary CRC or FCC, provided by genetic counseling. The intervention effect was evaluated using a logit-linear model. With the tool, 46/489 (9.4%) patients received a screening or surveillance recommendation, compared to 35/292 (12.0%) in the control group. In the intention-to-treat-analysis, accounting for time trends and hospital effects, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). A family history tool does not necessarily assist in increasing the number of CRC patients and relatives enrolled in screening or surveillance recommendations for hereditary CRC or FCC. Other interventions should be considered.

  3. Physical activity, family history of diabetes and risk of developing hyperglycaemia and diabetes among adults in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Wang, Y; Ware, R S; Tse, L Ah; Dunstan, D W; Liang, Y; Wang, Z; Hong, X; Owen, N

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the joint influence of physical activity and family history of diabetes on the subsequent risk of developing hyperglycaemia and Type 2 diabetes among Chinese adults. A prospective community-based cohort study was conducted among adults aged 35 years and older during 2004-2007 in Nanjing, China. Four communities (three urban and one rural) were randomly selected from 11 urban districts and two rural counties. Hyperglycaemia and Type 2 diabetes were defined using World Health Organization criteria based on fasting blood glucose concentration and physicians' diagnosis, respectively. Physical activity, parental diabetes history, and other important covariates were assessed at baseline and in the third-year follow-up survey. At study conclusion data were collected from 3031 participants (follow-up rate 81.3%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of hyperglycaemia and Type 2 diabetes was 6.2% and 2.4%, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, compared with those with positive family history and insufficient physical activity, the adjusted relative risk ratio (95% CI) of developing hyperglycaemia was 0.19 (0.02, 1.51) for participants with sufficient physical activity and a positive family history; 0.55 (0.31, 0.97) for participants with insufficient physical activity and a negative family history; and 0.36 (0.19, 0.70) for participants with sufficient physical activity but a negative family history. Participants who had a negative family history and insufficient physical activity were also less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes (RRR = 0.28; 0.14, 0.54), and participants with a negative family history and sufficient physical activity were the least likely to develop Type 2 diabetes (0.23; 0.10, 0.56). Sufficient physical activity and negative family history of diabetes may jointly reduce the risk of developing hyperglycaemia and Type 2 diabetes in Chinese adults. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  4. Evolutionary History of the Cancer Immunity Antigen MAGE Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Yukako; Satta, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary mode of a multi-gene family can change over time, depending on the functional differentiation and local genomic environment of family members. In this study, we demonstrate such a change in the melanoma antigen (MAGE) gene family on the mammalian X chromosome. The MAGE gene family is composed of ten subfamilies that can be categorized into two types. Type I genes are of relatively recent origin, and they encode epitopes for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in cancer cells. Type II genes are relatively ancient and some of their products are known to be involved in apoptosis or cell proliferation. The evolutionary history of the MAGE gene family can be divided into four phases. In phase I, a single-copy state of an ancestral gene and the evolutionarily conserved mode had lasted until the emergence of eutherian mammals. In phase II, eight subfamily ancestors, with the exception for MAGE-C and MAGE-D subfamilies, were formed via retrotransposition independently. This would coincide with a transposition burst of LINE elements at the eutherian radiation. However, MAGE-C was generated by gene duplication of MAGE-A. Phase III is characterized by extensive gene duplication within each subfamily and in particular the formation of palindromes in the MAGE-A subfamily, which occurred in an ancestor of the Catarrhini. Phase IV is characterized by the decay of a palindrome in most Catarrhini, with the exception of humans. Although the palindrome is truncated by frequent deletions in apes and Old World monkeys, it is retained in humans. Here, we argue that this human-specific retention stems from negative selection acting on MAGE-A genes encoding epitopes of cancer cells, which preserves their ability to bind to highly divergent HLA molecules. These findings are interpreted with consideration of the biological factors shaping recent human MAGE-A genes. PMID:21695252

  5. Treatment decision making for adolescents with familial hypercholesterolemia: Role of family history and past experiences.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Thomas I; Tse, Lisa L; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Ryan, Heather R; Leslie, Laurel K

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are at high risk for underdiagnosis and inadequate treatment. Yet, little is known about the factors that influence the medical decision making of AYAs with FH and their families. This study explores how family medical history, family narratives of medical experiences, and AYA medical experiences together function as "experiential evidence" and influence screening and treatment decisions. Twenty-four parents and AYAs affected by FH from a pediatric preventive cardiology practice responded to a survey and a semistructured qualitative interview. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Study design, instruments, and interpretation of results were informed by a 20-member stakeholder panel. AYAs and parents reported extensive personal and family experiences with cholesterol and cardiovascular conditions and treatments, sometimes distinct from FH, which were used as evidence to inform their own perceptions of FH risk and treatment. This experiential evidence impacted perceptions of: (1) hereditary risk for FH diagnoses, (2) risk for future cardiovascular disease, (3) risks associated with treatments, and (4) capacity to comply with recommended treatments. Although experiences of family members initially informed screening and treatment decisions, the subsequent personal experiences of AYAs led to new experiential evidence that informed future decisions. Family cardiovascular history related to and distinct from FH influenced screening and treatment decisions of AYAs and parents affected by FH. Additional clinical assessment of personal and family medical experiences may enhance understanding of the decision-making processes among AYAs and ultimately improve adherence to screening and treatment recommendations. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  7. High prevalence of thrombophilic traits in children with family history of thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, Meghan J; Ross, Cassie N; Pounder, Elizabeth; Cassidy, Danielle; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Goldenberg, Neil A

    2010-09-01

    To determine a proximate family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in (1) the prevalence of thrombophilia; (2) the frequency of recommended changes in management resulting from thrombophilia evaluation; and (3) outcomes in longitudinal follow-up. Laboratory thrombophilia investigation was performed in 56 children with first- or second-degree family history of thromboembolism before age 55 years, but without personal history of thromboembolism, who were enrolled in a prospective inception cohort. VTE risk factors, family history, thrombophilia findings, and management recommendations were systematically collected, along with thromboembolism risk episodes/exposures, prophylactic anticoagulation, major bleeds, and thromboembolism events during follow-up. The frequencies of all thrombophilia traits were higher than the general population. Among 32 children who underwent complete laboratory evaluation, 34% had >or=2 traits. Thrombophilia testing led to recommendations for risk-based transient antithrombotic prophylaxis in 71% of subjects. No thromboembolism episodes developed during more than 900 patient-months of follow-up, although at-risk exposures were infrequent. Risk-stratified approaches to primary prevention of pediatric VTE should be further evaluated in cooperative prospective studies.

  8. Is a positive family history of endometriosis a risk factor for endometrioma recurrence after laparoscopic surgery?

    PubMed

    Campo, Sebastiano; Campo, Vincenzo; Gambadauro, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    A total of 148 patients were followed up for an average of 30.1 ± 17 months following to laparoscopic excision of ovarian endometriomas by a single surgical team. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate the association between endometrioma recurrence and several factors, age, body mass index, family history, cyst diameter, number and location, adhesions or peritoneal implants, occurrence of spillage, postoperative treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, or pregnancies. The overall recurrence rate of the endometriomas was 18.2%. At bivariate analysis, recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with a positive family history of endometriosis (40% vs 14.8%). Recurrence was also more frequent, albeit nonsignificantly, in patients with a history of dysmenorrhea, intraoperative spillage, and postoperative hormonal suppression. At multivariate analysis with logistic regression, a positive family history of endometriosis was the only variable independently associated with endometrioma recurrence following laparoscopic removal (odds ratio 3.245; 95% confidence interval: 1.090-9.661).

  9. Association of premature hair graying with family history, smoking, and obesity: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyoseung; Ryu, Hyeong Ho; Yoon, Junghee; Jo, Seongmoon; Jang, Sihyeok; Choi, Mira; Kwon, Ohsang; Jo, Seong Jin

    2015-02-01

    Many researchers have been concerned about the association of hair graying with systemic diseases. However, the common factors associated with hair graying and systemic diseases have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify risk factors for premature hair graying (PHG) in young men. We conducted a cross-sectional study using questionnaires in young men. After a pilot study that included 1069 men, we surveyed 6390 men younger than 30 years about their gray hair status and various socioclinical characteristics. The age of participants in the main survey was 20.2 ± 1.3 years (mean ± SD). Of the 6390 participants, 1618 (25.3%) presented with PHG. Family history of PHG (odds ratio [OR], 12.82), obesity (OR, 2.61), and >5 pack-years history of smoking (OR, 1.61) were significantly associated with PHG. In the multivariate analysis, family history of PHG (OR, 2.63) and obesity (OR, 2.22) correlated with the severity of PHG. Owing to the use of questionnaires, the possibility of recall bias exists. Women were not evaluated in this study. Smoking, family history of PHG, and obesity are important factors associated with PHG. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of family hypertension history on exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Baggish, Aaron L; Weiner, Rory B; Yared, Kibar; Wang, Francis; Kupperman, Eli; Hutter, Adolph M; Picard, Michael H; Wood, Malissa J

    2009-07-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is a well-established, but highly variable, finding among exercise-trained persons. The causes for the variability in LV remodeling in response to exercise training remain incompletely understood. The present study sought to determine whether a family history of hypertension is a determinant of the cardiac response to exercise training. The cardiac parameters in 60 collegiate rowers (30 men/30 women; age 19.8 +/- 1.1 years) with (family history positive [FH+], n = 22) and without (family history negative [FH-], n = 38) a FH of hypertension were studied with echocardiography before and after 90 days of rowing training. The LV mass increased significantly in both groups. However, the LV mass increased significantly more in FH- persons (Delta 17 +/- 5 g/m(2)) than in FH+ persons (Delta 9 +/- 6 g/m(2), p <0.001) with distinctly differently patterns of LV hypertrophy between the 2 groups. FH- athletes experienced eccentric LV hypertrophy (relative wall thickness index 0.39 +/- 0.4) characterized by LV dilation. In contrast, FH+ athletes developed concentric LV hypertrophy (relative wall thickness index 0.44 +/- 0.3; p <0.001) characterized by LV wall thickening. Furthermore, the eccentric LV remodeling in FH- athletes was associated with a more robust enhancement of LV diastolic function than the concentric LV remodeling that occurred in FH+ athletes. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patterns of exercise-induced LV remodeling are strongly associated with FH history status.

  11. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining

  12. Assessing individual risk for AMD with genetic counseling, family history, and genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Cascella, R; Strafella, C; Longo, G; Manzo, L; Ragazzo, M; De Felici, C; Gambardella, S; Marsella, L T; Novelli, G; Borgiani, P; Sangiuolo, F; Cusumano, A; Ricci, F; Giardina, E

    2017-09-15

    PurposeThe goal was to develop a simple model for predicting the individual risk profile for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on the basis of genetic information, disease family history, and smoking habits.Patients and methodsThe study enrolled 151 AMD patients following specific clinical and environmental inclusion criteria: age >55 years, positive family history for AMD, presence of at least one first-degree relative affected by AMD, and smoking habits. All of the samples were genotyped for rs1061170 (CFH) and rs10490924 (ARMS2) with a TaqMan assay, using a 7500 Fast Real Time PCR device. Statistical analysis was subsequently employed to calculate the real individual risk (OR) based on the genetic data (ORgn), family history (ORf), and smoking habits (ORsm).Results and conclusionThe combination of ORgn, ORf, and ORsm allowed the calculation of the Ort that represented the realistic individual risk for developing AMD. In this report, we present a computational model for the estimation of the individual risk for AMD. Moreover, we show that the average distribution of risk alleles in the general population and the knowledge of parents' genotype can be decisive to assess the real disease risk. In this contest, genetic counseling is crucial to provide the patients with an understanding of their individual risk and the availability for preventive actions.Eye advance online publication, 15 September 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.192.

  13. Recurrence of Preterm Delivery in Women with a Family History of Preterm Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sherf, Yehonatan; Sheiner, Eyal; Vardi, Ilana Shoham; Sergienko, Ruslan; Klein, Jamie; Bilenko, Natalya

    2017-03-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the role of a family history of preterm delivery on the risk of preterm delivery in the next generation. Study Design A retrospective population-based study was conducted. Perinatal information was gathered from 2,303 familial triads, composed of mothers (F1), daughters (F2), and children (F3). All births occurred in the same regional medical center between the years 1991 and 2013. Statistical analysis using logistic regression was performed to define the risk of F2 delivering a preterm baby (F3) if she was born preterm herself, and then to define the risk of F2 delivering preterm if her mother (F1) gave birth preterm during any of her birthing events. Results The risk for preterm delivery of the F2 parturient was 34% greater if their mother (F1) at any of her births had delivered preterm, controlling for parity, maternal age at delivery, and preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio: 1.34, 95% confidence interval: -1.01 to 1.77; p = 0.042). Conclusion The family history of preterm delivery is an independent risk factor for preterm delivery. The family history includes the mother as well as one of the mother's sisters (F2 generation) being born preterm.

  14. Expanded IT-15 genes in patients without known family history of Huntington Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.A.; Klock, R.J.; Kennedu, D.

    1994-09-01

    The NYGH laboratory is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health to provide DNA-based diagnostic and predictive testing for HD through a network of provincial Genetics centres. To date, samples from 146 apparently independent kindreds were received to test and/or bank for HD. Not all have been assayed for size of the IT-15 gene, but in 19 cases an expansion (> 39 CAG repeats) was found despite lack of known family history. These cases were classified according to the likelihood that they are true {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} full expansions in IT-15. Six were unlikely, due to a lack of information (adoption, history uncertain, or pedigree not provided). Ten cases were considered possible or probable based on a good negative family history with parents who were asymptomatic beyond age 50 but family samples unavailable. For one of those, parents are deceased, but inference of parental alleles from the proband`s sibship suggests a pre-mutation allele of approximately 30 repeats. In 3 cases, a new expansion was considered proven. One was first ascertained by another laboratory and reported elsewhere. For another, the proband`s father has one allele of about 35 repeats. In a third remarkable case, the proband has an expanded allele near 50 repeats and a normal sized allele that matches one maternal allele. The father`s larger allele has 30+/-1 repeats. Paternity was established by concordance of 10 independent polymorphic alleles. Additional family samples may help to assess the allelic stability. This prevalence of new HD cases was unanticipated before discovery of the predisposing gene, but has emerged over the first year of direct diagnostic testing and may foreshadow greater demand for testing as the extended families become aware of their risks. These cases provoke new questions about interpretation of DNA data for patients, raise ethical concerns about informing extended families, and special counselling issues for families to whom HD is a new entity.

  15. Surveillance survey of family history in children with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dupépé, Esther B; Patel, Daxa M; Rocque, Brandon G; Hopson, Betsy; Arynchyna, Anastasia A; Bishop, E Ralee'; Blount, Jeffrey P

    2017-03-31

    OBJECTIVE Although there are known risk factors for the development of neural tube defects (NTDs), little is known regarding the role of family history. The authors' goal in this study is to describe the family history in their population of patients with NTDs. METHODS Surveys were completed for 254 patients who were accompanied by their biological mother during their annual visit to the multidisciplinary Spina Bifida Clinic at Children's of Alabama. An NTD has been diagnosed in all patients who are seen in this clinic (myelomeningocele, lipomeningocele, split cord malformation, and congenital dermal sinus tract). Each mother answered questions regarding known NTD risk factors and their pregnancy, as well as the family history of NTDs, other CNS disorders, and birth defects. RESULTS The overall prevalence of family history of NTDs in children with an NTD was 16.9% (n = 43), of which 3.1% (n = 8) were in first-degree relatives. In patients with myelomeningocele, 17.7% (n = 37) had a positive family history for NTDs, with 3.8% in first-degree relatives. Family history in the paternal lineage for all NTDs was 8.7% versus 10.6% in the maternal lineage. Twenty-two patients (8.7%) had a family history of other congenital CNS disorders. Fifteen (5.9%) had a family history of Down syndrome, 12 (4.7%) had a family history of cerebral palsy, and 13 (5.1%) patients had a family history of clubfoot. Fourteen (5.5%) had a family history of cardiac defect, and 13 (5.1%) had a family history of cleft lip or palate. CONCLUSIONS The family history of NTDs was 16.9% in children with NTD without a difference between maternal and paternal lineage. This high rate of positive family history suggests that genetics and epigenetics may play a larger role in the pathogenesis of NTD in the modern era of widespread folate supplementation.

  16. The promiscuous evolutionary history of the family Bromoviridae.

    PubMed

    Codoñer, Francisco M; Elena, Santiago F

    2008-07-01

    Recombination and segment reassortment are important contributors to the standing genetic variation of RNA viruses and are often involved in the genesis of new, emerging viruses. This study explored the role played by these two processes in the evolutionary radiation of the plant virus family Bromoviridae. The evolutionary history of this family has been explored previously using standard molecular phylogenetic methods, but incongruences have been found among the trees inferred from different gene sequences. This would not be surprising if RNA exchange was a common event, as it is well known that recombination and reassortment of genomes are poorly described by standard phylogenetic methods. In an attempt to reconcile these discrepancies, this study first explored the extent of segment reassortment and found that it was common at the origin of the bromoviruses and cucumoviruses and at least at the origin of alfalfa mosaic virus, American plum line pattern virus and citrus leaf rugose virus. Secondly, recombination analyses were performed on each of the three genomic RNAs and it was found that recombination was very common in members of the genera Bromovirus, Cucumovirus and Ilarvirus. Several cases of recombination involving species from different genera were also identified. Finally, a phylogenetic network was constructed reflecting these genetic exchanges. The network confirmed the taxonomic status of the different genera within the family, despite the phylogenetic noise introduced by genetic exchange.

  17. Headache prevalence and related symptoms, family history, and treatment habits in a representative population of children in Alba, Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavestro, Cinzia; Montrucchio, Francesca; Benci, Paola; Pompilio, Domenica; Mandrino, Silvia; Cencio, Pier Giuseppe; Frigeri, Maria Cristina; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    Headache is a widespread disorder in children, but little is known about the headache prevalence in northwest Italy, on less frequent migraine equivalents, family history, and treatment habits in children. This is an epidemiologic population-based study of a representative sample of children aged 3 to 11 years, conducted in Alba, Italy. We used a self-administered questionnaire to acquire information on gender, age, headache, possible migraine equivalents, family history for various diseases, and treatment habits. We distributed the questionnaire to 1152 children, and a total of 649 questionnaires were successfully completed. In the preschool age, 10.3% (seven boys and nine girls) of children suffered from headache. In school-age children, the prevalence of headache was 31.4% (75 boys and 80 girls; 27% in 6 year olds and 41% at age 9 years). We found a significant correlation between headache and abdominal pain in the entire sample and with cyclic vomiting syndrome and dizziness in school-age children only. Headache correlated significantly with a family history of headache, thyroid diseases, diabetes, hypertension, and vascular diseases. Headache was treated with drugs, primarily paracetamol, in 60 of the 171 (35%) children who reported headache and in 61% of the children with migraine; no subjects were treated with triptans. Headache is widespread in children, with a high prevalence of associated symptoms and family history for many other headache-related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between family history risk categories and prevalence of diabetes in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinping; Yang, Zhaojun; Xiao, Jianzhong; Xing, Xiaoyan; Lu, Juming; Weng, Jianping; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Jie; Tian, Haoming; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhu, Dalong; Ge, Jiapu; Chen, Li; Guo, Xiaohui; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Zhiguang; Lin, Lixiang; Wang, Na; Yang, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between different family history risk categories and prevalence of diabetes in the Chinese population. The family history of diabetes was obtained from each subject, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed for measuring the fasting and postload glucose and insulin levels based on a national representative cross-sectional survey of 46,239 individuals (age ≥ 20 years) in the 2007-2008 China National Diabetes and Metabolism Disorders Study. The family history risk categories of diabetes were high, moderate, and average (FH2 and FH1: at least two generations and one generation of first-degree relatives with diabetes, respectively; FH0: no first-degree relatives with diabetes). The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rates of diabetes were 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 26.4-39.7%) in FH2, 20.1% (95% CI: 18.2-22.1%) in FH1, and 8.4% (95% CI: 7.9-8.9%) in FH0 (P < 0.0001). The calculated homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and insulinogenic index (ΔI30/ΔG30) values showed significant trending changes among the three risk categories, with the most negative effects in FH2. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratios of having diabetes were 6.16 (95% CI: 4.46-8.50) and 2.86 (95% CI: 2.41-3.39) times higher in FH2 and FH1, respectively, than in FH0 after adjustment for classical risk factors for diabetes. Family history risk categories of diabetes have a significant, independent, and graded association with the prevalence of this disease in the Chinese population.

  19. On the ages of resonant, eroded and fossil asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Knežević, Zoran; Spoto, Federica; Cellino, Alberto; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2017-05-01

    In this work we have estimated 10 collisional ages of 9 families for which for different reasons our previous attempts failed. In general, these are difficult cases that required dedicated effort, such as a new family classifications for asteroids in mean motion resonances, in particular the 1/1 and 2/1 with Jupiter, as well as a revision of the classification inside the 3/2 resonance. Of the families locked in mean motion resonances, by employing a numerical calibration to estimate the Yarkovsky effect in proper eccentricity, we succeeded in determining ages of the families of (1911) Schubart and of the ;super-Hilda; family, assuming this is actually a severely eroded original family of (153) Hilda. In the Trojan region we found families with almost no Yarkovsky evolution, for which we could compute only physically implausible ages. Hence, we interpreted their modest dispersions of proper elements as implying that the Trojan asteroid families are fossil families, frozen at their proper elements determined by the original ejection velocity field. We have found a new family, among the Griquas locked in the 2/1 resonance with Jupiter, the family of (11097) 1994 UD1. We have estimated the ages of 6 families affected by secular resonances: families of (5) Astraea, (25) Phocaea, (283) Emma, (363) Padua, (686) Gersuind, and (945) Barcelona. By using in all these cases a numerical calibration method, we have shown that the secular resonances do not affect significantly the secular change of proper a. We have confirmed the existence of the family resulting from cratering on (5) Astraea by computing a new set of resonant proper elements adapted to the resonance g +g5 - 2g6 : this new family has a much larger membership and has a shape compatible with simple collisional models. For the family of (145) Adeona we could estimate the age only after removal of a number of assumed interlopers. With the present paper we have concluded the series dedicated to the determination of

  20. Early predictors of dyslexia in Chinese children: familial history of dyslexia, language delay, and cognitive profiles.

    PubMed

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lam, Fanny; Lam, Catherine; Chan, Becky; Fong, Cathy Y-C; Wong, Terry T-Y; Wong, Simpson W-L

    2011-02-01

    This work tested the rates at which Chinese children with either language delay or familial history of dyslexia at age 5 manifested dyslexia at age 7, identified which cognitive skills at age 5 best distinguished children with and without dyslexia at age 7, and examined how these early abilities predicted subsequent literacy skills. Forty-seven at-risk children (21 who were initially language delayed and 26 with familial risk) and 47 control children matched on age, IQ, and mothers' education were tested on syllable awareness, tone detection, rapid automatized naming, visual skill, morphological awareness, and word reading at age 5 and subsequently tested for dyslexia on a standard Hong Kong measure at age 7. Of those with an early language delay, 62% subsequently manifested dyslexia; for those with familial risk, the rate of dyslexia was 50%. Those with dyslexia were best distinguished from those without dyslexia by the age-5 measures of morphological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and word reading itself; other measures did not distinguish the groups. In a combined regression analysis across all participants, morphological awareness uniquely explained word reading accuracy and rapid automatized naming uniquely explained timed word reading at age 7, with all other measures statistically controlled. Separate stepwise regression analyses by group indicated that visual skill uniquely explained subsequent literacy skills in the at-risk group only, whereas tone and syllable awareness were unique predictors of literacy skills in the control group only. Both early language delay and familial risk strongly overlap with subsequent dyslexia in Chinese children. Overall, rapid automatized naming and morphological awareness are relatively strong correlates of developmental dyslexia in Chinese; visual skill and phonological awareness may also be uniquely associated with subsequent literacy development in at-risk and typically developing children, respectively. © 2010

  1. Reproductive and hormonal factors, family history, and breast cancer according to the hormonal receptor status.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Valentina; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; Talamini, Renato; Dal Maso, Luigino; Malvezzi, Matteo; Falcini, Fabio; Montella, Maurizio; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between breast cancer risk, reproductive factors, and family history of breast cancer by the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study including 1075 women with incident breast cancer and 1477 hospital controls. We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) of breast cancer using unconditional logistic regression models including major recognized risk factors for breast cancer. Stronger associations with ER+ than with ER- breast cancer were observed for parity (OR: 0.7 vs. 0.9 for ≥ 3 births vs. nulliparae), age at first birth (OR: 1.6 vs. 1.2 for age ≥ 30 vs. <25 years), menopausal status (OR: 0.7 vs. 0.8 for postmenopause vs. pre/perimenopause), age at menopause (OR: 1.3 vs. 1.2 for menopause at age ≥ 50 vs. <50 years), and family history of breast cancer (OR: 2.2 vs. 1.4). Among the ER+ patients, the presence of PR+ did not appreciably modify any of the risk estimates. The association with age at menarche and hormone replacement therapy use was neither significant nor heterogeneous across ER and PR subtypes. In conclusion, we found stronger associations with selected menstrual and reproductive factors for ER+ (PR+) than for ER- (PR-) breast cancers, though in the absence of significant heterogeneity.

