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Sample records for family medicine university

  1. [Family and community medicine and the university. SESPAS report 2010].

    PubMed

    Casado Vicente, Verónica; Bonal Pitz, Pablo; Cucalón Arenal, José Manuel; Serrano Ferrández, Elena; Suárez Gonzalez, Félix

    2012-03-01

    Family and community medicine is an academic subject, a medical specialty and a health profession with distinct dimensions: healthcare, teaching, research and management. In this discipline, the object of knowledge is the person, understood as a whole. Family medicine, as an academic subject, and primary care, as a health education setting, should be incorporated into the core graduate and postgraduate curricula. The absence of these elements leads to training bias and has major repercussions on quality, coordination and patient safety. The development of the Health Professions Act and the construction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) have created a favorable climate for the presence of this discipline in the university. Since the 1960s, family medicine has been consolidated as an academic subject with its own departments in almost all European universities, and a significant number of family physicians are teachers. A balance has been achieved between the hospital-based system (based on theory, disease, and the biological model) and the patient-centred model (based on problem solving, community-oriented and the bio-psycho-social model). The introduction of family and community medicine as a specific subject, and as a transverse subject and as an option in practicals, represents the adaptation of the educational system to social needs. This adaptation also represents a convergence with other European countries and the various legal requirements protecting this convergence. However, this new situation requires a new structure (departments) and faculty (professors and associate and assistant professors). PMID:22055214

  2. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  3. The Evolution of Family Medicine Resident Projects at Dalhousie University

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The Dalhousie Family Medicine Residency Program has always attempted to meet the research objectives of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. From a “Monitored Reading and Research” program, where projects were encouraged, the department developed a program which involved a mandatory project, preferably involving research, that is formally and objectively evaluated and supervised by faculty. The background, rationale, and problems encountered, as well as attempted solutions, are outlined. PMID:21249037

  4. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation. PMID:27796117

  5. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  6. [Family Medicine and university in Spain: initial reflections from a national research project].

    PubMed

    Martín Zurro, Amando; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Angel Otero

    2011-04-01

    In 2006, a national research project was initially designed in Spain, with the basic aim of analysing the level of information on Primary Care that is available to medical students, their perception of the role of family medicine in the health system, and professional practice preferences, as well as the opinion expressed on the usefulness and need of specific teaching on primary care and family medicine during undergraduate studies. A questionnaire was prepared for each of the Spanish Faculties of Medicine to gather quantitative and qualitative data on the current situation on the teaching of primary care and family medicine. In this article, we give a short description of the characteristics of the project, the principle data obtained with this first questionnaire and, importantly, the first reflections on the academic situation of Family Medicine in Spain.

  7. Drug sample management in University of Montreal family medicine teaching units

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Vanier, Marie-Claude; Authier, Marie; Diallo, Fatoumata Binta; Gagnon, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the management and distribution of drug samples in family medicine teaching units (FMUs). Design Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting All 16 FMUs affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine at the University of Montreal in Quebec. Participants Health care professionals (physicians, residents, pharmacists, and nurses) who manage (n = 22) and dispense (n = 294) drug samples in the FMUs. Methods Data were collected between February and March 2013 using 2 self-administered questionnaires completed by health care professionals who manage or dispense drug samples. The data were subjected to descriptive and bivariate analyses. Results The participation rate was 100.0% for staff who manage drug samples and 72.5% for those who dispense them. Of the 16 participating FMUs, 12 have drug sample cabinets. Eight of the FMUs have a written institutional policy governing the management of drug samples. Of the 76.2% of respondents who said they distributed samples, more than half did not know whether their institution had a policy. In 7 of 12 FMUs with drug sample cabinets, access to samples is not restricted to those authorized to prescribe medications. Cabinets are most often managed by nurses (9 of 12 FMUs). Only 4 of 12 FMUs take regular inventory of cabinet contents. The main reasons cited for dispensing samples were to help a patient financially and to test for tolerance and efficacy when initiating or modifying a treatment for a patient. Three-quarters (78.2%) of dispensers reported that sometimes they were unable to find the drug they wanted in the cabinet; half of those consequently gave patients drugs that were not their first choice. More than half the dispensers reported they never or only occasionally referred patients to their community pharmacists. Conclusion A portrait of drug sample management and dispensation in the academic FMUs emerged from this study. This study provides insight into current

  8. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  9. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M.; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM degree theses were reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Results: Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master's degrees (84.1%). Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%). The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC)-based studies in 59.1%. The “Patient” category exceeded the other categories (28.4%). Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. Conclusion: The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended. PMID:25949959

  10. An innovative family medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; MacLeod, N M

    1981-10-01

    A clinical clerkship in family medicine at Brown University has been developed utilizing many innovative educational modalities. These include games, simulations, group problem solving, research projects, videotaping, case presentations, field trips, sensitivity sessions, computer assisted instruction, patient management problems, slide-tape shows, and direct clinical experiences. These modalities are described together with a new approach to evaluation. Students' evaluations of the clerkship have been excellent, providing evidence that this clerkship offers a model of learning that is both effective and enjoyable.

  11. Rural family medicine training site

    PubMed Central

    Liskowich, Sarah; Walker, Kathryn; Beatty, Nicolas; Kapusta, Peter; McKay, Shari; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a framework for a successful rural family medicine training program and to assess the potential for a rural family medicine residency training program using the Weyburn and Estevan areas of Saskatchewan as test sites. Design A mixed-method design was used; however, the focus of this article was on the qualitative data collected. Questions formulated for the semistructured interviews evolved from the literature. Setting Rural Saskatchewan. Participants Community physicians and representatives from the Sun Country Regional Health Authority, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health, and the University of Saskatchewan. Methods The data were documented during the interviews using a laptop computer, and the responses were reviewed with participants at the end of their interviews to ensure accuracy. The qualitative data collected were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Main findings Through the analysis of the data several themes emerged related to implementing a rural family medicine residency training program. Key predictors of success were physical resources, physician champions, physician teachers, educational support, administrative support, and other specialist support. Barriers to the development of a rural family medicine training site were differing priorities, lack of human resources, and lack of physical resources. Conclusion A project of this magnitude requires many people at different levels collaborating to be successful. PMID:26380856

  12. Rural family medicine training in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, J. T.; Rourke, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the status of postgraduate family medicine training that occurs in rural family practice settings in Canada and to identify problems and how they are addressed. DESIGN: A retrospective questionnaire sent to all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs followed by a focus group discussion of results. SETTING: Canadian university family medicine training programs. PARTICIPANTS: Chairs or program directors of all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs and people attending a workshop at the Section of Teachers of Family Medicine annual meeting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Extent of training offered, educational models used, common problems for residents and teachers. RESULTS: Nine of 18 programs offer some family medicine training in a rural practice setting to some or all of their first-year family medicine residents, and 99 of 684 first-year family medicine residents did some training in a rural practice. All programs offer some training in a rural practice to some or all of the second-year residents, and 567 of 702 second-year residents did some training in a rural setting. In 12 of 18 programs, a rural family medicine block is compulsory. Education models for training for rural family practice vary widely. Isolation, accommodation, and supervision are common problems for rural family medicine residents. Isolation and faculty development are common problems for rural physician-teachers. Programs use various approaches to address these problems. CONCLUSIONS: The variety of postgraduate training models for rural family practice used in the 18 training programs reflects different regional health care needs and resources. There is no common rural family medicine curriculum. Networking through a rural physician-teachers group or a faculty of rural medicine could further the development of education for rural family practice. PMID:7780331

  13. Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm

    PubMed Central

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mörtl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4th to 6th year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’. Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development. PMID:21818229

  14. Family medicine residents’ practice intentions

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Lawrence E.M.; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess residents’ practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. Design A survey based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. Main outcome measures The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents’ intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. Results The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents’ intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. Conclusion The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. PMID:26889508

  15. Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Katherine; Janakiram, Praseedha; Nicolle, Eileen; Godoy-Ruiz, Paula; Pakes, Barry N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Despite the rapid emergence of global health training across North American universities, there remains a gap in educational programs focusing on the unique role of family medicine and primary care in global health. Objective of program The objective of the Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer, developed in 2013 by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario, is to strengthen global health competencies among family medicine residents and faculty. Program description The course covers the meaning of global health; global health ethics; the place of family medicine, primary care, and primary health care in the global health context; epidemiology; infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; and care of vulnerable populations locally and globally. The course is delivered in an intensive 5-day format with didactic lectures, group discussions, interactive workshops, and lived-experience panels. Conclusion The Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer has proven to be a successful educational initiative and provides valuable lessons learned for other academic science centres in developing global health training programs for family medicine residents and faculty. PMID:26380854

  16. Decision making in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Labrecque, Michel; Ratté, Stéphane; Frémont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jérôme; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Légaré, France

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Design Randomized trial. Setting Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Intervention Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. Main outcome measures The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine’s effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Results Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either

  17. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  18. Family Medicine Mandatory Assessment of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Fok-Han; Herold, Jodi; Iglar, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To report the results of a pilot in-training progress test, the Family Medicine Mandatory Assessment of Progress, taken by first- and second-year postgraduate family medicine trainees. Design Assessment of resident performance on a key-features approach multiple-choice progress test. Test questions were developed by competency content area experts. Setting University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Construct validity was assessed based on performance on the test by first- and second-year residents, Canadian and international medical graduates, and residents with more or less than 1 month of relevant clinical experience. Results Pilot progress testing of family medicine residents (N = 255) at the University of Toronto revealed a significant 1.6% difference (P < .01) in mean scores between first- and second-year postgraduate family medicine trainees and achieved construct validity across many parameters studied. The agreement coefficients for residents being identified as the poorest performers ranged from 0.88 to 0.90 depending on the domain of practice assessed. Conclusion Competency-based progress testing using the key-features model is a valid means of assessing the progress of family medicine residents.

  19. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  20. Who Goes into Family Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezler, A. G.; Kalishman, S. G.

    The results of a study to identify criteria that could help select applicants to medical school who have a lasting commitment to family medicine are presented. During the past 15 years major efforts have been made to increase the number of family physicians in the United States. Although primary care programs attract more students whose initial…

  1. Academic family medicine in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, B K

    1993-01-01

    Fifty years ago family practice in Canada had no academic presence. Stimulated by a number of general practitioners and with the support of the Canadian Medical Association, the College of General Practitioners of Canada (CGPC) was founded in 1954. In 1962, conferences on education for general practice attended by the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges and the CGPC led to pilot postgraduate residencies in family practice supported by Department of National Health and Welfare. The first certification examination was held in 1969 and, by 1974, all Canadian medical schools had a family medicine residency program. Today departments of family medicine contribute substantially to undergraduate education in all 16 schools. In Canada, the medical profession, governments and the medical schools have demonstrated the importance they place on appropriate education for family physicians. PMID:8477381

  2. Teaching Core Content in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, K. V.; Craven, Marilyn

    1985-01-01

    Core content in family medicine has been difficult to define, given that family practice has differed widely from physician to physician, according to locale and availability of resources. Since family medicine has been taught, educators have been attempting to define its core content—and find ways of teaching it. At the McMaster University Medical Centre Family Practice Unit we have put the problems first: residents present a problem in patient care and the group discusses the problem in relation to a precirculated article on the topic. Lecturing is kept to a minimum, and articles are chosen according to the principles of critical appraisal. An attempt at evaluation generated a positive response. PMID:21274213

  3. [The flexibility of family medicine].

    PubMed

    Minguet, C; Aubrege, A; Aubart, M; Cornuz, J; di Patrizio, P; Du Boullay, D; Farghadani, H; Flammang, M; Haas, N; Kacenelenbogen, N; Kopp, M; Leners, J C; Levêque, M; Mbengue, M; Paur, H; Paur, I; Raphaël, F; Rausch, S; Shetgen, M; Stein R; Tabouring, P; Thomas, J M; Vignon, G

    2015-01-01

    We are a European academic group of family doctors and we propose a definition of flexibility in family medicine. A review of the literature shows that flexibility and complexity are emerging concepts in the field of family practice. The outcomes of a workshop at the WONCA-Europe congress in 2014 are discussed. The flexibility is a capability of the general practitioner to deal with complex clinical situations in a biomedical and societal changing world. Flexibility is framed by ethics. It could improve the quality of care, be useful against burnout and used in medical research. In conclusion, family medicine should adopt a specific definition of the flexibility describing its specificity, a useful and teachable capacity. PMID:26946851

  4. Family Medicine in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Michael; Wootton, J.S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Recruitment of physicians for rural communities is a continuing problem in Canada. Medical schools can be involved through preferential admission policies. Departments of family medicine across the country are including on-site training in rural communities and are seeking to improve their rural program curriculum. The McGill rural program is described from its origins to its present state. A rural coordinator oversees 12 sites at which both residents and students are trained. One site at Shawville, Que, is described from a rural physician's point of view. Imagesp2011-ap2012-ap2014-a PMID:21233945

  5. Family Medicine: Bridge to Life.

    PubMed

    Luz, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the suicide of a close friend, this essay explores what comprises, and inspires a will to live, and how those in Family Medicine can address suicide risk even in the face of debilitating or terminal illness. Research indicates that the will to live is a measurable indicator of general well-being, distinct from depression, and an important predictor of a person's motivation to "hold on to life". As such, understanding what is at the heart of a desire to live should alter clinical practice. This essay offers ideas for ways in which to create bridges for patients that could help sustain life.

  6. Family medicine 360°: Global exchanges in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Ana N.; Rigon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The global world of the 21st century has created communities and cultures that are interconnected, thanks to the development both in the field of transportation and technology. In this global intercultural community, future physicians, and even more so future general practitioners (GPs)/family physicians (FPs), need to be clinically competent and culturally sensitive and flexible in order to adapt to different social settings while delivering holistic care in multiethnic teams and environments with professionalism. As such, exchange programs are exceptional opportunities for international collaboration and the development of personal and professional competencies of these health care professionals. Materials and Methods: This article presents a review of the literature on the value of exchanges as well as the results of exchange programs with educational content that are aimed at junior GPs/FPs. Results: Exchange programs have been growing in popularity, especially among junior GPs/FPs. Since its launch in 2013, The “Family Medicine 360° (FM360°) program has been receiving up to 163 inquires till date, promoting global cooperation among the World Organization of family Doctors (WONCA)'s Young Doctors’ Movementd (YDMs). Conclusions: By participating in an exchange program, future GPs/FPs are given the chance to experience intercultural communication and peer collaboration. They also develop personal and professional skills and thus, actively contribute to the growth and development of primary care all over the world. PMID:26288763

  7. Family medicine education in India: A panoramic view

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Sharma, Anjali; Pati, Sandipana; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the recent years, there has been renewed interest in strengthening primary care for improved health services delivery. Family medicine with its holistic principles is an effective approach for building primary care workforce in resource constraint settings. Even though this discipline is well established and mainstreamed in Western countries, the same is yet to occur in low- and middle-income nations. India with its paradigm shift for universal health coverage is strategically poised to embrace family medicine as a core component of its health system. However, till date, a clear picture of family medicine teaching across the country is yet to be available. Methods: This paper makes an attempt to assess the landscape of family medicine teaching in India with an aim to contribute to a framework for bolstering its teaching and practice in coming years. The objective was to obtain relevant information through a detailed scan of the health professional curricula as well as mapping independent academic programs. Specific areas of interest included course content, structure, eligibility criteria, and accreditation. Results: Our findings indicate that teaching of family medicine is still in infancy in India and yet to be mainstreamed in health professional education. There are variations in family medicine teaching across academic programs. Conclusion: It is suggested that both medical and nursing colleges should develop dedicated Departments of Family Medicine for both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Further, more number of standalone diploma courses adopting blended learning methods should be made available for in-service practitioners. PMID:26985405

  8. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  9. Statistical methods and errors in family medicine articles between 2010 and 2014-Suez Canal University, Egypt: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

    2016-01-01

    Background: With limited statistical knowledge of most physicians it is not uncommon to find statistical errors in research articles. Objectives: To determine the statistical methods and to assess the statistical errors in family medicine (FM) research articles that were published between 2010 and 2014. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. All 66 FM research articles that were published over 5 years by FM authors with affiliation to Suez Canal University were screened by the researcher between May and August 2015. Types and frequencies of statistical methods were reviewed in all 66 FM articles. All 60 articles with identified inferential statistics were examined for statistical errors and deficiencies. A comprehensive 58-item checklist based on statistical guidelines was used to evaluate the statistical quality of FM articles. Results: Inferential methods were recorded in 62/66 (93.9%) of FM articles. Advanced analyses were used in 29/66 (43.9%). Contingency tables 38/66 (57.6%), regression (logistic, linear) 26/66 (39.4%), and t-test 17/66 (25.8%) were the most commonly used inferential tests. Within 60 FM articles with identified inferential statistics, no prior sample size 19/60 (31.7%), application of wrong statistical tests 17/60 (28.3%), incomplete documentation of statistics 59/60 (98.3%), reporting P value without test statistics 32/60 (53.3%), no reporting confidence interval with effect size measures 12/60 (20.0%), use of mean (standard deviation) to describe ordinal/nonnormal data 8/60 (13.3%), and errors related to interpretation were mainly for conclusions without support by the study data 5/60 (8.3%). Conclusion: Inferential statistics were used in the majority of FM articles. Data analysis and reporting statistics are areas for improvement in FM research articles. PMID:27453839

  10. The family and family medicine: should this marriage be saved?

    PubMed

    Merkel, W T

    1983-11-01

    Although there have been many noteworthy attempts to integrate a family focus into family medicine, there is little evidence that this integration has occurred in either residency education or community practice. When the specialty was founded, a family emphasis may have been politically useful as a way to differentiate the new family physician from the old general practitioner. Now, however, it is unclear what specific family-related material should be taught or who should teach it since few family practice faculty are trained in understanding families. If a practicing family physician actually wants to see a family, practical problems concerning time, space, and money arise. Furthermore, the medicolegal system is structured to protect the confidential relationship between one patient and one physician. Other obstacles to the integration include the difficult epistemological shift required to apply systems theory, the current chaos in the family field, and family medicine's need to gain professional stature by being proficient in traditional medicine. It may be time for the family and family medicine to reconsider their well-intended but ill-advised relationship. PMID:6631349

  11. Key informants' perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gossa, Weyinshet; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Mekonnen, Demeke; Eshetu, Wondwossen; Abebe, Zerihun; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia's health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by the Ministry of Health and collaboration between institutions within the country, other Sub-Saharan African countries, and international partners supportive of establishing family medicine in Ethiopia. PMID:27175100

  12. What shall we do for family medicine?

    PubMed

    Grainge Biggs, John Sydney

    2016-06-01

    In November 2014 the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council directed that Family Medicine should be taught to final year medical students. Family Medicine will be strengthened as a result. This paper considers some implications of the decision, identifying first the need for more information on primary care services, especially in the private sector, to enable planning of the curriculum and attachments to public and private units. The challenges to medical colleges in providing what will be largely experiential learning are described and the importance of training practitioners is emphasised. The urgent need to overcome the virtual absence in Pakistan of postgraduate training in Family Medicine described, and the quality standards of primary care are explored and the need for attention in the face of student learning is described. Recommendations are offered, including an advisory board on Family Medicine to audit its introduction and performance. PMID:27339579

  13. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    PubMed

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead. PMID:26927655

  14. [Family medicine in Mexico: Present and future].

    PubMed

    Varela-Rueda, Carlos E; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio; Ochoa-Díaz-López, Héctor; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the challenges and the future scenario of Family Medicine is a priority to address challenges such as the reduction of benefits granted by social security; to adapt their practice to the changing health profile; and to curb demand for specialized services and contain the high costs of care in the second and third level. The program is aimed at three professional roles: medical care, research, and education. It is imperative review these in the light of changing demographic conditions, the type of health needs arising from new social determinants, the public expectations for greater participation in their care, and the evolution of the health system itself with the advancement of technology and a variety of organizational options with frequently limited resources. For primary care, as the core of a health system that covers principles of equity, solidarity, universality, participation, decentralization, and intra- and inter-sectorial coordination, it is necessary to put at the center of the primary care team the family doctor and not an administrator, who plays an important role in supporting the care team, but can not take the lead.

  15. Pharmacists teaching in family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Derek; Muller, Andries; Whelan, Anne Marie; Buxton, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the percentage of family medicine residency programs that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents, the types and extent of teaching provided by pharmacists in family medicine residency programs, and the primary source of funding for the pharmacists. Design Web-based survey. Setting One hundred fifty-eight resident training sites within the 17 family medicine residency programs in Canada. Participants One hundred residency program directors who were responsible for overseeing the training sites within the residency programs were contacted to determine the percentage of training sites in which pharmacists were directly involved in teaching. Pharmacists who were identified by the residency directors were invited to participate in the Web-based survey. Main outcome measures The percentage of training sites for family medicine residency that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents. The types and the extent of teaching performed by the pharmacists who teach in the residency programs. The primary source of funding that supports the pharmacists’ salaries. Results More than a quarter (25.3%) of family medicine residency training sites include direct involvement of pharmacist teachers. Pharmacist teachers reported that they spend a substantial amount of their time teaching residents using a range of teaching modalities and topics, but have no formal pharmacotherapy curriculums. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) of the pharmacists reported that their salaries were primarily funded by the residency programs. Conclusion Pharmacists have a role in training family medicine residents. This is a good opportunity for family medicine residents to learn about issues related to pharmacotherapy; however, the role of pharmacists as educators might be optimized if standardized teaching methods, curriculums, and evaluation plans were in place. PMID:21918131

  16. State of family medicine practice in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Mariana; Rizk, Grace Abi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many difficulties are encountered in family medicine practice and were subject to multinational studies. To date, no study was conducted in Lebanon to assess the challenges that family physicians face. This study aims to evaluate the family medicine practice in Lebanon stressing on the difficulties encountered by Lebanese family physicians. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 96 family medicine physicians practicing in Lebanon. Participants answered questions about characteristics of family medicine practice, evaluation of the quality of work, identification of obstacles, and their effect on the medical practice. Results: The response rate was 59%, and the average number of years of practice was 10.7 years. Physicians complain mainly of heavy load at work, too many bureaucratic tasks, demanding patients, and being undervalued by the specialists. Most physicians are able to adapt between their professional and private life. Conclusion: Despite all the obstacles encountered, Lebanese family physicians have a moderate satisfaction toward their practice. They remain positive and enthusiastic about their profession. Until the ministry of public health revises its current health system, the primary care profession in Lebanon will remain fragile as a profession. PMID:27453843

  17. [Traditions of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Brazdzionyte, Julija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the dimensions of the traditions of the idea of the university that are relevant in our today's world--the autonomy of the university, education of a free and creative personality, and belonging to the unified space of studies--and to review the experience of Kaunas University of Medicine in the development of the traditions of university studies. The research object was university studies, and the methods applied in this research were analysis of literature and analysis of documents. The article consists of the introduction, two parts, and generalization. The first part discusses the autonomy of the university, the importance of liberal studies, and the influence of the European higher education and provides a generalized survey of the historical tradition of university studies in Lithuania. The second part of the article reviews the predominant factors that condition the development of university studies at Kaunas University of Medicine: organization of studies and implementation of liberal studies realized through general university education subjects into the modern content of university studies. The generalization of the results of the performed analysis allows for stating that the contents and the organization of curricula and the ongoing reforms at Kaunas University of Medicine expand the continuity of the traditions of the European university education, highlight the idea of the university, and realize university studies that reflect modern global tendencies. PMID:17090986

  18. Hypnosis and Hypnotism in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Gaetan

    1992-01-01

    This article attempts to define and demystify hypnosis and to present the range of its applications in family medicine. The author reviews definitions and describes hypnotic phenomena, suggestibility, and the use of suggestion, as well as traditional, semitraditional, and Ericksonian induction methods, precautions, and dangers. Clinical uses are then presented for the family physician to apply to surgery, obstetrics, pain treatment, psychosomatic disorders, and psychotherapy. Imagesp2076-a PMID:21221278

  19. Family Medicine: Reassessment of Two Educational Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Danis J.

    1983-01-01

    Emphasis on family medicine has resulted in three problems: definition, discrepancies between objectives and practice, and the lack of a specialized body of knowledge. Training should concentrate on simple but more effective goals, enhanced compassion and empathy, and improved communication skills, understanding of emotional needs, and counseling…

  20. Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

  1. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  2. Family medicine training--the international experience.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard G; Hunt, Vincent R; Kulie, Teresa I; Schmidt, Wesley; Schirmer, Julie M; Villanueva, Tiago; Wilson, C Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Family medicine is undergoing dramatic transformation around the world. Its organisation, delivery, and funding are changing in profound ways. While the specifics of primary care reform vary, a common emerging strategy involves establishment of primary health care teams that provide improved access, use electronic records, are networked with other teams, and are paid using blended payment schemes. More family doctors are needed in all countries. New approaches beyond the traditional apprenticeships or residency programs will be required to meet global demand. Training of family doctors must change to prepare tomorrow's family physician for a different practice reality. Curricula are more competency-oriented, rather than time-focused. Today's trainees can anticipate a career that includes periodic reassessment of their knowledge base and competency. This article explores these trends and offers some strategies that have proved effective in various parts of the world for training increased numbers of qualified family doctors. PMID:21644860

  3. Comparison of Research Trends in Korean and International Family Medicine in Journals of Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin-Kyung; Lee, Jungun

    2014-01-01

    Background Research is important for the development of family medicine as a professional field in primary care. The aim of this study was to suggest directions for the development of family medicine research by analyzing research trends in original papers published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) and international journals. Methods We investigated original research papers published in KJFM and 4 international journals from August 2009 to July 2010. Analysis was conducted according to research topics, authors, methods, participants, and data sources. Results 'Clinical research' was the most common research topic in both the KJFM (88.3%) and international journals (57.3%); however, international journals had more studies in other domains ('education and research,' 'health service,' and 'family medicine'). More authors other than family physicians participated in international journals than in the KJFM (58% and 3.3%, respectively). Most studies were 'cross-sectional' in KJFM (77.0%) and international journals (51.5%): however, the latter had more 'qualitative' studies, 'cohort' studies, and 'systematic reviews' than the former. The largest study population was 'visitors of health promotion center' in the KJFM and 'outpatients' in international journals. Most of the study sources were 'survey' and 'medical records' in both. Conclusion There were limitations of diversity in the papers of the KJFM. Future investigation on papers of other than family medicine journals should be planned to assess research trends of family physicians. PMID:25426274

  4. Key informants’ perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gossa, Weyinshet; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Mekonnen, Demeke; Eshetu, Wondwossen; Abebe, Zerihun; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia’s health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by the Ministry of Health and collaboration between institutions within the country, other Sub-Saharan African countries, and international partners supportive of establishing family medicine in Ethiopia. PMID:27175100

  5. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  6. Family medicine and the life course paradigm.

    PubMed

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Elder, Glen H

    2007-01-01

    A unique characteristic of family physicians is that they seek to understand individual patients within the context of their families and larger social environments. Unfortunately, the intellectual development of family medicine is hampered by the reliance on epidemiologic, health service, and biomedical paradigms that are limited in their contextual perspectives on patients' lives. However, another paradigm, that of the life course, represents an interdisciplinary framework that views persons in context over time. It provides an ecological understanding of individual people by examining phenomena at the nexus of social pathways, developmental or health trajectories, and social change. A life course paradigm provides a way of thinking about patients in both proximal (eg, lived lives and family) and distal (eg, health care system) contexts over a life span. Five core principles define the life course as a paradigmatic framework: (1) human development and aging as lifelong processes, (2) human agency, (3) historical time and place, (4) the timing of events in a life, and (5) linked lives. At the individual level, the life course orients physicians to the opportunities and constraints that frame the health care choices, plans, and initiatives of people who maintain health and also face illness. At the organizational level, the life course offers an intellectual infrastructure for the New Model of Family Medicine by depicting an idealized delivery system that may be longitudinally integrated. It also emphasizes health and illness trajectories by linking health and other service organizations that assist individuals at different stages of their lives.

  7. Screening for Depression Patients in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Alma; Pranjic, Nurka; Selmanovic, Senada; Alibasic, Esad; Alic, Fahrudin; Ramic, Enisa; Spahic-Sarajlic, Selvedina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Goal: The aims are to establish the prevalence of newfound, unidentified cases of depressive disorder by screening with the Becks Depression scale; To establish a comparative relationship with self-identified cases of depression in the patients in the family medicine; To assess the significance of the BDI in screening practice of family medicine. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted anonymously by Beck's Depression scale (Beck Depression Questionnaire org.-BDI) and specially created short questionnaire. The study included 250 randomly selected patients (20-60 years), users of services in family medicine in “Dom Zdravlja” Zenica, and the final number of respondents with included in the study was 126 (51 male, 75 female; response or response rate 50.4%). Exclusion factor was previously diagnosed and treated mental disorder. Participation was voluntary and respondents acknowledge the validity of completing the questionnaire. BDI consists of 21 items. Answers to questions about symptoms were ranked according to the Likert type scale responses from 0-4 (from irrelevant to very much). Respondents expressed themselves on personal perception of depression, whether are or not depressed. Results: Depression was observed in 48% of patients compared to 31% in self estimate depression analyzed the questionnaires. The negative trend in the misrecognition of depression is -17% (48:31). Depression was significantly more frequent in unemployed compared to employed respondents (p=0.001). The leading symptom in both sexes is the perception of lost hope (59% of cases). Conclusion: All respondents in family medicine care in Zenica showed a high percentage of newly detected (17%) patients with previously unrecognized depression. BDI is a really simple and effective screening tool for the detection and identification of persons with symptoms of depression. PMID:24783910

  8. Training experts in family medicine teaching.

    PubMed

    Švab, Igor; Allen, Justin; Žebiene, Egle; Petek Šter, Marija; Windak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine teachers require specific educational skills. A framework for their professional development is essential for future development of the discipline in Europe. EURACT developed a framework on educational expertise, and subsequently applied it in a curriculum of teaching-skills courses of various levels. The aim of this article is to describe the development of the teaching framework, and of an international three-level course programme for 'teaching-the-teachers'. Furthermore, we describe our experiences and lessons learned, in particular with regard to the level-three programme for proficient teachers, which was new. We conclude that it is possible to develop a theoretical framework of family medicine teaching expertise and to apply it in an international high-level educational programme for future experts in family medicine education. Research evidence of the usefulness of this approach is needed, and the threats for its further development into a sustainable activity are its high teacher/student ratio associated with relatively high costs and difficulties in recruiting suitable participants.

  9. [General and family medicine: a gratifying choice].

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Dina

    2006-01-01

    The problematic discussion of speciality choice have been largely studied in other countries, where we can see the same setting of the announced crises of Primary Care and the so called decline of Family Medicine. In Portugal, many authors have shown an increasing concern in the way of getting more attention by the political policies/entities for the reduction of the number of family doctors. The decline of the interest of the medical students for Family Medicine is a complex and multifactorial problem that exists at international level, as in other generalist specialities, without technical procedures and technological investment. The importance of human values in medical education, by the new challenges that we have in the XXI century medicine, puts us the question about the students we are graduating today in our schools. The educational and health system reform, and the medical schools support, may influence the choices of medical graduates and motivate them for this speciality, developing a more real and more close medical care that responds to the interests and the needs of the population. PMID:17187715

  10. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  11. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  12. The University of Vermont College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Martin

    This study of the origin and history of the University of Vermont College of Medicine begins with the appointment of John Pomeroy to the faculty in 1804, and traces the years that followed. Chiefly concerned with the individuals who were involved, it is a case study of the responses of one small medical school to reform movements, and its ability…

  13. Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

    2007-01-01

    Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project

  14. Length of training debate in family medicine: idealism versus realism?

    PubMed

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-06-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by "decompressing" the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates. PMID:24404258

  15. Length of Training Debate in Family Medicine: Idealism Versus Realism?

    PubMed Central

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by “decompressing” the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates. PMID:24404258

  16. Revolutionary leadership and family medicine education.

    PubMed

    Saultz, John W

    2008-04-01

    Reform of the payment and delivery systems in American health care is now being discussed at the highest levels of business and government. Family medicine educators, researchers, and program leaders have an opportunity to provide substantial leadership to this process in their own communities and nationally. To do so, they must reconsider the assumptions made in creating our current systems of practice and education, and this will require new leadership skills that focus on innovation and adaptability. It will also require a more aggressive willingness to test new ideas and a new scientific method to prove or disprove their value. This essay outlines essential elements of such leadership for those responsible for the education of future generations of family physicians. PMID:18382841

  17. The Future of Family Medicine: A Collaborative Project of the Family Medicine Community

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recognizing fundamental flaws in the fragmented US health care systems and the potential of an integrative, generalist approach, the leadership of 7 national family medicine organizations initiated the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project in 2002. The goal of the project was to develop a strategy to transform and renew the discipline of family medicine to meet the needs of patients in a changing health care environment. METHODS A national research study was conducted by independent research firms. Interviews and focus groups identified key issues for diverse constituencies, including patients, payers, residents, students, family physicians, and other clinicians. Subsequently, interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of 9 key constituencies. Based in part on these data, 5 task forces addressed key issues to meet the project goal. A Project Leadership Committee synthesized the task force reports into the report presented here. RESULTS The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. The proposed New Model of practice has the following characteristics: a patient-centered team approach; elimination of barriers to access; advanced information systems, including an electronic health record; redesigned, more functional offices; a focus on quality and outcomes; and enhanced practice finance. A unified communications strategy will be developed to promote the New Model of family medicine to multiple audiences. The study concluded that the discipline needs to oversee the training of family physicians who are committed to excellence, steeped in the core values of the discipline, competent to provide family medicine’s basket of services within the New Model, and capable of adapting to varying patient needs and changing care technologies

  18. Obstetrics anyone? How family medicine residents' interests changed.

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, J.; Holzapfel, S. G.; Carroll, J. C.; Cummings, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family medicine residents' attitudes and plans about practising obstetrics when they enter and when they graduate from their residency programs. DESIGN: Residents in each of 4 consecutive years, starting July 1991, were surveyed by questionnaire when they entered the program and again when they graduated (ending in June 1996). Only paired questionnaires were used for analysis. SETTING: Family medicine residency programs at the University of Toronto in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 358 family medicine residents who completed the University of Toronto program, 215 (60%) completed questionnaires at entry and exit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in attitudes and plans during the residency program as ascertained from responses to entry and exit questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis was based on 215 paired questionnaires. Women residents had more interest in obstetric practice at entry: 58% of women, but only 31% of men were interested. At graduation, fewer women (49%) and men (22%) were interested in practising obstetrics. The intent to undertake rural practice was strongly associated with the intent to practise obstetrics. By graduation, residents perceived lifestyle factors and compensation as very important negative factors in relation to obstetric practice. Initial interest and the eventual decision to practise obstetrics were strongly associated. CONCLUSIONS: Intent to practise obstetrics after graduation was most closely linked to being a woman, intending to practise in a rural area, and having an interest in obstetrics prior to residency. Building on the interest in obstetrics that residents already have could be a better strategy for producing more physicians willing to practise obstetrics than trying to change the minds of those uninterested in such practice. PMID:10099803

  19. How medical schools can encourage students' interest in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Rohan-Minjares, Felisha; Alfero, Charles; Kaufman, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    The discipline of family medicine is essential to improving quality and reducing the cost of care in an effective health care system. Yet the slow growth of this field has not kept pace with national demand. In their study, Rodríguez and colleagues report on the influence of the social environment and academic discourses on medical students' identification with family medicine in four countries-the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Spain. They conclude that these factors-the social environment and discursive activity within the medical school-influence students' specialty choices. While the discourses in Canada, France, and Spain were mostly negative, in the United Kingdom, family medicine was considered a prestigious academic discipline, well paying, and with a wide range of practice opportunities. Medical students in the United Kingdom also were exposed early and often to positive family medicine role models.In the United States, academic discourses about family medicine are more akin to those in Canada, France, and Spain. The hidden curriculum includes negative messages about family medicine, and "badmouthing" primary care occurs at many medical schools. National education initiatives highlight the importance of social determinants in medical education and the integration of public health and medicine in practice. Other initiatives expose students to family medicine role models and practice during their undergraduate training and promote primary care practice through new graduate medical education funding models. Together, these initiatives can reduce the negative effects of the social environment and create a more positive discourse about family medicine.