  2. The Inextricable Link between Age and Criminal History in Sentencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushway, Shawn D.; Piehl, Anne Morrison

    2007-01-01

    In sentencing research, significant negative coefficients on age research have been interpreted as evidence that actors in the criminal justice system discriminate against younger people. This interpretation is incomplete. Criminal sentencing laws generally specify punishment in terms of the number of past events in a defendant's criminal history.…

  3. The Inextricable Link between Age and Criminal History in Sentencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushway, Shawn D.; Piehl, Anne Morrison

    2007-01-01

    In sentencing research, significant negative coefficients on age research have been interpreted as evidence that actors in the criminal justice system discriminate against younger people. This interpretation is incomplete. Criminal sentencing laws generally specify punishment in terms of the number of past events in a defendant's criminal history.…

  4. Systemic inflammation and family history in relation to the prevalence of type 2 diabetes based on an alternating decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Hirokazu; Ghaibeh, A. Ammar; Katsuura-Kamano, Sakurako; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Bahari, Tirani; Ishizu, Masashi; Moriguchi, Hiroki; Arisawa, Kokichi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate unknown patterns associated with type 2 diabetes in the Japanese population, we first used an alternating decision tree (ADTree) algorithm, a powerful classification algorithm from data mining, for the data from 1,102 subjects aged 35–69 years. On the basis of the investigated patterns, we then evaluated the associations of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as a biomarker of systemic inflammation and family history of diabetes (negative, positive or unknown) with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes because their detailed associations have been scarcely reported. Elevated serum hs-CRP levels were proportionally associated with the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes after adjusting for probable covariates, including body mass index and family history of diabetes (P for trend = 0.016). Stratified analyses revealed that elevated serum hs-CRP levels were proportionally associated with increased prevalence of diabetes in subjects without a family history of diabetes (P for trend = 0.020) but not in those with a family history or with an unknown family history of diabetes. Our study demonstrates that systemic inflammation was proportionally associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes even after adjusting for body mass index, especially in subjects without a family history of diabetes. PMID:28361994

  5. Systemic inflammation and family history in relation to the prevalence of type 2 diabetes based on an alternating decision tree.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Hirokazu; Ghaibeh, A Ammar; Katsuura-Kamano, Sakurako; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Bahari, Tirani; Ishizu, Masashi; Moriguchi, Hiroki; Arisawa, Kokichi

    2017-03-31

    To investigate unknown patterns associated with type 2 diabetes in the Japanese population, we first used an alternating decision tree (ADTree) algorithm, a powerful classification algorithm from data mining, for the data from 1,102 subjects aged 35-69 years. On the basis of the investigated patterns, we then evaluated the associations of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as a biomarker of systemic inflammation and family history of diabetes (negative, positive or unknown) with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes because their detailed associations have been scarcely reported. Elevated serum hs-CRP levels were proportionally associated with the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes after adjusting for probable covariates, including body mass index and family history of diabetes (P for trend = 0.016). Stratified analyses revealed that elevated serum hs-CRP levels were proportionally associated with increased prevalence of diabetes in subjects without a family history of diabetes (P for trend = 0.020) but not in those with a family history or with an unknown family history of diabetes. Our study demonstrates that systemic inflammation was proportionally associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes even after adjusting for body mass index, especially in subjects without a family history of diabetes.

  6. Age Trends in the Experience of Family Discord in Single-Mother Families across Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Jodi B.; Larson, Reed

    2001-01-01

    Utilized the Family Environment Scale and the Experience Sampling Method to evaluate how family discord was related to adolescents' age, in 101 single-mother families. Mothers' reports of overall discord decreased across adolescence. In immediate interactions, boys reported feeling more anger towards their mothers with age, while girls reported…

  7. Insulin sensitivity in African-American children with and without family history of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Danadian, K; Balasekaran, G; Lewy, V; Meza, M P; Robertson, R; Arslanian, S A

    1999-08-01

    African-Americans are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. We have previously demonstrated that African-American children are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant compared with their white American peers. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the impact of family history of type 2 diabetes on insulin sensitivity in African-American children. A total of 13 prepubertal healthy children with negative family history (FH-) and 9 with positive family history (FH+) of type 2 diabetes underwent a 3-h hyperinsulinemic (40 mU x m(-2) x min(-1))-euglycemic clamp study to assess insulin sensitivity. The groups were comparable for age, pubertal status, total body adiposity determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, abdominal adiposity assessed by computed tomography scan at the level of L4-5 lumbar vertebra, and physical fitness measured by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). The FH+, compared with the FH-, group had lower insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (10.9+/-1.2 vs. 14.2+/-0.9 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.035) and lower nonoxidative glucose disposal (5.7+/-0.8 vs. 8.3+/-0.6 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.015), with no differences in rates of glucose oxidation, fat oxidation, or insulin-mediated free fatty acid suppression. Fasting hepatic glucose production assessed with [6,6-2H2]glucose and basal rates of glucose and fat oxidation were not different between the two groups. These data suggest that in African-American children, family history of type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for insulin resistance. These children manifest important metabolic alterations, including impaired insulin-stimulated total and nonoxidative glucose disposal early in the first decade of life. We propose that this familial tendency, combined with environmental influences, could lead to type 2 diabetes decades later.

  8. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in subjects with family history of the disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; La Vecchia, C; D'Avanzo, B; Negri, E; Franceschi, S

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between lifestyle factors, past medical conditions, daily meal frequency, diet and the risk of 'familial' colorectal cancer has been analysed using data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy. A total of 1584 colorectal cancer patients and 2879 control subjects were admitted to a network of hospitals in the Greater Milan area and the Pordenone province. The subjects included for analysis were the 112 cases and the 108 control subjects who reported a family history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives. Colorectal cancer cases and control subjects with family history were similarly distributed according to sex, age, marital status, years of schooling and social class. Familial colorectal cancer was associated with meal frequency, medical history of diabetes (relative risk, RR = 4.6) and cholelithiasis (RR = 5.2). Significant positive trends of increasing risk with more frequent consumption were observed for pasta (RR = 2.5, for the highest vs the lowest intake tertile), pastries (RR = 2.4), red meat (RR = 2.9), canned meat (RR = 1.9), cheese (RR = 3.5) and butter (RR = 1.9). Significant inverse associations and trends in risk were observed for consumption of poultry (RR = 0.4), tomatoes (RR = 0.2), peppers (RR = 0.3) and lettuce (RR = 0.3). Significant inverse trends in risk with increasing consumption for beta-carotene and ascorbic acid were observed (RR = 0.5 and 0.4 respectively, highest vs lowest intake tertile). These results suggest that risk factors for subjects with a family history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives are not appreciably different from recognized risk factors of the disease in the general population.

  9. Effects of Family History of Alcohol Use Disorders on Spatial Working Memory BOLD Response in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Spadoni, Andrea D.; Norman, Andria L.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A positive family history (FH) of alcohol use disorders (AUD) has been linked to increased risk for the development of AUD, and neurocognitive factors have been postulated as important underlying mechanisms of familial alcoholism transmission. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a spatial working memory (SWM) and vigilance paradigm to investigate potential neurodevelopmental differences linked to familial density of AUD in 72 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years. Results Youth with denser family histories of AUD showed less activation during a simple vigilance condition relative to SWM in cingulate and medial frontal gyri (β = 0.28, p = 0.03), and a trend for more relative activity during rest (β = −0.25, p = 0.07) in this cluster. Conclusions Youth with greater familial densities of AUD may be less successful at modulating activity of the default network, potentially indicating a greater propensity for task-independent thought or reduced inhibition of task-irrelevant processing. Failure to moderate activation of the default network may have implications for cognitive efficiency and goal directed behavior in youth with dense FH. Further, aberrant activation in cingulate regions may be linked to genetic variation in GABA receptor units, suggesting a useful endophenotype for risk associated with alcohol dependence. PMID:18540914

  10. Age determination in refugee children: A narrative history tool for use in holistic age assessment.

    PubMed

    Vaska, Ashish I; Benson, Jill; Eliott, Jaklin A; Williams, Jan

    2016-05-01

    To present the rationale for using a narrative history tool as part of a holistic age assessment of accompanied refugee children with age uncertainty by exploring cultural narratives of age. Seven small group, semi-structured interviews with 24 humanitarian entrants (10 male, 14 female) recruited from Afghan, Bhutanese and Burundian communities in Adelaide, Australia were conducted. Interviews were performed with interpreters present, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Four themes emerged: the significance of age; ways of remembering age; the refugee experience and its effect on age recall; and the reliability and permissibility of documentation. Age was significant, but understood and remembered differently with knowledge of an exact date of birth not required for functioning in participants' home societies. Information regarding age was embedded in narrative accounts, related to events and other people. Birth was not always registered, with birth and age-containing documentation obtained later in life. These documents often reflected cultural ideas regarding age, rather than recording true chronological age. The refugee experience profoundly affected the ability of people to remember their age by disrupting methods used to recall specific events, including birth. Narrative history provides valuable information regarding age in accompanied refugee children with age uncertainty, and allows for age to be located within a range that approximates true chronological age when age documentation is absent or clearly erroneous. The Age Assessment Tool questionnaire provides health professionals with a framework for conducting age assessment interviews. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. History, Pathogenesis, and Management of Familial Gastric Cancer: Original Study of John XXIII's Family

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Giovanni; Roncalli, Fabrizio; Marrelli, Daniele; Carneiro, Fátima; Roviello, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is associated with the E-cadherin germline mutations, but genetic determinants have not been identified for familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. The guidelines for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are clearly established; however, there are no defined recommendations for the management of familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. Methods. In this study we describe Pope John XXIII's pedigree that harboured gastric cancer as well as six other family members. Family history was analysed according to the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium criteria, and gastric tumours were classified in accord with the last Japanese guidelines. Results. Seven out of 109 members in this pedigree harboured gastric cancer, affecting two consecutive generations. John XXIII's clinical tumour (cTN) was classified as cT4bN3a (IV stage). In two other cases, gastric carcinomas were classified as intestinal histotype and staged as pT1bN0 and pT2N2, respectively. Conclusions. Pope John XXIII's family presents a strong aggregation for gastric cancer affecting almost seven members; it spreads through two consecutive generations. In absence of defined genetic causes and considering the increased risk of gastric cancer's development in these families, as well as the high mortality rates and advanced stages, we propose an intensive surveillance protocol for asymptomatic members. PMID:23484115

  12. The Succession of Lineage Roles as Families Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Studied the succession of roles adopted from generation to generation as patterned in relation to the family life course, changes in health and dependency of various generations and factors such as family size, birth order, and sex. Proposes a conceptual framework for an analysis of aging and the family. (Author)

  13. A Young Patient with a Family History of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of causes of hypertension in young adults with a family history of hypertension needs to be methodical to identify potentially treatable causes. Renal- and renovascular imaging and measurement of plasma aldosterone and plasma renin activity are at the core of this evaluation in most patients. Pertinent aspects of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are discussed with a focus on the role of the endothelium in mediating early hypertension and a review of treatment strategies. Finally, the possibility that autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and primary aldosteronism are connected beyond coincidence is explored; evidence to support it is scant, although there is a likely role for aldosterone excess and the resultant hypokalemia in promoting cyst growth. PMID:25092599

  14. Limitations of backward integration method for asteroid family age estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, Viktor

    2017-10-01

    Determining the age of an asteroid family is important as it gives us a better understanding of the dynamics, formation and collisional evolution of a family. So far, a few methods for determining the age of a family have been developed. The most accurate one is probably the backward integration method (BIM) that works very well for young families. In this paper, we try to study its characteristics and limitations in more detail using a fictional asteroid family. The analysis is performed with two numerical packages: orbfit and mercury. We studied the clustering of the secular angles Ω and ϖ and obtained linear relationship between the depth of the clustering and the age of the family. Our results suggest that the BIM could be successfully applied only to families not older than 18 Myr.

  15. Running in the family or swimming in the gene pool: discriminating between family history and genetic risk in illness perceptions.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Abigail L; Giuliano, Traci A

    2007-11-01

    The present study sought to understand how the genetic component of a disease affects individual's risk perceptions. Specifically, participants read three scenarios that asked them to imagine that they had either genetic, ambiguous, of no family history for a hypothetical disease and to imagine that their parents' lifestyles were either healthy or unhealthy. As expected, when participants received an ambiguous family history (rather than a genetic history or no family history), they rated a healthy diet and exercise as more effective at preventing the disease when their parents lifestyles were discribed as unhealthy rather than healthy (N = 97).

  16. Influence of alcohol use and family history of alcoholism on neural response to alcohol cues in college drinkers.

    PubMed

    Dager, Alecia D; Anderson, Beth M; Stevens, Michael C; Pulido, Carmen; Rosen, Rivkah; Jiantonio-Kelly, Rachel E; Sisante, Jason-Flor; Raskin, Sarah A; Tennen, Howard; Austad, Carol S; Wood, Rebecca M; Fallahi, Carolyn R; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2013-01-01

    Heavy drinkers show altered functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol cues. Little is known about alcohol cue reactivity among college age drinkers, who show the greatest rates of alcohol use disorders. Family history of alcoholism (family history positive [FHP]) is a risk factor for problematic drinking, but the impact on alcohol cue reactivity is unclear. We investigated the influence of heavy drinking and family history of alcoholism on alcohol cue-related fMRI response among college students. Participants were 19 family history negative (FHN) light drinkers, 11 FHP light drinkers, 25 FHN heavy drinkers, and 10 FHP heavy drinkers, aged 18 to 21. During fMRI scanning, participants viewed alcohol images, nonalcohol beverage images, and degraded control images, with each beverage image presented twice. We characterized blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast for alcohol versus nonalcohol images and examined BOLD response to repeated alcohol images to understand exposure effects. Heavy drinkers exhibited greater BOLD response than light drinkers in posterior visual association regions, anterior cingulate, medial frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and dorsal striatum, and hyperactivation to repeated alcohol images in temporo-parietal, frontal, and insular regions (clusters > 8,127 μl, p < 0.05). FHP individuals showed increased activation to repeated alcohol images in temporo-parietal regions, fusiform, and hippocampus. There were no interactions between family history and drinking group. Our results parallel findings of hyperactivation to alcohol cues among heavy drinkers in regions subserving visual attention, memory, motivation, and habit. Heavy drinkers demonstrated heightened activation to repeated alcohol images, which could influence continued drinking. Family history of alcoholism was associated with greater response to repeated alcohol images in regions underlying visual attention, recognition, and encoding, which could

  17. Family history of hypertension and arterial elasticity characteristics in healthy young people.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Chen, Yuanyuan; Sun, Ningling; Liu, Xirong

    2008-05-01

    Family history of hypertension is a primary predictor of high blood pressure (BP). This study attempted to determine whether there is a gradual increase in BP and an early change in arterial elasticity characteristics between young healthy individuals with or without a family history of hypertension and whether or not this increase is apparent in males as well as in females. A total of 270 normotensive healthy individuals (112 men and 158 women, aged 16 to 30 years) with or without a family history of hypertension, participated in conventional BP measurement and completed questionnaires covering basic information and a detailed family history of cardiovascular disease. Large arterial (capacitive) compliance (C1) and small arterial (oscillatory or reflective) compliance (C2) were derived from HDI/PulseWave CR-2000 (Hypertension Diagnostics, Minneapolis, USA). Based on family history information about parents and grandparents, three groups were formed: subjects with at least one hypertensive parent (group A), subjects with only hypertensive grandparents (group B), and subjects with normotensive parents and grandparents (group C). Men in group A had lower C1 and C2 along with higher systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and heart rate than men in group C. Those in group B had intermediate C1, C2 and BP levels. C1 had a linear relationship with SBP, DBP, and heart rate. In the logistic regression model of family history of hypertension, C2 was lower in young normotensive males with parental hypertension (B = -0.315, exp B = 0.73, p = 0.03), independently of SBP, DBP, and heart rate. Among females, subjects with parental hypertension had higher systolic, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure (p < 0.05), and there were no significant differences in C1 and C2 between those with and those without parental hypertension. In conclusion, compared with normotensive offspring of normotensive parents, normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents had increased BP and

  18. Family history of completed suicide and characteristics of major depressive disorder: a STAR*D (sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression) study.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Alpert, Jonathan E; Gaynes, Bradley N; Warden, Diane; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Biggs, Melanie M; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Barkin, Jennifer L; Rush, A John

    2008-05-01

    Clinicians routinely ask patients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD) about their family history of suicide. It is unknown, however, whether patients with a family member who committed suicide differ from those without such a history. Patients were recruited for the STAR*D multicenter trial. At baseline, patients were asked to report first-degree relatives who had died from suicide. Differences in demographic and clinical features for patients with and without a family history of suicide were assessed. Patients with a family history of suicide (n=142/4001; 3.5%) were more likely to have a family history of MDD, bipolar disorder, or any mood disorder, and familial substance abuse disorder, but not suicidal thoughts as compared to those without such a history. The group with familial suicide had a more pessimistic view of the future and an earlier age of onset of MDD. No other meaningful differences were found in depressive symptoms, severity, recurrence, depressive subtype, or daily function. A history of completed suicide in a family member was associated with minimal clinical differences in the cross-sectional presentation of outpatients with MDD. Limitations of the study include lack of information about family members who had attempted suicide and the age of the probands when their family member died. STAR*D assessments were limited to those needed to ascertain diagnosis and treatment response and did not include a broader range of psychological measures.

  19. A family history of fracture and fracture risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanis, J A; Johansson, H; Oden, A; Johnell, O; De Laet, C; Eisman, J A; McCloskey, E V; Mellstrom, D; Melton, L J; Pols, H A P; Reeve, J; Silman, A J; Tenenhouse, A

    2004-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine whether a parental history of any fracture or hip fracture specifically are significant risk factors for future fracture in an international setting, and to explore the effects of age, sex and bone mineral density (BMD) on this risk. We studied 34,928 men and women from seven prospectively studied cohorts followed for 134,374 person-years. The cohorts comprised the EPOS/EVOS study, CaMos, the Rotterdam Study, DOES and cohorts at Sheffield, Rochester and Gothenburg. The effect of family history of osteoporotic fracture or of hip fracture in first-degree relatives, BMD and age on all clinical fracture, osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture risk alone was examined using Poisson regression in each cohort and for each sex. The results of the different studies were merged from the weighted beta coefficients. A parental history of fracture was associated with a modest but significantly increased risk of any fracture, osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture in men and women combined. The risk ratio (RR) for any fracture was 1.17 (95% CI=1.07-1.28), for any osteoporotic fracture was 1.18 (95% CI=1.06-1.31), and for hip fracture was 1.49 (95% CI=1.17-1.89). The risk ratio was higher at younger ages but not significantly so. No significant difference in risk was seen between men and women with a parental history for any fracture (RR=1.17 and 1.17, respectively) or for an osteoporotic fracture (RR=1.17 and 1.18, respectively). For hip fracture, the risk ratios were somewhat higher, but not significantly higher, in men than in women (RR=2.02 and 1.38, respectively). A family history of hip fracture in parents was associated with a significant risk both of all osteoporotic fracture (RR 1.54; 95CI=1.25-1.88) and of hip fracture (RR=2.27; 95% CI=1.47-3.49). The risk was not significantly changed when BMD was added to the model. We conclude that a parental history of fracture (particularly a family history of hip fracture) confers an

  20. Family History of Skin Cancer is Associated with Early-Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma Independent of MC1R Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Nicholas L.; Cartmel, Brenda; Leffell, David J.; Bale, Allen E.; Mayne, Susan T.; Ferrucci, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background As a marker of genetic susceptibility and shared lifestyle characteristics, family history of cancer is often used to evaluate an individual’s risk for developing a particular malignancy. With comprehensive data on pigment characteristics, lifestyle factors, and melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence, we sought to clarify the role of family history of skin cancer in early-onset basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Materials and Methods Early onset BCC cases (n=376) and controls with benign skin conditions (n=383) under age 40 were identified through Yale Dermatopathology. Self-report data on family history of skin cancer (melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer), including age of onset in relatives, was available from a structured interview. Participants also provided saliva samples for sequencing of MC1R. Results A family history of skin cancer was associated with an increased risk of early-onset BCC (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.80–3.45). In multivariate models, family history remained a strong risk factor for early-onset BCC after adjustment for pigment characteristics, UV exposure, and MC1R genotype (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.74–3.35). Conclusions Risk for BCC varied based upon the type and age of onset of skin cancer among affected relatives; individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with skin cancer prior to age 50 were at highest risk for BCC (OR 4.79, 95% CI 2.90–7.90). Even after taking into account potential confounding effects of MC1R genotype and various lifestyle factors that close relatives may share, family history of skin cancer remained strongly associated with early-onset BCC. PMID:26381319

  1. Family history of skin cancer is associated with early-onset basal cell carcinoma independent of MC1R genotype.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Nicholas L; Cartmel, Brenda; Leffell, David J; Bale, Allen E; Mayne, Susan T; Ferrucci, Leah M

    2015-12-01

    As a marker of genetic susceptibility and shared lifestyle characteristics, family history of cancer is often used to evaluate an individual's risk for developing a particular malignancy. With comprehensive data on pigment characteristics, lifestyle factors, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence, we sought to clarify the role of family history of skin cancer in early-onset basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Early onset BCC cases (n=376) and controls with benign skin conditions (n=383) under age 40 were identified through Yale dermatopathology. Self-report data on family history of skin cancer (melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer), including age of onset in relatives, was available from a structured interview. Participants also provided saliva samples for sequencing of MC1R. A family history of skin cancer was associated with an increased risk of early-onset BCC (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.80-3.45). In multivariate models, family history remained a strong risk factor for early-onset BCC after adjustment for pigment characteristics, UV exposure, and MC1R genotype (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.74-3.35). Risk for BCC varied based upon the type and age of onset of skin cancer among affected relatives; individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with skin cancer prior to age 50 were at highest risk for BCC (OR 4.79, 95% CI 2.90-7.90). Even after taking into account potential confounding effects of MC1R genotype and various lifestyle factors that close relatives may share, family history of skin cancer remained strongly associated with early-onset BCC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Family History Density of Alcoholism Relates to Left Nucleus Accumbens Volume in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita; Gillespie, Alicia J; Michael, Paul G; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A family history of alcoholism is a significant risk factor for the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Because common structural abnormalities are present in reward and affective brain regions in alcoholics and those with familial alcoholism, the current study examined the relationship between familial loading of AUDs and volumes of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in largely alcohol-naive adolescents, ages 12–16 years (N = 140). Method: The amygdala and NAcc were delineated on each participant’s T1-weighted anatomical scan, using FMRIB Software Library’s FMRIB Integrated Registration & Segmentation Tool, and visually inspected for accuracy and volume outliers. In the 140 participants with accurate segmentation (75 male/65 female), subcortical volumes were represented as a ratio to intracranial volume (ICV). A family history density (FHD) score was calculated for each adolescent based on the presence of AUDs in first- and second-degree relatives (range: 0.03–1.50; higher scores represent a greater prevalence of familial AUDs). Multiple regressions, with age and sex controlled for, examined the association between FHD and left and right amygdala and NAcc volume/ICV. Results: There was a significant positive relationship between FHD and left NAcc volume/ICV (ΔR2 = .04, p = .02). Post hoc regressions indicated that this effect was only significant in females (ΔR2 = .11, p = .006). Conclusions: This finding suggests that the degree of familial alcoholism, genetic or otherwise, is associated with alterations in reward-related brain structure. Further work will be necessary to examine whether FHD is related to future alcohol-related problems and reward-related behaviors. PMID:25486393

  3. Machine learning amplifies the effect of parental family history of Alzheimer's disease on list learning strategy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Coen, Michael H; La Rue, Asenath; Jonaitis, Erin; Koscik, Rebecca L; Hermann, Bruce; Sager, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Identification of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an essential first step in developing interventions to prevent or delay disease onset. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that deeper analyses of traditional cognitive tests may be useful in identifying subtle but potentially important learning and memory differences in asymptomatic populations that differ in risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Subjects included 879 asymptomatic higher-risk persons (middle-aged children of parents with AD) and 355 asymptotic lower-risk persons (middle-aged children of parents without AD). All were administered the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test at baseline. Using machine learning approaches, we constructed a new measure that exploited finer differences in memory strategy than previous work focused on serial position and subjective organization. The new measure, based on stochastic gradient descent, provides a greater degree of statistical separation (p = 1.44 × 10-5) than previously observed for asymptomatic family history and non-family history groups, while controlling for apolipoprotein epsilon 4, age, gender, and education level. The results of our machine learning approach support analyzing memory strategy in detail to probe potential disease onset. Such distinct differences may be exploited in asymptomatic middle-aged persons as a potential risk factor for AD.

  4. Family history and breast cancer hormone receptor status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuejuan; Castelao, Jose Esteban; Chavez-Uribe, Elisabet; Fernandez Rodriguez, Beatriz; Celeiro Muñoz, Catuxa; Redondo, Carmen M; Peña Fernandez, Maite; Novo Dominguez, Alejandro; Pereira, Carina Doris; Martínez, María Elena; García-Caballero, Tomás; Fraga Rodriguez, Máximo; Antúnez, José; Carracedo, Angel; Forteza-Vila, Jerónimo; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease that impacts racial/ethnic groups differently. Differences in genetic composition, lifestyles, reproductive factors, or environmental exposures may contribute to the differential presentation of breast cancer among Hispanic women. A population-based study was conducted in the city of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. A total of 645 women diagnosed with operable invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2005 participated in the study. Data on demographics, breast cancer risk factors, and clinico-pathological characteristics of the tumors were collected. Hormone receptor negative tumors were compared with hormone receptor postive tumors on their clinico-pathological characteristics as well as risk factor profiles. Among the 645 breast cancer patients, 78% were estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) or progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and 22% were ER-&PR-. Women with a family history of breast cancer were more likely to have ER-&PR- tumors than women without a family history (Odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-2.26). This association was limited to cancers diagnosed before age 50 (Odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-5.81). An increased proportion of ER-&PR- breast cancer was observed among younger Spanish women with a family history of the disease.

  5. Family History and Breast Cancer Hormone Receptor Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Uribe, Elisabet; Rodriguez, Beatriz Fernandez; Muñoz, Catuxa Celeiro; Redondo, Carmen M.; Fernandez, Maite Peña; Dominguez, Alejandro Novo; Pereira, Carina Doris; Martínez, María Elena; García-Caballero, Tomás; Rodriguez, Máximo Fraga; Antúnez, José; Carracedo, Angel; Forteza-Vila, Jerónimo; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease that impacts racial/ethnic groups differently. Differences in genetic composition, lifestyles, reproductive factors, or environmental exposures may contribute to the differential presentation of breast cancer among Hispanic women. Materials and Methods A population-based study was conducted in the city of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. A total of 645 women diagnosed with operable invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2005 participated in the study. Data on demographics, breast cancer risk factors, and clinico-pathological characteristics of the tumors were collected. Hormone receptor negative tumors were compared with hormone receptor postive tumors on their clinico-pathological characteristics as well as risk factor profiles. Results Among the 645 breast cancer patients, 78% were estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) or progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and 22% were ER−&PR−. Women with a family history of breast cancer were more likely to have ER−&PR− tumors than women without a family history (Odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.91–2.26). This association was limited to cancers diagnosed before age 50 (Odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.34–5.81). Conclusions An increased proportion of ER−&PR− breast cancer was observed among younger Spanish women with a family history of the disease. PMID:22238615

  6. Delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure abnormalities in youth with a family history of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Megan M.; Schwartz, Daniel; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Youth with family history of alcohol abuse have a greater risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Brain and behavior differences may underlie this increased vulnerability. The current study examined delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure in youth at high-risk for alcohol abuse, as determined by a family history of alcoholism (FH+), and youth without such family history (FH−). Methods Thirty-three healthy youth (FH+ = 15, FH− = 18), ages 11 to 15 years, completed a delay discounting task and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Tract Based Spatial Statistics (Smith et al., 2006), as well as follow-up region-of-interest analyses, were performed in order to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) between FH+ and FH− youth. Results FH+ youth showed a trend toward increased discounting behavior and had significantly slower reaction times on the delay discounting paradigm compared to FH− youth. Group differences in FA were seen in several white matter tracts. Furthermore, lower FA in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right optic radiation statistically mediated the relationship between FH status and slower reaction times on the delay discounting task. Conclusion Youth with a family history of substance abuse have disrupted white matter microstructure, which likely contributes to less efficient cortical processing, and may act as an intrinsic risk-factor contributing to an increased susceptibility of developing AUD. In addition, FHP youth showed a trend toward greater impulsive decision making, possibly representing an inherent personal characteristic that may facilitate substance use onset and abuse in high-risk youth. PMID:20586754

  7. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Nodora, Jesse N.; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A.; Gallo, Linda; Montenegro, María Mercedes Meza; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Millán, Luis Enrique Gutierrez; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Methods Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. Results In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Conclusions Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. PMID:26189937

  8. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women.

    PubMed

    Nodora, Jesse N; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A; Gallo, Linda; Meza Montenegro, María Mercedes; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Gutiérrez Millán, Luis Enrique; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Germline BAP1 mutational landscape of asbestos-exposed malignant mesothelioma patients with family history of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohar, Jill A.; Cheung, Mitchell; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Howard, Suzanne E.; Howard, Timothy D.; Hesdorffer, Mary; Peng, Hongzhuang; Rauscher, Frank J.; Testa, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Heritable mutations in the BAP1 tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to mesothelioma and other cancers. However, a large-scale assessment of germline BAP1 mutation incidence and associated clinical features in mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer has not been reported. Therefore, we examined the germline BAP1 mutation status of 150 mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer, 50 asbestos-exposed control individuals with a family history of cancers other than mesothelioma, and 153 asbestos-exposed individuals without familial cancer. No BAP1 alterations were found in control cohorts, but were identified in 9 of 150 mesothelioma cases (6%) with a family history of cancer. Alterations among these cases were characterized by both missense and frameshift mutations, and enzymatic activity of BAP1 missense mutants was decreased compared to wild-type BAP1. Furthermore, BAP1 mutation carriers developed mesothelioma at an earlier age that was more often peritoneal than pleural (5 of 9), and exhibited improved long-term survival compared to mesothelioma patients without BAP1 mutations. Moreover, many tumors harboring BAP1 germline mutations were associated with BAP1 syndrome, including mesothelioma and ocular/cutaneous melanomas, as well as renal, breast, lung, gastric, and basal cell carcinomas. Collectively, these findings suggest that mesothelioma patients presenting with a family history of cancer should be considered for BAP1 genetic testing to identify those individuals who might benefit from further screening and routine monitoring for the purpose of early detection and intervention. PMID:26719535

  10. Germline BAP1 Mutational Landscape of Asbestos-Exposed Malignant Mesothelioma Patients with Family History of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohar, Jill A; Cheung, Mitchell; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Howard, Suzanne E; Howard, Timothy D; Hesdorffer, Mary; Peng, Hongzhuang; Rauscher, Frank J; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Heritable mutations in the BAP1 tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to mesothelioma and other cancers. However, a large-scale assessment of germline BAP1 mutation incidence and associated clinical features in mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer has not been reported. Therefore, we examined the germline BAP1 mutation status of 150 mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer, 50 asbestos-exposed control individuals with a family history of cancers other than mesothelioma, and 153 asbestos-exposed individuals without familial cancer. No BAP1 alterations were found in control cohorts, but were identified in nine of 150 mesothelioma cases (6%) with a family history of cancer. Alterations among these cases were characterized by both missense and frameshift mutations, and enzymatic activity of BAP1 missense mutants was decreased compared with wild-type BAP1. Furthermore, BAP1 mutation carriers developed mesothelioma at an earlier age that was more often peritoneal than pleural (five of nine) and exhibited improved long-term survival compared to mesothelioma patients without BAP1 mutations. Moreover, many tumors harboring BAP1 germline mutations were associated with BAP1 syndrome, including mesothelioma and ocular/cutaneous melanomas, as well as renal, breast, lung, gastric, and basal cell carcinomas. Collectively, these findings suggest that mesothelioma patients presenting with a family history of cancer should be considered for BAP1 genetic testing to identify those individuals who might benefit from further screening and routine monitoring for the purpose of early detection and intervention.

  11. Family history of mood disorder and characteristics of major depressive disorder: a STAR*D (sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression) study.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Fava, Maurizio; Biggs, Melanie M; Shores-Wilson, Kathy; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Balasubramani, G K; Rush, A John

    2007-01-01

    Clinicians routinely ask patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) about their family history. It is unknown, however, if patients who report a positive family history differ from those who do not. This study compared the demographic and clinical features of a large cohort of treatment-seeking outpatients with non-psychotic MDD who reported that they did or did not have at least one first-degree relative who had either MDD or bipolar disorder. Subjects were recruited for the STAR( *)D multicenter trial. Differences in demographic and clinical features for patients with and without a family history of mood disorders were assessed after correcting for age, sex, race, and ethnicity. Patients with a family history of mood disorder (n=2265; 56.5%) were more frequently women and had an earlier age of onset of depression, as compared to those without such a history (n=1740; 43.5%). No meaningful differences were found in depressive symptoms, severity, recurrence, depressive subtype, or daily function. Women were twice as likely as men to report a positive family history of mood disorder, and a positive family history was associated with younger age of onset of MDD in the proband. Consistent with prior research, early age of onset appears to define a familial and, by extension, genetic subtype of major depressive disorder.

  12. A positive family history of hypertension might be associated with an accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes: Results from the National Center Diabetes Database (NCDD-02).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Mori, Yasumichi; Yamashita, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hidekatsu; Mishima, Shuichi; Handa, Nobuhiro; Shimokawa, Kotaro; Yoshida, Akiko; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Shimbo, Takuro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2017-03-18

    Type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by a combination of decreased insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity, can be delayed or prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviors. Therefore, it is important that the population in general understands their personal risk at an early age to reduce their chances of ever developing the disease. A family history of hypertension is known to be associated with insulin resistance, but the effect of a family history of hypertension on the onset of type 2 diabetes has not well been examined. We performed a retrospective study examining patient age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by analyzing a dataset of 1,299 patients (1,021 men and 278 women) who had been diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes during a health checkup. The mean ± standard deviation of the patient age at the time of the diagnosis of diabetes was 49.1 ± 10.4 years for patients with a family history of hypertension and 51.8 ± 11.4 years for patients without a family history of hypertension (p < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis showed a significant association between a family history of hypertension and a younger age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, independent of a family history of diabetes mellitus and a male sex, suggesting that a positive family history of hypertension might be associated with the accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Family history of alcoholism interacts with alcohol to affect brain regions involved in behavioral inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kareken, David A.; Dzemidzic, Mario; Wetherill, Leah; Eiler, William; Oberlin, Brandon G.; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Wang, Yang; O’Connor, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Impulsive behavior is associated with both alcohol use disorders and a family history of alcoholism (FHA). One operational definition of impulsive behavior is the stop signal task (SST), which measures the time needed to stop a ballistic hand movement. Objective Employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study right frontal responses to stop signals in heavy drinking subjects with and without FHA, and as a function of alcohol exposure. Methods Twenty two family history positive (FHP; age = 22.7 years, SD= 1.9) and 18 family history negative (FHN; age = 23.7, SD= 1.8) subjects performed the SST in fMRI in two randomized visits: once during intravenous infusion of alcohol, clamped at a steady-state breath alcohol (BrAC) concentration of 60mg%, and once during infusion of placebo saline. An independent reference group (n= 13, age= 23.7, SD= 1.8) was used to identify a priori right prefrontal regions activated by successful inhibition (Inh) trials, relative to ‘Go’ trials that carried no need for inhibition (Inh > Go). Results FHA interacted with alcohol exposure in right prefrontal cortex, where alcohol reduced [Inh > Go] activation in FHN subjects, but not in FHP subjects. Within this right frontal cortical region, stop signal reaction time (SSRT) also correlated negatively with [Inh > Go] activation, suggesting that the [Inh > Go] activity was related to inhibitory behavior. Conclusions The results are consistent with the low level of response theory (Schuckit, 1980; Quinn & Fromme, 2011), with FHP being less sensitive to alcohol’s effects. PMID:23468100

  14. The interpretability of family history reports of alcoholism in general community samples: Findings in a Midwestern US twin birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Mary; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Glowinski, Anne L.; Grant, Julia D.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Jacob, Theodore; Sher, Kenneth J.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although there is a long tradition in alcoholism research of using family history ratings, the interpretability of family history reports of alcoholism from general community samples has yet to be established. Methods Telephone interview data obtained from a large cohort of female like-sex twins (N = 3787, median age 22) and their biological parents (N = 2928, assessed at twins’ median age 15) were analyzed to determine agreement between parent self-report, parent ratings of coparent, and twin narrow (alcohol problems) versus broad (problem or excessive drinking) ratings of each parent. Results In European ancestry (EA) families, high tetrachoric correlations were observed between twin and cotwin ratings of parental alcohol problems, between twin and parent ratings of coparent alcohol problems using symptom-based and single-item assessments, as well as moderately high correlations between twin and both mother and father self-reports. In African American (AA) families, inter-rater agreement was substantially lower than for EA families, with no cases where father ratings of maternal alcohol problems agreed with either twin ratings or mother self-report; and both cotwin agreement and mother-twin agreement were reduced. Differences between EA and AA families were not explained by differences in years of cohabitation with father or mother’s education; however, underreporting of problems by AA parents may have contributed. Conclusions Results support the use of family history ratings of parental alcoholism in general community surveys for European ancestry families, but suggest that family history assessment in African American families requires improved methods. PMID:22235921

  15. Family history of myocardial infarction is an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø study.

    PubMed

    Braekkan, S K; Mathiesen, E B; Njølstad, I; Wilsgaard, T; Størmer, J; Hansen, J B

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that arterial cardiovascular diseases and venous thromboembolism (VTE) share common risk factors. A family history of myocardial infarction (MI) is a strong and independent risk factor for future MI. The purpose of the present study was to determine the impact of cardiovascular risk factors, including family history of MI, on the incidence of VTE in a prospective, population-based study. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and family history of MI were registered in 21,330 subjects, aged 25-96 years, enrolled in the Tromsø study in 1994-95. First-lifetime VTE events during follow-up were registered up to 1 September 2007. There were 327 VTE events (1.40 per 1000 person-years), 138 (42%) unprovoked, during a mean of 10.9 years of follow-up. In age- and gender-adjusted analysis, age [hazard ratio (HR) per decade, 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.82-2.12], gender (men vs. women; HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.55), body mass index (BMI; HR per 3 kg m(-2), 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31), and family history of MI (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.65) were significantly associated with VTE. Family history of MI remained a significant risk factor for total VTE (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.01-1.60) and unprovoked VTE (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.03-2.07) in multivariable analysis. Blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and smoking were not independently associated with total VTE. Family history of MI is a risk factor for both MI and VTE, and provides further evidence of a link between venous and arterial thrombosis.

  16. Family history of hepatocellulcar carcinoma is not associated with its patients’ prognosis after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family history of liver cancer is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the prognosis of patients with HCC with or without family history. Methods Data for 1,313 patients who underwent hepatectomy as initial treatment for HCC between 2000 and 2008 at a tertiary cancer center hospital were retrieved from a prospective database. A positive family history was defined as a self-reported history of HCC in first-degree relatives. Clinicopathologic characteristics were compared by family history. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regressions were applied for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Results Of 1,313 patients, 169 patients (12.9%) had first-degree relatives with a history of HCC. There were no significant differences between patients with or without family history in basic clinicopathologic characteristics. In either whole group or each stage according to the TNM staging system, first-degree family history was not associated with survival in all patients, hepatitis B virus-positive patients, as well as male patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that first-degree family history was not a prognostic factor, either for OS or DFS. Conclusion A first-degree family history of HCC is not associated with its patients’ prognosis after hepatectomy. PMID:24134117

  17. The effect of chronic disease family history on healthcare provider practice and patient behavior among Oregonians.

    PubMed

    Zlot, A I; Cox, S L; Silvey, K; Leman, R

    2012-01-01

    Family history is an independent risk factor for many chronic conditions. Therefore, efforts to prevent these diseases among asymptomatic people at high familial risk are justified to reduce the health burden of these chronic conditions. We analyzed 2006-2009 Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to examine associations between family history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC), and: (1) patient-reported clinician recommendations, (2) adoption of preventive and screening behaviors, and (3) chronic disease risk factors among respondents without a personal history of the condition. A positive family history was associated with a higher likelihood of reported discussion by clinicians of CRC and BC screening and a greater likelihood of respondents having cholesterol and CRC screening. The combination of family history and clinician recommendations significantly increased the odds of CRC and BC screening compared to family history alone. A positive family history was also associated with respondents reporting lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes, CVD, and CRC, but not BC. Awareness of family history prompts clinicians to recommend screening and may motivate patients to be screened. Understanding positive family history may also motivate patients to adopt healthy lifestyles.

  18. Differences in DNA methylation by extent of breast cancer family history in unaffected women.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Wu, Hui-Chen; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-02-01

    Breast cancer clusters within families but genetic factors identified to date explain only a portion of this clustering. Lower global DNA methylation in white blood cells (WBC) has been associated with increased breast cancer risk. We examined whether WBC DNA methylation varies by extent of breast cancer family history in unaffected women from high-risk breast cancer families. We evaluated DNA methylation levels in LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 in 333 cancer-free female family members of the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, the minority of which were known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We used generalized estimated equation models to test for differences in DNA methylation levels by extent of their breast cancer family history after adjusting for age. All unaffected women had at least one sister affected with breast cancer. LINE-1 and Sat2 DNA methylation levels were lower in individuals with 3 or more (3+) first-degree relatives with breast cancer relative to women with only one first-degree relative. For LINE-1, Alu, and Sat2, having 3+ affected first-degree relatives was associated with a decrease of 23.4% (95%CI = -46.8%, 0.1%), 17.9% (95%CI = -39.5%, 3.7%) and 11.4% (95% CI = -20.3%, -2.5%), respectively, relative to individuals with only one affected first-degree relative, but the results were only statistically significant for Sat2. Individuals having an affected mother had 17.9% lower LINE-1 DNA methylation levels (95% CI = -28.8%, -7.1%) when compared with those not having an affected mother. No associations were observed for Alu or Sat2 by maternal breast cancer status. If replicated, these results indicate that lower global WBC DNA methylation levels in families with extensive cancer histories may be one explanation for the clustering of cancers in these families. Family clustering of disease may reflect epigenetic as well as genetic and shared environmental factors.

  19. Differences in DNA methylation by extent of breast cancer family history in unaffected women

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Wu, Hui-Chen; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer clusters within families but genetic factors identified to date explain only a portion of this clustering. Lower global DNA methylation in white blood cells (WBC) has been associated with increased breast cancer risk. We examined whether WBC DNA methylation varies by extent of breast cancer family history in unaffected women from high-risk breast cancer families. We evaluated DNA methylation levels in LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 in 333 cancer-free female family members of the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, the minority of which were known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We used generalized estimated equation models to test for differences in DNA methylation levels by extent of their breast cancer family history after adjusting for age. All unaffected women had at least one sister affected with breast cancer. LINE-1 and Sat2 DNA methylation levels were lower in individuals with 3 or more (3+) first-degree relatives with breast cancer relative to women with only one first-degree relative. For LINE-1, Alu, and Sat2, having 3+ affected first-degree relatives was associated with a decrease of 23.4% (95%CI = −46.8%, 0.1%), 17.9% (95%CI = −39.5%, 3.7%) and 11.4% (95% CI = −20.3%, −2.5%), respectively, relative to individuals with only one affected first-degree relative, but the results were only statistically significant for Sat2. Individuals having an affected mother had 17.9% lower LINE-1 DNA methylation levels (95% CI = −28.8%, −7.1%) when compared with those not having an affected mother. No associations were observed for Alu or Sat2 by maternal breast cancer status. If replicated, these results indicate that lower global WBC DNA methylation levels in families with extensive cancer histories may be one explanation for the clustering of cancers in these families. Family clustering of disease may reflect epigenetic as well as genetic and shared environmental factors. PMID:24172832

  20. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy: A Nationwide Family Study in a Cohort of 3.9 Million Persons.

    PubMed

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina; Jensen, Morten K; Axelsson, Anna; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Bundgaard, Henning; Boyd, Heather A

    2015-09-15

    Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (<50 years) aggregates in families at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (<60 years) from cardiomyopathy. By linking Danish national register data, we constructed a cohort of 3.9 million persons born from 1950 to 2008. We ascertained family history of premature (<60 years) death from cardiomyopathy or other conditions, and cohort members were followed from 1977 to 2008 for cardiomyopathy diagnosed at <50 years. We identified 3890 cardiomyopathies in 89 million person-years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios for cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death. Premature cardiomyopathy deaths in first- and second-degree relatives were associated with 29- and 6-fold increases in the rate of cardiomyopathy, respectively. If the first-degree relative died aged <35 years, the rate of cardiomyopathy increased 100-fold; given ≥2 premature deaths in first-degree relatives, the rate increased more than 400-fold. In contrast, a family history of premature death from other cardiac or noncardiac conditions increased the rate of cardiomyopathy 3-fold at most. A family history of premature cardiomyopathy death was associated with an increase in risk of cardiomyopathy ranging from 6- to 400-fold, depending on age, kinship, gender and number of affected family members. Our general population-based results support recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Phenylthiocarbamide tasting and family history of depression, revisited: low rates of depression in families of supertasters.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Perez, Marisol

    2004-04-15

    Past studies suggest that phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste status is related to vulnerability to depression, such that those sensitive to PTC are more vulnerable. We questioned this, reasoning that those insensitive to PTC may be more vulnerable (because they may have lower hedonic tone and higher risk for alcohol abuse). Forty-two volunteers responded to questionnaires regarding family history of depression, and were assigned to supertaster, taster, or non-taster categories based on taste reactions to a 3.80 x 1.43 cm piece of commercially prepared paper treated with PTC. Supertasters were significantly less likely to report first-degree relatives with a history of depression than were tasters and non-tasters. Supertasters may be afforded some protection from depression; elucidating the mechanisms of this protection is a potentially interesting avenue for future research.