  20. Health Is Primary: Family Medicine for America’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Pugno, Perry A.; Saultz, John W.; Tuggy, Michael L.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Hoekzema, Grant S.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Weida, Jane A.; Peterson, Lars E.; Hughes, Lauren S.; Kruse, Jerry E.; Puffer, James C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE More than a decade ago the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, American Board of Family Medicine, Association of Departments of Family Medicine, Association of Family Practice Residency Directors, North American Primary Care Research Group, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine came together in the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) to launch a series of strategic efforts to “renew the specialty to meet the needs of people and society,” some of which bore important fruit. Family Medicine for America’s Health was launched in 2013 to revisit the role of family medicine in view of these changes and to position family medicine with new strategic and communication plans to create better health, better health care, and lower cost for patients and communities (the Triple Aim). METHODS Family Medicine for America’s Health was preceded and guided by the development of a family physician role definition. A consulting group facilitated systematic strategic plan development over 9 months that included key informant interviews, formal stakeholder surveys, future scenario testing, a retreat for family medicine organizations and stakeholder representatives to review strategy options, further strategy refinement, and finally a formal strategic plan with draft tactics and design for an implementation plan. A second communications consulting group surveyed diverse stakeholders in coordination with strategic planning to develop a communication plan. The American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians joined the effort, and students, residents, and young physicians were included. RESULTS The core strategies identified include working to ensure broad access to sustained, primary care relationships; accountability for increasing primary care value in terms of cost and quality; a commitment to helping reduce health care disparities; moving to comprehensive payment and away from fee-for-service; transformation of

  1. Mentorship perceptions and experiences among academic family medicine faculty

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Barbara; Krueger, Paul; White, David; Meaney, Christopher; Kwong, Jeffrey; Antao, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To collect information about the types, frequency, importance, and quality of mentorship received among academic family medicine faculty, and to identify variables associated with receiving high-quality mentorship. Design Web-based survey of all faculty members of an academic department of family medicine. Setting The Department of Family and Community Medicine of the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants All 1029 faculty members were invited to complete the survey. Main outcome measures Receiving mentorship rated as very good or excellent in 1 or more of 6 content areas relevant to respondents’ professional lives, and information about demographic and practice characteristics, faculty ratings of their local departments and main practice settings, teaching activities, professional development, leadership, job satisfaction, and health. Bivariate and multivariate analyses identified variables associated with receiving high-quality mentorship. Results The response rate was 66.8%. Almost all (95.0%) respondents had received mentorship in several areas, with informal mentorship being the most prevalent mode. Approximately 60% of respondents rated at least 1 area of mentoring as very good or excellent. Multivariate logistic regression identified 5 factors associated with an increased likelihood of rating mentorship quality as very good or excellent: positive perceptions of their local department (odds ratio [OR] = 4.02, 95% CI 2.47 to 6.54, P < .001); positive ratings of practice infrastructure (OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.80, P = .003); increased frequency of receiving mentorship (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.59 to 4.89, P < .001); fewer years in practice (OR = 1.93, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.12, P = .007); and practising in a family practice teaching unit (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.27, P = .040). Conclusion With increasing emphasis on distributed education and community-based teachers, family medicine faculties will need to develop strategies to support

  2. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  3. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit. PMID:24883163

  4. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    PubMed Central

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  5. Hospital grand rounds in family medicine. Content and educational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Lewkonia, R.; Sosnowski, M.; Murray, F.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate hospital grand rounds in family medicine, to examine their content and organization, and to recommend improved educational structures for these ubiquitous continuing medical education events. DATA SELECTION: Retrospective analysis of titles and content of 358 family medicine grand rounds offered in the department of family medicine of a large urban hospital from mid-1983 to the end of 1994. FINDINGS: Only 10% of family medicine grand rounds were presented by family physicians. Most grand rounds were in the form of specialists exhibiting their own interests in a lecture format. Analysis of grand rounds titles showed no consistent pattern of topics but an emphasis on practical aspects of medical care. Patient-based presentations were uncommon, as were grand rounds with more than one speaker. CONCLUSIONS: The content and mix of topics appeared appropriate, but in the absence of a curricular structure, or evaluation of learning gain, it is difficult to assess the value of grand rounds. PMID:9222579

  6. [Effects of family medicine education on medical students' attitudes].

    PubMed

    Chou, M C; Lee, M C

    1991-07-01

    Undergraduate education is considered to be one of the main contributory factors for the development of family medicine through increasing the number of medical graduates opting for a career in family practice. To evaluate the effects of family medicine education on student's attitudes, 140 fifth year medical students were asked in 1989 to fill in a questionnaire both before and after their curricula. The average age of the 123 students who completed the questionnaire on both occasions was 24.9 years; 106 were males; 17 were tuition free and 26 took additional family medicine clerkships. On aggregate, the students' disposition toward family medicine before their curricula appeared to be uncertain. Mean scores on the attitude scale did not significantly differ between socioeconomic subgroups before the curricula. After the curricula, students' attitudes were significantly altered, especially toward the future development of family medicine in Taiwan. However, their disposition toward family practice as a career changed the least. The degree of alteration in students' attitude toward family medicine before and after the curricula was related to the intensity of the course and to their socioeconomic backgrounds.

  7. Attractiveness of family medicine for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Courteau, Josiane; Scott, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the association between students’ personal characteristics, backgrounds, and medical schools and their intention to enter a family medicine (FM) specialty. Design Descriptive study using data from the 2007 National Physician Survey. Setting Canada. Participants Clinical (n = 1109) and preclinical (n = 829) medical student respondents to the 2007 National Physician Survey. Main outcome measures The main variable was hoping to enter an FM specialty, and 40 independent variables were included in regression and classification-tree models. Results Fewer than 1 medical student in 3 (30.2% at the preclinical level and 31.4% at the clinical level) hoped to enter into an FM career. Those who did were more likely to be female, were slightly older, were more frequently married or living with partners, were typically born in Canada, and were more likely to have previous exposure to non-urban environments. The most important predictor for both populations was the debt related to medical studies, which acted in the opposite direction of whether or not students were interested in research. Students interested in research were attracted by specialties with high earning potential, while those not interested in research looked for short residency programs, such as FM, so they could begin to pay off debt sooner. Therefore, the interest in research appears to be inversely related to the choice of FM. Conclusion Less than one-third of medical students were looking for residencies in FM in Canada. This is far below the goals of 45% set at the national level and 50% set by some provinces like Quebec. Debt and interest in research have strong influences on the choice of residency by medical students. PMID:21673198

  8. [Approach to Teaching Kampo Medicine at Kyoto Pharmaceutical University].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    An approach to educating our pharmaceutical students about Kampo medicine in the six-year system of undergraduate pharmacy education at Kyoto Pharmaceutical University is introduced, including the author's opinions. Curriculum revisions have been made in our university for students entering after 2012. In teaching Kampo medicine at present, a medical doctor and an on-site pharmacist share information difficult to give in a lecture with the teaching staff in my laboratory. For example, before the curriculum revision, we conferred with a pharmacist and a doctor in the course "Kampo Medicine A, B" for 4th year students, in which students were presented a basic knowledge of Kampo medicine, the application of important Kampo medicines, combinations of crude drugs, etc. Further, in our "Introduction to Kampo Medicine" for 6th year students, presented after they have practiced in hospitals and community pharmacies, we again lecture on the pharmacological characteristics of Kampo medicines, on "pattern (Sho)", and on evidence-based medicine (EBM) and research studies of important Kampo medicines. After our curriculum revision, "Kampo Medicine A, B" was rearranged into the courses "Kampo and Pharmacognosy" and "Clinical Kampo Medicine". "Kampo and Pharmacognosy" is now provided in the second semester of the 3rd year, and in this course we lecture on the basic knowledge of Kampo medicine. An advanced lecture will be given on "Clinical Kampo Medicine" in the 6th year. We are searching for the best way to interest students in Kampo medicine, and to counteract any misunderstandings about Kampo medicine.

  9. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Donoff, Michel; Lawrence, Kathrine; Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Crichton, Tom; Bethune, Cheri; Laughlin, Tom; Wetmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop and describe observable evaluation objectives for assessing competence in professionalism, which are grounded in the experience of practising physicians. Design Modified nominal group technique. Setting The College of Family Physicians of Canada in Mississauga, Ont. Participants An expert group of 7 family physicians and 1 educational consultant, all of whom had experience in assessing competence in family medicine. Group members represented the Canadian context with respect to region, sex, language, community type, and experience. Methods Using an iterative process, the expert group defined a list of observable behaviours that are indicative of professionalism, or not, in the family medicine setting. Themes relate to professional behaviour in family medicine; specific observable behaviours are those that family physicians believe are indicative of professionalism for each theme. Main findings The expert group identified 12 themes and 140 specific observable behaviours to assist in the observation and discussion of professional behaviour in family medicine workplace settings. Conclusion Competency-based education literature emphasizes the importance of formative evaluation and feedback. Such feedback is particularly challenging in the domain of professionalism because of its personal nature and the potential for emotional reactions. Effective dialogue between learners and teachers begins with clear expectations and reference to descriptions of relevant, specific behaviour. This research has generated a competency-based resource to assist the assessment of professional behaviour in family medicine educational programs. PMID:23064939

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  11. Interprofessional education in academic family medicine teaching units

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; Howard, Michelle; Hilts, Linda; Dolovich, Lisa; McCarthy, Lisa; Walsh, Allyn E.; Dykeman, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM ADDRESSED The new family health teams (FHTs) in Ontario were designed to enable interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care; however, many health professionals have not been trained in an interprofessional environment. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To provide health professional learners with an interprofessional practice experience in primary care that models teamwork and collaborative practice skills. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The 2 academic teaching units of the FHT at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, employ 6 types of health professionals and provide learning environments for family medicine residents and students in a variety of health care professions. Learners engage in formal interprofessional education activities and mixed professional and learner clinical consultations. They are immersed in an established interprofessional practice environment, where all team members are valued and contribute collaboratively to patient care and clinic administration. Other contributors to the success of the program include the physical layout of the clinics, the electronic medical record communications system, and support from leadership for the additional clinical time commitment of delivering interprofessional education. CONCLUSION This academic FHT has developed a program of interprofessional education based partly on planned activities and logistic enablers, and largely on immersing learners in a culture of long-standing interprofessional collaboration. PMID:19752260

  12. Workshops for Faculty Development in Family Medicine. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reineke, Robert A.; Welch, Wayne W.

    An evaluation was conducted of four faculty development workshops sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine for faculty in family practice residency programs. Objectives of the evaluation were to determine the extent to which the workshops achieved the specified educational objectives and to assess the operational aspects of the…

  13. Training family medicine residents to care for children

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation. PMID:21321160

  14. The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. Methods A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Results Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Conclusions Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised. PMID:23510461

  15. Weaving public health education into the fabric of a family medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Potts, Stacy E; Deligiannidis, Konstantinos E; Cashman, Suzanne B; Caggiano, Marie E; Carter, Lisa H; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Ferguson, Warren J

    2011-10-01

    Policymakers and accrediting bodies have recognized the importance of integrating public health, population health, and prevention into graduate medical education programs. The high prevalence of chronic illness, coupled with the impact of behavioral and societal determinants of health, necessitate an urgent call for family medicine residencies to prepare future leaders to meet these challenges. The University of Massachusetts Worcester Family Medicine Residency recently developed an integrated curriculum that strives to develop a culture of incorporating fundamental public health principles into everyday practice. This public health curriculum was designed to integrate new topics within the current residency structure through longitudinal and concentrated experiences. This strategy has substantially improved public health and prevention education without substantial impact on the already strained residency curricular structure. This paper describes the integration of public health and prevention education into a family medicine residency to help residents acquire the fundamental skills necessary to improve a population's health.

  16. Report of Survey of Howard University College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Howard University's School of Medicine is evaluated in this report, in fulfillment of the United States Congress's requirement that the Office of Education annually evaluate one aspect of the Howard University educational program. Evaluation teams, comprised mostly of Office of Education professionals, spent several days at the University meeting…

  17. Topics for Family Medicine Research in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William E.; Calonge, Ned

    1988-01-01

    Primarily because of improvements in care of the low-birthweight neonate, Canada's neonatal mortality rates have declined significantly over the last 20 years. To make further improvement, research is now focused on the prevention of prematurity. However, benefits from the implementation of such research and the maintenance of the current neonatal mortality rate depend on the availability of obstetric care providers in rural areas. The recent trend among family physicians to drop the practice of obstetrics significantly jeopardizes access to obstetric care for inhabitants of rural areas, and a significant body of literature suggests that such declines in access will be accompanied by an increase in the neonatal death rate. A logical research agenda for rural family physicians would include the forecasting of the effect of the decrease in obstetric care manpower, follwed by the study of factors behind this trend, and the evaluation programs designed to prevent family physicians abandoning obstetric practice. PMID:21253225

  18. Results of the 2004 national resident matching program: family medicine.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Fetter, Gerald T; Kahn, Norman B

    2004-09-01

    The results of the 2004 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a leveling in the recent trend of declining student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2003 Match, 34 more positions (36 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2004, at the same time as 14 fewer (four fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 10 more in pediatrics-primary care (one more US senior), and 35 more (38 more US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, one less position (one more US senior) was filled in anesthesiology and seven fewer (five more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past several years. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 165 more positions (12 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine while 164 more positions (15 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. With the needs of the nation, especially for rural and underserved populations, continuing to offer opportunities for family physicians, family medicine experienced a slight increase through the 2004 NRMP. The 2004 NRMP suggests that the trend away from family medicine and primary care careers may be leveling off. PMID:15343417

  19. Results of the 2005 national resident matching program: family medicine.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; Schmittling, Gordon T; Fetter, Gerald T; Kahn, Norman B

    2005-09-01

    The results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2004 Match, 19 more positions (66 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2005, at the same time as four fewer (18 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, seven more in pediatrics-primary care (three fewer US seniors), and 12 fewer (21 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. In comparison, 25 more positions (four more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology but two fewer (14 fewer US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past several years. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, lifestyle issues, and the impact of faculty and resident role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. Seven more positions (57 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine while 48 more positions (68 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. With the needs of the nation, especially for rural and underserved populations, continuing to offer opportunities for family physicians, family medicine experienced another slight increase through the 2005 NRMP. The 2005 NRMP results suggest that interest in family medicine and primary care careers continues to be stable. PMID:16145633

  20. Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, U. B.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

  1. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  2. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015. PMID:27453835

  3. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015. PMID:27453835

  4. Finding, keeping, and revitalizing the meaning in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Anne; Seger, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    The culture of medicine is undergoing revolutionary change. Physicians are pulled in many directions involving the practice of medicine, the business of medicine, and the technology of medicine. Financial incentives and career promotions may be dependent upon such things as patient satisfaction scores, as well as adherence to guidelines for admissions and diagnostic testing. Of course, these metrics are monitored closely by hospitals, insurance companies, and the federal government. The resultant seemingly endless paperwork, deadlines, and multiple demands may result in a sense of time famine for physicians. Unfortunately, these expectations and demands can subsequently diminish the passion for medicine. Moreover, physicians are at high risk for significant physical and emotional exhaustion, often leading to a sense of demoralization. Physicians can ultimately lose sight of their reasons for choosing the field of medicine. Indeed, they can lose the inspiration and "meaning" derived from work in medicine all together. How, then, does one buffer oneself against such perils, and maintain the original passion and meaning in a chosen career of service to others? This article will describe one program's approach to promoting resilience and maintaining meaning during the residency training years through the establishment of a Meaning in Family Medicine Group. The conceptual background, approach to curriculum development, goals and objectives, resident feedback, and suggestions about how to carry this curriculum beyond the residency training years will be discussed. PMID:24261266

  5. Medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of family Sterculiaceae: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Muqarrabun, L M R; Ahmat, N

    2015-03-01

    The family Sterculiaceae is one of the most important families among flowering plants. Many of its members demonstrate medicinal properties and have been used for the treatment of various ailments and wounds. A wide range of compounds including alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and other types of compounds including hydrocarbons, sugars, quinones, phenolic acids, lactones, lignans, amine and amides have been isolated from several species in this family. Few studies have reported that some extracts and single compounds isolated from this family exhibited several biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The present review is an effort to provide information about the traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of species from family Sterculiaceae, and to uncover the gaps and potentials requiring further research opportunities regarding the chemistry and pharmacy of this family.

  6. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes.

    PubMed

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M

    2015-10-13

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent [Formula: see text], another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class with [Formula: see text]. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents [Formula: see text] are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either [Formula: see text] (if a KPZ mode exist) or [Formula: see text] (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean [Formula: see text] as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement.

  7. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes.

    PubMed

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M

    2015-10-13

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent [Formula: see text], another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class with [Formula: see text]. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents [Formula: see text] are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either [Formula: see text] (if a KPZ mode exist) or [Formula: see text] (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean [Formula: see text] as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement. PMID:26424449

  8. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes

    PubMed Central

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M.

    2015-01-01

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent z=2, another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar−Parisi−Zhang (KPZ) class with z=3/2. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents zα are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either z1=3/2 (if a KPZ mode exist) or z1=2 (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean z=(1+5)/2 as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement. PMID:26424449

  9. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  10. ENT Experience in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Is There Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Brenda S.; Saywell, Robert M., Jr.; Zollinger, Terrell W.; Smith, Christopher P.; Burba, Jennifer L.; Stopperich, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Used patient encounter records completed by 445 medical students to determine whether a family medicine clerkship offered enough experience in ear, nose, and throat (ENT) conditions. Results, which were used for curriculum development, suggest that these students were receiving sufficient opportunities for some areas of ENT practice, but not for…

  11. Family Medicine Educators' Perceptions of the Future of Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirk, Mark; Lasser, Daniel; Domino, Frank; Chuman, Alan; Devaney-O'Neil, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Family medicine faculty participated in focus groups to gather their perceptions about faculty development. They emphasized that faculty development methods must be proven effective, woven into the fabric of clinical practice, and deal with increasing time and financial pressures. Much discussion was related to the need for national and regional…

  12. Depression and burnout symptoms among Air Force family medicine providers.

    PubMed

    Varner, Derrick F; Foutch, Brian K

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of depression and burnout symptoms among family medicine providers on active duty in the US Air Force. Results demonstrated that 84% of those surveyed scored positive for degrees of depression symptoms; only sex differences were significant. PMID:24758978

  13. Graduate Training in Family Medicine: Two Years or Three?

    PubMed Central

    Vinger, Irving

    1979-01-01

    Graduate training in family medicine is a three year program in the United States and a two year program in Canada. For the majority of family practice residents the third year is required in order to consolidate the attitudes and skills related to continuing comprehensive health care and prevention. Without this consolidation, the application of these concepts to the practice of family health care is subject to the normal anxieties, frustrations and uncertanties which lead physicians to provide technologically oriented, episodic care. PMID:21297762

  14. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  15. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps. PMID:25968851

  16. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators.

  17. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators. PMID:27613785

  18. [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine: status of clinical laboratory medicine education].

    PubMed

    Ito, Wataru; Chihara, Junichi

    2010-03-01

    Education in laboratory medicine is important. However, many medical students and doctors cannot understand this importance. This problem may be caused by the unclear character of laboratory medicine in research as well as hospital work, resulting in a lack of staff in the Department of Laboratory Medicine. One of the characters of laboratory medicine is its all-inclusive actions unrestrained by medical specialty. Thus, we tell medical students that the staff of laboratory medicine are suitable members of the infection control team (ICT) and nutrition support team (NST) in lectures. Moreover, we also teach allergy, immunology, infection, and sex-specific medicine, which are some subjects the topics of research. Many students in Akita University recognize that the staff of the Department of Laboratory Medicine are specialists of infection and allergy. On the other hand, young doctors can also receive postgraduate clinical training and conduct research not restricted to allergy and infection. We have a policy whereby the Department of Laboratory Medicine always opens its door widely to everyone including students and doctors. Nine staff joined the Department of Laboratory Medicine of Akita University about ten years, and now, can fully provide students with medical education. To solve some problems regarding education in laboratory medicine, we should promote our roles in medical education as well as in hospitals, and increase the number of staff. PMID:20408446

  19. Folk medicinal uses of Verbenaceae family plants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Jahan, Rownak; Azam, F M Safiul; Hossan, S; Mollik, M A H; Rahman, Taufiq

    2011-01-01

    Folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health-care providers to most of the rural population of Bangladesh. They are known locally as Kavirajes and rely almost solely on oral or topical administration of whole plants or plant parts for treatment of various ailments. Also about 2% of the total population of Bangladesh are scattered among more than twenty tribes residing within the country's borders. The various tribes have their own tribal practitioners, who use medicinal plants for treatment of diseases. The objective of the present survey was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey among the Kavirajes and tribal practitioners to determine which species of plants belonging to the Verbenaceae family are used by the practitioners. The Verbenaceae family plants are well known for constituents having important bio-active properties. The present survey indicated that 13 species belonging to 8 genera are used by the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh. A comparison of their folk medicinal uses along with published reports in the scientific literature suggests that the Verbenaceae family plants used in Bangladesh can potentially be important sources of lead compounds or novel drugs for treatment of difficult to cure debilitating diseases like malaria and rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Folk medicinal uses of Verbenaceae family plants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Jahan, Rownak; Azam, F M Safiul; Hossan, S; Mollik, M A H; Rahman, Taufiq

    2011-01-01

    Folk medicinal practitioners form the first tier of primary health-care providers to most of the rural population of Bangladesh. They are known locally as Kavirajes and rely almost solely on oral or topical administration of whole plants or plant parts for treatment of various ailments. Also about 2% of the total population of Bangladesh are scattered among more than twenty tribes residing within the country's borders. The various tribes have their own tribal practitioners, who use medicinal plants for treatment of diseases. The objective of the present survey was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey among the Kavirajes and tribal practitioners to determine which species of plants belonging to the Verbenaceae family are used by the practitioners. The Verbenaceae family plants are well known for constituents having important bio-active properties. The present survey indicated that 13 species belonging to 8 genera are used by the folk and tribal medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh. A comparison of their folk medicinal uses along with published reports in the scientific literature suggests that the Verbenaceae family plants used in Bangladesh can potentially be important sources of lead compounds or novel drugs for treatment of difficult to cure debilitating diseases like malaria and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22754058

  1. Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myllys, Heli

    The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

  2. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  3. Balance of trade: export-import in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Pust, Ronald E

    2007-01-01

    North American family physicians leaving for less-developed countries (LDCs) may not be aware of internationally validated diagnostic and treatment technologies originating in LDCs. Thus they may bring with them inappropriate models and methods of medical care. More useful "exports" are based in sharing our collaborative vocational perspective with dedicated indigenous generalist clinicians who serve their communities. More specifically, Western doctors abroad can promote local reanalyses of international evidence-based medicine (EBM) studies, efficient deployment of scarce clinical resources, and a family medicine/generalist career ladder, ultimately reversing the "brain drain" from LDCs. Balancing these exports, we should import the growing number of EBM best practices originated in World Health Organization and other LDCs research that are applicable in developed nations. Many generalist colleagues, expatriate and indigenous, with long-term LDC experience stand ready to help us import these practices and perspectives. PMID:17987419

  4. Improving Health Care Globally: A Critical Review of the Necessity of Family Medicine Research and Recommendations to Build Research Capacity

    PubMed Central

    van Weel, Chris; Rosser, Walter W.

    2004-01-01

    An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was “Improving Health Globally: The Necessity of Family Medicine Research.” Guiding conference discussions was the value that to improve health care worldwide, strong, evidence-based primary care is indispensable. Eight papers reviewed before the meeting formed the basic material from which the conference developed 9 recommendations. Wonca, as an international body of family medicine, was regarded as particularly suited to pursue these conference recommendations: Research achievements in family medicine should be displayed to policy makers, health (insurance) authorities, and academic leaders in a systematic way. In all countries, sentinel practice systems should be developed to provide surveillance reports on illness and diseases that have the greatest impact on the population’s health and wellness in the community. A clearinghouse should be organized to provide a central repository of knowledge about family medicine research expertise, training, and mentoring. National research institutes and university departments of family medicine with a research mission should be developed. Practice-based research networks should be developed around the world. Family medicine research journals, conferences, and Web sites should be strengthened to disseminate research findings internationally, and their use coordinated. Improved representation of family medicine research journals in databases, such as Index Medicus, should be pursued. Funding of international collaborative research in family medicine should be facilitated. International ethical guidelines, with an international ethical review process, should be developed in particular for participatory (action) research, where researchers work in partnership with communities. When implementing these recommendations

  5. Occupational Stress and Physical Symptoms among Family Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, So-Myung; Park, Yong Soon; Kim, Go-Young

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of occupational stress and physical symptoms among family medicine residents and investigate the effect of subscales of occupational stress on physical symptoms. Methods A self-administered questionnaire survey of 1,152 family medicine residents was carried out via e-mail from April 2010 to July 2010. The response rate was 13.1% and the R (ver. 2.9.1) was used for the analysis of completed data obtained from 150 subjects. The questionnaire included demographic factors, resident training related factors, 24-items of the Korean Occupational Stress Scales and Korean Versions of the Wahler Physical Symptom Inventory. Results The total score of occupational stress of family medicine residents was relatively low compared to that of average workers. The scores of 'high job demand', 'inadequate social support', 'organizational injustice', and 'discomfort in occupational climate' were within the top 50%. Parameters associated with higher occupational stress included level of training, on-duty time, daily patient load, critical patient assigned, total working days, night duty day, sleep duration, and sleep quality. The six subscales of occupational stress, except for 'Job insecurity', had a significant positive correlation with physical symptom scores after adjustment had been made for potential confounders (total score, r = 0.325 and P < 0.001; high job demand, r = 0.439 and P < 0.001). Conclusion After the adjustment had been made for potential confounders, the total score of occupational stress and six subscales in family medicine residents showed a significant positive correlation with physical symptom scores. PMID:23372906

  6. Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

  7. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care.

  8. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care. PMID:27688865

  9. Shiraz University School of Medicine: its foundation and development.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Khosrow

    2009-01-01

    The history of Shiraz University School of Medicine (the former Pahlavi University School of Medicine) is important if we are to understand the development of medical education in Iran during the 20th century. This medical school took a unique path to its development including full-time faculty members, use of English as its institutional language, and emphasis on self learning. However, the most important of all is that it applied scientific method and modern knowledge to the problems of Iran and that it emphasized the importance of relevance of medical education to the problems of the region. This article summarizes the foundation and process of development of this school, emphasizing its unique features. This is not the history of individuals who were critical to its development. Nor a history of structures and buildings. Rather, it is the story of its intellectual development, and its process of change as the University became relevant. PMID:19111039

  10. Profile of Diseases Prevalent in a Tribal Locality in Jharkhand, India: A Family Medicine Practitioner's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Majority of Indian population is dependent on general practitioners (GPs) for medical services at primary care level in India. They are most preferred and considered to be first contact person for medical services at primary care level. But advances in medical science has put more emphasis on specialist culture and average Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) graduates who are working as general physician are gradually feeling themselves less competent because they are less exposed to latest advances in treatment of diseases. Amidst such scenario, Christian Medical College (CMC) has come up with an idea: “The refer less and resolve more initiative”. It has started a decentralized 2-year family medicine distance diploma course (Postgraduate Diploma in Family Medicine (PGDFM)) now accredited by Dr. MGR Medical University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, that trains the GPs to become family medicine specialist. Materials and Methods: As component of PGDFM course, this study was conducted to provide better understanding of prevalent ailments and common treatment provided by the GPs in the community at present giving key insight of current practice in rural area by a registered family medicine practitioner. Results: As part of study, among 500 patients evaluated, three most common diagnosis were upper respiratory infections (URIs; 18%), acute gastroenteritis including water-borne diseases (15.8%), and anemia (10.4%). Treatment given to these patients comprised of mostly of antipyretic, analgesic, and antimicrobial agents. Most common drug prescribed was paracetamol for fever. Other common drugs prescribed were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloroquine, artemisin derivative, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, miltefosine, cephalexin, ceftriaxone sodium, cefixime, oral rehydration salts, ranitidine, omeprazole, pantoprazole, metronidazole, albendazole, ondansetron, diclofenac sodium, piroxicam, ibuprofen, diphenhydramine, codeine-sulfate, amlodipine, ramipril

  11. Designing and implementing a resiliency program for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Julie; McGrady, Angele

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine residents are at risk for burnout due to extended work hours, lack of control over their work schedule, and challenging work situations and environments. Building resiliency can prevent burnout and may improve a resident's quality of life and health behavior. This report describes a program designed to build resiliency, the ability to bounce back from stress, in family medicine residents in a medium sized U.S. residency training program. Interactive sessions emphasized building self-awareness, coping skills, strengths and meaning in work, time management, self-care, and connections in and outside of medicine to support resident well-being. System changes which fostered wellness were also implemented. These changes included increasing the availability of fresh fruits in the conference and call room, purchasing an elliptical exercise machine for the on call room, and offering a few minutes of mindfulness meditation daily to the inpatient residents. Results to date show excellent acceptance of the program by trainees, increased consumption of nutritious foods, more personal exercise, and self-reported decreased overreactions to stress. Resiliency programs can effectively serve to meet accreditation requirements while fostering residents' abilities to balance personal and professional demands. PMID:26130769

  12. Teaching forensic medicine in the University of Porto.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Santos, Agostinho

    2014-07-01

    The University of Porto (UP) provides education in Forensic Medicine (FM) through the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of studies, post-graduation and continuing education courses. This education is related to forensic pathology, clinical forensic medicine (including forensic psychology and psychiatry), forensic chemistry and toxicology, forensic genetics and biology, and criminalistics. With this work we intent to reflect on how we are currently teaching FM in the UP, at all levels of university graduation. We will present our models, regarding the educational objectives, curricular program and teaching/learning methodologies of each cycle of studies as well as in post-graduate and continuing education courses. Historically, and besides related administratively to the Ministry of Justice, the Portuguese Medico-Legal Institutes (since 1918) and more recently the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (INMLCF) also have educational and research responsibilities. Thus, it lends space and cooperates with academic institutions and this contribution, namely regarding teaching forensic sciences in Portugal has been judged as an example for other Countries. This contribution is so important that in UP, the Department of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine (FMUP) shares, until now, the same physical space with North Branch of the INMLCF, which represents a notorious advantage, since it makes possible the "learning by doing".

  13. Context and trade-offs in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency.

  14. Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

  15. Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India.

  16. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched “family medicine” AND “Taiwan” in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal’s impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3%) articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2%) and international in 142 (11.7%). Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles), the United Kingdom (21) and the People’s Republic of China (20) were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers. PMID:26500827

  17. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  18. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  19. Curriculum to enhance pharmacotherapeutic knowledge in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bordman, Risa; Bajcar, Jana; Kennie, Natalie; Fernandes, Lisa; Iglar, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Prescribing is an essential skill for physicians. Despite the fact that prescribing habits are still developing in residency, formal pharmacotherapy curricula are not commonplace in postgraduate programs. Objective of program To teach first-year and second-year family medicine residents a systematic prescribing process using a medication prescribing framework, which could be replicated and distributed. Program description A hybrid model of Web-based (www.rationalprescribing.com) and in-class seminar learning was used. Web-based modules, consisting of foundational pharmacotherapeutic content, were each followed by an in-class session, which involved applying content to case studies. A physician and a pharmacist were coteachers and they used simulated cases to enhance application of pharmacotherapeutic content and modeled interprofessional collaboration. Conclusion This systematic approach to prescribing was well received by family medicine residents. It might be important to introduce the process in the undergraduate curriculum—when learners are building their therapeutic foundational knowledge. Incorporating formal pharmacotherapeutic curriculum into residency teaching is challenging and requires further study to identify potential effects on prescribing habits. PMID:24235207

  20. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    PubMed

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  1. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  2. Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries. Methods A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review. Results Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia. Conclusions Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process. PMID:22409775

  3. Are family medicine residents adequately trained to deliver palliative care?

    PubMed Central

    Mahtani, Ramona; Kurahashi, Allison M.; Buchman, Sandy; Webster, Fiona; Husain, Amna; Goldman, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore educational factors that influence family medicine residents’ (FMRs’) intentions to offer palliative care and palliative care home visits to patients. Design Qualitative descriptive study. Setting A Canadian, urban, specialized palliative care centre. Participants First-year (n = 9) and second-year (n = 6) FMRs. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with FMRs following a 4-week palliative care rotation. Questions focused on participant experiences during the rotation and perceptions about their roles as family physicians in the delivery of palliative care and home visits. Participant responses were analyzed to summarize and interpret patterns related to their educational experience during their rotation. Main findings Four interrelated themes were identified that described this experience: foundational skill development owing to training in a specialized setting; additional need for education and support; unaddressed gaps in pragmatic skills; and uncertainty about family physicians’ role in palliative care. Conclusion Residents described experiences that both supported and inadvertently discouraged them from considering future engagement in palliative care. Reassuringly, residents were also able to underscore opportunities for improvement in palliative care education. PMID:27035008

  4. A novel nutrition medicine education model: the Boston University experience.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student-mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations.

  5. A novel nutrition medicine education model: the Boston University experience.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student-mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations. PMID:23319117

  6. [Training in internal medicine and its specialties: universities' proposals].

    PubMed

    Norero, C

    1996-04-01

    Medical School graduates can enter a medicine subspecialty training program upon completion of a 3 year Internal Medicine residency. The Ministry of Health has contributed to postgraduate training by defining the type of physician the country needs, and by financial support of specially (Internal Medicine) training. Before 1995, when applicants began being charged a fee, finding for subspecialty training was provided exclusively by the universities. Currently, 450 training post are available for 550 graduates from all medical schools. Of these, 59 are in Internal Medicine and 58 in its subspecialties. A quantitative analysis of 40 years of training programs in Internal Medicine by the traditional medical schools shows that only the Catholic University of Chile Medical School privileges subspecially training whereas all other schools favor general Internal Medicine training. A high number of Internal Medicine trainees never take final examination. Nevertheless, training through practice, not necessarily in a university setting, accounts for 67% of Autonomous National Corporation for Certification of Medical Specialties. CONACEM accredited subspecialists. About 63% of those who finish an Internal Medicine training program decide to go into subspecialization. It is felt that subspecialization involves technical as well as non-professional aspects, such as a philosophical stance towards the search for truth through research and creativity. An integral education in a subspecialty can only be given by the university. Non-university centers, however, can contribute to subspecialization by allowing trainees to gain access to newer technology or to larger numbers of patients. A critical question is how many subspecialists should exist in relation to the number of generalists and according to the country's health requirements. In my personal view, the proportion of subspecialists is excessive. The decision to subspecialize should not be exclusively a personal choice, but

  7. Extending the boundaries of family medicine to perform manual procedures.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, Haim; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    A recent survey by Menahem and colleagues revealed that 65% of the surveyed primary care physicians reported that they performed any minor surgical procedures, and 46% reported performance of any musculoskeletal injections. Lack of allocated time and lack of training were the main reported barriers confronting higher performance rates. Healthcare systems are shifting large chunks of traditional hospital-centered activities to competent and comprehensive community-based structures. These changes are very well aligned with key trends in modern consumerism that prefer a close to home availability of medical services. Minor surgical procedures and musculoskeletal injections are good examples of medical activities that had been performed mainly by hospital and community based specialists. The syllabus of specialty training in Family Medicine in Israel includes these skills and trainees should acquire them during the residency program. We estimate that hundreds of family physicians obtain different levels of such training. Yet, only few family physicians have allocated protected time for performance of the procedures. For the skilled physician, performance of such relatively simple procedures extends his professional boundaries and the comprehensiveness of his service. For the healthcare system the "extra effort" and investment needed for performance of minor surgical procedures in primary care clinics is small. The results of the present study reflect on wider issues of care delivery. This study highlights the need for formalized and documented training of family physicians together with allocation of managerial and technical requirements needed to encourage these and similar medically and economically justified endeavors that seem to be perfectly aligned with the wishes of healthcare consumers. PMID:25383180

  8. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information.

  9. Reframing Balint: thoughts on family medicine departmental Balint groups.

    PubMed

    Stein, Howard F

    2003-04-01

    This paper explores recurrent processes and themes in the 1,300 family medicine faculty, resident, intern, and community Balint groups the author has facilitated/led. The frequent group "deviation" from the central Balint task of understanding difficult physician-patient relationships is reframed as less "resistance" or "obstacle" to work, as it is an expression of unmet developmental needs and organizational realities. When group members are carefully attended to (by facilitator and one another), the group often becomes emotionally capable of addressing a "case " in the conventional Balint understanding of the work the group has assembled to do. The group dynamics of such "hybrid" Balint groups thus become comprehensible as other than error.