  2. The KinFact Intervention – A Randomized Controlled Trial to Increase Family Communication About Cancer History

    PubMed Central

    McClish, Donna; Gyure, Maria; Corona, Rosalie; Krist, Alexander H.; Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Maibauer, Alisa M.; Borzelleca, Joseph; Bowen, Deborah J.; Quillin, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Knowing family history is important for understanding cancer risk, yet communication within families is suboptimal. Providing strategies to enhance communication may be useful. Methods: Four hundred ninety women were recruited from urban, safety-net, hospital-based primary care women's health clinics. Participants were randomized to receive the KinFact intervention or the control handout on lowering risks for breast/colon cancer and screening recommendations. Cancer family history was reviewed with all participants. The 20-minute KinFact intervention, based in communication and behavior theory, included reviewing individualized breast/colon cancer risks and an interactive presentation about cancer and communication. Study outcomes included whether participants reported collecting family history, shared cancer risk information with relatives, and the frequency of communication with relatives. Data were collected at baseline, 1, 6, and 14 months. Results: Overall, intervention participants were significantly more likely to gather family cancer information at follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01, 3.71) and to share familial cancer information with relatives (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.37, 2.48). Communication frequency (1=not at all; 4=a lot) was significantly increased at follow-up (1.67 vs. 1.54). Differences were not modified by age, race, education, or family history. However, effects were modified by pregnancy status and genetic literacy. Intervention effects for information gathering and frequency were observed for nonpregnant women but not for pregnant women. Additionally, intervention effects were observed for information gathering in women with high genetic literacy, but not in women with low genetic literacy. Conclusions: The KinFact intervention successfully promoted family communication about cancer risk. Educating women to enhance their communication skills surrounding family history may allow them to partner

  3. Increased Pre- and Early-Adolescent Stress in Youth with a Family History of Substance Use Disorder and Early Substance Use Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Nora E.; Mathias, Charles W.; Acheson, Ashley; Bray, Bethany C.; Ryan, Stacy R.; Lake, Sarah L.; Liang, Yuanyuan; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of substance use disorders (Family History Positive) are more likely to have early-onset substance use (i.e., prior to age 15), which may contribute to their higher rates of substance use disorders. One factor that may differentiate Family History Positive youth who engage in early-onset substance use from other Family History Positive youth is exposure to stressors. The aim of this study was to quantify how exposure to stressors from age 11 to 15 varies as a function of family history of substance use disorders and early-onset substance use. Self-reported stressors were prospectively compared in a sample of predominately (78.9%) Hispanic youth that included 68 Family History Positive youth (50% female) who initiated substance use by age 15 and demographically matched non-users with (n=136; 52.9% female) and without (n=75; 54.7% female) family histories of substance use disorders. Stressors were assessed at 6-month intervals for up to 4 years. Both the severity of stressors and the degree to which stressors were caused by an individual’s own behavior were evaluated. All three groups differed from one another in overall exposure to stressors and rates of increase in stressors over time, with Family History Positive youth who engaged in early-onset substance use reporting the greatest exposure to stressors. Group differences were more pronounced for stressors caused by the participants’ behavior. Family History Positive users had higher cumulative severity of stressors of this type, both overall and across time. These results indicate greater exposure to stressors among Family History Positive youth with early-onset substance use, and suggest that higher rates of behavior-dependent stressors may be particularly related to early-onset use. PMID:25788123

  4. Increased Pre- and Early-Adolescent Stress in Youth with a Family History of Substance Use Disorder and Early Substance Use Initiation.

    PubMed

    Charles, Nora E; Mathias, Charles W; Acheson, Ashley; Bray, Bethany C; Ryan, Stacy R; Lake, Sarah L; Liang, Yuanyuan; Dougherty, Donald M

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with a family history of substance use disorders (Family History Positive) are more likely to have early-onset substance use (i.e., prior to age 15), which may contribute to their higher rates of substance use disorders. One factor that may differentiate Family History Positive youth who engage in early-onset substance use from other Family History Positive youth is exposure to stressors. The aim of this study was to quantify how exposure to stressors from age 11-15 varies as a function of family history of substance use disorders and early-onset substance use. Self-reported stressors were prospectively compared in a sample of predominately (78.9%) Hispanic youth that included 68 Family History Positive youth (50% female) who initiated substance use by age 15 and demographically matched non-users with (n = 136; 52.9% female) and without (n = 75; 54.7% female) family histories of substance use disorders. Stressors were assessed at 6-month intervals for up to 4 years. Both the severity of stressors and the degree to which stressors were caused by an individual's own behavior were evaluated. All three groups differed from one another in overall exposure to stressors and rates of increase in stressors over time, with Family History Positive youth who engaged in early-onset substance use reporting the greatest exposure to stressors. Group differences were more pronounced for stressors caused by the participants' behavior. Family History Positive users had higher cumulative severity of stressors of this type, both overall and across time. These results indicate greater exposure to stressors among Family History Positive youth with early-onset substance use, and suggest that higher rates of behavior-dependent stressors may be particularly related to early-onset use.

  5. The contribution of reproductive factors and family history towards premenopausal breast cancer risk in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razif, S Mohd; Sulaiman, S; Hanie, S Soraya; Aina, E Nor; Rohaizak, M; Fuad, I; Nurismah, M I; Sharifah, N A

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. This study aimed to determine the reproductive for premenopausal breast cancer risk in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A case-control study was conducted in 216 histopathologically confirmed cases of premenopausal breast cancer and 216 community-based controls that were matched by age within a 5-year period and ethnicity. The results of this study showed that premenopausal breast cancer risks were strongly related to parity, number of live births and family history of breast cancer. Premenopausal women with these known reproductive and family history risk factors should take extra measures to undergo appropriate screening method for early detection of breast cancer.

  6. Associations among family history of cancer, cancer screening and lifestyle behaviors: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bostean, Georgiana; Crespi, Catherine M; McCarthy, William J

    2013-08-01

    Some cancers are largely preventable through modification of certain behavioral risk factors and preventive screening, even among those with a family history of cancer. This study examined the associations between (1) family cancer history and cancer screening, (2) family history and cancer preventive lifestyle behaviors, and (3) cancer screening and lifestyle behaviors. Data were from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (n = 12,603). Outcomes included screening for breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) and six cancer preventive lifestyle behaviors, based on World Cancer Research Fund recommendations. Multivariate logistic regression analyses, stratified by gender and race-ethnicity, examined associations. Predicted probabilities of cancer screening by family cancer history, race-ethnicity, and sex were computed. Family history of site-specific cancer-CRC for men and women, and BC for women-was associated with higher probability of cancer screening for most groups, especially for CRC, but was largely unrelated to other lifestyle behaviors. In the few cases in which family history was significantly associated with lifestyle-for example, physical activity among White and Latino males, smoking among White and Asian females-individuals with a family history had lower odds of adherence to recommendations than those with no family history. Greater overall adherence to lifestyle recommendations was associated with higher odds of up-to-date CRC screening among White and Asian males, and lower odds among Asian females (no significant association with BC screening); this relationship did not vary by family cancer history. The fact that family history of cancer is not associated with better lifestyle behaviors may reflect shared behavioral risks within families, or the lack of knowledge about how certain lifestyle behaviors impact personal cancer risk. Findings can inform interventions aimed at lifestyle behavioral modification for individuals at increased

  7. Associations among Family History of Cancer, Cancer Screening and Lifestyle Behaviors: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Bostean, Georgiana; Crespi, Catherine M.; McCarthy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Some cancers are largely preventable through modification of certain behavioral risk factors and preventive screening, even among those with a family history of cancer. This study examined the associations between: (1) family cancer history and cancer screening; (2) family history and cancer preventive lifestyle behaviors; and, (3) cancer screening and lifestyle behaviors. Methods Data were from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (n=12,603). Outcomes included screening for breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) and six cancer preventive lifestyle behaviors, based on World Cancer Research Fund recommendations. Multivariate logistic regression analyses, stratified by gender and race-ethnicity, examined associations. Predicted probabilities of cancer screening by family cancer history, race-ethnicity and sex were computed. Results Family history of site-specific cancer—CRC for men and women, and BC for women—was associated with higher probability of cancer screening for most groups, especially for CRC, but was largely unrelated to other lifestyle behaviors. In the few cases in which family history was significantly associated with lifestyle—e.g., physical activity among White and Latino males, smoking among White and Asian females—individuals with a family history had lower odds of adherence to recommendations than those with no family history. Greater overall adherence to lifestyle recommendations was associated with higher odds of up-to-date CRC screening among White and Asian males, and lower odds among Asian females (no significant association with BC screening); this relationship did not vary by family cancer history. Conclusions The fact that family history of cancer is not associated with better lifestyle behaviors may reflect shared behavioral risks within families, or the lack of knowledge about how certain lifestyle behaviors impact personal cancer risk. Findings can inform interventions aimed at lifestyle behavioral

  8. A Qualitative Study of Early Family Histories and Transitions of Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories…

  9. A Qualitative Study of Early Family Histories and Transitions of Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories…

  10. Familial history of cancer and childhood acute leukemia: a French population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ripert, Mahaut; Menegaux, Florence; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lamagnére, Jean-Pierre; Margueritte, Geneviève; Boutard, Patrick; Robert, Alain; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Munzer, Martine; Millot, Frédéric; de Lumley, Lionel; Berthou, Christian; Rialland, Xavier; Pautard, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective A case-control study was conducted to investigate the role of a familial history of cancer in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (AL). Methods The history of cancer in the relatives of 472 cases was compared to that of 567 population-based controls. Recruitment was frequency matched on age, gender and region. The familial history of cancer in each child’s relatives was reported by the mother in response to a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Results A familial history of solid tumor in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of ALL (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), while a familial history of hematopoietic malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of AML (OR=4.3 [1.4–13]). The ORs for the histories of cancer increased with the number of relatives with cancer (OR=1.5 [1.1–2.0] for one relative and OR=2.3 [1.3–3.8] for two relatives or more; ptrend<0.0001). Significant associations between childhood AL and familial history of genital cancers and brain tumor were also observed (OR=2.7 [1.2–5.8], OR=10.7 [1.3–86], respectively). Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that a familial history of cancer may play a role in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. It also evidences some specific associations that require further investigation. PMID:17923819

  11. IMMUNOLOGIC AND GENETIC MARKERS IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC OCULAR INFLAMMATION AND A FAMILY HISTORY OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Javaneh; Martin, Tammy M.; Patel, Sarju; Tessler, Howard H; Goldstein, Debra A

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of immunologic and genetic markers in patients with idiopathic ocular inflammation and a family history of inflammatory bowel disease. DESIGN: Prospective, matched case-control study. METHODS: Patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic ocular inflammation and family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who did not have IBD themselves were identified and matched to control patients with idiopathic ocular inflammation without a personal or family history of IBD. Serum was evaluated for immunologic markers using Prometheus IBD 7 Serology®. Genomic DNA was analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of the NOD2 gene associated with Crohn’s disease. RESULTS: Fifteen patients with idiopathic ocular inflammation and family history of inflammatory bowel disease were matched to fifteen control patients based on age, gender, and race. 8/15 (53%) patients with a family history of IBD had elevated p-ANCA antibody levels compared to 3/15 (20%) of controls (one sided P=0.04) with a matched analysis OR of 6.0 [one-sided P=0.06]. 4/15 (27%) patients with family history of IBD tested positive for immunologic markers predicting ulcerative colitis, while no control patients tested positive [one-sided P=0.06]. Carrier rates of NOD2 SNPs did not differ significantly between the test and control groups. CONCLUSIONS: One quarter of patients with idiopathic ocular inflammation and a family history of inflammatory bowel disease had immunologic markers predicting IBD, and one half had elevated p-ANCA levels. IBD serology may be useful in the evaluation of selected patients with unexplained uveitis. PMID:22464367

  12. [The combined effects of family history of cardiovascular disease and overweight on ischemic stroke incidence among the Mongolian population].

    PubMed

    Tian, Y F; Zhang, J H; Lu, H M; Liu, Y Y; Zhou, Y P; Lu, Q; Buren, Rbt; Zhang, Y H

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To investigate the cumulative effect of family history of cardiovascular disease(CVD)and overweight on ischemic stroke events in the Mongolian population. Methods: Study participants were recruited from 32 villages from May 2002 to August 2012 in Kezuohou Banner(county)and Naiman Banner in Inner Mongolia, China. Among 3 457 Mongolian people aged ≥20 years old living in these villages, 2 589 were selected to participate in this study. None of the participants had chronic kidney disease, malignant tumor, thyroid disease or adrenalopathy, or acute infectious disease. The 2 589 participants were followed for a mean of 9.2 years. Six participants were lost to follow up, resulting in a follow-up rate of 99.8%. Information collected included demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, history of disease, family history of CVD, and physical examination. Ischemic stroke incidence information was collected during follow-up. All participants were categorized into four subgroups according to family history of CVD and overweight status. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios(HR)and 95% CI of ischemic stroke events among subgroups, compared with the subgroup with no family history of CVD and body mass index(BMI)<24 kg/m(2)(the reference group). Results: Among 2 589 participants, 76 ischemic stroke events occurred after follow-up, and 8 were excluded because of lack of key data. Finally, 2 581 participants were included in the analysis, and the incidence density was 323/100 000 person-years. The cumulative incidence rates of ischemic stroke were 2.48%, 1.86%, 6.67% and 9.00% in the no family history of CVD and BMI <24 kg/m(2), no family history of CVD and BMI ≥24 kg/m(2), family history of CVD and BMI <24 kg/m(2) and family history of CVD and BMI ≥ 24 kg/m(2) subgroups, respectively. Using the Cox proportional hazards model, after further adjustment for age, gender, smoking

  13. Family history, comorbidity, smoking and other risk factors in microscopic colitis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wickbom, Anna; Nyhlin, Nils; Montgomery, Scott M; Bohr, Johan; Tysk, Curt

    2017-05-01

    Data on heredity, risk factors and comorbidity in microscopic colitis, encompassing collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC), are limited. The aim was to carry out a case-control study of family history, childhood circumstances, educational level, marital status, smoking and comorbidity in microscopic colitis. A postal questionnaire was sent in 2008-2009 to microscopic colitis patients resident in Sweden and three population-based controls per patient, matched for age, sex and municipality. Some 212 patients and 627 controls participated in the study. There was an association with a family history of microscopic colitis in both CC [odds ratio (OR): 10.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1-50.4, P=0.004] and LC (OR not estimated, P=0.008). Current smoking was associated with CC [OR: 4.7; 95% CI: 2.4-9.2, P<0.001) and LC (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.6-6.7, P=0.002). The median age at diagnosis was around 10 years earlier in ever-smokers compared with never-smokers.CC was associated with a history of ulcerative colitis (UC) (OR: 8.7, 95% CI: 2.2-33.7, P=0.002), thyroid disease (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.5, P=0.02), coeliac disease (OR: 13.1; 95% CI: 2.7-62.7, P=0.001), rheumatic disease (OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0-3.5, P=0.042) and previous appendicectomy (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8, P=0.003), and LC with UC (OR: 6.8; 95% CI: 1.7-28.0, P=0.008), thyroid disease (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.1-5.4, P=0.037) and coeliac disease (OR: 8.7; 95% CI: 2.8-26.7, P<0.001). Association with a family history of microscopic colitis indicates that familial factors may be important. The association with a history of UC should be studied further as it may present new insights into the pathogenesis of microscopic colitis and UC.

  14. Family Extrusion of the Aged Patient: Family Homeostasis and Sexual Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael B.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Case studies demonstrate that when chronic sexual conflict constitutes a factor in family homeostasis, nursing home placement of the aged ill is a likely event when either there is a shift in family dynamics due to death or illness of a key member or the aged becomes overtly psychiatrically disabled. (Author)

  15. Family Extrusion of the Aged Patient: Family Homeostasis and Sexual Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael B.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Case studies demonstrate that when chronic sexual conflict constitutes a factor in family homeostasis, nursing home placement of the aged ill is a likely event when either there is a shift in family dynamics due to death or illness of a key member or the aged becomes overtly psychiatrically disabled. (Author)

  16. Ideal ages for family formation among immigrants in Europe.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jennifer A; de Valk, Helga A G

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates ideal ages for marriage and parenthood among immigrants from over 160 countries origins living in 25 European countries. Ideals regarding the timing of family formation are indicative of how individuals perceive the family life course and provide insight into family-life aspirations and the meaning attached to these transitions. Using data from the European Social Survey (Round 3, 2006; N=6330) and a cross-classified multilevel modeling approach, we investigate associations between the influences of the dominant family formation timing patterns in countries of origin and settlement, individual-level characteristics, and ideal ages. We make innovative use of a standard demographic measure, the singulate mean age of marriage, to measure family formation patterns. Results suggest that residential context influences are associated with the timing ideals of all migrants, but origin influences seem to be associated with the ideals of only the most recent migrants.

  17. No differences in ventral striatum responsivity between adolescents with a positive family history of alcoholism and controls.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kathrin U; Gan, Gabriela; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ströhle, Andreas; Struve, Maren; Schumann, Gunter; Smolka, Michael N

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with alcohol-dependent parents show an elevated risk of developing alcohol-related problems themselves. Modulations of the mesolimbic reward circuit have been postulated as a pre-existing marker of alcoholism. We tested whether a positive family history of alcoholism is correlated with ventral striatum functionality during a reward task. All participants performed a modified version of the monetary incentive delay task while their brain responses were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared 206 healthy adolescents (aged 13-15) who had any first- or second-degree relative with alcoholism to 206 matched controls with no biological relative with alcoholism. Reward anticipation as well as feedback of win recruited the ventral striatum in all participants, but adolescents with a positive family history of alcoholism did not differ from their matched peers. Also we did not find any correlation between family history density and reward anticipation or feedback of win. This finding of no differences did not change when we analyzed a subsample of 77 adolescents with at least one parent with alcohol use disorder and their matched controls. Because this result is in line with another study reporting no differences between children with alcohol-dependent parents and controls at young age, but contrasts with studies of older individuals, one might conclude that at younger age the effect of family history has not yet exerted its influence on the still developing mesolimbic reward circuit. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Family history of hypertension, heart disease, and stroke among women who develop hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Markovic, Nina; Bass, Debra; Harger, Gail; Roberts, James M

    2003-12-01

    To assess familial cardiovascular risk factors in women developing hypertension in pregnancy. Of 2211 women delivering live births after enrollment in a pregnancy cohort study, 85 (3.8%) developed preeclampsia (antepartum systolic blood pressure greater than 140 or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 plus proteinuria) and 142 (6.4%) developed transient hypertension of pregnancy (antepartum blood pressure elevation without proteinuria). At a mean of 10.2 weeks' gestation, women were asked about first-degree family members with heart disease or stroke, hypertension, diabetes, renal disease, or any of these, which defined familial cardiovascular risk. After adjustment for age and body size, having two or more family members, versus no family members, with cardiovascular risk imparted a 1.9-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1, 3.2) elevated risk for developing preeclampsia and a 1.7-fold (95% CI 1.1, 2.6) risk for developing transient hypertension of pregnancy. Having two or more family members with hypertension also imparted a significant, two-fold elevation in risk of preeclampsia and transient hypertension of pregnancy, and having two or more family members with heart disease or stroke imparted a 3.2-fold (95% CI 1.4, 7.7) elevation in the risk for preeclampsia. A strong family history of aggregate cardiovascular risk increased the likelihood for developing preeclampsia and transient hypertension of pregnancy. These findings support the theory that a preexisting tendency to cardiovascular risk, and particularly hypertension, increases a women's susceptibility to developing hypertension in pregnancy.

  19. Family History of Diabetes, Acculturation, and the Metabolic Syndrome among Mexican Americans: Proyecto SALSA.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Tamara; Perez, Angelica; Alcaraz, John; Talavera, Gregory; McCarthy, Jeanette J

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effect modifiers of the relationship between family history of diabetes, a proxy for genetic predisposition, and the metabolic syndrome. Subjects were a cross-sectional sample of 205 Mexican-Americans patients of the San Ysidro Health Center in San Diego County. Self-reported parental history of diabetes was examined as a risk factor for individual metabolic syndrome traits (hyperglycemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol) and a composite phenotype, defined both by standard modified National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria and using principal components analysis, in age and sex-adjusted multiple logistic and linear regression models. Family history of diabetes was most strongly associated with individual traits of hyperglycemia (P = .0002) and low HDL-C (P = .001) and conferred a significant increased odds of metabolic syndrome defined by both NCEP-ATPIII criteria (odds ratio 3.57, 95% confidence interval 1.82, 7.01; P = .0002) and by principal components analysis (P = 0.003). Moreover, the family history association with metabolic syndrome was modified by number of years living in the United States (interaction P = .04). This same effect was not seen for diabetes (P = .19). The results of our study support a common etiology for at least some components of the metabolic syndrome, especially hyperglycemia and low HDL-cholesterol, the basis of which may be genetic. Moreover, the effect of genes on these traits may be modified by longer duration in the United States, supporting the concept of gene-environment interaction in the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Type-2 diabetes family history delays the onset of type-1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zalloua, P A; Shbaklo, H; Halaby, G; Terwedow, H; Xu, X; Azar, S T

    2002-07-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease leading to insulin deficiency. Its occurrence is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 accounts for 45% of the genetic susceptibility for the disease, mainly the HLA-DQB1*0201 and HLA-DQB1*0302 alleles. Among the environmental factors involved, early exposure to cow's milk seems to be a trigger. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of T1D in 253 Lebanese Caucasian patients, in relation to HLA-DQB1*0201, HLA-DQB1*0302, HLA-DQB1*0602, gender, and early exposure to cow's milk, as well as to family history of T1D and type-2 diabetes (T2D). Our genetic analysis results show that in the patients studied, 77% and 40% were positive for BQ1*0201 and BQ1*0302, respectively. As for BQ1*0602, only 0.8% of patients were positive for this T1D protective allele, compared with 24% among the controls. Furthermore, our results did not show any gender preference of the disease or any effects of early intake of cow's milk on the age at onset of T1D. When family history of T2D or T1D was studied, our results show a novel finding whereby an immediate family history of T2D, but not T1D, delays the age at onset of T1D.

  1. Families with School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The…

  2. Relations between the course of illness, family history of schizophrenia and family functioning in persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ruzić, Klementina; Palijan, Tija Zarković; Graovac, Mirjana; Siuc-Valković, Dunja; Knez, Rajna; Grahovac, Tanja

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the aspects of family functioning which are associated with the course and remission of schizophrenia and to explore relations between aspects of family functioning and family history of schizophrenia. The subjects were 90 patients, treated at the Clinical hospital centre in Rijeka, Croatia, with diagnosed schizophrenia (F20.0 to F20.5) and without psychiatric comorbidity. The patients were organized into three groups depending on the treatment status during the calendar year that preceded the year in which the survey took place: patients with schizophrenia who received an outpatient care and were maintaining favourable remission, patients who were hospitalized once to twice and patients who were hospitalized at least three times in the precedent calendar year. The treatment status was used as an indicator of the course of the illness. A Family Functioning Scale was applied and the data on the absence/presence of schizophrenia in the family history were collected through the examination of previous medical records. The lowest prevalence of familial schizophrenia was found among the patients who were maintaining favourable remission. Among the three groups statistically significant differences were found regarding the following family functioning variables: expressiveness, family sociability, democratic family style. Also there were observed statistically significant differences in the family functioning depending on the presence/absence of the schizophrenia in the family history that included following domains: family cohesion, external locus of control and democratic family style. Our study gives support to the conclusion that family functioning of persons with schizophrenia differs depending on the course of the illness and presence/absence of schizophrenia in the family history.

  3. Home renovation, family history of atopy, and respiratory symptoms and asthma among children living in China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Simckes, Maayan; Zelicoff, Alan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the association of indoor air pollution with the respiratory health of children, we evaluated the associations of children's respiratory symptoms with asthma and recent home renovation. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a school recruitment sample of 31,049 children aged 2 to 14 years in 25 districts of 7 cities of northeast China in 2008-2009. The children's parents completed standardized questionnaires characterizing the children's histories of respiratory symptoms and illness, recent home renovation information, and other associated risk factors. The effects of home renovation in the past 2 years were significantly associated with cough, phlegm, current wheeze, doctor-diagnosed asthma, and current asthma. The associations we computed when combining the status of home renovation and family history of atopy were higher than were those predicted from the combination of the separate effects. However, the interactions between home renovation and family history of atopy on a multiplicative scale were not statistically significant (P>.05). Home renovation is associated with increases in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. The effects of different renovation materials on child respiratory health should be studied further.