  10. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information. PMID:19227968

  11. Teaching family medicine residents brief interventions for alcohol misuse.

    PubMed

    Rule, J Chris; Samuel, Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Across the lifespan, alcohol misuse affects a large percentage of patients seen in primary care clinics. It can lead to alcohol use disorders, ranging from risky use to alcohol dependence. Alcohol use disorders frequently complicate acute and chronic illnesses of patients seen in FM clinics. Screening patients for alcohol and substance use has become a standard of practice in most primary care settings. This report describes how a family medicine residency program solidified a residency curriculum in substance abuse screening, assessment, and brief intervention by merging three presentation-style didactics into a blended approach. The curriculum combines didactic teaching, motivational interviewing, and behavioral rehearsal of clinical practice skills. Qualitative feedback suggests that the curriculum has been successful in exposing residents to a variety of practical assessment methods and, through rehearsal, has improved resident confidence in addressing alcohol use and misuse in a primary care population. PMID:26130770

  12. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  13. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  14. Effect of family medicine residents on use of diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Augene; Osmun, W.E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the effect of the presence of family medicine residents on the use of laboratory and imaging investigations in a rural emergency department (ED). Design A retrospective cross-sectional electronic chart audit was completed. Background characteristics, as well as type and number of ordered investigations, were compared between study groups. Setting Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital in Strathroy, Ont, a rural community hospital that sees approximately 20 000 ED visits per year. Participants A total of 2000 sequential ED visits, including adult and pediatric patients. The test group consisted of patients seen while a resident was present in the ED. The control group consisted of patients seen while no residents were present in the ED. Main outcome measures Twenty-two distinct categories of common ED investigations were studied. Results There was no statistically significant difference between study groups for 19 of the 22 categories of investigations. There were significant differences in 3 categories: an increased number of D-dimer assays for patients seen while there were no residents in the ED (1.7% of patients vs 0.5% of patients, P = .03) and increased computed tomography and ultrasound imaging for patients seen while a resident was in the ED (4.8% vs 1.8%, P = .0012, and 5.3% and 1.7%, P < .001, respectively). These differences are likely not owing to resident involvement but are explained by a difference in test availability between groups. Conclusion The study was underpowered for most categories of studied investigations. However, the trends demonstrated in this study suggest that the presence of family medicine residents in a rural community ED does not substantially affect the overall use of diagnostic investigations. PMID:25217692

  15. Students letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Mrduljaš-Đjujic, Nataša; Pavličević, Ivančica; Marušic, Ana; Marušic, Matko

    2012-01-01

    Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor- patient relationship. We explored the value of students practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at the School of Medicine in Split wrote letters to the patients from consultations under the supervision of the supervisor in a family medicine practice. Structured teaching of communication with the patient brings family medicine back to what has actually always been its main part- communication and doctor-patient relationship. Our future aim is to develop students letters to patients as a new tool in the family medicine course examination. Moreover, we will investigate how they can be used in everyday practice of family medicine.

  16. The Application of Entrustable Professional Activities to Inform Competency Decisions in a Family Medicine Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Karen; Griffiths, Jane; Lacasse, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Assessing entrustable professional activities (EPAs), or carefully chosen units of work that define a profession and are entrusted to a resident to complete unsupervised once she or he has obtained adequate competence, is a novel and innovative approach to competency-based assessment (CBA). What is currently not well described in the literature is the application of EPAs within a CBA system. In this article, the authors describe the development of 35 EPAs for a Canadian family medicine residency program, including the work by an expert panel of family physician and medical education experts from four universities in three Canadian provinces to identify the relevant EPAs for family medicine in nine curriculum domains. The authors outline how they used these EPAs and the corresponding templates that describe competence at different levels of supervision to create electronic EPA field notes, which has allowed educators to use the EPAs as a formative tool to structure day-to-day assessment and feedback and a summative tool to ground competency declarations about residents. They then describe the system to compile, collate, and use the EPA field notes to make competency declarations and how this system aligns with van der Vleuten's utility index for assessment (valid, reliable, of educational value, acceptable, cost-effective). Early outcomes indicate that preceptors are using the EPA field notes more often than they used the generic field notes. EPAs enable educators to evaluate multiple objectives and important but unwieldy competencies by providing practical, manageable, measurable activities that can be used to assess competency development.

  17. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  18. New library building: Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, J A; Bernard, G R

    1984-01-01

    The Mercer University School of Medicine (MUSM) enrolled its charter class in 1982. The curriculum is problem-based and adaptable to the learning needs of each student. MUSM is housed in a new building designed to support this unique educational program. Its library is an example of a comparatively small, but fully functional, medical school library. The planning process, design, and layout of the new library facility are described. Among its unique features are an integrated print and non-print collection, current periodical display space, and extensive use of task lighting. PMID:6733330

  19. UVAL-MED a universal visual associative language for medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, B.; Echavé, V.; Preiss, S. F.; Kaltenbach, M.

    1994-01-01

    We describe UVAL-MED, a Universal visual associative language for medicine, and propose its use in combination with diagnostic reasoning and decision support systems. When fully developed, our system will automatically translate SNOMED terms to UVAL-MED terms. Grammar and syntax for UVAL-MED are defined and its features as a language-independent tool are discussed. The perceived advantages of our graphical language for rapid integration of knowledge and the assessment of developing situations could thus facilitate decision making. PMID:7949931

  20. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    PubMed

    Šter, Marija Petek; Švab, Igor; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional

  1. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    PubMed

    Šter, Marija Petek; Švab, Igor; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional

  2. Exploring Gaps of Family History Documentation in EHR for Precision Medicine -A Case Study of Familial Hypercholesterolemia Ascertainment.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Saeed; Wang, Yanshan; Ihrke, Donna; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    In the era of precision medicine, accurately identifying familial conditions is crucial for providing target treatment. However, it is challenging to identify familial conditions without detailed family history information. In this work, we studied the documentation of family history of premature cardiovascular disease and hypercholesterolemia. The information on patients' family history of stroke within the Patient-provided information (PPI) forms was compared with the information gathered by clinicians in clinical notes. The agreement between PPI and clinical notes on absence of family history information in PPI was substantially higher compared to presence of family history. PMID:27570664

  3. Exploring Gaps of Family History Documentation in EHR for Precision Medicine -A Case Study of Familial Hypercholesterolemia Ascertainment

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Saeed; Wang, Yanshan; Ihrke, Donna; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    In the era of precision medicine, accurately identifying familial conditions is crucial for providing target treatment. However, it is challenging to identify familial conditions without detailed family history information. In this work, we studied the documentation of family history of premature cardiovascular disease and hypercholesterolemia. The information on patients’ family history of stroke within the Patient-provided information (PPI) forms was compared with the information gathered by clinicians in clinical notes. The agreement between PPI and clinical notes on absence of family history information in PPI was substantially higher compared to presence of family history. PMID:27570664

  4. Going Through Medical School and Considering the Choice of Family Medicine: Prescription or Antidote?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauksch, Hans O.; And Others

    A study of the choice of specialty by medical students suggests that Family Medicine depends on students whose choice predates medical school; the number of those interested diminishes significantly over the four years. Interviews suggest several characteristics of the medical school that mitigate against the choice of family medicine and steer…

  5. One medicine, one university: the DVM/MPH program at the University of Illinois.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, John A; Hershow, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Veterinary Medicine (UIUC-CVM) and the University of Illinois-Chicago School of Public Health (UIC-SPH) are in the fourth year of a collaborative Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Master of Public Health dual-degree program. The two campuses, one urban and one rural, are 150 miles apart but are sister schools within the University of Illinois system. This article describes the origin of the program, how the program functions across two campuses, its academic focus, required coursework, and research projects designed to fulfill the program's capstone requirements. The article shows how two campuses can be linked through a combination of online and on-site didactic coursework, briefly describes innovative proposals for projects within the United States and abroad, and highlights faculty committed to educating cross-trained public-health professionals while addressing the national need for veterinarians trained in public health. The authors also discuss how the dual-degree program has led to the formation of the Illinois Center for One Medicine, One Health (ICOMOH), an intra-university collaboration focusing on the interface of human, animal, and ecosystem health.

  6. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline’s education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

  7. Filling the gaps between theory and daily clinical procedural skills training in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Performance of procedures is an integral part of any family physician/general practitioner's practice. Unfortunately, discrepancy occurs between the existing theoretical methods of procedural teaching and the training imparted during real daily practice, which creates gaps that need to be overcome. This article identifies and reviews teaching gaps in family medicine training and presents suggestions to overcome them with a view to forming holistic psychomotor skills based on the learner's characteristics within the patient-centred philosophy of family medicine. PMID:27073067

  8. Teaching adaptive leadership to family medicine residents: what? why? how?

    PubMed

    Eubank, Daniel; Geffken, Dominic; Orzano, John; Ricci, Rocco

    2012-09-01

    Health care reform calls for patient-centered medical homes built around whole person care and healing relationships. Efforts to transform primary care practices and deliver these qualities have been challenging. This study describes one Family Medicine residency's efforts to develop an adaptive leadership curriculum and use coaching as a teaching method to address this challenge. We review literature that describes a parallel between the skills underlying such care and those required for adaptive leadership. We address two questions: What is leadership? Why focus on adaptive leadership? We then present a synthesis of leadership theories as a set of process skills that lead to organization learning through effective work relationships and adaptive leadership. Four models of the learning process needed to acquire such skills are explored. Coaching is proposed as a teaching method useful for going beyond information transfer to create the experiential learning necessary to acquire the process skills. Evaluations of our efforts to date are summarized. We discuss key challenges to implementing such a curriculum and propose that teaching adaptive leadership is feasible but difficult in the current medical education and practice contexts.

  9. The economic impacts of Oklahoma's Family Medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Lapolla, Michael; Brandt, Edward N; Barker, Andréa; Ryan, Lori

    2004-06-01

    The enactment of Medicare and Medicaid created a new demand for medical services in Oklahoma, particularly in rural areas. The state of Oklahoma responded by creating The Oklahoma Physician Manpower Training Commission in 1975. The overall purpose of the Commission was to increase the number of primary care physicians and influence distribution into non-metro areas. This analysis concerns the public policy value of this ongoing program. The PMTC has provided resident stipend funding to each of Oklahoma's publicly funded Family Medicine residency programs. Since 1975, the PMTC has provided over 139 million dollars in resident stipend funding and support; and there have been 749 program graduates with 431 practicing in Oklahoma. This model calculates that the Oklahoma-based physicians have created a cumulative 3.7 billion dollars of economic impact on the state; and conservatively estimates that only 10% of the practice decisions/locations were influenced by the PMTC. This creates an estimated return of 370 million dollars on an "investment" of 139 million dollars. Additionally the model demonstrates that the current cohort of physicians is annually responsible for 15,530 jobs and an associated payroll of 428 million dollars. PMID:15346805

  10. Appraisal of the communication skills of residents in the Family Medicine Program in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsaad, Saad M.; Alshammari, Sulaiman A.; Almogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess patients’ perceptions of the communication skills of family medicine residents. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from patients, seeing 23 residents from 4 family medicine residency programs in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia namely, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh Military Hospital, Security Forces Hospital, and King Abdul-Aziz Medical City. The translated version of the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) was used. Data were collected during January and February 2013. Results: A total of 350 patients completed the CAT, with an 87.5% response rate. Patients rated each resident differently, but the mean percentage of items, which residents rated as excellent was 71%. In general, male residents were rated higher 72.8 ± 27.2 than female residents 67.8 ± 32.2 with a significant difference; (p<0.005). Also, significant differences were found based on the gender of the residents, when each item of the CAT was compared. Comparing training centers, there were no significant differences found in the overall percentage of items rated as excellent or among items of the CAT. Conclusion: The study identified areas of strength and weaknesses that need to be addressed to improve communication skills of physicians. PMID:27381544

  11. Learning to See Beneath the Surface: A Qualitative Analysis of Family Medicine Residents' Reflections About Communication.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Ashley P; Vicini, Andrea; Allen, Lucas; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-01-01

    Patients share straightforward statements with physicians such as describing their fears about their diagnosis. Physicians need to also understanding implicit, indirect, subtle communication cues that give broader context to patients' illness experiences. This project examines physicians' written reflections that offer insight into their interpretation of both the stated and the tacit aspects of their observations about communication, their resulting responses, and their intended actions. Tufts University Family Medicine residents (N = 33) of the Tufts Family Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance completed three reflective exercises each week over the course of 1 year (756 reflective entries). An interdisciplinary research team identified communication-related concepts within the reflections. Identified themes include (a) physicians recognizing and discovering mutual interplay of their communication with and patient disclosure, (b) physicians paying attention to subtleties of patient behavior as indicative of a fuller picture of patients' lives and their coping with illness, and (c) physician images of growth and awareness about communication indicative of their potential for growth and improvement. The project extends the literature in communication and medical education by examining explicit and tacit points of reflection about communication. The project (a) allows for unpacking the multifaceted aspects of reflection and (b) bridges reflective theory and medical education with communication foundations.

  12. Learning to See Beneath the Surface: A Qualitative Analysis of Family Medicine Residents' Reflections About Communication.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Ashley P; Vicini, Andrea; Allen, Lucas; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-01-01

    Patients share straightforward statements with physicians such as describing their fears about their diagnosis. Physicians need to also understanding implicit, indirect, subtle communication cues that give broader context to patients' illness experiences. This project examines physicians' written reflections that offer insight into their interpretation of both the stated and the tacit aspects of their observations about communication, their resulting responses, and their intended actions. Tufts University Family Medicine residents (N = 33) of the Tufts Family Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance completed three reflective exercises each week over the course of 1 year (756 reflective entries). An interdisciplinary research team identified communication-related concepts within the reflections. Identified themes include (a) physicians recognizing and discovering mutual interplay of their communication with and patient disclosure, (b) physicians paying attention to subtleties of patient behavior as indicative of a fuller picture of patients' lives and their coping with illness, and (c) physician images of growth and awareness about communication indicative of their potential for growth and improvement. The project extends the literature in communication and medical education by examining explicit and tacit points of reflection about communication. The project (a) allows for unpacking the multifaceted aspects of reflection and (b) bridges reflective theory and medical education with communication foundations. PMID:26147857

  13. The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.

    PubMed

    Demaitre, Luke

    2003-01-01

    Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient.

  14. The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.

    PubMed

    Demaitre, Luke

    2003-01-01

    Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

  15. Why does teaching research skills to family medicine trainees make sense?

    PubMed

    Kersnik, Janko; Ungan, Mehmet; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2015-01-01

    There are only a few countries in Europe that have incorporated research skills training in specialty training programmes. In the eyes of most practising family physicians, research traditionally is a field reserved for colleagues with academic ambitions; an activity that often is not associated with the clinical practice of family medicine. However, residents became aware that research is essential to improving healthcare provision. Research in family medicine has a long tradition. Performing or taking part in research projects opens new horizons to present and future family physicians and provides support to increase their self-esteem. Consequently, this could foster future family medicine development. The authors urge the whole family physician community to raise the awareness every single family physician towards teaching and learning research skills in specialty training and basic medical education as a generic subject. PMID:26414382

  16. Development and Validation of Search Filters to Identify Articles on Family Medicine in Online Medical Databases.

    PubMed

    Pols, David H J; Bramer, Wichor M; Bindels, Patrick J E; van de Laar, Floris A; Bohnen, Arthur M

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and researchers in the field of family medicine often need to find relevant articles in online medical databases for a variety of reasons. Because a search filter may help improve the efficiency and quality of such searches, we aimed to develop and validate search filters to identify research studies of relevance to family medicine. Using a new and objective method for search filter development, we developed and validated 2 search filters for family medicine. The sensitive filter had a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 74.9%. The specific filter had a specificity of 97.4% and a sensitivity of 90.3%. Our new filters should aid literature searches in the family medicine field. The sensitive filter may help researchers conducting systematic reviews, whereas the specific filter may help family physicians find answers to clinical questions at the point of care when time is limited.

  17. Teaching and addressing health disparities through the family medicine social and community context of care project.

    PubMed

    White, Jordan; Heney, Jessica; Esquibel, Angela Y; Dimock, Camia; Goldman, Roberta; Anthony, David

    2014-09-01

    By training future physicians to care for patients with backgrounds different from their own, medical schools can help reduce health disparities. To address the need for education in this area, the leaders of the Family Medicine Clerkship at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University developed the Social and Community Context of Care project, required of all medical students rotating through this clerkship. Students develop a hypothetical intervention addressing a health issue seen at their preceptor site, and are assessed on their grasp of the social and contextual issues affecting that health issue in their particular community. Some interventions are actualized in later clerkships or independent study projects; one example, a health class for pregnant and parenting teens at Central Falls High School, is described here. If made a routine part of medical education, projects such as these may help medical students address the health disparities they will encounter in future practice.

  18. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  19. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, Nouf; Afify, Ayman AM; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting. Objective To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data. Results A total 123 health care workers (45.6%) experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5%) and nonphysical violence (99.2%), including verbal violence (94.3%) and intimidation (22.0%). Offenders were patients (71.5%) in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%), or both (3.3%). Almost half (48.0%) of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence. Conclusion Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care workers, efficient reporting system, and zero tolerance policies need to be implemented to minimize workplace violence against health workers. PMID:27330300

  20. A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

  1. Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge

  2. Exploring professional identification and reputation of family medicine among medical students: a Canadian case study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Charo; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle

    2012-05-01

    We aim to shed light on medical students' professional identification with family medicine by means of a qualitative case study examining the reputation of, and professional identification processes with, family medicine among students enrolled in a Canadian medical school, where a consistently low number of students choose family medicine as first choice for postgraduate training. Six focus groups, three for second year students and three for fourth year students, were conducted in 2007 and 2008. Transcripts from group discussions were submitted to a thematic analysis, while documentary sources supported contextualisation. All the students participating in the investigation had a clear idea about the traditional role of general practitioners (GPs). Those students who seemed to better identify with a family medicine career path were characterised by feeling comfortable with the broad scope of general medical knowledge, and with requesting a second opinion, by valuing the possibility of a diversified profile of practice, and holding strong humanistic values, as well as by being more concerned about lifestyle issues. This was observed despite an academic context that strongly encouraged medical specialisation, as students unanimously pointed out. In such circumstances, identification with family medicine by undecided medical students was hampered. In order to embed family medicine in the academic discourse of excellence, and therefore encourage students' identification with this profession, more attention should be paid to family physicians' identity formation in academic centres.

  3. [History of the 4th Department of Internal Medicine of the First Faculty of Medicine at Charles University and the General University Hospital in Prague].

    PubMed

    Bartůněk, Petr

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the doctors and nurses of the 4th Department of Internal Medicine of the First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and the General University Hospital in Prague celebrated the 70th anniversary of its founding. The article summarizes the clinics contribution to the field of internal medicine, and particularly to angiology, hepatogastroenterology and lipidology. It comments the clinics current activities and the possibilities of its further development. Attention is also paid to the tradition of high ethical and professional standards of medical care in accordance with the norms established by the clinic's founder, prof. MUDr. Bohumil Prusík.

  4. Reuniting public health and medicine: the University of New Mexico School of Medicine Public Health Certificate.

    PubMed

    Geppert, Cynthia M A; Arndell, Cynthia L; Clithero, Amy; Dow-Velarde, Lily A; Eldredge, Jonathan D; Eldredge, Jonathan P; Kalishman, Summers; Kaufman, Arthur; McGrew, Martha C; Snyder, Tiffany M; Solan, Brian G; Timm, Craig T; Tollestrup, Kristine; Wagner, Lana K; Wiese, William H; Wiggins, Charles L; Cosgrove, Ellen M

    2011-10-01

    The University of New Mexico School of Medicine (UNMSOM) sought to train medical students in public health concepts, knowledge, and skills as a means of improving the health of communities statewide. Faculty members from every UNMSOM department collaborated to create and integrate a public health focus into all years of the medical school curriculum. They identified key competencies and developed new courses that would synchronize students' learning public health subjects with the mainstream medical school content. New courses include: Health Equity: Principles of Public Health; Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Evidence-Based Practice; Community-Based Service Learning; and Ethics in Public Health. Students experiencing the new courses, first in pilot and then final forms, gave high quantitative ratings to all courses. Some students' qualitative comments suggest that the Public Health Certificate has had a profound transformative effect. Instituting the integrated Public Health Certificate at UNMSOM places it among the first medical schools to require all its medical students to complete medical school with public health training. The new UNMSOM Public Health Certificate courses reunite medicine and public health in a unified curriculum.

  5. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    PubMed Central

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  6. [Intensive care medicine from the viewpoint of patients, their family and nursing personnel].

    PubMed

    Wahl, W; Küchle, R; Schrapers, S; Junginger, T

    1998-01-01

    We wanted to know how our intensive care unit would be graded by the patients, their family members and the staff, as well as the impression that intensive care medicine made on them. A total of 82% of the patients and 90% of the family members were of the opinion that they owed their lives to intensive care medicine, and 100% of the patients and 96% of family members deemed intensive care medicine significant. The patients and their family members judged the medical and nursing care, the medical technology, the care of basic needs and their accommodation altogether positive. The nursing staff held a contrary opinion and were more critical. Competent explanation and transmission of information represented the most important factor in forming a positive opinion of intensive care medicine. PMID:9931723

  7. Assessment of the Federal Grant Program for the Establishment of Departments of Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lawler, F H; Davis, J A

    1990-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of the Federal Establishment of Departments of Family Medicine Grant Program, nine departments of family medicine were visited from March to May 1988 to assess their development in the academic setting and to evaluate the role of the federal program in that developmental process. The study found that grant support has been useful in enhancing the status of family medicine by aiding research and curriculum development, supporting administrative infrastructure, and fostering other topics specific to individual departments. The flexibility with which departments can seek funds for specific needs makes broad measures of success impractical; however, it appears that funds from this grant program have been reasonably effective in advancing the academic stature of departments of family medicine. It is concluded from the study that the program should be continued and that its inherent flexibility should be preserved.

  8. [Development and status of intensive care medicine in internal medicine at the Karl Marx University in Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Engelmann, L; Schneider, D

    1989-01-15

    Issuing from the accomplishments of Köhler for the development of the intensive medicine in internal medicine-in 1964 he performed the first long-term respiration at the then Medical Clinic of the Karl Marx University, in 1969 he institutionalized the young subdiscipline at the clinic, in 1978 he founded the department for intensive medicine and is at work by his decisions concerning the development of young scientists, by the handbook "Intensive Medicine. Internal Medicine and Adjacent Subjects" as well as a member of the presidium of the GDR Society for Internal Medicine for the development of the internal intensive medicine-a description of the development of the department, its achievements and problems is given. The promotion of the intensive medicine by Köhler results, as we think, also from the comprehension that it has the duty to perform a function integrating the subdisciplines, which the modern internal medicine oriented to organs and systems threatens to lose, which, however, makes its self-apprehension, which the patient wishes and the teaching is demanding. From this and from the charge for a highly specialized care of patients who life-threateningly fell ill with internal diseases as well as from the duty to create a scientific forerunning results the stringent necessity of the development of the non-operative, in reality internal intensive medicine in the clinics for internal medicine of the county hospitals and university institutions as well as the greater identification of the internist with the subdiscipline in the district hospitals dealing with multidisciplinary intensive medicine.

  9. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  10. Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Kirstin; Nürnberger, Frank; Sader, Robert; Dittrich, Winand

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept. Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010), which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”). Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis. Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved. Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies. PMID:22558026

  11. Family Medicine: A Solution for Career Inequalities among Doctors in India.

    PubMed

    Beswal, Gaurav

    2013-07-01

    Career in medicine is challenging. Medical education system is a ever evolving entity. Due to certain bottle necks in the medical education system, young medical graduates in India are facing difficulties in career progression. Author draws from the experience of Britain and explores how family medicine could be answer to many question which the Indian health system is challenged with. PMID:24479085

  12. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  13. What can technology do to, and for, family medicine?

    PubMed

    Ebell, M H; Frame, P

    2001-04-01

    Medical technology can be divided into information technology, diagnostic technology, and therapeutic technology. These technologies can enhance the care of patients in a family practice; they also have the potential to diminish or fragment family practice when the technologies can only be provided by specialists. While some family physicians have an aversion to technological advances, we believe it is imperative that family physicians participate in the development of technologies that enhance family practice and improve patient outcomes in primary care practice. These include electronic medical records, decision support systems, tools for managing medical information, and others. Criteria are presented to help determine when these new technologies should be adopted into practice.

  14. Behavioral science in family medicine residencies: Part I. Teachers and curricula. The STFM Task Force on Behavioral Science.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    A survey was conducted of all members of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to describe teachers, curricula, and teacher satisfaction in family medicine residency behavioral science education. The response rate was approximately 60% of eligible individuals. Family medicine teachers divide themselves into behavioral scientists, family physicians, both, program directors, and other faculty members. Behavioral scientists are most often psychologists or social workers, have been teaching family medicine a relatively short time, and are more likely to be female than the other groups. Behavioral science curricula emphasize counseling, interviewing, and family dynamics. Satisfaction with behavioral curricula is high.

  15. [e-learning of faculty of medicine Chulalongkorn University].

    PubMed

    Nujunkaew, Naiyana; Benjavongkulchai, Sunpetch; Patradul, Adisorn

    2004-09-01

    The teaching policy of facult of medicine, chulalongkorn university had long been established, with frequently up-to-date to provide the learning and teaching opportunity to medical students and teaching personnels and even the postgraduate training course. At the same time, the faculty had a commitment to increase its numbers of high quality medical graduates and post graduate medical students. The teaching and training course must be shortened and concise to fulfil the new trends of teaching curriculum which was recently re-arranged in this faculty. The world-wide, available contemporary technology, information and communication technology (ICT), is considered to utilized their ability. Learning and teaching by this technological trends are increasing in recent years in many developed and developing countries. Students, trainees and educators can access these new modern technology in anytime and anywhere by connecting internet network, and also by this way, they can continue their medical learning, training and gaining up-to-date medical technique and knowledge till their life. The process of utilizing and incorporating these available programme techniques, such as, hypertext, webboard, chat room and e-mails, for education purpose, is named as e-learning, or some may called it, e-education, e-school, etc. PMID:15516018

  16. [Racism of "Blood" and colonial medicine - Blood group anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine].

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon Young

    2012-12-01

    This paper attempts to explore implications of Colonial medicine's Blood Type Studies, concerning the characteristics and tasks of racism in the Japanese Colonial Empire. Especially, it focuses on the Blood Group Anthropology Studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine. In Colonial Korea, the main stream of Blood Type Studies were Blood Group Anthropology Studies, which place Korean people who was inferior to Japanese people in the geography of the race on the one hand, but on the other, put Koreans as a missing link between the Mongolian and the Japanese for fulfillment of the Japanese colonialism, that is, assimilationist ideology. Then, Compared to the Western medicine and Metropole medicine of Japan, How differentiated was this tendency of Colonial Medicine from them? In this paper, main issues of Blood Group Anthropology Studies and its colonial implications are examined.

  17. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  18. Undergraduate medical education in general practice/family medicine throughout Europe – a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is increasingly becoming evident that a strong primary health care system is more likely to provide better population health, more equity in health throughout the population, and better use of economic resources, compared to systems that are oriented towards specialty care. Developing and maintaining a strong and sustainable primary health care requires that a substantial part of graduating doctors go into primary care. This in turn requires that general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) strongly influences the curricula in medical schools. In the present paper we aim at describing the extent of GP/FM teaching in medical schools throughout Europe, checking for the presence of GP/FM curricula and clinical teaching in GP offices. Methods A brief questionnaire was e-mailed to GP/FM or other professors at European medical universities. Results 259 out of 400 existing universities in 39 European countries responded to our questionnaire. Out of these, 35 (13.5%) reported to have no GP/FM curriculum. These 35 medical faculties were located in 12 different European countries. In addition, 15 of the medical schools where a GP/FM curriculum did exist, reported that this curriculum did not include any clinical component (n = 5), or that the clinical part of the course was very brief - less than one week, mostly only a few hours (n = 10). In total, 50 universities (19%) thus had no or a very brief GP/FM curriculum. These were mainly located in the Eastern or Southern European regions. Conclusion It is still possible to graduate from European medical universities without having been exposed to a GP/FM curriculum. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice (EURACT) will launch efforts to change this situation. PMID:24289459

  19. Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

    2014-08-01

    Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase.

  20. Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

    2014-08-01

    Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase. PMID:25072584

  1. Universal influenza immunization. Were Ontario family physicians prepared?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Grant; Sutton, Judy; Reid, Graham J.; Beynon, Charlene; Cohen, Irene; Huffman, David

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' experiences during the first year of Ontario's universal influenza immunization program. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. SETTING: Thames Valley region of southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A maximum variation sample of nine family physicians selected by snowball sampling after initial consultation with a local family physician advisory committee. METHOD: Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was sequential, using a combination of editing, immersion, and crystallization. Interview transcripts were read by individual members of the team who met to compare findings at several stages during data collection. MAIN FINDINGS: The program affected family physicians because immunization strategies designed for immunizing high-risk patients needed to be modified to deal with greater numbers of patients. While generally supportive of the program, physicians found it difficult to implement. Responses reflected ongoing conflict between individual and public health priorities, particularly regarding children and pregnant women. CONCLUSION: The program could have been more effective if the culture and climate of Ontario family practice had been considered during its development and implementation. PMID:14594100

  2. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  3. [Experience and problems of implementation of family medicine in post-socialist countries].

    PubMed

    Chopey, I V

    2014-01-01

    The experience of medical-insurance organisations that provide medical services basing on family medicine principles (HMO-type organizations) shows huge potential opportunities for optimization of health care systems through family physicians operating as fundholders. The experience of training of health care specialists, in particular, family physicians at the Department of Post-Graduate Training calls for further improvement of the training in applied issues of legal, financial and economic nature that provide work of family medicine specialists under the conditions of market economy development and health insurance, in particular. In this article shows huge opportunities for optimization of financial and economic provisions of the system, as well as medical and report facility structure and network that are included in the plans of establishment of medical-insurance organizations working on the principles of family medicine and organized by family physicians. ln this regard, it is very important to provide personnel of such medical-insurance organizations with appropriate training in legal, financial and economic issues. Special attention should be paid to the training of facility administrators and managers of family medicine subunits in legal and economic issues. As this is one of the milestones of their work.

  4. Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

  5. Teaching Giants and Other Mentors of the Howard University: College of Medicine Class of 1952.

    PubMed

    Julian Haywood, L

    2015-03-01

    During the two decades following World War II, rapid changes occurred in medicine and in society as a whole in the United States including the establishment of the National Institutes of Health and the civil rights movement. This article profiles the teaching faculty of the Howard University College of Medicine that prepared the Class of 1952 for the decades that were to follow.

  6. [The oldest statutes of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Rostock].

    PubMed

    Michael, Susi-Hilde

    2015-01-01

    The statutes of the Faculties of Medicine of the Universities Rostock and Bützow are in the process of being edited and translated from Latin in to German. This article gives the first critical examination of the oldest statutes of the Faculty of Medicine of the Alma Mater Rostochiensis.

  7. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  8. Family Medicine, the specialty of the future: the Portuguese situation within the European context

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    General Practice/Family Medicine is a specialty focused on the provision of comprehensive, continuing, and community oriented, person-centred care. The lack of prestige and the difficulty in attracting trainees to the specialty have been longstanding problems in most countries around the world. In Europe, General Practice/Family Medicine is also hampered for not being recognized as a specialty throughout Europe. As for Portugal, General Practice/Family Medicine is undergoing a massive organizational reform, as well as unprecedented levels of popularity among trainees. General Practice/Family holds tremendous latent potential, and is thus a specialty with a bright future ahead. It could well establish itself as the specialty of the future if it is able to overcome the barriers that currently make of General Practice/Family Medicine an unpopular career choice. It is important to train confident, competent and polyvalent family physicians, but it is also necessary to overhaul payment schemes, to invest in primary care infra-structure and organization, and to continue to attract more and more bright and motivated trainees. PMID:19906299

  9. Children's psychosocial problems presenting in a family medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yelena P; Messner, Brynne M; Roberts, Michael C

    2010-09-01

    Primary care physicians have an important role in identifying, treating, and referring children with psychosocial problems. However, there is a limited literature describing whether and how family physicians address psychosocial problems and why parents may not discuss children's problems with physicians. The current study examined how family physicians address psychosocial problems and reasons that parents do not discuss children's psychosocial problems with physicians. Results indicated that there are a variety of reasons involving parents, their perceptions of physicians, and the number of psychosocial problems reported, that may lead to fewer discussions of psychosocial problems. PMID:20508977

  10. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ČAKOVEC].

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ksenija; Munđar, Roko; Sović, Slavica; Bergman-Marković, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of Čakovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (Čižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, χ2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study

  11. History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Chasis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as

  12. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  13. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  14. Medicine utilization review at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, M.; Bhadana, V.; Alam, M.S.; Pillai, K. K.; Kapur, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A prospective medicine usage evaluation based on prescription monitoring was conducted in the medicine OPD of our university teaching hospital to know prescribing trends of different categories of medicines. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 patients were included in the study comprising of 339 (56.5%) males and 261 (43.5%) females. The data were recorded within the OPD by a registered pharmacist on a medicine usage evaluation form, approved by The University Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results: A total of 2365 medicines were prescribed to 600 patients during the 3 months study period. The mean number of medicines per prescription were found to be 3.94. Medicines were most frequently prescribed as solid dosage forms (85.62%), especially tablets (70.82%), and liquid formulations (14.12%). Oral route (96.17%) was the most preferred mode of administration, followed by topical (2.11%) and parenteral (1.60%) routes. Combination therapy (94.33%) was more prevalent than monotherapy (5.66%). An overwhelming tendency for prescribing medicines by brand names (99%) was observed by the physicians. The most frequently prescribed class of medicines were antimicrobials > analgesics > cardiovascular > gastrointestinal agents. The most prescribed individual medicines among various therapeutic classes included isoniazid (antimicrobial), amlodipine (cardiovascular), metformin (hypoglycemic), cetirizine (antiallergic), rabeprazole (GI medicine), atorvastatin (hypolipidemic), dextromethorphan (respiratory medicine), alprazolam (sedative-hypnotic), paracetamol (analgesic). Conclusions: There is a considerable scope of improvement in the existing prescribing practice, especially prescribing by generic names, needs to be encouraged and a hospital formulary has to be developed for the purpose. The number of medicines to be included per prescription should be judged rationally and polypharmacy ought to be curbed. Use of antimicrobial also needs to be rationalized as

  15. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  16. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform).

  17. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform). PMID:16219440

  18. Universal Entropy of Word Ordering Across Linguistic Families

    PubMed Central

    Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Zanette, Damián H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The language faculty is probably the most distinctive feature of our species, and endows us with a unique ability to exchange highly structured information. In written language, information is encoded by the concatenation of basic symbols under grammatical and semantic constraints. As is also the case in other natural information carriers, the resulting symbolic sequences show a delicate balance between order and disorder. That balance is determined by the interplay between the diversity of symbols and by their specific ordering in the sequences. Here we used entropy to quantify the contribution of different organizational levels to the overall statistical structure of language. Methodology/Principal Findings We computed a relative entropy measure to quantify the degree of ordering in word sequences from languages belonging to several linguistic families. While a direct estimation of the overall entropy of language yielded values that varied for the different families considered, the relative entropy quantifying word ordering presented an almost constant value for all those families. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that despite the differences in the structure and vocabulary of the languages analyzed, the impact of word ordering in the structure of language is a statistical linguistic universal. PMID:21603637

  19. [End of the word and relegation of bodies in medicine: university formation of physicians].

    PubMed

    Sicard, D

    2008-01-01

    Medicine is based on a growing demand for science. Yet, the patient's speech is ill adapted to the current desire of rationality. Inaccuracy and errancy have become the features of clinical examination. Self censorship of the speech gradually appears. Presenting the body becomes useless, if not suspicious. Medical technology replaces perceived subjectivity. What medicine says prevails over what the body knows. In a strange paradox, the "echo" precedes the speech. The risk of having an autistic medicine is looming. University teaching must be aware of this. The obvious gap between the speech and the body not only evades the ethical issue but also paradoxically deprives the medicine from its scientific acumen. PMID:19445110

  20. A computerized faculty time-management system in an academic family medicine department.

    PubMed

    Daugird, Allen J; Arndt, Jane E; Olson, P Richard

    2003-02-01

    The authors describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a computerized faculty time-management system (FTMS) in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The FTMS is presented as an integrated set of computerized spreadsheets used annually to allocate faculty time across all mission activities of the department. It was first implemented in 1996 and has been continuously developed since then. An iterative approach has been used to gain consensus among faculty about time resources needed for various tasks of all missions of the department. These time-resource assumptions are used in the computerized system. Faculty time is allocated annually by the department vice chair in negotiation with individual faculty, making sure that the activities planned do not exceed the work time each faculty member has available for the year. During this process, faculty preferences are balanced against department aggregate needs to meet mission commitments and obligations. The authors describe how the computerized FTMS is used for faculty time management and career development, department planning, budget planning, clinical scheduling, and mission cost accounting. They also describe barriers and potential abuses and the challenge of building an organizational culture willing to discuss faculty time openly and committed to developing a system perceived as fair and accurate. The spreadsheet file is available free from the authors for use in other departments.

  1. Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible. PMID:25022654

  2. [Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Katsuichi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery.

  3. A Significant Number of Charter Diplomates Participate in American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Maintenance of Certification.

    PubMed

    Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    Considerable controversy about the value of participating in Maintenance of Certification has recently arisen within the medical community. Despite this controversy, large numbers of family physicians certified by the American Board of Family Medicine participate in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians. Surprisingly, a small but significant number of charter diplomats--those initially certified by the American Board of Family Medicine at its founding--are engaged in the process.

  4. Effects of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on Medical Education: The Shiraz University School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronaghy, Hossain A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Of 173 full-time faculty employed in 1978 at Shiraz University School of Medicine, 108 had left the university by December 1982, and 81 of these had left the country, aggravating the chronic shortage of medical personnel in Iran. Iranian authorities have not been able to counteract these trends. (GC)

  5. Partnerships in Medical Education: An Exploration of Library Service Models for Postgraduate Medicine at Macquarie University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Macquarie University's new medical school, The Australian School of Advanced Medicine (ASAM), is developing a postgraduate program that incorporates a partnership with Macquarie University Library. The curriculum encompasses contemporary models of competency-based assessment, teamwork and lifelong learning that are integrated with research and…

  6. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definition and scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation and inefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators can help inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made during a visit to family physicians (FPs) in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice of family medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different and sometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly and enmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effective information technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staff attended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to more complicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed to undergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients and healthcare workers (HCW) may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting should be formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective information technology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure is necessary to achieve good health indicators. PMID:27247159

  7. [The use of medicines storaged in the household in a population assisted by Family Health Program].

    PubMed

    Lima, Geandra Batista; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; de Barros, José Augusto Cabral

    2010-11-01

    To approach the epidemiological use of medicines is necessary to recognize that such practice is not strictly limited to pharmacotherapy. The appropriate storage and the preservation of medicines are fundamental factors for effectiveness. This study was aimed at verifying the storage form/use of medicines in a community assisted by the Family Health Program in the district of Cristino Castro (PI, Brazil), as well as the level of the people's knowledge regarding drugs storage at home. The data were obtained visiting 52 families, starting with observations and applying a questionnaire. It was observed a low income and education levels, a fact that contributes in the effective therapeutic orientation. High percentage of the stored medicines is acquired without prescription. It is worth of mention the presence of a big amount of antimicrobial, reinforcing the danger of the self medication. 62% of those who take care of drugs have no information about their rational use, and 66% are not conscious of the toxicity. 54.10% of the medicines were at children's and domestic animals reach and 15.92% didn't possess label or any identification. Some families maintain in stock, basic medications, another accumulate a "therapeutic arsenal".

  8. Back to the future: reflections on the history of the future of family medicine.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Endres, Jill; Koehn, Nerissa; Miller, John; Scherger, Joseph E; Martin, James; Devoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    These are historic times for family medicine. The profession is moving beyond the visionary blueprint of the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) report while working to harness the momentum created by the FFM movement. Preparing for, and leading through, the next transformative wave of change (FFM version 2.0) will require the engagement of multigenerational and multidisciplinary visionaries who bring wisdom from diverse experiences. Active group reflection on the past will potentiate the collective work being done to best chart the future. Historical competency is critically important for family medicine's future. This article describes the historical context of the development and launch of the FFM report, emphasizing the professional activism that preceded and followed it. This article is intended to spark intergenerational dialog by providing a multigenerational reflection on the history of FFM and the evolution that has occurred in family medicine over the past decade. Such intergenerational conversations enable our elders to share wisdom with our youth, while allowing our discipline to visualize history through the eyes of future generations. PMID:25381082

  9. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  10. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  11. Clinical Poems and Clinical Conversations: Some Thoughts on Working with Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Howard F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in which Family Medicine residents composed, read, and discussed their poems as a way of bringing to life their often complex relationships with patients. It argues that this approach mobilizes the physicians' own creativity in the service of reflective practice and improved doctor-patient relationships. This…

  12. Health Literacy Teaching in U.S. Family Medicine Residency Programs: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Nguyen, Nancy T; Garvin, Roger; Sou, Channbunmorl; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers, including medical residents, often lack adequate knowledge and skills to work effectively with patients who have limited health literacy. Little is known about the degree to which medical residents are trained to communicate effectively with people who have limited health literacy. This study aimed to assess the status of health literacy training for physicians in U.S. family medicine residency programs. We conducted an online survey of residency directors at 444 U.S. family medicine residencies. Among 138 respondents (31% response rate), 58 programs (42%) reported teaching residents about health literacy as part of the required curriculum. Most instruction occurred during the 1st year of training. Hours of instruction ranged from 2 to 5 during Years 1 through 3. Skills-based training (e.g., plain language techniques) was taught by most programs. Not having access to a faculty authority on health literacy was strongly associated with lack of a required health literacy curriculum. Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that increasing health literacy training for medical students and residents would help improve residents' clinical skills. This study provides a baseline snapshot of health literacy curricula in U.S. family medicine residencies and likely overestimates the prevalence of such curricula. Additional studies are needed to determine the quality of health literacy instruction in U.S. family medicine residencies and the most effective methods for teaching residents about health literacy. PMID:27043758

  13. Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

  14. Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

  15. Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. How do patients who consult family physicians use these therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L. K.; Jue, P.; Lam, A.; Yeung, W.; Cham-Wah, Y.; Birtwhistle, R.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how a population of Chinese patients consulting family physicians in Vancouver use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), specifically Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. DESIGN: Bilingual survey (English and Chinese). SETTING: Four family practices with predominantly Chinese patients in metropolitan Vancouver. PARTICIPANTS: The 932 patients or family members who visited one of the practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic characteristics; frequency and reason for visiting a family physician, Chinese herbalist, or acupuncturist; choice of practitioner if affected by one of 16 common conditions. RESULTS: The study population was mostly Chinese and immigrant to Canada. Chinese herbal medicine was currently used by 28% (262/930) of respondents (more than one visit in the last year), and another 18% (172/930) were past users. Acupuncture was currently used by 7% (64/927) and had been used in the past by another 8% (71/927). Use of Chinese herbal medicine varied significantly (P < .01) according to age, sex, immigrant status, and ethnicity. Acupuncture use varied significantly only by age. The main reasons for consulting Chinese herbalists were infection (41%, 157/382), respiratory problems (11%, 42/382), and rheumatologic problems (10%, 38/382), whereas acupuncturists were consulted almost exclusively for rheumatologic problems (80%, 45/56). CONCLUSIONS: Using TCM in conjunction with visiting family physicians was very popular among this predominantly Chinese study population. Patients with acute conditions, such as influenza, consulted both their family physicians and Chinese herbalists in quick succession. On the other hand, those suffering from more chronic conditions, such as rheumatologic diseases, were more likely to start using TCM after repeated visits to their family physicians. Images p1011-a PMID:9612586

  16. [Trends in family medicine--how to sort the wheat from the chaff].

    PubMed

    Djalali, Sima; Senn, Oliver

    2015-11-11

    Considering the trends in medicine, time just seems to move at a slower pace in general practice/family medicine than in the medical specialties. Novel medical drugs and therapeutic modalities appear to take longer to become well-established, and sometimes it never happens. There are obvious gaps between the requirements of the guidelines issued by scientific medical societies and the practical implementation of these guidelines by primary care physicians. In health services research this is known as the «evidence-performance gap». The aim of this narrative review is to outline the nature and the dynamics of trends in general practice/family medicine on the one hand and in the medical specialties on the other hand, and to elucidate the potential causes leading to the evidence-performance gaps observed.

  17. A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes.

  18. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    PubMed

    Setlhare, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs) in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW) may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators. PMID:27247159

  19. The practice of travel medicine by family practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ross, M; Pinto, I; Sparks, B

    1995-06-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of family practitioners (FPs) in Johannesburg, South Africa, who are consulted by travelers. The study quantified the extent of medical activity of FPs and determined sources of physicians' updating information. Data were obtained from a random sample of 180 of the 576 nonspecialists listed as private medical practitioners in 1992-93 in the Johannesburg telephone directory. Interviews were obtained from 109 practitioners, of whom 105 were consulted by travelers. The average rate of consultations was an estimated 30/FP. Over 90% of FPs were asked about malaria prevention and/or immunization. 98% provided advice on malaria, and over 80% administered immunizations. The most common vaccine was Hepatitis B (63%), followed by gamma globulin for Hepatitis A (58%), and tetanus toxoid (50%). It was common for FPs to recommend antidiarrheal medications. Clients did not generally ask about diarrhea prevention. 47% gave preventive advice alone on diarrhea or recommendations for medication. FPs kept up to date on medical affairs by reading professional journals and following local experts or colleagues. In 1992, an estimated 100,000 travelers visited FPs in Johannesburg. PMID:12178510

  20. [Diet as a cardiovascular risk factor in family medicine].

    PubMed

    Bergman Marković, Biserka; Katić, Milica; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Kranjcević, Ksenija; Jasna, Vucak; Ivezić Lalić, Dragica

    2010-05-01

    Although Mediterranean country by its geographic position, according to cardiovascular mortality (CVM) rate, Croatia belongs to Central-East European countries with high CV mortality. Prevention by changing nutritional habits is population (public health programmes) or individually targeted. General practitioner (GP) provides care for whole person in its environment and GP's team plays a key role in achieving lifestyle changes. GPs intervention is individually/group/family targeted by counselling or using printed leaflets (individual manner, organized programmes). Adherence to lifestyle changes is not an easy task; it is higher when recommendations are simple and part of individually tailored programme with follow- ups included. Motivation is essential, but obstacles to implementation (by patient and GPs) are also important. Nutritional intervention influences most important CV risk factors: cholesterol level, blood pressure (BP), diabetes. Restriction in total energy intake with additional nutritional interventions is recommended. Lower animal fat intake causes CVM reduction by 12%, taking additional serving of fruit/day by 7% and vegetables by 4%. Restriction of dietary salt intake (3 g/day) lowers BP by 2-8 mm Hg, CVM by 16%. Nutritional intervention gains CHD and stroke redact in healthy adults (12%, 11% respectively). Respecting individual lifestyle and nutrition, GP should suggest both home cooking and careful food declaration reading and discourage salt adding. Recommended daily salt intake is < or =6 g. In BP lowering, salt intake restriction (10-12 to 5-6 g/day) is as efficient as taking one antihypertensive drug. Lifestyle intervention targeting nutritional habits and pharmacotherapy is the most efficient combination in CV risk factors control.

  1. [Are investment activity and backlog in investments risks for university medicine in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Amann, I; Heyder, R; Strehl, R

    2009-08-01

    University medicine in Germany requires significantly higher funding and investment because its tasks not only include health care but also research and teaching. However, over recent decades less and less funding compared to the development of the turnover has been available. This trend is due to decreasing public funding. The diminishing funding has caused a major backlog of investment at German university hospitals. The first part of the article summarizes the investments policies at university hospitals and other hospitals. The second part describes the investment needs in university medicine and exposes risk factors for research, education and health care due to the process of investment planning and realization. Goal-oriented solutions are shown to facilitate investments. The third part discusses several risks caused by insufficient investments in university medicine. There are special risks for research, teaching, and the capacity for innovation in university medicine besides economical and medical risks. Some policies and financial strategies to overcome the backlog in investments are presented. After a summary, the article concludes with some practical examples of further measures to ensure sustainable funding.

  2. Teaching Giants and Other Mentors of the Howard University: College of Medicine Class of 1952.

    PubMed

    Julian Haywood, L

    2015-03-01

    During the two decades following World War II, rapid changes occurred in medicine and in society as a whole in the United States including the establishment of the National Institutes of Health and the civil rights movement. This article profiles the teaching faculty of the Howard University College of Medicine that prepared the Class of 1952 for the decades that were to follow. PMID:27282727

  3. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

  4. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so.

  5. Family medicine's search for manpower: the American Osteopathic Association accreditation option.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Mark; Kunkle, Judith L; Doane, Cheryl

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, family medicine has encountered problems recruiting and filling its Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residencies. In addressing these reverses, one increasingly popular strategy has been to acquire American Osteopathic Association (AOA) accreditation as a way to tap into the growing number of osteopathic graduates. This stratagem is founded on assumptions that parallel-accredited postdoctoral programs are attractive to doctor of osteopathy (DO) graduates, that collaboration with sponsoring colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) provides direct access to osteopathic students, and that DOs can play an important role in replacing the increasing scarcity of United States medical graduates who are selecting specialty residencies. Within the past 5 years, nearly 10% of all ACGME family medicine residency programs have voluntarily obtained a second level of accreditation to also qualify as AOA-accredited family medicine residency programs. This strategy has produced mixed outcomes, as noted from the results of the osteopathic matching program. The flood of osteopathic graduates into these parallel-accredited programs has not occurred. In addition, recent AOA policy changes now require ACGME-accredited programs to make a deeper educational commitment to osteopathic postdoctoral education. The most successful ACGME/AOA-accredited programs have been those that are closely affiliated with and in near proximity of a COM and also train osteopathic students in required clerkship rotations. PMID:16518739

  6. Family Physicians with a Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQs) in Sports Medicine Spend the Majority of Their Time Practicing Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Wade M; Cochrane, Anneli; Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    While family physicians holding certificates of added qualifications in sports medicine practice in multiple settings, little is currently known about the proportion of their time devoted exclusively to the practice of sports medicine. We found that most spend a majority of their time doing so, and this number has been increasing over the past decade.

  7. African leaders’ views on critical human resource issues for the implementation of family medicine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organisation has advocated for comprehensive primary care teams, which include family physicians. However, despite (or because of) severe doctor shortages in Africa, there is insufficient clarity on the role of the family physician in the primary health care team. Instead there is a trend towards task shifting without thought for teamwork, which runs the risk of dangerous oversimplification. It is not clear how African leaders understand the challenges of implementing family medicine, especially in human resource terms. This study, therefore, sought to explore the views of academic and government leaders on critical human resource issues for implementation of family medicine in Africa. Method In this qualitative study, key academic and government leaders were purposively selected from sixteen African countries. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results There were 27 interviews conducted with 16 government and 11 academic leaders in nine Sub-Saharan African countries: Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. Respondents spoke about: educating doctors in family medicine suited to Africa, including procedural skills and holistic care, to address the difficulty of recruiting and retaining doctors in rural and underserved areas; planning for primary health care teams, including family physicians; new supervisory models in primary health care; and general human resource management issues. Conclusions Important milestones in African health care fail to specifically address the human resource issues of integrated primary health care teamwork that includes family physicians. Leaders interviewed in this study, however, proposed organising the district health system with a strong embrace of family medicine in Africa, especially with regard to providing clinical leadership in team

  8. Correlates of certification in family medicine in the billing patterns of Ontario general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, C A; Cohen, M; Ferrier, B M; Goldsmith, C H; Keane, D

    1989-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence as to whether physicians who are certified in family medicine practise differently from their noncertified colleagues and what those differences are. We examined the extent to which certification in family medicine is associated with differences in the practice patterns of primary care physicians as reflected in their billing patterns. Billing data for 1986 were obtained from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan for 269 certified physicians and 375 noncertified physicians who had graduated from Ontario medical schools between 1972 and 1983 and who practised as general practitioners or family physicians in Ontario. As a group, certificants provided fewer services per patient and billed less per patient seen per month. They were more likely than noncertificants to include counselling, psychotherapy, prenatal and obstetric care, nonemergency hospital visits, surgical services and visits to chronic care facilities in their service mix and to bill in more service categories. Certificants billed more for prenatal and obstetric care, intermediate assessments, chronic care and nonemergency hospital visits and less for psychotherapy and after-hours services than noncertificants. Many of the differences detected suggest a practice style consistent with the objectives for training and certification in family medicine. However, whether the differences observed in our study and in previous studies are related more to self-selection of physicians for certification or to the types of educational experiences cannot be directly assessed. PMID:2804847

  9. Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

    1993-01-01

    All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time. PMID:8219838

  10. [Institutional reorganization associated to curricular changes in the School of Medicine of the University of Chile].

    PubMed

    Rosselot, E

    1998-03-01

    The model of medical education of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile is being subjected to important changes. These changes are required to introduce new teaching methodologies and new curricular contents to prepare professionals suited to the needs of the XXI Century. Complex universities need to modify their academic behavior and administrative management, to become competitive with the new universities that proliferate, with drastic changes in play rules and expectancies to accomplish their aims. Universities must reorganize and modify their structures to avoid becoming obsolete in the exercise of teaching and other academic options. The transformations of the Faculty of Medicine are good examples of the resources that have to be mobilized and the organisms that must be adapted to obtain changes that will improve academic efficiency. The continuous assessment of its functioning will establish the usefulness of adopted changes and the need for rectification. PMID:9674304

  11. Family medicine training in Saudi Arabia: Are there any variations among different regions?

    PubMed Central

    Abu Zuhairah, Ammar R.; Al-Dawood, Kasim M.; Khamis, Amar H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to compare Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions in term of residents’ perception of the achievement of training objectives, and to assess various rotations based on residents’ perception. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was done among family medicine residents in the Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions. Methodology: A questionnaire was developed by the investigator and validated by two experts. All residents, except R1 residents, were included. All data were collected by the investigator by direct contact with the residents. Statistical Analysis Used: Cronbach's alpha, analysis of variance, t-test, and univariate regression model as appropriate, were used. Results: Reliability of the questionnaire was found to be 75.4%. One hundred and seven (response rate: 83.6%) residents completed the questionnaire. There were 51 (47.7%), 27 (25.2%), and 29 (27.1%) residents in the program in the Eastern region, Makkah, and Asir, respectively. The mean age was 29.1 ± 2.5 years; half of the residents were male, most of (83.2%) were married, and more than half (54.2%) of had worked in primary health care before joining the program. Overall, 45% of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The highest rotations as perceived by the residents were psychiatry and otolaryngology while the lowest were orthopedics and ophthalmology. There were significant differences among the study regions with regard to the rotations in family medicine, internal medicine, orthopedics, general surgery, and emergency medicine. Conclusions: Overall, a good percentage of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The rotations differed in the studied regions. Psychiatry and otolaryngology had the highest percentage of family medicine residents who perceived that they had achieved the training objectives while lowest was in internal medicine and obstetrics and gynecology. The highest rotations as perceived by the

  12. [Preliminary practice on education of integrated Chinese and Western medicine in Western medical universities].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Ping; Ling, Jiang-Hong

    2008-03-01

    Through the exploration and practice on education of integrated Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM) in Guangxi Medical University, it is elaborated in this paper that to train the compound personnel of ICWM is the demand of society nowadays; to establish the courses of ICWM in Western medical universities has its great advantages, and it is one of the best ways to nurture the top-level personnel in ICWM.

  13. Reform in the United States: its impact on medicine and education for family practice.

    PubMed

    Stephens, G G

    1976-10-01

    The historical concept of reform is useful as an aid to understand the modern rise of family practice education. Beginning about 1890, historians have identified several themes of reform in the United States which have been expressed culturally, politically, and socially. Each of these themes, agrarianism, bureaucratization of the professions, and utopianism, has influenced medicine and medical education--first at the turn of the century in the activities of the AMA in promoting public health and in establishing the natural sciences as a basis for medical education and practice. Since the end of World War II, additional reform themes have become visible which are also influencing medicine. Among these are humanism, consumerism, and the women's movement. It is the author's thesis that the present vitality and future development of family practice as a discipline is more dependent on its capacity and willingness to be identified with these expressions of reform than on its negotiations and compromises within the medical education establishment.

  14. Social Justice as the Moral Core of Family Medicine: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A recurring conference theme was the essential place of social justice within family medicine, especially the need to focus on denominator populations, exalt the personal and caring qualities of doctoring, and address social determinants of health. Many expressed solidarity with "community," but it is not always easy to define community in our large and diverse nation. Exhortations for health advocacy were frequently voiced, but putting these into meaningful action agendas is a challenge. There was general agreement that medicine is in flux and that the many expressions of "commodity-centered consumerism" have altered organization and financing. The increasing demands by "consumers", who want low cost, instant availability, and shared decision-making, and yet change doctors when health plans alter coverage also differentially impact high-volume, low-margin specialties such as family medicine. Additional challenges were the electronic health record and calibrating an appropriate work/life balance. Five action steps are recommended: 1) speak out on the important social and moral issues; 2) be the experts on personal care; 3) make common cause with potential allies; 4) help institutions perceive the value of generalism; and 5) help find ways to enrich generalist disciplines to increase the joy of medicine and decrease the threat of burn out.

  15. Social Justice as the Moral Core of Family Medicine: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    A recurring conference theme was the essential place of social justice within family medicine, especially the need to focus on denominator populations, exalt the personal and caring qualities of doctoring, and address social determinants of health. Many expressed solidarity with "community," but it is not always easy to define community in our large and diverse nation. Exhortations for health advocacy were frequently voiced, but putting these into meaningful action agendas is a challenge. There was general agreement that medicine is in flux and that the many expressions of "commodity-centered consumerism" have altered organization and financing. The increasing demands by "consumers", who want low cost, instant availability, and shared decision-making, and yet change doctors when health plans alter coverage also differentially impact high-volume, low-margin specialties such as family medicine. Additional challenges were the electronic health record and calibrating an appropriate work/life balance. Five action steps are recommended: 1) speak out on the important social and moral issues; 2) be the experts on personal care; 3) make common cause with potential allies; 4) help institutions perceive the value of generalism; and 5) help find ways to enrich generalist disciplines to increase the joy of medicine and decrease the threat of burn out. PMID:27387169

  16. Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Ángel Otero

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25 years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2 years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain. PMID:22189348

  17. Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive,…

  18. [History of the University of Chile Faculty of Medicine and clinical hospital location].

    PubMed

    Osorio A, Carlos G

    2015-02-01

    The history of the location of the University of Chile Faculty of Medicine North Campus is derived from a farm of Pedro de Valdivia founder of the city of Santiago de la Nueva Extremadura and governor of the “Reyno de Chile”. This work narrates succinctly the history of this particular location from the Spanish Conquest period to present days.

  19. Veterinary Medicine Program Review. State University System of Florida. Consultant's Report and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David P.

    This report reviews the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine and provides an analysis of the institution's strengths and weaknesses, along with recommendations to improve the college's programs. It examines the college's degree programs, students, faculty, facilities, and resources, as well as actions taken to meet…

  20. Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

  1. The Rockefeller University Hospital (1910-2010): creating the science of medicine.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jules

    2011-01-01

    The year 2010 marked the centennial of the Rockefeller University Hospital, one of the great philanthropic achievements of 20th-century science. For 100 years, the Hospital played a central role in the development and growth of medical science by enabling physician-scientists to make intensive study of human biology and disease. With ingenuity and devotion, they greatly enriched clinical medicine as well as basic biological science. This account emphasizes the founding and first half-century of the Hospital as it became a germinal center for clinical investigation. The second half of the century saw rapid change in medicine and health care with vexing problems, many yet unsolved. This history should serve as a call to arms for maintaining the linkage of science and medicine, supporting patient-oriented research as a basic discipline of medicine.

  2. Behavioral science in family medicine residencies: Part II. Teacher roles, relationships, and rewards. The STFM Task Force on Behavioral Science.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    A survey of members of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine provided information about roles, relationships, and rewards for teachers involved in family medicine residency behavioral science education. Family physicians and behavioral scientists perceive their own roles in behavioral teaching and patient care as greater than is perceived by the other group. All groups of respondents see a continued need for collaborative behavioral teaching, patient care, and research. Interpersonal rewards reported emphasize family physicians learning from behavioral scientists. Frustrations reflect personal style, use of jargon, and a sense that the other group does not understand important aspects of one's work. Income is markedly greater for family physicians than behavioral scientists. Most behavioral scientists responding plan to remain in family medicine teaching.

  3. The Doctoring Curriculum at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine: Leadership and Participant Roles for Psychiatry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, James A.; Ton, Hendry; Onate, John; McCarthy, Tracy; Stevenson, Frazier T.; Servis, Mark E.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe in detail the 3-year model of the Doctoring curriculum plus an elective fourth-year Doctoring course at University of California, Davis School of Medicine (UCDSOM) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine and the critical role for psychiatry faculty leadership and participation. Methods:…

  4. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

  5. Development of a Student Mentored Research Program between a Complementary and Alternative Medicine University and a Traditional, Research Intensive University

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Barbara M.; Furner, Sylvia E.; Cramer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well-documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared to traditional, research intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out. The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM pre-doctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers. Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health (DC/MPH) and master of clinical and translational research (DC/MS CTS) were established. PMID:24988423

  6. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  7. Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward

  8. [90th anniversary of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine Poznan University of Medical Sciences].

    PubMed

    Zaba, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    The paper outlines the history of the Chair and Department of Forensic Medicine Poznan University of Medical Sciences since it was established until today. Changes in the appearance and organization of the seat of the institution were discussed briefly. The profiles of all former heads of the Department, their contribution to the development and improvement of the institution and formation of the new scientific forensic medicine staff were presented. The specification and analysis of the scientific staff achievements was performed, especially taking into account their scientific publications and scope of the research that contributed to the efficient service activities for the prosecution and police, as well as society.

  9. Teaching team membership to family medicine residents: what does it take?

    PubMed

    Eubank, Daniel; Orzano, John; Geffken, Dominic; Ricci, Rocco

    2011-03-01

    Primary care reform proponents advocate for patient-centered medical homes built on interdisciplinary teamwork. Recent efforts document the difficulty achieving reform, which requires personal transformation by doctors. Currently no widely accepted curriculum to teach team membership in Family Medicine residencies exists. Organizational Development (OD) has 40 years of experience assessing and teaching the skills underlying teamwork. We present a curriculum that adapts OD insights to articulate a framework describing effective teamwork; define and teach specific team membership skills; reframe residents' perception of medicine to make relationships relevant; and transform training experiences to provide practice in interdisciplinary teamwork. Curriculum details include a rotation to introduce the new framework, six workshops, experiential learning in the practice, and coaching as a teaching method. We review program evaluations. We discuss challenges, including institutional resources and support, incorporation of a new language and culture into residency training, recruitment "for fit," and faculty/staff development. We conclude that teaching the relationship skills of effective team membership is feasible, but hard. Succeeding has transformative implications for patient relationships, residency training and the practice of family medicine. PMID:21417522

  10. Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students’ Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

  11. The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human

  12. Walking the Walk in Team-Based Education: The Crimson Care Collaborative Clinic in Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, Kirsten; Wohler, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of robust team-based care in the United States requires significant training for all team members. This education is integral to creating a culture of collaboration and respect among interprofessional members of the health care team. The lack of interprofessional clinical educational experiences contributes to a "hidden curriculum" that reinforces the problematic view that medicine is at the top of a hierarchy among health professions. However, learners themselves have started resisting this view by integrating cross-disciplinary team-based training into their own education. One example of learner-based leadership in interprofessional team care is the Crimson Care Collaborative at Cambridge Health Alliance, a student-faculty collaborative family medicine clinic. This successful clinic demonstrates that high-quality interprofessional clinical education can be accomplished through partnerships between educational institutions and existing patient-centered medical homes. PMID:27669136

  13. Effect of debt on U.S. medical school graduates' preferences for family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Colquitt, W L; Zeh, M C; Killian, C D; Cultice, J M

    1996-04-01

    The authors assess the importance of educational debt in graduates' primary care specialty choices, and the variety of mechanisms through which debt may influence career decisions. Logistic regression models were used to identify significant predictors of the primary care specialty choices made by the 1991 and 1992 graduates of U.S. medical schools. These predictors were debt itself; other financial indicators; certain medical school characteristics; certain practice location plans; certain demographic factors; aspects of academic performance; and students' predisposition to a primary care specialty. Data for this study were gathered from a variety of sources at the Association of American Medical Colleges and from the Health Education Assistance Loans program. Both direct and indirect effects of debt were identified under specific conditions. The study revealed complex relationships between debt and the other predictors identified. For example, debt operated in relation to the levels of the graduates' expected incomes; debt from subsidized loan sources was significant for women who chose general internal medicine; debt was important in choices of family practice; and debt by itself was significant for those planning to practice in the West and who chose general internal medicine. Also, seemingly opposing effects of debt occurred. For example, in the family practice model used in this study, the threshold effect of debt was positive, while the linear effect of debt above the threshold was negative. Such vriations help explain the conflicting findings of some past research. These and other findings prompt the authors to state that when investigating the effects of debt, it is not fruitful to ask what the effect of the debt is on all three primary care fields as a group. It is more appropriate to ask several questions, such as: under what conditions does debt influence specialty plans? Among which groups of students does debt have an impact on specialty plans? Are

  14. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  15. Assessment of the social accountability of the faculty of medicine at University of Gezira, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Elsanousi, S; Elsanousi, M; Khalafallah, O; Habour, A

    2016-04-01

    A socially accountable medical school is one that directs its education, research and service activities towards addressing the priority health concerns of the community it serves and verifying its impact on the community. This study aimed to assess the social accountability of the University of Gezira faculty of medicine in Sudan. We reviewed the literature, faculty documents and reports and used both the World Health Organization social accountability grid and the conceptualization-production-usability model as frameworks for analysis. In most of the domains and phases of the social accountability grid, the faculty's educational programme was found to be well-planned and well-implemented, demonstrating an impact on the community and active participation in health-system development in the local area. The University of Gezira faculty of medicine is socially responsible and responsive and is on the way to becoming fully socially accountable in certain aspects. PMID:27432408

  16. In sickness or in health: TDR's parners. 7. Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    Mahidol University's Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand, established in 1960, is one of 14 faculties, 5 institutions, 5 centers, and 2 colleges within Mahidol University. It consists of the following departments: Helminthology, Medical Entomology, Microbiology and Immunology, Protozoology, Social and Environmental Medicine, Tropical Hygiene, Tropical Medicine, Tropical Nutrition and Food Science, Tropical Pediatrics, Tropical Pathology, and Tropical Radioisotopes. The UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) has been associated with the Faculty since 1977, collaborating mainly upon malaria research, but also in filariasis, leprosy, and schistosomiasis research. Early TDR support was directed at research training and institutional strengthening, although by the early 1980s, the Faculty played an increasingly important role in TDR's research and development program. In recent years, the Faculty has focused upon researching malaria, parasitic and bacterial diseases, nutrition and food sciences, and environmental health. The Faculty's malaria-related research is described. The Faculty also conducts research in many other areas of tropical medicine outside of those of interest to TDR. PMID:12348565

  17. From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2014-01-01

    The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

  18. Careers in medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: an innovative approach to specialty exploration and selection.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Kyle R; Fritz, Ryan A; Rodgers, Scott M

    2012-07-01

    Research on resident attrition rates suggests that medical students would benefit from more comprehensive career advising programs during medical school. Responding to this need, students and administrators at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (Vanderbilt) introduced a broad Careers in Medicine (CiM) program in 2005 to complement the CiM resources offered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In this article, the authors detail the Vanderbilt CiM program's four core components: career-related events, an elective course, specialty interest groups, and career advising. The authors discuss the program's implementation and its student-led organizational structure, and they provide a critical assessment of important lessons learned. Using data from internal satisfaction surveys and the AAMC's Medical School Graduation Questionnaire (GQ), they demonstrate the success of Vanderbilt's career counseling efforts. According to recent GQ data, Vanderbilt ranks above the U.S. medical school average on graduating students' ratings of overall satisfaction with career services and of the usefulness of key programming. The authors present this description of the Vanderbilt CiM model as a framework for other medical schools to consider adopting or adapting as they explore options for expanding their own career counseling services.

  19. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  20. University commitment to the improvement of family health education and services.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R

    1985-06-01

    The Program for International Training in Health (INTRAH) is 1 of the major programs of the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Initiated in October 1979 with a contract with the US Agency for International Development (AID), INTRAH has 2 major objectives: to increase the capacities and capabilities of host countries to train and support family health trained personnel without continual external assistance; and to increase the actual number of such personnel deployed in health service systems in the regions of Africa and the Near East. In developing the appropriate strategy to meet its objectives, INTRAH recognizes the importance of several factors: the need to strengthen institutions already existing in the regions; the need to work closely with host country colleagues in implementing training development strategies which are consistent with their national health objectives and resources; the recognition that institution-building is a relatively slow process but one whose results are substantive and long lasting; and the recognition that family planning services are an element of maternal and child heatlh care as well as of comprehensive family health care. The identification and development of country resources focuses on careful selection and monitoring of resources and resource professionals, concentrating on building in-country capabilities for training, planning, supervision, and support of family health services through the training of national trainers, supervisor/managers, program planners, directors, evaluators, and service delivery personnel. Institution building and development of regional resources focuses on the institutionalization of training systems developed during the 1st phase. This is accomplished through provision of: co-trainer support and technical assistance as required; training and other resource materials; and follow-up, periodic consultation, and tools for the evaluation of training. INTRAH develops

  1. Options for Families in the Face of Adversity. (Proceedings of the Family Study Conference, Oklahoma State University, March 16-18, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater. Div. of Home Economics.