  4. Home Renovation, Family History of Atopy, and Respiratory Symptoms and Asthma Among Children Living in China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Simckes, Maayan; Zelicoff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the association of indoor air pollution with the respiratory health of children, we evaluated the associations of children’s respiratory symptoms with asthma and recent home renovation. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a school recruitment sample of 31 049 children aged 2 to 14 years in 25 districts of 7 cities of northeast China in 2008–2009. The children’s parents completed standardized questionnaires characterizing the children’s histories of respiratory symptoms and illness, recent home renovation information, and other associated risk factors. Results. The effects of home renovation in the past 2 years were significantly associated with cough, phlegm, current wheeze, doctor-diagnosed asthma, and current asthma. The associations we computed when combining the status of home renovation and family history of atopy were higher than were those predicted from the combination of the separate effects. However, the interactions between home renovation and family history of atopy on a multiplicative scale were not statistically significant (P > .05). Conclusions. Home renovation is associated with increases in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. The effects of different renovation materials on child respiratory health should be studied further. PMID:24228648

  5. Atypical parietal lobe activity to subliminal faces in youth with a family history of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Peraza, Jennifer; Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) show different behavioral and neurological functioning during emotional processing tasks from healthy controls. Adults with a family history (FHP) of AUD also show different activation in limbic brain areas, such as the amygdala. However, it is unclear if this pattern exists during adolescence before any episodes of heavy alcohol use. Objectives We hypothesized that the amygdalar response to subliminally-presented fearful faces would be reduced in FHP adolescents compared to peers who were family history negative (FHN) for AUD. Method An adapted Masked Faces paradigm was used to examine blood oxygen level-dependent response to subliminal fearful vs. neutral faces in 14 FHP (6 females, 8 males) and 15 FHN (6 females, 9 males) youth, ages 11–15 years. Both FHP and FHN youth had no history of heavy alcohol consumption. Results A significant difference was seen between groups in the left superior parietal lobule FHN youth showed deactivation to fearful and neutral masked faces compared to baseline, whereas FHP youth showed deactivation only to fearful masked faces. No significant differences in amygdalar activation were seen between groups. Conclusion The left superior parietal lobule is part of the fronto-parietal network, which has been implicated in attentional control. Lack of reduced neural activity to neutral faces among FHP youth may represent differences in suppressing attention networks to less salient emotional stimuli, or perhaps, a higher threshold of saliency for emotional stimuli among at-risk youth. PMID:25268683

  6. Atypical parietal lobe activity to subliminal faces in youth with a family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Peraza, Jennifer; Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2015-03-01

    Adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) show different behavioral and neurological functioning during emotional processing tasks from healthy controls. Adults with a family history (FHP) of AUD also show different activation in limbic brain areas, such as the amygdala. However, it is unclear if this pattern exists during adolescence before any episodes of heavy alcohol use. We hypothesized that the amygdalar response to subliminally-presented fearful faces would be reduced in FHP adolescents compared to peers who were family history negative (FHN) for AUD. An adapted Masked Faces paradigm was used to examine blood oxygen level-dependent response to subliminal fearful vs. neutral faces in 14 FHP (6 females, 8 males) and 15 FHN (6 females, 9 males) youth, ages 11-15 years. Both FHP and FHN youth had no history of heavy alcohol consumption. A significant difference was seen between groups in the left superior parietal lobule FHN youth showed deactivation to fearful and neutral masked faces compared to baseline, whereas FHP youth showed deactivation only to fearful masked faces. No significant differences in amygdalar activation were seen between groups. The left superior parietal lobule is part of the fronto-parietal network, which has been implicated in attentional control. Lack of reduced neural activity to neutral faces among FHP youth may represent differences in suppressing attention networks to less salient emotional stimuli, or perhaps, a higher threshold of saliency for emotional stimuli among at-risk youth.

  7. Changing Family and Sex Roles: An Assessment of Age Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Stan L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Studied 759 married pairs at different points in their life cycles. When they were compared in terms of such factors as preferred division of labor between spouses, actual family role enactment, marital decision-making, and attitudes about "alternative family forms," similarities across different age groups were far more important than…

  8. Personal history of dieting and family history of obesity are unrelated: implications for understanding weight gain proneness.

    PubMed

    Lowe, M R; Shank, L M; Mikorski, R; Butryn, M L

    2015-04-01

    Identifying predictors of future weight gain is important in obesity prevention efforts. Both family history of obesity and personal dieting history have been established as predictors of future weight gain; however, it is unknown if they are independent or overlapping predictors. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of overlap between these two predictors using cross-sectional data. Baseline data from four studies were examined separately and in combination for a total of 561 female participants, and analyses were conducted to examine parent anthropometric variables by dieting status within and across studies. All participants were female university students between the ages of 17 and 30. For each study, as well as for the entire sample combined, parent anthropometric variables were examined by dieting status using factorial ANOVAs. No meaningful pattern was found when examining parent anthropometric variables by dieting status, which suggests that the two risk factors are largely independent. This suggests that the processes associated with the development of future weight gain by each variable are different; therefore, future research should use a longitudinal study to test the hypothesis that using both variables to predict future weight gain would account for more variance than using either variable alone.

  9. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were “pushed out” (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults’ trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults’ family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  10. Childhood stress exposure among preadolescents with and without family histories of substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Nora E.; Ryan, Stacy R.; Acheson, Ashley; Mathias, Charles W.; Liang, Yuanyuan; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Having a family history of substance use disorders (FH+) increases risk for developing a substance use disorder. This risk may be at least partially mediated by increased exposure to childhood stressors among FH+ individuals. However, measures typically used to assess exposure to stressors are narrow in scope and vary across studies. The nature of stressors that disproportionately affect FH+ children, and how these stressors relate to later substance use in this population, are not well understood. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess exposure to a broad range of stressors among FH+ and FH− children to better characterize how exposure to childhood stressors relates to increased risk for substance misuse among FH+ individuals. Methods A total of 386 children (305 FH+, 81 FH−; ages 10-12) were assessed using the Stressful Life Events Schedule prior to the onset of regular substance use. Both the number and severity of stressors were compared. Preliminary follow-up analyses were done for 53 adolescents who subsequently reported initiation of substance use. Results FH+ children reported more frequent and severe stressors than did FH− children, specifically in the areas of housing, family, school, crime, peers, and finances. Additionally, risk for substance use initiation during early adolescence was influenced directly by having a family history of substance use disorders and also indirectly through increased exposure to stressors among FH+ individuals. Conclusions FH+ children experience greater stress across multiple domains, which contributes to their risk for substance misuse and related problems during adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:25134029

  11. Suicide Attempts and Family History of Suicide in Three Psychiatric Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremeau, Fabien; Staner, Luc; Duval, Fabrice; Correa, Humberto; Crocq, Marc-Antoine; Darreye, Angelina; Czobor, Pal; Dessoubrais, Cecile; Macher, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The influence of a family history of suicide on suicide attempt rate and characteristics in depression, schizophrenia, and opioid dependence was examined. One hundred sixty inpatients with unipolar depression, 160 inpatients with schizophrenia, and 160 opioid-dependent patients were interviewed. Overall, a family history of suicide was associated…

  12. Family Structure History: Links to Relationship Formation Behaviors in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Schelar, Erin; Manlove, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Using data from three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 4,667), we examined the intergenerational link between parental family structure history and relationship formation in young adulthood. We investigated (a) whether parental family structure history is associated with young adults' own relationship formation…

  13. Family Structure History: Links to Relationship Formation Behaviors in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Schelar, Erin; Manlove, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Using data from three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 4,667), we examined the intergenerational link between parental family structure history and relationship formation in young adulthood. We investigated (a) whether parental family structure history is associated with young adults' own relationship formation…

  14. Writing the Social History of One's Family...Revised Guidelines for Faculty Members and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard; Hareven, Tamara K.

    The Anonymous Families History Project of the University of Minnesota developed guidelines for college students researching and writing the social histories of their families. Included in the guidelines are interview questions, tips for conducting an oral interview, a primary source list, and a bibliography of background reading. Question topics…

  15. Suicide Attempts and Family History of Suicide in Three Psychiatric Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremeau, Fabien; Staner, Luc; Duval, Fabrice; Correa, Humberto; Crocq, Marc-Antoine; Darreye, Angelina; Czobor, Pal; Dessoubrais, Cecile; Macher, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The influence of a family history of suicide on suicide attempt rate and characteristics in depression, schizophrenia, and opioid dependence was examined. One hundred sixty inpatients with unipolar depression, 160 inpatients with schizophrenia, and 160 opioid-dependent patients were interviewed. Overall, a family history of suicide was associated…

  16. Persisting Racial Disparities in Colonoscopy Screening of Persons with a Family History of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Xirasagar, Sudha; de Groen, Piet C

    2017-08-15

    With 23 and 47% higher colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality, respectively, among African Americans vs. Whites, CRC screening studies are important. Screening guidelines recommend 5-yearly colonoscopy screening of persons with a family history of CRC (first-degree relatives, FDRs), beginning at 40 years of age. For this elevated-risk group, colonoscopy screening is preferred because of the risk of more aggressive cancer that may elude early detection by other methods. African Americans with a family history of CRC are at the intersection of two elevated risk demographics, race and FDR status. This study explored racial disparities in colonoscopy screening of FDRs using 2005, 2010, and 2015 national survey data on 3220 Whites and 466 African Americans.Despite increasing colonoscopy rates among FDRs (72.3 and 62.2% in 2015 among Whites and African Americans, respectively), the 40-49 age group showed substantial racial disparities each year, persisting through 2015 (58.8, 31.7, and 35.3% lower among African Americans in 2005, 2010, and 2015, respectively). Adjusted analysis of the pooled 3-year sample showed that FDRs aged 40-49 years had one-third the colonoscopy likelihood of the 50-plus age group. African Americans without college education were 40 and 60% less likely than Whites without college and with college education, respectively, to have had a colonoscopy. The sustained, high screening disparity, and low colonoscopy rates in the 40-49 age group overall, call for novel approaches to reduce CRC mortality disparities, such as, patient navigation programs to reach out to younger FDRs, particularly, less educated African Americans.

  17. Family history, near work, outdoor activity, and myopia in Singapore Chinese preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Low, Wilson; Dirani, Mohamed; Gazzard, Gus; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Zhou, Hui-Jun; Selvaraj, Prabakaran; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Young, Terri L; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the risk factors for myopia, including near work and outdoor activity, in Singapore Chinese preschool children. Methods A cross-sectional study, with disproportionate random sampling by 6-month age groups, of 3009 Singapore Chinese children aged 6–72 months was performed. Information on family history, near work and outdoor activity was obtained. Spherical equivalent refraction (SEA) was assessed. Results Children with two myopic parents were more likely to be myopic (adjusted OR=1.91; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.63) and to have a more myopic SER (regression coefficient=−0.35; 95% CI −0.47 to −0.22) than children without myopic parents. For each 1 cm taller height, the SER was more myopic by 0.01 dioptres. Neither near work nor outdoor activity was associated with preschool myopia. Conclusions A family history of myopia was the strongest factor associated with preschool myopia. In contrast, neither near work nor outdoor activity was found to be associated with early myopia. These data suggest that genetic factors may play a more substantial role in the development of early-onset myopia than key environmental factors. PMID:20472747

  18. Arterial hypertension in migraine: Role of familial history and cardiovascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Babayan, Laura; Mamontov, Oleg V; Amelin, Alexander V; Bogachev, Mikhail; Kamshilin, Alexei A

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that migraine is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, links between autonomic cardiovascular regulation, arterial hypertension (AH) and migraine are still little explored. In this study, we evaluated autonomic regulation in migraine patients with and without hypertension. We studied 104 patients with migraine, aged 34±10 y, including 28 with and 76 without hypertension (M+AH and M-AH groups, respectively). The control group consisted of 88 healthy volunteers matched by age and sex. The autonomic regulation of circulation was examined with the tilt-table test, deep-breathing and Valsalva Maneuver, handgrip test, cold-stress induced vasoconstriction, arterial baroreflex, and blood pressure variability measurements. We found that migraine patients with concomitant hypertension demonstrated reduced arterial baroreflex, whereas other parameters of cardiac autonomic regulation were unchanged. In contrast, most indicators of vasomotor reactivity (blood pressure response to the hand-grip, Valsalva maneuver and cold vasoconstriction) were enhanced in migraine patients with no significant differences between migraine patients with and without hypertension. Patients from both M+AH and M-AH groups more commonly had a family history of cardiovascular disorders. Our data revealed increased vasomotor reactivity in migraine patients, with or without concomitant hypertension. This was associated with the family history of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Opposite Cannabis-Cognition Associations in Psychotic Patients Depending on Family History

    PubMed Central

    González-Pinto, Ana; González-Ortega, Itxaso; Alberich, Susana; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Bernardo, Miguel; Bioque, Miquel; Cabrera, Bibiana; Corripio, Iluminada; Arango, Celso; Lobo, Antonio; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M.; Cuesta, Manuel J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate cognitive performance in a first-episode psychosis sample, when stratifying the interaction by cannabis use and familial or non-familial psychosis. Hierarchical-regression models were used to analyse this association in a sample of 268 first-episode psychosis patients and 237 controls. We found that cannabis use was associated with worse working memory, regardless of family history. However, cannabis use was clearly associated with worse cognitive performance in patients with no family history of psychosis, in cognitive domains including verbal memory, executive function and global cognitive index, whereas cannabis users with a family history of psychosis performed better in these domains. The main finding of the study is that there is an interaction between cannabis use and a family history of psychosis in the areas of verbal memory, executive function and global cognition: that is, cannabis use is associated with a better performance in patients with a family history of psychosis and a worse performance in those with no family history of psychosis. In order to confirm this hypothesis, future research should explore the actual expression of the endocannabinoid system in patients with and without a family history of psychosis. PMID:27513670

  20. Opposite Cannabis-Cognition Associations in Psychotic Patients Depending on Family History.

    PubMed

    González-Pinto, Ana; González-Ortega, Itxaso; Alberich, Susana; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Bernardo, Miguel; Bioque, Miquel; Cabrera, Bibiana; Corripio, Iluminada; Arango, Celso; Lobo, Antonio; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate cognitive performance in a first-episode psychosis sample, when stratifying the interaction by cannabis use and familial or non-familial psychosis. Hierarchical-regression models were used to analyse this association in a sample of 268 first-episode psychosis patients and 237 controls. We found that cannabis use was associated with worse working memory, regardless of family history. However, cannabis use was clearly associated with worse cognitive performance in patients with no family history of psychosis, in cognitive domains including verbal memory, executive function and global cognitive index, whereas cannabis users with a family history of psychosis performed better in these domains. The main finding of the study is that there is an interaction between cannabis use and a family history of psychosis in the areas of verbal memory, executive function and global cognition: that is, cannabis use is associated with a better performance in patients with a family history of psychosis and a worse performance in those with no family history of psychosis. In order to confirm this hypothesis, future research should explore the actual expression of the endocannabinoid system in patients with and without a family history of psychosis.

  1. Frequency of family history of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Argentine FRICAS (Factores de Riesgo Coronario en America del Sur) Investigators.

    PubMed

    Ciruzzi, M; Schargrodsky, H; Rozlosnik, J; Pramparo, P; Delmonte, H; Rudich, V; Piskorz, D; Negri, E; Soifer, S; La Vecchia, C

    1997-07-15

    The relation between family history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the risk of AMI was analyzed using data of a case-control study conducted in Argentina between 1992 and 1994. Case patients were 1,060 subjects with AMI admitted to 35 coronary care units, and controls were 1,071 subjects admitted to the same network of hospitals where cases had been identified, for a wide spectrum of acute conditions unrelated to known or likely risk factors for AMI: 31% of cases versus 15% of controls reported > or = 1 first-degree relative with history of AMI. Compared with subjects without family history of AMI, the odds ratio (OR) of AMI, after allowance for age, sex, cholesterolemia, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, education, social class, and physical exercise, was 2.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.74 to 2.74) for those with family history of AMI. The OR was 2.04 (95% CI 1.60 to 2.60) for subjects with 1 relative, and 3.18 (95% C 1.86 to 5.44) for those reporting > or = 2 relatives with AMI. In women the OR for any family history of AMI was 2.83, and in men 2.01. The association was of similar magnitude if the mother (OR 1.98), the father (OR 2.13), or a sibling (OR 2.48) had had an AMI. The association with family history was stronger at a younger age because the OR for subjects reporting > or = 2 more relatives with a history of AMI was 4.42 for subjects aged < 55 years, and 3.00 for those aged > or = 55 years. The association between AMI and family history of AMI was consistent across separate strata of education, social class, smoking, and serum cholesterol, but was less strong in subjects with history of diabetes and hypertension. When the interaction of known risk factors with family history of AMI was analyzed, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and smoking had approximately multiplicative effects on the relative risk. The OR was 4.50 for subjects with family history and cholesterol > or = 240 ml/dl, 4.52 for those with hypertension, and

  2. Family history and risk of hospital treatment for varicose veins in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Zöller, B; Ji, J; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2012-07-01

    Family history has been suggested as a risk factor for varicose veins, but recall bias may inflate the familial risks. The aim of this nationwide study was to determine familial risks for hospital treatment for varicose veins. Data from the Swedish Multi-Generation Register of people aged 0-76 years were linked to Hospital Discharge Register data for 1964-2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for individuals whose relatives were treated in hospital for varicose veins and compared with those whose relatives were not. Only main diagnoses of varicose veins were considered. A total of 39 396 people had hospital treatment for varicose veins. The familial SIR among offspring with one affected parent was 2·39 (95 per cent confidence interval 2·32 to 2·46). The SIR for those with one affected sibling was 2·86 (2·76 to 2·97). SIRs were increased in both men and women. The SIR for individuals with two or more affected siblings or with two affected parents was 5·88 (5·28 to 6·53) and 5·52 (4·77 to 6·36) respectively. The SIR for the wives of men treated for varicose veins was 1·69 (1·59 to 1·80); that for the husbands of women treated for varicose veins was 1·68 (1·58 to 1·79). Using the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register, and thereby eliminating recall bias, family history of hospital treatment for varicose veins was associated with an increased risk of similar treatment among relatives. The increased spousal risk suggests a contribution from non-genetic factors. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The relationship between family history of cancer, coping style and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Cao, Chunmei

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between family history of cancer, coping style and psychological distress. Total 80 patients with family history of cancer and 72 normal controls were analyzed using self-reporting inventory (SCL-90), coping style scale and impact of event scale-revised (IES-R). 1. Between the two groups of patients, there were significant differences in anxiety, depression, cancer-specific distress and coping style. 2. Psychological distress (anxiety, depression and cancer-specific distress) had positive correlation with negative coping style and family history. 3. Negative coping style played an intermediary role in the family history and psychological distress. The negative coping style will predispose to a more stronger psychological distress among the individuals with family history of cancer.

  4. Family health history communication networks of older adults: importance of social relationships and disease perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J

    2013-10-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication (have shared and intend to share new FHH information with family members) to inform public health efforts to facilitate FHH dissemination. Information on 970 social network members enumerated by 99 seniors (aged 57 years and older) at 3 senior centers in Memphis, Tennessee, through face-to-face interviews was analyzed. Participants shared FHH information with 27.5% of the network members; 54.7% of children and 24.4% of siblings. Two-level logistic regression models showed that participants had shared FHH with those to whom they provided emotional support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.836) and felt close to (OR = 1.757). Network-members were more likely to have received FHH from participants with a cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.617) and higher familiarity with (OR = 1.380) and importance of sharing FHH with family (OR = 1.474). Participants intended to share new FHH with those who provide tangible support to (OR = 1.804) and were very close to them (OR = 2.112). Members with whom participants intend to share new FHH were more likely to belong to the network of participants with higher perceived severity if family members encountered heart disease (OR = 1.329). Many first-degree relatives were not informed of FHH. Perceptions about FHH and disease risk as well as quality of social relationships may play roles in whether seniors communicate FHH with their families. Future studies may consider influencing these perceptions and relationships.

  5. Positive family history of coronary atherosclerosis and serum triglycerides may predict repeated coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Mennander, Ari; Angervuori, Tuula; Huhtala, Heini; Karhunen, Pekka; Tarkka, Matti; Kuukasjärvi, Pekka

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular risk factor profile of patients in need of repeated coronary artery bypass surgery (redo CABG) seldom differ from patients having only single coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of positive family history for coronary artery disease in respect to redo CABG vs CABG in a case-control setting. One hundred and eighty four patients undergoing redo CABG between 1990-1998 were identified from the computed registry of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery in Tampere University Hospital. One hundred and eighty four age, gender and operation date matched patients with CABG were selected for control. According to chi-square analysis, positive family history for coronary artery disease was more common in Study group, 60.4% versus 49.5% (p<0.05). Preoperative systolic blood pressure was 135.5+/-1.4 mmHg versus 133.5+/-1.5 mmHg (ns), preoperative diastolic blood pressure was 81.2+/-0.8 mmHg versus 82.8+/-0.9 mmHg (ns), serum total cholesterol was 5.8+/-0.1 mmol/L versus 6.6+/-1.2 mmol/L and preoperative blood glucose was 5.6+/-0.2 mmol/L versus 5.3+/-0.2 mmol/L (ns) in Controls and Study group, respectively. However, serum triglyceride level was significantly higher in Study group 2.8+/-0.2 mmol/L versus 2.0+/-0.1 mmol/L (p<0.000). In regression analysis, only positive family history (OR=2.4; 95% CI=1.1-5.1; p<0,02) and high serum triglyceride level (>or=2 mmol/L, OR=1.6; 95% CI=1.2-2.2; p<0,02) were independent predictors for redo CABG. According to this study, positive family history for coronary atherosclerosis at the presence of high serum triglyceride level is significantly predicting the need for future redo CABG as compared with age, gender and operation time matched controls of CABG.

  6. Family history of venous thromboembolism and identifying factor V Leiden carriers during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Amanda L; Momirova, Valerija; Dizon-Townson, Donna; Wenstrom, Katharine; Wendel, George; Samuels, Philip; Sibai, Baha; Spong, Catherine Y; Cotroneo, Margaret; Sorokin, Yoram; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J; Conway, Deborah; Wapner, Ronald J

    2010-03-01

    To estimate whether there is a correlation between family history of venous thromboembolism and factor V Leiden mutation carriage in gravid women without a personal history of venous thromboembolism. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of the frequency of pregnancy-related thromboembolic events among carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation. Family history of venous thromboembolism in either first- or second-degree relatives was self-reported. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of family history to predict factor V Leiden mutation carrier status were calculated. Women without a personal venous thromboembolism history and with available DNA were included (n=5,168). One hundred forty women (2.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.2%]) were factor V Leiden mutation-positive. Four hundred twelve women (8.0% [95% CI 7.3-8.7%]) reported a family history of venous thromboembolism. Women with a positive family history were twofold more likely to be factor V Leiden mutation carriers than those with a negative family history (23 of 412 [5.6%] compared with 117 of 4,756 [2.5%], P<.001). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of a family history of a first- or second-degree relative for identifying factor V Leiden carriers were 16.4% (95% CI 10.7-23.6%), 92.3% (95% CI 91.5-93.0%), and 5.6% (95% CI 3.6-8.3%), respectively. Although a family history of venous thromboembolism is associated with factor V Leiden mutation in thrombosis-free gravid women, the sensitivity and positive predictive values are too low to recommend screening women for the factor V Leiden mutation based solely on a family history.