    This report of a statewide conference on the possible options for families in the face of adversity was co-sponsored by the Family Study Center--Division of Home Economics, and the Office of University Extension, Oklahoma State University. General sessions on the effect of social change on the family, the co-relation between the energy crisis and…

  2. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A.; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction. PMID:27282276

  3. "Genes to society"--the logic and process of the new curriculum for the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Charles M; Thomas, Patricia A; Goodspeed, Elizabeth; Valle, David; Nichols, David G

    2010-03-01

    In August 2009, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine implemented a new curriculum, "Genes to Society" (GTS), aimed at reframing the context of health and illness more broadly, to encourage students to explore the biologic properties of a patient's health within a larger, integrated system including social, cultural, psychological, and environmental variables. This approach presents the patient's phenotype as the sum of internal (genes, molecules, cells, and organs) and external (environment, family, and society) factors within a defined system. Unique genotypic and societal factors bring individuality and variability to the student's attention. GTS rejects the phenotypic dichotomy of health and illness, preferring to view patients along a phenotypic continuum from "asymptomatic and latent" to "critically ill." GTS grew out of a perceived need to reformulate the student experience to meet the oncoming revolution in medicine that recognizes individuality from the genome to the environment. This article describes the five-year planning process that included the definition of objectives, development of the new curriculum, commission of a new education building, addition of enhancements in student life and faculty development, and creation of a vertical and horizontal structure, all of which culminated in the GTS curriculum. Critical ingredients in meeting the challenges of implementing GTS were leadership support, dialogue with faculty, broad engagement of the institutional community, avoidance of tunnel vision, and the use of pilot courses to test concepts and methods. GTS can be viewed as the foundation for the scientific and clinical career development of future physicians. PMID:20182127

  4. College and University Reference Guide to Work-Family Programs. Report on a Collaborative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.; And Others

    This report summarizes findings of a study that assessed current levels of support for family friendly programs at colleges and universities in the United States. Analysis of the survey data text and tables is presented in four sections that define purpose and methodology, historical context, provide profiles of various work-family initiatives,…

  5. The Role of Gender, Attachment Dimensions, and Family Environment on Loneliness among Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirli, Aylin; Demir, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of gender, attachment dimensions and family environment in explaining loneliness among students. The study included 473 students (281 females, 192 males) from Ankara University. The UCLA Loneliness Scale, Family Environment Assessment Scale and Experiences in Close…

  6. Evaluation of Four Commonly Used DNA Barcoding Loci for Chinese Medicinal Plants of the Family Schisandraceae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruozhu; Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Zhiduan

    2015-01-01

    Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL) and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA) possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL). The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding. PMID:25938480

  7. Rooted in Mission: Family and Consumer Sciences in Catholic Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the unity between the missions of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) discipline and Catholic higher education by demonstrating relationships among (a) Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and the role of the service principle to FCS; (b) Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) and the centrality of intellect…

  8. Family-Friendly Policies and the Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Kate; Lange, Sheila Edwards; Olswang, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    Institutions of higher education nationwide have been adopting policies to help faculty members with primary caregiving roles to attain tenure, and much research has been devoted to their effectiveness. The range of policies and programs has expanded dramatically since the 1970s. Among the options now available are family leave, elder-care…

  9. Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

  10. Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

  11. Babies on Campus: Service to Infants and Families among Competing Priorities in University Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Mary Benson; Lash, Martha

    2012-01-01

    University early childhood programs attempt to balance a traditional tri-part mission: service to children and families; professional development of caregivers/teachers, clinicians, and researchers; and research on child development, learning, and/or education. Increasingly, infants receive care and education on university campuses, yet little is…

  12. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  13. A Classification of Genre Families in University Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Sheena; Nesi, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    As demand for English-medium higher education continues to grow internationally and participation in higher education increases, the need for a better understanding of academic writing is pressing. Prior university wide taxonomies of student writing have relied on intuition, the opinions of faculty, or data from course documentation and task…

  14. The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Baserga, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1945. The years 1916--1920 saw the number of women enrolled in medical school almost double. Yale's decision to admit women seems to have been made with little resistance from the faculty. The final decision was made through the encouragement and financial help of Henry Farnam, a professor of economics at Yale, who agreed to pay for the women's bathrooms. His daughter, Louise, was in the first class of women. At graduation she was awarded the highest scholastic honors, the Campbell Gold Prize. From Yale she travelled to the Yale-sponsored medical school in Changsha, China, where she became the first female faculty member, a position she held for twelve years. The impressions of Ella Clay Wakeman Calhoun, the only woman to graduate in the second class of women, are presented here. Since 1916 the Yale School of Medicine has undergone extensive physical and philosophical changes, developments in which women have participated. PMID:6996342

  15. Florida International University: development and accreditation of Miami's Public College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rock, John A; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Dambach, George; O'Leary, J Patrick; Markham, Sanford; Bagby, Larry; Seecharan, Khaleel; Berkman, Ronald M

    2009-10-01

    Anticipating pressing health care needs in the region, Florida International University (FIU) proposed the FIU College of Medicine (COM), which was approved by the Florida Board of Governors in March 2006. The FIU COM provides a program of study enabling graduates to pursue a wide spectrum of professional careers. This includes careers in general and subspecialty private practice, academic medicine, public service, health care, and public policy leadership. Irrespective of career choice, the special emphasis of the FIU COM mission is its focus on community health in a diverse metropolitan region. Clinical facilities are met through a public partner and multiple private hospital affiliations. Educational objectives are organized into five strands reflecting the breadth of medical education and running concurrently through the four-year curriculum: (1) human biology, (2) disease, illness, and injury, (3) clinical medicine, (4) professional development, and (5) medicine and society. Founding teaching faculty with expertise in the core basic sciences will not only introduce core scientific concepts during the initial seven months but reinforce these same concepts during organ system integrated courses and clerkships. The Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program is an FIU COM innovation in which each medical student is a member of a team that throughout the four-year curriculum identifies and addresses health care needs and factors affecting health outcomes. Preliminary approval of FIU COM was conferred in February 2008, with the first cohort of 40 students matriculating in August 2009. PMID:19881442

  16. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students. PMID:25633031

  17. Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

  18. How can we help family carers manage pain medicines for patients with advanced cancer? A systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Latter, Sue; Hopkinson, Jane B; Richardson, Alison; Hughes, Jane A; Lowson, Elizabeth; Edwards, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background Family carers play a significant role in managing pain and associated medicines for people with advanced cancer. Research indicates that carers often feel inadequately prepared for the tasks involved, which may impact on carers’ and patients’ emotional state as well as the achievement of optimal pain control. However, little is known about effective methods of supporting family carers with cancer pain medicines. Aims To systematically identify and review studies of interventions to help carers manage medicines for pain in advanced cancer. To identify implications for practice and research. Method A systematic literature search of databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and AMED) was carried out to identify studies of pain medication management interventions that involved family carers of patients with advanced cancer, and reported specific outcomes for family carers. Patient pain outcomes were also sought. Studies were quality appraised; key aspects of study design, interventions and outcomes were compared and a narrative synthesis of findings developed. Results 8 studies were included; all had significant methodological limitations. The majority reported improvements in family carer knowledge and/or self-efficacy for managing pain medicines; no effect on patient pain outcomes; and no adverse effects. It was not possible to discern any association between particular intervention characteristics and family carer outcomes. Conclusions Current evidence is limited, but overall suggests face-to-face educational interventions supported by written and/or other resources have potential to improve carers’ knowledge and self-efficacy for pain management. Further research is needed to identify how best to help family carers manage pain medicines for patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27150294

  19. Family medicine model in Turkey: a qualitative assessment from the perspectives of primary care workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A person-list-based family medicine model was introduced in Turkey during health care reforms. This study aimed to explore from primary care workers’ perspectives whether this model could achieve the cardinal functions of primary care and have an integrative position in the health care system. Methods Four groups of primary care workers were included in this exploratory-descriptive study. The first two groups were family physicians (FP) (n = 51) and their ancillary personnel (n = 22). The other two groups were physicians (n = 44) and midwives/nurses (n = 11) working in community health centres. Participants were selected for maximum variation and 102 in-depth interviews and six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured form. Results Data analysis yielded five themes: accessibility, first-contact care, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. Most participants stated that many people are not registered with any FP and that the majority of these belong to the most disadvantaged groups in society. FPs reported that 40-60% of patients on their lists have never received a service from them and the majority of those who use their services do not use FPs as the first point of contact. According to most participants, the list-based system improved the longitudinality of the relationship between FPs and patients. However, based on other statements, this improvement only applies to one quarter of the population. Whereas there was an improvement limited to a quantitative increase in services (immunisation, monitoring of pregnant women and infants) included in the performance-based contracting system, participants stated that services not among the performance targets, such as family planning, postpartum follow-ups, and chronic disease management, could be neglected. FPs admitted not being able to keep informed of services their patients had received at other health institutions. Half of the participants stated that the list

  20. Lost in Translation: NIH Funding for Family Medicine Research Remains Limited.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Departments of Family Medicine (DFMs) in the United States consistently received around 0.2% of total research funding dollars and 0.3% of all awards awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) across the years 2002 to 2014. We used the NIH Reporter tool to quantify the amount of funding and the number of grants received by DFMs from the NIH from 2002 to 2014, using criteria similar to those applied by previous researchers. NIH funding to DFMs as remained fairly consistent across the time period, at roughly 0.2% of total NIH funding and 0.3% of total grants awarded. Changing these proportions will likely require considerable effort to build research capacity within DFMs and their frontline practice research networks, and to shift policymaker and funder perceptions of the value of the FM research enterprise. PMID:27613784

  1. Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive, and facilitated small group discussion sessions. Initial educational outcomes have been positive. Ongoing challenges include faculty recruitment and retention, recruiting a group of senior partners that reflects the diversity of the community, and managing generational and ethno-cultural conflicts. The program offers unique opportunities for innovative development in geriatrics education.

  2. The multidiscipline laboratories of the University of Malaya Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, R

    1980-09-01

    The multidiscipline laboratories (MDLs) of University of Malaya are a significant feature in the Faculty of Medicine. They provide facilities for a number of activities within the teaching curriculum. This is in contrast to the departmental type of laboratories. Being the first in the eastern hemisphere, they are gaining popularity among new medical schools in this part of the world. Since a number of visitors testify to a continued interest in the multidiscipline laboratories, an attempt is made to discuss our experience with these facilities in relation to tthe design, uses, organisation, staff requirement, student usage and space problems. PMID:7432218

  3. Establishing the need for family medicine training in intimate partner violence screening.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany B; Reyna, Guadalupe; Lam, Kenrick; Silver, Mandy; Gimpel, Nora E

    2015-06-01

    In 2012, the USPSTF updated its guidelines and now recommends that all women of childbearing age be screened for IPV and services provided for women who screen positive. Based on these recommendations, objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate IPV knowledge, attitudes, and practices of physicians from different specialties and (2) determine significant differences by medical specialty. We recruited (n = 183) Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine (FM) and Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and attending physicians to complete a 15-question online survey assessing knowledge, attitudes and current IPV screening practices. We evaluated associations between medical specialty and knowledge, attitudes and practice measures before and after controlling for covariates. Knowledge of how often IPV occurs in society, community resources, and screening tools were significantly different by specialty (all p's < 0.05). A majority of FM physicians (88%) reported that it is a physician's responsibility to find and treat IPV and 97% reported that IPV should be included in their training. Compared to OB/GYN physicians in multivariate analyses, FM physicians were less likely to report they were comfortable discussing IPV with their patients in crude (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.13, 0.94) and adjusted models (OR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.06, 0.60). FM physicians were also less likely to report screening female patients for IPV before (OR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.86) and after adjusting for confounders (OR = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.47). Our results indicate that FM physicians have positive attitudes towards finding and treating IPV yet need enhanced training to improve their comfort level with screening for and discussing IPV with their patients.

  4. Assessing prescribing of NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants in Canadian family medicine using chart review.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kevin; Davis, Christine; Falk, Jamie; Singer, Alex; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-10-01

    Background Drug-related problems have been identified as a major contributor to emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and death. The most commonly implicated medications are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Considering a significant proportion of these harms are preventable, indicators to identify risky prescribing before they lead to harm have been developed. Objective To examine the prevalence and patterns of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs) in a primary care population who are using high-risk medications. Setting This study was performed within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics in Winnipeg, Canada. Method A cross-sectional electronic/paper chart audit was conducted within two multi-disciplinary family medicine teaching clinics to evaluate the prevalence of 13 evidence-based high-risk prescriptions. Patients were included if they were prescribed an oral NSAID, antiplatelet, or an anticoagulant within the 12 month period between June 2012 and June 2013. Main outcome measure The proportion of PIPs associated with an increased bleeding risk for NSAIDs, antiplatelets, and anticoagulants. Results Of the 567 patients included in the review, 198 (35 %) patients had received at least 1 PIP in the past year. The most common PIP was the use of an oral NSAID with one or more GI risk factors without adequate gastro-protection. Only 34 (6 %) of these patients received a full medication review performed by a pharmacist. Although not statistically significant, patients who received a medication review had fewer inappropriate prescriptions (27 % with review, 35 % without). Conclusion Over one-third of the patients who were using high-risk medications were using them potentially inappropriately. Although pharmacists have been shown to reduce the amount of inappropriate prescribing, very few patients using these medications were referred to the pharmacist for a full medication review

  5. 50(th) Anniversary of the Central Dental Library of School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb.

    PubMed

    Borić, Vesna

    2014-12-01

    Libraries have an exceptional place in the history, culture, education and scientific life of a nation. They collect all aspects of our linguistics and literacy, all out theoretical assumptions as well as all the results of experience and practice. The importance of a library is not mirrored only in the national and historical role and heritage, but in a more permanent, informational role, since a modern library must, above all, be an effective information system. Since a library of a university operates as a part of its matrix, it is easily shadowed by other forms of educational and scientific infrastructure. 50(th) anniversary of the Central Dental Library of the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb is an excellent opportunity to make a call to the institution and public to its unique and irreplaceable role.

  6. 50th Anniversary of the Central Dental Library of School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Libraries have an exceptional place in the history, culture, education and scientific life of a nation. They collect all aspects of our linguistics and literacy, all out theoretical assumptions as well as all the results of experience and practice. The importance of a library is not mirrored only in the national and historical role and heritage, but in a more permanent, informational role, since a modern library must, above all, be an effective information system. Since a library of a university operates as a part of its matrix, it is easily shadowed by other forms of educational and scientific infrastructure. 50th anniversary of the Central Dental Library of the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb is an excellent opportunity to make a call to the institution and public to its unique and irreplaceable role.

  7. Job dissatisfaction in lecturers in School of Medical Sciences Universiti Sains Malaysia and Faculty of Medicine Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Huda, B Z; Rusli, B N; Naing, L; Tengku, M A; Winn, T; Rampal, K G

    2004-06-01

    Job dissatisfaction in doctors and teachers is known to have direct consequences on the quality of service and teaching for patients and students respectively. A cross-sectional study to assess dissatisfaction in lecturers of School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) and Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was undertaken between August 2001 and May 2002. The original English version of the Job Content Questionnaire (CQ) version 1.7 (revised 1997) by Robert Karasek was self-administered to 73 (response rate 58.4%) and 80 (response rate 41.7%) lecturers in the medical faculties of USM and UKM, respectively. The prevalence of job dissatisfaction in USM and UKM lecturers were 42.6% and 42.9%, respectively; the difference was not significant (p>0.05). Risk factors of job dissatisfaction in USM lecturers were decision authority (p<0.001) and psychological job demand (p<0.001). Significant risk factors of job dissatisfaction in UKM lecturers were skill discretion (p<0.01) and psychological job demand (p<0.001). We conclude that psychological job demand was a risk factor of job dissatisfaction in both USM and UKM lecturers; in USM, decision authority was protective, while in UKM, skill discretion was protective against job dissatisfaction.

  8. “Negotiorum Gestio” in Family Medicine, Informed Consent Obtainment, and Disciplinary Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Negotiorum gestio (NG) denotes an action where a person well intendedly acts on behalf of another without obtaining the latter's prior consent. In broad terms, NG-like actions have played a considerable role in health care provision. In some settings, health care delivery with only little or presumed patients' consent has been the rule rather than the exception. However, bioethical principles regarding patient autonomy and obtainment of the patient's informed consent (IC) before intervention are now increasingly materialized in the law of many countries. Aim. To study legal consequences of NG in family medicine and IC handling options. Methods. Case law examination. Results. A disciplinary board case is described concerning a family doctor conducting unlawful NG by not coming up to legal IC requirements. Discussion and Conclusion. The practical and legal implications of IC and possible role of novel Shared Decision-Making approaches in coming up to regulation and bioethical demands are discussed. It is concluded that a doctor may run an unnecessary legal risk when conducting NG in decision-competent patients and furthermore it is suggested that novel Shared Decision-Making approaches could help in obtaining a rightful and practicable IC. PMID:27110401

  9. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Abdullah T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE) in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM), was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1). The PHEEM's domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13) for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88), for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6), for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program) significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents' learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians. PMID:25657612

  10. [Development of traditional careers at new universities. The case of medicine].

    PubMed

    Goic, A

    1995-01-01

    In 1981, the educational system in Chile was diversified characterizing Universities, Professional Institutes and Technical Training Centers. The provincial seats of traditional Universities were transformed in independent universities, which strongly increased its number. A number of private universities also emerged. This strategy was quantitatively successful, duplicating the number of youngsters between 19 and 24 years old that were following superior studies (from 88 to 199 per 1,000) and duplicating the registers at higher education institutions (from 118,000 to 244,000). The quality of the education is a matter of concern at the present time. In the case of Medicine, the Medical Schools Association has proposed to the Higher Education Council an accreditation system for programs that pursue the M.D. degree, based on explicit standards for all medical schools. Considering that teaching, research, laboratory and library resources in Chile are limited, accreditation is even more important. The splitting relationship between Medical Schools and the Ministry of Health, whose establishments are used as training centers, is also worrisome. Finally the physician:inhabitant relationship in Chile is adequate for its development level (1:960). Its geographical distribution, however, is highly unsatisfactory (1:657 in Santiago and 1:2,200 in some Regions). The implementation of professional and economical incentives could reverse this situation.

  11. Elements related to attrition of women faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Pooja

    Recent studies have shown that the number of women faculty in academic medicine is much lesser than the number of women that are graduating from medical schools. Many academic institutes face the challenge of retaining talented faculty and this attrition from academic medicine prevents career advancement of women faculty. This case study attempts to identify some of the reasons for dissatisfaction that may be related to the attrition of women medical faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Data was collected using a job satisfaction survey, which consisted of various constructs that are part of a faculty's job and proxy measures to gather the faculty's intent to leave their current position at the University of Pittsburgh or academic medicine in general. The survey results showed that although women faculty were satisfied with their job at the University of Pittsburgh, there are some important factors that influenced their decision of potentially dropping out. The main reasons cited by the women faculty were related to funding pressures, work-life balance, mentoring of junior faculty and the amount of time spent on clinical responsibilities. The analysis of proxy measures showed that if women faculty decided to leave University of Pittsburgh, it would most probably be due to better opportunity elsewhere followed by pressure to get funding. The results of this study aim to provide the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh with information related to attrition of its women faculty and provide suggestions for implications for policy to retain their women faculty.

  12. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  13. An Analysis of the Combination Frequencies of Constituent Medicinal Herbs in Prescriptions for the Treatment of Stroke in Korean Medicine: Determination of a Group of Candidate Prescriptions for Universal Use

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Byeong Cheol; Pae, Seung Bin; Han, Yoo Kyoung; Choi, Moo Jin; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Baek, Jin Ung

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to Western medicine, which typically prescribes one medicine to treat a specific disease, traditional East Asian medicine uses any one of a large number of different prescriptions (mixtures of medicinal herbs), according to the patient's characteristics. Although this can be considered an advantage, the lack of a universal prescription for a specific disease is considered a drawback of traditional East Asian medicine. The establishment of universally applicable prescriptions for specific diseases is therefore required. As a basic first step in this process, this study aimed to select prescriptions used in the treatment of stroke and, through the analysis of medicinal herb combination frequencies, select a high-frequency medicinal herb combination group for further experimental and clinical research. As a result, we selected some candidates of a medicinal herb combination and 13 candidates of a medicinal herb for the treatment of stroke. PMID:27087820

  14. [Graduate Program on Physiological Sciences of the School of Medicine of the Central University of Venezuela: XXV years of history].

    PubMed

    Ponte-Sucre, A; Torrealba, A T; González, E

    1999-01-01

    The Graduate Program of Physiological Sciences, the first Master's and Doctor degrees of the Faculty of Medicine from the Central University of Venezuela reached its XXV anniversary in 1998. These pages are devoted to describe and analyze the main subjects related to its growth and its pioneer role on the development of the 4th level studies in the Faculty of Medicine. Also, we discuss in these pages the plans for the future of this program.

  15. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Children with Cancer: A Study at a Swiss University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Tatjana; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Torchetti, Loredana; Wengenroth, Laura; Lüer, Sonja; Frei-Erb, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Though complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are frequently used by children and adolescents with cancer, there is little information on how and why they use it. This study examined prevalence and methods of CAM, the therapists who applied it, reasons for and against using CAM and its perceived effectiveness. Parent-perceived communication was also evaluated. Parents were asked if medical staff provided information on CAM to patients, if parents reported use of CAM to physicians, and what attitude they thought physicians had toward CAM. Study Design All childhood cancer patients treated at the University Children’s Hospital Bern between 2002–2011 were retrospectively surveyed about their use of CAM. Results Data was collected from 133 patients (response rate: 52%). Of those, 53% had used CAM (mostly classical homeopathy) and 25% of patients received information about CAM from medical staff. Those diagnosed more recently were more likely to be informed about CAM options. The most frequent reason for choosing CAM was that parents thought it would improve the patient’s general condition. The most frequent reason for not using CAM was lack of information. Of those who used CAM, 87% perceived positive effects. Conclusions Since many pediatric oncology patients use CAM, patients’ needs should be addressed by open communication between families, treating oncologists and CAM therapists, which will allow parents to make informed and safe choices about using CAM. PMID:26694320

  16. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  17. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  18. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  19. Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction and Labour Turnover Intentions among State University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredein, Afolakemi Olasumbo; Alao, Foluso Toyin

    2010-01-01

    Examining the extent at which work-family conflict and job satisfaction could predict the labour turnover intentions among lecturers, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, as a case study, is the purpose of this study. 229 (95%) respondents out of 240 returned their copies of the questionnaire for data analysis. The results reveal that there was a…

  20. Impact of family medicine clerkships in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Michels, Nele R; Hendrickx, Kristin; Remmen, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Synthesise evidence about the impact of family medicine/general practice (FM) clerkships on undergraduate medical students, teaching general/family practitioners (FPs) and/or their patients. Data sources Medline, ERIC, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge searched from 21 November to 17 December 2013. Primary, empirical, quantitative or qualitative studies, since 1990, with abstracts included. No country restrictions. Full text languages: English, French, Spanish, German, Dutch or Italian. Review methods Independent selection and data extraction by two authors using predefined data extraction fields, including Kirkpatrick’s levels for educational intervention outcomes, study quality indicators and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) strength of findings’ grades. Descriptive narrative synthesis applied. Results Sixty-four included articles: impact on students (48), teaching FPs (12) and patients (8). Sample sizes: 16-1095 students, 3-146 FPs and 94-2550 patients. Twenty-six studies evaluated at Kirkpatrick level 1, 26 at level 2 and 6 at level 3. Only one study achieved BEME’s grade 5. The majority was assessed as grade 4 (27) and 3 (33). Students reported satisfaction with content and process of teaching as well as learning in FM clerkships. They enhanced previous learning, and provided unique learning on dealing with common acute and chronic conditions, health maintenance, disease prevention, communication and problem-solving skills. Students’ attitudes towards FM were improved, but new or enhanced interest in FM careers did not persist without change after graduation. Teaching FPs reported increased job satisfaction and stimulation for professional development, but also increased workload and less productivity, depending on the setting. Overall, student’s presence and participation did not have a negative impact on patients. Conclusions Research quality on the impact of FM clerkships is still limited, yet across different settings and

  1. Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Stefanie; Musselmann, Berthold; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners (“Heilpraktiker”). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany. A postal questionnaire developed based on qualitatively derived data was sent to 3000 randomly selected FPs in Germany. A reminder letter including a postcard (containing a single question about CAM use in practice and reasons for non-particpation in the survey) was sent to all FPs who had not returned the questionnaire. Of the 3000 FPs, 1027 (34%) returned the questionnaire and 444 (15%) returned the postcard. Altogether, 886 of the 1471 responding FPs (60%) reported using CAM in their practice. A positive attitude toward CAM was indicated by 503 FPs (55%), a rather negative attitude by 127 FPs (14%). Chirotherapy, relaxation and neural therapy were rated as most beneficial CAM therapies by FPs, whereas neural therapy, phytotherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies in German family practices. This survey clearly demonstrates that CAM is highly valued by many FPs and is already making a substantial contribution to first-contact primary care in Germany. Therefore, education and research about CAM should be increased. Furthermore, with the provision of CAM by FPs, the role of non-medical CAM practitioners within the German healthcare system is to be questioned. PMID:19293252

  2. The Primary Care-Population Medicine Program at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    PubMed

    George, Paul; Tunkel, Allan R; Dollase, Richard; Gruppuso, Philip; Dumenco, Luba; Rapoza, Brenda; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    The United States healthcare system has been in a period of rapid evolution over the past decade, a trend that is anticipated to continue for the foreseeable future. Physicians are increasingly responsible for the quality of care they provide, and are being held accountable not just for the patient in front of them, but also for the outcomes of their patient panels, communities, and populations. In response to these changes, as well as the projected shortage of primary care physicians, the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) developed the Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program, which builds upon the traditional curriculum with major integrated curricular innovations. The first is a Master of Science Degree in Population Medicine that requires students to take nine additional courses over four years, complete a thesis project focused on an area of Population Medicine, and take part in significant leadership training. Another significant innovative element is the development of a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) during the 3rd year of medical school in which the students complete a longitudinal outpatient experience with the same preceptors and patients. During the LIC students will follow a panel of patients wherever care is provided, while focusing on population health and healthcare delivery issues, in addition to medical topics throughout their clinical and didactic experiences. Though several of the innovative elements are being piloted, the inaugural PC-PM class of up to 24 students will only begin in August 2015. While the outcomes from this program will not be known for many years, the potential impact of the program is significant for AMS, medical education, and the future of healthcare delivery. PMID:26324970

  3. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

    2011-06-01

    To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed.

  4. Simulated minority admissions exercise at Louisiana State University School of Medicine: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Helm, E G; Prieto, D O; Sedlacek, W E

    1997-09-01

    The Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Medicine-New Orleans has been active in recruiting minority students to create a diverse medical student body. Recognizing the need to explore ways to assess minority applicants, over the past 10 years, LSU has offered Stimulated Minority Admissions Exercise (SMAE) workshops to its admission committee members. Participants in six of LSU's SMAE workshops were asked to respond anonymously to an evaluation form immediately following the workshop. Sixty of the 64 participants responded. The overall evaluation of the workshops was positive. More than 80% of participants indicated that due to their participation in SMAE, they knew how to locate and assess application data particularly relevant to minority applicants. The results suggest that identifying variables that enhance minority student admission and retention is desirable.

  5. Simulated minority admissions exercise at Louisiana State University School of Medicine: an evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, E. G.; Prieto, D. O.; Sedlacek, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Medicine-New Orleans has been active in recruiting minority students to create a diverse medical student body. Recognizing the need to explore ways to assess minority applicants, over the past 10 years, LSU has offered Stimulated Minority Admissions Exercise (SMAE) workshops to its admission committee members. Participants in six of LSU's SMAE workshops were asked to respond anonymously to an evaluation form immediately following the workshop. Sixty of the 64 participants responded. The overall evaluation of the workshops was positive. More than 80% of participants indicated that due to their participation in SMAE, they knew how to locate and assess application data particularly relevant to minority applicants. The results suggest that identifying variables that enhance minority student admission and retention is desirable. PMID:9302857

  6. Nutrition education curriculum at the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    St Jeor, S T; Scott, B J; MacKintosh, F R; Daugherty, S A; Goodman, P H; Lazerson, J

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a developing nutrition education curriculum for the University of Nevada School of Medicine, a small and progressive, community-based medical school. The curriculum has been planned to reflect the longitudinal, interdisciplinary, and comprehensive integration of nutrition into new required and existing courses so that timely delivery of knowledge and development of skills will occur in the basic science years followed by direct application in the clinical clerkships. The availability of the "Nutrition and Cancer Education Objectives" is timely and provides overall direction and curricular goals for the simultaneous development of nutrition-cancer education. The coordination of the four-year curriculum of the entire medical school can be specifically targeted for the incorporation of this needed information synergistically at a most opportune time.

  7. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  8. Evaluation of Saudi family medicine training program: the application of CIPP evaluation format.

    PubMed

    Al-Khathami, Abdullah Dukhail

    2012-01-01

    The Saudi Diploma in Family Medicine (SDFM) was enacted in 2007 to fulfill the needs of qualified Primary Health Care providers in Saudi Arabia. Evaluation is not only an integral process for designing educational training programs, but an effective evaluation strategy that helps achieve program objectives and enhances the quality of learning objectives: (1) Construct a self-administered questionnaire based on Context, input, process and product (CIPP) format to seek trainees' perceptions about the SDFM program; (2) identify the strengths and weaknesses of the SDFM program in relation to the learning outcomes; and (3) define the main obstacles to achieve the outcomes. A self-administered questionnaire was designed based on the CIPP evaluation format after. its validity and reliability were tested through piloting. Then, all the SDFM program trainees were included. The study response rate was 91.2%. More than 77% of the trainees stated that they had achieved the program objectives; a significant difference was found among Saudis and non-Saudis (p = 0.002). The training period was reported by 84% as a main barrier to achieve the program objectives, particularly the hospital rotation period. Results indicate an overall satisfaction with the training objectives and the teaching methods used. These findings can be useful for the policy makers to implement the suggested recommendations and deal with obstacles to improve the SDFM program in order to provide effective and efficient primary care services.

  9. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required.

  10. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models. PMID:24261270

  11. Family medicine residents' beliefs, attitudes and performance with problem drinkers: a survey and simulated patient study.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Meldon; Wilson, Lynn; Liu, Eleanor; Borsoi, Diane; Brewster, Joan M; Sobell, Linda C; Sobell, Mark B

    2004-03-01

    Fifty-six second-year family medicine residents completed a survey on their knowledge and beliefs about problem drinkers. Most residents felt responsible for screening and counseling, were confident in their clinical skills in these areas, and scored well on related knowledge questions. However, only 18% felt that problem drinkers would often respond to brief counseling sessions with physicians while 36% felt that moderate drinking was a reasonable goal for patients with severe alcohol dependence. Residents were then visited by unannounced simulated patients (SPs) presenting with alcohol-induced hypertension or insomnia. Residents detected the SP in 45 out of 104 visits. In the 59 undetected SP visits, residents asked about alcohol consumption in 47 visits (80%), discussed the relationship between alcohol use and the presenting complaint in 37 visits (63%), and recommended a specific weekly consumption in 35 visits (59%). Only 31% offered reduced drinking strategies, and most did not ask about features of alcohol dependence. These results suggest that residents have the fundamental clinical skills required to manage the problem drinker who gives a clear history and is receptive to advice. Educational efforts with residents should focus on the importance of systematic screening, taking an alcohol history under more challenging conditions, identifying the subtler presentations of alcohol problems, counselling the less receptive patient at an earlier stage of change, distinguishing the problem drinker from the alcohol-dependent patient, and offering specific behavioral strategies for the problem drinker.

  12. Enhancing behavioral science education at the Ohio State University College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Post, Douglas M; Stone, Linda C; Knutson, Douglas J; Gutierrez, Tamara L; Sari, Firuzan; Hudson, William A

    2008-01-01

    The social and behavioral sciences play key roles in patient health outcomes. Given this reality, successful development of social and behavioral science curricula in medical education is critically important to the quality of patients' lives and the effectiveness of health care delivery systems. The Institute of Medicine, in a recent report, recommended that medical schools enhance their curricula in these areas and identified four institutions as "exemplars" of social and behavioral science education. The authors describe an ongoing curriculum development and improvement process that produced one such exemplary program at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. The authors provide a historical perspective on behavioral science education, discuss issues that led to curricular change, and describe the principles and processes used to implement reform. Critical factors underlying positive change are addressed: increase active learning, recruit a core group of small-group facilitators who are primary care physicians, diversify teaching methods, support student-directed educational initiatives, enhance student-teacher relationships, centralize course administration, obtain funding, implement a faculty development program, and apply curriculum quality improvement methods. Outcome data from evaluations completed by both students and small-group physician faculty are presented, and future directions regarding further revision are outlined. The authors believe that the strategies they describe can be applied at other institutions and assist behavioral science educators who may experience the challenges typically encountered in this important field of medical education.

  13. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  14. University of Venda’s male students’ attitudes towards contraception and family planning

    PubMed Central

    Morwe, Keamogetse G.; Tshitangano, Takalani

    2016-01-01

    Background Many young men continue to disregard the importance of contraception and family planning in South Africa. The fact that even university students also do not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to their own health and well-being. Aim This paper aims at investigating the attitudes of male students towards contraception and the promotion of female students’ sexual health rights and well-being at the University of Venda. Methods Quantitative research method is used to determine how attitudes of 60 male students towards contraception can jeopardise the health and well-being of both male and female students. Results This study reveals that the majority of 60 male students at the University of Venda have a negative attitude towards contraceptives. As a result, male students at the University of Venda are not keen on using contraceptives. Male students’ negative attitude and lack of interest in contraceptives and family planning also limit progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals on primary health care, especially with regard to sexual and reproductive health and well-being of female students at the University of Venda. Conclusion The fact that more than half of the male students interviewed did not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to health and well-being of students, including violation of female students’ sexual and reproductive health rights in South Africa. This calls for radical health promotion and sexual and reproductive rights programmes which should specifically target male students at the University of Venda. PMID:27542288

  15. Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that

  16. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  17. Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy.

  18. Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy. PMID:23677768

  19. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. PMID:26477903

  20. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned.

  1. Early Signs of Atherogenesis in Adolescents in a Havana Family Medicine Catchment Area.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Wendy; Díaz-Perera, Georgia; Espinosa, Tania M

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Atherosclerosis is the common underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases; the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. It is a major contributor to disability and poorer quality of life and is costly to health systems, individuals, families and society. Early signs of atherogenesis are manifestations of atherosclerosis and known atherogenic risk factors occurring at young ages and detectable by health professionals. Early detection of such signs in children and adolescents enables actions to prevent short- and long-term complications. OBJECTIVE Detect early signs of atherogenesis in adolescents in Family Doctor-and-Nurse Office No. 13 of the Raúl Gómez García Polyclinic in Havana's 10 de Octubre Municipality. METHODS An observational, cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted: the universe consisted of 110 adolescents and, once exclusion criteria were applied, the sample was made up of 96 adolescents in the office's geographical catchment area. Variables included sociodemographic data; measurements from physical and anthropometric examinations (weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, presence of acanthosis nigricans); maternal history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, smoking during pregnancy; birth weight and duration of exclusive breastfeeding; lifestyle (physical activity, dietary habits by frequency of consumption of fruits and vegetables, salt intake, and smoking); and a history of atherogenic risk factors and atherosclerotic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and chronic kidney disease) in adolescents and their families. The number of early signs of atherogenesis was determined. Descriptive statistics and a chi-square test, with significance threshold set at p = 0.05, were used to examine differences by sex and age. RESULTS A total of 62.5% of participating adolescents were female and the same percent of the total

  2. [80 years' of internal medicine education at the medical school of the university in Belgrade (1922-2002)].

    PubMed

    Micić, Jovan; Micić, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    ORGANISATION OF TEACHING INTERNAL MEDICINE: The Department for Internal Medicine and Internal Clinics were founded in spring 1922. Dr. Radenko Stankovic and Dr. Dimitrije Antic were appointed as part-time Professors, while Dr. Aleksandar Ignjatovski, a former Full-time Professor of the Warsaw University, was appointed as professor under contract. A year later, Dr. Aleksandar Radosavljevic was appointed as Part-time Professor. In the General State Hospital and Military Hospital, certain wards were turned into clinics. II and III Internal Clinics were situated in the barracks, while the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were located in the Military Hospital. Upon the construction of the buildings of the Internal Clinic and General State Hospital, the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were permanently placed in the new building, and II and III Internal Clinics in the General State Hospital. Teaching of Internal Medicine started 31 October 1922. Dr. R. Stanko vic delivered a lecture in Propedeutics for students of the fifth term. This date marks the beginning of teaching internal medicine at the newly established School of Medicine, University of Belgrade. Dr. A. Ignjatovski started lecturing Internal medicine 23 March 1923, whereas Dr. D. Antic and and Dr. A. Radosavljevic also delivered lectures in the areas of Internal Medicine within their professional scope. At the beginning, the clinics belonged to the General State Hospital. It was impossible to teach successfully in hospital, therefore upon the professors' request, the clinics were separated and thus became the institutions belonging to the School of Medicine-educational institutions, while hospitals were health institutions. The rule was 'one professor--one clinic'. After the Second World War, teaching Internal Medicine was begun in demolished buildings in very difficult financial circumstances. The Propedeutic Internal clinic was renamed IV Internal Clinic, which continued dealing predominantly with

  3. My university. What I learned from the Productive Cooperative Movement to Promotion of Humanistic Family Planning.

    PubMed

    Kunii, C

    1990-07-01

    Based on experiences with the Productive Cooperative Movement and the Parasite Control Movement in Japan, the Japanese Family Planning Movement began in April 1954. The resultant private and nonprofit Japan Family Planning Association (JFPA) followed and it served to help Japan achieve its goal of reducing fertility by promoting family planning. It did so by publishing a monthly newsletter on family planning, hosting meetings and national conventions, spreading information via the mass media, and selling contraceptives and educational materials. JFPA earned funding from these sales with no support from the government thereby establishing self dependence and freedom to speak candidly to the government. The JFPA learned that families wanted to improve their standard of living and were willing to limit family size to 2 children. After the birth rate peaked in 1955, the birth rate and the number of illegal abortions decreased. In the 1950s, JFPA joined the International Planned Parenthood Federation and subsequently learned of the problems faced by developing countries. Based on the successful reduction of fertility in Japan and a strong economic base, JFPA and the government were in a position to organize an international cooperation program for family planning. Therefore, the leader of JFPA resigned to found the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning which promotes family planning in developing countries via its integrated family planning, nutrition, and parasite control program. A steering committee composed of leaders from government, universities, and private organizations sets the policies for the program in each country. It is to the Japanese government's advantage to work with private organizations instead of providing all social services because they are flexible and provide administrative stability and national expenses are minimized.

  4. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University.

    PubMed

    Veitia, M; McCarty, S; Kelly, P; Szarek, J; Harvey, H

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project was designed to enhance interest in and support of generalism during the first two years of medical education. The original goals at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University included the design and implementation of a core curriculum, Introduction to Patient Care (IPC), and enhancement of teaching excellence through faculty development. The core curriculum facilitated integration with the basic sciences and early introduction of physical examination skills, which were further developed in longitudinal clinical experiences with mentors. Although it was not originally intended to include basic scientists in the preceptor groups, they became important additions and created additional opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and reciprocal learning. The mentor program, another well-received and intended curriculum change, evolved from a structured experience to a more flexible component of the curriculum. The program met the requirements of the IGC Project but 53% of the originally intended mentor time was achievable, due to curriculum constraints. Faculty development, another success, was originally intended to target IPC faculty but ultimately became a university-wide effort. The changes implemented as a result of the IGC Project continue to flourish beyond the funding period and have become integral aspects of the curriculum and the medical school.

  5. Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.

    PubMed

    Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict.

  6. [Development of standards for education and training in family and community medicine - contributions by WONCA IberoAmerica (CIMF)].

    PubMed

    Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Marin, Anibal; Padula Anderson, Maria Inez; De Castro Filho, Eno Dias; Kidd, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The WONCA Education Working Party (WEP) is developing a set of standards for medical student education, postgraduate training in family medicine / general practice and continuing professional development for family doctors. At this point the contributions by WONCA world regions are very important, and for this reason the main objective of this report is to present the standards developed by the Iberoamerican WONCA Region (CIMF). To be comprehensive and effective, standards should reflect regional realities and so the contributions from CIMF may reinforce and strengthen the key initiative of WEP and the implementation of the standards throughout the world. PMID:21145135

  7. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  8. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  9. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  10. Experience of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and their families: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungha; Chung, Seung Eun; Lee, Sanghun; Park, Jeonghwan; Choi, Sunmi; Kim, Sungchul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the life experience related to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Data were collected though semi-structured interviews of nine patients with ALS and seven family members, who have used CAM. Audio recordings of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and checked for accuracy. The Giorgi's method of phenomenology was used for data analysis. Five constituents forming the units of meaning were: facing the limits of conventional medicine; getting to know CAM; recognizing the ineffectiveness of CAM; using CAM for symptomatic treatment; and seeking new CAM endlessly for complete cure. The study results provide an in-depth understanding of experience with CAM among patients with ALS and their family members. Healthcare providers must give accurate information about the efficacy of CAM as well as its safety and possible adverse effects and should offer patient-centred treatment through active communication throughout the process of diagnosis and treatment.

  11. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  12. Development of the acquisition model of online information resources at Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit

    2013-09-01

    Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University started to acquire online information resources since 2001 with the subscriptions to 2 databases. Nowadays it has 29 items of subscriptions and the expenses on online information resources reach to 17 million baht, more than 70 percent of the information resources budget, serving the academic purposes of the Faculty of Medicine. The problems of online information resources acquisition fall into 4 categories, and lead to 4 aspects conforming the model of the acquisition, comparing or benchmarking with the 4 selected medical school libraries in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Songkhla, and discussion with some other Thai and foreign libraries. The acquisition model of online information resources is developed from those problems and proposed for Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University as well as for any medical libraries which prefer.

  13. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned…

  15. Split-Session Focus Group Interviews in the Naturalistic Setting of Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Fetters, Michael D.; Guetterman, Timothy C.; Power, Debra; Nease, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE When recruiting health care professionals to focus group interviews, investigators encounter challenges such as busy clinic schedules, recruitment, and a desire to get candid responses from diverse participants. We sought to overcome these challenges using an innovative, office-based, split-session focus group procedure in a project that elicited feedback from family medicine practices regarding a new preventive services model. This procedure entails allocating a portion of time to the entire group and the remaining time to individual subgroups. We discuss the methodologic procedure and the implications of using this approach for data collection. METHODS We conducted split-session focus groups with physicians and staff in 4 primary care practices. The procedure entailed 3 sessions, each lasting 30 minutes: the moderator interviewed physicians and staff together, physicians alone, and staff alone. As part of the focus group interview, we elicited and analyzed participant comments about the split-session format and collected observational field notes. RESULTS The split-session focus group interviews leveraged the naturalistic setting of the office for context-relevant discussion. We tested alternate formats that began in the morning and at lunchtime, to parallel each practice’s workflow. The split-session approach facilitated discussion of topics primarily relevant to staff among staff, topics primarily relevant to physicians among physicians, and topics common to all among all. Qualitative feedback on this approach was uniformly positive. CONCLUSION A split-session focus group interview provides an efficient, effective way to elicit candid qualitative information from all members of a primary care practice in the naturalistic setting where they work. PMID:26755786

  16. Multi-source evaluation of interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-12-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and teaching staffs and to compare the ratings with the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Our results revealed instruments used by staffs, peers, nurses, and self-evaluation have good internal consistency reliability (α > 0.90), except for the behavioral checklist (α = 0.57). Staffs', peers', and nurses' evaluations were highly correlated with one another (r = 0.722 for staff- and peer-rating, r = 0.734 for staff- and nurse-rating, r = 0.634 for peer- and nurse-rating). However, residents' self-rating and patients-rating were not correlated to ratings by any other raters. OSCE evaluation was correlated to peer-rating (r = 0.533) and staff-rating (r = 0.642), but not correlated to self- or patient-rating. The generalizability study revealed the major sources of variance came from the types of rater and the interaction of residents and types of rater. This study found self-rating and patient-rating were not consistent with other sources of rating on residents' interpersonal and communication skills. Whether variations among different types of rater in a multi-source evaluation should be regarded as measurement errors or complementary information is worth further study.

  17. Medical student attitudes towards family medicine in Spain: a statewide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Family and community medicine (FM) became a recognized specialty in Spain in 1978; however, most medical schools in Spain still lack mandatory core courses in FM. In order to explore the perceptions, expectations and level of information amongst medical students in Spain in relation to FM and PC, and the training in these areas in the curriculum of the Medical Schools, a survey was developed to be administered in medical schools every two years. This article presents data from the first questionnaire administration. Methods The study population was all first-, third-, and fifth-year students (2009–2010) in 22 participating medical schools in Spain (of 27 total). The 83-item survey had three sections: personal data, FM training, professional practice expectations, and preferences). Chi-squared test or analyses of variance were used, as appropriate. Results We had a 41.8% response rate (n = 5299/12924); 89.8% considered the social role of FM to be essential, while only 20% believed the specialty was well respected within the medical profession. The appeal of FM increased with years of study, independent of student characteristics or medical school attended. Among third and fifth-year students, 54.6% said their specialty preferences had changed during medical school; 73.6% felt that FM specialists should teach FM courses, and 83.3% thought that FM rotations in primary care centres were useful. Conclusions Students valued the social role of FM more highly than its scientific standing. The vast majority believe that FM training should be mandatory. Only 25% of first-year students have clear preferences for a specialization. Interest in FM increases moderately over their years of study. Working conditions in FM have decisive influence in choosing a specialty. PMID:22642617

  18. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training – A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Marquard, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM) training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany. Materials and Methods A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in “Google (Scholar)”. From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect. Results The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, “Google” n = 1), containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35); process quality (n = 43); and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2). Conclusion A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels. PMID:27459714

  19. Comparative Review of Education Programs of Family Medicine (FM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Several Transition Countries.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Skopljak, Amira; Jatic, Zaim

    2014-12-01

    Family Medicine as an independent medical discipline is relatively young in the countries of Southeast Europe. Still are used the old models of all forms of education in this module, although most countries accepted Bologna undergraduate teaching concept and already implement it with greater or lesser success. Measuring the effects of the qualities of these concepts and models is not done systematically nor in uniform manner, so it could not be compared by the unique variables measuring the quality of education curricula, and especially the quality of education level of the graduates at the first, second and third degree courses and other forms of education. This paper provides a comparative overview of the state of education in the area of family medicine in the region. It creates comparison according to the study duration for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, doctoral studies and specialized studies in specified areas. What stand out are the proposals to improve education in the field of family medicine in the region.

  20. Telemedicine and E-Learning in a Primary Care Setting in Sudan: The Experience of the Gezira Family Medicine Project.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, K G; Hunskaar, S; Abdelrahman, S H; Malik, E M

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is progressively used in the health sector (e-health), to provide health care in a distance (telemedicine), facilitate medical education (e-learning), and manage patients' information (electronic medical records, EMRs). Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) in Sudan provides a 2-year master's degree in family medicine, with ICT fully integrated in the project. This cross-sectional study describes ICT implementation and utilization at the GFMP for the years 2011-2012. Administrative data was used to describe ICT implementation, while questionnaire-based data was used to assess candidates' perceptions and satisfaction. In the period from April 2011 to December 2012, 3808 telemedicine online consultations were recorded and over 165000 new patients' EMRs were established by the study subjects (125 candidates enrolled in the program). Almost all respondents confirmed the importance of telemedicine. The majority appreciated also the importance of using EMRs. Online lectures were highly rated by candidates in spite of the few challenges encountered by combining service provision with learning activity. Physicians highlighted some patients' concerns about the use of telemedicine and EMRs during clinical consultations. Results from this study confirmed the suitability of ICT use in postgraduate training in family medicine and in service provision. PMID:26839704

  1. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  2. Seeking the Passionate Career: First-in-Family Enabling Students and the Idea of the Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Josephine; Delahunty, Janine; O'Shea, Sarah; Stone, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the idea of the university from the first-in-family enabling students' perspective. It provides an overview of the current crisis of meaning in scholarly commentary that points to a spectrum of meanings about the university. This spectrum ranges from the ancient imaginary of the monastic university as "ivory tower" to…

  3. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  4. Several families of viscous optimized waveriders - A review of waverider research at the University of Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D., Jr.; Lewis, Mark J.; Corda, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research conducted by the Hypersonic Group at the University of Maryland in the area of viscous optimized waveriders is reviewed. In particular, the motivation for this class of waveriders is discussed, and results obtained to date are presented. Various waverider families generated from different flows and designed for different applications are examined, including waveriders using chemically reacting flow effects and very high altitude applications.

  5. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p < 0.01). Didactic instruction was the most commonly used training method but was rated as only somewhat effective by 67.9% of respondents using this method. The most frequently cited significant barrier to implementing childhood obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children. PMID:20163732

  6. The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

    2014-01-01

    With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum.

  7. Investigating knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards Iranian traditional medicine-case study: universities of Tehran in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Khorasgani, Sahar Rabani; Moghtadaie, Leila

    2014-07-29

    The present study aimed at Investigating the knowledge and attitude of Nursing Students towards Iranian Traditional Medicine in universities of Tehran in 2012-2013. 300 students of nursing studying at different universities in Tehran participated in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The data was collected through a standard questionnaire with an acceptable validity and reliability. The questionnaire was made of five sections including demographic, general knowledge of the Iranian traditional medicine, general attitude towards it, resources of the Iranian traditional medicine and the barriers to it. The results revealed that general knowledge of the students about Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine is low. The attitude of the students towards including Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine in their curriculum is positive. General attitude of students towards Iranian traditional medicine is positive too. The majority of the participants had not passed any course on Iranian traditional medicine. There was no relationship between participants' attitude towards Iranian traditional medicine and the number of semesters they had passed. Considering the participants' positive attitude and their low level of knowledge, it seems necessary for the university policy makers to provide nursing students with different training courses on Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine in order to increase their knowledge.

  8. Genetics in medical school curriculum: A look at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Deanne M.; Fong, Chin-To

    2008-01-01

    Genetics is assuming an increasingly important role in medicine. As a result, the teaching of genetics should also be increased proportionally to ensure that future physicians will be able to take advantage of the new genetic technology, and to understand the associated ethical, legal and social issues. At the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, we have been able to incorporate genetic education into a four-year medical curriculum in a fully integrated fashion. This model may serve as a template for other medical curriculum still in development. PMID:18196607

  9. [Pages from the history of the Department of Forensic Medicine, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University].

    PubMed

    Leonova, E N; Romanenko, G Kh; Sidorovich, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Department of Forensic Medicine of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University is highlighted based on the results of the studies of the relevant literature data and archival materials. The authors lay special emphasis on the organization of the teaching process and research at different stages of the development of the Department, scientific and forensic medical activities of its leading specialists, materials obtained in the course of research, and the contribution to the development of forensic medicine made by outstanding scientists.

  10. 50th Year Anniversary of Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University.

    PubMed

    Lertakyamanee, Jariya

    2016-05-01

    Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, has started to be a formal anesthesia division, divided from division of Surgery in 1965; hence our 50th year anniversary in 2015. Research is now a priority and mandatory mission, according to the vision of Mahidol University. Second mission is to teach and train, and we produce the highest number of states-of-the-art anesthesiologists and anesthetic nurses each year Curriculum and training are being continuously improved. From a small unit, now it is one of the largest departments and extends the service, our third mission, to more than only in the operating theaters. We look after pre-anesthesia assessment, inside and outside operating room anesthesia, post-operative pain relief Intensive Care Unit, and chronic pain management. The number of patients and their diseases increase; so do the complexities of surgeries. There are tremendous changes in drugs and equipment. There is the fourth mission on administration, IT and resource management. And the fifth mission which is corporate social responsibility. However, we still believe that compassion, responsibility and integrity are most important. We have taught and tried to live by the teaching of HRH the King's Father. And these will contribute to our progress and shine in the next 50 years.

  11. Using and teaching evidence-based medicine: the Duke University child and adolescent psychiatry model.

    PubMed

    March, John S; Chrisman, Allan; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; Clouse, Kelly; D'Alli, Richard; Egger, Helen; Gammon, Pat; Gazzola, Marta; Lin, Anne; Mauro, Christian; Rana, Aasim; Ravi, Himabindu; Srirama, Madhanika; Su, Hansen; Thrall, Grace; van de Velde, Polly

    2005-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as a set of processes that facilitate the conscientious, explicit, and judicious integration of individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research in making decisions about the care of individual patients. EBM focuses not only on grading the strength of the evidence but also on the processes and tools that are necessary for clinicians to continually upgrade their knowledge and skills for those problems encountered in daily practice. This article, authored by members of the Duke Pediatric Psychiatry EBM Seminar Team, (1) describes EBM as applied to the training of child and adolescent psychiatrists in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center; (2) presents a simplified discussion of EBM as a technology for training and patient care; (3) discusses the basic principles and procedures for teaching EBM in the setting of a multidisciplinary training program; and (4) briefly mentions two training and research initiatives that are furthered by incorporating EBM.

  12. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession.

  13. 50th Year Anniversary of Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University.

    PubMed

    Lertakyamanee, Jariya

    2016-05-01

    Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, has started to be a formal anesthesia division, divided from division of Surgery in 1965; hence our 50th year anniversary in 2015. Research is now a priority and mandatory mission, according to the vision of Mahidol University. Second mission is to teach and train, and we produce the highest number of states-of-the-art anesthesiologists and anesthetic nurses each year Curriculum and training are being continuously improved. From a small unit, now it is one of the largest departments and extends the service, our third mission, to more than only in the operating theaters. We look after pre-anesthesia assessment, inside and outside operating room anesthesia, post-operative pain relief Intensive Care Unit, and chronic pain management. The number of patients and their diseases increase; so do the complexities of surgeries. There are tremendous changes in drugs and equipment. There is the fourth mission on administration, IT and resource management. And the fifth mission which is corporate social responsibility. However, we still believe that compassion, responsibility and integrity are most important. We have taught and tried to live by the teaching of HRH the King's Father. And these will contribute to our progress and shine in the next 50 years. PMID:27501620

  14. [Attitudes of health personnel in a university hospital toward evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Markulin, Helena; Petrak, Jelka

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years the concepts and methods of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) have been increasingly recognized and applied in the Croatian medical community. Central Medical Library at Zagreb university Medical School has been developing a web-based service aimed to help practitioners find best evidence for solving specific clinical problems. Therefore, the health personnel affiliated to a teaching hospital were surveyed. The questionnaire included 18 questions evaluating attitudes towards EBM. It was displayed by the library's information desk. There were 204 respondents, 62% of them clinical specialists. Most respondents agreed that EBM is useful in clinical decision making (57.4%) as well as in improving patient care (55.4%). Lack of personal time (60.8%) and insufficient skills (60.3%) were percieved as the main barriers to practising EBM. The vast majority of respondents (96.6%) reported never having received EBM training. The study results show that medical librarians can play an expanded role in saving the practitioners' time by searching EBM resources and assessing the quality of the information. PMID:20857805

  15. Leadership lessons from curricular change at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Loeser, Helen; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Irby, David M

    2007-04-01

    After successive Liaison Committee on Medical Education accreditation reports that criticized the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine for lack of instructional innovation and curriculum oversight, the dean issued a mandate for curriculum reform in 1997. Could a medical school that prided itself on innovation in research and health care do the same in education? The authors describe their five-phase curriculum change process and correlate this to an eight-step leadership model. The first phase of curricular change is to establish a compelling need for change; it requires leaders to create a sense of urgency and build a guiding coalition to achieve action. The second phase of curriculum reform is to envision a bold new curriculum; leaders must develop such a vision and communicate it broadly. The third phase is to design curriculum and obtain the necessary approvals; this requires leaders to empower broad-based action and generate short-term wins. In the fourth phase, specific courses are developed for the new curriculum, and leaders continue to empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains, and produce more change. During the fifth phase of implementation and evaluation, leaders need to further consolidate gains, produce more change, and anchor new approaches in the institution. Arising from this experience and the correlation of curricular change phases with leadership steps, the authors identify 27 specific leadership strategies they employed in their curricular reform process. PMID:17414186

  16. Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

  17. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL) as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU) and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9). Image problems: 0% (0/9). Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9); 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76). Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76) considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76) believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76) considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76) experienced technical problems, while; 9% (7/76) thought

  18. Development of a student-mentored research program between a complementary and alternative medicine university and a traditional, research-intensive university.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Barbara M; Furner, Sylvia E; Cramer, Gregory D

    2014-09-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared with traditional, research-intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out.The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM predoctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs, and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers.Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP's success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health and master of clinical and translational research were established.

  19. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student’s t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. Results A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression(BDI≧14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors—conflict and control—were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Conclusions Soft family environmental factors—especially cohesion, conflict and control—appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very

  20. Comparison of Patient Costs in Internal Medicine and Anaesthesiology Intensive Care Units in a Tertiary University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kara, İskender; Yıldırım, Fatma; Başak, Dilek Yumuş; Küçük, Hamit; Türkoğlu, Melda; Aygencel, Gülbin; Katı, İsmail; Karabıyık, Lale

    2015-01-01

    Objective The allocation of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to health is limited, therefore it has made a need for professional management of health business. Hospital managers as well as employees are required to have sufficient knowledge about the hospital costs. Hospital facilities like intensive care units that require specialization and advanced technology have an important part in costs. For this purpose, cost analysis studies should be done in the general health business and special units separately. Methods In this study we aimed to compare the costs of anaesthesiology and internal medicine intensive care units (ICU) roughly. Results After approval of this study by Gazi University Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, the costs of 855 patients that were hospitalized, examined and treated for at least 24 hours in internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs between January 2012–August 2013 (20 months period) were taken and analyzed from chief staff of the Department of Information Technology, Gazi University Hospital. Conclusion At the end of the study, we observed clear differences between internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs arising from transactions and patient characteristics of units. We stated that these differences should be considered by Social Security Institution (SSI) for the reimbursement of the services. Further, we revealed that SSI payments do not meet the intensive care expenditure. PMID:27366486

  1. A coordinated teaching program for future dairy practitioners at the university of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nigel B; Eisele, Christian O; Klos, Rachel F; Bennett, Thomas B; McGuirk, Sheila M; Goodger, William J; Oetzel, Garrett R; Nordlund, Kenneth V

    2004-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine (UW-SVM) has implemented a variety of strategies to optimize teaching in dairy herd medicine. These include the provision of opportunities for dairy cow handling and management using a dairy teaching herd for veterinary students throughout the four-year curriculum, exposure for all students in their final year to a substantial first-opinion dairy case load using a private practice-based ambulatory clinic rotation, and, finally, the teaching of dairy herd health management and problem solving in a group of four final-year elective production medicine clinical rotations. On average, since 1986, 32.6% of each graduating class attended at least one elective production medicine rotation, with a range from 19.0% to 43.4%. For those University of Wisconsin students who could be traced, 65% were still actively involved in some aspect of dairy practice, representing a range of between seven and 17 students per year since the start of the program. The advantages and disadvantages of operating a "regional center of excellence" for training students from out-of-state institutions are discussed.

  2. Experiences with the implementation of a national teaching qualification in university medical centres and veterinary medicine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Willemina M Ineke; Zanting, Anneke

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, a compulsory national basic teaching qualification was introduced for all university teachers in the Netherlands. At that time all eight University Medical Centres (UMCs) and the only Faculty of Veterinary Medicine had adopted or were setting up teacher development programmes. This study explores how these programmes relate to each other and to the basic teaching qualification. To gather information on teacher development programmes in the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty an online survey was filled out by teacher development representatives from each of them. The programmes had main features in common (e.g. competency based and portfolio assessment), but differed somewhat in contents according to the local situation. Importantly, they had all been formally accepted as equivalent to the basic teaching qualification. We consider the freedom to tailor the qualifications to the medical context as well as to the local situation of the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty one of the major success factors and the well-established collaboration between teacher development representatives of the UMCs and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine as another. Challenges for the future include embedding the teacher development programmes in the institutional organizations and maintaining and further developing the programmes and the competencies of the qualified teachers, e.g. in a senior qualification.

  3. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  4. Respiratory medicine at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario: 1968 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Norman L; O’Byrne, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The medical school at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) was conceived in 1965 and admitted the first class in 1969. John Evans became the founding Dean and he invited Moran Campbell to be the first Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Moran Campbell, already a world figure in respiratory medicine and physiology, arrived at McMaster in September 1968, and he invited Norman Jones to be Coordinator of the Respiratory Programme. At that time, Hamilton had a population of 300,000, with two full-time respirologists, Robert Cornett at the Hamilton General Hospital and Michael Newhouse at St Joseph’s Hospital. From the clinical perspective, the aim of the Respiratory Programme was to develop a network approach to clinical problems among the five hospitals in the Hamilton region, with St Joseph’s Hospital serving as a regional referral centre, and each hospital developing its own focus: intensive care and burns units at the Hamilton General Hospital; cancer at the Henderson (later Juravinski) Hospital; tuberculosis and rehabilitation at the Chedoke Hospital; pediatrics and neonatal intensive care at the McMaster University Medical Centre; and community care at the Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington (Ontario). The network provided an ideal base for a specialty residency program. There was also the need to establish viable research. These objectives were achieved through collaboration, support of hospital administration, and recruitment of clinicians and faculty, mainly from our own trainees and research fellows. By the mid-1970s the respiratory group numbered more than 25; outpatient clinic visits and research had grown beyond our initial expectations. The international impact of the group became reflected in the clinical and basic research endeavours. ASTHMA: Freddy Hargreave and Jerry Dolovich established methods to measure airway responsiveness to histamine and methacholine. Allergen inhalation was shown to increase airway responsiveness for several weeks

  5. Family non-universal U(1)' gauge symmetries and b {r_arrow} s transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Jiang, J.; Langacker, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C .E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Inst. for Advanced Study

    2009-01-01

    We present a correlated analysis for the {Delta}B = 1, 2 processes which occur via b {yields} s transitions within models with a family nonuniversal U(1){prime}. We take a model-independent approach and only require family universal charges for the first and second generations and small fermion mixing angles. The results of our analysis show that within this class of models, the anomalies in B{sub s}-B{sub s}{sup -} mixing and the time-dependent CP asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B{sub d} {yields} ({pi},{psi},{eta}{prime},{rho},{omega},f{sub 0})K{sub S} decays can be accommodated.

  6. [Practical Use Evaluation of Aluminum Packaging for Medicinal Products Based on Universal Design].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kazuya; Hidaka, Takashi; Marubashi, Koichi; Takagi, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have requested optimization of aluminum packaging of medicinal products in terms of usability. To improve operational efficiency of aluminum packaging, we used Universal Design (UD)-based approach, which enables products to be used properly and consistently regardless of users. The UD-pack used in this research is composed of a film that can be easily opened and torn linear. Here, we compared the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging by evaluating the practical use of each under the cooperation of 24 pharmacists. Following opening and removal of contents of one sample for both types of packaging, monitors were asked which type was easier to use in each case. Also, monitors were to repeat the opening and removal of contents of five samples in a row, and were asked the same question. Monitors were recorded by digital camera to measure the time required to finish the procedure for five samples in a row. After opening one sample, approximately 83% of monitors preferred the UD-pack, and after opening five samples, all (100%) preferred the UD-pack. Regarding the time required for opening five samples and removing the contents measured by analyzing the recorded video, the UD-pack significantly reduced the time required for all monitors. The average time ratio of the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging was approximately 59%, and no significant difference was observed between male and female pharmacists. Our results indicate the UD-pack improves ease of opening and removal of contents and increases efficiency of dispensing in a clinical setting compared with conventional aluminum packaging.

  7. [Practical Use Evaluation of Aluminum Packaging for Medicinal Products Based on Universal Design].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kazuya; Hidaka, Takashi; Marubashi, Koichi; Takagi, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have requested optimization of aluminum packaging of medicinal products in terms of usability. To improve operational efficiency of aluminum packaging, we used Universal Design (UD)-based approach, which enables products to be used properly and consistently regardless of users. The UD-pack used in this research is composed of a film that can be easily opened and torn linear. Here, we compared the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging by evaluating the practical use of each under the cooperation of 24 pharmacists. Following opening and removal of contents of one sample for both types of packaging, monitors were asked which type was easier to use in each case. Also, monitors were to repeat the opening and removal of contents of five samples in a row, and were asked the same question. Monitors were recorded by digital camera to measure the time required to finish the procedure for five samples in a row. After opening one sample, approximately 83% of monitors preferred the UD-pack, and after opening five samples, all (100%) preferred the UD-pack. Regarding the time required for opening five samples and removing the contents measured by analyzing the recorded video, the UD-pack significantly reduced the time required for all monitors. The average time ratio of the UD-pack to conventional aluminum packaging was approximately 59%, and no significant difference was observed between male and female pharmacists. Our results indicate the UD-pack improves ease of opening and removal of contents and increases efficiency of dispensing in a clinical setting compared with conventional aluminum packaging. PMID:26632152

  8. Current state of open access to journal publications from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Škorić, Lea; Vrkić, Dina; Petrak, Jelka

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the share of open access (OA) papers in the total number of journal publications authored by the members of the University of Zagreb School of Medicine (UZSM) in 2014. Methods Bibliographic data on 543 UZSM papers published in 2014 were collected using PubMed advanced search strategies and manual data collection methods. The items that had “free full text” icons were considered as gold OA papers. Their OA availability was checked using the provided link to full-text. The rest of the UZSM papers were analyzed for potential green OA through self-archiving in institutional repository. Papers published by Croatian journals were particularly analyzed. Results Full texts of approximately 65% of all UZSM papers were freely available. Most of them were published in gold OA journals (55% of all UZSM papers or 85% of all UZSM OA papers). In the UZSM repository, there were additional 52 freely available authors’ manuscripts from subscription-based journals (10% of all UZSM papers or 15% of all UZSM OA papers). Conclusion The overall proportion of OA in our study is higher than in similar studies, but only half of gold OA papers are accessible via PubMed directly. The results of our study indicate that increased quality of metadata and linking of the bibliographic records to full texts could assure better visibility. Moreover, only a quarter of papers from subscription-based journals that allow self-archiving are deposited in the UZSM repository. We believe that UZSM should consider mandating all faculty members to deposit their publications in UZSM OA repository to increase visibility and improve access to its scientific output. PMID:26935617

  9. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  10. Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

    2011-08-01

    The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

  11. Educating students in a university museum environment: the Adler Museum of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

    PubMed

    Keene, Rochelle

    2009-01-01

    Museums are now very much part of the mainstream of education and are no longer regarded as peripheral to education. They increasingly serve in South Africa as formal partners in education at primary and secondary level. University museums particularly have a formal role to play in tertiary education, with most university collections having been established to further the teaching of a faculty or school. The Adler Museum of Medicine plays an important educational role within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (Wits) and is also increasingly used by schools. As the curricula for South African schools were changed after the first democratic election in 1994, and outcome-based education implemented in this country, more and more educators established contact with museums in particular learning areas of the curricula. In South Africa, there are three areas of the school syllabi which this particular Museum can directly address: great discoveries, technological advances and traditional healing and indigenous knowledge.

  12. Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

    2011-10-01

    This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science.

  13. Innovation in veterinary medical education: the concept of 'One World, One Health' in the curriculum of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Calgary.

    PubMed

    Cribb, A; Buntain, B

    2009-08-01

    'One World, One Health' is a foundation concept in veterinary medicine, much like comparative medicine. However, teachers of veterinary medicine often fail to identify it or speak of its importance within the veterinary curriculum. The resurgence of interest in the 'One World, One Health' concept aligns well with the underlying principles on which the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) has been newly founded. This concept is therefore a key component of the UCVM programme, and one that is well highlighted for those studying in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) course and graduate students.

  14. A Qualitative Study of Intimate Partner Violence Universal Screening by Family Therapy Interns: Implications for Practice, Research, Training, and Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todahl, Jeffrey L.; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented--and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening--is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy…

  15. Marvels and Shadows: Science and Education at the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine under the Auspices of Columbia University: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl; Rabionet, Silvia E; Peña-Carro, Lucy; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    This essay introduces a series of five historical articles on the scientific and educational contributions of the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine (STM), under the auspices of Columbia University (1926-1949), to the fields of tropical medicine and public health. The articles will appear in several consecutive issues, and will address various themes as follows: 1) historical antecedents of the STM, particularly institutional precedents; 2) the educational legacy of the STM; 3) a history of the STM scientific journal ("The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine"); 4) the scientific practices and representations that prevailed at the institution; and, 5) a brief sociocultural history of malaria in Puerto Rico, mainly from the perspective of the STM's scientific and public health activities. The authors have systematically and comprehensively studied a wide variety of documents from different sources based on multiple archives in Puerto Rico, the United States and England. The authors treat the fluid meanings of the examined historical encounters from a research perspective that privilege complex reciprocal interactions, multiple adaptations and elaborate sociocultural constructs present in a collaborative exemplar of the modernity of medical science in a neocolonial tropical context.

  16. Marvels and Shadows: Science and Education at the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine under the Auspices of Columbia University: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Santana, Raúl; Rabionet, Silvia E; Peña-Carro, Lucy; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    This essay introduces a series of five historical articles on the scientific and educational contributions of the University of Puerto Rico School of Tropical Medicine (STM), under the auspices of Columbia University (1926-1949), to the fields of tropical medicine and public health. The articles will appear in several consecutive issues, and will address various themes as follows: 1) historical antecedents of the STM, particularly institutional precedents; 2) the educational legacy of the STM; 3) a history of the STM scientific journal ("The Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine"); 4) the scientific practices and representations that prevailed at the institution; and, 5) a brief sociocultural history of malaria in Puerto Rico, mainly from the perspective of the STM's scientific and public health activities. The authors have systematically and comprehensively studied a wide variety of documents from different sources based on multiple archives in Puerto Rico, the United States and England. The authors treat the fluid meanings of the examined historical encounters from a research perspective that privilege complex reciprocal interactions, multiple adaptations and elaborate sociocultural constructs present in a collaborative exemplar of the modernity of medical science in a neocolonial tropical context. PMID:27232864

  17. Geriatric medicine training for family practice residents in the 21st century: a report from the Residency Assistance Program/Harfford Geriatrics Initiative.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of geriatric medicine training for family practice residents is a particular challenge for community-based programs. With support from the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York City, the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) implemented in 1995 a multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. This report summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for residency directors. The goals of the retreats were to build recognition among the residency directors of the skills that future family physicians will require to be successful providers of primary care to older adults and to allow the residency directors to identify and develop solutions to barriers to improving geriatric medicine training for residents. Forty-six program directors participated in the three retreats between February 2000 and February 2001. The participants represented 52 programs and rural tracks in all geographic regions, small and large programs, and urban and rural settings. The program directors developed a consensus on the geriatric medicine knowledge, skills, and attitudes that should be expected of all family practice residency graduates; developed a list of basic, required educational resources for each family practice residency program; and proposed solutions to common obstacles to successful curriculum development.

  18. Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bech-Nielsen, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

  19. Respiratory medicine at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario: 1968 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Norman L; O’Byrne, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The medical school at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) was conceived in 1965 and admitted the first class in 1969. John Evans became the founding Dean and he invited Moran Campbell to be the first Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Moran Campbell, already a world figure in respiratory medicine and physiology, arrived at McMaster in September 1968, and he invited Norman Jones to be Coordinator of the Respiratory Programme. At that time, Hamilton had a population of 300,000, with two full-time respirologists, Robert Cornett at the Hamilton General Hospital and Michael Newhouse at St Joseph’s Hospital. From the clinical perspective, the aim of the Respiratory Programme was to develop a network approach to clinical problems among the five hospitals in the Hamilton region, with St Joseph’s Hospital serving as a regional referral centre, and each hospital developing its own focus: intensive care and burns units at the Hamilton General Hospital; cancer at the Henderson (later Juravinski) Hospital; tuberculosis and rehabilitation at the Chedoke Hospital; pediatrics and neonatal intensive care at the McMaster University Medical Centre; and community care at the Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington (Ontario). The network provided an ideal base for a specialty residency program. There was also the need to establish viable research. These objectives were achieved through collaboration, support of hospital administration, and recruitment of clinicians and faculty, mainly from our own trainees and research fellows. By the mid-1970s the respiratory group numbered more than 25; outpatient clinic visits and research had grown beyond our initial expectations. The international impact of the group became reflected in the clinical and basic research endeavours. ASTHMA: Freddy Hargreave and Jerry Dolovich established methods to measure airway responsiveness to histamine and methacholine. Allergen inhalation was shown to increase airway responsiveness for several weeks

  20. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  1. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  2. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  3. Development of a structure-validated Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ) with Chinese university students.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Kai; Fu, Lingyun; Xu, Shaofang; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Consistent results have shown a relationship between the psychological world of children and their perceived parental bonding or family attachment style, but to date there is no single measure covering both styles. The authors designed a statement matrix with 116 items for this purpose and compared it with the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in a study with 718 university students. After exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, five factors (scales)--namely, Paternal/Maternal Encouragement (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Abuse (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Freedom Release (5 items each), General Attachment (5 items), and Paternal/Maternal Dominance (4 items each)--were defined to form a Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ). The internal alphas of the factors ranged from .64 to .83, and their congruency coefficients were .93 to .98 in samples regarding father and mother. Women scored significantly higher on FRQ General Attachment and Maternal Encouragement and lower on Paternal Abuse than men did; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Encouragements than children with siblings did. Women also scored significantly higher on PBI Paternal Autonomy Denial; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Cares and Maternal Autonomy Denial. All intercorrelations between FRQ scales were low to medium, and some correlations between FRQ and PBI scales were medium to high. This study demonstrates that the FRQ has a structure of five factors with satisfactory discriminant and convergent validities, which might help to characterize family relationships in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:26366981

  4. Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violette, Ronald W.

    This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

  5. A Countercultural Heritage: Rediscovering the Relationship-Centered and Social Justice Roots of Family Medicine-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Waters, Richard C; Stoltenberg, Mark; Hughes, Lauren S

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 G. Gayle Stephens Keystone conference convened a cohort of primary care professionals to discuss what promises personal physicians will make to their patients going forward. New physicians were prompted to rediscover the foundational values of and historic context for family medicine. At the heart of this rediscovery was learning of the writings and teachings of Dr. G. Gayle Stephens, a founder of family medicine who emphasized the essentiality of relationship-centered care and social justice to the new specialty. Dr. Stephens viewed family medicine as being in a countercultural relationship to mainstream medicine, as family medicine fought for justice and equity in an inequitable and fragmented health care system. Here we argue that by reaffirming and renewing this countercultural heritage the new generation of family physicians will have better clarity in approaching the many challenges in health care today. Particularly for trainees and new physicians, the historic lens offered by Dr. Stephens's writing and other foundational documents allows us to better see ourselves in a trajectory of ongoing health care reform. PMID:27387164

  6. A Countercultural Heritage: Rediscovering the Relationship-Centered and Social Justice Roots of Family Medicine-A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    PubMed

    Waters, Richard C; Stoltenberg, Mark; Hughes, Lauren S

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 G. Gayle Stephens Keystone conference convened a cohort of primary care professionals to discuss what promises personal physicians will make to their patients going forward. New physicians were prompted to rediscover the foundational values of and historic context for family medicine. At the heart of this rediscovery was learning of the writings and teachings of Dr. G. Gayle Stephens, a founder of family medicine who emphasized the essentiality of relationship-centered care and social justice to the new specialty. Dr. Stephens viewed family medicine as being in a countercultural relationship to mainstream medicine, as family medicine fought for justice and equity in an inequitable and fragmented health care system. Here we argue that by reaffirming and renewing this countercultural heritage the new generation of family physicians will have better clarity in approaching the many challenges in health care today. Particularly for trainees and new physicians, the historic lens offered by Dr. Stephens's writing and other foundational documents allows us to better see ourselves in a trajectory of ongoing health care reform.