  7. Work, Health, and Family at Older Ages in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Raymo, James M.; Liang, Jersey; Kobayashi, Erika; Sugihara, Yoko; Fukaya, Taro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate ways in which the relationship between health and labor force exit at older ages is moderated by family characteristics. Using two waves of data from a national sample of older Japanese men collected 1999 and 2002, we estimate logistic regression models for labor force exit beyond age 63 as a function of health change, family characteristics, and their interactions. We confirm that poor health is strongly associated with labor force exit and find evidence that moderating influences of family context depend upon the level of health. However, results are only partially consistent with hypotheses that the relationship between health and the likelihood of labor force exit should be stronger for (a) those with good health and family incentives to exit the labor force and (b) those with poor health and family incentives to remain in the labor force. PMID:23082037

  8. Increased Mortality Exposure within the Family Rather than Individual Mortality Experiences Triggers Faster Life-History Strategies in Historic Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Störmer, Charlotte; Lummaa, Virpi

    2014-01-01

    Life History Theory predicts that extrinsic mortality risk is one of the most important factors shaping (human) life histories. Evidence from contemporary populations suggests that individuals confronted with high mortality environments show characteristic traits of fast life-history strategies: they marry and reproduce earlier, have shorter birth intervals and invest less in their offspring. However, little is known of the impact of mortality experiences on the speed of life histories in historical human populations with generally higher mortality risk, and on male life histories in particular. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether individual-level mortality experiences within the family have a greater effect on life-history decisions or family membership explains life-history variation. In a comparative approach using event history analyses, we study the impact of family versus individual-level effects of mortality exposure on two central life-history parameters, ages at first marriage and first birth, in three historical human populations (Germany, Finland, Canada). Mortality experience is measured as the confrontation with sibling deaths within the natal family up to an individual's age of 15. Results show that the speed of life histories is not adjusted according to individual-level mortality experiences but is due to family-level effects. The general finding of lower ages at marriage/reproduction after exposure to higher mortality in the family holds for both females and males. This study provides evidence for the importance of the family environment for reproductive timing while individual-level mortality experiences seem to play only a minor role in reproductive life history decisions in humans. PMID:24421897

  9. The Long History of Old Age The Long History of Old Age Thane Pat Thames & Hudson £25 320 0 500 25126 6 0500251266 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This book provides an absorbing overview of 'old age', charting the history of ageing within society. It aims to right the misconceptions of ageing throughout history by writing about topics that have been 'for too long surrounded by taboo' and by challenging some of the misconceptions associated with getting older.

  10. Mixed-Age Interactions in Family Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Loraine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined how preschoolers' experiences with mixed-age peers in family child care homes affect development. Found that interaction with younger and same-age peers was associated with less complex social and cognitive play and lower receptive language scores. Interaction with older peers was related to more complex cognitive play. The setting…

  11. Birth Order, Age-Spacing, IQ Differences, and Family Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfouts, Jane H.

    1980-01-01

    Very close age spacing was an obstacle to high academic performance for later borns. In family relations and self-esteem, first borns scored better and performed in school as well as their potentially much more able younger siblings, regardless of age spacing. (Author)

  12. Relationship of epicardial fat thickness with endothelial and cardiac functions in children with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Ragab A; Alzaiat, Ahmad; Yousry, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that many of the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause atherosclerotic disease may be present in early childhood in children with family history of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to investigate the relation of epicardial fat thickness (EFT) with flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and diastolic function in children with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We measured EFT, FMD, in 209 children (mean age 8.6 + 3.2 years). Children were classified into 2 groups: 109 children with a family history of type 2 diabetes (group at risk) and 100 healthy children with age and body mass index matched and without parental history of diabetes constituted the control group. Epicardial fat thickness was significantly increased in group at risk compared with control children (P < 0.001), while FMD was significantly lower in group at risk versus controls (P < 0.001). EFT was inversely correlated with FMD (r = -0.46; P < 0.001), while it was positively correlated with E/E' (r = 0.48; P < 0.001) and hsCRP (r = 0.39; P < 0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a cutoff value of 5 mm for EFT can predict endothelial dysfunction in children with family history of DM area under the curve (AUC = 0.852) with a specificity of 92.2% and a sensitivity of 77.4%. Our results suggest that children with family history of type 2 diabetes bear considerably impaired FMD% and diastolic dysfunction associated with increased EFT, that reflecting process that promote the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Interviews with primary care physicians regarding taking and interpreting the cancer family history

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Alan; Flynn, Brian S

    2008-01-01

    Background. The cancer family history can be used to stratify risk and guide management regarding screening and prevention of cancer. Objective. The current study was designed to gain understanding of specific barriers to obtaining and using the cancer family history for the primary care physician. Methods. Interviews were conducted with structured samples of specialists in family medicine, general internal medicine and gynaecology in three settings in two north-eastern states. A medical anthropologist conducted interviews based on a topical outline; transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Results. Among 40 urban, suburban and rural physicians interviewed, 40% were women and medical school graduation years ranged from 1963 to 2000. These physicians regarded cancer family history as important, but process and content were not standardized. Major barriers to more focused use of this information included limitations of patients’ family history knowledge; time needed to clarify and interpret this information and the lack of clear and accessible guidelines to assist in collection, interpretation and management decisions for average, moderate and higher risk patients. Language and cultural barriers made it more difficult to collect family histories in some populations. Conclusions. Barriers to effective application of cancer family history information included limitations of patients’ family history information; lack of methods to systematically and efficiently focus on the most useful information and lack of accessible guidance for risk stratification and management. Results suggest a need for support addressing these concerns to better utilize several readily available cancer risk management opportunities. PMID:18765407

  14. Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to slow aging and extend healthspan.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Cohen, Harvey J; Kraus, William E; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2017-08-01

    Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from laboratory animal models to human clinical trials. Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges, among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging. To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18 biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and 38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics studied were known predictors of age-related disease and mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood. Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity, childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively, we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent health system contact according to electronic medical records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants' early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who responds to anti-aging therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Acting Out History from the Ice Age to the Modern Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattioli, Denee J.; Drake, Frederick

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the teaching methods of Michael Welch, a seventh grade teacher, who incorporates the humanities, such as drama and literature, into his history classroom in order to help students learn to question, think analytically, solve problems, and make decisions. Summarizes a particular unit on the Ice Age. (CMK)

  16. Acting Out History from the Ice Age to the Modern Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattioli, Denee J.; Drake, Frederick

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the teaching methods of Michael Welch, a seventh grade teacher, who incorporates the humanities, such as drama and literature, into his history classroom in order to help students learn to question, think analytically, solve problems, and make decisions. Summarizes a particular unit on the Ice Age. (CMK)

  17. LIFE HISTORY. Age-related mortality explains life history strategies of tropical and temperate songbirds.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas E

    2015-08-28

    Life history theory attempts to explain why species differ in offspring number and quality, growth rate, and parental effort. I show that unappreciated interactions of these traits in response to age-related mortality risk challenge traditional perspectives and explain life history evolution in songbirds. Counter to a long-standing paradigm, tropical songbirds grow at similar overall rates to temperate species but grow wings relatively faster. These growth tactics are favored by predation risk, both in and after leaving the nest, and are facilitated by greater provisioning of individual offspring by parents. Increased provisioning of individual offspring depends on partitioning effort among fewer young because of constraints on effort from adult and nest mortality. These growth and provisioning responses to mortality risk finally explain the conundrum of small clutch sizes of tropical birds.

  18. It's A Family Affair: Reflections About Aging and Health Within a Family Context.

    PubMed

    Utz, Rebecca L; Berg, Cynthia A; Butner, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    One's health and aging cannot be uncoupled from the family system in which it occurs. Not only do families provide genetic material that determines major health risks and outcomes, families also share a culture, environment, and lifestyle that further influence health and aging trajectories. As well, family members are interconnected, so that an illness or a positive lifestyle change in one person can have reverberating effects on the health and well-being of others in the family system. This essay explores how families have the potential to both promote and threaten individual health and well-being, thereby influencing how an individual might age or experience later life. Weaving together personal biographies from three different authors, this essay provides specific examples of how the family affects the health and aging of individuals and how the health and aging of individuals affect the larger family unit. These dynamic processes have the potential to positively or negatively shape individual experiences of health and aging, even among those persons who are not yet in late life. This essay blends a developmental life course perspective with a dynamic family-systems approach to show how families engage in collaborative efforts throughout the life course, in which they both affect and are affected by the diagnosis and management of chronic diseases and the adoption of health promoting behaviors. Applying this perspective to the study of health and aging calls for interdisciplinary thinking, as well as novel methodological and quantitative solutions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Validating the 5Fs mnemonic for cholelithiasis: time to include family history.

    PubMed

    Bass, Gary; Gilani, S Nadia S; Walsh, Thomas N

    2013-11-01

    The time-honoured mnemonic of '5Fs' is a reminder to students that patients with upper abdominal pain and who conform to a profile of 'fair, fat, female, fertile and forty' are likely to have cholelithiasis. We feel, however, that a most important 'F'-that for 'family history'-is overlooked and should be introduced to enhance the value of a useful aide memoire. To assess the usefulness of each of the existing factors of a popular mnemonic, 398 patients admitted with upper abdominal pain between March 2009 and April 2010 were studied. The clinical features expressed in the cholelithiasis mnemonic in patients with sonographic evidence of cholelithiasis were compared with those of patients without. In the cholelithiasis group, significantly more patients were women (150/198 (75.8%) vs 111/200 (55.5%), p<0.001), fair (144/198 (62.9%) vs 54/200 (32.1%), (p<0.001)), fertile (135/198 (68.2%) vs 50/200 (25%) (p<0.001)) and had a body mass index >30 (56/198 (28.3%) vs 19/200 (9.5%) (p<0.001)) compared with controls; but age over 40 years did not predict cholelithiasis (82/198 (41.4%) vs 79/200 (39.5%) (p=0.697)). In the cholelithiasis group, 78/198 (39.4%) had a family history in at least one first-degree relative, compared with 27/200 (13.5%) of controls, (p<0.001). Where the phenotypic elements of the history existed in combination, that patient was found to be at an increased risk of cholelithiasis. Our study found that the validated 'students' 5Fs' mnemonic retains a role in clinical diagnosis of patients suspected of cholelithiasis but the factor 'familial' should be substituted for 'forty' in recognition of the role of inheritance and the changing demographics of gallstone incidence.

  20. Health literacy and the perception of risk in a breast cancer family history clinic.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, E J; Kelly, J; Lehane, E A; Livingstone, V; Cotter, B; Butt, A; O'Sullivan, M J; O Connell, F; Redmond, H P; Corrigan, M A

    2016-11-28

    Informed consent is an essential component of medical practice, and especially so in procedural based specialties which entail varying degrees of risk. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, and as such is the focus of extensive research and significant media attention. Despite this, considerable misperception exists regarding the risk of developing breast cancer. This study aims to examine the accuracy of risk perception of women attending a breast cancer family history clinic, and to explore the relationship between risk perception accuracy and health literacy. A cross-sectional study of women attending a breast cancer family history clinic (n = 86) was carried out, consisting of a patient survey and a validated health literacy assessment. Patients' perception of personal and population breast cancer risk was compared to actual risk as calculated by a validated risk assessment tool. Significant discordance between real and perceived risks was observed. The majority (83.7%) of women overestimated their personal lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, as well as that of other women of the same age (89.5%). Health literacy was considered potentially inadequate in 37.2% of patients; there was a correlation between low health literacy and increased risk perception inaccuracy across both personal ten-year (rs = 0.224, p = 0.039) and general ten-year population estimations. (rs = 0.267, p = 0.013). Inaccuracy in risk perception is highly prevalent in women attending a breast cancer family history clinic. Health literacy inadequacy is significantly associated with this inaccuracy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  2. Promoting Family Awareness and Intergenerational Exchange: An Informal Life-History Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Katherine R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an informal program for promoting family awareness and facilitating intergenerational exchange through the use of a modified life-history method. Provides two exercises: the Family Geneology Exercise and the Family Recollections Exercise. Also provides discussion questions and suggestions for gathering further information about family…

  3. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  4. Reflections on the Construction of a Digital Family Oral History and Its Impact on Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londt, Susan Cole

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Family Oral History Pilot (DFOHP) data were collected and catalogued on a private website blog for family members to learn about their grandfather (ALP) who died without telling his own story. This study examined the outcomes and perceptions of the family members who were engaged with the pilot. A self-selected sample of 17 family…

  5. Reflections on the Construction of a Digital Family Oral History and Its Impact on Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londt, Susan Cole

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Family Oral History Pilot (DFOHP) data were collected and catalogued on a private website blog for family members to learn about their grandfather (ALP) who died without telling his own story. This study examined the outcomes and perceptions of the family members who were engaged with the pilot. A self-selected sample of 17 family…

  6. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  7. Correlation of Family History with Specific Autistic Subgroups: Asperger's Syndrome and Bipolar Affective Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, G. Robert; Dwyer, Judith T.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the possible role of familial psychopathology in the etiology of infantile autism, family histories and neurological status of 51 autistic subjects subgrouped by level of language function were evaluated. Among findings was a high incidence of Asperger's Syndrome in family members of high functioning autistic subjects. (Author/DB)

  8. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  9. Contribution of extended family history in assessment of risk for breast and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Benjamin L; Whitman, Todd; Wood, Marie E

    2016-09-01

    Family history is important for identifying candidates for high risk cancer screening and referral for genetic counseling. We sought to determine the percentage of individuals who would be eligible for high risk cancer screening or genetic referral and testing if family history includes an extended (vs limited) family history. Family histories were obtained from 626 women at UVMMC associated mammography centers from 2001 to 2002. ACS guidelines were used to determine eligibility for high risk breast or colon cancer screening. Eligibility for referral for genetic counseling for hereditary breast and colon cancer was determined using the Referral Screening Tool and Amsterdam II screening criteria, respectively. All family histories were assessed for eligibility by a limited history (first degree relatives only) and extended history (first and second degree relatives). Four hundred ninety-nine histories were eligible for review. 18/282 (3.6 %) and 62/123 (12 %) individuals met criteria for high risk breast and colon cancer screening, respectively. 13/18 (72 %) in the high risk breast cancer screening group and 12/62 (19 %) in the high risk colon cancer screening group met criteria based upon an extended family history. 9/282 (1.8 %) and 31/123 (6.2 %) individuals met criteria for genetic counseling referral and testing for breast and colon cancer, respectively. 2/9 (22 %) of individuals in the genetic breast cancer screening group and 21/31 (68 %) individuals in the genetic colon cancer screening group met criteria based upon extended family history. This is one of the first studies to suggest that first degree family history alone is not adequate for identification of candidates for high risk screening and referral for genetic counseling for hereditary breast and colon cancer syndromes. A larger population is needed to further validate this data.

  10. Developmental Change in Amygdala Reactivity during Adolescence: Effects of Family History for Depression and Stressful Life Events

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Johnna R.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Though heightened amygdala reactivity is observed in patients with major depression, two critical gaps in our knowledge remain. First, it is unclear whether heightened amygdala reactivity is a premorbid vulnerability or consequence of the disorder. Second, it is unknown how and when this neural phenotype develops. The objective of this study was to address these gaps by evaluating developmental change in threat-related amygdala reactivity in adolescents at high or low risk for depression based on family history, before the onset of disorder. Method Adolescents (initially aged 11–15 years) completed an fMRI paradigm that elicited threat-related amygdala reactivity at baseline and again 2 years later. After quality control, data from 232 adolescents at Wave 1 and 197 adolescents at Wave 2 were available. Longitudinal data (meeting quality control at both waves) were available for 157 of these participants. Change in amygdala reactivity was assessed as a function of family history of depression and stressful life event severity. Results Threat-related amygdala reactivity increased with age in those with a positive family history regardless of the severity of life stress reported, and in adolescents with a negative family history when they reported relatively severe life stress. Critically, these changes in amygdala reactivity with age occurred in the absence of clinical disorder or increases in depressive symptoms. Conclusions These results suggest that heightened amygdala reactivity emerges during adolescence prior to the development of depression as a function of familial risk or, in the absence of familial risk, stressful life events. PMID:25526599

  11. Heavy cigarette smoking is strongly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), particularly in patients without a family history of RA

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D; Shepstone, L; Moots, R; Lear, J; Lynch, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the potential relation between cumulative exposure to cigarette smoking in patients with or without rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a positive family history of the disease.
METHODS—239 outpatient based patients with RA were compared with 239 controls matched for age, sex, and social class. A detailed smoking history was recorded and expressed as pack years smoked. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the association between RA and pack years smoked. The patients with RA were also interviewed about a family history of disease and recorded as positive if a first or second degree relative had RA. The smoking history at the time of the study of the patients with RA with or without a family history of the disease was compared directly with that of their respective controls. Patients with RA with or without a family history of the disease were also compared retrospectively for current smoking at the time of disease onset.
RESULTS—An increasing association between increased pack years smoked and RA was found. There was a striking association between heavy cigarette smoking and RA. A history for 41-50 pack years smoked was associated with RA (odds ratio (OR) 13.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.89 to 63.38; p<0.001). The association between ever having smoked and RA was modest (OR 1.81, CI 1.22 to 2.19; p=0.002). Furthermore, cigarette smoking in the patients with RA without a positive family history of RA was more prevalent than in the patients with a positive family history of RA for ever having smoked (72% v 54%; p=0.006), the number of pack years smoked (median 25.0 v 4.0; p<0.001), and for smoking at the time of disease onset (58% v 39%; p=0.003).
CONCLUSIONS—Heavy cigarette smoking, but not smoking itself, is strongly associated with RA requiring hospital follow up and is markedly more prevalent in patients with RA without a family history of RA.

 PMID:11171682

  12. A case control study on family history as a risk factor for herpes zoster and associated outcomes, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Suo, Luodan; Lu, Li; Li, Juan; Sun, Mu; Wang, Haihong; Peng, Xinhui; Yang, Fan; Pang, Xinghuo; Marin, Mona; Wang, Chengbin

    2017-05-09

    Hospital-based case control studies have found family history of herpes zoster (HZ) was associated with risk of HZ, but the role of family history is not fully examined for other HZ-associated outcomes such as recurrent HZ, occurrence of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and HZ with different pain severities. We conducted a population-based matched case control study. HZ cases that occurred during December 1, 2011 to November 30, 2012 were identified by face-to-face interview with all residents of eight selected communities/villages from three districts of Beijing, China. Medical records were reviewed for those who sought healthcare for HZ. For each case-patient, three, age-matched controls (±5 years) without HZ were enrolled from the same community/village of the matched case. Data on family history of HZ were collected by interview and only defined among first-degree relatives. A total of 227 case-patients and 678 matched controls were enrolled. Case-patients were more likely to report a family history of HZ [odds ratio (OR) =2.4, P = 0.002]. Compared with controls, association of family history decreased from HZ with PHN to HZ without PHN (OR = 6.0 and 2.3, respectively; P = 0.002 for trend), from recurrent HZ to primary HZ (OR = 9.4 and 2.2, respectively; P = 0.005 for trend), and from HZ with moderate or severe pain to HZ with mild or no pain (OR = 3.2 and 0.8, respectively; P < 0.001 for trend). Family history of HZ was associated with HZ occurrence and was more likely in HZ case-patients with PHN, recurrences, and painful HZ.

  13. Atypical spatial working memory and task-general brain activity in adolescents with a family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz Seghete, Kristen L; Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2013-03-01

    Altered behavioral performance and brain activation during spatial working memory (SWM) tasks have been demonstrated in individuals with an alcohol use disorder (AUD). It is possible that alterations in processing during SWM may be present prior to initiation of heavy alcohol use in adolescents with a family history of AUDs (family history positive [FHP]) and therefore represent a premorbid neural phenotype that could increase risk for developing an AUD. The goal of our study was to investigate group differences in brain activation during a SWM task between FHP adolescents and adolescents with no family history of AUDs (family history negative [FHN]), as well as examine the relationship between brain activation and individual differences in family history density (FHD) of AUDs. Eighteen FHP and 16 gender and age-matched FHN participants completed a SWM and vigilance task while undergoing a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. There were no group differences in task performance. The FHN group demonstrated expected greater activation during the SWM than vigilance condition in the right middle frontal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the FHP group demonstrated comparable brain activation for both the more demanding and simple task conditions. Additionally, FHD was associated with greater activation of the right superior parietal cortex and less activation of the right cerebellum during the SWM task, but not during the vigilance task. Results suggest FHP adolescents demonstrate alterations in activation of prefrontal regions that are related more generally to the maintenance of top-down cognitive control and alterations in parietal and cerebellar regions that are specific to SWM. Alterations in top-down cognitive control may be a general risk factor for FHP adolescents, whereas SWM-specific alterations are seen as a function of family history loading. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Defining the Flora Family: Reflectance Properties and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuis, Melissa J.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Van Kooten, Samuel J; Greenberg, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Flora family resides in the densely populated inner main belt, bounded in semimajor axis by the ν6 secular resonance and the Jupiter 3:1 mean motion resonance. The presence of several large families that overlap dynamically with the Floras (e.g. the Vesta, Baptistina, and Nysa-Polana families), and the removal of a significant fraction of Floras via the nearby ν6 resonance have historically complicated the Flora family's distinction in both proper orbital elements and reflectance properties. Here we use orbital information from AstDyS, color information from SDSS, and albedo information from WISE, to obtain the characteristic orbital and reflectance properties of the Floras, by sampling the core of the family in multidimensional phase space. We find the characteristic Flora SDSS colors to be a* = 0.127 ± 0.012 and i-z = -0.038 ± 0.008; the characteristic Flora albedo is pV = 0.295 ± 0.006. These properties allow us to select a high-purity sample of Floras with similar orbital and reflectance properties as required for a detailed dynamical study. We then use the young Karin family, for which we have an age determined via direct backward integration of members' orbits, to calibrate the Yarkovsky drift rates for the Flora family without having to estimate the Floras' material properties. The size-dependent dispersion of the Flora members in semimajor axis (the "V" plot) then yields an age for the family of 940+160-120 My. We discuss the effects on our age estimate of two independent processes that both introduce obliquity variations among the family members on short (My) timescales: 1) the capture of Flora members in spin-orbit resonance, and 2) YORP-driven obliquity variation through YORP cycles. Accounting for these effects does not significantly change the age determination.

  15. Natural History of Aging in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KLINE, ANTONIE D.; GRADOS, MARCO; SPONSELLER, PAUL; LEVY, HOWARD P.; BLAGOWIDOW, NATALIE; SCHOEDEL, CHRISTIANNE; RAMPOLLA, JONI; CLEMENS, DOUGLAS K.; KRANTZ, IAN; KIMBALL, AMY; PICHARD, CARMEN; TUCHMAN, DAVID

    2016-01-01

    Observations about the natural history of aging in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) are made, based on 49 patients from a multidisciplinary clinic for adolescents and adults. The mean age was 17 years. Although most patients remain small, obesity may develop. Gastroesophageal reflux persists or worsens, and there are early long-term sequelae, including Barrett esophagus in 10%; other gastrointestinal findings include risk for volvulus, rumination, and chronic constipation. Submucous cleft palate was found in 14%, most undetected before our evaluation. Chronic sinusitis was noted in 39%, often with nasal polyps. Blepharitis improves with age; cataracts and detached retina may occur. Decreased bone density is observed, with occasional fractures. One quarter have leg length discrepancy and 39% scoliosis. Most females have delayed or irregular menses but normal gynecologic exams and pap smears. Benign prostatic hypertrophy occurred in one male prior to 40 years. The phenotype is variable, but there is a distinct pattern of facial changes with aging. Premature gray hair is frequent; two patients had cutis verticis gyrata. Behavioral issues and specific psychiatric diagnoses, including self-injury, anxiety, attention-deficit disorder, autistic features, depression, and obsessive-compulsive behavior, often worsen with age. This work presents some evidence for accelerated aging in CdLS. Of 53% with mutation analysis, 55% demonstrate a detectable mutation in NIPBL or SMC1A. Although no specific genotype–phenotype correlations have been firmly established, individuals with missense mutations in NIPBL and SMC1A appear milder than those with other mutations. Based on these observations, recommendations for clinical management of adults with CdLS are made. PMID:17640042

  16. Genetic risk scores and family history as predictors of schizophrenia in Nordic registers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Pouget, J G; Andreassen, O A; Djurovic, S; Esko, T; Hultman, C M; Metspalu, A; Milani, L; Werge, T; Sullivan, P F

    2017-09-25

    Family history is a long-standing and readily obtainable risk factor for schizophrenia (SCZ). Low-cost genotyping technologies have enabled large genetic studies of SCZ, and the results suggest the utility of genetic risk scores (GRS, direct assessments of inherited common variant risk). Few studies have evaluated family history and GRS simultaneously to ask whether one can explain away the other. We studied 5959 SCZ cases and 8717 controls from four Nordic countries. All subjects had family history data from national registers and genome-wide genotypes that were processed through the quality control procedures used by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Using external training data, GRS were estimated for SCZ, bipolar disorder (BIP), major depression, autism, educational attainment, and body mass index. Multivariable modeling was used to estimate effect sizes. Using harmonized genomic and national register data from Denmark, Estonia, Norway, and Sweden, we confirmed that family history of SCZ and GRS for SCZ and BIP were risk factors for SCZ. In a joint model, the effects of GRS for SCZ and BIP were essentially unchanged, and the effect of family history was attenuated but remained significant. The predictive capacity of a model including GRS and family history neared the minimum for clinical utility. Combining national register data with measured genetic risk factors represents an important investigative approach for psychotic disorders. Our findings suggest the potential clinical utility of combining GRS and family history for early prediction and diagnostic improvements.