  7. The evolution of integrative medical education: the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maizes, Victoria; Horwitz, Randy; Lebensohn, Patricia; McClafferty, Hilary; Dalen, James; Weil, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an internationally recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States' medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that all medical students and residents will soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fellowship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as well as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the challenges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fellowship training. Allied health professional IM educational courses, as well as integrative health coaching, assure that all members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and will be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives.

  8. Academic promotion and tenure in U.S. family medicine units.

    PubMed

    Holloway, R L; Hale, K L; Rakel, R E

    1989-05-01

    The authors interviewed by telephone the heads (or their representatives) of 101 of the 120 family practice units in U.S. medical schools in 1987. Each respondent was asked for his or her personal perceptions of the relative importances of research, teaching, patient care, and administrative activities in the academic promotion process. Respondents were also asked for their views of their units' and institutions' perceptions of the importances of the same four activities in the promotion process, as well as other related questions about promotion and tenure. The findings indicate that there is still a significant incongruence between the value structure of most family practice units and that of their institutions but that many family practice units are beginning to achieve parity of promotion and tenure with other departments in their institutions. PMID:2713010

  9. Progress of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine “REDEEM” at Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    Tohoku University promotes the “REDEEM” project, which is a national project of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine. This education system provides a curriculum for engineers who belong to bio-medical R&D. In Japan, most of industrial engineers have been excluded from systemized bio-medical education, while medical and co-medical personnel lack engineering education. This difference of backgrounds causes a discrepancy between medicine and engineering bringing difficulty in collaboration for development of medical equipments or drugs. In this project, we focus on the engineering side, and we try to develop and provide a bio-medical engineering course for engineers. In this paper, we report and discuss on the outline and the progress of the “REDEEM” project.

  10. [A statistical study of autopsy cases in the department of legal medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, during the last 10 years (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Suzutani, T; Ishibashi, H; Tajima, S; Takatori, T

    1976-07-01

    The mediocolegal autopsies performed in the Department of Legal Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, during the 10-year period, 1965-1974 were 617 cases, 87 of them in newborns, 530 in infants and adults. Of cases autopsied as homicidal or suspicious deaths in infants and adults, 88.5% were recognized to be due to external causes, 9.1% to disease conditions and 2.5% undetermined. Of neonatal deaths, 10.3% were stillbirth, 78.2% live birth and 11.5% undetermined. Among the deaths due to external causes in infants and adults, 43.3% were homicidal, 7.2% suicidal, 32.6% accidental and 16.6% undetermined. Of external factors causing death, 42.9% were force, 36.8% asphyxiaton, 8.0% chemical substances and 8.0% heat. The causes of homicidal deaths inflicted with cutting or piercing instruments were circulatory disturbance, asphyxia and infection. In deaths inflicted with blunt instruments, they were mostly injuries of central nervous system and circulatory disturbance in the minority. All categories of causes of death were recognized in accidental deaths. All neonatal deaths were due to external causes. Their causes of death were mostly asphyxia and blunt force injuries of head.

  11. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration.

  12. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  13. Molecular identification of the traditional herbal medicines, Arisaematis Rhizoma and Pinelliae Tuber, and common adulterants via universal DNA barcode sequences.

    PubMed

    Moon, B C; Kim, W J; Ji, Y; Lee, Y M; Kang, Y M; Choi, G

    2016-01-01

    Methods to identify Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma are required because of frequent reciprocal substitution between these two herbal medicines and the existence of several closely related plant materials. As a result of the morphological similarity of dried tubers, correct discrimination of authentic herbal medicines is difficult by conventional methods. Therefore, we analyzed DNA barcode sequences to identify each herbal medicine and the common adulterants at a species level. To verify the identity of these herbal medicines, we collected five authentic species (Pinellia ternata for Pinelliae Tuber, and Arisaema amurense, A. amurense var. serratum, A. erubescens, and A. heterophyllum for Arisaematis Rhizoma) and six common adulterant plant species. Maturase K (matK) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) genes were then amplified using universal primers. In comparative analyses of two DNA barcode sequences, we obtained 45 species-specific nucleotides sufficient to identify each species (except A. erubescens with matK) and 28 marker nucleotides for each species (except P. pedatisecta with rbcL). Sequence differences at corresponding positions of the two combined DNA barcodes provided genetic marker nucleotides that could be used to identify specimens of the correct species among the analyzed medicinal plants. Furthermore, we generated a phylogenetic tree showing nine distinct groups depending on the species. These results can be used to authenticate Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma from their adulterants and to identify each species. Thus, comparative analyses of plant DNA barcode sequences identified useful genetic markers for the authentication of Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma from several adulterant herbal materials. PMID:26909979

  14. Molecular identification of the traditional herbal medicines, Arisaematis Rhizoma and Pinelliae Tuber, and common adulterants via universal DNA barcode sequences.

    PubMed

    Moon, B C; Kim, W J; Ji, Y; Lee, Y M; Kang, Y M; Choi, G

    2016-02-19

    Methods to identify Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma are required because of frequent reciprocal substitution between these two herbal medicines and the existence of several closely related plant materials. As a result of the morphological similarity of dried tubers, correct discrimination of authentic herbal medicines is difficult by conventional methods. Therefore, we analyzed DNA barcode sequences to identify each herbal medicine and the common adulterants at a species level. To verify the identity of these herbal medicines, we collected five authentic species (Pinellia ternata for Pinelliae Tuber, and Arisaema amurense, A. amurense var. serratum, A. erubescens, and A. heterophyllum for Arisaematis Rhizoma) and six common adulterant plant species. Maturase K (matK) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) genes were then amplified using universal primers. In comparative analyses of two DNA barcode sequences, we obtained 45 species-specific nucleotides sufficient to identify each species (except A. erubescens with matK) and 28 marker nucleotides for each species (except P. pedatisecta with rbcL). Sequence differences at corresponding positions of the two combined DNA barcodes provided genetic marker nucleotides that could be used to identify specimens of the correct species among the analyzed medicinal plants. Furthermore, we generated a phylogenetic tree showing nine distinct groups depending on the species. These results can be used to authenticate Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma from their adulterants and to identify each species. Thus, comparative analyses of plant DNA barcode sequences identified useful genetic markers for the authentication of Pinelliae Tuber and Arisaematis Rhizoma from several adulterant herbal materials.

  15. Planning a new library in an age of transition: the Washington University School of Medicine Library and Biomedical Communications Center.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S; Halbrook, B

    1990-01-01

    In an era of great technological and socioeconomic changes, the Washington University School of Medicine conceptualized and built its first Library and Biomedical Communications Center in seventy-eight years. The planning process, evolution of the electronic library, and translation of functions into operating spaces are discussed. Since 1983, when the project was approved, a whole range of information technologies and services have emerged. The authors consider the kind of library that would operate in a setting where people can do their own searches, order data and materials through an electronic network, analyze and manage information, and use software to create their own publications. Images PMID:2393757

  16. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Vladimir-Knežević, Sanda; Blažeković, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladić, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

    2014-01-09

    The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases.

  17. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    PubMed

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made. PMID:25959290

  18. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    PubMed

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made.

  19. Capacity building toward evidence-based medicine among healthcare professionals at the university of medicine and pharmacy, ho chi minh city, and its related institutes.

    PubMed

    Nga, LE Thi Quynh; Goto, Aya; Trung, Tran The; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Khue, Nguyen Thy

    2014-02-01

    Research capacity development enhances a country's ownership of activities aimed at strengthening its health system. In Vietnam, continuing medical education (CME) is attracting increasing attention with the establishment of legal and policy frameworks. During 2010-2013, the Japan International Cooperation Agency funded a research capacity building project targeting physicians in Ho Chi Minh City. The project had been developed in four previous courses that were conducted in collaboration with Fukushima Medical University and Ho Chi Minh City University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP). The project succeeded in obtaining accreditation as the city's CME course. A total of 262 physicians attended three courses that have a divided set of research competencies. Following the Kirkpatrick Model for evaluating the effectiveness of training programs, we confirmed the participants' positive reaction to the courses (Level 1 evaluation), their perceived increase in knowledge and confidence in research skills (Level 2 evaluation), and application of learned knowledge in their practice (Level 3 evaluation). Presented here is a step-by-step scaling-up model of health research capacity building. Strategies for the further expansion include: further capacity building of instructors; responding to clinicians' specific needs; building a recruiting system with authorization; and improving the Level 3 training evaluation.

  20. Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, July 1, 1986-June 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, an affiliate of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), covering the period July 1, 1986 through June 30, 1989, is presented. Topics covered include the following: preamble;…

  1. Pure annihilation type decays in the family non-universal Z‧ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Dan-Dan; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2016-01-01

    By assuming that the scalar meson belongs to the first excited states or the lowest lying ground states of qq¯‧, we study the pure annihilation-type decays in the QCD factorization approach. Within the Standard Model, the branching fractions are of the order of 10-8-10-7, which is possible to measure in the ongoing LHCb experiment or forthcoming Belle-II experiment. We also study these decays in the family non-universal Z‧ model. The results show that if mZ‧ ≈ 600 GeV (ζ = 0.02), both the branching fractions and CP asymmetries of could be changed remarkably, which provides us with a place for probing the effect of new physics. These results could be used to constrain the parameters of the Z‧ model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175151, 11575151, 11375208, 11235005) and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET) by Ministry of Education of P. R. China (NCET-13-0991)

  2. Medical liability insurance as a barrier to the provision of abortion services in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Dehlendorf, Christine E; Grumbach, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Family physicians who wish to provide abortions have been subject to both denial of coverage by medical liability insurers and the imposition of large premium increases. These policy decisions by insurance companies raise questions about the role of family physicians in abortion care and about the autonomy of medical specialties in defining their scope of practice. We review the issues specific to abortion services in the primary care setting and examine the broader implications for the medical profession. Finally, we review how advocacy and improved regulation of the insurance industry could help to ensure that clinicians who are trained and willing to provide services to their patients are not limited by the decisions of medical liability insurers.

  3. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Paul F.; Semelka, Michael W.; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. Objective We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. Methods The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. Results A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Conclusions Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training. PMID:26217424

  4. Bending the cost curve and increasing revenue: a family medicine model that works!

    PubMed

    Katz, Bernard J; Needham, Mark R

    2012-12-01

    This article attempts to illustrate ways in which family physician practices are able to demonstrate high value, enhanced quality, and streamlined costs, essential components of practice sustainability. Specific examples are provided to assist practices to consider questions and information that allow for skillful engagement during contract negotiations, consider increasing practice revenues by adopting practice enhancements that make sense for the location of the practice and community needs, develop workflow analyses, and review opportunities for expense reduction.

  5. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    IN PLANNING A NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE, A PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED OUTLINING THE DESIGN NEEDS AND THE SPACE AND FACILITY REQUIREMENTS. MAJOR AREAS OF THE PROGRAM WERE--(1) GENERAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS, (2) THE RESEARCH COMPONENT, AND (3) THE BASIC SCIENCE TEACHING COMPONENTS. SPACE…

  6. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  7. [The teaching of microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Rome. Memories of the Institute].

    PubMed

    Orsi, N

    2008-01-01

    The Author describes the various phases of the teaching of microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University, of Rome, from the unity of Italy to the end of the twentieth century. A regular course of Bacteriology was started only in the academic year 1905/1906 as separate teaching from that of Hygiene and the Institute of Bacteriology was created in 1924. It was centered in Piazza del Viminale in Rome, in the same building as the Institute of Hygiene. Prof Vittorio Puntoni was the first Director of the Institute, also in its new site of the Città Universitaria which was inaugurated in 1935. In the meantime the old name of Bacteriology was changed to Microbiology and prof Puntoni remained as Director until 1943. The bombing during the war produced heavy damage to the new Institute and with the appointment of prof Aldo Cimmino as a new Director in 1946 the Institute of Microbiology began a long period of reconstruction and development. An astonishing improvement was achieved in the availability of human and technical resources, many groups of research workers were created and several pupils became professor of Microbiology in different Italian Universities. In 1981 prof Cimmino definitely retired, leaving, the teaching of Microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" to five of his pupils. One of them, prof Garaci, a few years later passed to the new University of Rome "Tor Vergata", becoming also Rector. The other four professor (Orsi, Filadoro, Pezzi, del Piano) continued their teaching in the successive years, with the collaboration of several associate professors, whose status was created by the law 382 in 1980. A later law on the short degree course required also the official participation of many researchers to the new teaching. Finally in 2001 the official activity of the Institute of Microbiology ceased and was incorporated in the Department of Public Health Sciences.

  8. VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-WISE ERROR RATE

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Lacey; Zhu, Ji; Murphy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are limited and lacking in power. In this article we discuss variable selection for qualitative interactions with the aim to discover these critical patient subsets. We propose a new technique designed specifically to find these interaction variables among a large set of variables while still controlling for the number of false discoveries. We compare this new method against standard qualitative interaction tests using simulations and give an example of its use on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression. PMID:22023676

  9. The Health Policy and Legislative Awareness Initiative at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine: theory meets practice.

    PubMed

    Quraishi, Sadeq A; Orkin, Fredrick K; Weitekamp, Michael R; Khalid, Ayesha N; Sassani, Joseph W

    2005-05-01

    In a constantly evolving health care landscape shaped by many voices--including those of third party payers and government--physicians must learn to play a more proactive role to become better advocates for their patients and to uphold the basic tenets of their noble profession. As legislation and public health become increasingly intertwined with the practice of medicine, educators must provide future physicians with the tools to meet these new challenges. Accordingly, in 1996 Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine embarked on its Health Policy and Legislative Awareness Initiative, a medical school elective designed to provide theoretical knowledge as well as practical experience in legislative and policy issues for future physicians early in their careers. The Initiative has three key elements: a series of lectures taught by national and local experts covering a basic health policy curriculum, a mini-internship conducted at the office of a Pennsylvania State legislator, and a practical assignment leading to authorship of a resolution to a national medical organization or assisting in drafting a bill intended for introduction to the Pennsylvania State Legislature. Following several years of successful implementation and a moderate growth in enrollment, recent changes in the local and national scene have peaked the interest of most students to learn about the system in which they will practice medicine. Therefore, in addition to describing the Initiative in its current form, the authors discuss future plans for expanded elective opportunities and consider the issue of integrating health policy education into core medical school curricula. PMID:15851453

  10. Organ retention and communication of research use following medico-legal autopsy: a pilot survey of university forensic medicine departments in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura-Ito, Takako; Inoue, Yusuke; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the circumstances and problems that departments of forensic medicine encounter with bereaved families regarding samples obtained from medico-legal autopsies. A questionnaire was posted to all 76 departments of forensic medicine performing medico-legal autopsies in Japan, and responses were received from 48 (63.2%). Of the respondents, 12.8% had approached and communicated with bereaved families about collecting samples from the deceased person during an autopsy and the storage of the samples. In addition, 23.4% of these had informed families that samples might be used in research. Eighteen departments had received enquiries and requests from families about the samples, with most requests concerning their return. The response to such requests varied according to the department. Few departments interacted with the bereaved families regarding the procedure for obtaining autopsy samples, and their methods for handling family concerns differed depending on the person within the department authorised to contact the family. Moreover, the procedures for engaging in such communication have long been unclear, and no legal or ethical consensus or agreement with the general public has been established. It is important for researchers to further discuss the correct way for forensic medicine departments to communicate with bereaved families.

  11. Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters of the American Association of University Professors, July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. School of Medicine.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters (690 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986 is presented. The agreement covers the New Jersey Medical School, New Jersey Dental School, Rutgers…

  12. [Informatics in the School of Medicine of the University of Chile. I. Origin and evolution of biomedical computing in Chile].

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, E A

    1990-08-01

    In the sixties and seventies, the School of Medicine of the University of Chile was the first Chilean institution to incorporate computers into academic endeavors through its own Computer Center. Later, professors were marginated from policy making, which became oriented to administrative goals, but they compensated that situation with the easy access to personal computers brought about by present technology. In 1986, when School authorities were again elected by the faculty staff, professors were able to participate again in a committee designing projects in this area. Current development at the School of Medicine include a proliferation of personal computers, the implementation of a computer network with access to medical data bases, and a growing number of applications in the fields of research and teaching. In the near future, due to the accessibility of telecommunications and computers, these advancements should have an impact on the whole biomedical community, a situation that would restore, after many years, the traditional role of the University of Chile in the life of the country.

  13. New paradigm in training of undergraduate clinical skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

    2010-10-01

    Clinical skills' training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools' curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called "Neptune-CSS," which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

  14. Family consent and the pursuit of better medicines through genetic research.

    PubMed

    Renegar, G; Rieser, P; Manasco, P

    2001-01-01

    Rapid changes in the science and technology related to genetic research are challenging scientists, health care providers, ethicists, regulators, patient groups, and the pharmaceutical industry to keep pace with ethically grounded, workable guidelines for both the research and clinical applications of human genetics. We describe the genetic research being conducted by one pharmaceutical company (GlaxoSmithKline) and how the company is addressing the ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding this research; discuss an industry working group's attempt to advance pharmacogenetic research by openly addressing and disseminating information on related ethical, legal, and regulatory issues; identify scientific and ethical differences among various types of genetic research; discuss potential implications of family consent on subject privacy and autonomy, data collection, and study conduct; and suggest points to consider when study sponsors, investigators, and ethics committees evaluate research proposals. Public and expert opinion regarding informed consent in genetic research is evolving as a result of increased education, discussion, and understanding of the relevant issues. Five years ago, there was strong support for anonymity in genetic research as a privacy safeguard. Now, an increasingly popular school of thought advocates against anonymity to preserve an individual's ability to withdraw and, if desired, access research results. It is important to recognize this evolution and address consent issues in a reasoned, practical, and consistent way, including input from patients and their families, health care providers, ethicists, scientists, regulatory bodies, research sponsors, and the lay community. Responsibility for assessing issues related to family consent for research should remain with local investigators, ethics boards, and study sponsors. A "one-size-fits-all" perspective in the form of new regulations, for example, would likely be a disservice to all.

  15. Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world. PMID:23028843

  16. Information Technology – a Tool for Development of the Teaching Process at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. Aim: The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. Material and methods: The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Results: Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p <0.05). When asked about the possibility of using computers at school, there were no significant differences between the two systems. There has been progress of that opportunity from year to year. Students of Bologna process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the

  17. [Experience and problems of the primary health care centers' specialists in the implementation of the integrated health system based on family medicine in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Hrytsko, R Iu; Furtak, I I; Parobets'ka, I M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of the primary health care' centers in Lviv, Mykolaiv, Kherson regions on the basis of family medicine, integrated medical space, modern governance mechanisms, market technology, promotion trasmural' approach, intersectoral coordination and collaboration and preventative health care population allows to get the maximum effectiveness of the provision of public health in relation to a particular administrative area with limited resources.

  18. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM LAMIACEAE FAMILY.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Laudy, Agnieszka E; Przybył, Jarosław; Ziarno, Małgorzata; Majewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) extracts from herbs often used in Polish cuisine and traditional herbal medicine including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were compared. The aqueous ethanolic extracts contained slightly higher levels of phenolics compared to the aqueous methanolic extracts. In turn, GC-MS analysis showed that the aqueous methanolic extracts of thyme, rosemary and sage contained several additional compounds such as eugenol or ledol. The present studies also indicated that the bacterial species applied in the experiment exhibited different sensitivities towards tested extracts. Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be the most sensitive bacteria to aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) rosemary and sage extracts and aqueous methanolic thyme extract. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Proteus vulgaris NCTC 4635 were more susceptible to the aqueous methanolic thyme extract. However, Listeria monocytogenes 1043S was the most sensitive to the aqueous ethanolic rosemary extract. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones. PMID:26647633

  19. [The evaluation of maternal-child care at 5 family medicine units].

    PubMed

    Vega-Vega, G

    1993-01-01

    In 1991 five of the 38 Family Practice Units of a Social Security Institute in Mexico City were evaluated regarding the care provided to pregnant women and to children under the age of one. The clinical records were reviewed looking for the following indicators: a) weeks of pregnancy at first prenatal visit, b) total number of prenatal visits, c) total number of times the arterial tension was recorded during the prenatal visits, d) total number of urine exams during the prenatal visits, e) total number of visits by the first year of age, f) weight, and g) number and type of vaccines. The five units had a variable compliance with the standards. The measurement of the indicators permits the identification of deviations and to focus future efforts to improve the care provided at the Units.

  20. Arriving, Surviving, and Succeeding: First-in-Family Women and Their Experiences of Transitioning into the First Year of University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines a qualitative narrative inquiry study conducted within Australia that focused on a group of female students commencing university, all of whom were the first in their family to pursue higher education. During 1 year of academic study, 17 women participated in periodic interviews as each moved through the year. By following…

  1. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  2. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  3. Career preferences and the work-family balance in medicine: gender differences among medical specialists.

    PubMed

    Heiliger, P J; Hingstman, L

    2000-05-01

    In this article career preferences of medical specialists in the Netherlands are analysed, based on a survey among the members of medical associations of five specialties. Four different career preferences were offered, each of which implied a possible variation in working hours. A questionnaire was sent to a random selected group of working specialists in general practice, internal medicine, anaesthesiology, ophthalmology and psychiatry. Logistic regressions were used to predict career preferences. Besides individual characteristics, work and home domain characteristics were taken into the analysis. Not surprisingly, the preference for career change in respect of working hours is higher among full-time MDs, especially women, than among part-time workers. In contradiction to what was expected, home domain characteristics did not predict a part-time preference for female, but for male MDs. One home domain characteristic, children's age, did predict the male part-time preference. Further gender differences were found in respect of the fit between actual and preferred working hours (A/P-fit). The majority of male MDs with a full-time preference had achieved an A/P-fit, whereas significantly less female MDs achieved their preferences. It was found that hospital-bound specialists are less positive towards part-time careers than other specialists. Furthermore, the change of working hours would imply a reduction in FTE for all specialties, if all preferences were met. Especially in hospital-bound specialisms it was not confirmed that the reduction in FTE would be low; this was found only in respect of interns. It may be concluded that individual preferences in career paths are very diverse. Personnel policy in medical specialties, especially in hospitals, will have to cope with changes in traditional vertical and age-related career paths. Flexible careers related to home domain determinants or other activities will reinforce a life cycle approach, in which the centrality

  4. Predictive value of human biomonitoring in environmental medicine: experiences at the outpatient unit of environmental medicine (UEM) of the University Hospital Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Straff, Wolfgang; Möller, Manfred; Jakobi, Nikolaus; Weishoff-Houben, Michaela; Dott, Wolfgang; Wiesmüller, Gerhard Andreas

    2002-07-01

    There is little data on the distribution of biomonitoring parameters in patients at outpatient Units of Environmental Medicine (UEM). We evaluated the biomonitoring parameters of 646 UEM outpatients from our University Hospital 1988-1998. Few patients were exposed to specific substances. Data of patients who were not obviously exposed was analysed statistically (geometric mean, standard deviation, median, 95th percentile). Results were compared with reference values in literature. Normal distribution of biomonitoring parameters was rare. 95th percentiles for arsenic, chromium, selenium, zinc, phenol and toluene were below standard, 95th percentiles for copper and mercury above, and 95th percentiles for lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, lindane, and beta-hexachlorocyclohexane were within the published range of reference values. Thallium as well as most volatile organic compounds analyzed were below detection levels. Aluminum and fluorine exposure was rarely analysed. In view of these results, it is concluded that the indication for biomonitoring needs to be stringent as levels of biomonitoring parameters are generally not risen in patients of the UEM.

  5. Suggestions for a Web based universal exchange and inference language for medicine.

    PubMed

    Robson, Barry; Caruso, Thomas P; Balis, Ulysses G J

    2013-12-01

    Mining biomedical and pharmaceutical data generates huge numbers of interacting probabilistic statements for inference, which can be supported by mining Web text sources. This latter can also be probabilistic, in a sense described in this report. However, the diversity of tools for probabilistic inference is troublesome, suggesting a need for a unifying best practice. Physicists often claim that quantum mechanics is the universal best practice for probabilistic reasoning. We discuss how the Dirac notation and algebra suggest the form and algebraic and semantic meaning of XML-like Web tags for a clinical and biomedical universal exchange language formulated to make sense directly to the eye of the physician and biomedical researcher.

  6. "No struggle, no fight, no court battle": the 1948 desegregation of the University of Arkansas School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2013-07-01

    In 1948, over 30 percent of the approved medical schools in the United States excluded black students. However, on September 10, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Medicine became the first Southern medical school to desegregate when Edith Mae Irby matriculated. Her admission occurred without incident. There were no jeering white mobs, no court action, and no federal troops. Irby's admission had its roots in a successful legal campaign launched by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to eradicate racial inequalities in professional and graduate education. A confluence of factors led the University of Arkansas to desegregate. These included the state's lack of the financial resources necessary to comply with U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a climate of racial moderation in Arkansas, shrewd political maneuvering by officials at the University of Arkansas, and Irby's academic accomplishments. Irby's historic admission is frequently overlooked as a historical milestone. Its invisibility is due in part to its sharp contrast to the dominant narratives of school desegregation in the South. Yet, the story of Irby's entrance into medical school is critical for a more complete understanding of the history of medical education and the civil rights movement.

  7. "No struggle, no fight, no court battle": the 1948 desegregation of the University of Arkansas School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2013-07-01

    In 1948, over 30 percent of the approved medical schools in the United States excluded black students. However, on September 10, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Medicine became the first Southern medical school to desegregate when Edith Mae Irby matriculated. Her admission occurred without incident. There were no jeering white mobs, no court action, and no federal troops. Irby's admission had its roots in a successful legal campaign launched by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to eradicate racial inequalities in professional and graduate education. A confluence of factors led the University of Arkansas to desegregate. These included the state's lack of the financial resources necessary to comply with U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a climate of racial moderation in Arkansas, shrewd political maneuvering by officials at the University of Arkansas, and Irby's academic accomplishments. Irby's historic admission is frequently overlooked as a historical milestone. Its invisibility is due in part to its sharp contrast to the dominant narratives of school desegregation in the South. Yet, the story of Irby's entrance into medical school is critical for a more complete understanding of the history of medical education and the civil rights movement. PMID:22416058

  8. Integrative laser medicine and high-tech acupuncture at the medical university of graz, austria, europe.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue "High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine" of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine.

  9. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  10. Role of Research Universities in Health and Medicine. Go8 Backgrounder 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Universities have much to contribute to the improvement of health delivery, research, and teaching/learning. In progressing health reform, the Government should be mindful of the need to: (1) strengthen high quality medical research; (2) promote translation of research to teaching, population health and health services; and (3) address Health…

  11. Academic Ethics in Turkish Universities: Perceptions of Academicians from Engineering, Medicine and Education Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Inayet; Demirkasimoglu, Nihan; Alkin, Senar

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: Academicians such as scientists contribute to the research of knowledge, to the free disclosure of knowledge, to students' training, and to public service with their special knowledge and skills. Academicians' ethical responsibilities and values a very important place in the development of universities' functions, which, in…

  12. Barriers to Screening and Possibilities for Active Detection of Family Medicine Attendees Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    KOPČAVAR GUČEK, Nena; PETEK, Davorina; ŠVAB, Igor; SELIČ, Polona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 1996 the World Health Organization declared intimate partner violence (IPV) the most important public health problem. Meta-analyses in 2013 showed every third female globally had been a victim of violence. Experts find screening controversial; family medicine is the preferred environment for identifying victims of violence, but barriers on both sides prevent patients from discussing it with doctors. Methods In July 2014, a qualitative study was performed through semi-structured interviews with ten family doctors of different ages and gender, working in rural or urban environments. Sound recordings of the interviews were transcribed, and the record verified. The data were interpreted using content analysis. A coding scheme was developed and later verified and analysed by two independent researchers. The text of the interviews was analysed according to the coding scheme. Results Two coding schemes were developed: one for screening, and the other for the active detection of IPV. The main themes emerging as barriers to screening were lack of time, staff turnover, inadequate finance, ignorance of a clear definition, poor commitment to screening, obligatory follow-up, risk of deterioration of the doctor-patient relationship, and insincerity on the part of the patient. Additionally, cultural aspects of violence, uncertainty/ helplessness, fear, lack of competence and qualifications, autonomy/negative experience, and passive role/stigma/ fear on the part of the patients were barriers to active detection. Conclusion All the participating doctors had had previous experience with active detection of IPV and were aware of its importance. Due to several barriers to screening for violence they preferred active detection. PMID:27647084

  13. The value of an ENT specialist outreach service in a Family Medicine Unit for the urban poor in India

    PubMed Central

    John, Mary; Parsons, Alicia; Abraham, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the function of an otolaryngology (ENT) specialist outreach service in a Family Medicine (FM) Unit for the urban poor attached to a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in India. Materials and Methods: The study investigated the pattern of ENT diseases in patients who came to the FM Unit and the proportion of these patients who were referred to the ENT specialist clinic at the unit. The study also analyzed the ENT problems that were managed by the ENT specialist at the unit and the conditions, which needed referral to the Tertiary Hospital. Data was collected by chart review. Setting: Weekly ENT specialist outreach service in an FM Unit for the urban poor in India attached to a Tertiary Teaching Hospital. Results: Among the outpatients who attended the unit in 12 months, 12.89% had ENT-related problems, of which 23.9% were referred to the visiting ENT specialist, 88.30% of these patients were managed in the FM Unit with basic ENT facilities. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that majority of the patients with ENT-related problems who presented to an FM Unit could be managed by the FM specialists. Of those patients who required the expertise of a specialist in ENT, the majority could be managed in the FM Unit, with basic ENT examination and treatment facilities. Triage and management by the family physician and the visiting ENT surgeon in the FM Unit is a prudent use of resources and will improve the quality of care people receive for their ENT problems. PMID:27453846

  14. Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

  15. Review of three decades of laboratory exercises in the preclinical curriculum at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Genuth, S; Caston, D; Lindley, B; Smith, J

    1992-03-01

    The authors reviewed the use of preclinical curricular time for laboratory exercises at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine from 1955-56 to 1988-89. Total hours decreased from over 1,000 in 1960-61 to just under 300 in 1988-89. From 1955-56 to 1985-86, laboratory hours devoted to animal and human physiology declined by 92%. Although the precise reasons for these changes--which have occurred in medical schools across the country--are difficult to document, the authors view them with concern. After considering the advantages and disadvantages of preclinical laboratory exercises, they conclude that the former still outweigh the latter. The further disappearance of laboratory exercises from the curriculum should be halted by efforts to revitalize them.

  16. [Summary of research works on viruses in the Vietnam Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University (NEKKEN) and National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Vietnam (NIHE) jointly conducted a project from 2006 on Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (ERID) granted by the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Technology (MEXT) of Japan. Fifteen independent researches have been carried out by 7 scientists who stationed in the Vietnam Research Station (VRS), and by approximately 60 visiting scientists. A wide variety of viruses have been studied in the research activities in the VRS, of those, topics of'' Nipah virus infection in bats in Vietnam'', ''Nam Dinh virus, a newly discovered insect nidovirus'', and'' Risk factors of dengue fever in southern Vietnam'' were summarized. It is important to develop a mechanism to facilitate young scientists to use the VRS in their research works, and then a scope to establish the VRS as a gateway to a successful career path for young scientists in the field of the infectious diseases would be realized.

  17. [Informatics in the School of Medicine of the University of Chile. II. The school network and access to data bases].

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, E A

    1990-12-01

    Projects on informatics at the School of Medicine of the University of Chile are being brought about in accordance with both its institutional goals and present trends in technology. Prominent among the latter are the widespread distribution of autonomous processing power represented by low-cost computers and the ease of communication at local and worldwide levels. Our main project has been the design and start of a computer network that integrates the School's Departments and the geographically dispersed teaching hospitals. The principal services provided by the network are local and international electronic mail, access to data bases, and emulation of mainframe terminals (eg, to run remotely a mainframe's statistics software). Automated bibliographic search has been made available both through remote access to Medline data base and through local usage of compact disc (CD-ROM) versions. Since our network is open, it should become a forceful mean of assisting and integrating the biomedical community throughout the country. PMID:2152674

  18. [Informatics in the School of Medicine of the University of Chile. II. The school network and access to data bases].

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, E A

    1990-12-01

    Projects on informatics at the School of Medicine of the University of Chile are being brought about in accordance with both its institutional goals and present trends in technology. Prominent among the latter are the widespread distribution of autonomous processing power represented by low-cost computers and the ease of communication at local and worldwide levels. Our main project has been the design and start of a computer network that integrates the School's Departments and the geographically dispersed teaching hospitals. The principal services provided by the network are local and international electronic mail, access to data bases, and emulation of mainframe terminals (eg, to run remotely a mainframe's statistics software). Automated bibliographic search has been made available both through remote access to Medline data base and through local usage of compact disc (CD-ROM) versions. Since our network is open, it should become a forceful mean of assisting and integrating the biomedical community throughout the country.

  19. Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative.

    PubMed

    Moran, Dane; Edwardson, Jill; Cuneo, Charles Nicholas; Tackett, Sean; Aluri, James; Kironji, Antony; Cox, Jacob; Carroll, Bryn; Lie, Erina; Fofana, Mariam; Bollinger, Robert C; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Chen, Chi C G

    2015-01-01

    Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP). The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.

  20. Knowledge and Attitude about Stem Cells and Their Application in Medicine among Nursing Students in Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    LYE, Jee Leng; SOON, Lean Keng; WAN AHMAD, Wan Amir Nizam; TAN, Suat Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stem cell research has been extensively explored worldwide to enhance human health in medical setting. Nevertheless, there is currently no full understanding of the stem cell knowledge and attitude levels among student nurses in Malaysia. This study aimed to assess the level of stem cell knowledge, attitude toward stem cell application in medicine, and its association with years of education, among Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) undergraduate nursing students. Methods: A cross-sectional study (n = 88) was conducted using self-administered questionnaire consisted of demographic information, stem cells knowledge and attitude statements. Data was analysed using Statistical Package Social Software 20.0. Results: The majority of participants (92%) had moderate knowledge score about stem cells. Many students (33%) worried that stem cell application might cause a harm to humanity yet had a positive (76.1%) attitude towards its therapeutic potential (45.5%). Poor correlation between knowledge and attitude (r = 0.08) indicated that acceptance towards stem cell is not solely based on the knowledge level but also on other factors including religion and culture. Conclusion: Therefore, this study suggests that various educational programs on stem cell should be implemented considering the religion, cultural, social, and behavioural determinants in the population to improve stem cell knowledge and encourage a more positive attitude towards stem cells in medicine among these nursing students. PMID:26715905

  1. A curricular model for the training of physician scientists: the evolution of the Duke University School of Medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    O'Connor Grochowski, Colleen; Halperin, Edward Charles; Buckley, Edward George

    2007-04-01

    Duke University School of Medicine offers an unusual doctor of medicine educational program. The core basic sciences are taught in year one, core clinical clerkships are completed in the second year, the entire third year is devoted to scholarly investigation, and elective rotations are fulfilled in the fourth year. The creation of this unique structure presented many challenges and is the product of a desire of key faculty 40 years ago to change radically the way medical education was taught. Over the years, improvements have been made, but the underlying principles of these visionary leaders have been retained: inquire not just acquire, flexibility of choice, and in-depth exploration. In the spirit of innovation that was established 40 years ago, leaders and faculty at Duke developed a new curricular model in 2004, called Foundation for Excellence, which is anchored in integrated, interdisciplinary innovation. The authors describe the process of curricular reform and provide a detailed overview of this unique approach to medical education. In keeping with Duke's mission to graduate clinician-researchers and clinician-educators, reducing the basic science curriculum to one year created a year saved, which students are now required to devote to scholarly pursuits. The authors argue that adopting a similar one-year basic science curriculum would make instructional time available for other schools to achieve their own institutional goals. PMID:17414195

  2. Evolution of a transdisciplinary "One Medicine-One Health" approach to global health education at the University of California, Davis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Patricia A; Mazet, Jonna A; Clifford, Deana; Scott, Cheryl; Wilkes, Michael

    2009-12-01

    In today's world health events in one nation or geographic area often have repercussions for the health and well-being of populations beyond that region; sometimes even globally. In recent years many factors, most notably concern about emerging infectious diseases, have contributed to an increasing appreciation of the interdependency of human, animal and ecosystem health worldwide. Integrated global approaches to improve the health of humans, animals and their shared environments are proving to be in the best interest of many countries. A special symposium and award were established in memoriam to the internationally renowned epidemiologist, Dr. Calvin W. Schwabe, who (while at the University of California, Davis) was a significant advocate of the "One Medicine" approach to public health, calling upon all health professionals, including veterinarians, to work collaboratively and comparatively to improve human health. This paper discusses the evolution of the "One Medicine" concept into a global "One Health" approach to research, training capacity and service infrastructure, focused not only on disease, but also on health at the individual, population, and ecosystem levels. Projects involving UCD faculty which attempt to integrate a One Health approach include the Health for Animals and Livelihood Improvement (HALI) Project in Tanzania, Envirovet Summer Institute, Avian Flu School and Newcastle Immunization Program in Africa, a web-based virtual global health training program, and the Calvin Schwabe One Health Project.

  3. Intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences and a history of childhood psychosomatic disorders among Japanese university students

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Akinori; Yamanaka, Takao; Hirakawa, Tadatoshi; Koga, Yasuyuki; Minomo, Ryosuke; Munemoto, Takao; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-01-01

    Background Japan has been witnessing a considerable increase in the number of children with psychosomatic disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the risk of psychosomatic disorder in adolescents and intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1592 Japanese university students (52% male, mean age 19.9 years) who completed a survey about intra- and extra-familial ACEs and the incidence of childhood psychosomatic disorders. Intra-familial ACEs included domestic violence, physical violence, emotional abuse, illness in household, parental divorce, no parental affection, and dysfunctional family. Extra-familial ACEs included physical violence or negative recognition by teachers, being bullied in elementary or junior high school, or sexual violence. Results The frequency of psychosomatic disorders among the respondents was 14.8%. Among the 7 intra-familial ACEs, emotional abuse (relative risk, RR = 1.9) and illness in household (RR = 1.7) increased the risk of psychosomatic disorders. Estimates of the relative risk for the 5 extra-familial ACEs were statistically significant and ranged from 1.5 for being bullied in elementary school or physical violence from teachers to 2.4. Students who had 3 or more intra-familial ACEs and 2 or more extra-familial ACEs had a 3.0 relative risk for psychosomatic disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that intra- and extra-familial ACEs are associated with the development of psychosomatic disorders. Therefore, sufficient evaluation of ACEs should be performed in adolescent patients with psychosomatic disorder. PMID:17407551

  4. Does the absence of a supportive family environment influence the outcome of a universal intervention for the prevention of depression?

    PubMed

    Spence, Susan H; Sawyer, Michael G; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

    2014-05-01

    To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression. PMID:24828082

  5. Setting priorities for teaching and learning: an innovative needs assessment for a new family medicine program in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Kanashiro, Jeanie; Hollaar, Gwen; Wright, Bruce; Nammavongmixay, Khamphong; Roff, Sue

    2007-03-01

    Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is a small, tropical, landlocked country in southeast Asia. It is one of the least developed countries in the region, and its socioeconomic indicators are among the lowest 25% in the world. The World Health Organization has long called for increased equity in primary health care access around the world. To meet this need in Lao PDR, the Family Medicine Specialist Program was developed, a Lao-generated postgraduate training program designed to produce community-oriented primary care practitioners to serve the rural, remote areas of Lao PDR, where 80% of the population lives. An innovative method of needs assessment was required to determine the health care priorities to be met by this new program. Through the use of a modified Delphi technique, local key leaders in medical education, clinical specialists, and teachers were consulted to develop prioritized objectives for the hospital-based curriculum of the program. By setting priorities for teaching and learning in the unique and needy circumstances of Lao PDR, a novel approach to curriculum planning in a low-income country was explored and ultimately formed the foundation of the new curriculum. This process served to direct the allocation of scarce resources during implementation of this groundbreaking program. More importantly, this model of needs assessment could potentially be used to customize medical curricula in other low-income countries facing challenges similar to those in Lao PDR.

  6. Constructing and Communicating Privacy Boundaries: How Family Medicine Physicians Manage Patient Requests for Religious Disclosure in the Clinical Interaction.

    PubMed

    Canzona, Mollie Rose; Peterson, Emily Bylund; Villagran, Melinda M; Seehusen, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    Religion/spirituality (R/S) is an important component of some patients' psychosocial framework when facing illness. While many patients report an increased desire for R/S dialogue in clinical interaction, especially when facing a frightening diagnosis, some physicians report discomfort talking about R/S and hold various beliefs regarding the appropriateness of such discussions. Not only do physicians manage conversations centering on patient disclosures in the clinical visit, they must also navigate requests to share their own personal information. Farber et al. (2000) found that over a 12-month period nearly 40% of physicians reported that patients asked questions that transgressed professional boundaries. This article uses Petronio's communication privacy management theory as a lens through which to situate our understanding of how family medicine physicians construct and communicate privacy boundaries in response to patient requests for religious disclosure. Results provide an in-depth theoretical understanding of issues surrounding religious disclosure in the medical visit and expand the discussion on health care providers' personal and professional privacy boundaries as documented by Petronio and Sargent (2011). Implications for health care training and practice are discussed.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  8. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  9. The Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: an organizational model for clinical research in a school of medicine.

    PubMed

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Landis, J Richard; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    A new model for the conduct of clinical research was established at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine, through the development of the interdepartmental Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in 1993 and the basic science Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in 1994. The authors describe the development and evolution of these novel structures.Five key objectives were achieved with these structures' creation: (1) Clinical faculty have the opportunity to be identified as both clinicians and epidemiologists, (2) nonclinical faculty have an academic "home," (3) clinical trainees are now educated in population medicine, which promotes its incorporation into their clinical practice, (4) population medicine and clinical medicine have become fully integrated, and (5) better epidemiologic research is conducted, informed by clinical insights.Today's center is the primary home for epidemiology and biostatistics at Penn, linking epidemiology, biostatistics, clinical medicine, and the health sciences. The center's core faculty manage their own research programs, conduct primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, serve as members of collaborative research teams, manage cores and service centers that support research projects, and lead graduate training programs in epidemiology and biostatistics. The department provides an academic home and structure for faculty, provides primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, supports the center's mission, and provides training in biostatistics. This organizational approach has wide applicability across schools of medicine in the United States and abroad and has been a model for many.

  10. Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family

  11. Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine 100th anniversary. Introduction. From hygiene and tropical medicine to global health.

    PubMed

    Buekens, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    The author reviews the history of the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. In 1912, Dr. Creighton Wellman published a groundbreaking paper entitled "The New Orleans School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene," outlining a clear plan for a new independent school of public health. He became the founding dean of the Tulane School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Wellman had spent 9 years practicing medicine in Angola and graduated from the London School of Tropical Medicine before launching a career in tropical medicine in the United States. Tulane already had a formal course of hygiene established as early as 1881. The founding of Tulane School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine was made possible by a gift from Samuel Zemurray, who would become the president of the United Fruit Company. In January of 1914, Dr. Wellman abruptly left New Orleans to live in Brazil. The school lost its independence in 1919 and again became part of the School of Medicine until 1967. The school initiated by Dr. Wellman is the foundation on which today's Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine is built.

  12. Trials of large group teaching in Malaysian private universities: a cross sectional study of teaching medicine and other disciplines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This is a pilot cross sectional study using both quantitative and qualitative approach towards tutors teaching large classes in private universities in the Klang Valley (comprising Kuala Lumpur, its suburbs, adjoining towns in the State of Selangor) and the State of Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. The general aim of this study is to determine the difficulties faced by tutors when teaching large group of students and to outline appropriate recommendations in overcoming them. Findings Thirty-two academics from six private universities from different faculties such as Medical Sciences, Business, Information Technology, and Engineering disciplines participated in this study. SPSS software was used to analyse the data. The results in general indicate that the conventional instructor-student approach has its shortcoming and requires changes. Interestingly, tutors from Medicine and IT less often faced difficulties and had positive experience in teaching large group of students. Conclusion However several suggestions were proposed to overcome these difficulties ranging from breaking into smaller classes, adopting innovative teaching, use of interactive learning methods incorporating interactive assessment and creative technology which enhanced students learning. Furthermore the study provides insights on the trials of large group teaching which are clearly identified to help tutors realise its impact on teaching. The suggestions to overcome these difficulties and to maximize student learning can serve as a guideline for tutors who face these challenges. PMID:21902839

  13. Training the teachers. The clinician-educator track of the University of Washington Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Rosemary; Goodman, Richard B; Kritek, Patricia; Luks, Andrew M; Tonelli, Mark R; Benditt, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    The University of Washington was the first pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to create a dedicated clinician-educator fellowship track that has its own National Residency Matching Program number. This track was created in response to increasing demand for focused training in medical education in pulmonary and critical care. Through the Veterans Health Administration we obtained a stipend for a clinician-educator fellow to dedicate 12 months to training in medical education. This takes place predominantly in the second year of fellowship and is composed of several core activities: fellows complete the University of Washington's Teaching Scholars Program, a professional development program designed to train leaders in medical education; they teach in a variety of settings and receive feedback on their work from clinician-educator faculty and the learners; and they engage in scholarly activity, which may take the form of scholarship of teaching, integration, or investigation. Fellows are guided throughout this process by a primary mentor and a mentoring committee. Since funding became available in 2009, two of the three graduates to date have successfully secured clinician-educator faculty positions. Graduates uniformly believe that the clinician-educator track met their training goals better than the research-based track would have.

  14. [The 2010 curriculum of the faculty of medicine at the National University of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Morales-López, Sara; Lozano-Sánchez, Rogelio; Martínez-González, Adrián; Graue Wiechers, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 undergraduate medical degree curriculum at the faculty of medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) constitutes an important curricular reform of medical education in our country. It is the result of an institutional reflective process and academic dialog, which culminated in its approval by UNAM’s Academic Council for the Biology, Chemistry, and Health Sciences areas on February 2nd, 2010. Some distinguishing characteristics of the new academic curriculum are: organization by courses with a focus on outcome competencies; three curricular axes that link three knowledge areas; four educational phases with achievement profiles; new courses (biomedical informatics, basic-clinical and clinical-basic integration, among others); and core curriculum. The aforementioned curriculum was decided within a framework of effective teaching strategies, competency oriented learning assessment methods, restructuring of the training of teaching staff, and establishment of a curriculum committee follow-up and evaluation of the program. Curricular change in medical education is a complex process through which the institution can achieve its mission and vision. This change process faces challenges and opportunities, and requires strategic planning with long-term foresight to guarantee a successful dynamic transition for students, teachers, and for the institution itself.

  15. Integrative Laser Medicine and High-Tech Acupuncture at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue “High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine” of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine. PMID:22570669

  16. [The 2010 curriculum of the faculty of medicine at the National University of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Morales-López, Sara; Lozano-Sánchez, Rogelio; Martínez-González, Adrián; Graue Wiechers, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 undergraduate medical degree curriculum at the faculty of medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) constitutes an important curricular reform of medical education in our country. It is the result of an institutional reflective process and academic dialog, which culminated in its approval by UNAM’s Academic Council for the Biology, Chemistry, and Health Sciences areas on February 2nd, 2010. Some distinguishing characteristics of the new academic curriculum are: organization by courses with a focus on outcome competencies; three curricular axes that link three knowledge areas; four educational phases with achievement profiles; new courses (biomedical informatics, basic-clinical and clinical-basic integration, among others); and core curriculum. The aforementioned curriculum was decided within a framework of effective teaching strategies, competency oriented learning assessment methods, restructuring of the training of teaching staff, and establishment of a curriculum committee follow-up and evaluation of the program. Curricular change in medical education is a complex process through which the institution can achieve its mission and vision. This change process faces challenges and opportunities, and requires strategic planning with long-term foresight to guarantee a successful dynamic transition for students, teachers, and for the institution itself. PMID:21527971

  17. Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen; Moen, Phyllis

    2004-01-01

    This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less…

  18. Positions toward Science Studies in Medicine among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

    2011-01-01

    The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical…

  19. The relationship between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--a profile in synergy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arthur S; Detre, Thomas P; McDonald, Margaret C; Roth, Loren H; Huber, George A; Brignano, Mary Germann; Danoff, Sandra N; Farner, David M; Masnick, Jeffrey L; Romoff, Jeffrey A

    2008-09-01

    In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research objectives of the SOM. UPMC's conceptual origin was fostered by its experience with Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in the 1970s. Over time, UPMC acquired other hospitals through merger and negotiation and, by 2008, had grown into a $7 billion global health enterprise. From the outset, the senior leaders of both UPMC and Pitt committed to collaborative decision making on all key issues. Under this coordinated decision-making model, UPMC oversees all clinical activity, including that from a consolidated physicians' practice plan. Pitt remains the guardian of all academic priorities, particularly faculty-based research. UPMC's steady financial success underpins the model. A series of interrelated agreements formally defines the relationship between Pitt and UPMC, including shared board seats and UPMC's committed ongoing financial support of the SOM. In addition, the two institutions have jointly made research growth a priority. The payoff from this dynamic has been a steadily growing Pitt research portfolio; enhanced growth, visibility, and stature for UPMC, the SOM, and Pitt as a whole; and the sustained success of UPMC's clinical enterprise, which now has an international scope. Given the current stagnation in the National Institutes of Health budget, the Pitt-UPMC experience may be instructive to other academic health centers. PMID:18728434

  20. An Outline of a Proposed Five- plus Three-Year Combined Undergraduate-Master's Degree for Clinical Medicine Majors at Nanjing Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Xing-Ya; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shen, Hong-Bing; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    To build an effective model to train excellent doctors, Nanjing Medical University has proposed a five- plus three-year combined undergraduate-master's clinical medicine degree program. The program integrates undergraduate education, the education of research students, and standardized doctor residency training into a single system, allowing…

  1. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine Sixth Annual Practice-based Research Network theme issue--They just keep getting better and better.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2011-01-01

    We have quite a rich issue this month related to practice-based research networks (PBRNs)--reflections on where they have been, where they should go, how they should happen; lessons learned about recruiting physicians and patients and new research methods; and several clinical studies from existing PBRNs. We had an amazing number of manuscripts submitted this year for the PBRN issue; as a result, this is a powerful issue. Some are under revision for future issues of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, just as we have some articles from PBRNs appearing in most issues. PBRNs have deepened the family medicine research tradition. The importance of primary care research to build the evidence base of our clinical practice, plus the useful work building the methods of primary care research, distinguishes the pioneers in PBRNs. PBRNs are Health Improvement Networks and national treasures to be nurtured.

  2. [Gunshot wounds in the material of Forensic Medicine Institute, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Bydgoszcz].

    PubMed

    Bloch-Bogusławska, Elzbieta; Engelgardt, Piotr; Paradowska, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    The Medical Forensic Institute, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Bydgoszcz annually conducts approximately 600 autopsies. Gunshot wounds constitute only a small percentage of that number. The authors of this work have conducted an analysis of autopsy protocols prepared at the Institute in the years 1995-2005. During this period, 48 people were found dead as a result of gunshot wounds. This number constitutes 0.66% of all autopsies conducted within that time-frame. The objective of this study was an attempt at assessing the character of this phenomenon with due consideration given to the following parameters: age, sex, sobriety, circumstances and locality of the event, as well as season of the year, at comparing the results with data found in the literature on the subject.

  3. Health, Medicine and Science in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Claude; Issel

    1998-01-01

    Using archival sources, the authors report on the debates and diverse perspectives of United Nations representatives responsible for formulating Article 25 (relating to health and medical care) and 27 (relating to science) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These articles supply important normative guidelines for human rights and public health policy. The question of whether health-related rights should depend on state and/or private sponsorship was left open. There was agreement that scientists deserve freedom in their work but the elitist tone of Article 27 was modified by adding that the general public should share in its benefits. The political nature of drafting these articles shows they have no one dominant progenitor, but finally reflect hard-won consensus in a process ably chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt. PMID:10343298

  4. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  5. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  6. A nationwide survey of public healthcare providers’ impressions of family medicine specialists in Malaysia: a qualitative analysis of written comments

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah; Bashah, Baizury

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine impressions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs (PERMFAMS). Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facility: hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analyses of written comments of respondents’ general impression of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58.0% (780/1345), with almost equal proportions from each public healthcare facility. A total of 23 categories for each of the 648 impression comments were identified. The six emerging themes were: (1) importance of FMSs; (2) roles of FMSs; (3) clinical performance of FMSs; (4) attributes of FMSs; (5) FMS practice challenges; (6) misconception of FMS roles. Overall, FMS practice was perceived to be safe and able to provide effective treatments in a challenging medical discipline that was in line with the current standards of medical care and ethical and professional values. The areas of concern were in clinical performance expressed by PHCPs from some hospitals and the lack of personal attributes and professionalism among FMSs mentioned by PHCPs from health clinics and offices. Conclusions FMSs were perceived to be capable of providing effective treatment and were considered to be important primary care physicians. There were a few negative impressions in some areas of FMS practice, which demanded attention by the FMSs themselves and the relevant authorities in order to improve efficiency and safeguard the fraternity's reputation. PMID:26743703

  7. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicines among pharmacy students of a Malaysian Public University

    PubMed Central

    Jamshed, Shazia Qasim; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Elkalmi, Ramadan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is consistently on the rise worldwide. Consumers often consider pharmacists as a major source of information about CAM products and their safety. Due to the limitation of data, it is worth exploring the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of pharmacy students toward CAM. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of pharmacy students regarding the use of CAM in Malaysia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for 3 months among Bachelor of Pharmacy students in a public sector University of Malaysia. A pretested, self-administered questionnaire, comprised four sections, was used to collect the data from 440 participants. Descriptive analysis was used, and Chi-square test was used to test the association between dependent and independent variables. Results: Of 440 questionnaire distributed, 287 were returned giving a response rate of (65.2%). The results showed that 38.6% participants gave correct answers when asked about the use of herbal products with digoxin. Majority of the participants were knowledgeable about supplementary therapy (25.3%) while the lack of knowledge was mostly evident in traditional Chinese medicines (73.7%). Majority of the students were either neutral (49.5%) or disagreed that (42.8%) CAM use is unsafe. Females were more in disagreement to the statements than males (P = 0.007). Majority of students also agreed to use CAM therapies for their health and well-being (51.2%). Conclusion: The study revealed that pharmacy students did not have adequate knowledge of CAM though their attitudes and perceptions were relatively positive. PMID:26957866

  8. [Introduction of a quality management system compliant with DIN EN 9001:2000 in a university department of nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Jansen-Schmidt, V; Paschen, U; Kröger, S; Bohuslavizki, K H; Clausen, M

    2001-12-01

    In 1995, the management of the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf proposed to establish a total quality assurance (QA) system. A revised QA-system has been introduced stepwise in the department of nuclear medicine since 1997, and certification was achieved in accordance with DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 on February 14, 2001. The QA-handbook is divided into two parts. The first part contains operational (diagnostic and therapeutic) procedures in so-called standard operating procedures (SOP). They describe the indication of procedures as well as the competences and time necessary in a standardized manner. Up to now, more than 70 SOPs have been written as a collaborative approach between technicians and physicians during daily clinical routine after analysing and discussing the procedures. Thus, the results were more clearly defined processes and more satisfied employees. The second part consists of general rules and directions concerning the security of work and equipment as well as radiation protection tasks, hygiene etc. as it is required by the law. This part was written predominantly by the management of the department of nuclear-medicine and the QA-coordinator. Detailed information for the patients, documentation of the work-flows as well as the medical report was adopted to the QM-system. Although in the introduction phase of a QA-system a vast amount of time is necessary, some months later a surplus for the clinical workday will become available. The well defined relations of competences and procedures will result in a gain of time, a reduction of costs and a help to ensure the legal demands. Last but not least, the QA-system simply helps to build up confidence and acceptance both by the patients and the referring physicians.

  9. "PULS." – a Blog-based Online-Magazine for Students of Medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt

    PubMed Central

    Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine „PULS.“ is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. „PULS.“ is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty– deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. “PULS.” is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. “PULS.” flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool “Blog” and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, “PULS.” has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

  10. Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints.

  11. Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints. PMID:23702521

  12. "PULS." - a blog-based online-magazine for students of medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt.

    PubMed

    Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine "PULS." is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. "PULS." is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty- deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. "PULS." is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. "PULS." flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool "Blog" and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, "PULS." has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty.

  13. "PULS." - a blog-based online-magazine for students of medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt.

    PubMed

    Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine "PULS." is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. "PULS." is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty- deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. "PULS." is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. "PULS." flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool "Blog" and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, "PULS." has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

  14. Tradition Meets Innovation: Transforming Academic Medical Culture at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-01-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past twenty years. While the academic physician’s triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic medical centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. Here, the authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multi-pronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met 5 times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  15. Perceptions of University Seniors toward Internationalizing Curriculum in Family and Consumer Sciences: Have We Made Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Rosalind C.; Williams, Sally K.

    2001-01-01

    Family and consumer sciences seniors (n=131) completed questionnaires and attended focus groups. Textiles/clothing and family and consumer sciences education students were most positive about international course content. A majority believed intercultural understanding was important to their careers. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  16. Family Background and Students' Achievement on a University Entrance Exam in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimaraes, Juliana; Sampaio, Breno

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of students' performance on the entrance test at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the importance of family background variables, such as parents' education and family income, on students' performance and how they relate to the probability of attending public schools…

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeome, Emmanuel R; Anarado, Agnes N

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu (UNTH-E), Nigeria Method Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the core surgical units of the UNTH- E, from June 2003 to September 2005. Results 160 patients were interviewed; 68 (42.5%) were males and 94 (57.5%) were females. Ages ranged from 13–86 years. Breast, urogenital system, gastrointestinal system, and soft tissue cancers predominated. One hundred and four patients (65.0%) have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness; 56 (35.0%) patients have not used any form of CAM. There were more females than males among the non-CAM users. The use of CAM was not affected by age, marital status, level of education, religious affiliation, or socioeconomic status. The most frequently used CAMs were herbs (51.9%), faith/prayer healing (49.4%), aloe vera (23.1%), Forever Living Products (16.3%), medicinal tea (14.4%), and Blackstone (12.5%). Over 23% of those who used CAM were satisfied, but 68.3% were disappointed. Most users (67.3%) did not see any benefit from the CAM, but 25% could describe some specific benefits. More than 21% of users reported various unwanted effects. While 86.5% of CAM users will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, 9.6% will use the two together to help each other. Most users (79.8%) will not repeat CAM or recommend its use for cancer. The majority of patients (55.8%) did not mention their use of CAM to their doctors – mostly because the doctor did not ask. Conclusion CAM use is

  18. Radical Reformation and Medicine in the Late Renaissance: The Case of the University of Padua.

    PubMed

    Suitner, Riccarda

    2016-01-01

    This paper, which presents first results of a wider book project, will reconstruct the influence of the so-called 'radical wing' of the Reformation, above all Anabaptism, Socinianism, and Antitrinitarism, on the tradition of natural philosophy that had established itself in particular in Veneto through the works of Pietro Pomponazzi, Agostino Nifo, and Giacomo Zabarella. Italian physicians and foreign students at the University of Padua developed theories that anticipated many scientific innovations of the 17th century (especially with regard to blood circulation). Often they were forced into exile, persecuted by the Inquisition and by political authorities of Protestant territories. In my article, I would like to give an overview of the education and European peregrinations of some of these heterodox physicians, in whose work medical, theological, and philosophical theory, religious dissent, conversion, and exile were remarkably entangled. I will focus on their international correspondence networks and on their relationship with political and religious authorities, with diplomats and with physicians from other confessions.

  19. Radical Reformation and Medicine in the Late Renaissance: The Case of the University of Padua.

    PubMed

    Suitner, Riccarda

    2016-01-01

    This paper, which presents first results of a wider book project, will reconstruct the influence of the so-called 'radical wing' of the Reformation, above all Anabaptism, Socinianism, and Antitrinitarism, on the tradition of natural philosophy that had established itself in particular in Veneto through the works of Pietro Pomponazzi, Agostino Nifo, and Giacomo Zabarella. Italian physicians and foreign students at the University of Padua developed theories that anticipated many scientific innovations of the 17th century (especially with regard to blood circulation). Often they were forced into exile, persecuted by the Inquisition and by political authorities of Protestant territories. In my article, I would like to give an overview of the education and European peregrinations of some of these heterodox physicians, in whose work medical, theological, and philosophical theory, religious dissent, conversion, and exile were remarkably entangled. I will focus on their international correspondence networks and on their relationship with political and religious authorities, with diplomats and with physicians from other confessions. PMID:27071298

  20. Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald

    PubMed Central

    Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Background: Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. Objective: To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. Method: For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. Results: The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. Conclusion: An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report. PMID:22242082

  1. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  2. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  3. Recommendations from recent graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy on improving interprofessional education in university programs: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional education (IPE) has been recognized as an innovative approach for the development of a collaborative, practice-ready health workforce, but is not used consistently in undergraduate health professional programs. We sought to explore the reflections of graduates on the IPE experiences they had during their undergraduate education and training. It was anticipated that having completed their pre-vocational education and spent up to two years working in a clinical environment, recent graduates would be well-placed to provide insights into the value of the IPE opportunities they had, and to suggest approaches for improving these opportunities in undergraduate programs. Methods This study was part of a larger research project (Interprofessional Education for the Quality use of Medicines; IPE for QuM) which used focus groups as part of an interpretive research design to inform other aspects of the research. Here, we report on focus groups with recent graduates recruited from area health services across Australia. Results Sixty-eight recent graduates working in New South Wales, Western Australia, and Tasmania participated in 12 focus group sessions. In this paper, we report on new graduates’ reflections on their experiences of IPE as part of their university degree, as well as their recommendations to improve interprofessional education before graduation. The new graduates were unanimous in valuing IPE from their current perspective of being in the health workforce. Most IPE experiences recalled were regarded as positive, but those valued most highly were experiences that involved genuine engagement and opportunities to interact with students in other professions working on a relevant problem. Clinical placement was a missed opportunity with few structured meaningful interprofessional learning experiences. Surprisingly there was little social contact between professions in universities even when programs were co-located, thus reinforcing

  4. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Susan M; Li, Wen; O'Brien, Jennifer E; Howard, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) family connectedness, (2) family conflict/family disconnection, and (3) family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area.

  5. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan M.; Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) family connectedness, (2) family conflict/family disconnection, and (3) family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area. PMID:26658077

  6. Fighting against human papillomavirus: the 25-year old contribution of the University of Crete School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-01-01

    Twenty five years have passed since the first research efforts in Greece on human papillomavirus (HPV) performed by the Department of Clinical Virology at the University of Crete School of Medicine. HPV infection in the human cervix was initially evaluated in relation to the host mutational and transcriptional activation of the ras/raf genes pathway, p53 gene polymorphisms, neo-angiogenesis- related gene expression and G1/S phase transition. A series of epidemiological studies ensued, evaluating HPV infection in the ophthalmic pterygium, benign laryngeal tumors, parotid lesions, nasal polyposis, actinic keratosis, aborted material and non-genital cancers. The observed geographical variations of different HPV types within the Hellenic population indicated a higher prevalence of HPV 18 on the island of Crete compared to mainland Greece. Moreover, our research led to the investigation of the mother-to-infant HPV transmission via human breast milk and the detection of novel HPV types in juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. We also evaluated the presence of HPV in the respiratory tract of asymptomatic children and the relationship between maternal HPV infection and neonatal prematurity. Despite the introduction of the current prophylactic vaccines against HPV into clinical practice, HPV remains a challenging target for the next generation of researchers, as the war against HPV continues. PMID:25778290

  7. Feasibility of an antibiotic order form. First experience in the department of internal medicine of a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Blok, W L; Gyssens, I C; Hekster, Y A; Koopmans, P P; van der Meer, J W

    1996-08-01

    Inadequate control of antimicrobial drug use may lead to excessive expenditure for antimicrobial drugs and improper prescribing it may also result in the emergence of multiresistant bacteria. An antibiotic order form may improve the quality of prescriptions by increasing the awareness of the physician of the antimicrobial spectrum needed (i.e. which microorganism is expected in a given patient), the desired duration of treatment, the potential need to adjust dosage, and the potential allergy of the patient to the drug. Furthermore, such an antibiotic order form facilitates prospective evaluation of both the quantity and the quality of prescribing practice. However, the introduction of yet another form to fill in may be met with opposition from prescribers. We have developed an easy-to-use antibiotic order form that incorporated the conventional medication order that was already in use in our hospital. Compliance (percentage of antimicrobial drug prescriptions for which an order form was used) was on average 58% in the first two weeks after introduction, and remained thereafter between 60% and 90%, varying between the different wards. Data retrieved from the antibiotic order forms could be used for surveillance We conclude that this antibiotic order form was feasible in a large department of internal medicine of a university hospital. Future usefulness will depend on compliance and on personnel support for data processing and intervention. PMID:8873229

  8. Prevalence and Perspectives of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among University Students in Atlanta, Newcastle upon Tyne, and New Delhi.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kritika; Midha, Inuka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage. Commentary analysis showed the importance of science and evidence in justifying CAM practice. Conclusions. Matching the most prevalent practices with their designated NCCAM categories suggested that the students were attracted to biologically based, body-based, and mind-body practices as the central themes of attraction. Selected and prevalent CAM practices suggested the students' desire to maintain physical and mental fitness. Access to healthcare may have influence on the prevalence of CAM. Indian students were more likely to view CAM as a viable alternative to conventional medicine. PMID:27382643

  9. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  10. Prevalence and Perspectives of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among University Students in Atlanta, Newcastle upon Tyne, and New Delhi.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kritika; Midha, Inuka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage. Commentary analysis showed the importance of science and evidence in justifying CAM practice. Conclusions. Matching the most prevalent practices with their designated NCCAM categories suggested that the students were attracted to biologically based, body-based, and mind-body practices as the central themes of attraction. Selected and prevalent CAM practices suggested the students' desire to maintain physical and mental fitness. Access to healthcare may have influence on the prevalence of CAM. Indian students were more likely to view CAM as a viable alternative to conventional medicine.

  11. WHO Collaborating Centre for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Altawalah, Haya; Al-Nakib, Widad

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the World Health Organization (WHO) designated the Virology Unit of the Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, Kuwait University, Kuwait, a collaborating centre for AIDS for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO), recognizing it to be in compliance with WHO guidelines. In this centre, research integral to the efforts of WHO to combat AIDS is conducted. In addition to annual workshops and symposia, the centre is constantly updating and renewing its facilities and capabilities in keeping with current and latest advances in virology. As an example of the activities of the centre, the HIV-1 RNA viral load in plasma samples of HIV-1 patients is determined by real-time PCR using the AmpliPrep TaqMan HIV-1 test v2.0. HIV-1 drug resistance is determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene, using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Assay on the OpenGene® DNA Sequencing System. HIV-1 subtypes are determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene using the genotyping assays described above. A fundamental program of Kuwait's WHO AIDS collaboration centre is the national project on the surveillance of drug resistance in human deficiency virus in Kuwait, which illustrates how the centre and its activities in Kuwait can serve the EMRO region of WHO.

  12. Ten-year experience with mission-based budgeting in the faculty of medicine of Dalhousie University.

    PubMed

    Ruedy, John; MacDonald, Noni E; MacDougall, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The Faculty of Medicine of Dalhousie University (the Faculty) has applied a mission-based approach to the allocation of the academic budget since 1993. Over the ensuing decade, large shifts in budgets to academic departments have been effected, and two goals that required special emphasis-the successful implementation of a tutorial-based undergraduate medical curriculum and an increase in research activity-have been achieved. This has occurred despite significant reductions in the overall academic budget over the ten-year period. The budgeting process provided the Faculty with a tangible means of supporting its mission and also gave each department a transparent report of its relative contribution to the overall mission of the Faculty, which helped instill pride. In some years, misunderstandings of the budget process arose because of confusion over the impact of the overall total academic budget reductions experienced by the Faculty in that year. This meant that recognition of a department's contribution resulted, in most instances, in a relatively smaller reduction in budget rather than a budget increase. Further misunderstandings have arisen because of confusion between mission-based and activity-based budgeting. This confusion was reinforced because the assessments of education outcomes were measurements of activity rather than of outcomes. However, these measures were chosen to be the best-available indirect measures of the desired educational outcome. After ten years, the fundamentals of the mission-based process introduced in 1993 remain unchanged as the basis for allocation of the academic budget for the Faculty.

  13. Prevalence and Perspectives of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among University Students in Atlanta, Newcastle upon Tyne, and New Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Kritika; Midha, Inuka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage. Commentary analysis showed the importance of science and evidence in justifying CAM practice. Conclusions. Matching the most prevalent practices with their designated NCCAM categories suggested that the students were attracted to biologically based, body-based, and mind-body practices as the central themes of attraction. Selected and prevalent CAM practices suggested the students' desire to maintain physical and mental fitness. Access to healthcare may have influence on the prevalence of CAM. Indian students were more likely to view CAM as a viable alternative to conventional medicine. PMID:27382643

  14. Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ezeala, Christian Chinyere; Siyanga, Nalucha

    2015-01-01

    It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills. PMID:26442716

  15. CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory for high school teachers and students at the Boston University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Franblau, C.; Phillips, C.; Zook, D.

    1994-12-31

    CityLab is a fully equipped biotechnology learning laboratory for high school students and teachers funded by the National Institutes of Health and located at the Boston University School of Medicine. The aim of CityLab is to provide access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and curriculum in biotechnology otherwise unavailable to most school systems. Teachers bring their classes to CityLab where they are challenged to solve problems by applying the same techniques and concepts of genetics and molecular biology. Each topic is presented in a mystery format. Some popular investigations include The Mystery of the Crooked Cell (sickle cell anemia), The Case of the Crown Jewels (DNA restrictions analysis), and Entangled in the Web (transformation). In addition to regular class visits, CityLab offers two after school enrichment activities, the Biotechnology Club and BioCity. The club provides eighty young people with the opportunity to work more extensively in the laboratory investigating topics such as genetic engineering, gene cloning, and AIDS. BioCity is a mock biotechnology company run by and for students. Since 1992, more than 2,000 high school students and 300 teachers have used CityLab.

  16. Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ezeala, Christian Chinyere; Siyanga, Nalucha

    2015-01-01

    It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students' study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills.

  17. At crossroads between laboratory disciplines and medical advancements-The Center for Molecular Medicine at the Karolinska University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Terenius, Lars

    2009-04-01

    The Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM) was conceived and built to respond to the challenges presented by the still common chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, allergy, and alcoholism. The Karolinska University Hospital has a proud history of research with developments such as the pacemaker and the gamma-knife. The nearby Karolinska Institutet has a strong presence internationally on the basic sciences. However, the challenges of the "new biology" and the access to the complete human genome, transcriptome, and proteome raised the need for a new research institute that could meet the experimental requirements for translational research. A Foundation was established in 1994 with the goal to build and govern the new enterprise. After an intense fundraising campaign, building could start and CMM (Fig. 1) was inaugurated in 1997. Through more than 10 years of existence, it has evolved into a multidisciplinary research institute with research in four programs, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Infection and Immunity, Neuropsychiatric Diseases, and Medical Genetics. Performance parameters have been introduced and scientific impact and relevance are followed annually. Transparency and collaboration between groups (now 28 groups with an approximate total of 400 people engaged in research) and leadership training for junior faculty are means to stimulate "centerness". PMID:19319499

  18. Internal Medicine Trainee Self-Assessments of End-of-Life Communication Skills Do Not Predict Assessments of Patients, Families, or Clinician-Evaluators

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Back, Anthony L.; Ford, Dee W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To investigate the strength of association between trainees' self-assessments of the quality of their end-of-life communication skills and the assessments of their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. Methods As part of a randomized trial, pre-intervention survey data were collected at two sites from internal medicine trainees and their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. In this observational analysis, comparisons using regression analysis were made between (1) trainees' scores on a scale of perceived competence at communication about end-of-life care and (2) patients', families', and clinician-evaluators' scores on a questionnaire on the quality of end-of-life communication (QOC). Secondary analyses were performed using topic-focused subscales of these measures. Results Internal medicine trainees (143) were studied with both self-assessment and external assessments. No significant associations were found between trainee perceived competence scores and primary outcome measures (p>0.05). Of the 12 secondary subscale analyses, trainees' self-ratings were significantly associated with external assessments for only one comparison, but the association was in the opposite direction with increased trainee ratings being significantly associated with decreased family ratings on “treatment discussions.” We also examined the correlation between ratings by patients, family, and clinician-evaluators, which showed significant correlations (p<0.05) for 7 of 18 comparisons (38.9%). Conclusions Trainee self-evaluations do not predict assessments by their patients, patients' families, or their clinician-evaluators regarding the quality of end-of-life communication. Although these results should be confirmed using the same measures across all raters, in the meantime efforts to improve communication about end-of-life care should consider outcomes other than physician self-assessment to determine intervention success. PMID

  19. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  20. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    PubMed

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.