  17. Risk estimates for complex disorders: comparing personal genome testing and family history.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Lila; Shuman, Cheryl; Hayeems, Robin; Dupuis, Annie; Pu, Shuye; Wodak, Shoshana; Chitayat, David; Velsher, Lea; Davies, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Personal genome testing allows the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with an increased risk for common complex disorders. An area of concern in the use of personal genome testing is how risk estimates generated differ from traditional measures of risk (e.g., family history analysis). We sought to analyze the concordance of risk estimates generated by family history analysis and by personal genome testing. Risk categorizations for 20 complex conditions included in Navigenics personal genome testing were compared with risk categorization estimates derived from family history assessment using the kappa (κ) statistic. The only conditions showing slight agreement between risk assessment methods were Alzheimer disease (κ = 0.131), breast cancer (κ = 0.154), and deep vein thrombosis (κ = 0.201) in females, and colon cancer (κ = 0.124) in males. Eighty-six individuals (11.4%) were found to have additional genetic risks not assessed by personal genome testing after family and medical history assessment, including 38 individuals with family histories suggestive of hereditary cancer syndromes. Discordance between personal genome testing and family history risk estimates suggests that these methods may provide independent information that could be used in a complementary manner. Results also support that eliciting family history adds value to overall risk assessment for individuals undergoing personal genome testing.

  18. The influence of family history on cognitive heuristics, risk perceptions, and prostate cancer screening behavior.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michelle E; Occhipinti, Stefano; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2013-11-01

    To examine how family history of prostate cancer, risk perceptions, and heuristic decision strategies influence prostate cancer screening behavior. Men with a first-degree family history of prostate cancer (FDRs; n = 207) and men without a family history (PM; n = 239) completed a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) examining prostate cancer risk perceptions, PSA testing behaviors, perceptions of similarity to the typical man who gets prostate cancer (representativeness heuristic), and availability of information about prostate cancer (availability heuristic). A path model explored family history as influencing the availability of information about prostate cancer (number of acquaintances with prostate cancer and number of recent discussions about prostate cancer) to mediate judgments of risk and to predict PSA testing behaviors and family history as a moderator of the relationship between representativeness (perceived similarity) and risk perceptions. FDRs reported greater risk perceptions and a greater number of PSA tests than did PM. Risk perceptions predicted increased PSA testing only in path models and was significant only for PM in multi-Group SEM analyses. Family history moderated the relationship between similarity perceptions and risk perceptions such that the relationship between these variables was significant only for FDRs. Recent discussions about prostate cancer mediated the relationships between family history and risk perceptions, and the number of acquaintances men knew with prostate cancer mediated the relationship between family history and PSA testing behavior. Family history interacts with the individuals' broader social environment to influence risk perceptions and screening behavior. Research into how risk perceptions develop and what primes behavior change is crucial to underpin psychological or public health intervention that seeks to influence health decision making.

  19. Insulin sensitivity is not impaired in Mexican-American women without a family history of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bonora, E; Gulli, G; Bonadonna, R; Del Prato, S; Solini, A; DeFronzo, R A

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare insulin sensitivity in Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic whites without a family history of diabetes to establish whether insulin resistance is a defect intrinsically related to subjects of Mexican origin. In study A, we compared insulin sensitivity in 12 Mexican-American and 12 non-Hispanic white women with normal glucose tolerance and no family history of diabetes. In study B, we compared insulin sensitivity in two groups of normal glucose-tolerant Mexican-Americans, nine with a positive (FHD+) and nine with a negative (FHD-) family history of diabetes. In both studies, the groups were closely matched for age, total body fat content, and fat topography. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with the euglycemic insulin clamp (20 microU.min-1.m2 surface area) which was performed in combination with tritiated glucose infusion and indirect calorimetry. Total fat mass and fat-free mass (FFM) were assessed by a tritiated water dilution technique, and regional fat distribution was evaluated by anthropometry and magnetic resonance imaging. During a 4-h euglycemic insulin clamp (study A), rates (mg.min-1.kg FFM-1) of total (6.32 +/- 0.64 vs. 6.62 +/- 0.81), oxidative (3.54 +/- 0.24 vs. 3.51 +/- 0.19), and nonoxidative (2.78 +/- 0.48 vs. 3.11 +/- 0.75) glucose utilization were similar in Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic whites; hepatic glucose production (0.33 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.13) was suppressed similarly in both groups. During a 2-h euglycemic insulin clamp (study B), Mexican-Americans with FHD+ had lower rates of insulin-mediated total (3.55 +/- 0.39 vs. 5.93 +/- 0.59, P < 0.001), oxidative (3.31 +/- 0.25 vs. 4.32 +/- 0.17, P < 0.01), and nonoxidative (0.24 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.49, P < 0.01) glucose disposal than subjects with FHD-; suppression of hepatic glucose production (0.24 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.18 +/- 0.12) was similar in both groups. These results indicate that in the absence of a family history of non

  20. Family history of type 2 diabetes and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adult Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Das, Mithun; Pal, Susil; Ghosh, Arnab

    2012-04-01

    Our objective was to test the association between familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in adult Asian Indians. A total of 448 adult (>30 years) individuals (257 males and 191 females) participated in the study. Familial risk of T2DM was classified into three groups viz., 1=both parents affected; 2=parent and/or siblings affected and 3=none or no family history for T2DM. Anthropometric measures, blood pressures, fasting blood glucose and metabolic profiles were studied using standard techniques. MS was defined accordingly. The prevalence of MS phenotypes was estimated and compared among the three familial risk strata. Individuals with a history of both parents affected from diabetes had significantly higher (P<0.001) body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and fasting blood glucose (FBG; P=0.035) than individuals having no family history of T2DM. Significant difference was also noticed between individuals with and without MS according to the family history of diabetes (P<0.001). Differences were evident between individuals who fulfilled all the MS criteria (P=0.001) and individuals with only one or two criteria (phenotypes) according to family history of T2DM. Family history of T2DM had significant effect on individuals with MS as compared to their counterparts (individuals having no family history of T2DM). It therefore seems reasonable to argue that family history of T2DM could be useful as a predictive tool for early diagnosis and prevention of MS in Asian Indian population.

  1. Resting state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens in youth with a family history of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita; Casimo, Kaitlyn; Fair, Damien; Nagel, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents with a family history of alcoholism (FHP) are at heightened risk for developing alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a key brain region for reward processing, is implicated in the development of AUDs. Thus, functional connectivity of the NAcc may be an important marker of risk in FHP youth. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) was used to examine the intrinsic connectivity of the NAcc in 47 FHP and 50 family history negative (FHN) youth, ages 10–16 years old. FHP and FHN adolescents showed significant group differences in resting state synchrony between the left NAcc and bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the left postcentral gyrus (PG). Additionally, FHP youth differed from FHN youth in right NAcc functional connectivity with the left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), left superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, left PG, and right occipital cortex. These results indicate that FHP youth have less segregation between the NAcc and executive functioning brain regions, and less integration with reward-related brain areas, such as the OFC. The findings of the current study highlight that premorbid atypical connectivity of appetitive systems, in the absence of heavy alcohol use, may be a risk marker in FHP adolescents. PMID:24440571

  2. Atypical frontal lobe activity during verbal working memory in youth with a family history of alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Cservenka, Anita; Herting, Megan M.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormal brain functioning during verbal working memory tasks has been shown in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Since adolescents with a familial history of alcoholism (FHP) are at high risk for developing an AUD, it is important to consider whether atypical brain activity during verbal working memory may help to explain FHP vulnerability toward developing alcoholism. Methods To that end, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined brain response during a verbal working memory 2-back task in 19 FHP adolescents and 16 age and gender-matched family history negative (FHN) controls. Results Despite no group differences in task accuracy, FHP youth had significantly slower average reaction time when making correct responses during the 2-back condition than FHN youth. In contrast to a vigilance control condition, while covarying for reaction time, FHP adolescents showed less activation during verbal working memory than FHN youth in multiple areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) – a brain region crucial to intact working memory skills. Conclusions These results suggest that even prior to heavy alcohol use, FHP adolescents show atypical executive brain functioning during verbal working memory, and that these differences are independent of slower working memory reaction time in FHP youth. Given the importance of working memory in numerous areas of day-to-day functioning, such as adaptive decision-making, these abnormalities may contribute to FHP youth vulnerability toward developing AUDs. PMID:22088655

  3. Hippocampal Volumes in Adolescents with and without a Family History of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Karen L.; Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Gorlick, Amanda; Tapert, Susan F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The hippocampus may be vulnerable to the effects of heavy alcohol use during adolescence, which is a time of continued neurodevelopment. However, differences in hippocampal volume may be due to risk factors such as a family history (FH) of alcoholism. We examined hippocampal volumes in youth with and without a FH of alcoholism prior to the initiation of alcohol use. Methods Participants were demographically matched adolescents (aged 12-14) with positive (n=15; FHP) and negative (n=15; FHN) FH of alcoholism. Each group consisted of 10 males and 5 females with minimal previous substance use. Manual hippocampal tracings were completed on high-resolution magnetic resonance images by reliable raters, and intracranial volumes were controlled in analyses. Results FH groups did not differ on memory or hippocampal volumes, but group × gender interactions (p<.05) indicated that FHP males had larger left hippocampi than FHN males. Females showed greater left versus right hippocampal asymmetry, while males showed larger right versus left asymmetry. For all adolescents, larger right hippocampal volumes predicted poorer delayed visual memory (p<.01). Conclusion and Significance Alcoholism risk factors, such as family history of alcoholism, may differentially influence adolescent hippocampal development for boys as compared to girls. Results suggest that FH does not account for prior findings of reduced left hippocampal volumes in heavy drinking youth. Findings are preliminary, but suggest that future studies examining the effects of alcohol use on the adolescent brain should consider the influence of FH, especially among boys. PMID:20465374

  4. Validation of a breast cancer risk assessment model in women with a positive family history.

    PubMed

    Bondy, M L; Lustbader, E D; Halabi, S; Ross, E; Vogel, V G

    1994-04-20

    Gail et al. developed a statistical model for estimating the risk of developing breast cancer in white women screened annually with mammography. This model is used for counseling and for admission to clinical trials. We evaluated the model prospectively in a cohort of women with a family history of breast cancer. We followed women who participated in the American Cancer Society 1987 Texas Breast Screening Project. The model was evaluated by comparing the observed (O) and expected (E) numbers of breast cancers using composite background rates from both the Breast Cancer Detection and Demonstration Project and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Data were partitioned by adherence to American Cancer Society screening guidelines. The Gail et al. model predicted the risk well among women who adhered to the American Cancer Society guidelines (O/E = 1.12; 95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.61) but overpredicted risk for women who did not adhere to the guidelines. There was an indication that the model overpredicted risk for women younger than 60 years old and underpredicted risk in women aged 60 years and older. Overall, the Gail et al. model accurately predicts risk in women with a family history of breast cancer and who adhere to American Cancer Society screening guidelines. Thus, the model should be used as it was intended, for women who receive annual mammograms.

  5. Family History of Alzheimer's Disease is Associated with Impaired Perceptual Discrimination of Novel Objects.

    PubMed

    Mason, Emily J; Hussey, Erin P; Molitor, Robert J; Ko, Philip C; Donahue, Manus J; Ally, Brandon A

    2017-03-10

    Early detection may be the key to developing therapies that will combat Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been consistently demonstrated that one of the main pathologies of AD, tau, is present in the brain decades before a clinical diagnosis. Tau pathology follows a stereotypical route through the medial temporal lobe beginning in the entorhinal and perirhinal cortices. If early pathology leads to very subtle changes in behavior, it may be possible to detect these changes in subjects years before a clinical diagnosis can currently be made. We aimed to discover if cognitively normal middle-aged adults (40-60 years old) at increased risk for AD due to family history would have impaired performance on a cognitive task known to challenge the perirhinal cortex. Using an oddity detection task, we found that subjects with a family history of AD had lowered accuracy without demonstrating differences in rate of acquisition. There were no differences between subjects' medial temporal lobe volume or cortical thickness, indicating that the changes in behavior were not due to significant atrophy. These results demonstrate that subtle changes in perceptual processing are detectable years before a typical diagnosis even when there are no differences detectable in structural imaging data. Anatomically-targeted cognitive testing may be useful in identifying subjects in the earliest stages of AD.

  6. Resting state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens in youth with a family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Cservenka, Anita; Casimo, Kaitlyn; Fair, Damien A; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2014-03-30

    Adolescents with a family history of alcoholism (FHP) are at heightened risk for developing alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a key brain region for reward processing, is implicated in the development of AUDs. Thus, functional connectivity of the NAcc may be an important marker of risk in FHP youth. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) was used to examine the intrinsic connectivity of the NAcc in 47 FHP and 50 family history negative (FHN) youth, ages 10-16 years old. FHP and FHN adolescents showed significant group differences in resting state synchrony between the left NAcc and bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the left postcentral gyrus (PG). Additionally, FHP youth differed from FHN youth in right NAcc functional connectivity with the left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), left superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, left PG, and right occipital cortex. These results indicate that FHP youth have less segregation between the NAcc and executive functioning brain regions, and less integration with reward-related brain areas, such as the OFC. The findings of the current study highlight that premorbid atypical connectivity of appetitive systems, in the absence of heavy alcohol use, may be a risk marker in FHP adolescents.

  7. The history and illustration of anatomy in the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Williams, Susan A; Cavdar, Safiye

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews the influence of key figures on the pictorial representation of anatomy and the evolution of anatomical illustration during the Middle Ages until the time of the Renaissance, based on medical history books, journals and ancient medical books. During the early period in the Middle Ages, most illustrations were traditional drawings of emblematic nature, oftentimes unrealistic, not only because the precise knowledge of anatomy was lacking but also because the objective was to elucidate certain principles for teaching purposes. Five figure-series that came down to us through ancient manuscripts and textbooks represent the best examples of such traditional illustrations. With the advent of human dissection in the 13th and 14th centuries, a significant transformation in the depiction of anatomy began to project the practice of human dissection, as we see in the works of Mondino de Luzzi, Henri de Mondeville and Guido de Vigevano. After the invention of book printing in the second half of the 15th century, the reproduction of books was commonly practised and the woodcut made multiplication of pictures easier. Peter of Abano, Hieronymous Brunschwig, Johannes de Ketham, Johannes Peyligk, Gregory Reisch, Magnus Hundt, Laurentius Phryesen and many more included several anatomical illustrations in their treatises that demonstrated the development of anatomical illustration during the later Middle Ages.

  8. Family history and psychiatric comorbidity in persons with compulsive buying: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Black, D W; Repertinger, S; Gaffney, G R; Gabel, J

    1998-07-01

    The authors explored the family history and psychiatric comorbidity of a group of compulsive buyers who volunteered for medication studies. Compulsive buying is characterized by inappropriate shopping and spending behavior that leads to impairment. Thirty-three subjects who met the criteria of McElroy and colleagues for compulsive buying, and who scored more than two standard deviations above the mean on the Compulsive Buying Scale, were recruited. Twenty-two comparison subjects were recruited in the course of another study, and the presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder was the only reason for exclusion. Both groups were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R disorders. The Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria were used to collect information about psychiatric disorders in first-degree relatives. Compulsive buyers had a mean age of 40 years; two (6%) were men. Comparison subjects had a mean age of 39 years; six (27%) were men. The two groups differed in gender distribution but not in age, marital status, or educational achievement. Compulsive buyers were more likely than comparison subjects to have lifetime mood disorders (especially major depression) and to have more than one psychiatric disorder. First-degree relatives of compulsive buyers were more likely than comparison relatives to suffer from depression, alcoholism, and a drug use disorder and to suffer more psychiatric disorders in general. These results indicate that persons who report compulsive buying behavior, and their first-degree relatives, are more likely to have a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorder than are comparison subjects.

  9. Complex exposure histories for meteorites with "short" exposure ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Vogt, S.; Albrecht, A.; Xue, S.; Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Weber, H. W.; Schultz, L.

    1997-05-01

    We report measurements of 26Al and 10Be activities in nine ordinary chondrites and of the light noble gas concentrations and 36Cl and 41Ca activities in subsets of those meteorites. All but Murray have low 21Ne concentrations (<1.0 (10-8 cm3 STP/g), and have previously been used to estimate 21Ne production rates. Ladder Creek, Murchison, Sena, and Timochin have inventories of cosmogenic radionuclides compatible with a single stage of irradiation and give 21Ne production rates consistent with the standard L-chondrite value of ~0.33 ( 10-8 cm3 STP/g-My. In contrast, Cullison, Guenie, Shaw, and Tsarev experienced complex irradiation histories. They and several other meteorites with low nominal exposure ages also have lower 3He/21Ne ratios than expected based on their 22Ne/21Ne ratios. A general association between low 21Ne contents and 3He losses suggests that meteorites with short lifetimes often occupy orbits with small perihelia. Meteorites with low 21Ne contents, one-stage exposure histories, and losses of cosmogenic 3He are rare, however. Possible explanations for the scarcity are 1) statistical; 2) that it is harder for more deeply buried proto-meteoroids to lose gas in a liberating collision; and 3) that it is harder to insert more deeply buried proto-meteoroids directly into orbits with small perihelia.

  10. History of allergy in the middle ages and renaissance.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In the Middle Ages little innovative medical literature came from Western Europe. The Greek-Roman tradition with the scriptures of Hippocrates and Galenos was preserved in Byzantium and then in the Middle East by Arabic medicine; it then returned to Europe in Latin translations mostly made in Italy and Spain. There were innovative developments in Arabic medicine also with regard to the history of allergy, especially with the first description of 'rose fever', which is described as very similar in symptomatology to hay fever. Under Arabic influence, the first medical university in Salerno was famous for its well-known text Tacuinum sanitatis in which a description of asthma can be found. With the beginning of renaissance new developments were also registered in Europe, with new observations and a new way of thinking.

  11. Evolutionary history of bovine endogenous retroviruses in the Bovidae family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements of retroviral origin that are present in the genomes of almost all vertebrates. In cattle, more than 13,000 elements related to ERVs have been detected, and based on the pol gene, 24 families or groups of bovine ERVs have been described. However, information about ERVs in other bovids and the presence of families of related bovine ERVs in different species of the Bovidae family is scarce. Results The 24 families of bovine ERVs previously detected in cattle (Bos taurus) were also detected in zebus (Bos indicus) and yaks (Bos grunniens). In addition, six new families, named BoERV25 to BoERV30, were detected in the three Bos species. Five more ruminant species were screened for related ERVs: 26 families were detected in these species, but four families (BoERV24, BoERV26, BoERV28 and BoERV29) were specific to cattle, zebus, yaks and buffalo. An analysis of the homology of the ERVs of cattle, zebus and yaks revealed that the level of LTR divergence was similar between ERVs from cattle and zebus but was less similar between with ERVs from cattle and yaks. In addition, purifying selection was detected in the genes and retroviral regions of clusters of ERVs of cattle, zebus and yaks. Conclusions In this work, the 24 ERV families previously identified in cattle were also found in two other species in the Bos genus. In addition, six new bovine ERV families were detected. Based on LTR divergence, the most recently inserted families are from Class II. The divergence of the LTR, used as an indirect estimate of the ERV insertion time, seemed to be influenced by the differences in genome evolution since the divergence of the species. In addition, purifying selection could be acting on clusters of ERVs from different species. PMID:24256121

  12. Comparison of breast cancers diagnosed in screening patients in their 40s with and without family history of breast cancer in a community outpatient facility.

    PubMed

    Destounis, Stamatia V; Arieno, Andrea L; Morgan, Renee C; Cavanaugh, David; Seifert, Posy J; Murphy, Philip F; Somerville, Patricia A

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare invasive breast cancer in patients in their 40s with and without a family history of breast cancer as well as the lymph node meta-static rate and mastectomy rate. From 2000 to 2011, a total of 793,827 examinations were performed; 221,541 (28%) were women between 40 and 49 years old. A total of 6965 cancers were found in 6511 patients. Specifically, 1207 cancers (17.3%) were detected in 1162 patients in their 40s. Patients presenting for diagnostic evaluation and those with a personal history of breast cancer were excluded, leaving 388 cancers available for study; 238 (61%) cancers were in patients with no family history of breast cancer, and 150 (39%) were in patients with a family history of breast cancer. Pearson chi-square, Fisher exact, and Student t tests were used for between-group comparisons for qualitative data. A two-sided p value was reported for all tests. The difference in lesions detected by imaging was not statistically significant (p = 0.17); 65% (154/238) had invasive and 35% (84/238) noninvasive disease in the no family history of breast cancer group and 65% (98/150) and 35% (52/150), respectively, in the family history of breast cancer group (p = 0.90). The mastectomy rate was not statistically significantly different (p = 0.14). Fifteen percent (35/238) of the no family history of breast cancer patients and 12% (18/150) of the family history of breast cancer patients had positive lymph nodes (p = 0.45). In patients in their 40s with or without a family history of breast cancer, no differences were detected in the proportion of invasive versus noninvasive cancers diagnosed, lymph node metastases, or mastectomy rates. Screening mammography should be performed in this age group regardless of family history.

  13. Family history influences the tumor characteristics and prognosis of breast cancers developing during postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, Rainer; Faltinova, Maria; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Nevanlinna, Heli; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-10-10

    Long term use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been reported to increase breast cancer risk. On the other hand, observational studies suggest that breast cancers diagnosed during HT may have a more favorable prognosis. While family history is a risk factor for breast cancer, and genetic factors also influence prognosis, the role of family history in combination with HT use has been little studied. We investigated the relationship between HT, family history, and prognosis in 584 (267 exposed) familial and 952 (460 exposed) non-familial breast cancer cases, using three survival end points: death from breast cancer (BCS), distant disease free survival (DDFS), and local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Among non-familial cases, HT was associated with better BCS (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.94; p = 0.025), and DDFS (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.85; p = 0.005), with a consistent but not statistically significant effect in LRFS. This effect was not seen in familial cases (HR > 1.0), and family history was found to interact with HT in BCS (p(interaction) = 0.0067) (BC-death) and DDFS (p(interaction) = 0.0070). There was phenotypic heterogeneity between HT-associated tumors in familial and non-familial cases, particularly on estrogen receptor (ER) status, although the interaction between HT and family history appears to be at least partially independent of these markers (p = 0.0370 after adjustment for standard prognostic factors). If confirmed by further studies, our results suggest that family history should be taken into consideration in clinical counseling before beginning a HT regimen.

  14. Assisting adoptive families: children adopted at older ages.

    PubMed

    Singer, Ellen; Krebs, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the adoption experience can help health care providers develop sensitivity to the special tasks of adopted children and their families. Children who are adopted at older ages may face particular challenges. Age at adoptive placement, the burden of loss, pre-adoptive experiences, and the challenge of attachment are all significant issues in older-child adoption. Pediatric nurses demonstrate sensitivity and support to adopted children and their families by using appropriate language about adoption; understanding the significance of missing health information; providing appropriate referrals as needed; and displaying an open, caring attitude.

  15. Pancreatic cancer screening in different risk individuals with family history of pancreatic cancer-a prospective cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Chu; Wu, Chih-Horng; Yang, Shih-Hung; Liang, Po-Chin; Chen, Bang-Bin; Jan, I-Shiow; Chang, Yu-Ting; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Our aim was to investigate the risk of malignant and premalignant pancreatic lesions in individuals with family history of PC. Individuals at risk of PC were enrolled prospectively in a screening program in Taiwan. All risk individuals received genetic testing of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene and the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene. They were stratified into three risk groups (high, moderate, and low) based on the family history and genetic testing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatogram (MRCP) were performed in all screened individuals. A total of three hundred and three risk individuals in 165 families were enrolled with the mean age of 51.1 years, 38.3% of whom were male. A total of 24 of 303 (7.9%) screened individuals had the PRSS1 mutation, and 7/234 (0.3%) had the SPINK1 mutation. Nineteen (6.3%) risk individuals had pancreatic pathology including seven with pancreatic cancer, and four with pancreatic mucinous neoplasms. The earliest age of onset of PC in affected members was an independent factor associated with risk of developing PC in all risk groups. DM was associated with much-increased risk of developing PC in low and moderate risk groups (OR45.8. 95% CI. 13.82-151.64, P=0.001). Combined family history of non-PC malignancy in the family in the low-risk individual was associated with abnormal findings on MRI (OR8.4, 95% CI 3.29-21.88, P < 0.0001). There was no any complication of screening. In summary, pancreatic cancer screening may benefit in risk individuals with family history of pancreatic cancer in our population. The diagnostic yield is similar to prior studies. MRCP as initial screening modality is safe and effective. Future study will be needed to tailor PC screening strategy in different risk populations. PMID:28337383

  16. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; McCulloh, Christopher; Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Davitkov, Perica; Robbins, Sarah; Cherukuri, Rajesh; Patel, Ashokkumar; Gupta, Rajnish; Cohen, Mark; Barrios, Jaime Vengoechea; Brewer, Cathy; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Denk, Barbara; Naska, Theresa; Laube, Frances; Steele, Ruth; Greene, Dale; Kastl, Alison; Bell, Susan; Aziz, Dina; Chiocca, E. A.; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Barnett, Gene H.; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases. PMID:22649779

  17. Life Stress and Family History for Depression: The Moderating Role of Past Depressive Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Scott M.; Slavich, George M.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the most consistently reported and powerful predictors of depression are a recent major life event, a positive family history for depression, and a personal history of past depressive episodes. Little research, however, has evaluated the inter-relations among these predictors in depressed samples. Such information is descriptively valuable and potentially etiologically informative. In the present article we summarize the existing literature and test four predictions in a sample of 62 clinically depressed individuals: (1) participants who experienced a major life event prior to onset would be less likely than participants who did not experience a major life event to have a positive family history for depression; (2) participants with a recent major life event would have fewer lifetime episodes of depression than would participants without; (3) participants with a positive family history for depression would have more lifetime episodes of depression than would participants with a negative family history for depression; and (4) we would obtain a 3-way interaction in which participants with a positive family history and without a major life event would have the most lifetime episodes, whereas participants with a negative family history and a major life event would have the fewest lifetime episodes. The first three predictions were confirmed, and the fourth prediction partially confirmed. These novel findings begin to elucidate the complex relations among these three prominent risk factors for depression, and point to avenues of research that may help illuminate the origins of depressive episodes. PMID:24308926

  18. Life stress and family history for depression: the moderating role of past depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Scott M; Slavich, George M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2014-02-01

    Three of the most consistently reported and powerful predictors of depression are a recent major life event, a positive family history for depression, and a personal history of past depressive episodes. Little research, however, has evaluated the inter-relations among these predictors in depressed samples. Such information is descriptively valuable and potentially etiologically informative. In the present article we summarize the existing literature and test four predictions in a sample of 62 clinically depressed individuals: (1) participants who experienced a major life event prior to onset would be less likely than participants who did not experience a major life event to have a positive family history for depression; (2) participants with a recent major life event would have fewer lifetime episodes of depression than would participants without; (3) participants with a positive family history for depression would have more lifetime episodes of depression than would participants with a negative family history for depression; and (4) we would obtain a 3-way interaction in which participants with a positive family history and without a major life event would have the most lifetime episodes, whereas participants with a negative family history and a major life event would have the fewest lifetime episodes. The first three predictions were confirmed, and the fourth prediction partially confirmed. These novel findings begin to elucidate the complex relations among these three prominent risk factors for depression, and point to avenues of research that may help illuminate the origins of depressive episodes.

  19. Association between family history of psychiatric disorders and long-term outcome in schizophrenia - The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study.

    PubMed

    Käkelä, Juha; Marttila, Riikka; Keskinen, Emmi; Veijola, Juha; Isohanni, Matti; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Haapea, Marianne; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Miettunen, Jouko

    2017-03-01

    Family history of psychiatric disorders has been associated with impaired outcome in schizophrenia, but very few studies have investigated its long-term social and occupational outcome. We investigated the association of family history of psychiatric disorders, especially psychosis, with long-term social, occupational, clinical and global outcome in schizophrenia. The study sample comprises of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Cohort members with psychosis were detected by Finnish national registers. Altogether 69 individuals with schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis participated, mean age 43, after on average 17 years since onset of illness. The information regarding family history of psychiatric disorders were gathered from registers and interviews. A Strauss-Carpenter Outcome Scale, PANSS and SOFAS were conducted to assess the outcome. Results showed that the family history of any psychiatric disorder was associated with more severe positive and emotional symptoms in PANSS. The family history of psychosis was not associated with outcomes. These findings suggest that family history of psychiatric disorders has a small association with outcome in schizophrenia. Despite family history of psychosis being a strong risk factor for schizophrenia, after years of illness it does not seem to affect outcome.

  20. Family history of prostate cancer and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Moslehi, Roxana; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Snyder, Kirk; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2008-09-01

    Prostate cancer family history has been associated with increased risk of the malignancy. Most prior studies have been retrospective and subject to recall bias, however, and data evaluating interactions with other important risk factors are limited. We examined the relationship between a family history of prostate cancer and prostate cancer risk in relation to body size, micronutrients and other exposures in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort of Finnish male smokers. Family history of cancer information was self-reported once during the study in 1991, and anthropometry was measured by trained personnel. Among 19,652 men with complete data, 1,111 incident cases were identified during up to 12.3 years of follow-up. A first-degree family history of prostate cancer was associated with an overall relative risk (RR) of 1.91 (95% CI = 1.49-2.47) and a RR of 4.16 (95% CI = 2.67-6.49) for advanced disease (stage >or= 3), adjusted for age and trial intervention. Our data also suggest that to some degree, height, body mass index, and serum alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene modify the family history and prostate cancer association, although the interactions were not statistically significant. Supplementation with vitamin E or beta-carotene did not modify the family history-prostate cancer association. This study provides additional evidence that family history is a significant risk factor for prostate cancer.

  1. Genetic variation at 8q24, family history of cancer, and upper gastrointestinal cancers in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tarleton, Heather P; Chang, Shen-Chih; Park, Sungshim Lani; Cai, Lin; Ding, Baoguo; He, Na; Hussain, Shehnaz K; Jiang, Qingwu; Mu, Li-Na; Rao, Jianyu; Wang, Hua; You, Nai-Chieh Y; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Zhao, Jin-Kou; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Genetic variation at 8q24 is associated with prostate, bladder, breast, colorectal, thyroid, lung, ovarian, UADT, liver and stomach cancers. However, a role for variation at 8q24 in familial clustering of upper gastrointestinal cancers has not been studied. In order to explore potential inherited susceptibility, we analyzed epidemiologic data from a population-based case-control study of upper gastrointestinal cancers from Taixing, China. The study population includes 204 liver, 206 stomach, and 218 esophageal cancer cases and 415 controls. Associations between 8q24 rs1447295, rs16901979, rs6983267 and these cancers were stratified by family history of cancer. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for potential confounders: age, sex, education, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and BMI at interview. We also adjusted for hepatitis B and aflatoxin (liver cancer) and Helicobacter pylori (stomach cancer). In a dominant model, among those with a family history of cancer, rs1447295 was positively associated with liver cancer (OR(adj) 2.80; 95% CI 1.15-6.80). Heterogeneity was observed (P(heterogeneity) = 0.029) with rs6983267 and liver cancer, with positive association in the dominant model among those with a family history of cancer and positive association in the recessive model among those without a family history of cancer. When considered in a genetic risk score model, each additional 8q24 risk genotype increased the odds of liver cancer by two-fold among those with a family history of cancer (OR(adj) 2.00; 95% CI 1.15-3.47). These findings suggest that inherited susceptibility to liver cancer may exist in the Taixing population and that variation at 8q24 might be a genetic component of that inherited susceptibility.

  2. [The history and library the Goda family of medical doctors].

    PubMed

    Machi, Senjuro; Kosoto, Hiroshi; Amano, Yosuke; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2005-12-01

    The Goda family discussed in this paper is a family lineage that served as the official physicians to the Sakakibara family that ruled Takada han in Echigo province from the middle of the Edo period. Last year old medical materials and writings that had been transmitted by the family were transferred to the Oriental Medicine Research Center of the Kitasato Institute. The authors have had the opportunity to study the family genealogy and collate these archives. The Goda family has continued through eight generations. These are, respectively- (1) the founder Heizo; (2) Chuzo; (3) Shojun; (4) Yoan; (5) Yoshinobu; (6) Hitoshi; (7) Hiroshi; and (8) the present head, Takashi. We have identified two lines of physicians in collateral families (from Susumu and Akira, both sons of Yoshinobu). The archive as received is comprised of 138 separate items from a total of 450 volumes. Of these, medical works constitute 102 items in 283 volumes. The library provides valuable material which sheds light on the standard of medicine in the Takada area of Echigo from the late Edo through the Meiji periods.

  3. MD Family Medicine - Calicut experience: History is made here

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Government Medical College, Calicut, Kerala - the first medical college in India to start Doctor of Medicine (MD) in family medicine as a postgraduate course. This was in the year 2012. Till date, this is the only medical college to have MD Family Medicine program in India. The college was allowed two MD Family Medicine seats per year by the Medical Council of India, and this is a 3 year course. The first batch of MD Family Medicine students has passed out from the Government Medical College, Calicut in July 2015. In this article, the author, who has been working as an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine, ever since the department started in the year 2012, shares her experiences in setting up the department, its functioning and the achievement of bringing out the first batch of successful MD Family Medicine specialists. Another laurel, of which the institution is proud of, is that they were able to incorporate family medicine teaching program in the MBBS curriculum. A brief introduction about Government Medical College, Calicut, is also given. PMID:27843820

  4. Outcomes of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in relation to familial history: a decision analysis (BRCR-D-16-00033).

    PubMed

    Davies, Kalatu R; Brewster, Abenaa M; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Parker, Patricia A; Crosby, Melissa A; Peterson, Susan K; Shen, Yu; Volk, Robert J; Cantor, Scott B

    2016-09-20

    Family history of breast cancer is associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) even in the absence of mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2. We compared quality-adjusted survival after contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) with surveillance only (no CPM) among women with breast cancer incorporating the degree of family history. We created a microsimulation model for women with first-degree, second-degree, and no family history treated for a stage I, II, or III estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or ER-negative breast cancer at the ages of 40, 50, 60, and 70. The model incorporated a 10-year posttreatment period for risk of developing CBC and/or dying of the primary cancer or CBC. For each patient profile, we used 100,000 microsimulation trials to estimate quality-adjusted life expectancy for the clinical strategies CPM and no CPM. CPM showed minimal improvement on quality-adjusted life expectancy among women age 50-60 with no or a unilateral first-degree or second-degree family history (decreasing from 0.31 to -0.06 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)) and was unfavorable for most subgroups of women age 70 with stage III breast cancer regardless of degree of family history (range -0.08 to -0.02 QALYs). Sensitivity analysis showed that the highest predicted benefit of CPM assuming 95 % risk reduction in CBC was 0.57 QALYs for a 40-year-old woman with stage I breast cancer who had a first-degree relative with bilateral breast cancer. Women age 40 with stage I breast cancer and a first-degree relative with bilateral breast cancer have a QALY benefit from CPM similar to that reported for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. For most subgroups of women, CPM has a minimal to no effect on quality-adjusted life expectancy, irrespective of family history of breast cancer.

  5. Role of family history and tumor location on prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous metastases.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Colloca; Antonella, Venturino

    2017-07-01

    Family history of colorectal cancer and tumor location along colon-rectum have been reported as prognostic factors. The aim of the current study is to analyze the role of both on overall survival in a series of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with synchronous metastases. A retrospective mono-institutional analysis has been performed on patients, who received chemotherapy from 2004 to 2008. A Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratio (HR) for death, after adjustment for other variables (tumor metastasectomy, number of organs involved with metastases, number of anti-neoplastic drugs, age, sex, tumor grade, baseline CEA). Two hundred and seven patients were included in the study. Only tumor metastasectomy was related with a better overall survival (HR 4.995; P < 0.001), whereas a positive family history was associated with a poor prognosis (HR 0.386; P = 0.021). After exclusion of rectal tumors, the negative prognostic effect of a positive family history appeared limited to patients with a left-sided colon cancer (HR 0.183; P = 0.036). Family history for colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative, and not tumor location, has a significant relationship with the prognosis of patients with a colorectal cancer and synchronous metastases.

  6. Defining the Flora Family: Orbital properties, reflectance properties and age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuis, Melissa J.; Molnar, Lawrence; Van Kooten, Samuel J.; Greenberg, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The Flora family resides in the densely populated inner main belt, bounded in semimajor axis by the ν6 secular resonance and the Jupiter 3:1 mean motion resonance. The presence of several large families that overlap dynamically with the Floras (e.g., the Vesta, Baptistina, and Nysa-Polana families), and the removal of a significant fraction of Floras via the nearby ν6 resonance complicates the Flora family's distinction in both proper orbital elements and reflectance properties. Here we use orbital information from the Asteroids Dynamic Site (AstDyS), color information from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and albedo information from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to obtain the median orbital and reflectance properties of the Floras by sampling the core of the family in multidimensional phase space. We find the median Flora SDSS colors to be a∗ = 0.126 ± 0.007 and i -z =-0.037±0.007 ; the median Flora albedo is pV = 0.291 ± 0.012. These properties allow us to define ranges for the Flora family in orbital and reflectance properties, as required for a detailed dynamical study. We use the young Karin family, for which we have an age determined via direct backward integration of members' orbits, to calibrate the Yarkovsky drift rates for the Flora family without having to estimate the Floras' material properties. The size-dependent dispersion of the Flora members in semimajor axis (the "V" plot) then yields an age for the family of 950-170+200 My, with the uncertainty dominated by the uncertainty in the material properties of the family members (e.g., density and surface thermal properties). We discuss the effects on our age estimate of two independent processes that both introduce obliquity variations among the family members on short (My) timescales: (1) the capture of Flora members in spin-orbit resonance, and (2) YORP-driven obliquity variation through YORP cycles. Accounting for these effects does not significantly change this age

  7. Prospective Study of Family History and Colorectal Cancer Risk by Tumor LINE-1 Methylation Level

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beyond known familial colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, the mechanisms underlying the elevated CRC risk associated with CRC family history remain largely unknown. A recent retrospective study suggests familial clustering of CRC with hypomethylation in long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1). We tested the hypothesis that CRC family history might confer a higher risk of LINE-1 methylation-low CRC. Methods Using the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we prospectively examined the association between CRC family history and the risk of rectal and colon cancer (N = 1224) according to tumor LINE-1 methylation level by duplication method Cox proportional hazards regression. We examined microsatellite instability (MSI) status to exclude the influence of Lynch syndrome. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The association between CRC family history and non-MSI CRC risk differed statistically significantly by LINE-1 methylation level (P heterogeneity = .02). CRC family history was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of LINE-1 methylation-low non-MSI cancer (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19 to 2.38 for 1 vs 0 first-degree relatives with CRC; multivariable HR = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.59 to 7.6 for ≥2 vs 0 first-degree relatives with CRC; P trend < .001). In contrast, CRC family history was not statistically significantly associated with LINE-1 methylation-high non-MSI cancer (P trend = .35). Conclusions This molecular pathological epidemiology study shows that CRC family history is associated with a higher risk of LINE-1 methylation-low CRC, suggesting previously unrecognized heritable predisposition to epigenetic alterations. Additional studies are needed to evaluate tumor LINE-1 methylation as a molecular biomarker for familial cancer risk assessment. PMID:23175808

  8. Placement History of Foster Children: A Study of Placement History and Outcomes in Long-Term Family Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijker, Johan; Knorth, Erik J.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The files of 419 children in family foster care and kinship foster care were used in a retrospective longitudinal design study that examined their placement histories in child welfare. Significant associations were found between the number of placements on one hand, and the prevalence of attachment disorders, severity of behavioral problems, and…

  9. Family history of atherosclerotic vascular disease is associated with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi; Bailey, Kent R; Austin, Erin; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether family history (FHx) of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) was associated with presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The study cohort comprised of 696 patients with AAA (70±8 years, 84% men) and 2686 controls (68±10 years, 61% men) recruited from noninvasive vascular and stress electrocardiogram (ECG) laboratories at Mayo Clinic. AAA was defined as a transverse diameter of abdominal aorta ⩾ 3 cm or history of AAA repair. Controls were not known to have AAA. FHx was defined as having at least one first-degree relative with aortic aneurysm or with onset of ASCVD (coronary, cerebral or peripheral artery disease) before age 65 years. FHx of aortic aneurysm or ASCVD were each associated with presence of AAA after adjustment for age, sex, conventional risk factors and ASCVD: adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval): 2.17 (1.66-2.83, p < 0.01) and 1.31 (1.08-1.59, p < 0.01), respectively. FHx of ASCVD remained associated with AAA after additional adjustment for FHx of aortic aneurysm: adjusted OR: 1.27 (1.05-1.55, p = 0.01). FHx of ASCVD in multiple arterial locations was associated with higher odds of having AAA: the adjusted odds were 1.23 times higher for each additionally affected arterial location reported in the FHx (1.08-1.40, p = 0.01). Our results suggest both unique and shared environmental and genetic factors mediating susceptibility to AAA and ASCVD.

  10. Family history of alcoholism, alcohol use disorders and the five-factor model of personality.

    PubMed

    Martin, E D; Sher, K J

    1994-01-01

    This study examines NEO-FFI correlates of risk for alcoholism, alcohol use disorders and alcoholism subtyping dimensions in a mixed-gender sample of 468 young adults (mean age = 21.3) presumed to be at high risk (n = 239) or low risk (n = 229) for alcoholism on the basis of a family history of paternal alcoholism. The NEO-FFI is a brief personality inventory measuring each of the key dimensions of the five-factor model of personality (FFMP), a comprehensive, empirically-derived model of personality structure. Familial risk for alcoholism was positively associated with openness and negatively associated with agreeableness and conscientiousness. Alcohol use disorders were positively associated with neuroticism and negatively associated with aggreeableness and conscientiousness. With the exceptions of alcoholism subtyped by comorbid antisocial personality disorder and by familial alcoholism, all of the alcoholic subtypes examined were related to at least one of the five dimensions. We conclude that the FFMP holds promise for studying personality traits in alcohol use disorders and in bringing a unifying perspective to research and clinical work in this area.

  11. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  12. Family History of Alcoholism: Are You at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse or alcoholism: Al–Anon Family Group Headquarters Internet address: www.al–anon.alateen.org Makes referrals ... Anonymous (AA) World Services Phone: (212) 870–3400 Internet address: www.aa.org Makes referrals to local ...

  13. [Metabolic syndrome prevalence in Chilean children and adolescent with family history of chronic noncommunicable diseases].

    PubMed

    Burrows, Raquel; Atalah, Eduardo; Leiva, Laura; Rojas, Pamela; Maza, María Pía de la; Vásquez, Fabian; Lera, Lydia; Díaz, Erick

    2012-06-01

    Family history (FH+) of non transmisible chronic diseases (NTCD) increase MetS risk. In Chile, the MetS affects 27% of overweight children, and fasting hyperglycemia is very low prevalent (4,0%). The objective was to study the prevalence of MetS and the cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in overweight children with a family background of NTCD and analyze its association with the number of relatives witth NTCD and with parental history (PH). In 183 overweight children (BMI > or = p85) mean age 11,8 +/- 1,8 (86 males) with a FH+ (parental or grandparental) of NTCD, were assessed the BMI z (CDC / NCHS), waist circumference, blood arterial pressure, fasting Glucose and Insulin (RIA), triglycerides, HDL chol. The MetS and the CVRF were diagnosed using the Cook phenotype and the insulin resistance (IR) through the HOMA-IR. Chi2, ANOVA, t Student and Willcoxon test were performed. The frequency of FH+ of DM2, hypertension and dyslipidemia were 81,4%, 88,0% and 71,6 % respectively. The MeTS prevalence was 46,5 % associated to overweight magnitude an parental history of NTCD. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 54,6%, while fasting hyperglycemia affected 31,4% of the sample. There was no association between number of relatives with NTCD and CV risk profile. We conclude that in overweight children with FH+ of NTCD, the prevalence of MetS, dyslipidemia and fasting hyperglycemia are significantly higher, than those observed in the general population of obese children.

  14. Family History of Alcohol Abuse Moderates Effectiveness of a Group Motivational Enhancement Intervention in College Women

    PubMed Central

    LaBrie, Joseph W.; Feres, Nashla; Kenney, Shannon R.; Lac, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether a self-reported family history of alcohol abuse (FH+) moderated the effects of a female-specific group motivational enhancement intervention with first-year college women. First-year college women (N= 287) completed an initial questionnaire and attended an intervention (n=161) or control (n=126) group session, of which 118 reported FH+. Repeated measures ANCOVA models were estimated to investigate whether the effectiveness of the intervention varied as a function of one’s reported family history of alcohol abuse. Results revealed that family history of alcohol abuse moderated intervention efficacy. Although the intervention was effective in producing less risky drinking relative to controls, among those participants who received the intervention, FH+ women drank less across five weeks of follow-up than FH− women. The current findings provide preliminary support for the differential effectiveness of motivational enhancement interventions with FH+ women. Keywords: college women, intervention, alcohol abuse, family history, motivational interviewing PMID:19162406

  15. Associations of phenylthiocarbamide tasting to alcohol problems and family history of alcoholism differ by gender.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Perez, Marisol; Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Butler, Melanie; Joiner, Thomas E

    2006-06-30

    Past research associating phenylthiocarbamide/propylthiouracil (PTC/PROP) taste status with alcoholism has produced equivocal results. Some have found higher proportions of nontasters among those with a family history of alcoholism than controls, whereas others have not. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between PTC taste status, alcohol problems, and family history of alcoholism. A total of 244 undergraduate students participated in this study, with a gender distribution of 75% female and 25% male. We found support for our hypothesis that male supertasters would report fewer problems with alcohol and a less significant family history of alcoholism. Interestingly, we also found that female supertasters had a greater family history of alcoholism and more current problems associated with alcohol use. Implications for the genetic link between PTC taste status and alcoholism are discussed.

  16. Family History of Alzheimer's Disease and Cortical Thickness in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ganske, Steffi; Haussmann, Robert; Gruschwitz, Antonia; Werner, Annett; Osterrath, Antje; Baumgaertel, Johanna; Lange, Jan; Donix, Katharina L; Linn, Jennifer; Donix, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease reflects genetic risks for the neurodegenerative disorder. Recent imaging data suggest localized effects of genetic risks on brain structure in healthy people. It is unknown whether this association can also be found in patients who already have dementia. Our aim was to investigate whether family history risk modulates regional medial temporal lobe cortical thickness in patients with Alzheimer's diseas